WorldWideScience

Sample records for weld type thermal

  1. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  2. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  3. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  4. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld metals in high-temperature water. Influence of corrosion potential, weld type, thermal aging, cold-work and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on crack growth rate measurement in oxygenated high-temperature pure water conditions, such as normal water chemistry in boiling water reactors, using compact tension type specimens have shown that weld stainless steels are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. However, to our knowledge, there is no crack growth data of weld stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary water. The principal purpose of this study was to examine the SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld metals in simulated PWR primary water. A second objective was to examine the effect of (1) corrosion potential, (2) thermal-aging, (3) Mo in alloy and (4) cold-working on SCC growth in hydrogenated and oxygenated water environments at 320degC. In addition, the temperature dependence of SCC growth in simulated PWR primary water was also studied. The results were as follows: (1) No significant SCC growth was observed on all types of stainless steel weld metals: as-welded, aged (400degC x 10 kh) 308L and 316L, in 2.7 ppm-hydrogenated (low-potential) water at 320degC. (2) 20% cold-working markedly accelerated the SCC growth of weld metals in high-potential water at 320degC, but no significant SCC growth was observed in the hydrogenated water, even after 20% cold-working. (3) No significant SCC growth was observed on stainless steel weld metals in low-potential water at 250degC and 340degC. Thus, stainless steel weld metals have excellent SCC resistance in PWR primary water. On the other hand, (4) significant SCC growth was observed on all types of stainless steel weld metals: as-weld, aged (400degC x 10 kh) and 20% cold-worked 308L and 316L, in 8 ppm-oxygenated (high-potential) water at 320degC. (5) No large difference in SCC growth was observed between 316L (Mo) and 308L. (6) No large effect on SCC growth was observed between before and after aging up to 400degC for 10 kh. (7) 20% cold-working markedly accelerated the SCC growth of stainless steel weld metals. (author)

  5. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  6. Influence of Thermal Aging on Tensile and Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Type 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Kumar, T.; Nagesha, A.; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.

    2018-05-01

    Influence of short-term thermal aging on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 316LN austenitic stainless steel weld joint with 0.07 wt pct N has been investigated. Prior thermal exposure was found to improve the fatigue life compared with the as-welded condition. Besides, the treatment also imparted a softening effect on the weld metal, leading to an increase in the ductility of the weld joint which had a bearing on the cyclic stress response. The degree of cyclic hardening was seen to increase after aging. Automated ball-indentation (ABI) technique was employed toward understanding the mechanical properties of individual zones across the weld joint. It was observed that the base metal takes most of the applied cyclic strain during LCF deformation in the as-welded condition. In the aged condition, however, the weld also participates in the cyclic deformation. The beneficial effect of thermal aging on cyclic life is attributed to a reduction in the severity of the metallurgical notch leading to a restoration of ductility of the weld region. The transformation of δ-ferrite to σ-phase during the aging treatment was found to influence the location of crack initiation. Fatigue cracks were found to initiate in the base metal region of the joint in most of the testing conditions. However, embrittlement in the weld metal caused a shift in the point of crack initiation with increasing strain amplitude under LCF.

  7. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  8. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  9. The fracture toughness of Type 316 steel and weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picker, C.

    This paper describes the results of fracture toughness tests on Type 316 steel and Manual Metal Arc (MMA) weld metal over a range of temperatures from 20 deg. C to 550 deg. C, and includes the effects on toughness of specimen size, post weld heat treatment and thermal ageing. The conclusions reached are that Type 316 steel possesses a superior toughness to the weld metal in the as-welded or stress relieved conditions but the toughness of the steel is degraded to a level similar to that of the weld metal following thermal ageing at temperatures over 600 deg. C. Relatively short term thermal ageing in the temperature range 370 deg. C to 450 deg. C does not appear to affect the toughness of either Type 316 steel or weld metal. (author)

  10. Multi-pass TIG welding process: simulating thermal SS304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harinadh, Vemanaboina; Akella, S.; Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Edision, G.

    2015-01-01

    Welding is basic requirement in the construction of nuclear reactors, power plants and structural components development. A basic studies on various aspects of the welding is essential to ensure the stability and structural requirement conditions. The present study explored the thermo-mechanical analysis of the multipass welds of austenitic stainless steels which are widely used in fusion and fission reactor components development. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model is developed to investigate thermally induced stress field during TIG welding process for SS304 material. The transient thermal analysis is performed to obtain the temperature history, which then is applied to the mechanical (stress) analysis. The present thermal analysis is conducted using element type DC3D8. This element type has a three dimensional thermal conduction capability and eight nodes. The 6 mm thick plated is welded with six numbers of passes. The geometry and meshed model with tetrahedral shape with volume sweep. The analysis is on TIG welding process using 3D-weld interface plug-in on ABAQUS-6.14. The results are reported in the present paper

  11. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  12. Study of thermal stress in heat affected zones during welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaux, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of applications of welding in the nuclear industry leads to the study of the main problem concerning metal welding: sensibility to cracking. The development of computation methods allows the numerical simulation of welding effects. Due to the complexity of this problem, it is divided in three steps: thermal, metallurgical and mechanical calculus. Interactions between the 3 steps are examined. Mathematical models necessary to get residual stress (i.e. stress remaining when welding is completed and structure at ambient temperature) are described. Then parameters for metallurgical structure determination are given and compared to experiments. A508 and A533 type steels of primary coolant circuit of PWR reactors are taken as examples and the numerical simulation of a test is presented [fr

  13. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool

  14. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool.

  15. The effects of welded joint characteristics on its properties in HDPE thermal fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongbin; Peng, Jun

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, PE100 pipes with the diameter of 200 mm and the thickness of 11.9 mm were used as material. The welded joints were obtained in different welding pressures with the optimal welding temperature of 220∘C. Reheating process on the welded joints with the temperature of 130∘C was carried out. The joints exhibited X-type, and the cause of X-type joints was discussed. The temperature field in the forming process of welded joints was measured, and tensile and bending tests on welded joints were carried out. The fracture surface of welded joints was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and crystallinity calculation was taken by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanism of X-type weld profile effects on welded joints properties was analyzed. It was concluded that the mechanical properties of welded joints decrease with the reduced X distance between lines.

  16. Investigation on mechanical properties of welded material under different types of welding filler (shielded metal arc welding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Abdullah Mohd; Lair, Noor Ajian Mohd; Wei, Foo Jun

    2018-05-01

    The Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) is (or the Stick welding) defined as a welding process, which melts and joins metals with an arc between a welding filler (electrode rod) and the workpieces. The main objective was to study the mechanical properties of welded metal under different types of welding fillers and current for SMAW. This project utilized the Design of Experiment (DOE) by adopting the Full Factorial Design. The independent variables were the types of welding filler and welding current, whereas the other welding parameters were fixed at the optimum value. The levels for types of welding filler were by the models of welding filler (E6013, E7016 and E7018) used and the levels for welding current were 80A and 90A. The responses were the mechanical properties of welded material, which include tensile strength and hardness. The experiment was analyzed using the two way ANOVA. The results prove that there are significant effects of welding filler types and current levels on the tensile strength and hardness of the welded metal. At the same time, the ANOVA results and interaction plot indicate that there are significant interactions between the welding filler types and the welding current on both the hardness and tensile strength of the welded metals, which has never been reported before. This project found that when the amount of heat input with increase, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and hardness decrease. The optimum tensile strength for welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7016 and the optimum of hardness of welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7018 at welding current of 80A.

  17. Thermal welding versus cold knife tonsillectomy: A prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Yilmaz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a prospective randomized study conducted in a group of children who underwent two methods of tonsillectomy: thermal welding or cold knife tonsillectomy. Parameters, such as postoperative pain scores, intraoperative blood loss, operation time, and postoperative bleeding rates, were analyzed to find out which technique is better. Ninety-one children (aged between 2 years and 13 years with recurrent tonsillitis, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, or both were included in the study. According to the type of tonsillectomy procedure, the patients were divided into two groups: cold knife and thermal welding procedure. The two groups were compared on the basis of postoperative pain scores, intraoperative blood loss, operation time, and postoperative bleeding. Fifty-seven patients underwent thermal welding tonsillectomy and 34 had cold knife tonsillectomy. The mean pain score in thermal welding group was significantly lower (p<0.001. There was no remarkable blood loss intraoperatively in the thermal welding procedure. The operation time was not significantly different between two groups. No postoperative bleeding was encountered in the thermal welding group. Compared with the cold knife technique, thermal welding was found to be a relatively new and safe technique for tonsillectomy as it results in significantly less postoperative pain and no remarkable blood loss.

  18. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  19. In-process weld sampling during hot end welds of type W overpacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Establish the criteria and process controls to be used in obtaining, testing, and evaluating in-process weld sample during the hot end welding of Type W Overpack capsules used to overpack CsCl capsules for storage at WESF

  20. Drop weld thermal injuries to the middle ear.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keogh, I J

    2009-01-01

    Drop weld injuries to the tympanic membrane and middle ear caused by hot sparks or molten slag are a rare but significant injury. Steel workers and welders who are regularly exposed to flying sparks and molten metal slag are predisposed. This type of transtympanic thermal injury occurs when the slag literally drops into the external auditory canal and burns through the tympanic membrane. A spectrum of severity of injury occurs which includes chronic tympanic membrane perforation, chronic otorrhoea, facial nerve injury and deafness. Chronic tympanic membrane perforation is the most common sequelae and is perhaps one of the most challenging of all perforations to repair The combination of direct thermal injury and foreign body reaction results in continuing or recurrent suppuration. The foreign body reaction is due to the embedding of metal slag in the promontorial mucosa. We present a case of drop weld injury to the left tympanic membrane, resulting in chronic middle ear inflammation, otorrhoea and tympanic perforation. CAT scan clearly demonstrated a metallic promontorial foreign body with localised bone erosion. We emphasise the importance of removing these foreign bodies and recommend a cartilage reinforced underlay tympanoplasty technique to repair these perforations. Transtympanic thermal trauma is a preventable occupational injury, which is best, avoided by earplugs and increased awareness.

  1. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  2. The influence of low dose irradiation on the creep properties of type 316 welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.; Steeds, J.W.; Lin, Y.P.; Finlan, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    Fully instrumented creep and stress rupture tests have been performed at 873K for times up to 20,000h on a series of type 316 steel/17Cr 8Ni 2Mo weld metal specimens in the unirradiated and thermal neutron irradiated conditions. The specimens tested included all weld metal longitudinal and transverse composites in the as-welded condition and following a stress relief heat treatment of 10h at 1075K. Simulated heat affected zone (HAZ) specimens were also tested. Analysis of the creep results combined with metallography, autoradiography and TEM established that the decrease in properties of irradiated samples is caused by an increasing secondary strain rate due to enhanced helium induced grain boundary fracture of the simulated HAZ and enhanced interdendritic fracture in the weld metal. Implications of strength reductions on the design of welded structures subjected to thermal irradiation are briefly assessed. (author)

  3. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This method is a solid-state weld process capable of joining metallic alloys without melting. The weld workpieces to be joined by thermal stir welding (TSW) are drawn, by heavy forces, between containment plates past the TSW stir tool that then causes joining of the weld workpiece. TSW is similar to friction stir welding (FSW) in that material is heated into a plastic state (not melted) and stirred using a stir rod. The FSW pin tool is an integrated geometrical structure consisting of a large-diameter shoulder, and a smaller-diameter stir pin protruding from the shoulder. When the pin is plunged into a weld workpiece, the shoulder spins on the surface of the weld workpiece, thus inducing frictional heat into the part. The pin stirs the fraying surfaces of the weld joint, thus joining the weld workpiece into one structure. The shoulder and stir pin of the FSW pin tool must rotate together at a desired rotational speed. The induced frictional energy control and stir pin control of the pin tool cannot be de-coupled. The two work as one integrated unit. TSW, on the other hand, de-couples the heating and stirring of FSW, and allows for independent control of each process element. A uniquely designed induction coil heats the weld workpiece to a desired temperature, and once heated, the part moves into a stir rod whose RPM is also independently controlled. As the weld workpiece moves into the stir rod, the piece is positioned, or sandwiched, between upper and lower containment plates. The plate squeezes together, thus compressing the upper and lower surfaces of the weld workpiece. This compressive force, also called consolidation force, consolidates the plastic material within the weld nugget material as it is being stirred by the stir rod. The stir rod is positioned through the center of the top containment plate and protrudes midway through the opposite lower containment plate where it is mechanically captured. The upper and lower containment plates are separated by a

  4. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS)-Based Models for Predicting the Weld Bead Width and Depth of Penetration from the Infrared Thermal Image of the Weld Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subashini, L.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Type 316 LN stainless steel is the major structural material used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding has been developed to increase the depth of penetration because the depth of penetration achievable in single-pass TIG welding is limited. Real-time monitoring and control of weld processes is gaining importance because of the requirement of remoter welding process technologies. Hence, it is essential to develop computational methodologies based on an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) or artificial neural network (ANN) for predicting and controlling the depth of penetration and weld bead width during A-TIG welding of type 316 LN stainless steel. In the current work, A-TIG welding experiments have been carried out on 6-mm-thick plates of 316 LN stainless steel by varying the welding current. During welding, infrared (IR) thermal images of the weld pool have been acquired in real time, and the features have been extracted from the IR thermal images of the weld pool. The welding current values, along with the extracted features such as length, width of the hot spot, thermal area determined from the Gaussian fit, and thermal bead width computed from the first derivative curve were used as inputs, whereas the measured depth of penetration and weld bead width were used as output of the respective models. Accurate ANFIS models have been developed for predicting the depth of penetration and the weld bead width during TIG welding of 6-mm-thick 316 LN stainless steel plates. A good correlation between the measured and predicted values of weld bead width and depth of penetration were observed in the developed models. The performance of the ANFIS models are compared with that of the ANN models.

  5. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  6. Cluster formation in in-service thermally aged pressurizer welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Kristina; Boåsen, Magnus; Stiller, Krystyna; Efsing, Pål; Thuvander, Mattias

    2018-06-01

    Thermal aging of reactor pressure vessel steel welds at elevated temperatures may affect the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. In this study, unique weld material from a pressurizer, with a composition similar to that of the reactor pressure vessel, that has been in operation for 28 years at 345 °C is examined. Despite the relatively low temperature, the weld becomes hardened during operation. This is attributed to nanometre sized Cu-rich clusters, mainly located at Mo- and C-enriched dislocation lines and on boundaries. The welds have been characterized using atom probe tomography, and the characteristics of the precipitates/clusters is related to the hardness increase, giving the best agreement for the Russell-Brown model.

  7. Re-austenitisation of chromium-bearing pressure vessel steels during the weld thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, Druce; Li, Huijun; Jones, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Steels with chromium contents between 0.5 and 12 wt% are commonly used for fabrication of creep resistant pressure vessels (PV) for the power generation industry. Most of these steels are susceptible to Type IV creep failure in the intercritical and/ or grain refined regions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the parent metal. The re-austenitisation process plays a central role in establishing the transformed microstructures and the creep resistance of the various sub-zones of the HAZ. The high alloy content and the presence of alloy-rich carbides in the as-supplied parent plate can significantly retard the kinetics of transformation to austenite, resulting in both incomplete austenitisation and inhomogeneous austenite. Overlapping weld thermal cycles in multi-pass welds add further complexity to the progressive development of microstructure over the course of the welding process. In order to clarify structural evolution, thermal simulation has been used to study the effects of successive thermal cycles on the structures and properties of the HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The results showed that, before post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), the HAZ microstructures and properties, particularly in doubly reheated sub-zones, were highly heterogeneous and differed markedly from those of the base steel. It is concluded that close control of the thermal cycle by pre-heat, weld heat input and post-heat is necessary to obtain a heat affected zone with microstructures and properties compatible with those of the base plate.

  8. Metallurgical and mechanical characterization of a submerged arc welded joint in a 316 type stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatti, G.; Vedani, M.

    1990-01-01

    The tensile (deformation and fracture) behaviour of a multipass submerged arc welded joint Type 316 stainless steel is investigated by tests at room temperature and at 400 0 C on all-weld metal and transverse to weld (composite) specimens as well as by microstructural and compositional analyses (optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy). The as-deposited metal is characterised by a systematic variation in the tensile properties across the thickness with the higher strength and the lower ductility in the weld centre. These variations are related to material variability (mainly in dislocation density) because of local dissimilarities in thermal and mechanical histories occurring during the welding process. However, the material variability in the fusion zone, although important is not so large in the present weld and it does not influence the tensile properties of the weld as a whole. Moreover, the tensile behaviour concerning the transverse to weld specimens is characterized by a supporting effect from the higher yield strength material zone (fusion zone) to the lower yield strength material zone (parent metal) justified by the different contribution of the parent metal and of the weld-deposit metal to the integral plastic strain of the specimens. (author)

  9. Laser welding of Ti-Ni type shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Akio; Araki, Takao; Uchihara, Masato; Honda, Keizoh; Kondoh, Mitsuaki.

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to apply the laser welding to the joining of a shape memory alloy. Butt welding of a Ti-Ni type shape memory alloy was performed using 10 kW CO 2 laser. The laser welded specimens showed successfully the shape memory effect and super elasticity. These properties were approximately identical with those of the base metal. The change in super elasticity of the welded specimen during tension cycling was investigated. Significant changes in stress-strain curves and residual strain were not observed in the laser welded specimen after the 50-time cyclic test. The weld metal exhibited the celler dendrite. It was revealed by electron diffraction analysis that the phase of the weld metal was the TiNi phase of B2 structure which is the same as the parent phase of base metal and oxide inclusions crystallized at the dendrite boundary. However, oxygen contamination in the weld metal by laser welding did not occur because there was almost no difference in oxygen content between the base metal and the weld metal. The transformation temperatures of the weld metal were almost the same as those of the base metal. From these results, laser welding is applicable to the joining of the Ti-Ni type shape memory alloy. As the application of laser welding to new shape memory devices, the multiplex shape memory device of welded Ti-50.5 at % Ni and Ti-51.0 at % Ni was produced. The device showed two-stage shape memory effects due to the difference in transformation temperature between the two shape memory alloys. (author)

  10. Thermal-deformation effect of welding on A 1 reactor pressure vessel weld joints properties and state of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becka, J.; Kupka, I.

    1976-01-01

    The methods are compared of electroslag welding and of arc welding with a view to their possible application in welding the Bohunice A-1 reactor pressure vessel. Considered are the thermal deformation effects of welding on the physical properties and the stress present in welded joints. For testing, plates were used having the dimensions of 1100x2300x200 mm and rings with 4820 mm outer diameter, 1800 mm height and 170 mm thickness made of steel CSN 413O30 modified with Ni, Al+Ti. The deformation effect of welding on the residual surface and triaxial stress, the specific stored energy, the initiation temperature of brittle crack and the critical size of the initiation defect corresponding to the thermal deformation effect of welding were determined. It was found that for electroslag welding, there is a low probability of crack formation in the joints, a low level of residual stress and a low level of specific stored energy in a relatively wide joint zone. For arc welding there is a considerable probability of defect formation in the vicinity of the sharp boundary of the joint, a high level of the triaxial state of stress in the tensile region, and a high level of specific stored energy concentrated in the narrow zone of weld joints. The recommended thermal process is given for welding pressure vessels made of the CSN 413030 steel modified with Ni, Al+Ti, and 150 to 200 mm in thickness. (J.P.)

  11. Automatic welding processes for reactor coolant pipes used in PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, T.; Nakamura, A.; Nagura, Y.; Sakamoto, N.

    1979-01-01

    The authors developed automatic welding processes (submerged arc welding process and TIG welding process) for application to the welding of reactor coolant pipes which constitute the most important part of the PWR type nuclear power plant. Submerged arc welding process is suitable for flat position welding in which pipes can be rotated, while TIG welding process is suitable for all position welding. This paper gives an outline of the two processes and the results of tests performed using these processes. (author)

  12. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  13. Investigations in thermal fields and stress fields induced by electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basile, G.

    1979-12-01

    This document presents the thermal study of electron beam welding and identifies stresses and strains from welding: description of the operating principles of the electron gun and characterization of various welding parameters, examination of the temperature fields during electron beam welding development of various mathematic models and comparison with experimental results, measurement and calculation of stresses and strains in the medium plane of the welding assembly, residual stresses analysis [fr

  14. Three dimensional, thermal stress analysis of a welded plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koening, H.A.; Lai, C.K.-F.; Morral, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    A general finite element thermal stress analysis has been developed. The analysis can be uncoupled to solve either the heat transfer problem or the stress problem independently and it can accommodate non-linear material behavior, initial states of stress and strain, and moving boundary conditions. A unique feature of the model it that it properly accounts for the latent heat effect during phase changes. Applying the moving heat flux boundary condition to simulate arc welding, the model has been used to predict the transient thermal mechanical response of a welded plate. It is the absorption and liberation of latent heat in the fusion zone of a weld which complicates numerical methods of treating welding. For pure materials and eutectic alloys the latent heat effect is less of a problem because phase changes take place at a specific temperature. But for most alloys, phase changes take place over a range of temperatures bounded by the solidus, T S , and liquidus, T L , and the latent heat effect occurs continuously over the temperature range. (author)

  15. Thermal damage control of dye-assisted laser tissue welding: effect of dye concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Buckley, Lisa A.; Prahl, Scott A.; Shaffer, Brian S.; Gregory, Kenton W.

    2001-05-01

    Successful laser-assisted tissue welding was implemented to provide proper weld strength with minimized tissue thermal injury. We investigated and compared the weld strengths and morphologic changes in porcine small intestinal submucose (SIS) and porcine ureteral tissues with various concentration of indocyanine green (ICG) and with a solid albumin sheet. The study showed that the tissues were welded at lower ICG concentration (0.05 mM) with minimized tissue thermal damage using an 800-nm wavelength diode laser.

  16. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibility...... information of the high-fidelity model. The optimization schemes are applied to stationary thermal models of differing complexity of the friction stir welding process. The optimization problems considered are based on optimizing the temperature field in the workpiece by finding optimal translational speed....... Also an optimization problem based on a microstructure model is solved, allowing the hardness distribution in the plate to be optimized. The use of purely thermal models represents a simplification of the real process; nonetheless, it shows the applicability of the optimization methods considered...

  17. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with TIG welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  18. Effect of welding processes on the impression creep resistance of type 316 LN stainless steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Sisira, P.; Divya, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.

    2016-01-01

    Type 316 LN stainless steel is the major structural material used in the construction of fast breeder reactors. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding , a variant of the TIG welding process has been found to enhance the depth of penetration significantly during autogenous welding and also found to enhance the creep rupture life in stainless steels. The present study aims at comparing the effect of TIG and A-TIG welding processes on the impression creep resistance of type 316 LN stainless steel base metal, fusion zone and heat affected zone (HAZ) of weld joints. Optical and TEM have been used to correlate the microstructures with the observed creep rates of various zones of the weld joints. Finer microstructure and higher ferrite content was observed in the TIG weld joint fusion zone. Coarser grain structure was observed in the HAZ of the weld joints. Impression creep rate of A-TIG weld joint fusion zone was almost equal to that of the base metal and lower than that of the TIG weld joint fusion zone. A-TIG weld joint HAZ was found to have lower creep rate compared to that of conventional TIG weld joint HAZ due to higher grain size. HAZ of the both the weld joints exhibited lower creep rate than the base metal. (author)

  19. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  20. Creep and rupture behavior of weld-deposited Type 16-8-2 stainless steel at 5930C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.L.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1976-03-01

    The creep and rupture behavior of weld-deposited Type 16-8-2 stainless steel at 593 0 C was investigated over the time range from 3.6 x 10 4 s to 2.5 x 10 7 s. Equations relating stress to the time to rupture, the time to the onset of tertiary creep, and the time to produce a given creep strain were obtained. The experimental results indicate that the control of welding parameters (e.g. current, voltage and travel speed) within reasonable ranges can yield weld deposits with consistent time-dependent properties. Limited data suggest that high temperature (1065 0 C) post-weld annealing significantly alters only the flow curve for plastic deformation, while long-term thermal exposure at an intermediate temperature (565 0 C) produces only minor changes in either the plastic deformation or creep behavior of the weld materials

  1. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  2. Thermal treatments effect on the austenite-ferrite equilibrium in a duplex stainless steel weld beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkessa, Brahim; Badji, Riad; Bettahar, Kheireddine; Maza, Halim

    2006-01-01

    Heat treatments in the temperature range between 800 to 1200 C, with a keeping at high temperature of 60 min, followed by a water quenching at 20 C, have been carried out on austeno-ferritic stainless steel welds (of type SAF 2205-UNS S31803). The heat treatments carried out at temperatures below 1000 C have modified the structure of the duplex stainless steel 2205 in inducing the formation of precipitates, identified by X-ray diffraction as being the intermetallic compound σ and the chromium carbides M 23 C 6 . The treatments applied to temperatures superior to 1000 C shift the δ-γ equilibrium towards the δ phase. Indeed, the increase of the ferrite rate with the treatment temperature is approximately linear. The ferrite rates are higher in the heat-affected zone, which has been submitted to a ferritizing due to the welding thermal effects. (O.M.)

  3. Effects of Thermal Aging on Microstructure and Impact Properties of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUO Qiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the thermal aging of nuclear primary pipe material 316LN stainless steel weld, accelerated thermal aging experiment was performed at 400℃ for 15000h. Microstructure evolution of weld after aging was investigated by TEM and HREM. Impact properties of weld thermally aged at different time was measured by Charpy impact test. Meanwhile, taking Charpy impact energy as the standard of thermal aging embrittlement, the thermal kinetics formula was obtained by the fitting method. Finally, the Charpy impact properties of the weld during 60 years of service at the actual operation temperature were estimated by the thermal kinetics formula. The results indicate that the spinodal decomposition occurs in the ferrite of the weld after thermal aging at 400℃ for 1000h, results in α (Fe-rich and α'(Cr-rich phases, and meanwhile, the G-phase is precipitated in the ferrite; the spinodal decomposition and the G-phase precipitation lead to the decrease in the impact energy of weld as time prolongs; the prediction results show that the Charpy impact energy of weld decreases quickly in the early 25 years, and then undergoes a slow decrease during the subsequent operation process.

  4. Experimental modeling of weld thermal cycle of the heat affected zone (HAZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kulhánek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Contribution deals with experimental modeling of quick thermal cycles of metal specimens. In the introduction of contribution will be presented measured graphs of thermal cycle of heat affected zone (HAZ of weld. Next will be presented experimental simulation of measured thermal cycle on the standard specimens, useable for material testing. This approach makes possible to create material structures of heat affected zone of weld, big enough for standard material testing.

  5. Thermal and microstructural modelling in weld heat-affected zones: microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribera, J.M.; Prado, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    After having analysed in Part 2 of this work the thermal effects caused by a welding process, a metallurgical model which uses those results is proposed to predict the hardness and the microstructure resulting in weld heat affected zones. This model simulates the decomposition of austenite to its various products: martensite, bainite, pearlite and ferrite. Thus, it allows one to optimize welding process parameters to achieve the best microstructure possible. (Author) 5 refs

  6. Flaw evaluation of Nd:YAG laser welding based plume shape by infrared thermal camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yeol; Yoo, Young Tae; Yang, Dong Jo; Song, Kyung Seol; Ro, Kyoung Bo

    2003-01-01

    In Nd:YAG laser welding evaluation methods of welding flaw are various. But, the method due to plume shape is difficult to classification od welding flaw. The Nd:YAG laser process is known to have high speed and deep penetration capability to become one of the most advanced welding technologies. At the present time, some methods are studied for measurement of plume shape by using high-speed camera and photo diode. This paper describes the machining characteristics of SM45C carbon steel welding by use of an Nd:YAG laser. In spite of its good mechanical characteristics, SM45C carbon steel has a high carbon contents and suffers a limitation in the industrial application due to the poor welding properties. In this study, plume shape was measured by infrared thermal camera that is non-contact/non-destructive thermal measurement equipment through change of laser generating power, speed, focus. Weld was performed on bead-on method. Measurement results are compared as two equipment. Here, two results are composed of measurement results of plume quantities due to plume shape by infrared thermal camera and inspection results of weld bead include weld flaws by ultrasonic inspector.

  7. Weld-forged rotors of the turbines for nuclear and thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudkovskij, A.F.; German, S.I.

    1979-01-01

    Considered is a principally new technology and equipment for assembling and welding superheavy rotors with mass up to 200 tons. Construction peculiarities and advantages of the application of weld-forged rotors are noted. The technology proposed permits to provide for a horizontal assembling, subsequent welding and quality control of rotors, one bench being used instead of three ones. The application of horizontal assembling and complex welding of rotors in one position permits not only to shorten the cycle of assembling and welding, too decrease the equipment costs and release production capacities, but also to improve substantially the quality of welds and especially the accuracy of rotor production. The equipment allows one to assemble and weld rotors with the mass up to 250 tons at maximum rotor diameter up to 2500 mm and length up to 13000 mm. Presented are data characterizing chemical composition and mechanical properties of steels used for forging of welded rotors. Also given are the results of studying mechanical properties of welded joints, welding and thermal treatment of which were made in accordance with the technology proposed. Serial production of rotors for turbines with the power of 500, 1000 and 1200 Mw is shown to be mastered along with the manufacture of welded rotors for cylinders of low, medium and high pressure turbines

  8. Thermal analysis of laser welding for ITER correction coil case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, C., E-mail: fangchao@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 200031 (China); Lappeenranta University of Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, 53850 Lappeenranta (Finland); Song, Y.T.; Wu, W.Y.; Wei, J.; Xin, J.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 200031 (China); Wu, H.P.; Salminen, A. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, 53850 Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Morphology of simulated heat source is found to be close to the welded joint sample. • The FEA temperature distribution shows good agreement with experimental measurements. • Laser welding process used on ITER correction coil case will not harm the winding pack. - Abstract: This paper presents the simulation results of 3D finite element analysis (FEA) of laser welding processes for the ITER correction coil case welding; predicts the temperature distribution and compares it with the experimental result to evaluate the impact to the properties of winding pack during the welding process. A specimen of coil case was modeled and simulated by using specialized welding simulation software SYSWELD, Modeling used austenitic stainless steel 316LN as the specimen material and a 3D Conical Gaussian was used as a heat source model. A plate sample was welded before the FE modeling in order to obtain the laser welding parameters and the Gaussian parameters of molten pool. To verify the simulation results, a coil case sample was welded using laser welding with welding parameters that matched the model, and the corresponding temperature values were measured using thermocouples. Compared with the FEA results, it was found that the FEA temperature distribution shows good agreement with the experimental measurements and the laser welding process will not harm the winding pack.

  9. Colosed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Ppart Qualification, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes variables...

  10. Closed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Part Qualification, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes variables...

  11. Simulation of Temperature Field in HDPE Pipe Thermal Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Li-jun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For high density polyethylene pipe connection,welding technology is the key of the high density engineering plastic pressure pipe safety. And the temperature distribution in the welding process has a very important influence on the welding quality. Polyethylene pipe weld joints of one dimensional unsteady overall heat transfer model is established by MARC software and simulates temperature field and stress field distribution of the welding process,and the thermocouple temperature automatic acquisition system of welding temperature field changes were detected,and compared by simulation and experiment .The results show that,at the end of the heating,the temperature of the pipe does not reach the maximum,but reached the maximum at 300 s,which indicates that the latent heat of phase change in the process of pressure welding. In the process of pressure welding, the axial stress of the pipe is gradually changed from tensile stress to compressive stress.

  12. Effect of Thermal Aging and Test Temperatures on Fracture Toughness of SS 316(N) Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, B. Shashank; Babu, M. Nani; Shanthi, G.; Moitra, A.; Sasikala, G.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of thermal aging and test temperatures on fracture toughness (J 0.2) of SS 316(N) weld material has been studied based on J-R curve evaluations. The aging of the welds was carried out at temperatures 370, 475 and 550 °C and for durations varying from 1000 to 20,000 h. The fracture toughness (J-R curve) tests were carried out at 380 and 550 °C for specimens after all aging conditions, including as-weld condition. The initiation fracture toughness (J 0.2) of the SS 316(N) weld material has shown degradation after 20,000-h aging durations and is reflected in all the test temperatures and aging temperatures. The fracture toughness after different aging conditions and test temperatures, including as-weld condition, was higher than the minimum specified value for this class of welds.

  13. Thermal Stir Welding of High Strength and High Temperature Alloys for Aerospace Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Keystone and MSU team propose to demonstrate the feasibility of solid-state joining high strength and temperature alloys utilizing the Thermal Stir Welding...

  14. Changes in type I collagen following laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, L S; Moazami, N; Pocsidio, J; Oz, M C; LoGerfo, P; Treat, M R

    1992-01-01

    Selection of ideal laser parameters for tissue welding is inhibited by poor understanding of the mechanism. We investigated structural changes in collagen molecules extracted from rat tail tendon (> 90% type I collagen) after tissue welding using an 808 nm diode laser and indocyanine green dye applied to the weld site. Mobility patterns on SDS-PAGE were identical in the lasered and untreated tendon extracts with urea or acetic acid. Pepsin incubation after acetic acid extraction revealed a reduction of collagen alpha and beta bands in lasered compared with untreated specimens. Circular dichroism studies of rat tail tendon showed absence of helical structure in collagen from lasered tendon. No evidence for covalent bonding was present in laser-treated tissues. Collagen molecules are denatured by the laser wavelength and parameters used in this study. No significant amount of helical structure is regenerated on cooling. We conclude that non-covalent interactions between denatured collagen molecules may be responsible for the creation of tissue welding.

  15. Evaluation of Electron Beam Welding Performance of AA6061-T6 Plate-type Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Sung; Seo, Kyoung-Seok; Lee, Don-Bae; Park, Jong-Man; Lee, Yoon-Sang; Lee, Chong-Tak

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most commonly used heat-treatable aluminum alloys, AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy is available in a wide range of structural materials. Typically, it is used in structural members, auto-body sheet and many other applications. Generally, this alloy is easily welded by conventional GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), LBW (Laser Beam Welding) and EBW(Electron Beam Welding). However, certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes possess the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the plate-type nuclear fuel fabrication and assembly, a fundamental electron beam welding experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the suitable welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using an electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the plate-type fuel assembly has been also studied by the weld penetrations of side plate to end fitting and fixing bar and weld inspections using computed tomography

  16. Fatigue crack growth rate behaviour of friction-stir aluminium alloy AA2024-T3 welds under transient thermal tensioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilman, M.N.; Kusmono,; Iswanto, P.T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • FSW enables unweldable aircraft material AA2024-T3 to be welded without cracking. • FSW applied to aircraft structure is required to have superior fatigue resistance. • Transient thermal tensioning (TTT) is being developed for stress relieving in FSW. • The fatigue crack growth rates of FSW joints under TTT are studied. - Abstract: Friction stir welding (FSW) has become a serious candidate technology to join metallic fuselage panels for the next generation of civil aircrafts. However, residual stress introduced during welding which subsequently affects fatigue performance is still a major problem that needs to be paid attention. The present investigation aims to improve fatigue crack growth resistance of friction stir aluminium alloy AA2024-T3 welds using transient thermal tensioning (TTT) treatment. In this investigation, aluminium alloy AA2024-T3 plates were joined using FSW process with and without TTT. The welding parameters used including tool rotation speed (Rt) and the plate travelling speed (v) were 1450 rpm and 30 mm/min respectively. The TTT treatments were carried out by heating both sides of friction stir weld line using moving electric heaters ahead of, beside and behind the tool at a heating temperature of 200 °C. Subsequently, a sequence of tests was carried out including microstructural examination, hardness measurement, tensile test and fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) test in combination with fractography using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The FCGR test was carried out using a constant amplitude fatigue experiment with stress ratio (R) of 0.1 and frequency (f) of 11 Hz whereas specimens used were centre-crack tension (CCT) type with the initial crack located at the weld nugget. Results of this investigation showed that at low ΔK, typically below 9 MPa m 0.5 , the friction stir welds under TTT treatments lowered fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and the lowest (da/dN) was achieved as the heaters were located ahead of

  17. Research of the Resistance of Contact Welding Joint of R65 Type Rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kęstutis Dauskurdis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the R65 type rail joints that were welded by resistance welding are analysed. Survey methodology of the research consists of the following parts: visual inspection of welded joint, ultrasonic rail inspection, hardness test of upper part of the rail, fusion area research, the measurement hardness test of heat-softened area, the measurement microhardness test, microstructure research of the welded joint, impact strength experiments, chemical analysis of welded joint, wheel-rail interaction research using the finite element method (FEM. The results of the research are analysed and the quality of weld is evaluated. The conclusion is based on the results of this research.

  18. Experimental electro-thermal method for nondestructively testing welds in stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Welds in austenitic stainless steel pipes are notoriously difficult to nondestructively examine using conventional ultrasonic and eddy current methods. Survace irregularities and microscopic variations in magnetic permeability cause false eddy current signal variations. Ultrasonic methods have been developed which use computer processing of the data to overcome some of the problems. Electro-thermal nondestructive testing shows promise for detecting flaws that are difficult to detect using other NDT methods. Results of a project completed to develop and demonstrate the potential of an electro-thermal method for nondestructively testing stainless steel pipe welds are presented. Electro-thermal NDT uses a brief pulse of electrical current injected into the pipe. Defects at any depth within the weld cause small differences in surface electrical current distribution. These cause short-lived transient temperature differences on the pipe's surface that are mapped using an infrared scanning camera. Localized microstructural differences and normal surface roughness in the welds have little effect on the surface temperatures

  19. Experimental investigation and characterization of micro resistance welding with an electro-thermal actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chun-Wei; Yeh, Cheng-Chi; Hsu Wensyang

    2009-01-01

    Resistance welding is a common scheme of assembly on the macro scale by pressing together two workpieces with current passing through them to generate joule heating at the contact region due to high contact resistance. However, micro assembly by resistance welding is seldom reported. Here, resistance welding with an electro-thermal microactuator to assemble micro Ni structures is experimentally investigated and characterized. The bent-beam electro-thermal microactuator is designed to provide the necessary displacements and pressing forces. The two-mask metal-based surface micromachining process is adopted to fabricate the micro Ni structures. The calibrated initial contact resistance is shown to decrease with increasing contact pressure. Furthermore, stronger welding strength is achieved at a smaller initial contact resistance, which indicates that a larger clamping force would enhance the welding strength as large as 3.09 MPa (74.4 µN) at a contact resistance of 2.7 Ω here. The input welding energy is also found to be a critical factor. In our tests, when welding energy is below the threshold limit of 0.05 J, the welding trials all fail. For the energy between 0.05 J and 1 J, there is a transition from a lower yield of 33.3% to a higher yield of 58.3%. At high welding energy, between 1 and 10 J, 100% yield is achieved. With the demonstration and characterization of micro resistance welding by the electro-thermal microactuator, the scheme proposed here would be helpful in the automation of micro assembly

  20. Submerged Arc Stainless Steel Strip Cladding—Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Thermal Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, I. C.; Chou, C. P.; Tseng, C. F.; Lee, I. K.

    2009-03-01

    Two types of martensitic stainless steel strips, PFB-132 and PFB-131S, were deposited on SS41 carbon steel substrate by a three-pass submerged arc cladding process. The effects of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on thermal fatigue resistance and hardness were evaluated by thermal fatigue and hardness testing, respectively. The weld metal microstructure was investigated by utilizing optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that, by increasing the PWHT temperature, hardness decreased but there was a simultaneous improvement in weldment thermal fatigue resistance. During tempering, carbide, such as (Fe, Cr)23C6, precipitated in the weld metals and molybdenum appeared to promote (Fe, Cr, Mo)23C6 formation. The precipitates of (Fe, Cr, Mo)23C6 revealed a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure with fine grains distributed in the microstructure, thereby effectively increasing thermal fatigue resistance. However, by adding nickel, the AC1 temperature decreased, causing a negative effect on thermal fatigue resistance.

  1. Comparison of pulsed Nd : YAG laser welding qualitative features with plasma plume thermal characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbaghzadeh, J; Dadras, S; Torkamany, M J

    2007-01-01

    A spectroscopic approach was used to study the effects of different operating parameters on st14 sheet metal welding with a 400 W maximum average power pulsed Nd : YAG laser. The parameters included pulse duration and peak power and type and flow rate of the assist gas and welding speed. Weld quality, including penetration depth and melt width, has been compared with the FeI electron temperature obtained from spectroscopic observations of a plasma plume. A correlation between the standard deviation of the electron temperature and the quality of welding has also been found

  2. Fabrication of AA6061-T6 Plate Type Fuel Assembly Using Electron Beam Welding Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soosung; Seo, Kyoungseok; Lee, Donbae; Park, Jongman; Lee, Yoonsang; Lee, Chongtak

    2014-01-01

    AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy is easily welded by conventional GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), LBW (Laser Beam Welding) and EBW. However, certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes possess the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the nuclear fuel plate fabrication and assembly, a fundamental EBW experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using an electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the fuel plate assembly has been also studied by the shrinkage measurement and weld inspection using computed tomography. This study was carried out to determine the suitable welding parameters and to evaluate tensile strength of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy. In the present experiment, satisfactory electron beam welding process of the full-sized sample was being developed. Based on this fundamental study, fabrication of the plate-type fuel assembly will be provided for the future Ki-Jang research reactor project

  3. Thermophysical properties of a Type 308 stainless steel weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.D.; Richards, H.L.; King, R.T.; Greene, L.M.; Darby, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity measurements were obtained in vacuo for a Type 304-308 stainless steel weldment for use in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor. Property measurements were somewhat variant, depending upon the direction of measurement, but the observed differences were small. (U.S.)

  4. Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, W., IV

    1998-06-01

    Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack oil both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub-surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of tile probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced In the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring tile concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and characterizing the Fourier-Transform infrared (FTIR) spectra before and after the laser exposure.

  5. Thermal Analysis and Microhardness Mapping in Hybrid Laser Welds in a Structural Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    conditions. Via the keyhole the laser beam brings about easier ignition of the arc, stabilization of the arc welding process, and penetration of the...with respect to the conventional GMAW or GTAW processes without the need for very close fit-up. This paper will compare an autogenous laser weld to a...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP017864 TITLE: Thermal Analysis and Microhardness Mapping in Hybrid Laser

  6. Investigation of Thermal Stress Distribution in Laser Spot Welding Process

    OpenAIRE

    Osamah F. Abdulateef

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the laser spot welding process of low carbon steel sheet. The investigations were based on analytical and finite element analyses. The analytical analysis was focused on a consistent set of equations representing interaction of the laser beam with materials. The numerical analysis based on 3-D finite element analysis of heat flow during laser spot welding taken into account the temperature dependence of the physical properties and latent heat of transf...

  7. A study on the fatigue characteristics of SM 490 A material due to the welding type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Goo, Byung Choon [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This study investigates the fatigue characteristics of SM 490 A material specimens for the railway vehicle due to the welding type. The more stress ratio decreases, the more strength of fillet welded specimen decreases. At specially, when the stress ratio of TN(Plate with transverse fillet welded rib) specimens decreases 0.5, 0.1, and -0.1, the fatigue limit decreases uniformly. The strength of TN is higher than it of NCN in the compare of fillet welding type, but the strength of NCN(Non load-carrying cruciform fillet welded joint) is higher than it of CN(Load-carrying cruciform fillet welded joint), which these specimens have the rib in the both side. We analysis the strains on the weld positions of the TN specimens during the fatigue test for the investigation of crack initiation and crack growth. In the theses results, we could find the fatigue crack initiation point and time.

  8. Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Ward, IV

    Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack on both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of the probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced in the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring the concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and measuring the infrared absorption spectra before and after the laser exposure. This investigation yielded results pertaining to both the methods and mechanisms of laser tissue welding. The combination of two-color infrared thermometry to obtain accurate surface temperatures free from emissivity bias and computer modeling illustrated the importance of including evaporation in the simulations, which effectively serves as an inherent cooling mechanism during laser irradiation. Moreover, the hydration state predicted by the model was useful in assessing the role of electrostatic versus covalent bonding in the fusion. These tools also helped elicit differences between dye- enhanced liquid solders and solid-matrix patches in laser-assisted tissue welding, demonstrating the significance of repeatable energy delivery. Surprisingly, covalent bonds

  9. A framework for shear driven dissolution of thermally stable particles during friction stir welding and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palanivel, S. [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute, Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Arora, A. [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Palaj, Gandhinagar 382355, Gujarat (India); Doherty, K.J. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Science Division, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Mishra, R.S., E-mail: Rajiv.Mishra@unt.edu [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute, Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A framework is proposed to explain the dissolution and fragmentation of particles during friction stir welding and processing. Two major mechanisms dissolve the particle during the process: (i) thermally activated diffusion, and (ii) dislocation and grain boundary sweeping of atoms. We use a three-dimensional coupled viscoplastic flow and heat transfer model to quantify these mechanisms. For illustration purposes, calculations were done on a thermally stable Mg{sub 2}Y intermetallic that dissolved during processing. The framework is universal and applies to any second phase dissolution and fragmentation during friction stir welding and processing, thus enabling a science-based approach to tailor microstructures.

