WorldWideScience

Sample records for weld type thermal

  1. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  2. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  3. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, 63-gil, Geumjeong-Gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  4. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  5. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  6. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  7. Friction welding thermal and metallurgical characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    This book provides insight into the thermal analysis of friction welding incorporating welding parameters such as external, duration, breaking load, and material properties. The morphological and metallurgical changes associated with the resulting weld sites are analysed using characterization methods such as electron scanning microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Nuclear reaction analysis.

  8. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  9. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  10. Peculiarities of thermal dissociation of oxides during submerged arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Zhdanov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of settlement of the process of thermal dissociation of oxides in reaction zone during the submerged arc welding and welding deposition is presented. Combined non-linear equations for definition of gas-vapour mixture composition were developed. They describe the dissociation of MeO, MeO2 and Me2O3 types of oxides. Calculations of the processes of oxide dissociation were performed for the oxides that are commonly included into welding fluxes. Their results and analysis are presented. The method proposed appeared to be adequate and applicable for analysis of processes during submerged arc operation that run in the gas phase.

  11. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  12. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool.

  13. Case-Study Inverse Thermal Analyses of Al2139 and Al2198 Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervaki, A. D.; Stergiou, V.; Lambrakos, S. G.

    2013-11-01

    Case study inverse thermal analyses of A12139 and Al2198 electron beam welds are presented. These analyses represent a continuation of previous studies using laser beam welds, but provide accessibility to different regions of the parameter space for temperature histories than achievable using laser beams. For these analyses, a numerical methodology is employed, which is in terms of analytic functions for inverse thermal analysis of steady-state energy deposition in plate structures. The results of the case studies presented provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories, which can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and their associated software implementations. In addition, these weld temperature histories can be used for construction of numerical basis functions that can be adopted for inverse analysis of welds corresponding to other process parameters or welding processes process conditions of which are within similar regimes.

  14. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  15. Effect of ferrite transformation on the tensile and stress corrosion properties of type 316 L stainless steel weld metal thermally aged at 873 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, H.; Khatak, H. S.; Seshadri, S. K.; Gnanamoorthy, J. B.; Rodriguez, P.

    1995-07-01

    This article deals with the effect of the microstructural changes, due to transformation of delta ferrite, on the associated variations that take place in the tensile and stress corrosion properties of type 316 L stainless steel weld deposits when subjected to postweld heat treatment at 873 K for prolonged periods (up to 2000 hours). On aging for short durations (up to 20 hours), carbide/ carbonitride was the dominant transformation product, whereas sigma phase was dominant at longer aging times. The changes in the tensile and stress corrosion behavior of the aged weld metal have been attributed to the two competitive processes of matrix softening and hardening. Yield strength (YS) was found to depend predominantly on matrix softening only, while sig-nificant changes in the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and the work-hardening exponent, n, occurred due to matrix hardening. Ductility and stress corrosion properties were considerably affected by both factors. Fractographic observations on the weld metal tested for stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) indicated a combination of transgranular cracking of the austenite and interface cracking.

  16. Drop weld thermal injuries to the middle ear.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keogh, I J

    2009-01-01

    Drop weld injuries to the tympanic membrane and middle ear caused by hot sparks or molten slag are a rare but significant injury. Steel workers and welders who are regularly exposed to flying sparks and molten metal slag are predisposed. This type of transtympanic thermal injury occurs when the slag literally drops into the external auditory canal and burns through the tympanic membrane. A spectrum of severity of injury occurs which includes chronic tympanic membrane perforation, chronic otorrhoea, facial nerve injury and deafness. Chronic tympanic membrane perforation is the most common sequelae and is perhaps one of the most challenging of all perforations to repair The combination of direct thermal injury and foreign body reaction results in continuing or recurrent suppuration. The foreign body reaction is due to the embedding of metal slag in the promontorial mucosa. We present a case of drop weld injury to the left tympanic membrane, resulting in chronic middle ear inflammation, otorrhoea and tympanic perforation. CAT scan clearly demonstrated a metallic promontorial foreign body with localised bone erosion. We emphasise the importance of removing these foreign bodies and recommend a cartilage reinforced underlay tympanoplasty technique to repair these perforations. Transtympanic thermal trauma is a preventable occupational injury, which is best, avoided by earplugs and increased awareness.

  17. Thermal-mechanical modeling and experimental validation of weld solidification cracking in 6061-T6 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.