  10. Thermal Insulation of Wet Shielded Metal Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Cooling Curves Superimposed on a CCT Diagram ......................... 20 Figure 3.3 Schematic of the Local Drying Method Developed by Satoh...with the Continuous Cooling Transformation ( CCT ) diagram for the steel being welded. An example of a CCT diagram with superimposed cooling curves is...2.5mnm from ar wfusionline 0.1 1.0 10 102 10 3 10 4 10 5 TIME ’,SEC) Figure 3.2 Weld Cooling Curves Superimposed on a CCT Diagram [101 20 fIt

  11. Effect of acoustic softening on the thermal-mechanical process of ultrasonic welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunkun; Zhang, Yansong; Wang, Hongze

    2017-03-01

    Application of ultrasonic energy can reduce the static stress necessary for plastic deformation of metallic materials to reduce forming load and energy, namely acoustic softening effect (ASE). Ultrasonic welding (USW) is a rapid joining process utilizing ultrasonic energy to form a solid state joint between two or more pieces of metals. Quantitative characterization of ASE and its influence on specimen deformation and heat generation is essential to clarify the thermal-mechanical process of ultrasonic welding. In the present work, experiments were set up to found out mechanical behavior of copper and aluminum under combined effect of compression force and ultrasonic energy. Constitutive model was proposed and numerical implemented in finite element model of ultrasonic welding. Thermal-mechanical analysis was put forward to explore the effect of ultrasonic energy on the welding process quantitatively. Conclusions can be drawn that ASE increases structural deformation significantly, which is beneficial for joint formation. Meanwhile, heat generation from both frictional work and plastic deformation is slightly influenced by ASE. Based on the proposed model, relationship between ultrasonic energy and thermal-mechanical behavior of structure during ultrasonic welding was constructed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Study on Fatigue Design Automation of Plug- and Ring-type Gas-welded Joints of STS301L Taking Welded Residual Stress into Account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung yeb; Yun, Ki Ho

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a fatigue design method for plug- and ring-type gas-welded joints, which takes into account the effects of welding residual stress. To develop this method, we simulated the gas-welding process by performing nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) To validate the FEA results, numerically calculated residual stresses in the gas welds were then compared with experimental results obtained by the hole-drilling method. To evaluate the fatigue strength of plug- and ring-type gas-welded joints influenced by welding residual stresses, the use of stress amplitude (σ a )R, which includes the welding residual stress in gas welds, is proposed (σ a )R on the basis of a modified Goodman equation that includes the residual stress effects. Using the stress amplitude (σ a )R at the hot spot point of gas weld, the relations obtained as the fatigue test results for plug and ring type gas welded joints having various dimensions and shapes were systematically rearranged to obtain the (σ a )R-N f relationship. It was found that more systematic and accurate evaluation of the fatigue strength of plug- and ring-type gas-welded joints can be achieved by using (σ a )R

  13. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  14. Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding – Initial Studies Using a Space Mapping Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process. The optimization is performed using a space mapping technique in which an analytical model is used along with the FEM model to be optimized. The results are compared to traditional gradient based optimization...

  15. Robust Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding Using Manifold Mapping Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Lahaye, Domenico; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a friction stir welding process taking robustness into account. The optimization problems are formulated with the goal of obtaining desired mean responses while reducing the variance of the response. We restrict ourselves to a thermal model of the process...

  16. Analysis of residual stresses in girth welded type 304 stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brust, F.W.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in boiling water reactor (BWR) piping is a problem for the nuclear power industry. Tensile residual stresses induced by welding are an important factor in IGSCC of Type 304 stainless steel pipes. Backlay and heat sink welding can retard IGSCC. 17 refs

  17. Multi-Criteria Optimization in Friction Stir Welding Using a Thermal Model with Prescribed Material Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    distribution in the weld zone, as a function of the heat generation, highly affects the evolution of the microstructure and the residual stresses, and also the performance of the weld. Therefore, thermal models play a crucial role in detailed analysis and improvement of this process. In this study, a three...... manufacturing problem having conflicting objectives, i.e., maximization of production rate and tool lifetime. The resulting multiple trade-off solutions are then investigated to unveil any design rules which have a strong potential in industrial use. © 2013 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC....

  18. Contribution to the assessment of thermal ageing of stainless steel castings and welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdarek, J.; Novak, J.

    1992-01-01

    Indentation tests are considered for measuring and verifying of thermal ageing of stainless steel castings and welds in service. Therefore, relations between indentation- and tensile diagrams were analyzed. Conventional tensile characteristics, deduced from the indentation diagram, should be used for fracture toughness prediction. Form of correlation of yield stress and tensile strength on one side and of fracture toughness on the other side was proposed, which is specific for austenitic-ferritic two-phase materials. Properties of castings and welds were compared and analyzed within the framework of a mesomechanical homogenization model with micromechanical effect of geometric slip distance. (author)

  19. Role of ferrite and phosphorus plus sulphur in the crack sensitivity of autogenously welded type 309 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, F.J. Jr.

    1976-07-01

    A study on autogenous welding of Type 309 thin stainless steel sheet was made after experiencing cracking difficulties on several commercial heats. A relationship exists between the sum of the phosphorus plus sulfur, the ferrite control of the weld metal, and the crack sensitivity of autogenously made welds. A new simple weld test for thin-gage sheet is utilized for studying the susceptibility to cracking. A chemistry modification is suggested to alleviate possible weld cracking when autogenously welding this grade. The principles of crack sensitivity prediction could apply to other austenitic stainless steel types where chemistry limits are such that ferrite is possible

  20. Optimization of friction stir welding using space mapping and manifold mapping-an initial study of thermal aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process by finding optimal welding parameters. The optimization is performed using space mapping and manifold mapping techniques in which a coarse model is used along with the fine model to be optimized. Different...

  1. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardening Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony

    2015-05-25

    Process design and implementation in FSW is mostly dependent on empirical information gathered through experience. Basic science of friction stir welding and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between process control parameters and response variables and resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters like tool rotation and translation rate and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to the process response variables such as peak temperature, time at temperature etc. Of primary influence to the other process response parameters are temperature and its gradient at the deformation and heat affected zones. Through review of pertinent works in the literature and some experimental results from boundary condition work performed in precipitation hardening aluminum alloys this paper will partially elucidate the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in Friction Stir Welding.

  2. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  3. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  4. Hydrogen Cracking in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of an AISI Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, P.; Unigovski, Ya.; Shneck, R.

    The effects of in situ cathodic charging on the tensile properties and susceptibility to cracking of an AISI type 321 stainless steel, welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, was studied by various treatments. Appearance of delta-ferrite phase in the as-welded steels in our tested conditions was observed with discontinuous grain boundaries (M23C6) and a dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C), which precipitated in the matrix. Shielding gas rates changes the mechanical properties of the welds. Ultimate tensile strength and ductility are increases with the resistance to the environments related the increase of the supplied shielding inert gas rates. Charged specimens, caused mainly in decreases in the ductility of welded specimens. However, more severe decrease in ductility was obtained after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited massive transgranular regions. Both types of specimen demonstrated narrow brittle zones at the sides of the fracture surface and ductile micro-void coalescences in the middle. Ferrite δ was form after welding with high density of dislocation structures and stacking faults formation and the thin stacking fault plates with e-martensite phase were typically found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodical charging process.

  5. Damage mechanism of piping welded joints made from austenitic Steel for the type RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karzov, G.; Timofeev, B.; Gorbakony, A.; Petrov, V.; Chernaenko, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the process of operation of RBMK reactors the damages were taking place on welded piping, produced from austenitic stainless steel of the type 08X18H10T. The inspection of damaged sections in piping has shown that in most cases crack-like defects are of corrosion and mechanical character. The paper considers in details the reasons of damages appearance and their development for this type of welded joints of downcomers 325xl6 mm, which were fabricated from austenitic stainless steel using TlG and MAW welding methods. (author)

  6. Inertia and friction welding of aluminum alloy 1100 to type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inertia and friction-welding processes were evaluated for joining aluminum alloy 1100-H14 and Type 316 vacuum-induction melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VIM VAR) stainless steel. While both processes consistently produced joints in which the strength exceeded the strength of the aluminum base metal, 100 percent bonding was not reliably achieved with inertia welding. The deficiency points out the need for development of nondestructive testing techniques for this type of joint. Additionally, solid-state volume diffusion did not appear to be a satisfactory explanation for the inertia and friction-welding bonding mechanism

  7. Fatigue strength of welds and welded materials of high-temperature steels resistant to pressurized hydrogen of the type 2.25% Cr/1% Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlat, J.; Cheviet, A.; Million, A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine systematically the creep strength of welded joints (base material, heat influence zone and welded seam) and of pure welding materials of the type 2 1/4-3% Cr/1% Mo. According to the AD standard rules, the rule which stipulates that the creep strength of welded seams under full stress be calculated with the strength characteristic value reduced by 20% applies to all heat-resistant steels, if no rupture stress values for the welded joints are available. Manufacturers of steel and weld fillers together with the Union of Technical Control Associations (VdTUeV) have prepared a test programme according to which on the one hand welded joints are tested at right angles to their seams, and on the other pure welding material is tested with respect to its creep strength. The development of the testes and their results have been described. The first results are available as VdTUeV material performance sheets, for 2 materials, and as provisional VdTUeV specification sheets, for 3 weld fillers. With the tested materials, it becomes practically feasible to reduce the creep strength of longitudinally welded pressure-bearing components by about 20% of wall thickness. (orig.) [de

  8. Vision-aided Monitoring and Control of Thermal Spray, Spray Forming, and Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, John E.; Bolstad, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Vision is one of the most powerful forms of non-contact sensing for monitoring and control of manufacturing processes. However, processes involving an arc plasma or flame such as welding or thermal spraying pose particularly challenging problems to conventional vision sensing and processing techniques. The arc or plasma is not typically limited to a single spectral region and thus cannot be easily filtered out optically. This paper presents an innovative vision sensing system that uses intense stroboscopic illumination to overpower the arc light and produce a video image that is free of arc light or glare and dedicated image processing and analysis schemes that can enhance the video images or extract features of interest and produce quantitative process measures which can be used for process monitoring and control. Results of two SBIR programs sponsored by NASA and DOE and focusing on the application of this innovative vision sensing and processing technology to thermal spraying and welding process monitoring and control are discussed.

  9. LOFT transient thermal analysis for 10 inch primary coolant blowdown piping weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, S.K.

    1978-01-01

    A flaw in a weld in the 10 inch primary coolant blowdown piping was discovered by LOFT personnel. As a result of this, a thermal analysis and fracture mechanics analysis was requested by LOFT personnel. The weld and pipe section were analyzed for a complete thermal cycle, heatup and Loss of Coolant Experiment (LOCE), using COUPLE/MOD2, a two-dimensional finite element heat conduction code. The finite element representation used in this analysis was generated by the Applied Mechanics Branch. The record of nodal temperatures for the entire transient was written on tape VSN=T9N054, and has been forwarded to the Applied Mechanics Branch for use in their mechanical analysis. Specific details and assumptions used in this analysis are found in appropriate sections of this report

  10. Thermal efficiency on welding of AA6061-T6 alloy by modified indirect electric arc and current signals digitalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriz, R. R.; Barrera, G.; Garcia, R.; Lopez, V. H.

    2009-01-01

    The results of the thermal efficiency on welding by modified indirect electric arc technique (MIEA) [1] of the 6061- T6 aluminum alloy are presented. These values are in a range of 90 to 94 %, which depend of the preheating employed. Thermal efficiency was obtained by means of a balance energy which considers the heat input, the amount of melted mass of the welding profiles, and welding parameters during the joining, especially of the arc current data acquisition. Also, some dimensionless parameters were employed in order to determine the approximation grade of the melted pool, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and their corresponding values with the experimental results. (Author) 13 refs

  11. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2018-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high-quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable alloys) that is historically operated at lower joining speeds (up to hundreds of millimeters per minute). In this study, we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with high welding speeds up to 3 M/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. The higher welding speed results in narrower, stronger heat-affected zones (HAZs) and also higher hardness in the nugget zones. The material flow direction in the nugget zone is found to be leaning towards the welding direction as the welding speed increases. Results are coupled with welding parameters and thermal history to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high-speed processing.

  12. Self-protective powder wire for semiautomatic welding of corrosion resistant chromium-nickel type 18-10 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipodaev, V.N.; Kakhovskij, N.I.; Fadeeva, G.V.

    1977-01-01

    Self-protecting NP-ANV1 powder wire has been developed for welding 18-10 type stainless steels. The use of the wire provides for the same running properties of the welds as the TsL-11 electrodes, the welding being 3-5 times more efficient

  13. Manufacture of micro fluidic devices by laser welding using thermal transfer printing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R.; Klein, K. F.; Tobisch, T.; Thoelken, D.; Belz, M.

    2016-03-01

    Micro-fluidic devices are widely used today in the areas of medical diagnostics and drug research, as well as for applications within the process, electronics and chemical industry. Microliters of fluids or single cell to cell interactions can be conveniently analyzed with such devices using fluorescence imaging, phase contrast microscopy or spectroscopic techniques. Typical micro-fluidic devices consist of a thermoplastic base component with chambers and channels covered by a hermetic fluid and gas tight sealed lid component. Both components are usually from the same or similar thermoplastic material. Different mechanical, adhesive or thermal joining processes can be used to assemble base component and lid. Today, laser beam welding shows the potential to become a novel manufacturing opportunity for midsize and large scale production of micro-fluidic devices resulting in excellent processing quality by localized heat input and low thermal stress to the device during processing. For laser welding, optical absorption of the resin and laser wavelength has to be matched for proper joining. This paper will focus on a new approach to prepare micro-fluidic channels in such devices using a thermal transfer printing process, where an optical absorbing layer absorbs the laser energy. Advantages of this process will be discussed in combination with laser welding of optical transparent micro-fluidic devices.

  14. Weldability investigation steel P 91 by weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates results of hardness and impact energy of thermal cycle simulated specimens of high-alloy steel P 91 and their dependence on cooling time from 800 to 500 °C. Results were obtained by measuring hardness HV 1 and by experimental testing of Charpy notched specimens. Metallographic analysis of samples was performed on scanning electronic microscope.

  15. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Said; Julan, Emricka; Tran, Xuan-Van; Robert, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  16. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Said, E-mail: Said.taheri@edf.fr [EDF-LAB, IMSIA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Julan, Emricka [EDF-LAB, AMA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tran, Xuan-Van [EDF Energy R& D UK Centre/School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Robert, Nicolas [EDF-DPN, UNIE, Strategic Center, Saint Denis (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  17. Thermal Aging Effects on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consists of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, is now being widely used as the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing material for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its mechanical property, thermal expansion coefficient, and corrosion resistance. The heat affected zone (HAZ) on Alloy 600 which is formed by welding process is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al. crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions [3]. And according to Z.P. Lu et al. CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. To predict the life time of components, there is a model which can calculate the effective degradation years (EDYs) of the material as a function of operating temperature. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects the hardness of dissimilar metal weld from the fusion boundary to Alloy 600 base metal and the residual strain at Alloy 600 heat affected zone. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. The hardness, measured by Vickers hardness tester, peaked near the fusion boundary between Alloy 182 and Alloy 600, and it decreases as the picked point goes to Alloy 600 base metal. Even though the formation of precipitate such as Cr carbide, thermal aging doesn't affect the value and the tendency of hardness because of reduced residual stress. According to kernel average misorientation mapping, residual strain decreases when the material thermally aged. And finally, in 30 years simulated specimen, the high residual strain almost disappears. Therefore, the influence of residual strain on primary water stress corrosion cracking can be diminished when the material undergoes thermal aging.

  18. Advanced welding for closed structure. Pt. 3 The thermal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacripanti, A.; Bonanno, G.; Paoloni, M.; Sagratella, G. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Arborino, A.; Varesi, R.; Antonucci, A. [DUNE, (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    This report describes the activities developed for the European Contract BRITE AWCS III to study the use of thermal sensing techniques to obtain an accurate detection of the internal reinforcement of the closed steel structures employed in the shipbuilding industry. After a description of the methods, normally developed in Russia, about the techniques and problems, for the thermal testing of materials in the conventional approach, a new thermal detector was utilized, a new bolometric thermo camera is introduced with a special software for the on line image analysis, there are also shown the experimental tests and results. The obtained conclusion shows that the thermal non destructive testing techniques with the new detector should be useful to assemble a complete sensing system with one ultrasonic head. [Italian] Questo rapporto descrive le attivita' sperimentali sviluppate nell'ambito del contratto europeo BRITE AWCS III, in cui si sono utilizzate tecniche termiche per ottenere un preciso rilevamento dei rinforzi interni di strutture metalliche chiuse utilizzate nell'industria delle costruzioni navali. Dopo la descrizione dei metodi sviluppati essenzialmente in Russia, circa le tecniche e i problemi riguardanti il testing termico dei materiali, e' stato introdotto un approccio innovativo basato su un nuovo sensore: una termocamera bolometrica connessa con un software dedicato per l'analisi online del setto; vengono inoltre mostrati i risultati sperimentali ottenuti. Le conclusioni ottenute mostrano che nel nuovo approccio, il testing termico non distruttivo dovrebbe essere utile per assemblare un sistema sensoriale completo che utilizzi anche un sensore di tipo ultrasonico.

  19. Microstructural analysis of the type-II boundary region in Alloy 152 weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The weld metals are more susceptible to SCC growth and that most cracks are blunted by the fusion boundary. However, they also found that some cracking occurs along the fusion boundary, often in an area with high hardness. Nelson et al. investigated a DMW of Monel 409 stainless steel and American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 1080 alloy and found a type-II boundary, which exists parallel to the fusion boundary in the dilution zone. They conclude that the type-II boundary is a potential path for crack growth. While there are several theories for the mechanisms of the type-II boundary formation, they conclude that the type-II boundary forms from the allotropic δ-γ transformation at the base metal in the elevated austenitic temperature range. As the operation time of nuclear power plants using DMWs of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B increases, these DMWs must be evaluated for their resistance to SCC for long-term operations. However, only few studies have investigated the thermal aging effects induced by long-term operations at high temperature. Type-II boundary is known as a potential crack path from the results of crack growth test at DMW without any heat treatment. So the analysis about type-II boundary with applying heat treatment could be helpful to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC of structural materials. The objective of this study is to analyze the detailed microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B, after applying heat treatment simulating thermal aging effect of a nuclear power plant operation condition to evaluate the susceptibility of this region to SCC. The microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B were analyzed with an energy dispersive x-ray spectroscope attached to a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and a nanoindentation test. Microstructural, grain boundary orientation, nanohardness analysis were conducted in the type

  20. Microstructural analysis of the type-II boundary region in Alloy 152 weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The weld metals are more susceptible to SCC growth and that most cracks are blunted by the fusion boundary. However, they also found that some cracking occurs along the fusion boundary, often in an area with high hardness. Nelson et al. investigated a DMW of Monel 409 stainless steel and American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 1080 alloy and found a type-II boundary, which exists parallel to the fusion boundary in the dilution zone. They conclude that the type-II boundary is a potential path for crack growth. While there are several theories for the mechanisms of the type-II boundary formation, they conclude that the type-II boundary forms from the allotropic δ-γ transformation at the base metal in the elevated austenitic temperature range. As the operation time of nuclear power plants using DMWs of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B increases, these DMWs must be evaluated for their resistance to SCC for long-term operations. However, only few studies have investigated the thermal aging effects induced by long-term operations at high temperature. Type-II boundary is known as a potential crack path from the results of crack growth test at DMW without any heat treatment. So the analysis about type-II boundary with applying heat treatment could be helpful to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC of structural materials. The objective of this study is to analyze the detailed microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B, after applying heat treatment simulating thermal aging effect of a nuclear power plant operation condition to evaluate the susceptibility of this region to SCC. The microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B were analyzed with an energy dispersive x-ray spectroscope attached to a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and a nanoindentation test. Microstructural, grain boundary orientation, nanohardness analysis were conducted in the type

  1. Keyhole formation and thermal fluid flow-induced porosity during laser fusion welding in titanium alloys: Experimental and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; Perumal, Bama; Ward, R. Mark; Turner, Nathanael; Turner, Richard P.; Brooks, Jeffery W.; Basoalto, Hector C.

    2017-01-01

    High energy-density beam welding, such as electron beam or laser welding, has found a number of industrial applications for clean, high-integrity welds. The deeply penetrating nature of the joints is enabled by the formation of metal vapour which creates a narrow fusion zone known as a “keyhole”. However the formation of the keyhole and the associated keyhole dynamics, when using a moving laser heat source, requires further research as they are not fully understood. Porosity, which is one of a number of process induced phenomena related to the thermal fluid dynamics, can form during beam welding processes. The presence of porosity within a welded structure, inherited from the fusion welding operation, degrades the mechanical properties of components during service such as fatigue life. In this study, a physics-based model for keyhole welding including heat transfer, fluid flow and interfacial interactions has been used to simulate keyhole and porosity formation during laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. The modelling suggests that keyhole formation and the time taken to achieve keyhole penetration can be predicted, and it is important to consider the thermal fluid flow at the melting front as this dictates the evolution of the fusion zone. Processing induced porosity is significant when the fusion zone is only partially penetrating through the thickness of the material. The modelling results are compared with high speed camera imaging and measurements of porosity from welded samples using X-ray computed tomography, radiography and optical micrographs. These are used to provide a better understanding of the relationship between process parameters, component microstructure and weld integrity.

  2. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin; Lee, Bong Ho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary

  3. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong Ho [National Center for Nanomaterials Technology (NCNT), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheongam-ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  4. Hexavalent chromium content in stainless steel welding fumes is dependent on the welding process and shield gas type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean; Slaven, James; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Antonini, James

    2009-02-01

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a known health hazard. To isolate elements in stainless steel welding fumes with high potential for adverse health outcomes, fumes were generated using a robotic gas metal arc system, using four shield gases of varying oxygen content. The objective was to measure Cr(VI) concentrations in a broad spectrum of gas metal arc welding processes, and identify processes of exceptionally high or low Cr(VI) content. The gases used were 95% Ar/5% O(2), 98% Ar/2% O(2), 95% Ar/5%CO(2), and 75% He/25% Ar. The welder was operated in axial spray mode (Ar/O(2), Ar/CO(2)), short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO(2) low voltage and He/Ar), and pulsed axial-spray mode (98% Ar/2% O(2)). Results indicate large differences in Cr(VI) in the fumes, with Ar/O(2) (Pulsed)>Ar/O(2)>Ar/CO(2)>Ar/CO(2) (SC)>He/Ar; values were 3000+/-300, 2800+/-85, 2600+/-120, 1400+/-190, and 320+/-290 ppm respectively (means +/- standard errors for 2 runs and 3 replicates per run). Respective rates of Cr(VI) generation were 1.5, 3.2, 4.4, 1.3, and 0.46 microg/min; generation rates were also calculated in terms of microg Cr(VI) per metre of wire used. The generation rates of Cr(VI) increased with increasing O(3) concentrations. Particle size measurements indicated similar distributions, but somewhat higher >0.6 microm fractions for the short-circuit mode samples. Fumes were also sampled into 2 selected size ranges, a microspatter fraction (>or=0.6 microm) and a fine (welding type and shield gas type, and this presents an opportunity to tailor welding practices to lessen Cr(VI) exposures in workplaces by selecting low Cr(VI)-generating processes. Short-circuit processes generated less Cr(VI) than axial-spray methods, and inert gas shielding gave lower Cr(VI) content than shielding with active gases. A short circuit He/Ar shielded process and a pulsed axial spray Ar/O(2) process were both identified as having substantially lower Cr(VI) generation rates per unit of wire used relative

  5. Thermal aging effects of VVER-1000 weld metal under operation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Kuleshova, E.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Erak, D.Y.; Zabusov, O.O.; Maltsev, D.A.; Zhurko, D.A.; Papina, V.B.; Skundin, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The VVER-1000 thermal aging surveillance specimen sets are located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under real operation conditions. Thermal aging surveillance specimens data are the most reliable source of the information about changing of VVER-1000 RPV materials properties because of long-term (hundred thousand hours) exposure at operation temperature. A revision of database of VVER-1000 weld metal thermal aging surveillance specimens has been done. The reassessment of transition temperature (T t ) for all tested groups of specimens has been performed. The duration of thermal exposure and phosphorus contents have been defined more precisely. The analysis of thermal aging effects has been done. The yield strength data, study of carbides evolution show absence of hardening effects due to thermal aging under 310-320 C degrees. Measurements of phosphorus content in grain boundaries segregation in different states have been performed. The correlation between intergranular fracture mode in Charpy specimens and transition temperature shift under thermal aging at temperature 310-320 C degrees has been revealed. All these data allow developing the model of thermal aging. (authors)

  6. Effect of Mg and Cu on mechanical properties of high-strength welded joints of aluminum alloys obtained by laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annin, B. D.; Fomin, V. M.; Karpov, E. V.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Results of experimental investigations of welded joints of high-strength aluminum-lithium alloys of the Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Li systems are reported. The welded joints are obtained by means of laser welding and are subjected to various types of processing for obtaining high-strength welded joints. A microstructural analysis is performed. The phase composition and mechanical properties of the welded joints before and after heat treatment are studied. It is found that combined heat treatment of the welded joint (annealing, quenching, and artificial ageing) increases the joint strength, but appreciably decreases the alloy strength outside the region thermally affected by the welding process.

  7. Physical and Theoretical Models of Heat Pollution Applied to Cramped Conditions Welding Taking into Account the Different Types of Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulygin, Y. I.; Koronchik, D. A.; Legkonogikh, A. N.; Zharkova, M. G.; Azimova, N. N.

    2017-05-01

    The standard k-epsilon turbulence model, adapted for welding workshops, equipped with fixed workstations with sources of pollution took into account only the convective component of heat transfer, which is quite reasonable for large-volume rooms (with low density distribution of sources of pollution) especially the results of model calculations taking into account only the convective component correlated well with experimental data. For the purposes of this study, when we are dealing with a small confined space where necessary to take account of the body heated to a high temperature (for welding), located next to each other as additional sources of heat, it can no longer be neglected radiative heat exchange. In the task - to experimentally investigate the various types of heat transfer in a limited closed space for welding and behavior of a mathematical model, describing the contribution of the various components of the heat exchange, including radiation, influencing the formation of fields of concentration, temperature, air movement and thermal stress in the test environment. Conducted field experiments to model cubic body, allowing you to configure and debug the model of heat and mass transfer processes with the help of the developed approaches, comparing the measurement results of air flow velocity and temperature with the calculated data showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between process parameters, that is an indicator of the adequacy of heat and mass transfer model.

  8. Mitigation of inside surface residual stress of type 304 stainless steel pipe welds by inside water cooling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, R.

    1980-01-01

    The weld residual stress distributions, macro- and microstructures of heat affected zone and IGSCC susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel pipe welds by natural and inside water cooling methods have been investigated. The residual stresses of pipe welds by the natural cooling method are high tensile on both the inside and the outside surface. While the residual stresses on the inside surface of pipe welds by the inside water cooling method are compressive in both axial and circumferential directions for each pipe size from 2 to 24 inch diameter. The sensitized zones of welds by the inside water cooling method are closer to the fusion line, much narrower and milder than those by the natural cooling method. According to the constant extension rate test results for specimens taken from the inside surface of pipe welds, the inside water cooled welds are more resistant to IGSCC than naturally cooled ones

  9. The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics to thermally stressed welded components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1981-01-01

    Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics techniques are applied to components constructed from brittle materials and operating at low or ambient temperatures. It is argued that these techniques can justifiably be applied to components at high temperature provided that stresses are thermally induced, self-equilibrating and cyclic. Such loading conditions occur for example in an LMFBR and a simple welded detail containing a crevice is taken as an example. Theoretical and experimental estimates of crack growth in this component are compared and good agreement is shown. (author)

  10. An investigation of reheat cracking in the weld heat affected zone of type 347 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung-On, Isaratat

    2007-12-01

    Reheat cracking has been a persistent problem for welding of many alloys such as the stabilized stainless steels: Types 321 and 347 as well as Cr-Mo-V steels. Similar problem occurs in Ni-base superalloys termed "strain-age cracking". Cracking occurs during the post weld heat treatment. The HAZ is the most susceptible area due to metallurgical reactions in solid state during both heating and cooling thermal cycle. Many investigations have been conducted to understand the RHC mechanism. There is still no comprehensive mechanism to explain its underlying mechanism. In this study, there were two proposed cracking mechanisms. The first is the formation of a PFZ resulting in local weakening and strain localization. The second is the creep-like grain boundary sliding that causes microvoid formation at the grain boundaries and the triple point junctions. Cracking occurs due to the coalescence of the microvoids that form. In this study, stabilized grade stainless steel, Type 347, was selected for investigation of reheat cracking mechanism due to the simplicity of its microstructure and understanding of its metallurgical behavior. The Gleeble(TM) 3800 system was employed due to its capability for precise control of both thermal and mechanical simulation. Cylindrical samples were subjected to thermal cycles for the HAZ simulation followed by PWHT as the reheat cracking test. "Susceptibility C-curves" were plotted as a function of PWHT temperatures and time to failure at applied stress levels of 70% and 80% yield strength. These C-curves show the possible relationship of the reheat cracking susceptibility and carbide precipitation behavior. To identify the mechanism, the sample shape was modified containing two flat surfaces at the center section. These flat surfaces were electro-polished and subjected to the HAZ simulation followed by the placement of the micro-indentation arrays. Then, the reheat cracking test was performed. The cracking mechanism was identified by tracing

  11. The Influence of Flow and Type of Variation in The Welding Electrode SMAW Against Carbon Steel Mechanical Propertis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Gatot Karohika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Welding is a joining process of 2 or more metal that is widely used in industry. To obtain good welding result it is needed appropriate filler and weld parameters to avoid weld defect and wide deference of mechanic properties between welded metal and base metal.In this experiment we used different filler and current (E 6010, 7018 ? 2,5mm ? 350mm , 100 dan 130 Aand use material carbon steel AISI 1045 and SMAW welding method. Rockwell C Hardness tested in welded metal, HAZ, and base metal area.The hardness number in welded metal and HAZ is reported higher than base metal area, the hardness number of welded metal and HAZ that use current 130 is higher than that one than use current 100 A,and hardness number in base metal relatifely similar. The hardness number of welded metal that use electrode 7018 is higher than hardness number of welded metal that use electrode 6010, and hardness number of HAZ and base metal is not affected significantly by the types of electrode.

  12. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Microstructural changes in stainless steel electroslag weld-overlay cladding. > Thermal aging caused progress of spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phases in the {delta}-ferrite phase. > The degree of the spinodal decomposition had a linear relationship to the hardness. - Abstract: The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% {delta}-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 deg. C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  13. The effect of thermal treatments on the corrosion behavior of friction stir welded 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsden, J.; Pollock, G.; Mahoney, M. [Rockwell Scientific, Camino dos Rios, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The rapid thermal cycle generated during friction stir welding (FSW) produces a gradient of microstructures and precipitate distributions in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) and the thermo mechanical affected zone (TMAZ). Metallurgical transformations associated with such heating and cooling become complex under these nonequilibrium conditions, producing unstable microstructures, which cause unpredictable changes in properties relative to the parent alloy. Our work has shown that the composition changes caused by the nucleation and coarsening of precipitates during FSW produce a sensitized microstructure in 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys. This paper describes the deleterious effects on the corrosion behavior of 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys resulting from FSW and the effects of pre- and post- weld heat treatments on the corrosion properties of the welded material. (orig.)

  14. Tensile Test of Welding Joint Parts for a Plate-type Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, K. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Yim, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The tensile tests were performed using an INSTRON 4505 (universal tensile) testing machine. These welding joints are composed of two parts for the soundness of the fuel assembly; one is the side plate with a fixing bar and the other is a side plate with an end fitting. These two joint parts are fabricated by TIG welding method. The tensile tests of the welding joints of a plate-type FA are executed by a tensile test. The fixture configurations for the specimen are very important to obtain the strict test results. The maximum strength has an approximately linear correlation with the unit bonding length of the welding joints. In spite of these results, the maximum strengths of the welding joints are satisfied according to the minimum requirement. These tensile tests of the joint parts for a plate-type fuel assembly (FA) have to be executed to evaluate the structural strength. For the tensile test, the joint parts of a FA used in the test are made of aluminum alloy (Al6061-T6)

  15. Tensile Test of Welding Joint Parts for a Plate-type Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, K. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Yim, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    The tensile tests were performed using an INSTRON 4505 (universal tensile) testing machine. These welding joints are composed of two parts for the soundness of the fuel assembly; one is the side plate with a fixing bar and the other is a side plate with an end fitting. These two joint parts are fabricated by TIG welding method. The tensile tests of the welding joints of a plate-type FA are executed by a tensile test. The fixture configurations for the specimen are very important to obtain the strict test results. The maximum strength has an approximately linear correlation with the unit bonding length of the welding joints. In spite of these results, the maximum strengths of the welding joints are satisfied according to the minimum requirement. These tensile tests of the joint parts for a plate-type fuel assembly (FA) have to be executed to evaluate the structural strength. For the tensile test, the joint parts of a FA used in the test are made of aluminum alloy (Al6061-T6)

  16. Characterization of coarse bainite transformation in low carbon steel during simulated welding thermal cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Liangyun, E-mail: lanly@me.neu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Kong, Xiangwei [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qiu, Chunlin [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Coarse austenite to bainite transformation in low carbon steel under simulated welding thermal cycles was morphologically and crystallographically characterized by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and electron backscattered diffraction technology. The results showed that the main microstructure changes from a mixture of lath martensite and bainitic ferrite to granular bainite with the increase in cooling time. The width of bainitic laths also increases gradually with the cooling time. For a welding thermal cycle with relatively short cooling time (e.g. t{sub 8/5} is 30 s), the main mode of variant grouping at the scale of individual prior austenite grains changes from Bain grouping to close-packed plane grouping with the progress of phase transformation, which results in inhomogeneous distribution of high angle boundaries. As the cooling time is increased, the Bain grouping of variants becomes predominant mode, which enlarges the effective grain size of product phase. - Highlights: • Main microstructure changes and the width of lath structure increases with cooling time. • Variant grouping changes from Bain zone to close-packed plane grouping with the transformation. • The change of variant grouping results in uneven distribution of high angle grain boundary. • Bain grouping is main mode for large heat input, which lowers the density of high angle boundary.

  17. Characterization of coarse bainite transformation in low carbon steel during simulated welding thermal cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Qiu, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    Coarse austenite to bainite transformation in low carbon steel under simulated welding thermal cycles was morphologically and crystallographically characterized by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and electron backscattered diffraction technology. The results showed that the main microstructure changes from a mixture of lath martensite and bainitic ferrite to granular bainite with the increase in cooling time. The width of bainitic laths also increases gradually with the cooling time. For a welding thermal cycle with relatively short cooling time (e.g. t 8/5 is 30 s), the main mode of variant grouping at the scale of individual prior austenite grains changes from Bain grouping to close-packed plane grouping with the progress of phase transformation, which results in inhomogeneous distribution of high angle boundaries. As the cooling time is increased, the Bain grouping of variants becomes predominant mode, which enlarges the effective grain size of product phase. - Highlights: • Main microstructure changes and the width of lath structure increases with cooling time. • Variant grouping changes from Bain zone to close-packed plane grouping with the transformation. • The change of variant grouping results in uneven distribution of high angle grain boundary. • Bain grouping is main mode for large heat input, which lowers the density of high angle boundary

  18. Low temperature thermal ageing embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds and its electrochemical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, K.; Kain, Vivekanand; Raja, V.S.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Embrittlement study of austenitic stainless steel welds after ageing up to 20,000 h. ► Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in ferrite at 400 °C. ► Spinodal decomposition of ferrite at 335 and 365 °C. ► Large decrease in corrosion resistance due to G-phase precipitation. ► Good correlation between electrochemical properties and the degree of embrittlement. - Abstract: The low temperature thermal ageing embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds is investigated after ageing up to 20,000 h at 335, 365 and 400 °C. Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation after thermal ageing were identified by transmission electron microscopy. Ageing led to increase in hardness of the ferrite phase while there was no change in the hardness of austenite. The degree of embrittlement was evaluated by non-destructive methods, e.g., double-loop and single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation tests. A good correlation was obtained between the electrochemical properties and hardening of the ferrite phase of the aged materials.

  19. In situ changes in the moisture content of heated, welded tuff based on thermal neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Carlson, R.C.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1991-07-01

    Thermal neutron logs were collected to monitor changes in moisture content within a welded tuff rock mass heated from a borehole containing an electrical heater which remained energized for 195 days. Thermal neutron measurements were made in sampling boreholes before, during and after heating. The results generally corroborated our conceptual understanding of hydrothermal flow as well as most of the numerical modeling conducting for this study. Conceptual models have been developed in conjunction with the numerical model calculations to explain differences in the drying and re-wetting behavior above and below the heater. Numerical modeling indicated that the re-wetting of the dried-out zone was dominated by the binary diffusion of water vapor through fractures. Saturation gradients in the rock matrix resulted in relative humidity gradients which drove water vapor (primarily along fractures) back to the dried-out zone where it condensed along the fracture walls and was imbibed by the matrix. 4 refs., 28 figs

  20. Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A tool that would be useable in both conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding (FSW) has been proposed. The tool would embody both a prior tooling concept for self-reacting FSW and an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability developed previously as an augmentation for conventional FSW. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed tool. In conventional FSW, depicted in Figure 1, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a rotating pin that protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. The main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional FSW is augmented with an APT capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or force-control system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding (SR-FSW), there are two rotating shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft, back into the FSW machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. A tool for SRFSW embodying this concept was reported in "Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding" (MFS-31914), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 53. In its outward appearance, the proposed tool (see Figure 2) would fit the above description of an SR

  1. Infrared sensing techniques for adaptive robotic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.T.; Groom, K.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using infrared sensors to monitor the welding process. Data were gathered using an infrared camera which was trained on the molten metal pool during the welding operation. Several types of process perturbations which result in weld defects were then intentionally induced and the resulting thermal images monitored. Gas tungsten arc using ac and dc currents and gas metal arc welding processes were investigated using steel, aluminum and stainless steel plate materials. The thermal images obtained in the three materials and different welding processes revealed nearly identical patterns for the same induced process perturbation. Based upon these results, infrared thermography is a method which may be very applicable to automation of the welding process

  2. Generalized classification of welds according to defect type based on raidation testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamenko, A.A.; Demidko, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    Constructed is a generalized classification of welds according to defect type, with respect to real danger of defect, which in the first approximation is proportional to relatively decrease of the thickness, and with respect to defect potential danger which can be determined by its pointing. According to this classification the welded joints are divided into five classes according to COMECON guides. The division into classes is carried out according to two-fold numerical criterium which is applicable in case of the presence of experimental data on three defect linear sizes. The above classification is of main importance while automatic data processing of the radiation testing

  3. Improving fatigue performance of rail thermite welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezzini-Aouad, M.; Flahaut, P.; Hariri, S.; Winiar, L.

    2010-06-01

    Rail transport development offers economic and ecological interests. Nevertheless, it requires heavy investments in rolling material and infrastructure. To be competitive, this transportation means must rely on safe and reliable infrastructure, which requires optimization of all implemented techniques and structure. Rail thermite (or aluminothermic) welding is widely used within the railway industry for in-track welding during re-rail and defect replacement. The process provides numerous advantages against other welding technology commonly used. Obviously, future demands on train traffic are heavier axle loads, higher train speeds and increased traffic density. Thus, a new enhanced weld should be developed to prevent accidents due to fracture of welds and to lower maintenance costs. In order to improve such assembly process, a detailed metallurgical study coupled to a thermomechanical modelling of the phenomena involved in the thermite welding process is carried out. Obtained data enables us to develop a new improved thermite weld (type A). This joint is made by modifying the routinely specified procedure (type B) used in a railway rail by a standard gap alumino-thermic weld. Joints of type A and B are tested and compared. Based on experimental temperature measurements, a finite element analysis is used to calculate the thermal residual stresses induced. In the vicinity of the weld, the residual stress patterns depend on the thermal conditions during welding as it also shown by litterature [1, 2]. In parallel, X-Ray diffraction has been used to map the residual stress field that is generated in welded rail of types A and B. Their effect on fatigue crack growth in rail welds is studied. An experimental study based on fatigue tests of rails welded by conventional and improved processes adjudicates on the new advances and results will be shown.

  4. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical property change of dissimilar metal welds Alloy 600 - Alloy 182 - A508 Gr. 3 according to thermal aging effect at 400 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To prevent such critical matters above mentioned, investigation about degradation mechanism of materials by thermal aging should be conducted. However, there are no sufficient studies on this field. Therefore, the final goal of this study is to investigate microstructure along the DMW undergone thermal aging process. Firstly, in order to get a reference data for further comparison analysis which is expected to show degradation mechanism of the weld joint, un-heated weld joint was investigated with several instruments, Vickers hardness tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). Detail instrumental analysis in Alloy 600 - Alloy 182 - A508 Gr. 3 DMW joint were performed in order to investigate microstructure and mechanical properties of material. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. Alloy 182 has austenitic dendrite structure which is formed by heat flow during welding process. Type-II boundaries were observed at the interface between Alloy 182 and A508 Gr. 3. Chemical composition shows rapid transition at the interface which makes 3000 µm of chromium dilution zone. Microstructure of A508 Gr. 3 was investigated from the interface between Alloy 182 to base metal.

  6. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  7. Welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Schulze Frielinghaus, W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a survey, with 198 literature references, of the papers published in the fields of welding and cutting within the last three years. The subjects dealt with are: weldability of the materials - Welding methods - Thermal cutting - Shaping and calculation of welded joints - Environmental protection in welding and cutting. (orig.) [de

  8. Study on the Applicability of Electron Beam Welding Methods to Assembly a Fuel Compact and Al Cover Plate of Research Reactor Plate Type Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Yoon Sang; Lee, Don Dae; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kwon, Sun Chil; Kim, Soo Sung; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Among the research reactor plate type fuel fabrication processes, there is an assembly process between fuel meat compact and Al cover plates using a welding method prior to rolling process. The assembly process is such as the Al frame and Al cover plate should be welded properly as shown in Fig. 1. For welding, TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding methods has been used conventionally, but in this study an electron beam welding(EB welding) technique which uses the electron beam of a high velocity for joining two materials is introduced to the assembly. The work pieces are melted as the kinetic energy of the electron beam is transformed into heat to join the two parts of the weld. The welding is often done in the conditions in a vacuum to prevent dispersion of the electron beam. The electron beam welding process has many ad-vantages such as contamination of the welds could be prevented, the penetration of the weld is deep, and also the strain of the welding area is less than other methods. In this study, to find optimal condition of the EB welding process, a welding speed, a beam current and an acceleration voltage were changed. To analyzing the welding results, the shape of the beads and defects of welding area was used. The width and depth of the beads were measured as well

  9. Study on the Applicability of Electron Beam Welding Methods to Assembly a Fuel Compact and Al Cover Plate of Research Reactor Plate Type Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Yoon Sang; Lee, Don Dae; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kwon, Sun Chil; Kim, Soo Sung; Park, Jong Man

    2012-01-01

    Among the research reactor plate type fuel fabrication processes, there is an assembly process between fuel meat compact and Al cover plates using a welding method prior to rolling process. The assembly process is such as the Al frame and Al cover plate should be welded properly as shown in Fig. 1. For welding, TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding methods has been used conventionally, but in this study an electron beam welding(EB welding) technique which uses the electron beam of a high velocity for joining two materials is introduced to the assembly. The work pieces are melted as the kinetic energy of the electron beam is transformed into heat to join the two parts of the weld. The welding is often done in the conditions in a vacuum to prevent dispersion of the electron beam. The electron beam welding process has many ad-vantages such as contamination of the welds could be prevented, the penetration of the weld is deep, and also the strain of the welding area is less than other methods. In this study, to find optimal condition of the EB welding process, a welding speed, a beam current and an acceleration voltage were changed. To analyzing the welding results, the shape of the beads and defects of welding area was used. The width and depth of the beads were measured as well

  10. Correlation between corrosion resistance properties and thermal cycles experienced by gas tungsten arc welding and laser beam welding Alloy 690 butt weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H T; Wu, J L

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the thermal cycles experienced by Alloy 690 weldments fabricated using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser beam welding (LBW) processes, and their corresponding corrosion resistance properties. The corrosion resistance of the weldments is evaluated using a U-bend stress corrosion test in which the specimens are immersed in a boiling, acid solution for 240 h. The experimental results reveal that the LBW inputs significantly less heat to the weldment than the GTAW, and therefore yields a far faster cooling rate. Moreover, the corrosion tests show that in the GTAW specimen, intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurs in both the fusion zone (FZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ). By contrast, the LBW specimen shows no obvious signs of IGC.

  11. Structural changes in complex steels with 12 % Cr during welding thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanova, N.V.; Kurnosova, N.D.

    1981-01-01

    The structural changes in the heat affected zones of welded steam tubes of the 12Kh11V2MF and 18Kh12VMBFR steels, are investigated. A short-time heating of thin samples up to 1300-900 deg C with the aim of imitating the thermal welding cycle permits to determine temperatures of specific region formation in heat affeced zones of 12% Cr steels. The difference in the amounts and structure of σ-ferrite and γ-phase in these regions is established. A ''tongue'' nature of γ-phase grain growth is found in the temperature range of 1150-1100 deg C, while at 1300-1250 deg C σ-ferrite growth with the formation of saw-shape boundaries is observed. It is shown that tensile properties of imitated heat affected zone of 12Kh12VMBFP steel increase with heating temperature with the insignificant plasticity decrease. Impact strength on longitudinal samples decreases but remains higher than that determined by specifications [ru

  12. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  13. Welding problems in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The problems of welding industry in nuclear power plant engineering, mainly related to the improvement of molten bath protection, are considered. Development of new materials for welding electrodes, for cladding and welding fluxes, is pointed out. Production of the following equipment is brought to a commercial level: welding heads and welding machines for branch pipe welding, anticorrosion cladding, zonal thermal treatment, electron beam welding facilities for the welding and maintenance of turbineblades, equipment for nondestructive testing of welded joints

  14. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  15. Prediction of grain size and mechanical properties in friction stir welded pure copper joints using a thermal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Esmaily, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a thermal model was developed and applied to simulate the friction stir welding of pure copper plates with the thickness of 2 mm. The different traverse speeds of 100, 200, 300, and 400 mm min−1 and rotational speeds of 400, 700, 900 rev min−1 were considered as welding parameters....... Microstructural characterization, hardness measurement, tensile test, and fractography were conducted experimentally. The comparison between the numerical and experimental results showed that the developed model was practically accurate. In addition, the results confirmed that the peak temperature...

  16. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Ti-6Al-4V Friction Stir Welds Using Numerical-Analytical Basis Functions with Pseudo-Advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2018-04-01

    Inverse thermal analysis of Ti-6Al-4V friction stir welds is presented that demonstrates application of a methodology using numerical-analytical basis functions and temperature-field constraint conditions. This analysis provides parametric representation of friction-stir-weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to computational procedures for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. These parameterized temperature histories can be used for inverse thermal analysis of friction stir welds having process conditions similar those considered here. Case studies are presented for inverse thermal analysis of friction stir welds that use three-dimensional constraint conditions on calculated temperature fields, which are associated with experimentally measured transformation boundaries and weld-stir-zone cross sections.

  17. Automatic welding of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, J.

    1958-01-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [fr

  18. Ultrasonic Low-Friction Containment Plate for Thermal and Ultrasonic Stir Weld Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Karl; Short, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The thermal stir welding (TSW) process is finding applications in fabrication of space vehicles. In this process, workpieces to be joined by TSW are drawn, by heavy forces, between "containment plates," past the TSW tool that then causes joining of the separate plates. It is believed that the TSW process would be significantly improved by reducing the draw force, and that this could be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the workpieces and containment plates. Based on use of high-power ultrasonics in metal forming processes, where friction reduction in drawing dies has been achieved, it is believed that ultrasonic vibrations of the containment plates could achieve similar friction reduction in the TSW process. By applying ultrasonic vibrations to the containment plates in a longitudinal vibration mode, as well as by mounting and holding the containment plates in a specific manner such as to permit the plates to acoustically float, friction between the metal parts and the containment plates is greatly reduced, and so is the drawing force. The concept was to bring in the ultrasonics from the sides of the plates, permitting the ultrasonic hardware to be placed to the side, away from the equipment that contains the thermal stir tooling and that applies clamping forces to the plates. Tests demonstrated that one of the major objectives of applying ultrasonics to the thermal stir system, that of reducing draw force friction, should be achievable on a scaled-up system.

  19. Thermal and microstructural modelling in weld heat-affected zones. Part I: thermal cycles; Modelizacion termica y microestructural de la zona afectada por el calor en la soldadura. Parte I: ciclos termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribera, J.M.; Prado, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    After a review about theoretical concepts involved in heat transfer, the ``double ellipsoid`` model is proposed which will be useful to simulate the welding heat input accurately. The different steps to perform an analysis using the Finite Elements Method (FEM) are described in order to compute the transient temperature field for any point of interest, and the transfer equations are solved numerically for several welding situations. The thermal cycles are obtained and so it will be possible to understand the metallurgical behavior that takes place in weld heat affected zones. In addition the effects of different welding parameters on the shape of the computed thermal cycles are shown. (Author) 5 refs.

  20. The grain boundary segregation of phosphorus in thermally aged and irradiated C-Mn submerged-are weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    The segregation of free phosphorus atoms to grain boundaries in C-Mn steels has been identified as an embrittlement mechanism. A change in the brittle fracture mechanism from transgranular to intergranular has been observed for materials with higher phosphorus grain boundary coverage. The grain boundary segregation of phosphorus in various steels used in the nuclear power industry has been thermodynamically and kinetically modelled mostly with the Langmuir-McLean model. Recent publications have also suggested that neutron irradiation can affect segregation and various attempts at modelling this are currently under way. The present paper describes a data base assembled on phosphorus grain boundary coverage measured by Auger electron spectroscopy on thermally aged and irradiated C-Mn submerged-arc weld specimens. Software tools were developed to evaluate the changes in phosphorus grain boundary coverage associated with instantaneous temperature changes and temperature gradients. The phosphorus free energy change associated with grain boundary segregation was modelled from the thermally aged data and used with the software to determine the phosphorus segregation in submerged-arc weld metals following the post weld stress relief heat treatments received prior to plant operation. The phosphorus grain boundary coverage changes arising from the thermal history of submerged-arc weld materials during irradiation were also modelled and found to compare well with data obtained on irradiated materials. It was concluded that under the irradiation conditions sampled, phosphorus grain boundary segregation in submerged-arc weld materials can be modelled successfully using only the thermal term without appealing to an irradiation induced segregation process. (author)

  1. Thermal stress measurement in continuous welded rails using the hole-drilling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuan; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood

    2016-04-01

    The absence of expansion joints in Continuous Welded Rail (CWR) has created the need for the railroad industry to determine the in-situ level of thermal stresses so as to prevent train accidents caused by rail buckling in hot weather and by rail breakage in cold weather. The development of non-destructive or semi-destructive methods for determining the level of thermal stresses in rails is today a high research priority. This study explores the known hole-drilling method as a possible solution to this problem. A new set of calibration coefficients to compute the relieved stress field with the finer hole depth increments was determined by a 3D Finite Element Analysis that modeled the entire hole geometry, including the mechanics of the hole bottom and walls. To compensate the residual stress components, a linear relationship was experimentally established between the longitudinal and the vertical residual stresses of two common sizes of rails, the 136RE and the 141RE, with statistical significance. This result was then utilized to isolate the longitudinal thermal stress component in hole-drilling tests conducted on the 136RE and 141RE thermally-loaded rails at the Large-scale CWR Test-bed of UCSD's Powell Research Laboratories. The results from the Test-bed showed that the hole-drilling procedure, with the appropriate residual stress compensation, can indeed estimate the in-situ thermal stresses to achieve a +/-5°F accuracy of Neutral Temperature determination with a 90% statistical confidence, which is the desired industry gold standard.

  2. Use of fusion-welding techniques in fabrication of a superconducting-magnet thermal-shield system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Berkey, J.H.; Chang, Y.; Johnson, G.L.; Lathrop, G.H.; Podesta, D.L.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Success of the thermal shield system was demonstrated by the results of acceptance tests performed with the magnet and all its ancillary equipment. During these tests the thermal shield system was: (1) thermally cycled several times from 300 0 K to 77 0 K; (2) pressure cycled several times from 0 to 5 atmospheres; (3) operated for more than 500 hours at 77 0 K and in a vacuum environment of less than 10 - 5 torr; (4) operated in a magnetic field up to 6.0 Telsa; (5) exposed to a rapidly collapsing magnetic field of more than 250 gauss per second; (6) drained of all LN 2 in a few minutes, without any weld failures. The successful (and relatively problem free) operation of the magnet system validates the choice of the welding processes used, as well as their execution in both shop and field environments

  3. Numerical Modelling Of Thermal And Structural Phenomena In Yb:YAG Laser Butt-Welded Steel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubiak M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The numerical model of thermal and structural phenomena is developed for the analysis of Yb:YAG laser welding process with the motion of the liquid material in the welding pool taken into account. Temperature field and melted material velocity field in the fusion zone are obtained from the numerical solution of continuum mechanics equations using Chorin projection method and finite volume method. Phase transformations in solid state are analyzed during heating and cooling using classical models of the kinetics of phase transformations as well as CTA and CCT diagrams for welded steel. The interpolated heat source model is developed in order to reliably reflect the real distribution of Yb:YAG laser power obtained by experimental research on the laser beam profile.

  4. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical property of thermally aged stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X.Y. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Zhu, P. [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., 1788 Xihuan Road, 215004 Suzhou (China); Ding, X.F. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Lu, Y.H., E-mail: lu_yonghao@mater.ustb.edu.cn [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Shoji, T. [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aoba AramakiAobaku, 980-8579 Sendai (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical property change of E308L stainless steel weld overlay cladding aged at 400 °C for 400, 1000 and 5000 h were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and small punch test (SPT). The results indicated that thermal aging had no obvious effect on the volume fraction of ferrite, but can cause microstructural evolution by spinodal decomposotion and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite phase. Spinodal decomposition took place after aging up to 1000 h, while G-phase formed along dislocations, and growed up to 2–11 nm after aging for 5000 h. The total energy for inducing deformation and fracture by the small punch tests decreased with the increase of thermal aging time, and this decline was associated with spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation. Plastic deformation of the aged ferrite proceeded via formation of curvilinear slip bands. Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands. The hardening of the ferrite and high stress concentration on δ/γ phase interface resulted in brittle fracture and phase boundary separation after thermal aging. - Highlights: •Spinodal decomposition took place after long-term therml aging at 400 °C. •Dislocations were the preferable sites for G-phase formation aged at 400 °C for 5000 h. •Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation induced reduction of small punch energy. •Thermal aging led to brittle fracture and phase boundary separation. •Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands in the aged ferrite phase.

  5. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical property of thermally aged stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, X.Y.; Zhu, P.; Ding, X.F.; Lu, Y.H.; Shoji, T.

    2017-01-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical property change of E308L stainless steel weld overlay cladding aged at 400 °C for 400, 1000 and 5000 h were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and small punch test (SPT). The results indicated that thermal aging had no obvious effect on the volume fraction of ferrite, but can cause microstructural evolution by spinodal decomposotion and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite phase. Spinodal decomposition took place after aging up to 1000 h, while G-phase formed along dislocations, and growed up to 2–11 nm after aging for 5000 h. The total energy for inducing deformation and fracture by the small punch tests decreased with the increase of thermal aging time, and this decline was associated with spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation. Plastic deformation of the aged ferrite proceeded via formation of curvilinear slip bands. Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands. The hardening of the ferrite and high stress concentration on δ/γ phase interface resulted in brittle fracture and phase boundary separation after thermal aging. - Highlights: •Spinodal decomposition took place after long-term therml aging at 400 °C. •Dislocations were the preferable sites for G-phase formation aged at 400 °C for 5000 h. •Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation induced reduction of small punch energy. •Thermal aging led to brittle fracture and phase boundary separation. •Nucleation of microcracks occurred at the δ/γ interface along the slip bands in the aged ferrite phase.

  6. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  7. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the {delta}-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 Degree-Sign C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the {delta}-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the {gamma}-austenite and {delta}-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  8. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F.; Brziak, P.; Lomozik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  9. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  10. Electron-beam-welded segmental heat pipes of AlMgSi 1 for the thermal model of the satellite Aeros-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoell, H.; Lasar, H.

    1974-07-01

    For the purposes of tests with the thermal model of the German aeronomy satellite Aeros-A, a heat pipe system of optimized weight was developed in order to transport thermal energy from the solar cells of the cylindrical satellite to the conical bottom. Because of stringent requirements on the fabrication process, electron beam welding is used for bonding. The welding process is described and preliminary test results are given. (LEW)

  11. Thermomechanical Modelling of Direct-Drive Friction Welding Applying a Thermal Pseudo Mechanical Model for the Generation of Heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2018-01-01

    In the present work a 2D a xisymmetric thermomechanical model of the direct-drive friction welding process is developed, taking the temperature dependent shear yield stress into account in the description of the heat generation, utilizing a recent thermal pseudo mechanical model originally...... developed for the friction stir welding (FSW) process. The model is implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit via a subroutine. The application in this case is joining of austenitic stainless steel rods with an outer diameter of 112 mm, used for manufacturing of exhaust gas valves for large two stroke marine engines....... The material properties in terms of the temperature dependent flowstress curves used both in the thermal and the mechanical constitutive description are extracted from compression tests performed between 20 °C and 1200 °C on a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. Comparison between measured and simulated...

  12. Propagation of internal stresses in composite materials during heating and cooling according to thermal cycles of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gukasyan, L.E.; Belov, V.V.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations of free thermal expansion of a composite material, of fibre and matrix during welding thermal cycle make it possible to estimate mean internal strain and stress in the composite components, as well as the residual internal stress and strain present in the composite material after manufacturing. The samples investigated consisted of nickel-chromium EhI445 alloy, reinforced by tungsten-rhenium alloy fibres. As the composite material was cooled and heated in course of welding, the stress and strain changed their sign twice, the first time upon heating, the second time upon cooling. After complete cooling of the composite material residual stresses in the fibre stay at the proportionality level, while those in the matrix are lower. Experimental evidence of internal stress and strain appearing in the composite material during heating are fairly consistent with calculations in the elastic region, if account is taken of the temperature of internal residual stress relaxation upon heating

  13. Welding thermal cycle-triggered precipitation processes in steel S700MC subjected to the thermo-mechanical control processing

    OpenAIRE

    Górka J.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents tests concerned with welding thermal process-induced precipitation processes taking place in 10 mm thick steel S700MC subjected to the Thermo-Mechanical Control Process (TMCP) with accelerated cooling. The thermomechanical processing of steel S700MC leads to its refinement, structural defects and solutioning with hardening constituents. Tests of thin foils performed using a transmission electron microscope revealed that the hardening of steel S700MC was primarily caused by...

  14. Effect of inclusion content on the creep rupture properties of type 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senior, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been known for some time that austenitic weldments exhibit low and variable creep rupture properties, but many of the factors controlling these properties are not well understood. In this investigation, two welds (Type 316) with similar compositions and fabricated using the same welding parameters, but with different electrode coatings, have been examined after creep testing. The results indicate that the inclusion and silicon content of type 316 welds can strongly influence their creep rupture properties, a high inclusion density being associated with poor creep rupture properties, and a low silicon content with a higher creep rate. This has been explained with reference to the micromechanism of creep failure operating in these welds. (author)

  15. Simulation Study on Multipassed Welding Distortion of Combined Joint Types using Thermo-Elastic-Plastic FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RN Lidam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the angular distortion induced by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW process on the combined butt and T-joint with a thickness of 9 mm. The material used in this study was low manganese carbon steel S355J2G3. A 2-D and 3-D thermo-elastic-plastic finite element (FE analysis has been developed to simulate the induced distortion of multipassed welding. In this research, SYSWELD 2010 with its computation management tool, known as multipassed welding advisor (MPA, was applied to analyze the distortion behavior of combined joint types. To model the heat source of GMAW, Goldak's double ellipsoid representation, which is available within this finite element analysis (FEA code was selected. Prior to the results discussion, this paper also shows the step-bystep procedures to simulate combined jointing which begins with metallurgical and customized heat source modeling, and is followed by creating geometrical mesh using Visual-Mesh 6.5 for analyzing and processing the results. Apart from 2-D and 3-D comparison analysis, the final objective of this research is also aimed to be a baseline study to provide preliminary information in preparing the tools and equipment for experimental investigation.

  16. An analysis of the creep/fatigue behaviour of type 316 weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.; Wynn, J.

    The document presents creep/fatigue results obtained at UKAEA Risley Nuclear Labs. on type 316 weld metal and the associated stress rupture data and analyses them in the same way as that currently favoured for wrought material. The continuous cycling fatigue results are shown; the lower temperature is seen to give a higher endurance. The creep/fatigue results indicate that lower endurances are obtained at 625 deg. C and that with increasing hold time there is a tendency for the endurance to be lowered. The weld metal creep/fatigue endurances are compared with published UK data on wrought material for strain ranges of up to 3%. Under the conditions examined, it can be seen that the weld metal endurance is towards the top of the scatter band, the results at 550 deg. C forming the upper bound. The stress rupture data note that the ductility is reasonable at short times but fall to relatively low values at long times (10,000h)

  17. Type IIIa cracking at 2CrMo welds in 1/2CrMoV pipework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, S.J.; Smith, P.A. [National Power plc, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    The most common form of in-service defect found today on the welds of National Power`s 1/2CrMoV pipework systems is Type IV cracking which occurs in intercritically transformed material at the edge of the heat affected zone. However an alternate form of cracking, termed IIIa, which occurs close to the weld fusion line in fully grain refined heat affected zones, has also been observed. The incidence of Type IIIa cracking has increased in recent years and these defects now constitute a significant part of the total recorded crack population. This presentation describes Type IIIa cracking and compares and contrasts it with the better documented Type IV cracking. Particular reference is made to the role of carbon diffusion at the weld fusion line in promoting Type IIIa damage in preference to Type IV. (orig.) 5 refs.

  18. Type IIIa cracking at 2CrMo welds in 1/2CrMoV pipework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, S J; Smith, P A [National Power plc, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-31

    The most common form of in-service defect found today on the welds of National Power`s 1/2CrMoV pipework systems is Type IV cracking which occurs in intercritically transformed material at the edge of the heat affected zone. However an alternate form of cracking, termed IIIa, which occurs close to the weld fusion line in fully grain refined heat affected zones, has also been observed. The incidence of Type IIIa cracking has increased in recent years and these defects now constitute a significant part of the total recorded crack population. This presentation describes Type IIIa cracking and compares and contrasts it with the better documented Type IV cracking. Particular reference is made to the role of carbon diffusion at the weld fusion line in promoting Type IIIa damage in preference to Type IV. (orig.) 5 refs.

  19. Special features of embrittlement of welded joints in shells of VVER-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasatkin, O.G.

    1999-01-01

    At present, the atomic power engineering of Russia and Ukraine is based on water-water energy reactors of the VVER-440 and VVER-1000 type, with the electric power of 440 and 1000 MW, respectively. The majority of the VVER-440 reactors are installed in Russia, and VVER-1000 reactors operate in Ukraine. The reactors' shell (RS) is produced from cylindrical shells and a dished end welded together by circular joints under a flux. The RS of the VVER-440 reactor is produced from 15Kh3MFA steel, and the VVER-1000 reactors are produced from 15Kh2NMFA steel. The shell of the VVER-1000 reactor has an internal austenite coating. The condition of the RS metal is determined mainly by the critical brittleness temperature T b at which the impact toughness of specimens with a sharp notch reaches 60 J/cm 2 . The energy reactors, working in western countries, are characterised by a service life of 40 years and discussion is being carried out to extend this lifetime to 60 years. The design service life of the domestic reactors varies from 30 (RS VVER-440) to 40 (RS VVER-1000) years. According to investigations, the service life of the shells of these reactors is restricted by the properties of welded joints which are characterised by higher susceptibility to embrittlement than that of the parent metal, especially due to a higher content in the weld of phosphorus (RS VVER-440) or nickel (RS VVER-1000). Therefore, some experts believe that the actual service life of the RS is shorter than the design life. The accurate evaluation of the service life of welded joints in the RS is very important for the safety of service and also in the economic aspects, because the unjustified decrease of the permissible service life and premature shutdown of units of the nuclear power station result in huge losses

  20. Parameters of Models of Structural Transformations in Alloy Steel Under Welding Thermal Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, A. S.; Makarov, E. L.; Kurkin, A. B.; Rubtsov, D. E.; Rubtsov, M. E.

    2017-05-01

    A mathematical model of structural transformations in an alloy steel under the thermal cycle of multipass welding is suggested for computer implementation. The minimum necessary set of parameters for describing the transformations under heating and cooling is determined. Ferritic-pearlitic, bainitic and martensitic transformations under cooling of a steel are considered. A method for deriving the necessary temperature and time parameters of the model from the chemical composition of the steel is described. Published data are used to derive regression models of the temperature ranges and parameters of transformation kinetics in alloy steels. It is shown that the disadvantages of the active visual methods of analysis of the final phase composition of steels are responsible for inaccuracy and mismatch of published data. The hardness of a specimen, which correlates with some other mechanical properties of the material, is chosen as the most objective and reproducible criterion of the final phase composition. The models developed are checked by a comparative analysis of computational results and experimental data on the hardness of 140 alloy steels after cooling at various rates.

  1. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% δ-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M 23C 6 type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  2. Tensile properties of four types of austenitic stainless steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balladon, P.

    1990-01-01

    In the field of an LMFBR research programme on austenitic stainless steel welds in a Shared Cost Action Safety, Research Area 8, coordinated by JRC-Ispra, four cooperating laboratories (ECN, IKE/MPA, the Welding Institute and UNIREC) have been involved in the fabrication and extensive characterization of welded joints made from one plate of ICL 167 stainless steel. The materials included parent metal, four vacuum electron beam welds, one non vacuum electron beam weld, one submerged arc weld, one gas metal arc weld and one manual metal arc weld. This report summarizes the 106 tensile tests performed at room temperature and 550 0 C, including the influence of strain rate, specimen orientation and welding procedure. Main results are that electron beam welds have tensile properties close to those of parent metal with higher values of yield strength in longitudinal orientation and lower values of total elongation in transverse orientation but with a similar reduction of area, that filler metal welds own the highest values of yield strength and lowest values of ductility. Most of the welds properties are higher than the minimum specified for parent metal, except for some values of total elongation, mainly in transverse orientation. In view of using electron beam welding for production of components used in LMFBR, results obtained show that tensile properties of electron beam welds compare well to those of classical welds. (author)

  3. Corrosion resistance of «tube – tubesheet» weld joint obtained by friction welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIZVANOV Rif Garifovich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are widely applied for implementation of various processes at ventures of fuel and energy complex. Cost of production and reliability of heat exchangers of this type is to a wide extent determined by corresponding characteristics of tube bundle, «tube – tubesheet» is its typical joint in particular when welding operations are used in order to attach tubes to tubesheet in addition to expansion. When manufacturing such equipment of heat-resistant chrome-bearing or chromium-molybdenum steels including steel 15H5M, the process of fixed joint manufacturing gets significantly more complicated and costly due to the necessity to use thermal treatment before, during and after welding (this problem is particularly applicable for manufacturing of large-size equipment. One of the options to exclude thermal treatment from manufacturing process is to use «non-arc» welding methods – laser welding, explosion welding as well as friction welding. Use of each of the welding methods mentioned above during production of heat-exchange equipment has its process challenges and peculiarities. This article gives a comparative analysis of weld structure and distribution of electrode potentials of welded joints and parent metal of the joints simulating welding of tube to tubesheet of steel 15H5M using the following welding methods: shielded manual arc welding, tungsten-arc inert-gas welding and friction welding. Comparative analysis of macro- and microstructures of specific zones of the studied welded joints showed that the joints produced by arc welding methods do not exhibit evident inhomogeneity of the structure after application of thermal treatment which is explained by the correctness of thermal treatment. Joints obtained via friction welding are characterized by structural inhomogeneity of the welded joint zone metal microstructure. The ultra-fine-grained structure obtained as a result of friction welding makes it possible to

  4. Low temperature fatigue crack propagation in neutron irradiated Type 316 steel and weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.; Walls, J.D.; Gravenor, J.

    1981-02-01

    The fast cycling fatigue crack propagation characteristics of Type 316 steel and weld metal have been investigated at 380 0 C after irradiation to 1.72-1.92x10 20 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) and 2.03x10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) at the same temperature. With mill-annealed Type 316 steel, modest decreases in the rates of crack propagation were observed for both dose levels considered, whereas for cold-worked Type 316 steel irradiation to 2.03x10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) caused increases in the rate of crack propagation. For Type 316 weld metal, increases in the rate of crack propagation were observed for both dose levels considered. The diverse influences of irradiation upon fatigue crack propagation in these materials are explained by considering a simple continuum mechanics model of crack propagation together with the results of control tensile experiments made on similarly irradiated materials. (author)

  5. TRANSIENT FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION OF AA2219 WELD JOINT USING GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman Arunkumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we focus on finite element simulation of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW of AA2219 aluminum alloy and the behavioral of the microstructure before and after weld. The simulations were performed using commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software. The thermal history of the weld region was studied by initially developed mathematical model. A sweep type meshing was used and transient analysis was performed for one welding cycle. The highest temperature noted was 3568 °C during welding. The welding operation was performed on 200×100×25 mm plates. Through metallurgical characterization, it was observed that a fair copper rich cellular (CRC network existed in the weld region. A small amount of intermetallic compounds like Al2Cu is observed through the XRD pattern.

  6. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Laser Welded Si-Al TRIP-Type Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with issues related to laser welding of Si-Al type TRIP steels with Nb and Ti microadditions. The tests of laser welding of thermomechanically rolled sheet sections were carried out using keyhole welding and a solid-state laser. The tests carried out for various values of heat input were followed by macro- and microscopic metallographic investigations as well as by microhardness measurements of welded areas. A detailed microstructural analysis was carried out in the penetration area and in various areas of the heat affected zone (HAZ. Special attention was paid to the influence of cooling conditions on the stabilisation of retained austenite, the most characteristic structural component of TRIP steels. The tests made it possible to determine the maximum value of heat input preventing the excessive grain growth in HAZ and to identify the areas of the greatest hardness reaching 520 HV0.1.

  7. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  8. Initial Parameter Estimation for Inverse Thermal Analysis of Ti-6Al-4V Deep Penetration Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-16

    theory, for the case of deep-penetration welding, is simulation of the coupling of keyhole formation, melting, fluid flow in the weld melt pool and...isothermal boundaires, e.g., TTB and TM. A specific procedure for interpolation, however, has not been considered. For the present study, the close ...Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2nd ed, 374, 1959. 19. R. Rai, J.W. Elmer, T.A. Palmer, T. DebRoy, Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow During Keyhole Mode Laser Welding

  9. Investigation on dissimilar underwater friction stir lap welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy to pure copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jingqing; Shen, Yifu; Yao, Xin; Xu, Haisheng; Li, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 6061-T6 Al and pure Cu were successfully underwater friction stir lap welded. • The underwater weld was analyzed via comparing with the classical weld. • The oxidation of Cu was prevented via the external water. • The amount of Al–Cu intermetallic was decreased by the external water. • The thickness of Al–Cu diffusion interlayer was decreased by the external water. - Abstract: Friction stir welding (classical FSW) is considered to offer advantages over the traditional fusion welding techniques in terms of dissimilar welding. However, some challenges still exist in the dissimilar friction stir lap welding of the aluminum/copper (Al/Cu) metallic couple, among which the formation of the Al–Cu intermetallic compounds is the major problem. In the present research, due to the fact that the formation and growth of the intermetallic are significantly controlled by the thermal history, the underwater friction stir welding (underwater FSW) was employed for fabricating the weld, and the weld obtained by underwater FSW (underwater weld) was analyzed via comparing with the weld obtained under same parameters by classical FSW (classical weld). In order to investigate the effect of the external water on the thermal history, the K-type thermocouple was utilized to measure the weld temperature, and it is found that the water could decrease the peak temperature and shorten the thermal cycle time. The XRD results illustrate that the interface of the welds mainly consist of the Al–Cu intermetallic compounds such as CuAl 2 and Cu 9 Al 4 together with some amounts of Al and Cu, and it is also found that the amount of the intermetallic in the underwater weld is obvious less than in the classical weld. The SEM images and the EDS line scan results also illustrate that the Al–Cu diffusion interlayer at the Al–Cu interface of the underwater weld was obviously thinner than that of the classical weld

  10. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on the Corrosion Behavior of AISI Type 304L SS Weld Metal in Simulated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Girija; Nandakumar, T.; Viswanath, A.

    2018-05-01

    The manuscript presents the investigations carried out on the effect of low-temperature sensitization (LTS) of 304L SS weld metal on its corrosion behavior in simulated groundwater, for its application as a canister material for long-term storage of nuclear vitrified high-level waste in geological repositories. AISI type 304L SS weld pad was fabricated by multipass gas tungsten arc welding process using 308L SS filler wire. The as-welded specimens were subsequently subjected to carbide nucleation and further to LTS at 500 °C for 11 days to simulate a temperature of 300 °C for 100-year life of the canister in geological repositories. Delta ferrite ( δ-ferrite) content of the 304L SS weld metal substantially decreased on carbide nucleation treatment and further only a marginal decrease occurred on LTS treatment. The microstructure of the as-welded consisted of δ-ferrite as a minor phase distributed in austenite matrix. The δ-ferrite appeared fragmented in the carbide-nucleated and LTS-treated weld metal. The degree of sensitization measured by double-loop electrochemical potentokinetic reactivation method indicated an increase in carbide nucleation treatment when compared to the as-welded specimens, and further increase occurred on LTS treatment. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization investigations in simulated groundwater indicated a substantial decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the carbide-nucleated and LTS 304L SS weld metals, when compared to the as-welded specimens. Post-experimental micrographs indicated pitting as the primary mode of attack in the as-welded, while pitting and intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurred in the carbide-nucleated weld metal. LTS-treated weld metal predominantly underwent IGC attack. The decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the weld metal after LTS treatment was found to have a direct correlation with the degree of sensitization and the weld microstructure. The results are detailed in the manuscript.

  11. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on the Corrosion Behavior of AISI Type 304L SS Weld Metal in Simulated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Girija; Nandakumar, T.; Viswanath, A.

    2018-04-01

    The manuscript presents the investigations carried out on the effect of low-temperature sensitization (LTS) of 304L SS weld metal on its corrosion behavior in simulated groundwater, for its application as a canister material for long-term storage of nuclear vitrified high-level waste in geological repositories. AISI type 304L SS weld pad was fabricated by multipass gas tungsten arc welding process using 308L SS filler wire. The as-welded specimens were subsequently subjected to carbide nucleation and further to LTS at 500 °C for 11 days to simulate a temperature of 300 °C for 100-year life of the canister in geological repositories. Delta ferrite (δ-ferrite) content of the 304L SS weld metal substantially decreased on carbide nucleation treatment and further only a marginal decrease occurred on LTS treatment. The microstructure of the as-welded consisted of δ-ferrite as a minor phase distributed in austenite matrix. The δ-ferrite appeared fragmented in the carbide-nucleated and LTS-treated weld metal. The degree of sensitization measured by double-loop electrochemical potentokinetic reactivation method indicated an increase in carbide nucleation treatment when compared to the as-welded specimens, and further increase occurred on LTS treatment. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization investigations in simulated groundwater indicated a substantial decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the carbide-nucleated and LTS 304L SS weld metals, when compared to the as-welded specimens. Post-experimental micrographs indicated pitting as the primary mode of attack in the as-welded, while pitting and intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurred in the carbide-nucleated weld metal. LTS-treated weld metal predominantly underwent IGC attack. The decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the weld metal after LTS treatment was found to have a direct correlation with the degree of sensitization and the weld microstructure. The results are detailed in the manuscript.

  12. The prediction of creep damage in Type 347 weld metal: part II creep fatigue tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spindler, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Calculations of creep damage under conditions of strain control are often carried out using either a time fraction approach or a ductility exhaustion approach. In part I of this paper the rupture strength and creep ductility data for a Type 347 weld metal were fitted to provide the material properties that are used to calculate creep damage. Part II of this paper examines whether the time fraction approach or the ductility exhaustion approach gives the better predictions of creep damage in creep-fatigue tests on the same Type 347 weld metal. In addition, a new creep damage model, which was developed by removing some of the simplifying assumptions that are made in the ductility exhaustion approach, was used. This new creep damage model is a function of the strain rate, stress and temperature and was derived from creep and constant strain rate test data using a reverse modelling technique (see part I of this paper). It is shown that the new creep damage model gives better predictions of creep damage in the creep-fatigue tests than the time fraction and the ductility exhaustion approaches

  13. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Behrouz [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keivani, Rasoul [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  14. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud; Bagheri, Behrouz; Keivani, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  15. Low-cycle fatigue and cyclic deformation behavior of Type 16-8-2 weld metal at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raske, D.T.

    1977-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue behavior of Type 16-8-2 stainless steel ASA weld metal at 593 0 C was investigated, and the results are compared with existing data for Type 316 stainless steel base metal. Tests were conducted under axial strain control and at a constant axial strain rate of 4 x 10 -3 s -1 for continuous cyclic loadings as well as hold times at peak tensile strain. Uniform-gauge specimens were machined longitudinally from the surface and root areas of 25.4-mm-thick welded plate and tested in the as-welded condition. Results indicate that the low-cycle fatigue resistance of this weld metal is somewhat better than that of the base metal for continuous-cycling conditions and significantly better for tension hold-time tests. This is attributed to the fine duplex delta ferrite-austenite microstructure in the weld metal. The initial monotonic tensile properties and the cyclic stress-strain behavior of this material were also determined. Because the cyclic changes in mechanical properties are strain-history dependent, a unique cyclic stress-strain curve does not exist for this material

  16. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288 degrees C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3 degrees C). The combined effect of aging and neutron irradiation at 288 degrees C to a fluence of 5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (> 1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29 degrees C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to -125 degrees C) but no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J Ic ) much more than did thermal aging alone. Irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. Other results from tensile, CVN, and fracture toughness specimens showed that the effects of thermal aging at 288 or 343 degrees C for 20,000 h each were very small and similar to those at 288 degrees C for 1605 h. The effects of long-term thermal exposure time (50,000 h and greater) at 288 degrees C will be investigated as the specimens become available in 1996 and beyond

  17. Effect of the weld thermal cycles by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA) on the mechanical properties of the AA6061-T6 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriz, R. A.; Barrera, G.; Garcia, R.; Lopez, V. H.

    2009-01-01

    Results of temperature measurements during welding of 12.7 mm thick AA6061-T6 alloy plates by modified indirect electric arc (MIEA) are presented. This study describes the thermal cycles of the heat affected zone (HAZ) and also in the fusion zone. Depending upon the position of the transducers, the maximum temperatures measured in the HAZ range from 308 to 693 degree centigrade, these measurements were related with the tensile test results, and the failure zone reported previously by the authors. It was observed that, there is a decrease in the mechanical strength of the welded joints, due to the microstructural changes suffered by AA6061-T6 alloy in which formation of the βoccurs according to the TTT transformation diagram. The inherent cooling conditions of the weld pool observed for the MIEA technique (only one pass of welding), have permitted to establish the characteristics of solidification and microstructure for a specific cooling rate. (Author) 24 refs

  18. Dictionary: Welding, cutting and allied processes. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiber, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The dictionary contains approximately 40 000 entries covering all aspects of welding technology. It is based on the evaluation of numerous English, American and German sources. This comprehensive and up to date dictionary will be a reliable and helpful aid in evaluation and translating. The dictionary covers the following areas: Welding: gas welding, arc welding, gas shielded welding, resistance welding, welding of plastics, special welding processes; Cutting: flame cutting, arc cutting and special thermal cutting processes; Soldering: brazing and soldering; Other topics: thermal spraying, metal to metal adhesion, welding filler materials and other consumables, test methods, plant and equipment, accessories, automation, welding trade, general welding terminology. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Transient thermal analysis during friction stir welding between AA2014-T6 and pure copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhavi, A. R.; Ghetiya, N. D.; Patel, K. M.

    2018-04-01

    AA2xxx-Cu alloys showed larger applications in the defence sectors and in aerospace industries due to high strength to weight ratio and toughness. FSW in a butt joint configuration was carried out between AA2014-T6 and pure Copper placing AA2014 on AS and Cu on RS. Temperature profiles were observed by inserting K-type thermocouples in the mid-thickness at various locations of the plate. A sharp decrease in temperature profiles was observed on Copper side due to its higher thermal conductivity. A thermal numerical model was prepared in ANSYS to compare the simulated temperature profiles with the experimental temperature profiles and both the temperature profiles were found to be in good agreement.

  20. An investigation on thermal and friction effect produced by friction welding of SA 213 tube to SA 387 tube plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pandia Rajan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the effect of thermal and friction produced in the tube to tube plate during the friction welding process by using a Tungsten carbide external tool. In this process, the fictional welding of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate was done by using an external tool. Modeling of tool and wok piece is done by using Solid works and to study the thermal and frictional effect by using Ansys. In this research work, joining of SA 213 tube to SA 387 tube plate was done by using two different techniques such as with hole [WH] and without hole [WOH]. The stress value of with hole and without hole such as 18,782 MPa and 10,486 MPa respectively and the ultimate heat flux generated with hole and without hole such as 0.80475 W/mm2 and 1.1344 W/mm2 respectively were observed.

  1. Increasing the brittle fracture resistance in manual arc welding and heat treatment of type 12KhM steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.P.; Bychenkova, G.A.; Gordeev, Y.V.; Ilyuhov, C.V.

    1984-01-01

    The extensive application of heat-resisting steels is delayed by their poor weldability. Optimum technology has been developed for manual arc welding and heat treatment of structures of type 12KhM steels resulting in high cracking resistance. Trials were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of removing the structural stresses in tempering the structures. On the basis of the experimental results, it may be assumed that the toughness properties of the welded joints produced by manual arc welding can be improved by optimizing the alloying system of the weld metal, with the parent metal treated in the optimum heat treatment conditions. The aim of subsequent investigations was to assess the properties of the weld metal made with vanadium-free electrodes. It was found that the impact toughness increased two to three times; the mean hardness and the maximum hardness were both less than 220. The reduction in hardness and increase of the toughness properties of the metal are caused by the lower degree of hardening of the bulk of the grain and, consequently, by the lower concentration of plastic strain at the grain boundaries

  2. Long-term aging of type 308 stainless steel welds: Effects on properties and microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Multipass gas tungsten arc welds with type 308 stainless steel filler metal in type 304L base plate have been aged at 400, 475, or 550 degrees C for times up to 5,000 h. The changes in mechanical properties as a result of these agings have been followed with tensile, impact, and fracture toughness testing, using subsize tensile, half-size Charpy, and 0.45T compact specimens, respectively. The changes in the microstructure were evaluated with optical and transmission electron microscopy. Relatively little change was observed in the tensile properties for any of the aging treatments, but significant embrittlement was observed in the impact and fracture toughness testing. The transition temperatures increased rapidly for aging at 475 or 550 degrees C, and more slowly for aging at 400 degrees C. The upper-shelf energies and the fracture toughness showed similar responses, with only a small decrease for 400 degrees C aging, but much greater and rapid decreases with aging at 475 or 550 degrees C. Aging at 400 or 475 degrees C resulted in the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase in the weld metal into iron-rich alpha and chromium-enriched alpha prime. In addition, at 475 degrees C G-phase precipitates formed homogeneously in the ferrite and also at dislocations. At 550 degrees C carbides formed and grew at the ferrite-austenite interfaces, and some ferrite transformed to sigma phase. These changes must all be considered in determining the effect of aging on the fracture properties

  3. Thermal damage of power plants components and their reparation. Aspects of welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautz, H.R.; Zurn, H.E.D.

    1993-01-01

    In the last years, the technology of power plants has been developed. With the recommendation in environmental protection, the research is focussed on gaseous effluents purification . In case of were an accident, the welding engineering might repair the components. 47 refs

  4. Use of servo controlled weld head for end closure welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, S.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Rao, A.; Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    In the PHWR fuel fabrication line resistance welding processes are used for joining various zirconium based alloy components to fuel tube of similar material. The quality requirement of these welding processes is very stringent and has to meet all the product requirements. At present these welding processes are being carried out by using standard resistance welding machines. In the resistance welding process in addition to current and time, force is one of the critical and important parameter, which influences the weld quality. At present advanced feed back type fast response medium frequency weld controllers are being used. This has upslope/down slope, constant and repetitive weld pattern selection features makes this critical welding process more reliable. Compared to weld controllers, squeeze force application devices are limited and normally standard high response pneumatic cylinders are used in the welding process. With this type of devices the force is constant during welding process and cannot be varied during welding process as per the material deformation characteristics. Similarly due to non-availability of feed back systems in the squeeze force application systems restricts the accuracy and quality of the welding process. In the present paper the influence of squeeze force pattern on the weld quality using advanced feed back type servo based force control system was studied. Different squeeze forces were used during pre and post weld heat periods along with constant force and compared with the weld quality. (author)

  5. On the effect of niobium on the properties of welded joints in the 2.25% Cr-1% Mo type steel with nickel and niobium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusek, P.; Gladis, R.; Walder, V.

    The effects were studied of the chemical composition of the base material and of welding parameters on the properties of welded joints of steel 08Cr2.25Mo1NiNb for fast reactor steam generators. Welding was done using Boehler-Fox electrodes and electrodes developed in Czechoslovakia. Testing revealed that the welded joint hardened and embrittled depending on the content of free niobium. The occurrence of eutectic formation of a general composition of Nbsub(m)Xsub(n) and possible of the Fe 2 Nb phase was considered to be one of the possible unfavourable microstructural factor which affects the mechanical properties of the thermally affected zone. The effect of the cooling rate Δtausub(8/5), ie., the effect of welding technologies was also found to be a function of the free niobium content. The results of welded joint creep to the fracture showed that until the 2x10 4 fracture time no negative effect of the welding cycle on the welded joint refractoriness was found. (B.S.)

  6. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteucci, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Zor, Kinga

    2016-01-01

    We compare ultrasonic welding (UW) and thermal bonding (TB) for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM) microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones ...

  7. A fractographic study of cracks produced by thermal shocks in 20MnMoNi55 and comparable weld material in water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.; Rintamaa, R.; Kemppainen, M.

    1983-04-01

    This report gives the results of a fractographic study of cracks produced by thermal shocks in 20MnMoNi55 and comparable weld material in water environment. The basic crack growth mechanism is shown to be by mechanical fatigue, but after some crack growth indications of environmentally assisted cyclic crack growth is seen. (author)

  8. High-energy-beam welding of type 316LN stainless steel for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewert, T.A.; Gorni, D.; Kohn, G.

    1988-01-01

    Laser and electron beam welds in 25-mm-thick AISI 316LN specimens containing 0.16 wt.$% N were evaluated for fusion reactor applications and their mechanical properties were compared with those of welds generated by lower productivity processes such as shielded-metal-arc and gas-metal-arc welding. Tensile tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens at 4 K. For both welding processes the fractures occurred in the base metal at a strength level near 950 MPa. This indicated that the weld and heat affected zone had a strength similar to that of the base metal. The 4 K weld fracture toughness was only slightly less than that for the base metal and comparable to the best values achieved with conventional welding processes in 316Ln weld metal. The Charpy V-notch absorbed energies averaged near 70 J at 76 K. Metallographic analysis revealed cellular and fully austenitic solidification with little porosity and no evidence of hot cracking

  9. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3 aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5 and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12. Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The highest strength and quality of welds was obtained when the Al99.5 filler metal was used in a braze welding process. The tests enabled the development of the most convenient braze welding conditions and parameters.

  10. Finite-Element Thermal Analysis and Grain Growth Behavior of HAZ on Argon Tungsten-Arc Welding of 443 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical and infrared experimental study of thermal and grain growth behavior during argon tungsten arc welding of 443 stainless steel. A 3D finite element model was proposed to simulate the welding process. The simulations were carried out via the Ansys Parametric Design Language (APDL available in the finite-element code, ANSYS. To validate the simulation accuracy, a series of experiments using a fully-automated welding process was conducted. The results of the numerical analysis show that the simulation weld bead size and the experiment results have good agreement. The grain growth in the heat-affected zone of 443 stainless steel is influenced via three factors: (1 the thermal cycle experienced; (2 grain boundary migration; and (3 particle precipitation. Grain boundary migration is the main factor. The modified coefficient k of the grain growth index is calculated. The value is 1.16. Moreover, the microhardness of the weld bead softened slightly compared to the base metal.

  11. Weld controller for automated nuclear service welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfield, K.L.; Strubhar, P.M.; Green, D.I.

    1995-01-01

    B and W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) uses many different types of weld heads for automated welding in the commercial nuclear service industry. Some weld heads are purchased as standard items, while others are custom designed and fabricated by BWNT requiring synchronized multiaxis motion control. BWNT recently completed a development program to build a common weld controller that interfaces to all types of weld heads used by BWNT. Their goal was to construct a system that had the flexibility to add different modules to increase the capability of the controller as different application needs become necessary. The benefits from having a common controller are listed. This presentation explains the weld controller system and the types of applications to which it has been applied

  12. Effect of welding processes and joint configuration on the residual stresses and distortion in type 316 LN stainless steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.; Palanichamy, P.

    2012-01-01

    Fabrication by welding introduces significant residual stresses in the welded structure/component due to non-uniform heat distribution during heating and cooling cycle. To control, reduce, or beneficially redistribute the residual stresses in weld joints, the stress distribution needs to be known. In the present study, weld joints of 16 mm thick 316LN stainless steel were made by multi-pass TIG, A-TIG welding and combination of TIG and A-TIG welding processes with various joint configurations. While V-groove edge preparation was required for making multi-pass TIG weld joint, square-edge preparation was sufficient for making A-TIG weld joint. Ultrasonic nondestructive technique based on the critically refracted longitudinal waves (LCR waves) has been used for the quantitative surface/sub-surface residual stress measurements in the weld joints. Distortion measurements were carried out before and after welding using height gauge. A-TIG weld joint was found to exhibit significant reduction in tensile residual stresses and distortion in comparison to that of other joints. (author)

  13. Unstable Temperature Distribution in Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiq Aziz Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the friction stir welding process, a nonuniform and high generated temperature is undesirable. Unstable temperature and distribution affect thermal and residual stresses along the welding line, thus necessitating mitigation. This paper presents a simple method to prevent significant temperature difference along the welding line and also to help nullifying some defect types associated with this welding, such as end-hole, initial unwelded line, and deformed areas. In the experimental investigation, a heat and force thermocouple and dynamometer were utilized while couple-field thermomechanical models were used to evaluate temperature and its distribution, plastic strain, and material displacement. The suggested method generated uniform temperature distributions. Measurement results are discussed, showing a good correlation with predictions.

  14. The Influence of TIG Welding Thermal Cycles on HSLA-100 Steel Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    8217 1.0’ 1,i 1.0’ 10’ TZ•ME. Secznas Figure 15. CCT diagram for a HSLA-100 steel with composition similar to that of the present work from Wilson...cooling rate through the transformation and ends up with a HAZ hardness of 345 HV which indicates a predominantly martensitic structure, on the CCT ... diagram . This is confirmed by the TEM micrograph of the HAZ taken close to fusion boundary, figure 14. On the other hand, the high heat input weld 1, with

  15. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  16. Modification of the microstructure of a weld of the same composition as X 20 CrMoV 12 1 by means of purely thermal aging and by aging under mechanical stress at 550 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deimel, P.; Hoffmann, M.; Kuppler, D.

    1991-01-01

    The experiments were to contribute deeper insight into the mechanisms and effects induced by long-term, purely thermal aging and by aging over the same period under mechanical stress in a weld of the same composition as X 20 CrMoV 12 1, which are known to cause microstructural changes resulting in modified toughness of the weld. (orig.) [de

  17. Effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinlabi OYETUNJI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of AISI 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS was studied. The tensile strength property of ASS welded samples was evaluated. Prepared samples of the ASS were welded under these three various variables. Tensile test was then carried out on the welded samples. It was found that the reduction in ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the butt joint samples increases with increase in core diameter of the electrode. Also, the best electrode for welding 304L ASS is 308L stainless steel-core electrode of 3.2 mm core diameter. It is recommended that the findings of this work can be applied in the chemical, food and oil industries where 304L ASS are predominantly used.

  18. Thermal recovery characteristics of Kori-unit 1 linde 80 weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, S. H.; Hong, J. H.; Kuk, I. H.; Kim, I. S.

    1997-01-01

    The recovery activation energy, the order of reaction and the characteristic recovery rate constant were determined by isochronal (573K -823K) and isothermal (723K - 775K) annealing experiments on specimens made from a broken half of a Kori-Unit 1 surveillance weld specimen (fluence: 1.21 x 10 23 n/m 2 , E (1MeV, Cu: 0.29 wt%) to investigate the recovery characteristics of a high copper weld of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Vickers microhardness tests were conducted to trace the recovery behavior after heat treatments. The results were analyzed in terms of recovery stages, behavior of responsible defects and recovery kinetics. It was shown that recovery occurred through two annealing stages (stage I: 673K - 753K, stage II: 753K - 823K) with recovery activation energies of 2.68 eV and 2.83 eV for stage I and II, respectively. The isothermal hardness recovery at 723 K and 775 K coincided with the ratio of the characteristic rate constant for each recovery stage. The order of reaction was 2 for both recovery stages. The recovery activation energies of present specimens are approximately equal to that of copper diffusion in α-iron in the presence of vacancies, suggesting that recovery may occur through the diffusion of copper atoms. The present results strongly support the copper precipitate coarsening model. (author)

  19. Welding technologies for nuclear machinery and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Yokono, Tomomi.

    1991-01-01

    The main welding methods applied to nuclear machinery and equipment are shielded metal arc welding, submerged arc welding, MAG welding and TIG welding. But in the last 10 years, in order to improve the reliability required for the welding of nuclear machinery and equipment, the welding technologies aiming at the reduction of heat input, the decrease of the number of welding pass and the automatic control of welding factors have been applied for the main purpose of bettering the quality and excluding human errors. The merits and the technology of narrow gap, pulsed MAG welding and melt-through welding are explained. As the automation of TIG welding, image processing type narrow gap, hot wire TIG welding and remote control type automatic TIG welding are described. For the longitudinal welding of active metal sheet products, plasma key-hole welding is applied. Since the concentration of its arc is good, high speed welding with low heat input can be done. For the stainless steel cladding by welding, electroslag welding has become to be employed in place of conventional submerged arc welding. Arc is not generated in the electroslag welding, and the penetration into base metal is small. (K.I.)