    1997-12-31

    Finite element simulation using an internal state variable constitutive model coupled with a void growth and damage model are used to study weld solidification cracking of 6061-T6 aluminum. Calculated results are compared with data from an experimental program determining the locations of failure as a function of weld process parameters and specimen geometry. Two types of weld solidification cracking specimen were studied. One specimen, in which cracking did not occur, was used to evaluate finite element simulations of the thermal response and calculations of average strain across the weld. The other specimen type was used to determine the location of crack initiation as a function of weld process parameters. This information was used to evaluate the finite element simulations of weld solidification cracking. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was used in both thermal and mechanical finite element analyses. A strain rate and temperature history dependent constitutive model is coupled with a ductile void growth damage model in the mechanical analyses. Stresses near the weld pool are examined to explain results obtained in the finite element analyses and correlated with experimental observations. Good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment for locations of crack initiation and extent of cracking. Some effects of uncertainties in material parameters are discussed.

  18. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  19. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This method is a solid-state weld process capable of joining metallic alloys without melting. The weld workpieces to be joined by thermal stir welding (TSW) are drawn, by heavy forces, between containment plates past the TSW stir tool that then causes joining of the weld workpiece. TSW is similar to friction stir welding (FSW) in that material is heated into a plastic state (not melted) and stirred using a stir rod. The FSW pin tool is an integrated geometrical structure consisting of a large-diameter shoulder, and a smaller-diameter stir pin protruding from the shoulder. When the pin is plunged into a weld workpiece, the shoulder spins on the surface of the weld workpiece, thus inducing frictional heat into the part. The pin stirs the fraying surfaces of the weld joint, thus joining the weld workpiece into one structure. The shoulder and stir pin of the FSW pin tool must rotate together at a desired rotational speed. The induced frictional energy control and stir pin control of the pin tool cannot be de-coupled. The two work as one integrated unit. TSW, on the other hand, de-couples the heating and stirring of FSW, and allows for independent control of each process element. A uniquely designed induction coil heats the weld workpiece to a desired temperature, and once heated, the part moves into a stir rod whose RPM is also independently controlled. As the weld workpiece moves into the stir rod, the piece is positioned, or sandwiched, between upper and lower containment plates. The plate squeezes together, thus compressing the upper and lower surfaces of the weld workpiece. This compressive force, also called consolidation force, consolidates the plastic material within the weld nugget material as it is being stirred by the stir rod. The stir rod is positioned through the center of the top containment plate and protrudes midway through the opposite lower containment plate where it is mechanically captured. The upper and lower containment plates are separated by a

  20. Laser welded versus resistance spot welded bone implants: analysis of the thermal increase and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Bonanini, Mauro; Lagori, Giuseppe; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Nammour, Samir

    2014-01-01

    The first aim of this "ex vivo split mouth" study was to compare the thermal elevation during the welding process of titanium bars to titanium implants inserted in pig jaws by a thermal camera and two thermocouples. The second aim was to compare the strength of the joints by a traction test with a dynamometer. Six pigs' jaws were used and three implants were placed on each side of them for a total of 36 fixtures. Twelve bars were connected to the abutments (each bar on three implants) by using, on one side, laser welding and, on the other, resistance spot welding. Temperature variations were recorded by thermocouples and by thermal camera while the strength of the welded joint was analyzed by a traction test. For increasing temperature, means were 36.83 and 37.06, standard deviations 1.234 and 1.187, and P value 0.5763 (not significant). For traction test, means were 195.5 and 159.4, standard deviations 2.00 and 2.254, and P value 0.0001 (very significant). Laser welding was demonstrated to be able to connect titanium implant abutments without the risk of thermal increase into the bone and with good results in terms of mechanical strength.

  1. Laser Welded versus Resistance Spot Welded Bone Implants: Analysis of the Thermal Increase and Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fornaini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The first aim of this “ex vivo split mouth” study was to compare the thermal elevation during the welding process of titanium bars to titanium implants inserted in pig jaws by a thermal camera and two thermocouples. The second aim was to compare the strength of the joints by a traction test with a dynamometer. Materials and Methods. Six pigs’ jaws were used and three implants were placed on each side of them for a total of 36 fixtures. Twelve bars were connected to the abutments (each bar on three implants by using, on one side, laser welding and, on the other, resistance spot welding. Temperature variations were recorded by thermocouples and by thermal camera while the strength of the welded joint was analyzed by a traction test. Results. For increasing temperature, means were 36.83 and 37.06, standard deviations 1.234 and 1.187, and P value 0.5763 (not significant. For traction test, means were 195.5 and 159.4, standard deviations 2.00 and 2.254, and P value 0.0001 (very significant. Conclusion. Laser welding was demonstrated to be able to connect titanium implant abutments without the risk of thermal increase into the bone and with good results in terms of mechanical strength.