  20. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Woong Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  1. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  2. Thermal shielding device in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroshi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the soundness and earthquake proofness of mounting structures to a reactor vessel in a thermal shielding device comprising a plurality of tightly closed casings evacuated or shield with heat insulation gases, by reducing the wall thickness and weight of the casing. Constitution: the thermal shielding body comprises tightly closed casings and compressing core materials for preventing the deformation of the casings. The tightly closed casing is in the shape of a hollow vessel, completely sealed in gastight manner, and evacuated or sealed with heat insulation gases at a low pressure of about less than 0.5 kg/cm 2 G, such that the inner pressure is lower than the outer pressure. Compressing core materials made of porous metals or porous ceramics are contained to the inside of the casing. In this way, the wall thickness of the tightly closed casing can be reduced significantly as compared with the conventional case, whereby the mounting work on the site to the reactor container on the field can remarkably be improved and high reliability can be maintained at the mounting portion. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. The preliminary results of the thermal annealing processes performed on the RPVs NPP V-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupca, L; Brezina, M; Beno, P [Vyskumny Ustav Jadrovych Elektrarni, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1994-12-31

    Samples of weld and base metal above and below the weld were taken from RPV material in the V-230 type NPP V-1 in Bohunice; hardness measurements were carried out across the weld on the external surface of the RPV under the thermal shielding, before and after annealing. Results are presented and the annealing procedure efficiency is discussed. (authors). 13 refs., 5 figs.

  4. A numerical analysis on the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of welding type plate heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Yun; Kang, Yong Tae; Nam, Sang Chul

    2008-01-01

    Numerical analysis was carried out to examine the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of plate heat exchangers for absorption application using computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) technique. A commercial CFD software package, FLUENT was used to predict the characteristics of heat transfer, pressure drop and flow distribution within plate heat exchangers. In this paper, a welded plate heat exchanger with the plate of chevron embossing type was numerically analyzed by controlling mass flow rate, solution concentration, and inlet temperatures. The working fluid is H 2 O/LiBr solution with the LiBr concentration of 50∼60% in mass. The numerical simulation show reasonably good agreement with the experimental results. Also, the numerical results show that plate of the chevron shape gives better results than plate of the elliptical shape from the view points of heat transfer and pressure drop. These results provide a guideline to apply the welded PHE for the solution heat exchanger of absorption systems

  5. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  6. Mechanism of the thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their intrinsically low thermal conductivity, intermetallic type-I clathrates are promising candidates for thermoelectric energy conversion, most notably for waste-heat recovery above room temperature. Combining their low thermal conductivity with the enhanced electrical power factor of strongly correlated materials can be considered as one of the most promising routes to a next generation thermoelectric material. However, although much investigated, the physical origin of the low thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates is still debated. Therefore, the main goal of this thesis was to gain deeper insight into the mechanism of the low thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates. On the basis of recent inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering studies on type-I clathrates and skutterudites, an analytical model for describing the phonon thermal conductivity of such filled cage compounds was developed within this thesis. This model is based on the phononic filter effect and on strongly enhanced Umklapp scattering. Data on several Ge-based single crystalline type-I clathrates are discussed in the context of this model, revealing the influence of host framework vacancies, charge carriers, and large defects such as grain boundaries on the low-temperature thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates. Since for waste heat recovery the thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures is of interest, a sophisticated 3w-experiment for accurate measurements of bulk and thin film materials at elevated temperatures was developed. With the help of this experiment, a universal dependence of the intrinsic phonon thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates on the sound velocity and the lowest-lying guest Einstein mode was demonstrated for the first time. Further investigations on thermoelectric materials including the first Ce-containing type-I clathrate, skutterudites, and thin films complete this doctoral work. (author)

  7. Thermal expansion of spinel-type Si3N4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paszkowics, W.; Minkikayev, R.; Piszora, P.

    2004-01-01

    The lattice parameter and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) for the spinel-type Si3N4 phase prepared under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions are determined for 14 K......The lattice parameter and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) for the spinel-type Si3N4 phase prepared under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions are determined for 14 K...

  8. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  9. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  10. Finite element type of stress analysis for parts based on S235 JR steel welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Babis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The determination of static and/or variable stress, in case of complex shaped welded structures is hard to achieve. One solution, though, is the use of finite element method, implemented by means of various specialized software. Nowadays, this method has become very popular due to its high precision of data obtained through both research and finite element analysis. Hence, the present paper deals with the modelling of the pull-out behaviour of concave and convex welded joints through finite element method.

  11. Model for Estimation of Thermal History Produced by a Single Pass Underwater Wet Weld

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dill, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Thermal history calculations for single pass underwater wet weldments were made by solving the appropriate beat transfer equations using the three-dimensional Crank-Nicholson finite difference method...

  12. Weldability with Process Parameters During Fiber Laser Welding of a Titanium Plate (I) - Effect of Type and Flow Rate of Shielding Gases on Weldability -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Ji Sung [Korea Maritime and Ocean Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, welding of pure titanium was carried out by using a continuous wave fiber laser with a maximum output of 6.3 kW. Because brittle regions form easily in titanium as a result of oxidation or nitriding, the weld must be protected from the atmosphere by using an appropriate shielding gas. Experiments were performed by changing the type and the flow rate of shielding gases to obtain the optimal shielding condition, and the weldability was then evaluated. The degree of oxidation and nitriding was distinguished by observing the color of beads, and weld microstructure was observed by using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The mechanical properties of the weld were examined by measuring hardness. When the weld was oxidized or nitrified, the bead color was gray or yellow, and the oxygen or nitrogen content in the bead surface and overall weld tended to be high, as a result of which the hardness of the weld was thrice that of the base metal. A sound silvery white bead was obtained by using Ar as the shielding gas.

  13. Effect of Thermal Aging on the Corrosion Behavior of Wrought and Welded Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebak, R.B.; Edgecumbe Summers, T.S.; Lian, T.

    2002-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) is a candidate material for the external wall of the high level nuclear waste containers for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. In the mill-annealed (MA) condition, Alloy 22 is a single face centered cubic phase. When exposed to temperatures on the order of 600 C and above for times higher than 1 h, this alloy may develop secondary phases that are brittle and offer a lower corrosion resistance than the MA condition. The objective of this work was to age Alloy 22 at temperatures between 482 C and 800 C for times between 0.25 h and 3,000 h and to study the corrosion performance of the resulting material. Aging was carried out using wrought specimens as well as gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) specimens. The corrosion performance was characterized using standard immersion tests in aggressive acidic solutions and electrochemical tests in multi-component solutions. Results show that, in general, in aggressive acidic solutions the corrosion rate increased as the aging temperature and aging time increased. However, in multi ionic environments that could be relevant to the potential Yucca Mountain site, the corrosion rate of aged material was the same as the corrosion rate of the MA material

  14. Segregation behavior of phosphorus in the heat-affected zone of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after simulated thermal aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Miyahara, Yuichi; Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Impacts of aging on P segregation in actual heat-affected zone were examined by 3D-APT. • Non-equilibrium segregation of P dominated in subsequent cooling after welding. • Equilibrium segregation of P prevailed in step-cooling heat treatment. • High enrichment of P at grain/packet boundaries occurred in CGHAZ and ICCGHAZ. • Level of P enrichment at precipitate/matrix interface seemed species-dependent. - Abstract: The segregation behavior of phosphorus (P) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after step cooling was investigated with atom probe tomography. At grain/packet boundaries, the final P segregation level consisted of non-equilibrium segregation that occurred during cooling after welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and equilibrium segregation that occurred during step cooling. In both processes, higher P coverage was observed in the coarse-grained and intercritically reheated coarse-grained HAZ than in the fine-grained HAZ and base material. The cooling after welding and PWHT seemed to have a pronounced impact on P segregation in the subsequent aging process. In addition, P segregation also occurred at the precipitate/matrix interfaces of cementite, Mo 2 C and Al–Si rich precipitates. The evolution of P coverage at these two types of sites suggested increasing risks of embrittlement with an increase in aging time

  15. Advances in submerged arc, narrow-gap welding with strip electrodes and thin, dual-wire electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nies, H.

    1990-01-01

    Container and tank construction for nuclear installations traditionally is one of the major applications of narrow-gap welding with the submerged arc technique. This type of welding presents one problem, namely to completely and reliably remove the welding slag from the deep and narrow gap. The research report in hand explains the variants of welding techniques that have been tested and describes the results obtained, which primarily are reduced occurrence of faults, i.e. enhanced reliability, and better welding economy. As an alternative to welding with thick wire electrodes, which is the standard method for the applications under review, a new technique has been conceived and extensively tested, which uses thin strip electrodes at longitudinal position in the gap. This submerged arc, dual-wire technique with thin electrodes is characterised by a significantly higher thermal efficiency compared to welding with thick wires, so that the same energy input yields better efficiency of metal deposition. (orig./MM) [de

  16. Numerical aspects for efficient welding computational mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aburuga Tarek Kh.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the residual stresses and strains is one of the most important parameter in the structure integrity assessment. A finite element model is constructed in order to simulate the multi passes mismatched submerged arc welding SAW which used in the welded tensile test specimen. Sequentially coupled thermal mechanical analysis is done by using ABAQUS software for calculating the residual stresses and distortion due to welding. In this work, three main issues were studied in order to reduce the time consuming during welding simulation which is the major problem in the computational welding mechanics (CWM. The first issue is dimensionality of the problem. Both two- and three-dimensional models are constructed for the same analysis type, shell element for two dimension simulation shows good performance comparing with brick element. The conventional method to calculate residual stress is by using implicit scheme that because of the welding and cooling time is relatively high. In this work, the author shows that it could use the explicit scheme with the mass scaling technique, and time consuming during the analysis will be reduced very efficiently. By using this new technique, it will be possible to simulate relatively large three dimensional structures.

  17. Microstructural features of dissimilar welds between 316LN austenitic stainless steel and alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sireesha, M.; Sundaresan, S.

    2000-01-01

    For joining type 316LN austenitic stainless steel to modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for power plant application, a trimetallic configuration using an insert piece (such as alloy 800) of intermediate thermal coefficient of expansion (CTE) has been sometimes suggested for bridging the wide gap in CTE between the two steels. Two joints are thus involved and this paper is concerned with the weld between 316LN and alloy 800. These welds were produced using three types of filler materials: austenitic stainless steels corresponding to 316,16Cr-8Ni-2Mo, and the nickel-base Inconel 182 1 . The weld fusion zones and the interfaces with the base materials were characterised in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy. The 316 and Inconel 182 weld metals solidified dendritically, while the 16-8-2(16%Cr-8%Ni-2%Mo) weld metal showed a predominantly cellular substructure. The Inconel weld metal contained a large number of inclusions when deposited from flux-coated electrodes, but was relatively inclusion-free under inert gas-shielded welding. Long-term elevated-temperature aging of the weld metals resulted in embrittling sigma phase precipitation in the austenitic stainless steel weld metals, but the nickel-base welds showed no visible precipitation, demonstrating their superior metallurgical stability for high-temperature service. (orig.)

  18. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  19. Metallurgical transformations of high strength low alloys steels 450 EMZ type II in the heat affected zone during multipass submerged arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Palma, R.; Suarez-Bermejo, J. C.; Vicario, F. J.; Munoz, A.

    2006-01-01

    A considerable number of crack tip opening displacement tests in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welds. performed in accordance with standards BS 5762 and EEMUA, are rejected since the crack is not inside the coarse grain region at 0.5 mm from the fusion border, as well as the quantity of the crack length in percentage, that the crack goes through the inter critical region instead of in the grain coarse region as it would correspond. This circumstance make advisable to carry out a metallographic study of he inter critical zone in the HAZ as well as the corresponding tests, in order analyze the inter critical region brittleness reasons. The study is performed on a HSLA 75 mm thick panel 450 EMZ type II, welded under a SAW process with heat input and welded parameters controlled, without any post weld heat treatment. (Author)

  20. Effects of Insert Metal Type on Interfacial Microstructure During Dissimilar Joining of TiAl Alloy to SCM440 by Friction Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Ki-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Kyun; Ito, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Makoto; Oh, Myung-Hoon

    2018-03-01

    Although the welding zone of direct bonding between a TiAl alloy and SCM440 can be obtained by friction welding, martensitic transformation and the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and cracks result in a lower tensile strength of the joints relative to those of other welding techniques. Insert metals were used as a buffer layer to relieve stress while increasing the bond strength. In this study, the microstructure and mechanical properties on welded joints of a TiAl alloy and SCM440 with various insert metals, were investigated. The TiAl/Cu/SCM440 and TiAl/Ni/SCM440 joints were fabricated using a servo-motor-type friction welding machine. As a result, it was confirmed that the formation of a welding flash was dependent on the insert metal type, and the strength of the base metal. At the TiAl/Cu/SCM440 interface, the formation of IMCs CuTiAl and Cu2TiAl was observed at TiAl/Cu, while no IMC formation was observed at Cu/SCM440. On the other hand, at the TiAl/Ni/SCM440 interface, several IMCs with more than 100 μm thickness were found, and roughly two compositions, viz., Ti2NiAl3 and TiNi2Al, were observed at the TiAl/Ni interface. At the Ni/SCM440 interface, 10 μm-thick FeNi and others were found.

  1. Effects of Insert Metal Type on Interfacial Microstructure During Dissimilar Joining of TiAl Alloy to SCM440 by Friction Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Ki-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Kyun; Ito, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Makoto; Oh, Myung-Hoon

    2018-05-01

    Although the welding zone of direct bonding between a TiAl alloy and SCM440 can be obtained by friction welding, martensitic transformation and the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and cracks result in a lower tensile strength of the joints relative to those of other welding techniques. Insert metals were used as a buffer layer to relieve stress while increasing the bond strength. In this study, the microstructure and mechanical properties on welded joints of a TiAl alloy and SCM440 with various insert metals, were investigated. The TiAl/Cu/SCM440 and TiAl/Ni/SCM440 joints were fabricated using a servo-motor-type friction welding machine. As a result, it was confirmed that the formation of a welding flash was dependent on the insert metal type, and the strength of the base metal. At the TiAl/Cu/SCM440 interface, the formation of IMCs CuTiAl and Cu2TiAl was observed at TiAl/Cu, while no IMC formation was observed at Cu/SCM440. On the other hand, at the TiAl/Ni/SCM440 interface, several IMCs with more than 100 μm thickness were found, and roughly two compositions, viz., Ti2NiAl3 and TiNi2Al, were observed at the TiAl/Ni interface. At the Ni/SCM440 interface, 10 μm-thick FeNi and others were found.

  2. Thermographic Analysis of Stress Distribution in Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domazet Ž.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue life prediction of welded joints based on S-N curves in conjunction with nominal stresses generally is not reliable. Stress distribution in welded area affected by geometrical inhomogeneity, irregular welded surface and weld toe radius is quite complex, so the local (structural stress concept is accepted in recent papers. The aim of this paper is to determine the stress distribution in plate type aluminum welded joints, to analyze the reliability of TSA (Thermal Stress Analysis in this kind of investigations, and to obtain numerical values for stress concentration factors for practical use. Stress distribution in aluminum butt and fillet welded joints is determined by using the three different methods: strain gauges measurement, thermal stress analysis and FEM. Obtained results show good agreement - the TSA mutually confirmed the FEM model and stresses measured by strain gauges. According to obtained results, it may be stated that TSA, as a relatively new measurement technique may in the future become a standard tool for the experimental investigation of stress concentration and fatigue in welded joints that can help to develop more accurate numerical tools for fatigue life prediction.

  3. Thermographic Analysis of Stress Distribution in Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piršić, T.; Krstulović Opara, L.; Domazet, Ž.

    2010-06-01

    The fatigue life prediction of welded joints based on S-N curves in conjunction with nominal stresses generally is not reliable. Stress distribution in welded area affected by geometrical inhomogeneity, irregular welded surface and weld toe radius is quite complex, so the local (structural) stress concept is accepted in recent papers. The aim of this paper is to determine the stress distribution in plate type aluminum welded joints, to analyze the reliability of TSA (Thermal Stress Analysis) in this kind of investigations, and to obtain numerical values for stress concentration factors for practical use. Stress distribution in aluminum butt and fillet welded joints is determined by using the three different methods: strain gauges measurement, thermal stress analysis and FEM. Obtained results show good agreement - the TSA mutually confirmed the FEM model and stresses measured by strain gauges. According to obtained results, it may be stated that TSA, as a relatively new measurement technique may in the future become a standard tool for the experimental investigation of stress concentration and fatigue in welded joints that can help to develop more accurate numerical tools for fatigue life prediction.

  4. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  5. Electron beam welding of aluminium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maajid, Ali; Vadali, S.K.; Maury, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is one of the most widely used materials in industries like transportation, shipbuilding, manufacturing, aerospace, nuclear, etc. The challenges in joining of aluminium are distortion, cleanliness and quality. Main difficulties faced during fusion welding of aluminium components are removal of surface oxide layer, weld porosity, high heat input requirement, distortion, hot cracking, etc. Physical properties of aluminium such as its high thermal conductivity, high coefficient of thermal expansion, no change in colour at high temperature, large difference in the melting points of the metal and its oxide (∼ 1400 °C) compound the difficulties faced during welding. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), etc are generally used in industries for fusion welding of aluminium alloys. However in case of thicker jobs the above processes are not suitable due to requirements of elaborate edge preparation, preheating of jobs, fixturing to prevent distortion, etc. Moreover, precise control over the heat input during welding and weld bead penetration is not possible with above processes. Further, if heat sensitive parts are located near the weld joint then high energy density beam welding process like Electron Beam Welding (EBW) is the best possible choice for aluminium welding.This paper discusses EB welding of aluminium components, typical geometry of components, selection/optimization of welding parameters, problems faced during standardization of welding and process parameters and their remedies etc.

  6. Determination of Flaw Type and Location Using an Expert Module in Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing for Weld Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, D.; Zolfaghari, A.; Masoumi, F.

    2011-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation is explained as nondestructive testing, nondestructive inspection, and nondestructive examination. It is a desire to determine some characteristic of the object or to determine whether the object contains irregularities, discontinuities, or flaws. Ultrasound based inspection techniques are used extensively throughout industry for detection of flaws in engineering materials. The range and variety of imperfections encountered is large, and critical assessment of location, size, orientation and type is often difficult. In addition, increasing quality requirements of new standards and codes of practice relating to fitness for purpose are placing higher demands on operators. Applying of an expert knowledge-based analysis in ultrasonic examination is a powerful tool that can help assure safety, quality, and reliability; increase productivity; decrease liability; and save money. In this research, an expert module system is coupled with ultrasonic examination (A-Scan Procedure) to determine and evaluate type and location of flaws that embedded during welding parts. The processing module of this expert system is implemented based on EN standard to classify welding defects, acceptance condition and measuring of their location via echo static pattern and image processing. The designed module introduces new system that can automate evaluating of the results of A-scan method according to EN standard. It can simultaneously recognize the number and type of defects, and determine flaw position during each scan.

  7. Use of high-power diode lasers for hardening and thermal conduction welding of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Fritz; Demmer, Axel; Zaboklicki, A.

    1997-08-01

    CO2 and Nd:YAG high power lasers have become established as machining tools in industrial manufacturing over the last few years. The most important advantages compared to conventional processing techniques lie in the absence of forces introduced by the laser into the workpiece and in the simple arid highly accurate control in terms ofpositioning and timing making the laser a universally applicable, wear-free and extremely flexible tool /1,2/. The laser can be utilised costeffectively in numerous manufacturing processes but there are also further applications for the laser which produce excellent results from a technical point of view, but are not justified in terms of cost. The extensive use of lasers, particularly in small companies and workshops, is hindered by two main reasons: the complexity and size ofthe laser source and plant and the high investment costs /3/. A new generation of lasers, the high power diode lasers (HDL), combines high performance with a compact design, making the laser a cheap and easy to use tool with many applications /3,4,5,6/. In the diode laser, the laser beam is generated by a microelectronic diode which transforms electrical energy directly into laser energy. Diode lasers with low power outputs have, for some time, been making their mark in our everyday lives: they are used in CD players, laser printers and scanners at cash tills. Modern telecommunications would be impossible without these lasers which enable information to be transmitted in the form oflight impulses through optical fibres. They can also be found in compact precision measurement instrumentation - range fmders, interferometers and pollutant analysis devices /3,6/. In the field of material processing, the first applications ofthe laser, such as for soldering, inscribing, surface hardening and plastic or heat conduction welding, will exceed the limits ofthe relatively low performance output currently available. The diode laser has a shorter wavelength than the CO2 and

  8. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  9. Automatization of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Tomita, Jinji; Nishihara, Katsunori.

    1978-01-01

    Automatization of welding is one of the effective measures for securing high degree of quality of nuclear power equipment, as well as for correspondence to the environment at the site of plant. As the latest ones of the automatic welders practically used for welding of nuclear power apparatuses in factories of Toshiba and IHI, those for pipes and lining tanks are described here. The pipe welder performs the battering welding on the inside of pipe end as the so-called IGSCC countermeasure and the succeeding butt welding through the same controller. The lining tank welder is able to perform simultaneous welding of two parallel weld lines on a large thin plate lining tank. Both types of the welders are demonstrating excellent performance at the shops as well as at the plant site. (author)

  10. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-beam equipment is considered along with fixed and mobile electron-beam guns, questions of weld environment, medium and nonvacuum welding, weld-joint designs, tooling, the economics of electron-beam job shops, aspects of safety, quality assurance, and repair. The application of the process in the case of individual materials is discussed, giving attention to aluminum, beryllium, copper, niobium, magnesium, molybdenum, tantalum, titanium, metal alloys, superalloys, and various types of steel. Mechanical-property test results are examined along with the areas of application of electron-beam welding

  11. Development of laser weld monitoring system for PWR space grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chin Man; Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk

    1998-06-01

    The laser welding monitoring system was developed to inspect PWR space grid welding for KNFC. The demands for this optical monitoring system were applied to Q.C. and process control in space grid welding. The thermal radiation signal from weld pool can be get the variation of weld pool size. The weld pool size and depth are verified by analyzed wavelength signals from weld pool. Applied this monitoring system in space grid weld, improved the weld productivity. (author). 4 refs., 5 tabs., 31 figs

  12. Effect of substrate type, dopant and thermal treatment on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of substrate type, dopant and thermal treatment on physicochemical properties of TiO2–SnO2 sol–gel films. I STAMBOLOVA. ∗. , V BLASKOV, S VASSILEV†, M SHIPOCHKA and A LOUKANOV‡. Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, †Institute of Electrochemistry and Energy Systems, BAS,. Acad. G. Bonchev ...

  13. Transient thermal creep of nuclear reactor pressure vessel type concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The immediate aim of the research was to study the transient thermal strain behaviour of four AGR type nuclear reactor concretes during first time heating in an unsealed condition to 600 deg. C. The work being also relevant to applications of fire exposed concrete structures. The programme was, however, expanded to serve a second more theoretical purpose, namely the further investigation of the strain development of unsealed concrete under constant, transient and cyclic thermal states in particular and the effect of elevated temperatures on concrete in general. The range of materials investigated included seven different concretes and three types of cement paste. Limestone, basalt, gravel and lightweight aggregates were employed as well as OPC and SRC cements. Cement replacements included pfa and slag. Test variables comprised two rates of heating (0.2 and 1 deg. C/minute), three initial moisture contents (moist as cast, air-dry and oven dry at 105 deg. C), two curing regimes (bulk of tests represented mass cured concrete), five stress levels (0, 10, 20, 30 and a few tests at 60% of the cold strength), two thermal cycles and levels of test temperature up to 720 deg. C. Supplementary, dilatometry, TGA and DTA tests were performed at CERL on individual samples of aggregate and cement paste which helped towards explaining the observed trends in the concretes. A simple formula was developed which relates the elastic thermal stresses generated from radial temperature gradients to the solution obtained from the transient heat conduction equation. Thermal stresses can, therefore, be minimized by reductions in the radius of the specimen and the rate of heating The results were confirmed by finite element analysis which indicate( tensile stresses in the central region and compressive stresses near the surf ace during heating which are reversed during cooling. It is shown that the temperature gradients, pore pressures and tensile thermal stresses during both heating and

  14. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  15. Determination of type, magnitude and direction of residual stresses generated in the welding of AISI H-13 steel with the hole drilling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia; I; Maldonado, C; Bedolla, A; Velez, M; Medina, A; Bejar, L

    2006-01-01

    AISI H-13 steel is considered to be a highly ultra resistant steel because its resistance to stress surpasses 1380 MPa. This steel is widely used in tools that heavily used, especially under high temperatures, such as: awls, molds for pressing, extrusion dies, extrusion tools from heat impact, tools for producing screws, bolts, rivets and taps, molds for centrifugal smelting, tools for presses with shaped pieces, knives for hot cutting, among others. The weldability of AISI H-13 steel is generally poor, but it is possible if the proper precautions are taken. Cracking is perhaps the factor that most limits the weldability of AISI H-13 steel. The tendency to crack during welding for this type of steel occurs in the base metal and the zone close to the supporting material (cold cracking). The interlayer covering technique is used in the repair, welding and recovery of pieces of high alloy steels in order to avoid cracking and to lower the residual stresses generated by obstructed contraction and martensitic transformation. This work defined the type, magnitude and direction of residual stresses at different distances starting from the center of the welded union on the 25.4 mm thick AISI H-13 steel sheet. The welding was carried out in a test piece with Y-Groove geometry following JIS Z 3158 standard, using the SMAW process and an AISI 312 stainless steel interlayer between the base metal and the supporting metal. The hole-drilling method was used to measure the type, magnitude and direction of residual stresses using extensometric gauge rosette CEA-06-062UM-120 and CEA-06-062RE-120 following the guidelines established by ASTM E 837 standard. Based on the relaxed deformations that were measured, the type, magnitude and direction of residual stresses were determined with the H-DRILL residual stress program for biaxial condition. The results indicate that under these welding conditions the residual strains at different distances from the welded union are from stress and

  16. Double thermal transitions of type I collagen in acidic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Lingrong; Chen, Mingmao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-01-01

    Contributed equally to this work. To further understand the origin of the double thermal transitions of collagen in acidic solution induced by heating, the denaturation of acidic soluble collagen was investigated by micro-differential scanning calorimeter (micro-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic laser light scattering (DLLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and two-dimensional (2D) synchronous fluorescence spectrum. Micro-DSC experiments revealed that the collagen exhibited double thermal transitions, which were located within 31-37 °C (minor thermal transition, T(s) ∼ 33 °C) and 37-55 °C (major thermal transition, T(m) ∼ 40 °C), respectively. The CD spectra suggested that the thermal denaturation of collagen resulted in transition from polyproline II type structure to unordered structure. The DLLS results showed that there were mainly two kinds of collagen fibrillar aggregates with different sizes in acidic solution and the larger fibrillar aggregates (T(p2) = 40 °C) had better heat resistance than the smaller one (T(p1) = 33 °C). TEM revealed that the depolymerization of collagen fibrils occurred and the periodic cross-striations of collagen gradually disappeared with increasing temperature. The 2D fluorescence correlation spectra were also applied to investigate the thermal responses of tyrosine and phenylalanine residues at the molecular level. Finally, we could draw the conclusion that (1) the minor thermal transition was mainly due to the defibrillation of the smaller collagen fibrillar aggregates and the unfolding of a little part of triple helices; (2) the major thermal transition primarily arose from the defibrillation of the larger collagen fibrillar aggregates and the complete denaturation of the majority part of triple helices.

  17. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  18. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  19. Reheat cracking susceptibility of P23 (7CrWVMoNb9-6) steel welds made using matching and mis-matching filler metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevasmaa, Pekka; Salonen, Jorma; Auerkari, Pertti; Rantala, Juhani; Holmstroem, Stefan [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Reheat cracking sensitivity of 7CrWVMoNb9-6 (P23) thick-section multipass welds has been investigated by Gleeble simulation, mechanical testing, fractography and metallography. The results demonstrate that the experimental weld metal made using a high-Nb-W-Ti-B type filler metal was sensitive to reheat cracking, with a reduction of area no more than 2-3% in the BWI reheat cracking (RC) test. Welds made using a high-W -low-Ti type filler metal with Nb content similar to the parent steel, as well as welds make using a Ni-Nb-Ti-free-(W-free) type filler metal with the chemical composition closer to P24 grade material, were more ductile and crack-resistant, though with reduced cross-weld creep strength. Fractography of RC test specimens showed evidence of pronounced localisation of damage at the prior austenite grain boundaries of the thermally reheated, experimental P23 weld metal. The reheat cracking susceptibility of the less ductile weld metal was apparently related both to the chemical composition (higher B, Nb and Ti content) and sub-structural features of the coarse-grained reheated weld metal microstructure. Appropriate single- and multi-cycle thermal Gleeble simulations to produce representative HAY and reheated weld metal microstructures (as function of peak temperature), in conjunction with the BWI RC test were successfully applied to characterise the reheat cracking sensitivity of the candidate weld metals and parent steel HAZ. (orig.)

  20. Effect of Welding Thermal Cycles on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Simulated Heat Affected Zone for a Weldox 1300 Ultra-High Strength Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węglowski M. St.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the investigation of weldability of ultra-high strength steel has been presented. The thermal simulated samples were used to investigate the effect of welding cooling time t8/5 on microstructure and mechanical properties of heat affected zone (HAZ for a Weldox 1300 ultra-high strength steel. In the frame of these investigation the microstructure was studied by light and transmission electron microscopies. Mechanical properties of parent material were analysed by tensile, impact and hardness tests. In details the influence of cooling time in the range of 2,5 ÷ 300 sec. on hardness, impact toughness and microstructure of simulated HAZ was studied by using welding thermal simulation test. The microstructure of ultra-high strength steel is mainly composed of tempered martensite. The results show that the impact toughness and hardness decrease with increase of t8/5 under condition of a single thermal cycle in simulated HAZ. The increase of cooling time to 300 s causes that the microstructure consists of ferrite and bainite mixture. Lower hardness, for t8/5 ≥ 60 s indicated that low risk of cold cracking in HAZ for longer cooling time, exists.

  1. Study on welding thermal cycle and residual stress of UNS S32304 duplex steel selected as external shield for a transport packaging of Mo-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Gomes, Maurilio P.; Milagre, Mariana X.; Machado, Caruline S.C.; Reis, Luis A.M.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Rossi, Jesualdo L.; Orlando, Marcos T.D.; Luz, Temístocles S.

    2017-01-01

    Thin plates of duplex stainless steel UNS S32304 were welded using the pulsed gas tungsten arc GTAW process (butt joint) without filler addition. The used shielding gas was pure argon and 98% argon plus 2% of nitrogen. The thermal cycles were acquired during welding, in regions near the melting pool. This alloy is candidate for the external clad of a cask for the transport of high activity radiopharmaceuticals substances. For the residual stress measurements in austenite phase an X-ray diffractometer was used in a Bragg-Brentano geometry with CuKα radiation (γ= 0.154 and for ferrite phase was used a pseudo-parallel geometry with CrKα radiation (γ= 0.2291 nm). The results of residual stress using sin 2 Ψ methodology shown that the influence of the high welding temperature leads to compressive stresses in for both phase of the duplex steels mainly in heat-affected zone. It was observed a high temperature peak and an increase of the mean residual stress after addition of nitrogen to the argon shielding gas. (author)

  2. Study on welding thermal cycle and residual stress of UNS S32304 duplex steel selected as external shield for a transport packaging of Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Gomes, Maurilio P.; Milagre, Mariana X.; Machado, Caruline S.C.; Reis, Luis A.M.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: egbetini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Orlando, Marcos T.D.; Luz, Temístocles S., E-mail: mtdorlando@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (DFIS/UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil). Departamento de Física

    2017-07-01

    Thin plates of duplex stainless steel UNS S32304 were welded using the pulsed gas tungsten arc GTAW process (butt joint) without filler addition. The used shielding gas was pure argon and 98% argon plus 2% of nitrogen. The thermal cycles were acquired during welding, in regions near the melting pool. This alloy is candidate for the external clad of a cask for the transport of high activity radiopharmaceuticals substances. For the residual stress measurements in austenite phase an X-ray diffractometer was used in a Bragg-Brentano geometry with CuKα radiation (γ= 0.154 and for ferrite phase was used a pseudo-parallel geometry with CrKα radiation (γ= 0.2291 nm). The results of residual stress using sin{sup 2} Ψ methodology shown that the influence of the high welding temperature leads to compressive stresses in for both phase of the duplex steels mainly in heat-affected zone. It was observed a high temperature peak and an increase of the mean residual stress after addition of nitrogen to the argon shielding gas. (author)

  3. STUDY AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF WELDING PROCESS ON DISTORTION WITH 304L STAINLESS STEEL WELD JOINTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dhananjay Kumar*, Dharamvir mangal

    2017-01-01

    The effect of welding process on the distortion with 304L stainless steel 12thk weld joints made by TIG (tungsten inert gas) and SMAW (Shielded metal arc welding) welding process involving different type joint configuration have been studied. The joint configurations employed were double V-groove edge preparation for double side SMAW welding and square – butt preparation for double side TIG welding. All weld joints passed by radiographic. Distortion measurements were carried out using height ...

  4. Experimental Study of Tensile Test in Resistance Spot Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebbal Habib

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance spot welding (RSW is a widely used joining process for fabricating sheet metal assemblies in automobile industry .In comparison with other welding processes the RSW is faster and easier for automation. This process involves electrical, thermal and mechanical interactions. Resistance spot welding primarily takes place by localized melting spot at the interface of the sheets followed by its quick solidification under sequential control of pressure water-cooled electrode and flow of required electric current for certain duration. In this work the tensile tests were studied, the results obtained show that the type material, the overlap length, the angle of the rolling direction and the thickness of the sheet have an influence in resistance spot welding process.

  5. Torque Measurement of Welding of Endplug-Endplate using Multi-pin Remote Welding System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae-Seo; Kim, Soo-Sung; Park, Geun-Il; Lee, Jung-Won; Song, Kee-Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    As fuel bundles in PHWR irradiates, inner pressure in claddings of fuel rods increases owing to outer pressure and fission products of nuclear fissions. Because of leak possibility of welding between cladding and end plug, this welding part connects with safety of nuclear fuel rods. Because of importance of this welding part, weldability of end plug-cladding of nuclear fuel rods is continually researched. Welding method for research and commercialization is classified as melting, solid type welding or resistance welding. End plug cladding welding of nuclear fuel rods in PHWR takes advantage of resistance upset butt welding using multicycle mode. This method makes weld flash and shapes re-entrant corner owing to welding heat due to resistivity, contact resistance of cladding-end plug, and inelasticity deformation due to pressure. Welding part between cladding and end plug receives stresses and makes small cracks. In this study, remote welding system for multi-pin assembly was designed, fabricated and welding specimens of end plug-endplate were made using electrical resistance method. The torques of welding between end plug and endplate were measured. These results on welding current, pressure of main electrode and pressure of branch electrode were analyzed. Weldability between end plug and endplate was confirmed through metallographic examinations. In the future, optimal welding examinations due to welding current, welding pressure and welding time will be performed to improve weldability of end plug-endplate.

  6. Influence of the Aluminium Alloy Type on Defects Formation in Friction Stir Lap Welding of Thin Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract The weldability in Friction Stir Lap Welding (FSLW of heat and non-heat treatable aluminium alloys, the AA6082-T6 and the AA5754-H22 aluminium alloys, respectively, are compared. For both alloys, welds were produced in very thin sheets, using the same welding parameters and procedures, and strong differences in welds morphology were found. The strength of the welds was evaluated by performing tensile-shear tests under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. As-welded and heat-treated samples of the AA6082- T6 were tested. It was found that the heat-treatable alloy is more sensitive to defects formation, in lap welding, than the non-heat-treatable alloy. The presence of defects has a strong influence on the monotonic and fatigue behaviour of the welds. In spite of this, for very high-applied stresses, the heat-treatable alloy welds perform better in fatigue than the non-heat-treatable alloy welds.

  7. Socket weld integrity in nuclear piping under fatigue loading condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hwan; Choi, Sun Yeong

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the integrity of socket weld in nuclear piping under the fatigue loading. The integrity of socket weld is regarded as a safety concern in nuclear power plants because many failures have been world-widely reported in the socket weld. Recently, socket weld failures in the chemical and volume control system (CVCS) and the primary sampling system (PSS) were reported in Korean nuclear power plants. The root causes of the socket weld failures were known as the fatigue due to the pressure and/or temperature loading transients and the vibration during the plant operation. The ASME boiler and pressure vessel (B and PV) Code Sec. III requires 1/16 in. gap between the pipe and fitting in the socket weld with the weld leg size of 1.09 x t 1 , where t 1 is the pipe wall thickness. Many failure cases, however, showed that the gap requirement was not satisfied. In addition, industry has demanded the reduction of weld leg size from 1.09 x t 1 to 0.75 x t 1 . In this paper, the socket weld integrity under the fatigue loading was evaluated using three-dimensional finite element analysis considering the requirements in the ASME Code. Three types of loading conditions such as the deflection due to vibration, the pressure transient ranging from P = 0 to 15.51 MPa, and the thermal transient ranging from T = 25 to 288 deg. C were considered. The results are as follows; (1) the socket weld is susceptible to the vibration where the vibration levels exceed the requirement in the ASME operation and maintenance (OM) code. (2) The effect of pressure or temperature transient load on socket weld in CVCS and PSS is not significant owing to the low frequency of transient during plant operation. (3) 'No gap' is very risky to the socket weld integrity for the systems having the vibration condition to exceed the requirement specified in the ASME OM Code and/or the transient loading condition from P = 0 and T = 25 deg. C to P = 15.51 MPa and T = 288 deg. C. (4

  8. Synthesis and thermal conductivity of type II silicon clathrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, M.; Nolas, G. S.

    2006-08-01

    We have synthesized and characterized polycrystalline Na 1Si 136 and Na 8Si 136, compounds possessing the type II clathrate hydrate crystal structure. Resistivity measurements from 10 to 300 K indicate very large resistivities in this temperature range, with activated temperature dependences indicative of relatively large band gap semiconductors. The thermal conductivity is very low; two orders-of-magnitude lower than that of diamond-structure silicon at room temperature. The thermal conductivity of Na 8Si 136 displays a temperature dependence that is atypical of crystalline solids and more indicative of amorphous materials. This work is part of a continuing effort to explore the many different compositions and structure types of clathrates, a class of materials that continues to be of interest for scientific and technological applications.

  9. A study on the welding characteristics of Mn-Ni-Mo type A302-C steel plate for pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byoung Hyun; Chang, Woong Seong; Kweon, Young Gak

    2003-01-01

    In order to develop ASTM A302 grade C type steel plate with excellent weldability, several steels with different chemistry have been manufactured and evaluated their mechanical properties and weldability. Trial A302-C steels have revealed tensile strength in the range of 61-67kg/mm 2 and elongation in the range of 27∼32%, depending on chemical compositions within the ASTM specification range. In case of impact toughness, trial steels showed in the range of 58-70J at 0 .deg. C. From the weldability test, the minimum preheat temperature was found to be about 150 .deg. C, and automatic welding condition satisfied the requirements of both ASTM specification and users

  10. Spot Welding Characterizations With Time Variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Hafid; Pinitoyo, A.; History; Paidjo, Andryansyah; Sagino, Sudarmin; Tamzil, M.

    2001-01-01

    For obtain spot welding used effective data, this research is made, so that time operational of machine increasing. Welding parameters are material classification, electrical current, and weld time. All of the factors are determined welding quality. If the plate more thick, the time must be longer when the current constant. Another factor as determined welding quality are surface condition of electrode, surface condition of weld material, and material classifications. In this research, the weld machine type IP32A2 VI (110 V), Rivoira trademark is characterized

  11. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  12. Short-term thermal response of rapidly solidified Type 304 stainless steel containing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.

    1988-06-01

    Type 304 stainless steel was heat treated for short times near its melting point in order to determine its microstructural response to thermal cycles typical of the near heat-affected zones of welding processes. The material was rapidly solidified as a powder by centrifugal atomization in a helium environment and consolidated by hot extrusion. Along with the ingot metallurgy material used for canning the powder prior to hot extrusion, it was heat treated using a Gleeble at temperatures of 1200 and 1300 degree C for times ranging from <1 to 1000 s, and the samples were examined for microstructure and the existence of porosity due to entrapped helium. At higher test temperatures and longer treatment times, the material developed extensive porosity, which was stabilized by the presence of helium and which may also have a role in anchoring grain boundaries and inhibiting grain growth. The powder material. At lower test temperatures and shorter treatment times, grain growth in the γ phase appeared to be restricted in the powder material, possible by the presence of helium. An intermediate temperatures and times, a γ-δ duplex microstructure also restricted grain growth again occurred in the δ microstructure. 9 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Welding metallurgy of SA508 Cl II heat affected zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberry, P.J.; Lambert, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A weld thermal simulation technique has been used to investigate the metallurgical response of SA508 class II material during welding. Dynamic Ac 1 and Ac 3 data, grain growth kinetics and continuous cooling transformation diagrams have been measured. The heat affected zone structure, grain size and precipitate distribution are described in terms of the weld thermal cycle experienced and compared with a weld heat affected zone. The as-welded hardness and tempering response of a range of possible heat affected zone structures has been established. The tempering effects of various weld thermal cycles are calculated from isothermal tempering data. The likely tempering effects during welding are estimated and compared with the tempering of actual welds during welding and in subsequent conventional post weld heat treatment. 16 figures, 6 tables

  14. Comparative Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behaviour of DMR 249A Steel and its welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    DMR249A Medium strength (low carbon) Low-alloy steels are used as structural components in naval applications due to its low cost and high availability. An attempt has been made to weld the DMR 249A steel plates of 8mm thickness using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welds were characterized for metallography to carry out the microstructural changes, mechanical properties were evaluated using vickers hardness tester and universal testing machine. Potentio-dynamic polarization tests were carried out to determine the pitting corrosion behaviour. Constant load type Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was done to observe the cracking tendency of the joints in a 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present study established that SMA welds resulted in formation of relatively higher amount of martensite in ferrite matrix when compared to gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). It is attributed to faster cooling rates achieved due to high thermal efficiency. Improved mechanical properties were observed for the SMA welds and are due to higher amount of martensite. Pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of SMA welds were poor when compared to GTA welds.

  15. Numerical analysis of weld pool oscillation in laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Farson, Dave F [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Hollis, Kendall; Milewski, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Volume of fluid (VOF) numerical simulation was used to investigate melt flow and volumetric oscillation of conduction-mode pulsed laser weld pools. The result is compared to high speed video stream of titanium laser spot welding experiment. The total simulation time is 10ms with the first 5 ms being heating and melting under constant laser irradiation and the remaining 5 ms corresponding to resolidification of the weld pool. During the melting process, the liquid pool did not exhibit periodic oscillation but was continually depressed by the evaporation recoil pressure. After the laser pulse, the weld pool was excited into volumetric oscillation by the release of pressure on its surface and oscillation of the weld pool surface was analyzed. The simulation model suggested adjusting thermal diffusivity to match cooling rate and puddle diameter during solidification which is distinguishable from previous weld pool simulation. The frequency continuously increased from several thousand cycles per second to tens of thousands of cycles per second as the weld pool solidified and its diameter decreased. The result is the first trial of investigation of small weld pool oscillation in laser welding although there have been several reports about arc welding.

  16. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Hung Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  17. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnjak, A.; Tusek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  18. Underwater welding and repair technologies applied in PWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scandella, Fabrice; Carpreau, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe several welding processes and technologies which have been used for underwater applications and which can be applied when repairing components of a PWR type reactor. They address, describe and discuss wet arc welding processes, the peculiarities of underwater welding, and the use of various processes such as 111, 114 and 135 processes, underwater welding with the hybrid plasma MIG-MAG process, underwater welding with the laser wire process, underwater welding with the FSW, FSP or UWFSW processes, underwater welding with variants of the friction welding process (friction surfacing, taper stitch welding, hydro-pillar processing

  19. Effect of welding thermal cycles on the structure and properties of simulated heat-affected zone areas in X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) steel at a state after 100,000 h of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łomozik, Mirosław, E-mail: miroslaw.lomozik@is.gliwice.pl [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Testing of Materials Weldability and Welded Constructions Department, 44-100 Gliwice, Bł. Czesława 16-18 (Poland); Hernas, Adam, E-mail: adam.hernas@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, 40-019 Katowice, Krasińskiego 8 str. (Poland); Zeman, Marian L., E-mail: marian.zeman@is.gliwice.pl [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Testing of Materials Weldability and Welded Constructions Department, 44-100 Gliwice, Bł. Czesława 16-18 (Poland)

    2015-06-18

    The article presents results of structural tests (light, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy) of X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) creep-resisting steel after approximately 100,000 h of operation. It was ascertained that the parent metal of T91 steel is characterized by the microstructure of tempered martensite with M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitates and few dispersive precipitates of MX-type niobium and vanadium carbonitrides. The most inconvenient change in T91 steel precipitate morphology due to long-term operation is the appearance of the Laves Fe{sub 2}Mo phase which along with M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide particles forms elongated blocks and conglomerates on grain boundaries. The article also presents results of tests related to the effect of simulated welding thermal cycles on selected properties of X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) grade steel at a state after approximately 100,000 h of operation. The tests involved the determination of the chemical composition of the steel tested as well as impact tests, hardness measurements and microscopic metallographic examination (based on light microscopy) of simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) areas for a cooling time (t{sub 8/5}) restricted within a range between 3 s and 120 s, with and without heat treatment. The tests revealed that, among other results, hardness values of simulated HAZ areas in X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) steel do not guarantee cold crack safety of the steel at the state without additional heat treatment. It was also observed that simulated welding thermal cycles of cooling times t{sub 8/5}=3, 12, 60 and 120 s do not significantly affect the toughness and hardness of simulated HAZ areas of the steel tested.

  20. Thermal fatigue behaviour for a 316 L type steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissolo, A.; Marini, B.; Nais, G.; Wident, P.

    1996-10-01

    This paper deals with initiation and growth of cracks produced by thermal fatigue loadings on 316 L steel, which is a reference material for the first wall of the next fusion reactor ITER. Two types of facilities have been built. As for true components, thermal cycles have been repeatedly applied on the surface of the specimen. The first is mainly concerned with initiation, which is detected with a light microscope. The second allows one to determine the propagation of a single crack. Crack initiation is analyzed using the French RCC-MR code procedure, and the strain-controlled isothermal fatigue curves. To predict crack growth, a model previously proposed by Haigh and Skelton is applied. This is based on determination of effective stress intensity factors, which takes into account both plastic strain and crack closure phenomena. It is shown that estimations obtained with such methodologies are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Thermal fatigue behaviour for a 316 L type steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.; Marini, B.; Nais, G.; Wident, P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with initiation and growth of cracks produced by thermal fatigue loadings on 316 L steel, which is a reference material for the first wall of the next fusion reactor ITER. Two types of facilities have been built. As for true components, thermal cycles have been repeatedly applied on the surface of the specimen. The first is mainly concerned with initiation, which is detected with a light microscope. The second allows one to determine the propagation of a single crack. Crack initiation is analyzed using the French RCC-MR code procedure, and the strain-controlled isothermal fatigue curves. To predict crack growth, a model previously proposed by Haigh and Skelton is applied. This is based on determination of effective stress intensity factors, which takes into account both plastic strain and crack closure phenomena. It is shown that estimations obtained with such methodologies are in good agreement with experimental data. (orig.)

  2. Thermomechanical Modelling of Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a generic programme for analysis, optimization and development of resistance spot and projection welding. The programme includes an electrical model determining electric current and voltage distribution as well as heat generation, a thermal model calculating heat...

  3. Thermal Aging Effects on Residual Stress and Residual Strain Distribution on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Junhyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consisting of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, has been widely used as a joining material of the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its good mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance. Residual tensile stress is mainly nominated as a cause of SCC in light water reactors by IAEA report. So, to relax the residual stress, post-weld heat treatment is required after manufacturing process such as welding. However, thermal treatment has a great effect on the microstructure and the chromium depletion profile on Alloy 600, so called sensitization. By this reason, HAZ on Alloy 600 is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al., Crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions. And according to Z.P. Lu et al., CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. There are some methods to measure the exact value of residual stress on the material surface. The most common way is X-ray diffraction method (XRD). The principle of XRD is based on lattice strains and depends on the changes in the spacing of the atomic planes in material. And there is a computer simulation method to estimate residual stress distribution which is called ANSYS. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects residual stress and residual strain distribution of Alloy 600 HAZ. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. According to preceding researches and this study, both the relaxation of residual stress and the change of residual strain follow as similar way, spreading out from concentrated region. The result of Vickers micro-hardness tester shows that tensile residual stresses are distributed broadly on the material aged by 15 years. Therefore, HT400{sub Y}15 material is weakest state for PWSCC. The

  4. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  5. Disc type thermal actuator with straight beams for angular motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M. Arefin; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Ahmed, A.K. Waiz

    2013-01-01

    Motion of a micro thermal actuator largely depends on its structural topology. This paper presents designs for a novel rotary type micro thermal actuator. This actuator has unique arrangement of hot segments around the cold segment. Upon application of potential difference, hot segments expand against the cold segment of disc and make the cold disc rotate about its center. This rotary motion can be used for various optical applications like, switching, attenuation and diffraction. The actuator has been fabricated using poly MUMPS process technology. An analytical model was used for predicting steady state temperature profile along the actuator length and rotational behavior of the cold disc under different applied voltages. A finite element analysis (FEA) was carried out to predict the behavior of the actuator by defining an air volume around the structure and also between structure and substrate. Finally testing was done for predicting feasibility of the actuator. Comparison of the rotational behavior obtained from both analytical model and FEA with that of obtained from testing shows close agreement. -- Highlights: ► Electro-thermo-mechanical modeling and verification of rotary micro thermal actuator. ► Modeling with conduction, convection and radiation modes for the air gap below 3 micron. ► In micro level, shape factor and material resistivity were estimated and verified through I–V characteristics. ► Two different designs of different shape factors were designed, fabricated and tested. ► The devices were fabricated using surface micromachining technology and tested for verification

  6. Effect of weld spacing on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM electron beam welding joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yutao; Huang, Bo, E-mail: aufa0007@163.com; Zhang, Junyu; Zhang, Baoren; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding, and a simplified model of CLAM sheet was proposed. • The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). • The effect of the welding thermal cycle was significantly when the weld spacings were smaller than 4 mm. • When the weld spacing was small enough, the original microstructures would be fragmented with the high heat input. - Abstract: China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel has been chosen as the primary structural material in the designs of dual function lithium-lead (DFLL) blanket for fusion reactors, China helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) for ITER and China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) blanket. The cooling components of the blankets are designed with high density cooling channels (HDCCs) to remove the high nuclear thermal effectively. Hence, the welding spacing among the channels are small. In this paper, the welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding (EBW). The weld spacing was designed to be 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm. The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The PWHT is tempering at 740 °C for 120 min. The results showed that the grain size in the heat affected zone (HAZ) increased with the increasing weld spacing, and the joint with small weld spacing had a better performance after PWHT. This work would give useful guidance to improve the preparation of the cooling components of blanket.

  7. Welding electrode for peripheral welds of A-1 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, L.

    1975-01-01

    The properties are outlined of the VUZ-AC1-52 welding electrode used in welding the Bohunice A-1 reactor pressure vessel. The mechanical properties of welded joints after the final thermal treatment are summed up. (J.K.)

  8. Welding metallurgy of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels welds are commonly found in nuclear reactor systems. The macrostructure and the transformation of delta -phase into γ - phase which occur during rapid solidification of such welds are discussed. Finally, several types of defects which are derived from the welding operation, particularly defects of crack type, are also discussed in brief. (author)

  9. Thermal characteristics during hydrogen fueling process of type IV cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Chan [Department of Fire and Disaster Prevention, Kyungil University, 33, Buhori, Hayang, Kyungsan 712-701 (Korea); Lee, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Kee Bong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Ang University, 221, Huksuk, Dongjak, Seoul 156-756 (Korea)

    2010-07-15

    Temperature increase during hydrogen fueling process is a significant safety concern of a high pressure hydrogen vessel. Hence, thermal characteristics of a Type IV cylinder during hydrogen filling process need to be understood. In this study, a series of experiments were conducted to quantify the temperature change of the cylinder during hydrogen filling to 35 MPa. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was also conducted to simulate the conditions of the experiments. The results predicted by the CFD analysis show reasonable agreement with the experiments and the discrepancy between the CFD results and experimental results decrease with higher initial gas pressures. The upper and the lower parts of the vessel showed a temperature difference in the vertical direction. The upper gas temperature was higher than that of the lower part due to the buoyancy effect in the vessel. The maximum gas temperature was higher than the maximum temperature allowed in the ISO safety code (85 C) for the case in which the vessel was pressurized from 0 MPa to 35 MPa. This work contributes to the understanding of the thermal flow characteristics of the hydrogen filling process and notes that additional efforts should be made to guarantee the safety of a type IV cylinder during the hydrogen fueling process. (author)

  10. Chemical Welding on Semimetallic TiS2 Nanosheets for High-Performance Flexible n-Type Thermoelectric Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Wan, Juanyong; Li, Qi; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Jiyang; Wang, Heao; He, Dunren; Li, Xiaorui; Yang, Yaocheng; Huang, Huihui

    2017-12-13

    Solution-based processing of two-dimensional (2D) materials provides the possibility of allowing these materials to be incorporated into large-area thin films, which can translate the interesting fundamental properties of 2D materials into available devices. Here, we report for the first time a novel chemical-welding method to achieve high-performance flexible n-type thermoelectric films using 2D semimetallic TiS 2 nanosheets. We employ chemically exfoliated TiS 2 nanosheets bridged with multivalent cationic metal Al 3+ to cross-link the nearby sheets during the film deposition process. We find that such a treatment can greatly enhance the stability of the film and can improve the power factor by simultaneously increasing the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity. The resulting TiS 2 nanosheet-based flexible film shows a room temperature power factor of ∼216.7 μW m -1 K -2 , which is among the highest chemically exfoliated 2D transition-metal dichalcogenide nanosheet-based films and comparable to the best flexible n-type thermoelectric films, to our knowledge, indicating its potential applications in wearable electronics.

  11. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  12. Simplified welding distortion analysis for fillet welding using composite shell elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the simplified welding distortion analysis method to predict the welding deformation of both plate and stiffener in fillet welds. Currently, the methods based on equivalent thermal strain like Strain as Direct Boundary (SDB has been widely used due to effective prediction of welding deformation. Regarding the fillet welding, however, those methods cannot represent deformation of both members at once since the temperature degree of freedom is shared at the intersection nodes in both members. In this paper, we propose new approach to simulate deformation of both members. The method can simulate fillet weld deformations by employing composite shell element and using different thermal expansion coefficients according to thickness direction with fixed temperature at intersection nodes. For verification purpose, we compare of result from experiments, 3D thermo elastic plastic analysis, SDB method and proposed method. Compared of experiments results, the proposed method can effectively predict welding deformation for fillet welds.

  13. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  14. A final report on the performance achieved by non-destructive testing of defective butt welds in 50mm thick Type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.; Hudgell, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    This report concludes a programme of work started approximately eight years ago to fabricate deliberately defective austenitic downhand welds in 50 mm thick Type 316 plate and then to examine them non-destructively under ideal laboratory conditions. After completing and reporting the Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), the specimens were subjected to detailed metallography to locate, identify and size all the planned and unplanned flaws in the welds. The report gives the final analysis of this exercise on the relative merits of X-radiography, pulse echo ultrasonics and the time-of-flight technique for the detection, location and sizing of weld flaws. It was found that X-radiography and pulse echo ultrasonics were the best techniques for flaw detection but neither technique was reliable for flaw sizing. The time-of-flight technique provided accurate sizing data but the location of the flaws had to be known to identify the diffracted signals from the extremities of the flaws due to the poor signal to noise ratio. Observations are also reported on the fabrication of deliberately defective austenitic welds for use as reference specimens in the FR programme. (author)

  15. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  16. Thermal characteristic test for saturated temperature type capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimi, Motoji; Someya, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Ohuchi, Mitsuo; Harayama, Yasuo

    1989-08-01

    The Japan Material Testing Reactor Project is developing a new type capsule so-called 'Saturated Temperature Capsule', as a part of irradiation technique improvement program. This type capsule, in which the water is supplied and boiled, bases on the conception of keeping the coolant at the saturated temperature and facilitating the temperature setting of specimens heated by gamma-ray in reactor. However, out-pile test was planned, because there were few usable data for design and operation of the capsule into which the coolant was injected. A out-pile apparatus, simulated the capsule with electric heaters, was fabricated and experiments were carried out, to obtain data concerning design and operation for the capsule into which the water was injected. As a structure of simulated capsule, a type of downward coolant supply was adopted. The downward coolant tube type injectes the water in the bottom of capsule by tube through the upper flange. Major objects of experiences were to grasp thermal features under operation and to provide performances of capsule control equipment. Experimental results proved that the temperature of water within the capsule was easily varied by controlling supply water flow rate, and that the control equipment was operated stably and safety. (author)

  17. Dictionary: Welding, cutting and allied processes. Pt. 2. German/English. Fachwoerterbuch: Schweissen, Schneiden und verwandte Verfahren. Bd. 2. Deutsch/Englisch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiber, A W

    1987-01-01

    The dictionary contains approximately 40 000 entries covering all aspects of welding technology. It is based on the evaluation of numerous English, American and German sources. This comprehensive and up to date dictionary will be a reliable and helpful aid in evaluation and translating. The dictionary covers the following areas: Welding: gas welding, arc welding, gas shielded welding, resistance welding, welding of plastics, special welding processes; Cutting: flame cutting, arc cutting and special thermal cutting processes; Soldering: brazing and soldering; Other topics: thermal spraying, metal to metal adhesion, welding filler materials and other consumables, test methods, plant and equipment, accessories, automation, welding trade, general welding terminology.

  18. Residual stress measurement in 304 stainless steel weld overlay pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, H.J.; Lin, M.C.C.; Chen, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    Welding overlay repair (WOR) is commonly employed to rebuild piping systems suffering from intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). To understand the effects of this repair, it is necessary to investigate the distribution of residual stresses in the welding pipe. The overlay welding technique must induce compressive residual stress at the inner surface of the welded pipe to prevent IGSCC. To understand the bulk residual stress distribution, the stress profile as a function of location within wall is examined. In this study the full destructive residual stress measurement technique -- a cutting and sectioning method -- is used to determine the residual stress distribution. The sample is type 304 stainless steel weld overlay pipe with an outside diameter of 267 mm. A pipe segment is cut from the circular pipe; then a thin layer is removed axially from the inner to the outer surfaces until further sectioning is impractical. The total residual stress is calculated by adding the stress relieved by cutting the section away to the stress relieved by axially sectioning. The axial and hoop residual stresses are compressive at the inner surface of the weld overlay pipe. Compressive stress exists not only at the surface but is also distributed over most of the pipe's cross section. On the one hand, the maximum compressive hoop residual stress appears at the pipe's inner surface. The thermal-mechanical induced crack closure from significant compressive residual stress is discussed. This crack closure can thus prevent IGSCC very effectively

  19. Comparative estimation of the properties of heat resisting nickel alloy welded joints made by electron-beam and arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morochko, V.P.; Sorokin, L.I.; Yakushin, B.F.; Moryakov, V.F.

    1977-01-01

    As compared to argon arc welding of refractory nickel alloys at 15 m/hour rate, electron beam welding decreases energy consumption per unit length (from 4300 to 2070 cal/cm), the weld area (from 108 to 24 mm 2 ), and the length of the thermal effect zone (from 0.9-1.8 to 0.4-0.8 mm). Electron beam welding also provides for better resistance to hot cracking in the weld metal and in the near-weld zone, as compared to automatic argon arc welding and manual welding with addition of the basic metal. However, this advantage is observed only at welding rates less than 45 m/hour. Electron beam welded joints of refractory nickel alloys with intermetallide reinforcement have higher strength, plasticity and impact strength, and lower scattering of these properties than arc welded joints

  20. Metallography of Battery Resistance Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. E.; Johannes, L. B.; Gonzalez, D.; Yayathi, S.; Figuered, J. M.; Darcy, E. C.; Bilc, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion cells provide an energy dense solution for systems that require rechargeable electrical power. However, these cells can undergo thermal runaway, the point at which the cell becomes thermally unstable and results in hot gas, flame, electrolyte leakage, and in some cases explosion. The heat and fire associated with this type of event is generally violent and can subsequently cause damage to the surrounding system or present a dangerous risk to the personnel nearby. The space flight environment is especially sensitive to risks particularly when it involves potential for fire within the habitable volume of the International Space Station (ISS). In larger battery packs such as Robonaut 2 (R2), numerous Li-ion cells are placed in parallel-series configurations to obtain the required stack voltage and desired run-time or to meet specific power requirements. This raises a second and less obvious concern for batteries that undergo certification for space flight use: the joining quality at the resistance spot weld of battery cells to component wires/leads and battery tabs, bus bars or other electronic components and assemblies. Resistance spot welds undergo materials evaluation, visual inspection, conductivity (resistivity) testing, destructive peel testing, and metallurgical examination in accordance with applicable NASA Process Specifications. Welded components are cross-sectioned to ensure they are free of cracks or voids open to any exterior surface. Pore and voids contained within the weld zone but not open to an exterior surface, and are not determined to have sharp notch like characteristics, shall be acceptable. Depending on requirements, some battery cells are constructed of aluminum canisters while others are constructed of steel. Process specific weld schedules must be developed and certified for each possible joining combination. The aluminum canisters' positive terminals were particularly difficult to weld due to a bi-metal strip that comes ultrasonically

  1. Quality improvement of steel cast-welded constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аркадій Васильович Лоза

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various types of metallurgical equipment there are structures which are welded compounds of a cast base and additional elements produced by casting or any other means. Such structures are called cast-welded constructions. Besides new working properties such constructions appear to be more efficient and provide better durability as compared to the similar structures produced by other industrial means. Meanwhile the advantages of the technology are not used in full. One reason is low quality of the compound products caused by lack of proper preparation of the elements to be welded and poor quality of the welds themselves. In the article the methods of quality production and the maintenance of steel cast-welded constructions have been considered. A ladle of a blast-furnace slag car is used as the subject of investigation and further testing of the mentioned above technologies. The ladle is a cast product. Under operating conditions, the ladle undergoes mechanical and thermal load, which results in deformation of its sides that deflect inside. To prevent the deflection stiffening ribs are welded onto the outer surface of the ladle. However, there may be casting defects in the base metal that could reduce the durability of the welds. It has been proved that welds on the unprepared cast base of the steel product cannot guarantee the combination’s durability and reliability. To prevent the influence of the casting defects it has been recommended to cover the base metal with one more metal layer before welding the elements on. Two-layer surfacing provides best result as the first layer serves for the weld penetration of the casting defects since this layer has a significant share of base metal therefore it is less malleable; the second layer is necessary for making the layer viscous enough. The viscous layer ensures the absence of sharp transition from the deposited metal to the base metal and increases the crack resistance of the weld. In

  2. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteucci

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compare ultrasonic welding (UW and thermal bonding (TB for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones obtained using TB. Parameters such as metal thickness of electrodes, depth of electrode embedding, delivered power, and height of energy directors (for UW, as well as pressure and temperature (for TB, were systematically studied to evaluate the two bonding methods and requirements for optimal electrochemical performance. The presented technology is intended for easy and effective integration of polymeric Lab-on-Chip systems to encourage their use in research, commercialization and education.

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF SCREW TYPE, ALLOY AND CYLINDER POSITION ON THE MARGINAL FIT OF IMPLANT FRAMEWORKS BEFORE AND AFTER LASER WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Castilio, Daniela; Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; Rossetti, Leylha Maria Nunes; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso

    2006-01-01

    Misfit at the abutment-prosthetic cylinder interface can cause loss of preload, leading to loosening or fracture of gold and titanium screws. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of screw type, alloy, and cylinder position on marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding. METHODS: After Estheticone-like abutments were screwed to the implants, thirty plastic prosthetic cylinders were mounted and waxed-up to fifteen cylindrical bars. Each specimen had three interconnected p...

  4. Application of local vacuum slide sealing electron beam welding procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shozo; Takano, Genta; Minami, Masaharu; Enami, Koji; Uchikawa, Takashi; Kuri, Shuhei

    1982-01-01

    Electron beam welding process is efficient and is superior in workmanship and its application to the welding of large plate structures is eagerly awaited. However, since electron beam welding is generally performed with the object of welding entirely put in a vacuum chamber, high welding cost becomes a problem. In response to this demand, two kinds of local vacuum slide sealing type electron beam welding machines have been developed. These welding machines are designed to perform welding with only the neighborhood of the weld line put in vacuum, one of which is for longitudinal joints and the other for circumferential joints. The welding machine for circumferential joints has been put to practical use for the welding of nucear fusion reactor vacuum vessels (outside diameter 3.5 m, inside diameter 1.7 m), showing that it is applicable to the welding of large structures. (author)

  5. Surface crack behavior in socket weld of nuclear piping under fatigue loading condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.H.; Kim, J.S.; Choi, S.Y.

    2005-01-01

    The ASME B and PV Code Sec. III allows the socket weld for the nuclear piping in spite of the weakness on the weld integrity. Recently, the integrity of the socket weld is regarded as a safety concern in nuclear power plants because many failures and leaks have been reported in the socket weld. OPDE (OECD Piping Failure Data Exchange) database lists 108 socket weld failures among 2,399 nuclear piping failure cases during 1970 to 2001. Eleven failures in the socket weld were also reported in Korean NPPs. Many failure cases showed that the root cause of the failure is the fatigue and the gap requirement for the socket weld given in ASME Code was not satisfied. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the fatigue crack behavior of a surface crack in the socket weld under fatigue loading condition considering the gap effect. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed to estimate the fatigue crack behavior of the surface crack. Three types of loading conditions such as the deflection due to vibration, the pressure transient ranging from P=0 to 15.51 MPa, and the thermal transient ranging from T=25 C to 288 C were considered. The results are as follows; 1) The socket weld is susceptible to the vibration where the vibration levels exceed the requirement in the ASME operation and maintenance (OM) Code. 2) The effect of pressure or temperature transient load on the socket weld integrity is not significant. 3) No-gap condition gives very high possibility of the crack initiation at the socket weld under vibration loading condition. 4) For the specific systems having the vibration condition to exceed the requirement in the ASME Code OM and/or the transient loading condition from P=0 and T=25 C to P=15.51 MPa and T=288 C, radiographic examination to examine the gap during the construction stage is recommended. (orig.)

  6. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  7. Metals welding by using laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qaisy, R.A.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work, same welding ''conduction limited type'' under atmospheric conditions was performed using pulsed Ng:YAG laser to weld; low carbon steel (LCS), stainless steel (304) (SUS304), stainless steel (303) (SUS303), and brass. Microstructure of welded zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and the laser energy on penetration depth and effective diameter were studied. Tensile test, micro-hardness, and surface roughness of welded and parent metals were also dealt with. Melting efficiency was worked out and an under vacuum seam welding of low carbon steel has been accomplished. Finally spot welding of aluminium tungsten, and platinium wires were employed using different layer energies. 34 tabs.; 82 figs.; 51 refs.; 1 app

  8. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  9. Evaluating the SCC resistance of underwater welds in sodium tetrathionate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.A.; Angeliu, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of welds to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by the surface residual tensile stresses generated by the typical welding process. However, underwater plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding has been shown to produce compressive surface residual stresses, an encouraging result if repairs of cracked boiling water reactor (BWR) components are to be made without further endangering them to SCC. This program was designed to verify that underwater PTA welds are resistant to SCC and to determine if underwater PTA welding could mitigate SCC in potentially susceptible welds. This was achieved by exposing various welds on solution annealed (SA) and SA + thermally sensitized 304 stainless steel at 25 C in a solution of 1.5 gm/liter of sodium sulfide added to 0.05M sodium tetrathionate, titrated to a pH of 1.25 with H 2 SO 4 . The autogeneous welds were produced using gas tungsten arc (GTA) and plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding under atmospheric conditions, and PTA welding underwater. After 1 hour of sodium tetrathionate exposure, GTA and air PTA welds exhibited SCC while the underwater PTA weld heat affected zones were more resistant. Underwater PTA welds bisecting a GTA weld eliminated the cracking in the GTA weld heat affected zone under certain conditions. The lack of IG cracking in the region influenced by the underwater PTA weld is consistent with the measurement of compressive surface residual stresses inherent to the underwater welding process

  10. Repair welding of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments have shown that irradiated Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 MPa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials

  11. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  12. Laser based spot weld characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  13. In vivo argon laser vascular welding using thermal feedback: open and closed loop patency and collagen crosslinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, W., LLNL

    1997-02-28

    An in vivo study of vascular welding with a fiber-delivered argon laser was conducted using a canine model. Longitudinal arteriotomies and venotomies were treated on femoral vein and artery. Laser energy was delivered to the vessel wall via a 400 {micro}m optical fiber. The surface temperature at the center of the laser spot was monitored in real time using a hollow glass optical fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. The surface temperature was limited by either a room-temperature saline drip or direct feedback control of the laser using a mechanical shutter to alternately pass and block the laser. Acute patency was evaluated either visually (leak/no leak) or by in vivo burst pressure measurements. Biochemical assays were performed to investigate the possible laser-induced formation or destruction of enzymatically mediated covalent crosslinks between collagen molecules. Viable welds were created both with and without the use of feedback control. Tissues maintained at 50 C using feedback control had an elevated crosslink count compared to controls, while those irradiated without feedback control experienced a decrease. Differences between the volumetric heating associated with open and closed loop protocols may account for the different effects on collagen crosslinks. Covalent mechanisms may play a role in argon laser vascular fusion.

  14. Development of radiographic technique for examining k-type butt weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barui, K.L.; Bhattacharyya, B.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a radiographic technique for examining K-type full penetration butt joints in heavy duty crane girders. The existing standard techniques of radiographic examination is found to be unsuitable to assess the internal defects properly. The examination technique reported here is successful in detecting not only the nature of the internal defects but also their degree of severities - from which clues for avoiding the most probable defects can be found out. The results of radiographic examination applied on the K-type butt joints of heavy duty crane girders have been discussed and it is specified that the acceptable limit of the defects must lie between 'blue' and 'green' according to the IIW colour code. Much work is yet to be done before standard specifications regarding the acceptibility of the defects in the actual job can be formulated. (author)

  15. New process for weld metal reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The industry-wide nature of weld cracking alerts one to the possibility that there is a fundamental law being overlooked. And in overlooking this law, industry is unable to counteract it. That law mandates that restraint during welding causes internal stress; internal stress causes weld metal to crack. Component restraint during welding, according to the welding standard, is the major cause of weld metal failures. When the metal working industry accepts this fact and begins to counter the effects of restraint, the number of weld failures experienced fall dramatically. Bonal Technologies, inc., of Detroit, has developed the first consistently effective non-thermal process to relieve stress caused by restraint during welding. Bonal's patented Mets-Lax sub-resonant stress relief acts as a restraint neutralizer when used during welding. Meta-Lax weld conditioning produces a finer more uniform weld grain structure. A finer, more uniform grain structure is a clear metallurgical indication of improved mechanical weld properties. Other benefits like less internal stress, and less warpage are also achieved

  16. Study of the temperature distribution on welded thin plates of duplex steel to be used for the external clad of a cask for transportation of radiopharmaceuticals products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Ceoni, Francisco C.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Politano, Rodolfo; Rossi, Jesualdo L.; Orlando, Marcos T.D.

    2015-01-01

    The clad material for a proprietary transport device for radiopharmaceutical products is the main focus of the present work. The production of 99 Mo- 99m Tc transport cask requires a receptacle or cask where the UNS S32304 duplex steel sheet has shown that it meets high demands as the required mechanical strength and the spread of impact or shock waves mitigation. This work reports the experimental efforts in recording the thermal distribution on autogenous thin plates of UNS S32304 steel during welding. The UNS S32304 duplex steel is the most probable candidate for the external clad of the containment package for the transport of radioactive substances so it is highly relevant the understanding of all its physical parameters and its behavior under the thermal cycle imposed by a welding process. For the welding of the UNS S32304 autogenous plates the GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) process was used with a pure argon arc protection atmosphere in order to simulate a butt joint weld on a thin duplex steel plate without filler metal. The thermal cycles were recorded by means of K-type thermocouples embedded by electrical spot welding near the weld region and connected to a multi-channel data acquisition system. The obtained results validate the reliability of the experimental apparatus for the future complete analysis of the welding experiment and further comparison to numerical analysis. (author)

  17. Welding abilities of UFG metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiński, Łukasz; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Olejnik, Lech; Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Fratini, Livan

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafine Grained (UFG) metals are characterized by an average grain size of welded joints with similar properties to the base of UFG material are crucial for the production of finished engineering components. Conventional welding methods based on local melting of the joined edges cannot be used due to the UFG microstructure degradation caused by the heat occurrence in the heat affected zone. Therefore, the possibility of obtaining UFG materials joints with different shearing plane (SP) positions by means of friction welded processes, which do not exceed the melting temperature during the process, should be investigated. The article focuses on the Linear Friction Welding (LFW) method, which belongs to innovative welding processes based on mixing of the friction-heated material in the solid state. LFW is a welding process used to joint bulk components. In the process, the friction forces work due to the high frequency oscillation and the pressure between the specimens is converted in thermal energy. Character and range of recrystallization can be controlled by changing LFW parameters. Experimental study on the welded UFG 1070 aluminum alloy by means of FLW method, indicates the possibility of reducing the UFG structure degradation in the obtained joint. A laboratory designed LFW machine has been used to weld the specimens with different contact pressure and oscillation frequency.

  18. Welding processes and ocular hazards and protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabley, A S; Keeney, A H

    1981-07-01

    There are approximately 60 different forms of welding, but only six of these are commonly used. Shielded metal-arc or stick welding, gas metal-arc welding, and oxyacetylene welding are the most frequently used. All produce ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation at damaging levels. Conventional glass welding shields contain ultraviolet, visible, and infrared absorbers. Infrared absorbers, however, cause heating and secondary re-radiation. New polycarbonate lenses offer greater impact resistance, and have less tendency to welding spatter. Early abrasion-resistant and reflective coatings on plastics were ineffective. Thin layers of gold with proprietary coatings provide cool reflection and surface resistance. Thermal monitoring of welding indicated that these new shields reduce temperature rises above the ambient by 150% to 175% compared to green glass filter plates without interfering with the welder's vision.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Duplex Steel Multipass Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giętka T.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses based on FEM calculations have significantly changed the possibilities of determining welding strains and stresses at early stages of product design and welding technology development. Such an approach to design enables obtaining significant savings in production preparation and post-weld deformation corrections and is also important for utility properties of welded joints obtained. As a result, it is possible to make changes to a simulated process before introducing them into real production as well as to test various variants of a given solution. Numerical simulations require the combination of problems of thermal, mechanical and metallurgical analysis. The study presented involved the SYSWELD software-based analysis of GMA welded multipass butt joints made of duplex steel sheets. The analysis of the distribution of stresses and displacements were carried out for typical welding procedure as during real welding tests.

  20. Laser welding of aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    This thesis treats laser welding of aluminium alloys from a practical perspective with elements of mathematical analysis. The theoretical work has in all cases been verified experimentally. The aluminium alloys studied are from the 5xxx and 6xxx groups which are common for example in the automotive industry. Aluminium has many unique physical properties. The properties which more than others have been shown to influence the welding process is its high reflection, high thermal conductivity, lo...

  1. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  2. Thermal-hydraulic experiments for the PCHE type steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, C. W.; No, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) manufactured by HEATRIC is a compact type of the mini-channel heat exchanger. The PCHE is manufactured by diffusion bonding of the chemically-etched plates, and has high heat transfer rate due to a large surface. Therefore, the size of heat exchanger can be reduced by 1/5 - 1/6 and PCHE can be operated under high pressure, high temperature and multi-phase flow. Under such merits, it is used as heat exchanger with various purposes of gas cycle and water cycle. Recently, it is newly suggested as an application of a steam generator. IRIS of MIT and FASES of KAIST conceptually adopted PCHE as a steam generator. When using boiling condition of micro-channel, flow instability is one of the critical issues. Instability may cause unstable mass flow rate, sudden temperature change and system control failure. However instability tests of micro channels using water are very limited because the previous studies were focused on a single tube or other fluid instead of water. In KAIST, we construct the test facility to study the thermal hydraulics and fluid dynamics of the heat exchanger, especially occurrence of instability. By inducing the pressure drop of inlet water, amplitude of oscillation declined by 90%. Finally, the throttling effect was experimentally confirmed that PCHE could be utilized as a steam generator

  3. Thermal Upgrading of 9977 Radioactive Material (Ram) Type B Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.; Abramczyk, G.

    2012-01-01

    The 9977 package is a radioactive material package that was originally certified to ship Heat Sources and RTG contents up to 19 watts and it is now being reviewed to significantly expand its contents in support of additional DOE missions. Thermal upgrading will be accomplished by employing stacked 3013 containers, a 3013 aluminum spacer and an external aluminum sleeve for enhanced heat transfer. The 7th Addendum to the original 9977 package Safety Basis Report describing these modifications is under review for the DOE certification. The analyses described in this paper show that this well-designed and conservatively analyzed package can be upgraded to carry contents with decay heat up to 38 watts with some simple design modifications. The Model 9977 package has been designed as a replacement for the Department of Transportation (DOT) Fissile Specification 6M package. The 9977 package is a very versatile Type B package which is certified to transport and store a wide spectrum of radioactive materials. The package was analyzed quite conservatively to increase its usefulness and store different payload configurations. Its versatility is evident from several daughter packages such as the 9978 and H1700, and several addendums where the payloads have been modified to suit the Shipper's needs without additional testing.

  4. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2017-11-20

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable allo ys) that has been applied successfully in the aerospace industry. However, the full potential of FSW on more cost-sensitive applications is still limited by the production rate, namely the welding speed of the process. The majority of literature evaluating FSW of aluminum alloys is based on welds made in the range of welding speeds around hundreds of millimeters per minute, and only a handful are at a moderate speed of 1 m/min. In this study we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with welding speeds up to 3 m/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. Results are coupled with welding parameters to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high speed processing.

  5. The Effect of Numerical 2D and 3D Fem Element Modelling on Strain and Stress Distributions at Laser Weld Notches in Steel Sandwich Type Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Karol

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Like other means of transport, merchant ships face the problem of increasing requirements concerning the environment protection, which, among other issues, implies the reduction of fuel consumption by the ship. Here, the conventional approach which consists in making use of higher strength steels to decrease the mass of the ship hull can be complemented by the use of new steel structures of sandwich panel type. However, the lack of knowledge and experience concerning, among other issues, fatigue strength assessment of thin-walled sandwich structures makes their use limited. Untypical welds imply the need for individual approach to the fatigue analysis. The article presents the effect of numerical FEM modelling with the aid of two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D elements on the results of strain and stress distributions in the areas of toe and root notches of the analysed laser weld. The presented results of computer simulation reveal that modelling of strain and stress states in 2D (instead of full 3D affects only the results in close vicinity of the notch, and the observed differences rapidly disappear at a distance of 0.05 mm from the bottom of the notch. The obtained results confirm the possibility of use of numerically effective 2D strain and stress state models for analysing the fatigue strength of laser weld according to local approach.

  6. The influence of screw type, alloy and cylinder position on the marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilio, Daniela; Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; Rossetti, Leylha Maria Nunes; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso

    2006-04-01

    Misfit at the abutment-prosthetic cylinder interface can cause loss of preload, leading to loosening or fracture of gold and titanium screws. To evaluate the influence of screw type, alloy, and cylinder position on marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding. After Estheticone-like abutments were screwed to the implants, thirty plastic prosthetic cylinders were mounted and waxed-up to fifteen cylindrical bars. Each specimen had three interconnected prosthetic components. Five specimens were one-piece cast in titanium and five in cobalt-chromium alloy. On each specimen, tests were conducted with hexagonal titanium and slotted gold screws separately, performing a total of thirty tested screws. Measurements at the interfaces were performed using an optical microscope with 5mm accuracy. After sectioning, specimens were laser welded and new measurements were obtained. Data were submitted to a four-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (alpha=0.05). Slotted and hexagonal screws did not present significant differences regarding to the fit of cylinders cast in titanium, either in one-piece casting framework or after laser welding. When slotted and hexagonal screws were tested on the cobalt-chromium specimens, statistically significant differences were found for the one-piece casting condition, with the slotted screws presenting better fit (24.13 microm) than the hexagonal screws (27.93 microm). Besides, no statistically significant differences were found after laser welding. 1) The use of different metal alloys do exert influence on the marginal fit, 2) The slotted and hexagonal screws play the exclusive role of fixing the prosthesis, and did not improve the fit of cylinders, and 3) cylinder position did not affect marginal fit values.

  7. Microstructural examination of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy welds made by pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, R.B.; Varma, P.V.S.; Panakkal, J.P.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the weld microstructure of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy material. Bead on plate welds were made using pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique at different parameters. These welds were characterized at macro and microstructural level. Weld pools of Pulsed Laser and TIG welds were not resolved by optical microscopy. SEM too did not reveal much. Orientation imaging microscopy could reveal the presence of fine martensite. It was observed that microstructure is very sensitive to welding parameters. Microhardness studies suggested formation of martensite in the weld pool. It was also observed that laser welds had very sharp weld pool boundary as compared to TIG welds. Variation in microhardness of the weldment is seen and is influenced by overlapping of weld spots causing thermal treatment of previously deposited spots. (author)

  8. Thermal efficiency on welding of AA6061-T6 alloy by modified indirect electric arc and current signals digitalisation; Eficiencia termica en soldadura de la aleacion AA6061-T6 por arco electrico indirecto modificado y digitalizacion de senales de intensidad de corriente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriz, R. R.; Barrera, G.; Garcia, R.; Lopez, V. H.

    2009-07-01

    The results of the thermal efficiency on welding by modified indirect electric arc technique (MIEA) [1] of the 6061- T6 aluminum alloy are presented. These values are in a range of 90 to 94 %, which depend of the preheating employed. Thermal efficiency was obtained by means of a balance energy which considers the heat input, the amount of melted mass of the welding profiles, and welding parameters during the joining, especially of the arc current data acquisition. Also, some dimensionless parameters were employed in order to determine the approximation grade of the melted pool, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and their corresponding values with the experimental results. (Author) 13 refs.

  9. Investigation of the ductile fracture properties of Type 304 stainless steel plate, welds, and 4-inch pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilaros, M.G.; Hays, R.A.; Gudas, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    J-integral fracture toughness tests were performed on welded 304 stainless steel 2-inch plate and 4-inch diameter pipe. The 2-inch plate was welded using a hot-wire automatic gas tungsten arc process. The tests were performed at 550 0 F, 300 0 F and room temperature. The results of the J-integral tests indicate that the Jsub(Ic) of the base plate ranged from 4400 to 6100 in lbs/in 2 at 550 0 F. The Jsub(Ic) values for the tests performed at 300 0 F and room temperature were beyond the measurement capacity of the specimens and appear to indicate that Jsub(Ic) was greater than 8000 in lb/in 2 . The J-integral tests performed on the weld metal specimens indicate that the Jsub(Ic) values ranged from 930 to 2150 in lbs/in 2 at 550 0 F. The Jsub(Ic) values of the weld metal specimens tested at 300 0 F and room temperature were 2300 and 3000 in lbs/in 2 respectively. One HAZ specimen was tested at 550 0 F and found to have a Jsub(Ic) value of 2980 in lbs/in 2 which indicates that the HAZ is an average of the base metal and weld metal toughness. These test results indicate that there is a significant reduction in the initiation fracture toughness as a result of welding. The second phase of this task dealt with the fracture toughness testing of 4-inch diameter 304 stainless steel pipes containing a gas tungsten arc weld. The pipes were tested at 550 0 F in four point bending. Three tests were performed, two with a through wall flaw growing circumferentially and the third pipe had a part through radial flaw in combination with the circumferential flaw. These tests were performed using unloading compliance and d.c. potential drop crack length estimate methods. The results of these tests indicate that the presence of a complex crack (radial and circumferential) reduces in the initiation toughness and the tearing modulus of the pipe material compared to a pipe with only a circumferentially growing crack. (orig.)

  10. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  11. Study of hybrid laser / MAG welding process: characterization of the geometry and the hydrodynamics of the melt pool and development of a 3D thermal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, E.

    2010-11-01

    Hybrid laser/MIG-MAG welding shows high advantages compared to laser welding or GMAW arc welding used separately. Thanks to this process, higher productivity can be gained through higher welding speed, higher squeeze tolerance moreover possible improvement of the metallurgical properties of the weld seam can be obtained. However, many operating parameters have to be set up in order to achieve optimal process. The complex physical phenomena, which govern welding process, have to be understood in order to use efficiently this technique in mass production. Understanding of these phenomena is also necessary to program numerical simulations which fit to this process. In the first step, experimental studies have been carried out with GMAW, laser and hybrid welding on samples of S355 steel. Influence of operating parameters has been analyzed through films performed with speed camera and macro-graphies of weld seam cross section. Surface deformations of the melt pool, induced by the arc pressure, weld pool length, droplet detachment and welding speed, have been analyzed precisely from images of the surface melt pool. In a second step, a numerical model was developed using the COMSOL Multiphysics software for MAG, laser and hybrid laser/MAG welding processes. A 3D quasi-stationary model has been calculated from the temperature field within the metal. The originality of the MAG and hybrid model lies in the prediction of the melt pool surface profile used to determine the 3D geometry, by taking into account the material input. The influence of different parameters such as arc power and speed welding on the efficiency as well as the distribution radius of the arc power and the arc pressure are analyzed through validations with different experimental results and different calculation configurations. (author)

  12. Zero thermal expansion in NaZn13-type La(Fe,Si)13 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Wen; Tan, Jie; Zhao, Yuqiang; Li, Shaopeng; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    2015-01-28

    A zero thermal expansion material in a pure form of NaZn13-type La(Fe,Si)13 was fabricated. Through optimizing the chemical composition, an isotropic zero thermal expansion material is achieved. The obtained materials exhibit a low expansion of |α| linear thermal expansion) over a broad temperature range (15-150 K). The present study indicates that the thermal expansion behavior of the NaZn13-type La(Fe,Si)13 compounds depends mainly on the content of Si element. This new material is desirable in many fields of industry as a reliable and low-cost zero thermal expansion material.

  13. Thermal analyses of KBS-3H type repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonen, K.

    2003-12-01

    This report contains the temperature dimensioning of the KBS-3H type nuclear fuel repository, where the fuel canisters are disposed at horizontal position in the horizontal tunnels according to the preliminary SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co) and Posiva plan. The maximum temperature on the canister surface is limited to the design temperature of +100 deg C. However, due to uncertainties in thermal analysis parameters (like scattering in rock conductivity) the allowable calculated maximum canister temperature is set to 90 deg C causing a safety margin of 10 deg C. The allowable temperature is controlled by adjusting the space between adjacent canisters, adjacent tunnels and the distance between separate panels of the repository and the pre-cooling time affecting power of the canisters. With reasonable canister and tunnel spacing the maximum temperature 90 deg C is achieved with an initial canister power of 1700 W. It became apparent that the temperature of canister surfaces can be determined by superposing analytic line heat source models much more efficiently than by numerical analysis, if the analytic model is first verified and calibrated by numerical analysis. This was done by comparing the surface temperatures of the central canister in a single infinite canister queue calculated numerically and analytically. In addition, the results from SKB analysis were used for comparison and for confirming the calculation procedure. For the Olkiluoto repository a reference case of one panel having 1500 canisters was analysed. The canisters are disposed in a rectangular geometry in a certain order. The calculation was performed separately for both Olkiluoto BWR canisters and Loviisa PWR canisters. The result was the minimum allowable spacing between canisters. (orig.)

  14. Microstructural Effects on Hydrogen Delayed Fracture of 600 MPa and 800 MPa grade Deposited Weld Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Jae; Lee, Tae Woo; Cho, Kyung Mox; Kang, Namhyun; Yoon, Byung Hyun; Park, Seo Jeong; Chang, Woong Seong

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-delayed fracture (HDF) was analyzed from the deposited weld metals of 600-MPa and 800-MPa flux-cored arc (FCA) welding wires, and then from the diffusible hydrogen behavior of the weld zone. Two types of deposited weld metal, that is, rutile weld metal and alkali weld metal, were used for each strength level. Constant loading test (CLT) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) analysis were conducted on the hydrogen pre-charged specimens electrochemically for 72 h. The effects of microstructures such as acicular ferrite, grain-boundary ferrite, and low-temperature-transformation phase on the time-to failure and amount of diffusible hydrogen were analyzed. The fracture time for hydrogen-purged specimens in the constant loading tests decreased as the grain size of acicular ferrite decreased. The major trapping site for diffusible hydrogen was the grain boundary, as determined by calculating the activation energies for hydrogen detrapping. As the strength was increased and alkali weld metal was used, the resistance to HDF decreased.

  15. Influence of weld discontinuities on strain controlled fatigue behavior of 308 stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Valsan, M.; Sandhya, R.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed investigations have been performed for assessing the importance of weld discontinuities in strain controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 308 stainless steel (SS) welds. The LCF behavior of 308 SS welds containing defects was compared with that of type 304 SS base material and 308 SS sound weld metal. Weld pads were prepared by shielded metal arc welding process. Porosity and slag inclusions were introduced deliberately into the weld metal by grossly exaggerating the conditions normally causing such defects. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests have been conducted in air at 823 K on type 304 SS base and 308 SS sound weld metal employing strain amplitudes in the range from ±0.25 to ±0.8 percent. A single strain amplitude of ±0.25 percent was used for all the tests conducted on weld samples containing defects. The results indicated that the base material undergoes cyclic hardening whereas sound and defective welds experience cyclic softening. Base metal showed higher fatigue life than sound weld metal at all strain amplitudes. The presence of porosity and slag inclusions in the weld metal led to significant reduction in life. Porosity on the specimen surface has been found to be particularly harmful and caused a reduction in life by a factor of seven relative to sound weld metal

  16. Comparison of creep rupture behavior of tungsten inert gas and electron beam welded grade 91 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, H.C.; Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Albert, S.K.; Roy, G.G.

    2016-01-01

    Creep rupture behavior of Grade 91 steel weld joints fabricated by multi-pass tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes has been studied and compared with base metal. Cross-weld creep specimens were fabricated from the X-ray radiography qualified and post weld heat treated (760°C/4 h) weld joints. Creep testing of weld joints and base metal was carried out at 650°C over a stress range of 40°120 MPa. Creep life of EBW joint is comparable to base metal; whereas multi-pass TIG joint have shown significant drop in creep life tested for the same stress level. Both types of weld joints show Type IV cracking for all the stress levels. The steady state creep rate of multi-pass TIG is found to be fifteen times than that of EBW joint for stress level of 80 MPa, which may be attributed to over tempering, more re-austenization, and fine grain structure of inter-critical and fine grain heat affected zone regions of the TIG joint. In contrast, single-pass and rapid weld thermal cycles associated with EBW process causes minimum phase transformation in the corresponding regions of heat affected zone. Microstructure studies on creep tested specimens shows creep cavities formed at the primary austenite grain boundaries nucleated on coarse carbide precipitates. The hardness measured across the weld on creep tested specimens shows significant drop in hardness in the inter-critical and fine grain heat affected zone regions of multi-pass TIG (176 VHN) in comparison to 192 VHN in the corresponding locations in EBW joint. (author)

  17. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  18. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  19. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the final chapter of this book, there is basic introduction on welding process. The good radiography must know somehow on welding process so that they can know what kind of welding that must rejected or not. All of the exposure technique that mention in earlier chapter almost applicable in this field because welding process is critical problem if there is no inspection will be done. So, for this chapter, all the discontinuity that usually appeared will be discussed and there is another discontinuity maybe not to important and do not give big impact if found it, do not described here. On top of that, the decision to accept or reject based on code, standard and specification that agreed by both to make sure that decision that agreed is corrected and more meaningful.