  2. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  3. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibility...... information of the high-fidelity model. The optimization schemes are applied to stationary thermal models of differing complexity of the friction stir welding process. The optimization problems considered are based on optimizing the temperature field in the workpiece by finding optimal translational speed...

  4. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  5. Effect of weld thermal cycle on helium bubble formation in stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, F.; Nakahigashi, S.; Nakamura, H.; Uesugi, N.; Mitamura, T.; Terasawa, M.; Irie, H.; Fukuya, K.

    1998-10-01

    Helium bubble structure was examined on a helium-implanted stainless steel after applying two kinds of heat input. Helium ions were implanted on Type 304 stainless steel at 573 K from 2 to 200 appm to a peak depth of 0.5 μm from the surface. After that, weld thermal history was applied by an electron beam. The cooling rates were selected to be 370 and 680 K/s from 1023 to 773 K. TEM observation revealed that nucleation and growth of helium bubbles were strongly dependent on the cooling rate after welding and the helium concentration.

  6. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with TIG welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  7. Thermal Modeling of Resistance Spot Welding and Prediction of Weld Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, M.; Valaee Tale, M.; Usefifar, GH. R.; Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash

    2017-11-01

    The microstructure of nuggets in resistance spot welding can be influenced by the many variables involved. This study aimed at examining such a relationship and, consequently, put forward an analytical model to predict the thermal history and microstructure of the nugget zone. Accordingly, a number of numerical simulations and experiments were conducted and the accuracy of the model was assessed. The results of this assessment revealed that the proposed analytical model could accurately predict the cooling rate in the nugget and heat-affected zones. Moreover, both analytical and numerical models confirmed that sheet thickness and electrode-sheet interface temperature were the most important factors influencing the cooling rate at temperatures lower than about T l/2. Decomposition of austenite is one of the most important transformations in steels occurring over this temperature range. Therefore, an easy-to-use map was designed against these parameters to predict the weld microstructure.

  8. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  9. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  10. In situ Weak Magnetic-Assisted Thermal Stress Field Reduction Effect in Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lvjie; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xin

    2018-01-01

    For decades, post-welding magnetic treatment has been used to reduce residual stress of welds by improving the crystal structure of solid-state welds. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic treatment method, which can reduce the time-dependent thermal stress field in situ and reduce the final residual stress of welds by simply exerting an assisted weak magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction and workpiece during laser welding. A new finite-element model is developed to understand the thermal-mechanical physical process of the magnetic-assisted laser welding. For the widely used 304 austenite stainless steel, we theoretically observed that this method can reduce around 10 pct of the time-dependent thermal stress field, and finally reduce approximately 20 MPa of residual stress near the heat-affected zone with a 415-mT magnetic field for typical welding process parameters. A new mechanism based on magneto-fluid dynamics is proposed to explain the theoretical predications by combining high-speed imaging experiments of the transient laser welding process. The developed method is very simple but surprisingly effective, which opens new avenues for thermal stress reduction in laser welding of metals, particularly heat-sensitive metallic materials.

  11. In situ Weak Magnetic-Assisted Thermal Stress Field Reduction Effect in Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lvjie; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xin

    2017-11-01

    For decades, post-welding magnetic treatment has been used to reduce residual stress of welds by improving the crystal structure of solid-state welds. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic treatment method, which can reduce the time-dependent thermal stress field in situ and reduce the final residual stress of welds by simply exerting an assisted weak magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction and workpiece during laser welding. A new finite-element model is developed to understand the thermal-mechanical physical process of the magnetic-assisted laser welding. For the widely used 304 austenite stainless steel, we theoretically observed that this method can reduce around 10 pct of the time-dependent thermal stress field, and finally reduce approximately 20 MPa of residual stress near the heat-affected zone with a 415-mT magnetic field for typical welding process parameters. A new mechanism based on magneto-fluid dynamics is proposed to explain the theoretical predications by combining high-speed imaging experiments of the transient laser welding process. The developed method is very simple but surprisingly effective, which opens new avenues for thermal stress reduction in laser welding of metals, particularly heat-sensitive metallic materials.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of collagen as a component in the thermally induced 'weld'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemole, G. M., Jr.; Anderson, R. Rox; DeCoste, Sue

    1991-06-01

    A simple thermodynamic approach to tissue 'welding' was studied. Fresh bovine tendon (67% type I collagen) was sectioned into disk shaped pieces, pairs of which were inserted between bowed glass coverslips and wrapped in aluminum foil. The packets were heated in a waterbath according to two protocols. In group I, packets were tested for four minutes at temperatures between 55-65 degree(s)C, in 1 degree(s)C intervals. In group II, the packets were kept at 62 degree(s)C for 4 minutes while the rate of cooling was altered. The force necessary to separate the tendon disks was then measured. The optimal temperature for tissue bonding (group I) was 62 degree(s)C (598 gm/in2). Stress values below 250 gm/in2 could be achieved without heat application and were considered non-welds. Group II showed that the faster the sample cools, the stronger the bond. Several conclusions can be postulated. The narrow temperature region necessary for tissue 'welding' strongly suggests that melting of type I collagen fibrils is involved. Bonding presumably occurs at 62 degree(s)C by allowing (alpha) -strands from the collagen super-helix molecule to form new, random connections. Group II results suggest that trans-incisional reannealing of unraveled helices does not play a role in tissue bonding. Rapid cooling allows less time for extended helix reformation; same-side a-helix reannealing may inhibit effective welds by reducing sites for trans-incisional visco-elastic bonding. Although the exact nature and optimization of thermal tissue 'welds' remains unclear, the behavior of collagen appears to play a central role.

  13. Experimental modeling of weld thermal cycle of the heat affected zone (HAZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kulhánek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Contribution deals with experimental modeling of quick thermal cycles of metal specimens. In the introduction of contribution will be presented measured graphs of thermal cycle of heat affected zone (HAZ of weld. Next will be presented experimental simulation of measured thermal cycle on the standard specimens, useable for material testing. This approach makes possible to create material structures of heat affected zone of weld, big enough for standard material testing.

  14. Thermal analysis of laser welding for ITER correction coil case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, C., E-mail: fangchao@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 200031 (China); Lappeenranta University of Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, 53850 Lappeenranta (Finland); Song, Y.T.; Wu, W.Y.; Wei, J.; Xin, J.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 200031 (China); Wu, H.P.; Salminen, A. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, 53850 Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Morphology of simulated heat source is found to be close to the welded joint sample. • The FEA temperature distribution shows good agreement with experimental measurements. • Laser welding process used on ITER correction coil case will not harm the winding pack. - Abstract: This paper presents the simulation results of 3D finite element analysis (FEA) of laser welding processes for the ITER correction coil case welding; predicts the temperature distribution and compares it with the experimental result to evaluate the impact to the properties of winding pack during the welding process. A specimen of coil case was modeled and simulated by using specialized welding simulation software SYSWELD, Modeling used austenitic stainless steel 316LN as the specimen material and a 3D Conical Gaussian was used as a heat source model. A plate sample was welded before the FE modeling in order to obtain the laser welding parameters and the Gaussian parameters of molten pool. To verify the simulation results, a coil case sample was welded using laser welding with welding parameters that matched the model, and the corresponding temperature values were measured using thermocouples. Compared with the FEA results, it was found that the FEA temperature distribution shows good agreement with the experimental measurements and the laser welding process will not harm the winding pack.

  15. Closed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Part Qualification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes variables...

  16. Colosed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Ppart Qualification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes variables...

  17. Effect of long-term thermal aging on the fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel base and weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F.F.

    1995-09-27

    Compact tension specimens taken from FFTF primary piping materials (Type 316 stainless steel (SS) and 16-8-2 SS weld metal) and from reactor vessel materials (304 SS and 308 SS weld metal) were heated in laboratory furnaces from 100,000 hours. Fracture toughness testing was performed on these specimens, which are 7.62- and 25.4-mm thick, respectively at the aging temperature (482 and 427 degrees). Results were analyzed with the multiple-specimen method. Thermal aging continues to reduce the fracture toughness of FFTF component materials. Results show that thermal aging has a strong effect on the toughness degradation of weld metals, particularly for 16-8-2 SS weld whose aged/unaged Jc ratio is only 0.31 after 100,000-hour aging. The fracture toughness of the 308 and 16-8-2 SS weld metals fluctuated during 20,000 to 50,000-hour aging but deteriorated as the aging time increased to 100,000 hours; the toughness degradation is significant. Fracture control based on a fracture mechanics approach should be considered