  20. Numerical evaluation of multipass welding temperature field in API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nóbrega

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many are the metallurgical changes suffered by materials when subjected to welding thermal cycle, promoting a considerable influence on the welded structures thermo mechanical properties. In project phase, one alternative for evaluating the welding cycle variable, would be the employment of computational methods through simulation. So, this paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field in a multipass welding of API 5L X80 steel used for oil and gas transportation, using the ABAQUS ® software, based on Finite Elements Method (FEM. During the simulation complex phenomena are considerable including: Variation in physical and mechanical properties of materials as a function of temperature, welding speed and the different mechanisms of heat exchange with the environment (convection and radiation were used. These considerations allow a more robust mathematical modeling for the welding process. An analytical heat source proposed by Goldak, to model the heat input in order to characterize the multipass welding through the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process on root and the SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes were used. So, it was possible to evaluate the effect of each welding pass on the welded joint temperature field, through the temperature peaks and cooling rates values during the welding process.

  1. Evaluation of Hydrogen Cracking in Weld Metal Deposited using Cellulosic-Coated Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-16

    Cellulosic-coated electrodes (primarily AWS EXX10-type) are traditionally used for "stovepipe" welding of pipelines because they are well suited for deposition of pipeline girth welds and are capable of high deposition rates when welding downhill. De...

  2. Milestones in welding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan's PhD thesis describes his research into cracking during arc welding of armour steels. Throughout his career, he had a strong interest in defects of all types, how they formed in metallic structures and how the larger ones could be detected and sized by non-destructive techniques. He was also vitally concerned with how defects impacted on the engineering integrity of welded structures, particularly the risk of fracture in nuclear plant. This study presents a view of some of the major milestones in global welding technology that took place over the 60 or more years of Sir Alan's career and highlights those where he had a personal and direct involvement.

  3. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  4. Friction Stir Welding of Tapered Thickness Welds Using an Adjustable Pin Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn; Venable, Richard; Lawless, Kirby

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) can be used for joining weld lands that vary in thickness along the length of the weld. An adjustable pin tool mechanism can be used to accomplish this in a single-pass, full-penetration weld by providing for precise changes in the pin length relative to the shoulder face during the weld process. The difficulty with this approach is in accurately adjusting the pin length to provide a consistent penetration ligament throughout the weld. The weld technique, control system, and instrumentation must account for mechanical and thermal compliances of the tooling system to conduct tapered welds successfully. In this study, a combination of static and in-situ measurements, as well as active control, is used to locate the pin accurately and maintain the desired penetration ligament. Frictional forces at the pin/shoulder interface were a source of error that affected accurate pin position. A traditional FSW pin tool design that requires a lead angle was used to join butt weld configurations that included both constant thickness and tapered sections. The pitch axis of the tooling was fixed throughout the weld; therefore, the effective lead angle in the tapered sections was restricted to within the tolerances allowed by the pin tool design. The sensitivity of the FSW process to factors such as thickness offset, joint gap, centerline offset, and taper transition offset were also studied. The joint gap and the thickness offset demonstrated the most adverse affects on the weld quality. Two separate tooling configurations were used to conduct tapered thickness welds successfully. The weld configurations included sections in which the thickness decreased along the weld, as well as sections in which the thickness increased along the weld. The data presented here include weld metallography, strength data, and process load data.

  5. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  6. Welding development for LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, G.M.; Edmonds, D.P.; Goodwin, G.M.; King, J.F.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    High-quality welds with suitable properties for long-time elevated-temperature nuclear service are among the most critical needs in today's welding technology. Safe, reliable, and economic generation of future power depends on welded construction in systems such as Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs). Rapid thermal transients in LMFBR systems at coolant temperatures around 590 to 650 0 C (1000 to 1200 0 F) could cause creep and creep-fatigue damage that is not encountered in lower temperature reactor systems. The undesirable consequences of interaction between the two working fluids - sodium and steam - in the steam generators are also of major concern. Thus sound welds that have excellent reliability over a 30-year service life are essential. Several programs are actively underway at ORNL to satisfy this critical need and selected portions of three of these programs are discussed briefly

  7. Numerical methods in simulation of resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2015-01-01

    Finite element simulation of resistance welding requires coupling betweenmechanical, thermal and electrical models. This paper presents the numerical models and theircouplings that are utilized in the computer program SORPAS. A mechanical model based onthe irreducible flow formulation is utilized...... a resistance welding point of view, the most essential coupling between the above mentioned models is the heat generation by electrical current due to Joule heating. The interaction between multiple objects is anothercritical feature of the numerical simulation of resistance welding because it influences...... thecontact area and the distribution of contact pressure. The numerical simulation of resistancewelding is illustrated by a spot welding example that includes subsequent tensile shear testing...

  8. Process Simulation of Resistance Weld Bonding and Automotive Light-weight Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Chergui, Azeddine; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    of mechanical, electrical, thermal and metallurgical processes, which are essential for simulation of resistance welding process to predict the welding results and evaluate the weldability of materials. These functions have been further extended with new functions for optimization of welding process parameters...... and predicting welding process window, for weld planning with optimal welding parameter settings, and for modeling microstructures and hardness distribution after welding. Latest developments have been made on simulation of resistance welding with nonconductive materials for applications in weld bonding......This paper presents the latest developments in numerical simulation of resistance welding especially with the new functions for simulation of microstructures, weld bonding and spot welding of new light-weight materials. The fundamental functions in SORPAS® are built on coupled modeling...

  9. Hot wire TIG temper bead welding for nuclear repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.A.; Gilston, P.F.

    1989-08-01

    A preliminary assessment has been carried out to determine the suitability of the hot wire tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process for the repair of thick section, ferritic steel nuclear pressure vessels. The objective has been to identify a hot wire TIG temper bead procedure, suitable for repairs without post weld heat treatment. This procedure involves depositing two weld layers with carefully selected welding parameters such that overlapping thermal cycles produce a refined and tempered heat affected zone, HAZ, microstructure. (author)

  10. Process for quality assurance of welded joints for electrical resistance point welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, R.; Singh, S.

    1977-01-01

    In order to guarantee the reproducibility of welded joints of even quality (above all in the metal working industry), it is proposed that before starting resistance point welding, a preheating current should be allowed to flow at the site of the weld. A given reduction of the total resistance at the site of the weld should effect the time when the preheating current is switched over to welding current. This value is always predetermined empirically. Further possibilities of controlling the welding process are described, where the measurement of thermal expansion of the parts is used. A standard welding time is given. The rated course of electrode movement during the process can be predicted and a running comparison of nominal and actual values can be carried out. (RW) [de

  11. Optimal parameters determination of the orbital weld technique using microstructural and chemical properties of welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, A.; Echevarria, J.F.; Rondon, S.; Leiva, P.; Sendoya, F.A.; Amalfi, J.; Lopez, M.; Dominguez, H.

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of the main parameters of thermal cycle in Orbital Automatic Weld, as a particular process of the GTAW Weld technique. Also is concerned with the investigation of microstructural and mechanical properties of welded joints made with Orbital Technique in SA 210 Steel, a particular alloy widely use during the construction of Economizers of Power Plants. A number of PC software were used in this sense in order to anticipate the main mechanical and structural characteristics of Weld metal and the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). The papers also might be of great value during selection of optimal Weld parameters to produce sound and high quality Welds during the construction / assembling of structural components in high requirements industrial sectors and also to make a reliable prediction of weld properties

  12. Effects of high thermal neutron fluences on Type 6061 aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Farrell, K.

    1992-01-01

    The control rod drive follower tubes of the High Flux Beam Reactor are contructed from precipitation-hardened 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and they operate in the high thermal neutron flux regions of the core. It is shown that large thermal neutron fluences up to ∼4 x 10 23 n/cm 2 at 333K cause large increases in tensile strength and relatively modest decreases in tensile elongation while significantly reducing the notch impact toughness at room temperature. These changes are attributed to the development of a fine distribution of precipitates of amorphous silicon of which about 8% is produced radiogenically. A proposed role of thermal-to-fast flux ratio is discussed

  13. Residual stress measurements in coil, linepipe and girth welded pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.; Prask, H.; Luzin, V.; Gnaeupel-Herold, T.

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines come from forming operations in producing the coil and pipe, seam welding the pipe, and girth welding pipes together to form a gas pipeline. Welding is used extensively in gas pipelines, the welds are made without post weld heat treatment. The three normal stresses were measured by neutron diffraction for three types of sample: coil, unwelded rings cut from the pipe made from this coil, and girth welded rings cut from linepipe. All three specimens came from three thicknesses of manufacture (5.4, 6.4, and 7.1 mm). The welds are manual metal arc cellulosic electrode welds made in X70 linepipe, these were measured at 5 through-thickness positions at 19 locations (from the center of the weld up to 35 mm away from the weld) with a spatial resolution of 1 mm 3 . The coil and unwelded rings were measured at the same five through-thickness positions

  14. Thermal expansion of crystals of the N2 type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolkachev, A.M.; Manzhelii, V.G.; Azarenkov, V.P.; Jezowski, A.; Kosobutskaya, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Linear expansion coefficients of low temperature crystals with linear molecules and Pa3 lattice N 2 (2-21 K), CO(2-28 K), CO 2 (2-25 K), N 2 O(2-90 K) were measured. A version of the law of corresponding states to describe the translational component of the thermal expansion of the substances studied and other low temperature crystals with close-packed lattices is proposed. In the thermal properties of crystals consisting of molecules without inversion centre, we have found anomalies interpreted as the evidence of a partial dipole ordering. (orig.)

  15. Conductive films of silver nanoparticles as novel susceptors for induction welding of thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermanaki Farahani, Rouhollah; Janier, Mathieu; Dubé, Martine

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, a conductive film of silver nanoparticles (nAg) as a novel heating element type, called susceptor, was developed and tested for induction welding of carbon fiber/polyphenylene sulfide (CF/PPS) thermoplastic composites, i.e., unidirectional pre-impregnated 16 plies of CF/PPS compression-molded in a quasi-isotropic stacking sequence. The nAg were synthesized, dispersed in deionized (DI) water and casted onto a pure PPS film, resulting in a conductive film upon the evaporation of DI water and thermal post-annealing. The thermal annealing at 250 °C significantly (by 7 orders) decreased the film’s electrical resistivity from 9.4 × 103 down to 3.1 × 10-4 Ω cm. The new susceptors led to fast heating rates in induction welding when compared to the standard stainless steel mesh susceptors under similar welding conditions. Lap shear mechanical testing revealed that the apparent lap shear strength (LSS) is sensitive to the susceptors’ resistivity and the input current. A relatively high LSS value was achieved for the specimens welded using the new susceptors which exceeded the value of those welded using stainless steel mesh susceptors (28.3 MPa compared to 20 MPa). The weld interface and specimens’ cross-section observation revealed that the nAg were dispersed and embedded into the resin upon welding. This study contains preliminary results that show high potential of nanoparticles as effective susceptors to further improve the mechanical performance of the joints in welding of thermoplastic composites.

  16. Parallel diffusion length on thermal neutrons in rod type lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, T.; Siddiqui, S.A.M.M.; Khan, A.M.

    1981-11-01

    Calculation of diffusion lengths of thermal neutrons in lead-water and aluminum water lattices in direction parallel to the rods are performed using one group diffusion equation together with Shevelev transport correction. The formalism is then applied to two practical cases, the Kawasaki (Hitachi) and the Douglas point (Candu) reactor lattices. Our results are in good agreement with the observed values. (author)

  17. Solar Thermal AIR Collector Based on New Type Selective Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musiy, R.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the best for optical performance and selective coating solar thermal air collector, which operates by solar power on the principle of simultaneous ventilation and heating facilities, is designed. It can be used for vacation homes, museums, wooden churches, warehouses, garages, houses, greenhouses etc.

  18. Advances in solar cell welding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidester, L.G.; Lott, D.R.

    1982-09-01

    In addition to developing the rigid substrate welded conventional cell panels for an earlier U.S. flight program, LMSC recently demonstrated a welded lightweight array system using both 2 x 4 and 5.9 x 5.9 cm wraparound solar cells. This weld system uses infrared sensing of weld joint temperature at the cell contact metalization interface to precisely control weld energy on each joint. Modules fabricated using this weld control system survived lowearth-orbit simulated 5-year tests (over 30,000 cycles) without joint failure. The data from these specifically configured modules, printed circuit substrate with copper interconnect and dielectric wraparound solar cells, can be used as a basis for developing weld schedules for additional cell array panel types.

  19. A 1993 review of welding in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes a prospect on Japanese welding technologies available in 1993. Amid the increasing research publications on non-ferrous metals as structural materials, publications are also increasing on steel materials as to their fracture and welding mechanics, and structural control. Studies are being made on ceramics with respect to its bonding, interface reaction mechanisms, and mechanical characteristics. The paper describes the progress and improvement in conventional technologies in welding and cutting processes. Especially active is the study on solid face welding such as pressure welding and diffusion. A considerable decrease is seen in reports on thermal spraying. The paper also introduces surface processing and hydrostatic pressure processing as new processing techniques. In the area of welding devices, practical use of arc welding robots has come to near a completion stage. Technological development and cost reduction are indispensable to transfer to visual sensing with a higher intelligence level. With respect to the performance of joints, a large number of research has been reported on welding deformation and residual stress. The paper also dwells on corrosion resistance and welding cracks. Quality assurance, inspection, and related standards are described. Details are given on application of welding to different industrial fields.

  20. SCC growth behavior of cast stainless steels in high-temperature water. Influences of corrosion potential, steel type, thermal aging and cold-work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies on crack growth rate (CGR) measurement in oxygenated high-temperature pure water conditions, such as normal water chemistry (NWC) in BWRs, using compact tension (CT) type specimens have shown that stainless steel weld metal are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). On the other hand, the authors reported that no significant SCC growth was observed on stainless steel weld metals in PWR primary water at temperatures from 250degC to 340degC. Cast austenitic stainless steels are widely used in light water reactors, and there is a similarity between welded and cast stainless steels in terms of the microstructure of the ferrite/austenite duplex structure. However, there are a few reports giving CGR data on cast stainless steels in the BWRs and PWRs. The principal purpose of this study was to examine the SCC growth behavior of cast stainless steels in simulated PWR primary water. A second objective was to examine the effects on SCC growth in hydrogenated and oxygenated water environments at 320degC of: (1) corrosion potential; (2) steels type (Mo in alloy); (3) thermal-aging (up to 400degC x 40 kh); and (4) cold-working (10%). The results were as follows: (1) No significant SCC growth was observed on all types of cast stainless steels: aged (400degC x 40 kh) of SCS14A and SCS13A and 10% cold-working, in hydrogenated (low-potential) water at 320degC. (2) Aging at 400degC x 40 kh SCS14A (10%CW) markedly accelerated the SCC growth of cast material in high-potential water at 320degC, but no significant SCC growth was observed in the hydrogenated water, even after long-term thermal aging (400degC x 40 kh). (3) Thus, cast stainless steels have excellent SCC resistance in PWR primary water. (4) On the other hand, significant SCC growth was observed on all types of cast stainless steels: 10%CW SCS14A and SCS13A, in 8 ppm-oxygenated (high-potential) water at 320degC. (5) No large difference in SCC growth was observed between SCS14A (Mo) and SCS13A. (6) No

  1. Analysis of welding distortion due to narrow-gap welding of upper port plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Pankaj; Mandal, N.R.; Vasu, Parameswaran; Padasalag, Shrishail B.

    2010-01-01

    Narrow-gap welding is a low distortion welding process. This process allows very thick plates to be joined using fewer weld passes as compared to conventional V-groove or double V-groove welding. In case of narrow-gap arc welding as the heat input and weld volume is low, it reduces thermal stress leading to reduction of both residual stress and distortion. In this present study the effect of narrow-gap welding was studied on fabrication of a scaled down port plug in the form of a trapezoidal box made of 10 mm thick mild steel (MS) plates using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Inherent strain method was used for numerical prediction of resulting distortions. The numerical results compared well with that of the experimentally measured distortion. The validated numerical scheme was used for prediction of weld induced distortion due to narrow-gap welding of full scale upper port plug made of 60 mm thick SS316LN material as is proposed for use in ITER project. It was observed that it is feasible to fabricate the said port plug keeping the distortions minimum within about 7 mm using GTAW for root pass welding followed by SMAW for filler runs.

  2. Effect of post-weld aging treatment on mechanical properties of Tungsten Inert Gas welded low thickness 7075 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmar, M.; Hadji, M.; Sahraoui, T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of post-weld aging treatment on the properties of joints is studied. → The post-weld aging treatment increases the tensile strength of TIG welded joints. → The strengthening is due to a balance of dissolution, reversion and precipitation. → Simple post-weld aging at 140 o C enhances the properties of the welded joints. -- Abstract: This paper reports the influence of post-weld aging treatment on the microstructure, tensile strength, hardness and Charpy impact energy of weld joints low thickness 7075 T6 aluminium alloy welded by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG). Hot cracking occurs in aluminium welds when high levels of thermal stress and solidification shrinkage are present while the weld is undergoing various degrees of solidification. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit microstructure modifications because of the thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results in low weld mechanical properties and low resistance to hot cracking. It has been observed that the mechanical properties are very sensitive to microstructure of weld metal. Simple post-weld aging treatment at 140 o C applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the mechanical properties of the welded joints. Correlations between microstructures and mechanical properties were discussed.

  3. Weld residual stress according to the ways of heat input in the simulation of weld process using finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    This paper is to discuss distribution of welding residual stresses of a ferritic low alloy steel nozzle with dissimilar metal weld using Alloy 82/182. Two Dimensional (2D) thermo-mechanical finite element analyses are carried out to simulate multi-pass welding process on the basis of the detailed and fabrication data. On performing the welding analysis generally, the characteristics on the heat input and heat transfer of weld are affected on the weld residual stress analyses. Thermal analyses in the welding heat cycle process is very important process in weld residual stress analyses. Therefore, heat is rapidly input to the weld pass material, using internal volumetric heat generation, at a rate which raises the peak weld metal temperature to 2200 .deg. C and the base metal adjacent to the weld to about 1400 .deg. C. These are approximately the temperature that the weld metal and surrounding base materials reach during welding. Also, According to the various ways of applying the weld heat source, the predicted residual stress results are compared with measured axial, hoop and radial through-wall profiles in the heat affected zone of test component. Also, those results are compared with those of full 3-dimensional simulation

  4. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility

  5. Investigation of a weld defect, reactor vessel head Ringhals 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embring, G.; Pers-Anderson, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    During the summer-outage 1993 Ringhals unit 2 vessel head was inspected at weld-area of Alloy 182. One major defect was found Two plus two ''boat-samples'' were taken out from the zone between the weld and the stainless cladding. All samples were sent to Studsviks laboratories for detailed investigations. The metallographic and fractographic investigations revealed that the major weld-defect had been there from manufacturing. The defect was located between the Alloy 182-buttering and the pressure vessel steel SA 533 grB cl 1. No indications of PWSCC or IDSCC were found. An inspection programme was defined. Different types of reference blocks were provided by Ringhals in cooperation with ABB TRC. Reference reflectors of type flat bottom hole (FBH) and eroded notches (EDM), with different sizes and separation were manufactured. One weld sample with manufacturing defects -lack of fusion and slag was inclusions- was present. ABB TRC performed UT inspection in the gap between the penetration and the thermal sleeve. Inspection results like defect identification, defect separation and defect sizing accuracy were compared with result from the destructive inspection. No relevant additional defects were found. An analysing and repair program was performed. A special designed disc sealed off the defect area. (authors). 5 figs., 3 refs

  6. Measurement of residual stresses in welded sample of dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, Tanius Rodrigues; Gomes, Paulo de Tarso Vida; Scaldaferri, Denis Henrique Bianchi; Martins, Geraldo Antonio Scoralick; Atanazio Filho, Nelson do Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    The welding of dissimilar metals has several applications in the industry. Especially in the nuclear industry, this joint type, common between carbon steel and stainless steel, it is always reason of analysis and special cares tends in view the need to maintain the integrity of the equipment. Residual stresses are introduced in the material as a result of processes as welding, machining, sanding and polishing that can to produce deformation in the proximities of the surface of the material. Residual compressive stresses can be introduced in the material through the jetting process (bombardment of the surface for small glass spheres, dry sand or steel). That procedure allows a fine subsurface layer to suffer yielding, compressing the superficial layer and reducing the formation of areas of concentration of traction stresses, increasing the resistance of the material to the fatigue. The welding process introduces residual stresses due to the geometry resulting from the fusion of the material welded and of the heterogeneous cooling. Besides the microstructural alteration and chemical composition of the material in the affected area for the heat, introduced by the welding, it is also had the effect of the discontinuity of the passes and the formation of bubbles and emptiness that can contribute to the cracks nucleation, reducing the resistance to the fatigue. In the great majority of the times residual stresses are harmful and there are many documented cases which US these stresses went predominant factors for the failure for fatigue. A particularly dangerous aspect of the residual stresses is that their presence is not usually observed, what usually happens with an applied load to the structure. The knowledge of the surface residual stresses is important to predict the emergence of failure when the component or structure is requested. In nuclear power plants it is common to welding of piping of stainless steels with mouthpieces of carbon steel of pressure vases of

  7. Welding template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Venue, R.J. of.

    1976-01-01

    A welding template is described which is used to weld strip material into a cellular grid structure for the accommodation of fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. On a base plate the template carries a multitude of cylindrical pins whose upper half is narrower than the bottom half and only one of which is attached to the base plate. The others are arrested in a hexagonal array by oblong webs clamped together by chuck jaws which can be secured by means of screws. The parts are ground very accurately. The template according to the invention is very easy to make. (UWI) [de

  8. Heat transfer and thermal storage performance of an open thermosyphon type thermal storage unit with tubular phase change material canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ping-Yang; Hu, Bo-Wen; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel open heat pipe thermal storage unit is design to improve its performance. • Mechanism of its operation is phase-change heat transfer. • Tubular canisters with phase change material were placed in thermal storage unit. • Experiment and analysis are carried out to investigate its operation properties. - Abstract: A novel open thermosyphon-type thermal storage unit is presented to improve design and performance of heat pipe type thermal storage unit. In the present study, tubular canisters filled with a solid–liquid phase change material are vertically placed in the middle of the thermal storage unit. The phase change material melts at 100 °C. Water is presented as the phase-change heat transfer medium of the thermal storage unit. The tubular canister is wrapped tightly with a layer of stainless steel mesh to increase the surface wettability. The heat transfer mechanism of charging/discharging is similar to that of the thermosyphon. Heat transfer between the heat resource or cold resource and the phase change material in this device occurs in the form of a cyclic phase change of the heat-transfer medium, which occurs on the surface of the copper tubes and has an extremely high heat-transfer coefficient. A series of experiments and theoretical analyses are carried out to investigate the properties of the thermal storage unit, including power distribution, start-up performance, and temperature difference between the phase change material and the surrounding vapor. The results show that the whole system has excellent heat-storage/heat-release performance

  9. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  10. Smooth hybrid inflation and non-thermal Type II leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sil, Arunansu

    2013-01-01

    We consider a smooth hybrid inflation scenario based on a supersymmetricSU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R ⊗ U(1) B-L model. The Higgs triplets involved in the model play a key role in inflation as well as in explaining the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe. We show that the baryon asymmetry can originate via non-thermal triplet leptogenesis from the decay of SU(2) B-L triplets, whose tiny vacuum expectation values also provide masses for the light neutrinos. (author)

  11. Multi-physics modeling and numerical simulation of weld pool in GTA welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Minh-Chien

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we develop a 3D physical and numerical model of the GTA (Gas Tungsten Arc) welding process in order to predict, for given welding parameters, useful quantities for the designer of welded assembly: weld bead shape, fluid flow in the weld pool as well as thermal distribution in the work piece. The model is developed in the Cast3M (http://www-cast3m.cea.fr/) finite element software and takes into account the main physical phenomena acting in the work piece and particularly in the weld pool, subject to source terms modeling the arc part of the welding process. A steady solution of this model is thought for and involves the coupling of the nonlinear thermohydraulics and electromagnetic equations together with the displacement of the deformable free surface of the weld pool. A first step in the development consisted in modeling the electromagnetic phenomena with two different numerical methods, in comparing the numerical results obtained with those of the literature and in quantifying the importance of the Lorentz force and the Joule effect compared to the other mechanical and thermal sources by computing power balances. Then, in order to assess the predictive capability of the model, simulations of various welding configurations are performed: variation in the chemical composition of the material, of the welding speed, of the prescribed arc pressure and of the welding positions, which is a focus of this work, are studied. A good agreement is obtained between the results of our model and other experimental and numerical results of the literature. Eventually, a model accounting for metal filling is proposed and its results are discussed. Thus, our complete model can be seen as a solid foundation towards future totally-coupled 3D welding models including the arc and it will be included in WPROCESS the in-house CEA software dedicated to the numerical simulation of welding. (author) [fr

  12. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  13. Friction stir welding of 6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, M.A.M.S.

    2009-01-01

    6061 AA (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance such as marine frames, pipelines, storage tanks, and aircraft components [1]. It is also used for the manufacturing of fuel elements in the nuclear research reactors. Compared to many of the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural alloys, friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded is not melted and recast [2]. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding traverse speed, and tool profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. Several FSW tools (differ from each other in pin angle, shoulder diameter, and shoulder concavity) have been used to fabricate a number of joints in order to obtain a tool with which a sound weld can be produced. It was found that the FSW tool with tapered cone pin, concave shoulder, and shoulder diameter equal to four times the welded plate thickness is suitable to produce a sound weld. The effect of the traverse speed on the global and local tensile properties of friction stir welded joints has been investigated in the 6061-T6 AA. The global tensile properties of the FSW joints were improved with increasing the traverse speed at constant rotation rate. It is found that the global tensile strength of the FSW joint is limited by the local tensile strength of the nearest region to the weld center at which the cross section is composed mainly of the HAZ. The effect of the initial butt surface on the formation of the zigzag line on the tensile properties of the welds was examined by using three types of welding samples differ in the preparation of the initial butt surface. The first type of samples welded without removing the oxide layer from the initial butt surface (uncleaned butt surfaces joint). In the second type of samples the oxide layer was removed from

  14. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  15. Evaluation of Haney-Type Surface Thermal Boundary Conditions Using a Coupled Atmosphere and Ocean Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Peter C; Chen, Yuchun; Lu, Shihua

    2001-01-01

    ... (Russell et al,, 1995) was used to verify the validity of Haney-type surface thermal boundary condition, which linearly connects net downward surface heat flux Q to air / sea temperature difference DeltaT by a relaxation coefficient K...

  16. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  17. Numerical and experimental study of heat transfers in an arc plasma. Application to TIG arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borel, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The arc welding is used for many industrial applications, especially GTA welding. Given the excellent quality of the produced welds, GTA welding is used for the majority of the interventions (repairs, joined sealing) on the French nuclear park. This work is part of a project carried out by EDF R and D which aims to simulate the whole process and builds a tool able to predict the welds quality. In this study, we focus on the development of a predictive model of the exchanged heat flux at the arc - work piece interface, responsible of the work piece fusion. The modeling of the arc plasma using the electric module of the hydrodynamics software Code Saturne R developed by EDF R and D is required. Two types of experimental tests are jointly carried out to validate this numerical model: i) on density and temperature measurements of plasma by atomic emission spectroscopy and ii) on the evaluation of the heat transfers on the work piece surface. This work also aims at demonstrate that the usual method of using an equivalent thermal source to model the welding process, can be replaced by our plasma model, without the numerous trials inherent to the usual method. (author)

  18. A Review on Solidification and Change in Mechanical Properties Under Vibratory Welding Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Prakash; Dr. S.P. Tewari; Bipin Kumar Srivastava

    2010-01-01

    Welding has been applied to various industries in particular, automotive, aerospace and microelectronics. Thermal cycle produced near weld line generates residual stress and inhomogeneous plastic deformation in weldments. However there are many methods for welding the workpieces and one of the method among these is vibratory welding. It has the advantages of less investment, more convenient operation, less pollution and shorter manufacturing period. In vibratory welding, workpiece vibrates in...

  19. Finite element simulation of laser transmission welding of dissimilar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    materials between polyvinylidene fluoride and titanium ... finite element (FE) thermal model is developed to simulate the laser ... Keywords: Laser transmission welding, Temperature field, Weld dimension, Finite element analysis, Thermal modeling. 1. .... 4) The heating phenomena due to the phase changes are neglected.

  20. Influence of welding parameter on texture distribution and plastic deformation behavior of as-rolled AZ31 Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Renlong, E-mail: rlxin@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); Liu, Dejia; Shu, Xiaogang; Li, Bo; Yang, Xiaofang; Liu, Qing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has promising application potential for Mg alloys. However, softening was frequently occurred in FSW Mg joints because of the presence of a β-type fiber texture. The present study aims to understand the influence of texture distribution in stir zone (SZ) on deformation behavior and joint strength of FSW Mg welds. AZ31 Mg alloy joints were obtained by FSW with two sets of welding speed and rotation rate. Detailed microstructure and texture evolutions were examined on Mg welds by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that the changes of welding parameters can affect texture distribution and the characteristic of texture in the transition region between SZ and thermal-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ). As a consequence, the activation ability of basal slip and extension twinning was changed, which therefore influenced joint strength, inhomogeneous plastic deformation and fracture behaviors. The present work provided some insights into understanding the texture–property relationship in FSW Mg welds and indicated that it is effective to tailor the joint performance by texture control. - Highlights: • Welding parameters largely affect the inclination angle of SZ/TMAZ boundary. • Fracture morphology is associated with the characteristic of SZ/TMAZ boundary. • The characteristic of plastic deformation is explained from the activation of basal slip.

  1. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E., E-mail: vtp@igcar.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  2. New welding information system on the internet (Prediction of the properties of weld heat-affected zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fujita

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available To promote continuous transfer and development of welding technology, a new system for predicting the microstructures and mechanical properties of welded joins has been built on the Internet. It combines a database system containing continuous cooling transformation diagrams (CCT diagrams for welding and an expert system for computing weld thermal histories. In addition, this system employs a technique which was invented during the development of another distributed database system called "Data-Free-Way" , which was designed to contain information advanced nuclear materials and materials obtained from other programs of welding research at NIMS in the past. This paper describes the current state of our new system for computing weld thermal histories to predict the properties of welded joints using the CCT diagrams database, which is now available on the Internet. Some problems encountered with the database used in such a system are also referred to.

  3. Sensor controlled robotic welding for nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to apply real time monitoring, artificial intelligence and on-line correction to dynamically control the depth of weld penetration and weld integrity during the welding process. Welding is a major technique used in the fabrication, construction and maintenance of power generating and energy conversion systems. In the welding process, fluctuations in process variables lead to weld defects such as lack of penetration, cracks, porosity and undesirable metallurgical structures. This research will apply advanced infrared sensing techniques which have been successfully used in seam tracking to the equally complex problem of weld defect and weld puddle penetration control. Thermal temperature distributions of plates being welded will be dynamically measured during welding using infrared techniques. These temperature distributions will be used to interpret changes in the size and shape of the molten metal pool and the presence of conditions that may lead to defects in the solidified weld. The ultimate result of this research will be the development of machines which are capable of sensing and altering process variables to eliminate defective welds and increase the productivity of the welding process. Successful completion of this proposed research will lead to potential major improvements in the fabrication, construction and maintenance of advanced nuclear reactors and promote increased safety and reliability while decreasing construction costs. 47 refs., 50 figs

  4. DEFORMATION INFLUENCE ON A LIFETIME OF WELDING ELECTRODE TIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Viňáš

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the influence of welding electrode tips deformation on their lifetime. The influence of material properties, production technology and the intensity of welding electrodes load on their lifetime are presented. The electrode tips of the most used type of CuCr1Zr alloy of three basic standard shapes before and after the process of welding are evaluated. The process of welding is realized with low, middle and maximum welding parameters on programmable pneumatic spot welding machine VTS BPK 20. The influence of welding parameters on chosen material characteristics of welding tips is observed. Through the use of upsetting test, dependency of forming strength and deformation of material on used technology of welding tip production is observed.

  5. Gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding of ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel: Microstructural and mechanical behavior characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, S., E-mail: s.sabooni@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ngan, A.H.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Jabbari, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In the present study, an ultrafine grained (UFG) AISI 304L stainless steel with the average grain size of 650 nm was successfully welded by both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW). GTAW was applied without any filler metal. FSW was also performed at a constant rotational speed of 630 rpm and different welding speeds from 20 to 80 mm/min. Microstructural characterization was carried out by High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) with Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation, microhardness measurements and tensile tests were also performed to study the mechanical properties of the base metal and weldments. The results showed that the solidification mode in the GTAW welded sample is FA (ferrite–austenite) type with the microstructure consisting of an austenite matrix embedded with lath type and skeletal type ferrite. The nugget zone microstructure in the FSW welded samples consisted of equiaxed dynamically recrystallized austenite grains with some amount of elongated delta ferrite. Sigma phase precipitates were formed in the region ahead the rotating tool during the heating cycle of FSW, which were finally fragmented into nanometric particles and distributed in the weld nugget. Also there is a high possibility that the existing delta ferrite in the microstructure rapidly transforms into sigma phase particles during the short thermal cycle of FSW. These suggest that high strain and deformation during FSW can promote sigma phase formation. The final austenite grain size in the nugget zone was found to decrease with increasing Zener–Hollomon parameter, which was obtained quantitatively by measuring the peak temperature, calculating the strain rate during FSW and exact examination of hot deformation activation energy by considering the actual grain size before the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. Mechanical properties observations showed that the welding

  6. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless-Steel Pipes Welded by TIG Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Albdiry

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel (type 204 pipes welded by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG welding process. Testing of hardness (HRC, tensile strength and bending strength was performed for the steel pipes welded at two different welding temperatures (700 °C and 900 °C with and without using the weld filler wire. The microstructure of the welding regions was examined by using an optical microscopy. The properties showed that the steel pipes welded by 900 °C with using the weld filler obtained the highest tensile strength and bending strength versus these welded by 700 °C without the use of the weld filler. This is attributed to the weld filler heated and melt at sufficient temperature (900 °C and compensate losing in the Ni metal occurred in the base steel metal during the welding process.

  7. Tensile properties of irradiated and fatigue exposed stainless steel DIN X 6 CrNi 1811 (similar to AISI type 304) plate and welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, M.I. de; Schaaf, B. van der; Elen, J.D.

    1979-10-01

    Test specimens of plate metal and welded joints of stainless steel DIN 1.4948, which is similar to AISI type 304, have been irradiated at 723 K and 823 K up to fluences of 1.10 23 n.m -2 and 5.10 24 n.m -2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These are representative conditions for the SNR-300 reactor vessel and inner components after 16 years of operation. High-rate (depsilon/dt = 1 s -1 ) tensile tests were performed after fatigue exposure up to various fractions of fatigue life (D) ranging from 5% to 95% at the same temperatures as the nominal temperatures of the irradiation series

  8. The prediction of creep damage in type 347 weld metal. Part I: the determination of material properties from creep and tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spindler, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Calculations of creep damage under conditions of strain control are often carried out using either a time fraction approach or a ductility exhaustion approach. In the case of the time fraction approach the rupture strength is used to calculate creep damage, whereas creep ductility is used in the ductility exhaustion approach. In part I of this paper the methods that are used to determine these material properties are applied to some creep and constant strain rate tests on a Type 347 weld metal. In addition, new developments to the ductility exhaustion approach are described which give improved predictions of creep damage at failure in these tests. These developments use reverse modelling to determine the most appropriate creep damage model as a function of strain rate, stress and temperature. Hence, the new approach is no longer a ductility exhaustion approach but is a true creep damage model

  9. Evaluation of welding by MIG in martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, M.A.; Mariano, N.A.; Marinho, D.H.C. Marinho

    2010-01-01

    This work evaluated structure's characterization and mechanical properties after the welding process of the stainless steel CA6NM. The employed welding process was the metal active gas with tubular wire. The control of the thermal cycle in the welding process has fundamental importance regarding the properties of the welded joint, particularly in the thermally affected zone. The mechanical properties were appraised through impact resistance tests and the hardness and microstructure through metallographic characterization and Ray-X diffraction. The parameters and the process of welding used promoted the hardness and toughness appropriate to the applications of the steel. Welding energy's control becomes an essential factor that can affect the temperature of carbide precipitation and the nucleation of the retained austenite in the in the region of the in the thermally affected zone. (author)

  10. Modelling of the temperature field that accompanies friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosal Przemysław

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal modelling of the Friction Stir Welding process allows for better recognition and understanding of phenomena occurring during the joining process of different materials. It is of particular importance considering the possibilities of process technology parameters, optimization and the mechanical properties of the joint. This work demonstrates the numerical modelling of temperature distribution accompanying the process of friction stir welding. The axisymmetric problem described by Fourier’s type equation with internal heat source is considered. In order to solve the diffusive initial value problem a fully implicit scheme of the finite difference method is applied. The example under consideration deals with the friction stir welding of a plate (0.7 cm thick made of Al 6082-T6 by use of a tool made of tungsten alloy, whereas the material subjected to welding was TiC powder. Obtained results confirm both quantitatively and qualitatively experimental observations that the superior temperature corresponds to the zone where the pin joints the shoulder.

  11. WELDABILITY, WELDING METALLURGY, WELDING CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjito Jokosisworo

    2012-01-01

    Sambungan las merupakan bagian penting dari stuktur/bangunan yang dilas, dan kunci dari logam induk yang baik adalah kemampuan las (weld ability). Kemampuan las yang baik dan kemudahan dalam fabrikasi dari suatu logam merupakan pertimbangan dalam memilih suatu logam untuk konstruksi.

  12. Steels and welding nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessa, M.; Milella, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    This ENEA Data-Base regards mechanical properties, chemical composition and heat treatments of nuclear pressure vessel materials: type A533-B, A302-B, A508 steel plates and forgings, submerged arc welds and HAZ before and after nuclear irradiation. Irradiation experiments were generally performed in high flux material test reactors. Data were collected from international available literature about water nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials embrittlement

  13. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    software ANSYS, a thermo-mechanical model is employed to predict the thermally induced stresses and strains during welding, while an in-house finite element code is used to study the plastic flow localization and failure in a subsequent structural analysis. The coupling between the two models is made......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence......, showed the largest influence of the post-welding conditions, even though significant relaxation of the residual stress state was predicted....

  14. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T.; Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M.; Le Barbier, R.; Määttä, T.; Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  15. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Le Barbier, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Määttä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  16. Thermal performance of plate-type loop thermosyphon at sub-atmospheric pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoi, Vadim; Chang, Shyy Woei; Chiang Kuei Feng; Huang, Chuan Chin

    2011-01-01

    This experimental study examines the thermal performance of a newly devised plate-type two-phase loop thermosyphon with cooling applications to electronic boards of telecommunication systems. The evaporation section is configured as the inter-connected multi channels to emulate the bridging boiling mechanism in pulsating thermosyphon. Two thermosyphon plates using water as the coolant with filling ratios (FR) of 0.22 and 0.32 are tested at sub-atmospheric pressures. The vapor-liquid flow images as well as the thermal resistances and effective spreading thermal conductivities are individually measured for each thermosyphon test plate at various heating powers. The high-speed digital images of the vapor-liquid flow structures reveal the characteristic boiling phenomena and the vapor-liquid circulation in the vertical thermosyphon plate, which assist to explore the thermal physics for this type of loop thermosyphon. The bubble agglomeration and pumping action in the inter-connected boiling channels take place at metastable non-equilibrium conditions, leading to the intermittent slug flows with a pulsation character. Such hybrid loop-pulsating thermosyphon permits the vapor-liquid circulation in the horizontal plate. Thermal resistances and spreading thermal conductivities detected from the present thermosyphon plates; the vapor chamber flat plate heat pipe and the copper plate at free and forced convective cooling conditions with both vertical and horizontal orientations are cross-examined. In most telecommunication systems and units, the electrical boards are vertical so that the thermal performance data on the vertical thermosyphon are most relevant to this particular application. - Highlights: → We examine thermal performances of plate-type loop thermosyphon. → Thermal resistances and spreading conductivities are examined. → Bubble agglomeration in inter-connected boiling channels generates intermittent slug flows with pulsations. → Boiling instability

  17. Study of the Zircaloy-2 welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Solano, R.; Jimenez Moreno, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    After a bibliographical analysis of the Zircaloy-2 properties its welding was approached. The selected procedure is the TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) d.c. arc-welding under an inert atmosphere vessel. A detailed description of the equipment and characteristics is given. During the tests two types of argon were used: one with 96 ppm. Impurities, the other with 7 ppm- impurities. It is al so mentioned the welding in helium atmosphere. The contamination of the welding was evaluated through hardness testing. (Author) 3 refs

  18. Analysis of the Corrosion Behavior of an A-TIG Welded SS 409 Weld Fusion Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.

    2017-11-01

    AISI 409 (SS 409) ferritic stainless steel is generally used as the thick gauge section in freight train wagons, in ocean containers, and in sugar refinery equipment. Activating the flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding process can reduce the welding cost during fabrication of thick sections. However, corrosion behavior of the A-TIG weld fusion zone is a prime concern for this type of steel. In the present work, the effect of the A-TIG welding process parameters on the corrosion behavior of a weld fusion zone made of 8-mm-thick AISI 409 ferritic stainless-steel plate has been analyzed. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion behavior. The maximum corrosion potential ( E corr) was shown by the weld made using a welding current of 215 A, a welding speed of 95 mm/min, and a flux coating density of 0.81 mg/cm2. The minimum E corr was observed in the weld made using a welding current of 190 A, a welding speed of 120 mm/min, and a flux coating density of 1.40 mg/cm2. The current study also presents the inclusive microstructure-corrosion property relationships using the collective techniques of scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction.

  19. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  20. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat...... generation and local material deformation (often referred to as flow) during the welding process itself. ii) Prediction of the residual stresses that will be present in the joint structure post to welding. While the former in general will call for a fully-coupled thermomechanical procedure, however...... for the FSW process at hand, the heat generation must either be prescribed analytically or based on a fully coupled analysis of the welding process itself. Along this line, a recently proposed thermal-pseudo-mechanical model is presented in which the temperature dependent yield stress of the weld material...

  1. Weld repair of creep damaged steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croker, A.B.L.; Harrison, R.P.; Moss, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    A cooperative research centre project 'Welding of Thermally Modified Structures' was commenced in June 1993 with support from ANSTO, CSIRO, BHP, University of Wollongong and the CRC for Materials, Welding and Joining. The main aims of the project are to quantify the effects of performing repair welds on materials which have operated for extended periods at elevated temperature. Welding is an increasingly used method for performing repairs, replacements, retrofits and modifications to elevated temperature plant, however, the effects of these repairs on the ultimate life of a component are poorly understood. This paper presents details of the three ex-service materials chosen for the project, a carbon steel and two alloy steels. Work is also presented on development of new methods of assessing materials and components both destructively, along with new methods of modelling welded components in high temperature service. 6 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials

  3. Use of narrow gap welding in nuclear power engineering and development of welding equipment at Vitkovice Iron Works (VZSKG), Ostrava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehar, F.; Sevcik, P.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly discussed are problems related to automatic submerged arc welding into narrow gaps. The said method was tested for the first time at the Vitkovice Iron Works VZSKG for peripheral welds on pressurizers for WWER-440 reactors. The demands are summed up which are put on the welding workplace which must be met for the use of the said technology. The requirements mainly include the provision of the positioning of the welding nozzle towards the weld gap in order to maximally exclude the effect of the welder. An automatic device was designed and manufactured at the VZSKG plant for mounting the welding nozzle on the automatic welding machine manufactured by ESAB which operates on the principle of the flexible compression of the nozzle to the wall of the weld gap. In the bottom part the welding nozzle is provided with a pulley which rolls during welding thereby providing a constant distance to be maintained between the welding wire and the wall of the weld gap. The diameter of the pulley is ruled by the diameter of the welding wire. Provided the clamping part is appropriately adjusted the developed equipment may be used for any type of automatic welding machine with motor driven supports. (Z.M.). 8 figs., 5 tabs., 9 refs

  4. Stress corrosion crack growth studies on nitrogen added AISI type 316 stainless steel and its weld metal in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution using the fracture mechanics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, H.; George, G.; Khatak, H.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Div. of Metallurgy; Schneider, F.; Mummert, K. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallische Werkstoffe

    2000-10-01

    Compact tension specimens of nitrogen-added AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel and its weld metal were subject to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing in a boiling solution containing 5 M sodium chloride + 0.15 M sodium sulphate + 2.5 ml/l hydrochloric acid solution using the constant extension rate testing (CERT) technique. The extension rate of testing was 10 microns per hour. The threshold values of stress intensify factor (K{sub ISCC}) and J-integral (J{sub ISCC}) were taken as those values of K{sub I} and J{sub I} at which about 25 microns of SCC crack growth was observed. These threshold values were about four times higher and plateau crack growth rates (PCGR) were nearly one order of magnitude lower for the base metal vis-a-vis the weld metal. Fractographic observations indicated failure by transgranular SCC (TGSCC) of austenite in both the base and weld metal. No stress-assisted dissolution of delta-ferrite or its interface with austenite, was observed. (orig.) [German] CT-Proben von Grund- und Schweissnahtwerkstoff des stickstoffhaltigen Stahles AISI 316 LN wurden Spannungsrisskorrosionstests in siedender chloridhaltiger Loesung (5 M Natriumchlorid/0,15 M Natriumsulfat/0,03 M Salzsaeure) unterzogen. Die Tests erfolgten bei konstanter Dehnrate (CERT-Test) von 10 {mu}m/h. Als Schwellwerte der Initiierung von Spannungsrisskorrosion K{sub ISCC} und I{sub ISCC} wurden die Werte des Spannungsintensitaetsfaktors K{sub I} und des J-Integrals J{sub I} ermittelt, bei denen ein Risswachstum von 25 {mu}m auftrat. Dabei wies der Grundwerkstoff 4-fach hoehere Schwellwerte K{sub ISCC} und J{sub ISCC} auf als der Schweissnahtwerkstoff. Auch die Risswachstumsraten im Plateaubereich der Risswachstumsrate-Spannungsintensitaetskruven waren am Grundwerkstoff um eine Groessenordnung geringer als am Schweissnahtwerkstoff. Die fraktorgrahischen Untersuchungen zeigten an beiden Materialien Schaedigung durch transkristalline Spannungsrisskorrosion. Eine

  5. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  6. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  7. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mitiaev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of ark welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc welding by the electrode with a diameter of 3 mm of AK-5 alloy. Metal structure of the welded joint was examined under the light microscope at a magnification of 200 and under the scanning electronic microscope «JSM-6360 LA». The Rockwell hardness (HRF was used as a strength characteristic of alloy. Hardness measuring of the phase constituents (microhardness was carried out using the device PМТ-3, with the indenter loadings 5 and 10 g. The crystalline structure parameters of alloy (dislocation density, second kind of the crystalline grid distortion and the scale of coherent scattering regions were determined using the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Electric pulse treatment (ET was carried out on the special equipment in the conditions of the DS enterprise using two modes A and В. Findings. On the basis of researches the previously obtained microhardness redistribution effect in the area of welded connection after ET was confirmed. As a result of use of the indicated treatment it was determined not only the reduction of microhardness gradient but also the simultaneous hardening effect in the certain thermal affected areas near the welding seam. During study of chemical composition of phase constituents it was discovered, that the structural changes of alloy as a result of ET first of all are caused by the redistribution of chemical elements, which form the connections themselves. By the nature of the influence the indicated treatment can be

  8. GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) process development for girth welding of high strength pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Vaidyanath; Daniel, Joe; Quintana, Marie [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yaoshan [Center for Reliable Energy Systems (CRES), Dublin, OH (United States); Souza, Antonio [Lincoln Electric do Brasil, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and findings from the first phase of a consolidated program co-funded by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and Pipeline Research Council Inc (PRCI) to develop pipe weld assessment and qualification methods and optimize X 100 pipe welding technologies. One objective of the program is to establish the range of viable welding options for X 100 line pipe, and define the essential variables to provide welding process control for reliable and consistent mechanical performance of the weldments. In this first phase, a series of narrow gap girth welds were made with pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW), instrumented with thermocouples in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal to obtain the associated thermal profiles, and instrumented to measure true energy input as opposed to conventional heat input. Results reveal that true heat input is 16%-22% higher than conventional heat input. The thermal profile measurements correlate very well with thermal model predictions using true energy input data, which indicates the viability of treating the latter as an essential variable. Ongoing microstructural and mechanical testing work will enable validation of an integrated thermal-microstructural model being developed for these applications. Outputs from this model will be used to correlate essential welding process variables with weld microstructure and hardness. This will ultimately enable development of a list of essential variables and the ranges needed to ensure mechanical properties are achieved in practice, recommendations for controlling and monitoring these essential variables and test methods suitable for classification of welding consumables. (author)

  9. Testing of electron beam welding by ultrasonic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touffait, A.-M.; Roule, M.; Destribats, M.-T.