  18. Finite element thermal analysis of the fusion welding of a P92 steel pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Yaghi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusion welding is common in steel pipeline construction in fossil-fuel power generation plants. Steel pipes in service carry steam at high temperature and pressure, undergoing creep during years of service; their integrity is critical for the safe operation of a plant. The high-grade martensitic P92 steel is suitable for plant pipes for its enhanced creep strength. P92 steel pipes are usually joined together with a similar weld metal. Martensitic pipes are sometimes joined to austenitic steel pipes using nickel based weld consumables. Welding involves severe thermal cycles, inducing residual stresses in the welded structure, which, without post weld heat treatment (PWHT, can be detrimental to the integrity of the pipes. Welding residual stresses can be numerically simulated by applying the finite element (FE method in Abaqus. The simulation consists of a thermal analysis, determining the temperature history of the FE model, followed by a sequentially-coupled structural analysis, predicting residual stresses from the temperature history.

    In this paper, the FE thermal analysis of the arc welding of a typical P92 pipe is presented. The two parts of the P92 steel pipe are joined together using a dissimilar material, made of Inconel weld consumables, producing a multi-pass butt weld from 36 circumferential weld beads. Following the generation of the FE model, the FE mesh is controlled using Model Change in Abaqus to activate the weld elements for each bead at a time corresponding to weld deposition. The thermal analysis is simulated by applying a distributed heat flux to the model, the accuracy of which is judged by considering the fusion zones in both the parent pipe as well as the deposited weld metal. For realistic fusion zones, the heat flux must be prescribed in the deposited weld pass and also the adjacent pipe elements. The FE thermal results are validated by comparing experimental temperatures measured by five thermocouples on the

  19. Simulation of Temperature Field in HDPE Pipe Thermal Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Li-jun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For high density polyethylene pipe connection,welding technology is the key of the high density engineering plastic pressure pipe safety. And the temperature distribution in the welding process has a very important influence on the welding quality. Polyethylene pipe weld joints of one dimensional unsteady overall heat transfer model is established by MARC software and simulates temperature field and stress field distribution of the welding process,and the thermocouple temperature automatic acquisition system of welding temperature field changes were detected,and compared by simulation and experiment .The results show that,at the end of the heating,the temperature of the pipe does not reach the maximum,but reached the maximum at 300 s,which indicates that the latent heat of phase change in the process of pressure welding. In the process of pressure welding, the axial stress of the pipe is gradually changed from tensile stress to compressive stress.

  20. Thermal Stir Welding of High Strength and High Temperature Alloys for Aerospace Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Keystone and MSU team propose to demonstrate the feasibility of solid-state joining high strength and temperature alloys utilizing the Thermal Stir Welding...

  1. Structure and Phase Composition of 09G2S Steel Modified by Different Types of Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Aleksandr N.; Popova, Natal’ya A.; Nikonenko, Elena L.; Ozhiganov, Evgenii A.; Ababkov, Nikolai V.; Koneva, Nina A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of the structure and phase composition of the type 09G2S weld steel modified by four types of welding, namely: electrode welding and electropercussive welding both with and without the introduction of artificial flaws. Artificial flows are aluminum pieces. TEM investigations are carried out within the heat-affected zone, i.e. between the deposited and base metal, at 0.5 mm distance to the former. Welding electrode of the type E50A is used for welding 09G2S steel specimens. It is shown how the type of welding affects the steel morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters. After each type of welding, the dislocation structure is polarized. This, however, does not cause internal stresses which can destroy the specimen.

  2. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  3. Research of the Resistance of Contact Welding Joint of R65 Type Rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kęstutis Dauskurdis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the R65 type rail joints that were welded by resistance welding are analysed. Survey methodology of the research consists of the following parts: visual inspection of welded joint, ultrasonic rail inspection, hardness test of upper part of the rail, fusion area research, the measurement hardness test of heat-softened area, the measurement microhardness test, microstructure research of the welded joint, impact strength experiments, chemical analysis of welded joint, wheel-rail interaction research using the finite element method (FEM. The results of the research are analysed and the quality of weld is evaluated. The conclusion is based on the results of this research.

  4. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    OpenAIRE

    J. U. Anaele; O. O. ONYEMAOBI; C. S. Nwobodo; C. C. Ugwuegbu

    2015-01-01

    The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated), E 308-16(lime-titania coated) electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range...

  5. Numerical Simulation of the Thermal Efficiency During Laser Deep Penetration Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, A.; Pieper, J.; Liebl, S.; Zaeh, M. F.

    The advantages of laser beam welding, such as its high flexibility, its high local energy input, and its fast processing speed, led to a substantial increase of industrial applications of the technology. High losses can be observed during laser welding of materials with a high thermal conductivity, such as aluminum or copper. This is caused by the heat conduction losses in the surrounding area of the process zone and due to reflections. These energy losses lead to a reduced efficiency of the laser welding process. A numerical model based on a CFD simulation is presented, which enables to calculate the molten pool isotherms. The thermal efficiency is determined for different keyhole geometries and welding velocities. This efficiency is defined as the ratio between the energy which is required to melt the volume of metal in the fusion zone and the absorbed laser beam power.

  6. Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, W., IV

    1998-06-01

    Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack oil both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub-surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of tile probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced In the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring tile concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and characterizing the Fourier-Transform infrared (FTIR) spectra before and after the laser exposure.

  7. Multiple exposure to metals in eight types of welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoli, P; Porru, S; Brunelli, E; Alessio, L

    1997-01-01

    This article evaluates multiple exposures to metals in different types of metal welding such as manual metal arc for mild and stainless steel, continuous wire, submerged arc, laser and brazing. Environmental monitoring was carried out in eight different occupational situations and the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique was adopted in order to characterize exposure to several elements simultaneously and with high accuracy. The results showed that up to 23 elements could be measured. The highest concentrations were found for Al, Mn, Fr, Ni, Cr, Cu and Zn. For some elements such as In, Nd, I, Rb the concentrations were very low. A qualitative and quantitative variation in fume composition was observed at a certain distance from the welding point, which should be to taken into account when evaluating indirect exposures. It would also be possible, with this technique, to identify specific elements in the mixture which could also be measured in biological fluids.

  8. Prevention of Porosities in Insert-type Electron Beam Welding for Nodular Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Fumio, SHIBATA; SEIICHI, ANDO; College of Science and Technology, Nihon University; College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports about investigations in regard to the influences of the welding conditions mainly on porosities in insert-type electron beam welding for 50 Kgf/mm^2 class nodular cast iron (plate thickness: 6, 12, 18mm) with austenitic stainless steel SUS304 (thickness: 0.5 mm) as insert metal. Bead appearances, shape of fusion zone, porosities, state of weld cracks, and tensile test of weld joint have been carefully observed under the influences of welding conditions, that is, pretreatmen...

  9. Swelling behavior of welded type 316 stainless steel and its improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, T.; Fukai, K.; Kodaira, T.; Nishida, T.; Nayama, M.; Hishinuma, A.

    1988-07-01

    Type 316 stainless steel was electron beam welded with titanium foil insertion. The concentration of introduced titanium in the weld metal was 0.1, 0.3 and 0.6 wt% corresponding to the inserted foil thickness of 10, 30 and 60 μm, respectively. All the weld joint showed good mechanical performance. The swelling resistance of the weld metal is effectively improved by the introduced titanium. Although inhomogeneous distribution of titanium makes it difficult to estimate the extent of the improvement quantitatively, the results suggest the applicability of this method to Ti-modified 316 stainless steel, where weld metal is already reported to show reduced swelling resistance.

  10. Investigation on narrow-gap welding residual stresses in ultra-thick ring-type mockups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan; Yang, Jiawei; Shi, Yifeng; Zhao, Yong

    2018-01-01

    The stress distributions within two ring-type mockups manufactured by multi-pass narrow-gap submerged welding were investigated by numerical simulations and experiments. The large mockup consisted of a 300 mm thick ring welded to a large cylinder, and the small one was a butt-welded joint consisted of two 300 mm thick curved plates. The effect of structure form on the stress in the heavy-section component was also investigated. Results show that the stress distribution in the small mockup is similar to that in the large one. The location where the minimum hoop and radial stresses appear at the weld centerline is decided by the weld metal height of the second welding step of the welding procedure used in the present study. In addition, a sudden stress change occurs near the top surface of the weld metal after the first welding step due to the strong stiffness of the mockups. For the 300 mm thick welded mockups investigated, the structure form has no evident effect on the shape of the through-thickness stress distribution at the weld centerline, which is determined by the welding procedure; however, the structure form can affect the value of the minimum stress.