    1978-01-01

    Focalized ultrasonic testing is well adapted to the study of electron beam welding. This type of welding leads to narrow weld beads and to small dimension testing zones. Focalized transducers can be used enabling very small defects to be detected [fr

  10. Possibilities of using welding-on technologies in crane wheel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The paper deals with analysis of welds-on quality of traverse crane wheels made from gr. 90–60 mate- rial, ASTM A148. Three types of welding-on technology with various filling materials were used. On wheel after wearing was welded-on one interlayer by a combination of additional materials, wire A 106 with F 11 ...

  11. Effect of the weld thermal cycles by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA) on the mechanical properties of the AA6061-T6 alloy; Efecto de los ciclo termicos de soldadura por arco electrico indirecto modificado (AEIM) en las propiedades mecanicas de la aleacion AA6061-T6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriz, R. A.; Barrera, G.; Garcia, R.; Lopez, V. H.

    2009-07-01

    Results of temperature measurements during welding of 12.7 mm thick AA6061-T6 alloy plates by modified indirect electric arc (MIEA) are presented. This study describes the thermal cycles of the heat affected zone (HAZ) and also in the fusion zone. Depending upon the position of the transducers, the maximum temperatures measured in the HAZ range from 308 to 693 degree centigrade, these measurements were related with the tensile test results, and the failure zone reported previously by the authors. It was observed that, there is a decrease in the mechanical strength of the welded joints, due to the microstructural changes suffered by AA6061-T6 alloy in which formation of the {beta}occurs according to the TTT transformation diagram. The inherent cooling conditions of the weld pool observed for the MIEA technique (only one pass of welding), have permitted to establish the characteristics of solidification and microstructure for a specific cooling rate. (Author) 24 refs.

  12. Pulsed infrared thermography for assessment of ultrasonic welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Megan E.; Rinker, Teresa J.; Sekol, Ryan C.

    2018-03-01

    Battery packs are a critical component in electric vehicles. During pack assembly, the battery cell tab and busbar are ultrasonically welded. The properties of the welds ultimately affect battery pack durability. Quality inspection of these welds is important to ensure durable battery packs. Pack failure is detrimental economically and could also pose a safety hazard, such as thermal runaway. Ultrasonic welds are commonly checked by measuring electrical resistance or auditing using destructive mechanical testing. Resistance measurements are quick, but sensitive to set-up changes. Destructive testing cannot represent the entire weld set. It is possible for a weak weld to satisfy the electrical requirement check, because only sufficient contact between the tabs and busbar is required to yield a low resistance measurement. Laboratory techniques are often not suitable for inline inspection, as they may be time-consuming, use couplant, or are only suitable for coupons. The complex surface geometry also poses difficulties for conventional nondestructive techniques. A method for inspection of ultrasonic welds is proposed using pulsed infrared thermography to identify discrepant welds in a manufacturing environment. Thermal measurements of welds were compared to electrical and mechanical measurements. The heat source distribution was calculated to obtain thermal images with high temporal and spatial resolution. All discrepant welds were readily identifiable using two thermographic techniques: pixel counting and the gradient image. A positive relationship between pixel count and mechanical strength was observed. The results demonstrate the potential of pulsed thermography for inline inspection, which can complement, or even replace, conventional electrical resistance measurements.

  13. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  14. Residual stresses in zircaloy welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R.; Fernandez, L; Vizcaino, P.; Banchik, A.D.; Samper, R; Martinez, R. L; Almer, J; Motta, A.T.; Colas, K.B; Kerr, M.; Daymond, M.R

    2009-01-01

    Welds in Zirconium-based alloys are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, as H enters the material due to dissociation of water. The yield strain for hydride cracking has a complex dependence on H concentration, stress state and texture. The large thermal gradients produced by the applied heat; drastically changes the texture of the material in the heat affected zone, enhancing the susceptibility to delayed hydride cracking. Normally hydrides tend to form as platelets that are parallel to the normal direction, but when welding plates, hydride platelets may form on cooling with their planes parallel to the weld and through the thickness of the plates. If, in addition to this there are significant tensile stresses, the susceptibility of the heat affected zone to delayed hydride cracking will be increased. Here we have measured the macroscopic and microscopic residual stressed that appear after PLASMA welding of two 6mm thick Zircaloy-4 plates. The measurements were based on neutron and synchrotron diffraction experiments performed at the Isis Facility, UK, and at Advanced Photon Source, USA, respectively. The experiments allowed assessing the effect of a post-weld heat treatment consisting of a steady increase in temperature from room temperature to 450oC over a period of 4.5 hours; followed by cooling with an equivalent cooling rate. Peak tensile stresses of (175± 10) MPa along the longitudinal direction were found in the as-welded specimen, which were moderately reduced to (150±10) MPa after the heat-treatment. The parent material showed intergranular stresses of (56±4) MPa, which disappeared on entering the heat-affected zone. In-situ experiments during themal cyclong of the material showed that these intergranular stresses result from the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficient of the hexagonal crystal lattice. [es

  15. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  16. The effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructure of ferritic and duplex stainless steels welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, J.; Kujanpää, V.

    This study is focused to determine empirically, which microstructural changes occur in ferritic and duplex stainless steels when heat input is controlled by welding parameters. Test welds were done autogenously bead-on-plate without shielding gas using 5 kW fiber laser. For comparison, some gas tungsten arc welds were made. Used test material were 1.4016 (AISI 430) and 1.4003 (low-carbon ferritic) type steels in ferritic steels group and 1.4162 (low-alloyed duplex, LDX2101) and 1.4462 (AISI 2205) type steels in duplex steels group. Microstructural changes in welds were identified and examined using optical metallographic methods.

  17. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen vitrified gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Zhiyong; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer; Guo, Qiongyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analyzed the denaturation of vitrigels synthesized under different conditions. ► Overall denaturation kinetics consisted of both reversible and irreversible steps. ► More stable vitrigels were formed under high level of vitrification. - Abstract: The denaturation kinetics of type I collagen vitrigels synthesized under different vitrification time and temperature were analyzed by the classical Kissinger approach and the advanced model free kinetics (AMFK) using the Vyazovkin algorithm. The AMFK successfully elucidated the overall denaturation into reversible and irreversible processes. Depending on vitrification conditions, the activation energy for the irreversible process ranged from 100 to 200 kJ/mol, and the reversible enthalpy ranged from 250 to 300 kJ/mol. All of these values increased with the vitrification time and temperature, indicating that a more stable and complex structure formed with increased vitrification. The classical Kissinger method predicted the presence of a critical temperate of approximately 60 °C for the transition between reversible and irreversible processes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of fibril structures in vitrigels both before and after full denaturation; however the fibrils had became thicker and rougher after denaturation.

  18. MAG narrow gap welding - an economic way to minimize welding expenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, W.; Scholz, E.; Weyland, F.

    1982-01-01

    The thicker structural components are, the more important it is to take measures to reduce the volume of the weld. The welding process requiring the smallest possible weld section is the so-called narrow gap process. In submerged arc narrow gap welding as well as in MAG narrow gap welding different variants are imaginable, some of them already in practical use. With regard to efficiency and weld quality an optimum variant of the MAG narrow gap welding process is described. It constitutes a two wire system in which two wire electrodes of 1.2 mm diameter are arranged one behind the other. In order to avoid lack of fusion, the wire guides are slightly pointed towards each groove face. Thus, by inclining the two arcs burning one behind the other in the direction of weld progress, it is achieved that two separately solidifying weld pools and two beads per layer are simultaneously formed. Welding parameters are selected in such a way that a heat input of 16-20 kJ/cm and a deposition rate of 11-16 kgs/h are obtained. In spite of this comparatively high deposition rate, good impact values are found both in the weld and HAZ (largely reduced coarse-grain zone) which is due to an optimum weld build-up. With the available welding equipment the process can be applied to structural members having a thickness of 40-400 mm. The width of gap is 13 mm (root section) with a bevel angle of 1 0 . As filler metal, basic flux-cored wires are used which, depending on the base metal to be welded and the required tensile properties, can be of the Mn-, MnMo-, MnCrMo-, MnNi-, or MnNiMo-alloyed types. (orig.)

  19. Pulsed TIG welding in the fabrication of nuclear components and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, W.; Males, B.O.

    1979-01-01

    TIG welding is an important welding technique in nuclear plant fabrication for the welding of critical components and structures where a high level of weld integrity is demanded. Whilst the process is ideally suited to precision welding, since the arc is a small intense heat source, it has proved to be somewhat intolerant to production variations in 'difficult' applications, such as tube to tube plate welding and orbital tube welding with tube in the fixed position. Whilst the problems directly associated with this intolerance (of the welding process) are less frequently observed when used manually, difficulties are experienced in fully mechanised welding operations particularly when welding to a relatively rigid approved procedure. Pulsing of the welding current was developed as a technique to achieve greater control of the behaviour of the weld pool. Instead of moving the weld pool in a continuous motion around the joint, welding was conducted intermittently in the form of overlapping spots. This technique, which offers significant advantages over continuous current welding has been exploited in nuclear fabrication for welding those components which demand a high level of weld quality. In this paper, the essential features of this technique are described and, in indicating its advantages, examples have been drawn from recent experiences on the welding of two types of joint for the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor, a tube sheet and a butt joint in the G Position. (author)

  20. 46 CFR 2.75-70 - Welding procedure and performance qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedure and performance qualifications. 2.75... for Construction Personnel § 2.75-70 Welding procedure and performance qualifications. (a) Welding... requirements for the welding of pressure piping, boilers, pressure vessels, and nonpressure vessel type tanks...

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Metal Active Gas (MAG) Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model for MAG (metal active gas) arc welding of thin plate has been developed. In MAG arc welding, the electrode wire is melted and supplied into the molten pool intermittently. Accordingly, it is assumed on the modeling that the thermal energy enters the base-plates through two following mechanisms, i.e., direct heating from arc plasma and “indirect” heating from the deposited metal. In the second part of the paper, MAG arc welding process is numerically analyzed by using the model, and the calculated weld bead dimension and surface profile have been compared with the experimental MAG welds on steel plate. As the result, it is made clear that the model is capable of predicting the bead profile of thin-plate MAG arc welding , including weld bead with undercutting.

  2. SATCAP-C : a program for thermal hydraulic design of pressurized water injection type capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Someya, Hiroyuki; Asoh, Tomokazu; Niimi, Motoji

    1992-10-01

    There are capsules called 'Pressure Water Injection Type Capsule' as a kind of irradiation devices at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). A type of the capsules is a 'Boiling Water Capsule' (usually named BOCA). The other type is a 'Saturated Temperature Capsule' (named SATCAP). When the water is kept at a constant pressure, the water temperature does not become higher than the saturated temperature so far as the water does not fully change to steam. These type capsules are designed on the basis of the conception of applying the water characteristic to the control of irradiation temperature of specimens in the capsules. In designing of the capsules in which the pressurized water is injected, thermal performances have to be understood as exactly as possible. It is not easy however to predict thermal performances such as axially temperature distribution of water injected in the capsule, because there are heat-sinks at both side of inner and outer of capsule casing as the result that the water is fluid. Then, a program (named SATCAP-C) for the BOCA and SATCAP was compiled to grasp the thermal performances in the capsules and has been used the design of the capsules and analysis of the data obtained from some actual irradiation capsules. It was confirmed that the program was effective in thermal analysis for the capsules. The analysis found out the values for heat transfer coefficients at various surfaces of capsule components and some thermal characteristics of capsules. (author)

  3. Protection of welded joints against corrosion degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Welded joints form an integral part of steel constructions. Welded joints are undetachable joints, which are however subjects of corrosion processes. The internal energy increases during the fusion welding especially in the heat affected places around the welded joint, which become initiating spot of corrosion degradation.The aim of the experiment is to put a welded joint produced by the MAG method to a test of corrosion degradation under the conditions of the norm ČSN ISO 9227 (salt-spray test. Organic and inorganic anticorrosion protections were applied on welded beads. First of all, there were prepared welded beads using the method MAG; secondly, metallographical analyses of welded metal, heat affected places and base material were processed. Further, microhardness as well as analysis of chemical composition using the EDS microscope were analysed. Based on a current trend in anticorrosion protections, there were chosen three types of protective coatings. First protective system was a double-layer synthetic system, where the base layer is formed by paint Pragroprimer S2000 and the upper layer by finishing paint Industrol S 2013. Second protective system is a duplex system formed by a combination of a base zinc coating with Zinorex paint. The last protective system was formed by zinc dipping only. Corrosion resistance of the individual tested samples was evaluated based on degradation of protective coating. The corrosion origin as well as the corrosion process were observed, the main criteria was the observation of welded bead.

  4. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  5. An Approach to Maximize Weld Penetration During TIG Welding of P91 Steel Plates by Utilizing Image Processing and Taguchi Orthogonal Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Debnath, Tapas; Dey, Vidyut; Rai, Ram Naresh

    2017-10-01

    P-91 is modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Fabricated structures and components of P-91 has a lot of application in power and chemical industry owing to its excellent properties like high temperature stress corrosion resistance, less susceptibility to thermal fatigue at high operating temperatures. The weld quality and surface finish of fabricated structure of P91 is very good when welded by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG). However, the process has its limitation regarding weld penetration. The success of a welding process lies in fabricating with such a combination of parameters that gives maximum weld penetration and minimum weld width. To carry out an investigation on the effect of the autogenous TIG welding parameters on weld penetration and weld width, bead-on-plate welds were carried on P91 plates of thickness 6 mm in accordance to a Taguchi L9 design. Welding current, welding speed and gas flow rate were the three control variables in the investigation. After autogenous (TIG) welding, the dimension of the weld width, weld penetration and weld area were successfully measured by an image analysis technique developed for the study. The maximum error for the measured dimensions of the weld width, penetration and area with the developed image analysis technique was only 2 % compared to the measurements of Leica-Q-Win-V3 software installed in optical microscope. The measurements with the developed software, unlike the measurements under a microscope, required least human intervention. An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) confirms the significance of the selected parameters. Thereafter, Taguchi's method was successfully used to trade-off between maximum penetration and minimum weld width while keeping the weld area at a minimum.

  6. Investigation of heat transfer and fluid flow in activating TIG welding by numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Huang, Jiankang; Huang, Yong; Fan, Ding; Guo, Yanning

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The heat input to the anode and subsequent thermal efficiency is almost equal for TIG and A-TIG welding. • Dominant effect heat convection and reversion of molten metal flow in weld pool causes significant increase in weld penetration. - Abstract: Heat transfer and fluid flow of arc plasma and weld pool in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of SUS 304 stainless steel are investigated comparatively though a 3D unified model. The model differs from the previous ones in that it considers the arc length more realistic for welding production. Tungsten electrode, anode (work piece) and arc plasma are all included. The effects of buoyance, plasma drag force, Lorentz force and Marangoni force on the weld pool flow are taken into account. By solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy as well as Maxwell equations, the distributions of temperature and velocity of arc plasma and weld pool are obtained for TIG and A-TIG welding. The heat flux, current density and shear stress at the weld pool are presented. Dimensionless numbers are employed to compare the relative importance of the driven forces and that of convection and conduction in heat transfer of the weld pool. It is demonstrated that there is no significant difference in the heat flux at the weld pool, and total heat input to the anode and thermal efficiency is almost equal for TIG and A-TIG welding. The current density and the heat flux at the weld pool are more concentrated in more realistic welding condition. As a result, both of the temperature of the weld pool for TIG welding and A-TIG welding increases, while the latter is more significant. Marangoni force ranges from zero to 100 Pa and dominant the weld pool flow. Compared with the conventional TIG welding, the reversion of the Marangoni force results in inward flow and thus causes inward heat convection in weld pool of A-TIG welding. Heat convection was the main mechanism of

  7. Some studies on weld bead geometries for laser spot welding process using finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva Shanmugam, N.; Buvanashekaran, G.; Sankaranarayanasamy, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, a 2 kW Nd:YAG laser welding system is used to conduct laser spot welding trials. → The size and shape of the laser spot weld is predicted using finite element simulation. → The heat input is assumed to be a three-dimensional conical Gaussian heat source. → The result highlights the effect of beam incident angle on laser spot welds. → The achieved results of numerical simulation are almost identical with a real weldment. -- Abstract: Nd:YAG laser beam welding is a high power density welding process which has the capability to focus the beam to a very small spot diameter of about 0.4 mm. It has favorable characteristics namely, low heat input, narrow heat affected zone and lower distortions, as compared to conventional welding processes. In this study, finite element method (FEM) is applied for predicting the weld bead geometry i.e. bead length (BL), bead width (BW) and depth of penetration (DP) in laser spot welding of AISI 304 stainless steel sheet of thickness 2.5 mm. The input parameters of laser spot welding such as beam power, incident angle of the beam and beam exposure time are varied for conducting experimental trials and numerical simulations. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of AISI 304 stainless steel, the effect of latent heat of fusion, and the convective and radiative aspects of boundary conditions are considered while developing the finite element model. The heat input to the developed model is assumed to be a three-dimensional conical Gaussian heat source. Finite-element simulations of laser spot welding were carried out by using Ansys Parametric Design Language (APDL) available in finite-element code, ANSYS. The results of the numerical analysis provide the shape of the weld beads for different ranges of laser input parameters that are subsequently compared with the results obtained through experimentation and it is found that they are in good agreement.

  8. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  9. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  10. Review on factors influencing thermal conductivity of concrete incorporating various type of waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misri, Z.; Ibrahim, M. H. W.; Awal, A. S. M. A.; Desa, M. S. M.; Ghadzali, N. S.

    2018-04-01

    Concrete is well-known as a construction material which is widely used in building and infrastructure around the world. However, its widespread use has affected the reduction of natural resources. Hence, many approached have been made by researchers to study the incorporation of waste materials in concrete as a substitution for natural resources besides reducing waste disposal problems. Concrete is basically verified by determining its properties; strengths, permeability, shrinkage, durability, thermal properties etc. In various thermal properties of concrete, thermal conductivity (TC) has received a large amount of attention because it is depend upon the composition of concrete. Thermal conductivity is important in building insulation to measure the ability of a material to transfer heat. The aim of this paper is to discuss the methods and influence factors of TC of concrete containing various type of waste materials.

  11. Flux distribution in phantom for biomedical use of beam-type thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji; Kimura, Itsuro

    1985-01-01

    For boron neutron capture therapy, the thermal neutron beam is worth using as therapeutic neutron irradiation without useless and unfavorable exposure of normal tissues around tumor and for microanalysis system to measure ppm-order 10 B concentrations in tissue and to search for the location of the metastasis of tumor. In the present study, the thermal neutron flux distribution in a phantom, when beam-type thermal neutrons were incident on it, was measured at the KUR Neutron Guide Tube. The measurements were carried out by two different methods using indium foil. The one is an ordinary foil activation technique by using the 115 In(n, γ) 116m 1 In reactions, while the other is to detect γ-rays from the 115 In(n, γ) 116m 2 In reactions during neutron irradiations with a handy-type Ge detector. The calculations with DOT 3.5 were performed to examine thermal neutron flux in the phantom for various beam size and phantom size. The experimental and calculated results are in good agreement and it is shown that the second type measurement has a potential for practical application as a new monitoring system of the thermal neutron flux in a living body for boron neutron capture therapy. (author)

  12. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  13. Structural and Thermal Safety Analysis Report for the Type B Radioactive Waste Transport Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S

    2007-09-15

    We carried out structural safety evaluation for the type B radioactive waste transport package. Requirements for type B packages according to the related regulations such as IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1, Korea Most Act. 2001-23 and US 10 CFR Part 71 were evaluated. General requirements for packages such as those for a lifting attachment, a tie-down attachment and pressure condition were considered. For the type B radioactive waste transport package, the structural, thermal and containment analyses were carried out under the normal transport conditions. Also the safety analysis were conducted under the accidental transport conditions. The 9 m drop test, 1 m puncture test, fire test and water immersion test under the accidental transport conditions were consecutively done. The type B radioactive waste transport packages were maintained the structural and thermal integrities.

  14. Comparing the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Welds on Ductile Cast Iron (700 MPa under Different Heat Treatment Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny M. Gouveia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The weldability of ductile iron, as widely known, is relatively poor, essentially due to its typical carbon equivalent value. The present study was developed surrounding the heat treatability of welded joints made with a high strength ductile cast iron detaining an ultimate tensile strength of 700 MPa, and aims to determine which heat treatment procedures promote the best results, in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. These types of alloys are suitable for the automotive industry, as they allow engineers to reduce the thickness of parts while maintaining mechanical strength, decreasing the global weight of vehicles and providing a path for more sustainable development. The results allow us to conclude that heat treatment methodology has a large impact on the mechanical properties of welded joints created from the study material. However, the thermal cycles suffered during welding promote the formation of ledeburite areas near the weld joint. This situation could possibly be dealt through the implementation of post-welding heat treatments (PWHT with specific parameters. In contrast to a ductile cast iron tested in a previous work, the bull-eye ductile cast iron with 700 MPa ultimate tensile strength presented better results during the post-welding heat treatment than during preheating.

  15. Effect of welding speed on microstructural and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K.H.; Fujii, H.; Nakata, K.

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate the properties of a friction stir welded Ni base alloy, Inconel 600 (single phase type) was selected. Sound friction stir welds without weld defect were obtained at 150 and 200 mm/min in welding speed, however, a groove like defect occurred at 250 mm/min. The electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) method was used to analyze the grain boundary character distribution. As a result, dynamic recrystallization was observed at all conditions, and the grain refinement was achieved in the stir zone, and it was gradually accelerated from 19 μm in average grain size of the base material to 3.4 μm in the stir zone with increasing the welding speed. It also has an effect on the mechanical properties so that friction stir welded zone showed 20% higher microhardness and 10% higher tensile strength than those of base material.

  16. Dye-enhanced laser welding for skin closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoste, S D; Farinelli, W; Flotte, T; Anderson, R R

    1992-01-01

    The use of a laser to weld tissue in combination with a topical photosensitizing dye permits selective delivery of energy to the target tissue. A combination of indocyanine green (IG), absorption peak 780 nm, and the near-infrared (IR) alexandrite laser was studied with albino guinea pig skin. IG was shown to bind to the outer 25 microns of guinea pig dermis and appeared to be bound to collagen. The optical transmittance of full-thickness guinea pig skin in the near IR was 40% indicating that the alexandrite laser should provide adequate tissue penetration. Laser "welding" of skin in vivo was achieved at various concentrations of IG from 0.03 to 3 mg/cc using the alexandrite at 780 nm, 250-microseconds pulse duration, 8 Hz, and a 4-mm spot size. A spectrum of welds was obtained from 1- to 20-W/cm2 average irradiance. Weak welds occurred with no thermal damage obtained at lower irradiances: stronger welds with thermal damage confined to the weld site occurred at higher irradiances. At still higher irradiances, local vaporization occurred with failure to "weld." Thus, there was an optimal range of irradiances for "welding," which varied inversely with dye concentration. Histology confirmed the thermal damage results that were evident clinically. IG dye-enhanced laser welding is possible in skin and with further optimization may have practical application.

  17. High Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Studies in Stainless Steel 316L(N Welds Processed by A-TIG and MP-TIG Welding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Welded stainless steel components used in power plants and chemical industries are subjected to mechanical load cycles at elevated temperatures which result in early fatigue failures. The presence of weld makes the component to be liable to failure in view of residual stresses at the weld region or in the neighboring heat affected zone apart from weld defects. Austenitic stainless steels are often welded using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG process. In case of single pass welding, there is a reduced weld penetration which results in a low depth-to-width ratio of weld bead. If the number of passes is increased (Multi-Pass TIG welding, it results in weld distortion and subsequent residual stress generation. The activated flux TIG welding, a variant of TIG welding developed by E.O. Paton Institute, is found to reduce the limitation of conventional TIG welding, resulting in a higher depth of penetration using a single pass, reduced weld distortion and higher welding speeds. This paper presents the fatigue crack growth rate characteristics at 823 K temperature in type 316LN stainless steel plates joined by conventional multi-pass TIG (MP-TIG and Activated TIG (A-TIG welding process. Fatigue tests were conducted to characterize the crack growth rates of base metal, HAZ and Weld Metal for A-TIG and MP-TIG configurations. Micro structural evaluation of 316LN base metal suggests a primary austenite phase, whereas, A-TIG weld joints show an equiaxed grain distribution along the weld center and complete penetration during welding (Fig. 1. MP-TIG microstructure shows a highly inhomogeneous microstructure, with grain orientation changing along the interface of each pass. This results in tortuous crack growth in case of MP-TIG welded specimens. Scanning electron microscopy studies have helped to better understand the fatigue crack propagation modes during high temperature testing.

  18. Fatigue damage evaluation method for the longitudinal welded joint of a FBR main vessel in the vicinity of the sodium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Masayuki; Shimokoshi, Minoru; Negishi, Hitoshi; Nagata, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    Metallurgical discontinuities are dominant in the fatigue strength reductions at the welded joints of vessels whose surfaces could be finished. In the welded joints of SUS 304 with TYPE 308 weld metal fatigue strength reductions are caused by strain concentrations as the result of the softening of the weld metal. A combination model of two elastic fully plastic materials is applicable to the structures under thermal stresses where displacements are self-controlled. Metallurgical discontinuities are represented by the difference of the yield strength. The longitudinal welded joint of a large FBR main vessel in the vicinity of the sodium surface was analyzed using this model under various conditions related to the design. Strain concentrations at the welded joint could be evaluated using the elastic follow-up model. The maximum value of the elastic follow-up parameter was 3.0 if the yield stress ratio of the weld metal to the base metal was not less than 0.8. (author)

  19. Assessment of delta ferrite in multipass TIG welds of 40 mm thick SS 316L: A comparative study of ferrite number (FN) prediction and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Raole, P. M.; Sarkar, B.

    2017-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the fabrication of fusion reactor major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, cryostat and other structural components development. Multipass welding is used for the development of thick plates for the structural components fabrication. Due to the repeated weld thermal cycles, the microstructure adversely alters owing to the presence of complex phases like austenite, ferrite and delta ferrite and subsequently influences the mechanical properties like tensile and impact toughness of joints. The present paper reports the detail analysis of delta ferrite phase in welded region of 40 mm thick SS316L plates welded by special design multipass narrow groove TIG welding process under three different heat input conditions. The correlation of delta ferrite microstructure of different type structures acicular and vermicular is observed. The chemical composition of weld samples was used to predict the Ferrite Number (FN), which is representative form of delta ferrite in welds, with Schaeffler’s, WRC-1992 diagram and DeLong techniques by calculating the Creq and Nieq ratios and compared with experimental data of FN from Feritescope measurements. The low heat input conditions (1.67 kJ/mm) have produced higher FN (7.28), medium heat input (1.72 kJ/mm) shown FN (7.04) where as high heat input (1.87 kJ/mm) conditions has shown FN (6.68) decreasing trend and FN data is compared with the prediction methods.

  20. Modeling of the mechanical behaviour of welded structures: behaviour laws and rupture criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, T.; Delaplanche, D.; Saanouni, K.

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the technological developments carried out in the CEA, the analysis of the mechanical behaviour of the heterogeneous welded bonds Ta/TA6V is a main preoccupation. Indeed, the welding of these two materials which cannot be distinguished by their mechanical and thermal properties induces strong microstructural heterogeneities in the melted zone. In order to characterize the behaviour of the welded joints and to develop a model of mechanical behaviour, a four points bending test on a notched specimen has been developed and implemented. This new test has allowed to obtain a macroscopic response of strength-displacement type but to analyze too more finely, with an optical extensometry and images correlation method, the influence of the heterogeneities on the local deformation of the welded joint. The confrontation of these results to a metallurgical study allows to validate the first conclusions deduced of the mechanical characterization tests and to conclude as for the local mechanisms governing the behaviour and the damage of the melted zone. The mechanical behaviour can be restored by an elasto-viscoplastic model with isotropic and non linear kinematic strain hardening coupled to this damage. The proposed model allows to identify the macroscopic behaviour of the weld bead. (O.M.)

  1. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II: Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Woong Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO2 laser welding. Kim et al. (2013 proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  2. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II : Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jae Woong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO₂laser welding. Kim et al. (2013 proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  3. Selected Welding Techniques, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1964-01-01

    Partial contents: CONVENTIONAL WELD JOINTS VERSUS BUTT JOINTS IN 1-INCH ALUMINUM PLATE, SPECIAL WELD JOINT PREPARATION, UPSET METAL EDGES FOR INCREASED WELD JOINT STRENGTH, OUT-OF-POSITION WELDING OF HEAVY GAGE...

  4. Thermal plasma properties for Ar–Al, Ar–Fe and Ar–Cu mixtures used in welding plasmas processes: I. Net emission coefficients at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cressault, Y; Gleizes, A

    2013-01-01

    This article is devoted to the calculation of the net emission coefficient (NEC) of Ar–Al, Ar–Fe and Ar–Cu mixtures at atmospheric pressure for arc welding processes. The results are given in data tables for temperatures between 3 kK and 30 kK, for five plasma thicknesses (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 mm) and ten concentrations of metallic vapours (pure gas, 0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and pure metal vapours in mass proportions). The results are in good agreement with most of the works published on the subject for such mixtures. They highlight the influence of three parameters on the radiation of the plasma: the NEC is directly related to temperature and inversely related to plasma radius and is highly sensitive to the presence of metal vapours. Finally, numerical data are supplied in tables in order to develop accurate computational modelling of welding arc and to estimate both qualitatively and quantitatively the influence of each metallic vapour on the size and on the shape of the weld pool. (paper)

  5. Feasibility study of pipe welding using a homopolar generator. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, R.E.; Weldon, W.F.; Rylander, H.G.; Woodson, H.H.

    1979-12-01

    The technical feasibility was studied of making girth welds of the upset butt resistance type in type 304 stainless steel boiling water reactor pipe using a homopolar generator as the power supply and a preliminary study of the process economics as compared with the present arc welding practice was made. The design and construction of a welding fixture and its use in conjunction with a 5 megajoule homopolar generator to accomplish successful welds having a nominal 28.4 cm 2 (4.4 in. 2 ) area in less than 1 second are discussed. The nature of the homopolar pulse resistance welding (HPRW) process is such that the time to accomplish the weld is independent of the size of the weld. Welds were produced having 100 percent joint efficiency as measured by the tensile test. It proved possible to obtain smooth inner diameter weld contours, but the joint design that resulted in the best contour also resulted in harmless oxide particles in the weld interface. A slight modification to the joint design was shown to eliminate the oxide particles, but resulted in a somewhat less desirable inner contour. Because of the relatively short heating cycle of HPR welding, the heat-affected zone of the weld is in the 400 to 800 C sensitization region for a substantially shorter time than in multipass arc welding. ASTM A262 Procedure A tests did not show any sensitization in HPR welds. HPR welding promises substantial savings in variable costs (labor, overhead, and materials) compared to arc welding

  6. Process Studies on Laser Welding of Copper with Brilliant Green and Infrared Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Sebastian; Ramsayer, Reiner; Poprawe, Reinhart

    Copper materials are classified as difficult to weld with state-of-the-art lasers. High thermal conductivity in combination with low absorption at room temperature require high intensities for reaching a deep penetration welding process. The low absorption also causes high sensitivity to variations in surface conditions. Green laser radiation shows a considerable higher absorption at room temperature. This reduces the threshold intensity for deep penetration welding significantly. The influence of the green wavelength on energy coupling during heat conduction welding and deep penetration welding as well as the influence on the weld shape has been investigated.

  7. Normal conditions of transport thermal analysis and testing of a Type B drum package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerrell, J.W.; Alstine, M.N. van; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing the content limits of radioactive material packagings can save money and increase transportation safety by decreasing the total number of shipments required to transport large quantities of material. The contents of drum packages can be limited by unacceptable containment vessel pressures and temperatures due to the thermal properties of the insulation. The purpose of this work is to understand and predict the effects of insulation properties on containment system performance. The type B shipping container used in the study is a double containment fiberboard drum package. The package is primarily used to transport uranium and plutonium metals and oxides. A normal condition of transport (NCT) thermal test was performed to benchmark an NCT analysis of the package. A 21 W heater was placed in an instrumented package to simulate the maximum source decay heat. The package reached thermal equilibrium 120 hours after the heater was turned on. Testing took place indoors to minimize ambient temperature fluctuations. The thermal analysis of the package used fiberboard properties reported in the literature and resulted in temperature significantly greater than those measured during the test. Details of the NCT test will be described and transient temperatures at key thermocouple locations within the package will be presented. Analytical results using nominal fiberboard properties will be presented. Explanations of the results and the attempt to benchmark the analysis will be presented. The discovery that fiberboard has an anisotropic thermal conductivity and its effect on thermal performance will also be discussed

  8. Thermal Casimir-Polder forces on a V-type three-level atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen-Ran; Xu, Jing-Ping; Al-amri, M.; Zhu, Cheng-Jie; Xie, Shuang-Yuan; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2017-09-01

    We study the thermal Casimir-Polder (CP) forces on a V-type three-level atom. The competition between the thermal effect and the quantum interference of the two transition dipoles on the force is investigated. To shed light onto the role of the quantum interference, we analyze two kinds of initial states of the atom, i.e., the superradiant state and the subradiant state. Considering the atom being in the thermal reservoir, the resonant CP force arising from the real photon emission dominates in the evolution of the CP force. Under the zero-temperature condition, the quantum interference can effectively modify the amplitude and the evolution of the force, leading to a long-time force or even the cancellation of the force. Our results reveal that in the finite-temperature case, the thermal photons can enhance the amplitude of all force elements, but have no influence on the net resonant CP force in the steady state, which means that the second law of thermodynamics still works. For the ideal degenerate V-type atom with parallel dipoles under the initial subradiant state, the robust destructive quantum interference overrides the thermal fluctuations, leading to the trapping of the atom in the subradiant state and the disappearance of the CP force. However, in terms of a realistic Zeeman atom, the thermal photons play a significant role during the evolution of the CP force. The thermal fluctuations can enhance the amplitude of the initial CP force by increasing the temperature, and weaken the influence of the quantum interference on the evolution of the CP force from the initial superradiant (subradiant) state to the steady state.

  9. Development of the electron beam welding of the aluminium alloy 6061-T6 for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 6061-T6 has been selected for the construction of the Jules Horowitz's reactor vessel. This reactor vessel is pressurized and will be made through butt welding of ∼ 2 cm thick aluminium slabs. The electron beam welding process has been tested and qualified. It appears that this welding process allows: -) welding without pre-heating, -) vacuum welding, -) welding of 100% of the thickness in one passage, -) very low deforming welding process, -) very low density and very low volume of blow holes, -) weak ZAT (Thermal Affected Zones), and -) high reproducibility that permits automation. (A.C.)

  10. Optimization of the A-TIG welding for stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurica, M.; Kožuh, Z.; Garašić, I.; Bušić, M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the influence of the activation flux and shielding gas on tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of the stainless steel. In introduction part, duplex stainless steel was analysed. The A-TIG process was explained and the possibility of welding stainless steels using the A-TIG process to maximize productivity and the cost-effectiveness of welded structures was presented. In the experimental part duplex, 7 mm thick stainless steel has been welded in butt joint. The influence of activation flux chemical composition upon the weld penetration has been investigated prior the welding. The welding process was performed by a robot with TIG equipment. With selected A-TIG welding technology preparation of plates and consumption of filler material (containing Cr, Ni and Mn) have been avoided. Specimens sectioned from the produced welds have been subjected to tensile strength test, macrostructure analysis and corrosion resistance analysis. The results have confirmed that this type of stainless steel can be welded without edge preparation and addition of filler material containing critical raw materials as Cr, Ni and Mn when the following welding parameters are set: current 200 A, welding speed 9,1 cm/min, heat input 1,2 kJ/mm and specific activation flux is used.

  11. Thermal performance parameters estimation of hot box type solar cooker by using artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, Hueseyin; Atik, Kemal; Oezkaymak, Mehmet; Recebli, Ziyaddin [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Karabuk Technical Education Faculty, 78200 Karabuk (Turkey)

    2008-02-15

    Work to date has shown that Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has not been used for predicting thermal performance parameters of a solar cooker. The objective of this study is to predict thermal performance parameters such as absorber plate, enclosure air and pot water temperatures of the experimentally investigated box type solar cooker by using the ANN. Data set is obtained from the box type solar cooker which was tested under various experimental conditions. A feed-forward neural network based on back propagation algorithm was developed to predict the thermal performance of solar cooker with and without reflector. Mathematical formulations derived from the ANN model are presented for each predicting temperatures. The experimental data set consists of 126 values. These were divided into two groups, of which the 96 values were used for training/learning of the network and the rest of the data (30 values) for testing/validation of the network performance. The performance of the ANN predictions was evaluated by comparing the prediction results with the experimental results. The results showed a good regression analysis with the correlation coefficients in the range of 0.9950-0.9987 and mean relative errors (MREs) in the range of 3.925-7.040% for the test data set. The regression coefficients indicated that the ANN model can successfully be used for the prediction of the thermal performance parameters of a box type solar cooker with a high degree of accuracy. (author)

  12. Friction weld ductility and toughness as influenced by inclusion morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, B.J.; Schaaf, B.W. Jr.; Wilson, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    Friction welding consistently provides high strength, freedom from fusion defects, and high productivity. However, friction welds in carbon steel exhibit impact toughness and bend ductility that are significantly lower than that of the base metal. The inclusion content and morphology were suspected to be major contributors to the reduction in weld ductility. For this reason, four electric furnace steels - three types of ASTM A516 Grade 70, and an ASTM A737 Grade B steel - were investigated. Friction welds were made by both the inertia and direct drive process variations and the welds evaluated. It was shown that friction welds of inclusion-controlled steels exhibited much improved toughness and bend ductility were demonstrated. Upper shelf impact energy was equivalent to or greater than that of the base metal in the short transverse direction. The transition temperature range for all four materials was shifted to higher temperatures for both types of friction welds. Under the conditions of this test, the direct drive friction welds showed a greater shift than the inertia friction welds. The ductility and toughness of welds in A737 Grade B steel were superior to welds in A516 Grade 70 steels, reflecting the superior properties of the base metal. Welds of the A737 material had usable Charpy V-notch impact toughness of 20 to 30 ft-lb (27 to 41 J) at temperatures as low as -40 0 F (-40 0 C). All the welds had an acicular structure. The differences in properties between the inertia and direct drive friction welds appear associated with microstructural variations. These variations resulted from the different heat inputs and cooling rates of the two process variations were demonstrated. The beneficial effects of inclusion control on toughness and ductility. In addition, it also indicates that additional improvements may be attainable through control of the as-welded microstructure by process manipulation

  13. Detecting flaws in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodacre, A.; Lawton, H.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for detecting flaws in welds in a workpiece, the portion of the workpiece containing the weld is maintained at a constant temperature and the weld is scanned by an infra red detector. The weld is then scanned again with the workpiece in contact with a cooling probe to produce a steeper temperature gradient across the weld. Comparison of the signals produced by each scan reveals the existence of defects in the welds. The signals may be displayed on an oscilloscope and the display may be observed by a TV camera and recorded on videotape. (UK)

  14. Fusion welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  15. Effects of neutron radiation and residual stresses on the corrosion of welds in light water reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, Bob van der; Gavillet, Didier; Lapena, Jesus; Ohms, Carsten; Roth, Armin; Dyck, Steven van

    2006-01-01

    After many years of operation in Light Water Reactors (LWR) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of internals has been observed. In particular the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has been associated with IASCC attack. The welding process induces residual stresses and micro-structural modifications. Neutron irradiation affects the materials response to mechanical loading. IASCC susceptibility of base materials is widely studied, but the specific conditions of irradiated welds are rarely assessed. Core component relevant welds of Type 304 and 347 steels have been fabricated and were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten to 0.3 and 1 dpa (displacement per atom). In-service welds were cut from the thermal shield of the decommissioned BR-3 reactor. Residual stresses, measured using neutron diffraction, ring core tests and X-ray showed residual stress levels up to 400 MPa. Micro-structural characterization showed higher dislocation densities in the weld and HAZ. Neutron radiation increased the dislocation density, resulting in hardening and reduced fracture toughness. The sensitization degree of the welds, measured with the electrochemical potentio-dynamic reactivation method, was negligible. The Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) tests, performed at 290 deg. C in water with 200 ppb dissolved oxygen, (DO), did not reveal inter-granular cracking. Inter-granular attack of in-service steel is observed in water with 8 ppm (DO), attributed not only to IASCC, but also to IGSCC from thermal sensitization during fabrication. Stress-relieve annealing has caused Cr-grain boundary precipitation, indicating the sensitization. The simulated internal welds, irradiated up to 1.0 dpa, did not show inter-granular cracking with 8 ppm DO. (authors)

  16. Quantification of Microtexture at Weld Nugget of Friction Stir-Welded Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Md M.; Sarkar, R.; Pal, T. K.; Ghosh, M.; Prabhu, N.

    2017-05-01

    Friction stir welding of C-Mn steel was carried out under 800-1400 rpm tool rotation. Tool traversing speed of 50 mm/min remained same for all joints. Effect of thermal state and deformation on texture and microstructure at weld nugget was investigated. Weld nugget consisted of ferrite + bainite/Widmanstatten ferrite with different matrix grain sizes depending on peak temperature. A texture around ( ϕ 2 = 0°, φ = 30°, ϕ 2 = 45°) was developed at weld nugget. Grain boundary misorientation at weld nugget indicated that continuous dynamic recrystallization influenced the development of fine equiaxed grain structure. Pole figures and orientation distribution function were used to determine crystallographic texture at weld nugget and base metal. Shear texture components D1, D2 and F were present at weld nugget. D1 shear texture was more prominent among all. Large number of high-angle grain boundaries ( 60-70%) was observed at weld nugget and was the resultant of accumulation of high amount of dislocation, followed by subgrain formation.

  17. On the shakedown analysis of welded pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianbai; Chen Haofeng; Chen Weihang; Ure, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the shakedown analysis of welded pipes subjected to a constant internal pressure and a varying thermal load. The Linear Matching Method (LMM) is applied to investigate the upper and lower bound shakedown limits of the pipes. Individual effects of i) geometry of weld metal, ii) ratio of inner radius to wall thickness and iii) all material properties of Weld Metal (WM), Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Parent Material (PM) on shakedown limits are investigated. The ranges of these variables are chosen to cover the majority of common pipe configurations. Corresponding individual influence functions on the shakedown limits are generated. These are then combined to allow the creation of a safety shakedown envelope, which can be used for the design of any welded pipes within the specified ranges. The effect of temperature-dependent yield stress (in PM, HAZ and WM) on these shakedown limits is also investigated.

  18. Safety evaluation of socket weld integrity in nuclear piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.H.; Kim, H.J.; Choi, S.Y.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are to evaluate the integrity of socket weld in nuclear piping and prepare the technical basis for a new guideline on radiographic testing (RT) for the socket weld. Recently, the integrity of the socket weld is regarded as a safety concern in nuclear power plants because lots of failures and leaks have been reported in the socket weld. The root causes of the socket weld failure are known as unanticipated loadings such as vibration or thermal fatigue and improper weld joint during construction. The ASME Code sec. III requires 1/16 inch gap between the pipe and fitting in the socket weld. Many failure cases, however, showed that the gap requirement was not satisfied. The Code also requires magnetic particle examination (MT) or liquid penetration examination (PT) on the socket weld, but not radiographic examination (RT). It means that it is not easy to examine the 1/16 inch gap in the socket weld by using the NDE methods currently required in the Code. In this paper, the effects of the requirements in the ASME Code sec. III on the socket weld integrity were evaluated by using finite element method. The crack behavior in the socket weld was also investigated under vibration event in nuclear power plants. The results showed that the socket weld was very susceptible to the vibration if the requirements in ASME Code were not satisfied. The constraint between the pipe and fitting due to the contact significantly affects the integrity of the socket weld. This paper also suggests a new guideline on the RT for the socket weld during construction stage in nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  19. Automatization and mechanization of welding in nuclear engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shul' ma, I E; Kupin, N V

    1986-02-01

    The state of welding and cladding works, which constitute more than 12% of total labour content of NPP equipment production, is described. Special attention is paid to a considerable part of manual labour in the processes of thermal cutting and welding of joints inside the vessels. The necessity of perspective technology introduction is pointed out. It means, in particular, the introduction of technological complex robotics for automatic welding of pipes with tube plates in heat exchanger, the mechanization of cladding processes for sealing surfaces of locking equipment, facility equipment for the welding of steam generator vessels to bottoms by means of preliminary and concomitant heating devices.