  11. Methodology for Estimating Thermal and Neutron Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds During Service in Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2016-04-28

    The effect of thermal aging on the degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties of austenitic stainless steel (SS) welds has been characterized at reactor temperatures. The solidification behavior and the distribution and morphology of the ferrite phase in SS welds are described. Thermal aging of the welds results in moderate decreases in Charpy-impact strength and fracture toughness. The upper-shelf Charpy-impact energy of aged welds decreases by 50–80 J/cm2. The decrease in fracture toughness J-R curve, or JIc is relatively small. Thermal aging has minimal effect on the tensile strength. The fracture properties of SS welds are insensitive to filler metal; the welding process has a significant effect. The large variability in the data makes it difficult to establish the effect of the welding process on fracture properties of SS welds. Consequently, the approach used for evaluating thermal and neutron embrittlement of austenitic SS welds relies on establishing a lower-bound fracture toughness J-R curve for unaged and aged, and non-irradiated and irradiated, SS welds. The existing fracture toughness J-R curve data for SS welds have been reviewed and evaluated to define lower-bound J-R curve for submerged arc (SA)/shielded metal arc (SMA)/manual metal arc (MMA) welds and gas tungsten arc (GTA)/tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in the unaged and aged conditions. At reactor temperatures, the fracture toughness of GTA/TIG welds is a factor of about 2.3 higher than that of SA/SMA/MMA welds. Thermal aging decreases the fracture toughness by about 20%. The potential combined effects of thermal and neutron embrittlement of austenitic SS welds are also described. Lower-bound curves are presented that define the change in coefficient C and exponent n of the power-law J-R curve and the JIc value for SS welds as a function of neutron dose. The potential effects of reactor coolant environment on the fracture toughness of austenitic SS welds are also discussed.

  12. Modeling of the Thermal Behavior of Metals During Welding Laser ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The temperature distribution in the workpiece can be determined from the heat equation which expresses the energy balance. This is a parabolic differential equation and for resolution we applied the finite difference method using the implicit scheme. Keywords: Laser Welding, Metal, Finite differences, temperature profile.

  13. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  14. Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding – Initial Studies Using a Space Mapping Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process. The optimization is performed using a space mapping technique in which an analytical model is used along with the FEM model to be optimized. The results are compared to traditional gradient based optimization...

  15. Fatigue properties and fracture mechanism of load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding

    OpenAIRE

    Takamasa Abe; Hiroyuki Akebono; Masahiko Kato; Atsushi Sugeta

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the hydraulic excavator and the crane have numerous one-sided welded joints. However, attachments with box like structures are difficult to weld at both sides. Therefore, high accurate evaluation method is needed. In this study, the fatigue properties and the fracture mechanism of the load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding were investigated experimentally to evaluate its fatigue damage with high accuracy based on the experimental results. As the ...

  16. Optimization of friction stir welding using space mapping and manifold mapping-an initial study of thermal aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process by finding optimal welding parameters. The optimization is performed using space mapping and manifold mapping techniques in which a coarse model is used along with the fine model to be optimized. Different...

  17. Prediction of grain size and mechanical properties in friction stir welded pure copper joints using a thermal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Esmaily, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a thermal model was developed and applied to simulate the friction stir welding of pure copper plates with the thickness of 2 mm. The different traverse speeds of 100, 200, 300, and 400 mm min−1 and rotational speeds of 400, 700, 900 rev min−1 were considered as welding parameters...

  18. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  19. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Thermally Aged Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds and Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Seo, Myeong-Gyu; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Conventional test methods for tensile and J-R properties of such weld require large size specimens. Meanwhile, small punch (SP) test has advantages of using small size samples at specific location. In this study, the mechanical property changes caused by the thermal aging were evaluated for the stainless steel welds and CASSs using tensile, J-R, and SP test. Based on the results, correlations were developed to estimate the fracture toughness using the load-displacement curve of SP tests. Finally, the fracture surfaces of compact tension (CT) and SP test specimens are compared and discussed in view of the effect of thermal aging on microstructure. Stainless steel welds of ER316L and ER347 as well as CASS (CF8M) were thermally aged at 400 .deg. C for 5,000 h. So far, tensile properties and fracture toughness of un-aged materials were carried out at room temperature and 320 .deg. C as a reference data. In order to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties, aged specimens are being tested and the changes in these properties will be discussed. In addition, correlations will be developed to estimate the fracture toughness in between J-R curve and SP curve.

  1. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2018-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high-quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable alloys) that is historically operated at lower joining speeds (up to hundreds of millimeters per minute). In this study, we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with high welding speeds up to 3 M/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. The higher welding speed results in narrower, stronger heat-affected zones (HAZs) and also higher hardness in the nugget zones. The material flow direction in the nugget zone is found to be leaning towards the welding direction as the welding speed increases. Results are coupled with welding parameters and thermal history to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high-speed processing.