  20. Automatization and mechanization of welding in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul'ma, I.E.; Kupin, N.V.

    1986-01-01

    The state of welding and cladding works, which constitute more than 12% of total labour content of NPP equipment production, is described. Special attention is paid to a considerable part of manual labour in the processes of thermal cutting and welding of joints inside the vessels. The necessity of perspective technology introduction is pointed out. It means, in particular, the introduction of technological complex robotics for automatic welding of pipes with tube plates in heat exchanger, the mechanization of cladding processes for sealing surfaces of locking equipment, facility equipment for the welding of steam generator vessels to bottoms by means of preliminary and concomitant heating devices

  1. Prevention of microcracking by REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal in laser clad welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okauchi, Hironori; Saida, Kazuyoshi; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Effect of REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal on microcracking prevention was verified in laser clad welding. Laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal or type 316L stainless steel was conducted using the five different filler metals of alloy 690 varying the La content. Ductility-dip crack occurred in laser clad welding when La-free alloy 690 filler metal was applied. Solidification and liquation cracks occurred contrarily in the laser cladding weld metal when the 0.07mass%La containing filler metal was applied. In case of laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal and type 316L stainless steel, the ductility-dip cracking susceptibility decreased, and solidification/liquation cracking susceptibilities increased with increasing the La content in the weld metal. The relation among the microcracking susceptibility, the (P+S) and La contents in every weld pass of the laser clad welding was investigated. Ductility-dip cracks occurred in the compositional range (atomic ratio) of La/(P+S) 0.99(on alloy 132 weld metal), >0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel), while any cracks did not occur at La/(P+S) being between 0.21-0.99 (on alloy 132 weld metal) 0.10-0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel). Laser clad welding test on type 316L stainless steel using alloy 690 filler metal containing the optimum La content verified that any microcracks did not occurred in the laser clad welding metal. (author)

  2. Review of techniques for on-line monitoring and inspection of laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, J; Yan, Y

    2005-01-01

    Laser welding has been applied to various industries, in particular, automotive, aerospace and microelectronics. However, traditional off-line testing of the welds is costly and inefficient. Therefore, on-line inspection systems with low cost have being developed to increase productivity and maintain high welding quality. This paper presents the applications of acoustic, optical, visual, thermal and ultrasonic techniques and latest development of laser welding monitoring. The advantages and limitations of these techniques are also discussed

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF POSTHEAT TREATMENT ON FERRITE REDISTRIBUTION IN DUPLEX STEELS ELECTRON BEAM WELDS

    OpenAIRE

    Zita Iždinská; František Kolenič

    2009-01-01

    The duplex stainless steel is two-phase steel with the structure composed of austenite and ferrite with optimum austenite/ferrite proportion 50%. At present, classical arc processes for welding duplex steels are generally regarded as acceptable. On the other hand electron and laser beam welding is up to now considered less suitable for welding duplex steels. The submitted work presents the results of testing various thermal conditions at welding duplex stainless steel with electron beam. It w...

  4. Reduced thermal conductivity due to scattering centers in p-type SiGe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaty, J.S.; Rolfe, J.L.; Vandersande, J.; Fleurial. J.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that a theoretical model has been developed that predicts that the addition of ultra-fine, inert, phonon-scattering centers to SiGe thermoelectric material will reduce its thermal conductivity and improve its figure-of-merit. To investigate this prediction, ultra-fine particulates (20 Angstrom to 200 Angstrom) of boron nitride have been added to boron doped, p-type, 80/20 SiGe. All previous SiGe samples produced from ultra-fine SiGe powder without additions had lower thermal conductivities than standard SiGe, but high temperature (1525 K) heat treatment increased their thermal conductivity back to the value for standard SiGe. Transmission Electron Microscopy has been used to confirm the presence of occluded particulates and X-ray diffraction has been used to determine the composition to be BN

  5. Lap weld joint modelling and simulation of welding in programme SYSWELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koňár Radoslav

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of the welding process for applications of practice using SYSWELD are presented. This paper presents simulation of welding in the repair of high-pressure gas pipeline with steel sleeve with composite filling. Material of experimental sample was steel S355. The simulations in SYSWELD divided in to two parts: the thermal simulation followed by the mechanical simulation. The results of the numerical model, which are listed in article are compared to real experiments.

  6. Experimental validation of thermal design of top shield for a pool type SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aithal, Sriramachandra; Babu, V. Rajan; Balasubramaniyan, V.; Velusamy, K.; Chellapandi, P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Overall thermal design of top shield in a SFR is experimentally verified. • Air jet cooling is effective in ensuring the temperatures limits for top shield. • Convection patterns in narrow annulus are in line with published CFD results. • Wire mesh insulation ensures gradual thermal gradient at top portion of main vessel. • Under loss of cooling scenario, sufficient time is available for corrective action. - Abstract: An Integrated Top Shield Test Facility towards validation of thermal design of top shield for a pool type SFR has been conceived, constructed & commissioned. Detailed experiments were performed in this experimental facility having full-scale features. Steady state temperature distribution within the facility is measured for various heater plate temperatures in addition to simulating different operating states of the reactor. Following are the important observations (i) jet cooling system is effective in regulating the roof slab bottom plate temperature and thermal gradient across roof slab simulating normal operation of reactor, (ii) wire mesh insulation provided in roof slab-main vessel annulus is effective in obtaining gradual thermal gradient along main vessel top portion and inhibiting the setting up of cellular convection within annulus and (iii) cellular convection with four distinct convective cells sets in the annular gap between roof slab and small rotatable plug measuring ∼ϕ4 m in diameter & gap width varying from 16 mm to 30 mm. Repeatability of results is also ensured during all the above tests. The results presented in this paper is expected to provide reference data for validation of thermal hydraulic models in addition to serving as design validation of jet cooling system for pool type SFR.

  7. Thermal Characteristics of Conversion-Type FeOF Cathode in Li-ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rutile FeOF was used as a conversion-type cathode material for Li-ion batteries. In the present study, 0.6Li, 1.4Li, and 2.7Li per mole lithiation reactions were carried out by changing the electrochemical discharge reaction depth. The thermal characteristics of the FeOF cathode were investigated by thermogravimetric mass spectrometric (TG-MS and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC systems. No remarkable HF release was detected, even up to 700 °C, which indicated a low toxic risk for the FeOF cathode. Changes in the thermal properties of the FeOF cathode via different conversion reaction depths in the associated electrolyte were studied by changing the cathode/electrolyte ratio in the mixture. LiFeOF was found to exothermically react with the electrolyte at about 210 °C. Similar exothermic reactions were found with charged FeOF cathodes because of the irreversible Li ions. Among the products of the conversion reaction of FeOF, Li2O was found to exothermically react with the electrolyte at about 120 °C, which induced the main thermal risk of the FeOF cathode. It suggests that the oxygen-containing conversion-type cathodes have a higher thermal risk than the oxygen-free ones, but controlling the cathode/electrolyte ratio in cells successfully reduced the thermal risk. Finally, the thermal stability of the FeOF cathode was evaluated in comparison with FeF3 and LiFePO4 cathodes.

  8. Assessment of delta ferrite in multipass TIG welds of 40 mm thick SS 316L plates: a comparative study of ferrite number (FN) prediction and experimental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Shaikh, Shamsuddin; Raole, Prakash M.; Sarkar, Biswanath

    2015-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the fabrication of fusion reactor major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, cryostat and other major structural components development. AISI SS316L materials of different thicknesses are utilized due to the superior mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, fatigue and stability at high temperature operation. The components are developed by using welding techniques like TIG welding with suitable filler material. Like in case of vacuum vessel, the multipass welding is unavoidable due to the use of high thickness plates (like in case of ITER and DEMO reactors). In general austenitic welds contains fraction of delta ferrite phase in multipass welds. The quantification depends on the weld thermal cycles like heat input and cooling rates associated with process conditions and chemical composition of the welds. Due to the repeated weld thermal passes, the microstructure adversely alters due to the presence of complex phases like austenite, ferrite and delta ferrite and subsequently influence the mechanical properties like tensile and impact toughness of joints. Control of the delta ferrite is necessary to hold the compatible final properties of the joints and hence its evaluation vital before the fabrication process. The present paper reports the detail analysis of delta ferrite phase in welded region and heat affected zones of 40 mm thick SS316L plates welded by special design multipass narrow groove TIG welding process under three different heat input conditions (1.67 kJ/mm, 1.78 kJ/mm, 1.87 kJ/mm). The correlation of delta ferrite microstructure with optical microscope and high resolution SEM has been carried out and different type of acicular and vermicular delta ferrite structures is observed. This is further correlated with the non destructive magnetic measurement using Ferrite scope. The measured ferrite number (FN) is correlated with the formed delta ferrite phase. The chemical composition of weld samples is

  9. Microstructural characterization of welded unions of cast refractory steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, Jorge L; Mannheim, Rodolfo L; Cisternas, Victor M; Lazo, Hector M

    2006-01-01

    This work presents a microstructural study of welded unions of cast heat resistant (refractory) steels, type HC (29Cr-2Ni-0,4C) and HD (28Cr-5Ni-0,4C) using quantitative metallography and X-ray diffraction. Two series of alloys were prepared in an induction furnace and cast in sand molds with phenolic resin, in the classic 'Y' shape, with thicknesses of 12, 25 and 50 mm, following ASTM A395. These samples were chemically and micro structurally characterized, in order to verify their chemical composition and the presence and distribution of phases in the material. Test pieces were then cut from the test section of the 'Y' samples to produce the welded unions, which were done with a single and double bevel (X) butt, using a manual arc and one with electrodes AWS E 309 and AWS E 410. These unions were also submitted to thermal treatments of 780 o C, in order to study the forced precipitation of the sigma phase, simulating service conditions in a production environment. The presence and distribution of phases in the fusion zone (welding cord) and in the thermally affected zones (TAZ) next to both sides of the cord were studied. They displayed a relatively low dilution compared to the composition of the electrodes. The presence of austenite in a ferritic matrix, with relatively small amounts of Cr 23 C 6 and Cr 7 C 3 carbides was shown together with an incipient presence of sigma phase. The annealing of the test pieces at temperatures close to those for the use of these materials, resulted in a new sigma precipitation, in different relative amounts, depending on the time of exposure to these temperatures. Sigma phase precipitates in low relative amounts simply from welding, but this event deserves more attention when the material is submitted to post-welding thermal treatments, or more intensely, to prolonged exposures to higher working temperatures. Quantitative metallographic techniques with contrast and coloring of phases can be used to quantify the micro

  10. Residual Stress Evaluation of Weld Inlay Process on Reactor Vessel Nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kihyun; Cho, Hong Seok [KEPCO KPS, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Weld overlay, weld inlay and stress improvement are mitigation technologies for butt joints. Weld overlay is done on pressurizer nozzles which are the highest potential locations occurring PWSCC due to high temperature in Korea. Reactor vessel nozzles are other big safety concerns for butt joints. Weld overlay and stress improvement should be so difficult to apply to those locations because space is too limited. Weld inlay should be one of the solutions. KEPCO KPS has developed laser welding system and process for reactor nozzles. Welding residual stress analysis is necessary for flaw evaluation. United States nuclear regulatory commission has calculated GTAW(Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) residual stress using ABAQUS. To confirm effectiveness of weld inlay process, welding residual stress analysis was performed. and difference between GTAW and LASER welding process was compared. Evaluation of weld inlay process using ANSYS and ABAQUS is performed. All of the both results are similar. The residual stress generated after weld inlay was on range of 450-500 MPa. Welding residual stresses are differently generated by GTAW and LASER welding. But regardless of welding process type, residual tensile stress is generated on inside surface.

  11. Numerical study of the thermal behaviour of two types of packages exposed to long duration fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doare, O.; Armingaud, F.; Sert, G.; Issard, H.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of two types of package exposed to long duration fires is studied. The TN trademark 12/2A and TN trademark 28VT packages, respectively used for spent fuel and vitrified waste transports, are modelled. Three-dimensional meshes are used. Attention was paid to the model of the thermal protective resin of the packages because of its complex thermal behaviour. During heating several endothermic reactions occur: water vapour is produced and a part of it diffuses though the resin and condensates on the cold parts of resin, increasing the global heat transfer within the material. The other part of the water vapour exits the package by fusible holes. The thermal characteristics of these reactions have been established thanks to specific tests performed in a laboratory. A model taking into account all these phenomena was developed and integrated to the global thermal model of the packages in order to simulate the thermal behaviour of the packages exposed to long duration fires. Four fire temperatures were considered and, for each of them, the maximum fire duration that packages can withstand without activity release was calculated. The results show safety margins regarding the IAEA regulatory thermal test (800 C-30 min). The use of the complex model of resin led to calculate safety margins about 40% greater than those calculated with a model of resin taking only conduction into account. The results were used to prepare a guideline for safety assessment in emergency situations involving fire. This emergency tool provides safety limits for containment according to fire duration, fire temperature, package heat power and ambient temperature

  12. Design and fabrication of a MEMS chevron-type thermal actuator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baracu, Angela, E-mail: angela.baracu@imt.ro [Laboratory of Modeling, Simulation and CAD, National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies - IMT Bucharest, 126A, Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190, Bucharest, Romania and University Politehnica of Bucharest (Romania); Voicu, Rodica; Müller, Raluca; Avram, Andrei [Laboratory of Modeling, Simulation and CAD, National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies - IMT Bucharest, 126A, Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190, Bucharest (Romania); Pustan, Marius, E-mail: marius.pustan@omt.utcluj.ro; Chiorean, Radu, E-mail: marius.pustan@omt.utcluj.ro; Birleanu, Corina, E-mail: marius.pustan@omt.utcluj.ro; Dudescu, Cristian, E-mail: marius.pustan@omt.utcluj.ro [Laboratory of Micro and Nano Systems, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Bd. Muncii, no. 103-105, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-02-17

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of a MEMS chevron-type thermal actuator. The device was designed for fabrication in the standard MEMS technology, where the topography of the upper layers depends on the patterns of structural and sacrificial layers underneath. The proposed actuator presents some advantages over usual thermal vertical chevron actuators by means of low operating voltages, high output force and linear movement without deformation of the shaft. The device simulations were done using COVENTOR software. The movement obtained by simulation was 12 μm, for a voltage of 0.2 V and the current intensity of 257 mA. The design optimizes the in-plane displacement by fixed anchors and beam inclination angle. Heating is provided by Joule dissipation. The material used for manufacture of chevron-based actuator was aluminum due to its thermal and mechanical properties. The release of the movable part was performed using isotropic dry etching by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE). A first inspection was achieved using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). In order to obtain the in-plane displacement we carried out electrical measurements. The thermal actuator can be used for a variety of optical and microassembling applications. This kind of thermal actuator could be integrated easily with other micro devices since its fabrication is compatible with the general semiconductor processes.

  13. Nanofluid Types, Their Synthesis, Properties and Incorporation in Direct Solar Thermal Collectors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisut Chamsa-ard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The global demand for energy is increasing and the detrimental consequences of rising greenhouse gas emissions, global warming and environmental degradation present major challenges. Solar energy offers a clean and viable renewable energy source with the potential to alleviate the detrimental consequences normally associated with fossil fuel-based energy generation. However, there are two inherent problems associated with conventional solar thermal energy conversion systems. The first involves low thermal conductivity values of heat transfer fluids, and the second involves the poor optical properties of many absorbers and their coating. Hence, there is an imperative need to improve both thermal and optical properties of current solar conversion systems. Direct solar thermal absorption collectors incorporating a nanofluid offers the opportunity to achieve significant improvements in both optical and thermal performance. Since nanofluids offer much greater heat absorbing and heat transfer properties compared to traditional working fluids. The review summarizes current research in this innovative field. It discusses direct solar absorber collectors and methods for improving their performance. This is followed by a discussion of the various types of nanofluids available and the synthesis techniques used to manufacture them. In closing, a brief discussion of nanofluid property modelling is also presented.

  14. Nanofluid Types, Their Synthesis, Properties and Incorporation in Direct Solar Thermal Collectors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsa-Ard, Wisut; Brundavanam, Sridevi; Fung, Chun Che; Fawcett, Derek; Poinern, Gerrard

    2017-05-31

    The global demand for energy is increasing and the detrimental consequences of rising greenhouse gas emissions, global warming and environmental degradation present major challenges. Solar energy offers a clean and viable renewable energy source with the potential to alleviate the detrimental consequences normally associated with fossil fuel-based energy generation. However, there are two inherent problems associated with conventional solar thermal energy conversion systems. The first involves low thermal conductivity values of heat transfer fluids, and the second involves the poor optical properties of many absorbers and their coating. Hence, there is an imperative need to improve both thermal and optical properties of current solar conversion systems. Direct solar thermal absorption collectors incorporating a nanofluid offers the opportunity to achieve significant improvements in both optical and thermal performance. Since nanofluids offer much greater heat absorbing and heat transfer properties compared to traditional working fluids. The review summarizes current research in this innovative field. It discusses direct solar absorber collectors and methods for improving their performance. This is followed by a discussion of the various types of nanofluids available and the synthesis techniques used to manufacture them. In closing, a brief discussion of nanofluid property modelling is also presented.

  15. Overall energy, exergy and carbon credit analysis by different type of hybrid photovoltaic thermal air collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Sanjay; Tiwari, G.N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Comparative study of PVT air collectors. ► CO 2 analysis of all type of PVT air collectors. ► Study of thermal energy, exergy gain and exergy efficiency. ► Exergy efficiency of unglazed hybrid PVT tiles air collector is most efficient. - Abstract: In this paper, comparative analysis of different type of photovoltaic thermal (PVT) air collector namely: (i) unglazed hybrid PVT tiles, (ii) glazed hybrid PVT tiles and (iii) conventional hybrid PVT air collectors have been carried out for the composite climate of Srinagar (India). The comparative study has been carried out in terms of overall thermal energy and exergy gain, exergy efficiency and carbon credit earned by different type of hybrid PVT air collectors. It has been observed that overall annual thermal energy and exergy gain of unglazed hybrid PVT tiles air collector is higher by 27% and 29.3% respectively as compared to glazed hybrid PVT tiles air collector and by 61% and 59.8% respectively as compared to conventional hybrid PVT air collector. It has also been observed that overall annual exergy efficiency of unglazed and glazed hybrid PVT tiles air collector is higher by 9.6% and 53.8% respectively as compared to conventional hybrid PVT air collector. On the basis of comparative study, it has been concluded that CO 2 emission reduction per annum on the basis of overall thermal energy gain of unglazed and glazed hybrid PVT tiles air collector is higher by 62.3% and 27.7% respectively as compared to conventional hybrid PVT air collector and on the basis of overall exergy gain it is 59.7% and 22.7%.

  16. Computational simulation of weld microstructure and distortion by considering process mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, M.; Mikami, Y.; Okano, S.; Itoh, S.

    2009-05-01

    Highly precise fabrication of welded materials is in great demand, and so microstructure and distortion controls are essential. Furthermore, consideration of process mechanics is important for intelligent fabrication. In this study, the microstructure and hardness distribution in multi-pass weld metal are evaluated by computational simulations under the conditions of multiple heat cycles and phase transformation. Because conventional CCT diagrams of weld metal are not available even for single-pass weld metal, new diagrams for multi-pass weld metals are created. The weld microstructure and hardness distribution are precisely predicted when using the created CCT diagram for multi-pass weld metal and calculating the weld thermal cycle. Weld distortion is also investigated by using numerical simulation with a thermal elastic-plastic analysis. In conventional evaluations of weld distortion, the average heat input has been used as the dominant parameter; however, it is difficult to consider the effect of molten pool configurations on weld distortion based only on the heat input. Thus, the effect of welding process conditions on weld distortion is studied by considering molten pool configurations, determined by temperature distribution and history.

  17. DEVELOPING AND QUANTIFYING PARAMETERS FOR CLOSURE WELDING OVERPACKS CONTAINING RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT HANFORD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANNELL GR

    2007-01-01

    Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leaktight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). . A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leaktight for the duration of the storage term

  18. Measurement of Laser Weld Temperatures for 3D Model Input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagel, Daryl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grossetete, Grant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maccallum, Danny O. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Laser welding is a key joining process used extensively in the manufacture and assembly of critical components for several weapons systems. Sandia National Laboratories advances the understanding of the laser welding process through coupled experimentation and modeling. This report summarizes the experimental portion of the research program, which focused on measuring temperatures and thermal history of laser welds on steel plates. To increase confidence in measurement accuracy, researchers utilized multiple complementary techniques to acquire temperatures during laser welding. This data serves as input to and validation of 3D laser welding models aimed at predicting microstructure and the formation of defects and their impact on weld-joint reliability, a crucial step in rapid prototyping of weapons components.

  19. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  20. Modelling of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    , a study of the damage development in Resistance SpotWelded joints, when subject to the commonly used static shear-lab or cross-tension testing techniques, has been carried out ([P3]-[P6]). The focus in thesis is on the Advanced High Strength Steels, Dual-Phase 600, which is used in for example......This thesis focuses on numerical analysis of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints. Two types of welds are investigated here. First, a study of the localization of plastic flow and failure in aluminum sheets, welded by the relatively new Friction Stir (FS) Welding method, has been...... conducted ([P1], [P2], [P7]-[P9]). The focus in the thesis is on FS-welded 2xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys, which are attractive, for example, to the aerospace industry, since the 2024 aluminum in particular, is typically classified as un-weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. Secondly...

  1. Fabrication of electroslag welded Magnox fuel transport flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuliani, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    The high weld metal deposition rate of the electroslag welding process offers an attractive method of fabricating nuclear fuel transport flasks from 370 mm (14.5in) thick steel plates. The paper describes pre-production trials carried out on full scale corner-section joints to establish that the weld metal meets the exacting mechanical property requirements for the Nuclear Industry. The paper presents results obtained on welds produced using two base metal compositions and two wires, one recommended for submerged-arc and the other for electroslag welding processes. Details of mechanical tests and metallographic examinations are given which led to the selection of the latter type of wire. It was found that while the weld metal deposited by this process may be sensitive to cracking, this can be avoided by careful selection of welding consumables and sound joints can be obtained under production conditions. (author)

  2. Cryogen spray cooling during laser tissue welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, N M; Walsh, J T

    2000-03-01

    Cryogen cooling during laser tissue welding was explored as a means of reducing lateral thermal damage near the tissue surface and shortening operative time. Two centimetre long full-thickness incisions were made on the epilated backs of guinea pigs, in vivo. India ink was applied to the incision edges then clamps were used to appose the edges. A 4 mm diameter beam of 16 W, continuous-wave, 1.06 microm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing approximately 100 ms pulses. There was a delay of 2 s between scans. The total irradiation time was varied from 1-2 min. Cryogen was delivered to the weld site through a solenoid valve in spurt durations of 20, 60 and 100 ms. The time between spurts was either 2 or 4 s, corresponding to one spurt every one or two laser scans. Histology and tensile strength measurements were used to evaluate laser welds. Total irradiation times were reduced from 10 min without surface cooling to under 1 min with surface cooling. The thermal denaturation profile showed less denaturation in the papillary dermis than in the mid-dermis. Welds created using optimized irradiation and cooling parameters had significantly higher tensile strengths (1.7 +/- 0.4 kg cm(-2)) than measured in the control studies without cryogen cooling (1.0 +/- 0.2 kg cm(-2)) (p laser welding results in increased weld strengths while reducing thermal damage and operative times. Long-term studies will be necessary to determine weld strengths and the amount of scarring during wound healing.

  3. An overview of the welding technologies of CLAM steels for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Huang Yuming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech. of University of Montana, Butte, MT 59701 (United States); Zhou Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 221013 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welding technologies of China Low Activation Martensitic steel is overviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most welding technologies in use are discussed and suggestions are given. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper welding technologies could ensure weld properties but more detailed work are necessary. - Abstract: China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAMs), a kind of RAFM steel with Chinese intellectual property rights, is considered as the primary structural material for the China-designed ITER test blanket module (TBM). As one of the key issues in the fabrication of the fusion reactor, the welding technologies of CLAMs are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the weldability of CLAMs by different welding methods, and on the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints. Recent highlights in research and development for the welding of CLAMs show that proper welding procedure could provide welds with adequate tensile strength but the welds exhibit lower impact toughness compared with the base metal. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and the application of ultrasonic energy during TIG welding could dramatically improve impact toughness. Research also shows that welds in CLAMs have sufficient resistance to swelling under irradiation as well as suitable compatibility with liquid LiPb. The microstructure, mechanical and other physical properties of welds are significantly different from those of the base metal due to the complicated welding thermal cycle. The weld joint is the area most likely to fail one or more of the design requirements within the fusion reactor. Therefore significant additional research is necessary to ensure safe application of welded CLAM steel for fusion reactor construction.

  4. Nondestructive testing: welding industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Subramanian, C.V.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter highlights various conventional and advanced nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques that have been used for weld evaluation. Welding Codes and Standards of International and National organisations that have been followed in India for various weld evaluation purposes are also included. The chapter also emphasises the importance of NDT by way of a few case studies that have been carried out on important critical welded components. (author). 12 refs., 17 figs., 1 appendix

  5. Influence of energy input in friction stir welding on structure evolution and mechanical behaviour of precipitation-hardening in aluminium alloys (AA2024-T351, AA6013-T6 and Al-Mg-Sc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis Olea, Cesar Afonso [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2008-12-04

    friction stir welded joints, produced using different weld energy inputs. In addition, it is intended to establish the microstucture/properties/weld energy input relationships of the resultant joints, in order to understand the precipitates evolution and its consequences. Metallurgical characterization of the base material and welded joints was performed using optical microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical assessment was carried out using microhardness, conventional flat tensile and microflat tensile testing. Microstructural investigation of the friction stir welded joints showed similar weld zone formation (heat affected zone - HAZ, thermomechanical affected zone - TMAZ, and stir zone - SZ) for the different Al alloys, but presented specific precipitation features, according to weld zone and energy input. In the case of Al-Mg-Sc joints, Al3Sc precipitates present in the base material were very stable and the thermal cycle produced during welding was not able to significantly deteriorate the strengthening effect, as evidenced by mechanical testing. The Al-Mg-Sc joints presented, in general, a similar mechanical behaviour to the base material. Strengthening precipitates S'' type and Guinier Preston Bagariastkij (GPB) zones, previously present in the base material of AA2024 T351 joints were dissolved in the SZ and coarse round-type precipitates were found. In the TMAZ, overaging was observed with rod and lath-type precipitates beyond precipitate free zones, which resulted in deteriorated mechanical properties in this region. Joints in AA2024 T351 showed a loss of strength in the TMAZ of up to 30 %, compared to the base material. In AA6013 T6 joints, needle-type {beta}'' precipitates (Mg-Si) were fully dissolved in the SZ. TMAZ was characterized essentially by lath-type Q' (Mg-Si-Cu) precipitates and particularly rod-type precipitates for the lower heat inputs, beyond the presence of dispersoids. Such precipitate

  6. Fundamental studies on electron-beam welding of heat-resistant superalloys for nuclear plants: Report 4. Mechanical properties of welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susei, S.; Shimizu, S.; Aota, T.

    1982-04-01

    In this report, electron-beam (EB) welded joints and TIG welded joints of various superalloys to be used for nuclear plants, such as Hastelloy-type, Inconel-type and Incoloy-type, are systematically evaluated in terms of tensile properties, low-cycle fatigue properties at elevated temperatures, creep and creep-rupture properties. It was fully confirmed as conclusion that the EB welded joints are superior to the TIG welded ones in mechanical properties, especially at high temperature. In the evaluation of creep properties, ductility is one of the most important criteria to represent the resistance against fracture due to creep deformation, and this criterion is very useful in evaluating the properties of welded joints. Therefore, the more comparable to the base metal the electron beam welded joint becomes in terms of ductility, the more resistant is it against fracture. From this point of view, the electron beam welded joint is considerably superior to the TIG welded joint [fr

  7. The effect of welding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welded AA2024-T351

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, M; Davenport, A.J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of welding parameters (rotation speed and travel speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welds in the high strength aluminium alloy AA2024-T351 was investigated. It was found that rotation speed plays a major role in controlling the location of corrosion attack. Localised...... intergranular attack was observed in the nugget region for low rotation speed welds, whereas for higher rotation speed welds, attack occurred predominantly in the heat-affected zone. The increase in anodic reactivity in the weld zone was due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries leading to intergranular...... attack. Enhancement of cathodic reactivity was also found in the nugget as a result of the precipitation of S-phase. The results were compared with samples of AA2024-T351 that had been heat treated to simulate the thermal cycle associated with welding, and with samples that had been exposed to high...

  8. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  9. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  10. Underwater welding of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  11. Welding Over Paint Primer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Kevin S; Liu, Stephen; Olson, David L

    1998-01-01

    .... According to the hydrogen-oxygen and }hydrogen-fluorine equilibrium considerations, an increase in the partial pressure of oxygen or fluorine could decrease the partial pressure of hydrogen within the welding arc. Consequently, a welding consumable that contains chemical ingredients of high oxygen and fluorine potential would be capable of minimizing hydrogen pick-up in the weld pool.

  12. Welding techniques development of CLAM steel for Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Chunjing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)], E-mail: lcj@ipp.ac.cn; Huang Qunying; Wu Qingsheng; Liu Shaojun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Lei Yucheng [Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Muroga, Takeo; Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Jifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Zhang Jianxun [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shanxi, 710049 (China); Li Jinglong [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shanxi, 710072 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Fabrication techniques for Test Blanket Module (TBM) with CLAM are being under development. Effect of surface preparation on the HIP diffusion bonding joints was studied and good joints with Charpy impact absorbed energy close to that of base metal have been obtained. The mechanical properties test showed that effect of HIP process on the mechanical properties of base metal was little. Uniaxial diffusion bonding experiments were carried out to study the effect of temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties. And preliminary experiments on Electron Beam Welding (EBW), Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding and Laser Beam Welding (LBW) were performed to find proper welding techniques to assemble the TBM. In addition, the thermal processes assessed with a Gleeble thermal-mechanical machine were carried out as well to assist the fusion welding research.

  13. Effects of diode laser welding with dye-enhanced glue on tensile strength of sutures commonly used in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, A J; Chang, D T; Kayton, M L; Libutti, S K; Connor, J P; Hensle, T W

    1996-01-01

    Tissue welding using laser-activated protein solders may soon become an alternative to sutured tissue approximation. In most cases, approximating sutures are used both to align tissue edges and provide added tensile strength. Collateral thermal injury, however, may cause disruption of tissue alignment and weaken the tensile strength of sutures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser welding on the tensile strength of suture materials used in urologic surgery. Eleven types of sutures were exposed to diode laser energy (power density = 15.9 W/cm2) for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Each suture was compared with and without the addition of dye-enhanced albumin-based solder. After exposure, each suture material was strained (2"/min) until ultimate breakage on a tensometer and compared to untreated sutures using ANOVA. The strength of undyed sutures were not significantly affected; however, violet and green-dyed sutures were in general weakened by laser exposure in the presence of dye-enhanced glue. Laser activation of the smallest caliber, dyed sutures (7-0) in the presence of glue caused the most significant loss of tensile strength of all sutures tested. These results indicate that the thermal effects of laser welding using our technique decrease the tensile strength of dyed sutures. A thermally resistant suture material (undyed or clear) may prevent disruption of wounds closed by laser welding techniques.

  14. Immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable plastic skull model and laser welding. A technical note on the screw-retained type: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ishida, Osamu; Kanitani, Hideo; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a new procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus. Preoperatively, the framework was fabricated on a photocurable resin skull model produced from a CT scan and individually designed guide template. The implants were immediately placed using the guide template; laser welding connected the components of framework. Despite the custom-made prosthesis, the total treatment from implant placement to superstructure placement can be completed within only 1 day. This procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus may be useful for any implant system and patient.

  15. Development of underwater YAG laser repair welding robots for tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Syuichi; Ito, Kosuke; Kochi, Tsutomu; Kojima, Toshio; Ohwaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro

    1999-01-01

    A remote-controlled repair welding robot which uses YAG laser welding technology in underwater environment was developed. This is an underwater robot technology combined with a laser welding technology. This report will describe the structure and performance of this robot, and the welding test results. The repair welding robot consists of two parts. The one is driving equipment, and the other is welding unit. It can swim in the tank, move around the tank wall, and stay on the welding area. After that it starts YAG laser repair welding. The target of this technology is inner surface repair of some tanks made of austenitic stainless steel, for example RW (Radioactive Waste) tanks. A degradation by General Corrosion and so on might be occurred at inner surface of these tanks in BWR type nuclear power plants. If the damaged area is wide, repair welding works are done. Some workers go into the tank and set up scaffolding after full drainage. In many cases it spends too much time for draining water and repair welding preparation. If the repair welding works can be done in underwater environment, the outage period will be reduced. This is a great advantage. (author)

  16. A numerical study on thermal behavior of a D-type water-cooled steam boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghari, M.; Hosseini, S.; Shokouhmand, H.; Sharifi, H.; Izadpanah, S.

    2012-01-01

    To achieve a precise assessment on thermal performance of a D-type water-cooled natural gas-fired boiler the present paper was aimed at determining temperature distribution of water and flue gas flows in its different heat exchange equipment. Using the zonal method to predict thermal radiation treatment in the boiler furnace and a numerical iterative approach, in which heat and fluid flow relations associated with different heat surfaces in the boiler convective zone were employed to estimate heat transfer characteristics, enabled this numerical study to obtain results in good agreement with experimental data measured in the utility site during steady state operation. A constant flow rate for a natural gas fuel of specified chemical composition was assumed to be mixed with a given excess ratio of air flow at a full boiler load. Significant results attributed to distribution of heat flux on different furnace walls and that of flue gas and water/steam temperature in different convective stages including superheater, evaporating risers and downcomers modules, and economizer were obtained. Besides the rate of heat absorption in every stage and other essential parameters in the boiler design too, inherent thermal characteristics like radiative and convective heat transfer coefficients as well as overall heat transfer conductance and effectiveness of convective stages considered as cross-flow heat exchangers were eventually presented for the given operating condition. - Highlights: ► Detailed distribution of heat flux on all of the boiler furnace walls was obtained. ► Flue gas and water thermal behaviors in different heating sections were evaluated. ► A good agreement was made between numerical results and experimental data. ► Contribution of the boiler furnace to the total thermal absorption was 39%. ► Contribution of the boiler tube banks to the total thermal absorption was 61%.

  17. Effects of solidified microstructures on J-R fracture resistances of the surge line pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, J. H.; Lee, B. S.; Yoo, W.

    2003-01-01

    The cause of the difference in J-R fracture resistances of AISI Type 347 GTAW welds which had almost same amounts of chromium carbides were investigated by the microstructural observations. As a result, the difference in the fracture resistances with the morphologies of the retained δ-ferrites in Type 347 welds were observed. The fracture resistance of the weld which had mostly vermicular type δ-ferrites was inferior to the weld which has lacy and acicular mixed type δ-ferrites. Therefore, it was deduced that the morphology of δ-ferrites affected the J-R fracture resistances of Type 347 welds

  18. Evaluation of strength property variations across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints using automated ball indentation (ABI) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraju, S.; GaneshKumar, J.; Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.; Laha, K.

    2017-01-01

    The variations of strength properties across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints fabricated by different arc welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and activated tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) have been evaluated employing automatic ball indentation (ABI) technique. ABI tests were conducted at 298 K across various zones of the weld joints comprising of base metal, weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) regions. The flow curves obtained from ABI tests were correlated with corresponding conventional tensile test results. In general, the tensile strength decreased systematically across the weld joint from weld metal to base metal. Inter critical HAZ exhibited the least strength implying that it is the weakest zone. The incomplete phase transformation in the ICHAZ during weld thermal cycle caused the softening. The A-TIG weld metal exhibited higher UTS and strain hardening values due to higher carbon in the martensite. The strain hardening exponent exhibited only slight variation across the various regions of the weld joints. A-TIG weld joint exhibited higher weld metal and HAZ strength, marginally higher UTS to YS ratio in the weld metal and HAZ compared to that of the other two processes. Hence, among the three welding processes chosen, A-TIG welding process is found to be superior in producing a 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint with better strength properties.

  19. Evaluation of strength property variations across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints using automated ball indentation (ABI) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaraju, S. [Nuclear Recycle Board, BARCF, Kalpakkam (India); GaneshKumar, J.; Vasantharaja, P. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Vasudevan, M., E-mail: dev@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Laha, K. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-05-17

    The variations of strength properties across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints fabricated by different arc welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and activated tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) have been evaluated employing automatic ball indentation (ABI) technique. ABI tests were conducted at 298 K across various zones of the weld joints comprising of base metal, weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) regions. The flow curves obtained from ABI tests were correlated with corresponding conventional tensile test results. In general, the tensile strength decreased systematically across the weld joint from weld metal to base metal. Inter critical HAZ exhibited the least strength implying that it is the weakest zone. The incomplete phase transformation in the ICHAZ during weld thermal cycle caused the softening. The A-TIG weld metal exhibited higher UTS and strain hardening values due to higher carbon in the martensite. The strain hardening exponent exhibited only slight variation across the various regions of the weld joints. A-TIG weld joint exhibited higher weld metal and HAZ strength, marginally higher UTS to YS ratio in the weld metal and HAZ compared to that of the other two processes. Hence, among the three welding processes chosen, A-TIG welding process is found to be superior in producing a 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint with better strength properties.

  20. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  1. Orbital welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The TIG (Tungsten-inert gas) orbital welding technique is applied in all areas of pipe welding. The process is mainly used for austenitic and ferritic materials but also for materials like aluminium, nickel, and titanium alloys are commonly welded according to this technique. Thin-walled as well as thick-walled pipes are welded economically. The application of orbital welding is of particular interest in the area of maintenance of thick-walled pipes that is described in this article. (orig.) [de

  2. New generation of welded semiautomatic for production of structures out of steels and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, A.N.; Poloskov, S.I.; Efanov, V.A.; Sedov, Yu.S.; Bukhta, O.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of the type of semiautomatic welding machines, produced in our country and abroad, is presented. New designs, realized in the 80th, are described. Design of KOMBI-500 and PRM-4M semiautomatic welding machines is described

  3. The Effect of Welding Current and Composition of Stainless steel on the Panetration in GTAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yılmaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, welding was performed on the plates of two different types of AISI 316 and AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steels by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding without using welding consumable in flat position. Automatic GTAW welding machine was used to control and obtain the exact values. The effects of welding currents used in welding process and the compositions of the stainless steels materials on the penetration were investigated. Weld bead size and shape such as bead width and dept were important considerations for penetration. Welding process was performed using various welding current values. The study showed that both welding parameters and composition of the stainless steels has influence on the penetration and It is increased with increasing of welding current. Besides, P/W rate of the weldments were influenced by the current and hardness values of the weld metal decrease with increasing welding current. The microstructure of the weld metal was also changed by variation of welding current.

  4. Study on Dynamic Development of Three-dimensional Weld Pool Surface in Stationary GTAW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiankang; He, Jing; He, Xiaoying; Shi, Yu; Fan, Ding

    2018-04-01

    The weld pool contains abundant information about the welding process. In particular, the type of the weld pool surface shape, i. e., convex or concave, is determined by the weld penetration. To detect it, an innovative laser-vision-based sensing method is employed to observe the weld pool surface of the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). A low-power laser dots pattern is projected onto the entire weld pool surface. Its reflection is intercepted by a screen and captured by a camera. Then the dynamic development process of the weld pool surface can be detected. By observing and analyzing, the change of the reflected laser dots reflection pattern, for shape of the weld pool surface shape, was found to closely correlate to the penetration of weld pool in the welding process. A mathematical model was proposed to correlate the incident ray, reflected ray, screen and surface of weld pool based on structured laser specular reflection. The dynamic variation of the weld pool surface and its corresponding dots laser pattern were simulated and analyzed. By combining the experimental data and the mathematical analysis, the results show that the pattern of the reflected laser dots pattern is closely correlated to the development of weld pool, such as the weld penetration. The concavity of the pool surface was found to increase rapidly after the surface shape was changed from convex to concave during the stationary GTAW process.

  5. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  6. Welding hot cracking in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrouault, N.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking is linked to several conditions, in particular, the composition of the material and the local strains due to clambering. The aim of this study is to better analyse the implied mechanisms and to lead to a local thermomechanical criterion for hot cracking. The example studied is an AISI 321-type stainless steel (X10CrNiTi18-12) strongly prone to cracking. Two weldability tests are studied: - the first one consists in carrying out a fusion line by the TIG process on a thin sheet. In the case of the defect occurrence, the crack is longitudinal and follows the back of the molten bath. The influence of the operating conditions welding (speed, welding heat input, width test sample) is studied. - the second one is the Varestraint test. It is widely used to evaluate the sensitivity of a material to hot cracking. It consists in loading the material by bending during a fusion line by the TIG process and in characterising the defects quantity (length, number). Various thermal and mechanical instrumentation methods were used. The possibilities of a local instrumentation instrumentation being limited because of the melting, the experimental results were complemented by a numerical modelling whose aim is to simulate the thermomechanical evolution of the loading thanks to the finite element analysis code ABAQUS. First, the heat input for thermal simulation is set by the use of an inverse method in order to optimise the energy deposit mode during welding in the calculation. Then, the mechanical simulation needs the input of a constitutive law that fits the mechanical behaviour over a wide temperature range from ambient to melting temperature. Thus, a mechanical characterization is performed by selecting strain values and strain rates representative of what the material undergoes during the tests. The results come from tensile and compressive tests and allow to settle an elasto-visco-plastic constitutive law over temperatures up to liquidus. Once

  7. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  8. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  9. The stress rupture properties of austenitic steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    Elevated temperature stress rupture data on Mo containing and Mo free austenitic weld metals have been collected from French, Dutch, German and UK sources and the results analysed. The stress rupture strength of Mo containing weld metal is significantly higher than that of Mo free weld metal. At 10,000h the rupture strength of Mo containing weld metal is higher than that of Type 316 steel whereas the Mo free weld metal is about 20% lower than that of Type 304 steel. Austenitic weld metal can give low stress rupture ductility values. It is concluded that there are insufficient data to permit reliable extrapolations to long times and it is recommended that long term tests are performed to overcome this situation

  10. Automatic welding of fuel elements; Soudure automatique des elements combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briola, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [French] Suivant le type d'element combustible, le materiau de gaine et l'importance de la serie a fabriquer, le soudeur dispose des differents procedes examines dans cette communication: - soudure classique a l'arc sous gaz inerte (utilisee pour G2 et le premier jeu EL3), - soudure en atmosphere complete d'argon (utilisee pour la soudure d'uranium et de zirconium), - soudure electronique (utilisee pourdeuxieme jeu EL3 et la cuve de Proserpine). (auteur)

  11. Welding with coated electrodes E 6010 and E 7018 in AISI 1025 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Reyes-Carcasés

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The welding of steel of low carbon content is a common practice in the nickel industry, where components with steels of these characteristics are manufactured. The objective of the paper was to establish the microstructural behavior of the AISI 1025 steel when it was welded with two types of electrodes (E 6010 and E 7018, the first one deposited as a mattress, and the second one to guarantee mechanical resistance; they were made in a 240 x 240 x 10 mm plate with simple bevel preparation. The microstructures obtained with the electrode E 6010 are of the ferrite type Widmanstátten, columnar ferrite and intergranular pearlite, with a hardness of 345 HV, while with the electrode E 7018 the microstructures are ferrite Widmanstátten, austenite and martensite, with hardness of 332 HV . The decrease in hardness in the latter case is associated with the thermal treatment of multipass annealing.

  12. Welding Residual Stress Analysis and Fatigue Strength Assessment at Elevated Temperature for Multi-pass Dissimilar Material Weld Between Alloy 617 and P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhwa; Hwang, Jeongho; Bae, Dongho

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, welding residual stress analysis and fatigue strength assessment were performed at elevated temperature for multi-pass dissimilar material weld between Alloy 617 and P92 steel, which are used in thermal power plant. Multi-pass welding between Alloy 617 and P92 steel was performed under optimized welding condition determined from repeated pre-test welding. In particular, for improving dissimilar material weld-ability, the buttering welding technique was applied on the P92 steel side before multi-pass welding. Welding residual stress distribution at the dissimilar material weld joint was numerically analyzed by using the finite element method, and compared with experimental results which were obtained by the hole-drilling method. Additionally, fatigue strength of dissimilar material weld joint was assessed at the room temperature (R.T), 300, 500, and 700 °C. In finite element analysis results, numerical peak values; longitudinal (410 MPa), transverse (345 MPa) were higher than those of experiments; longitudinal (298 MPa), transverse (245 MPa). There are quantitatively big differences between numerical and experimental results, due to some assumption about the thermal conductivity, specific heat, effects of enforced convection of the molten pool, dilution, and volume change during phase transformation caused by actual shield gas. The low fatigue limit at R.T, 300 °C, 500 °C and 700 °C was assessed to be 368, 276, 173 and 137 MPa respectively.

  13. Welding Residual Stress Analysis and Fatigue Strength Assessment at Elevated Temperature for Multi-pass Dissimilar Material Weld Between Alloy 617 and P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhwa; Hwang, Jeongho; Bae, Dongho

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, welding residual stress analysis and fatigue strength assessment were performed at elevated temperature for multi-pass dissimilar material weld between Alloy 617 and P92 steel, which are used in thermal power plant. Multi-pass welding between Alloy 617 and P92 steel was performed under optimized welding condition determined from repeated pre-test welding. In particular, for improving dissimilar material weld-ability, the buttering welding technique was applied on the P92 steel side before multi-pass welding. Welding residual stress distribution at the dissimilar material weld joint was numerically analyzed by using the finite element method, and compared with experimental results which were obtained by the hole-drilling method. Additionally, fatigue strength of dissimilar material weld joint was assessed at the room temperature (R.T), 300, 500, and 700 °C. In finite element analysis results, numerical peak values; longitudinal (410 MPa), transverse (345 MPa) were higher than those of experiments; longitudinal (298 MPa), transverse (245 MPa). There are quantitatively big differences between numerical and experimental results, due to some assumption about the thermal conductivity, specific heat, effects of enforced convection of the molten pool, dilution, and volume change during phase transformation caused by actual shield gas. The low fatigue limit at R.T, 300 °C, 500 °C and 700 °C was assessed to be 368, 276, 173 and 137 MPa respectively.

  14. Liquid phase and supercooled liquid phase welding of bulk metallic glasses