  2. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2017-11-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high-quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable alloys) that is historically operated at lower joining speeds (up to hundreds of millimeters per minute). In this study, we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with high welding speeds up to 3 M/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. The higher welding speed results in narrower, stronger heat-affected zones (HAZs) and also higher hardness in the nugget zones. The material flow direction in the nugget zone is found to be leaning towards the welding direction as the welding speed increases. Results are coupled with welding parameters and thermal history to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high-speed processing.

  3. Different types of cracking of P91 steel weld joints after long-term creep tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, D.; Kasl, J.; Chvostova, E. (SKODA VYZKUM s.r.o., Plzen (Czech Republic))

    2010-05-15

    This paper deals with creep testing and microstructural investigation of trial weld joints prepared of wrought and cast 9Cr-1Mo-V steels using GTAW & SMAW method. Creep testing was carried out at temperature range from 525 degC to 625 degC, the longest time to rupture of 45 811 hrs was achieved. The creep strengths of weld joints for 100 000 hrs were calculated. Different types of cracking were observed in dependency on conditions of creep test and the type of weld joint. Type 1 and Type 2 fractures occurred at high applied stress at relatively low temperatures in the tube weld joint and also in two speciments of the cast plate weld joint after creep test at the lowest temperature and the highest temperature. All other fractures were of the Type 4. Causes of different fracture location in tested weld joints were elucidated on the base of substructure evolution in individual zones - the weld metal, the heat affected zone and the base material. Two processes occur simultaneously, which result in the creep damage: (i) softening of solid solution as a result of Laves phase precipitation and (ii) formation and coalescence of cavities in the soft fine grained parts of heat affected zone. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of the Thermal Welding Technique and Cold Dissection for Pediatric Tonsillectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yaşar, Hüsamettin; Özkul, Haluk; Verim, Ayşegül

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the thermal welding technique (TWT) with cold dissection (CD) for pediatric tonsillectomy. Patients and Methods: Fifty consecutive children with chronic tonsillitis and/or upper airway obstruction were alternately assigned to the TWT or CD group. Age, gender, operation time, intraoperative hemostasis method, early postoperative pain, time to regain normal diet, and extent of healing of the tonsillar fossa on the tenth postoperative day were evaluated. Re...

  5. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. U. Anaele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated, E 308-16(lime-titania coated electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range of 1.5≤Creq./Nieq.≤1.9 and solidified with a duplex mode and were found to be resistant to solidification cracking. The E 308-16 weld metal had the greatest resistance to solidification cracking. Joints produced from E 310-16 had Creq./Nieq. ratio 1.9 and solidified with ferrite mode. It had a low resistance to solidification cracking.

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF WELDING DEFORMATION TYPES OF HYBRID NODE ON ASSEMBLY SUITABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Urbański

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents welding deformation types identified in a hybrid node. The hybrid node is a new structure element. Its implementation requires solving many problems, especially those related to the technology. The most important problems in this field are welding deformations arising at the prefabrication stage of a node fabrication. Welding deformations influence the quality of prefabricated section and cause an increase of manufacturing costs. Therefore, a definition of influence of each deformation type on assembly suitability is a significant problem. The expert method presented in the article makes it possible to define this influence.

  7. Effects of Metal Types on Residual Stress in Electron-Beam Welding Joints with Sheet Metals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagai, Takuya; Kasai, Ryu; Ueno, Kunika; Mochizuki, Masahito; Suga, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of metal types on the residual stresses has been researched through X-ray stress measurement for the electron-beam welding joints made of sheet metals with a thickness of approximately 10 mm...

  8. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Said, E-mail: Said.taheri@edf.fr [EDF-LAB, IMSIA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Julan, Emricka [EDF-LAB, AMA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tran, Xuan-Van [EDF Energy R& D UK Centre/School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Robert, Nicolas [EDF-DPN, UNIE, Strategic Center, Saint Denis (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  9. Weldability investigation steel P 91 by weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates results of hardness and impact energy of thermal cycle simulated specimens of high-alloy steel P 91 and their dependence on cooling time from 800 to 500 °C. Results were obtained by measuring hardness HV 1 and by experimental testing of Charpy notched specimens. Metallographic analysis of samples was performed on scanning electronic microscope.

  10. Effect of joint design and welding type on the flexural strength and weld penetration of Ti-6Al-4V alloy bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Resende Novais, Veridiana; Rodrigues Machado, Asbel; Soares, Carlos José; Araújo Raposo, Luís Henrique

    2015-05-01

    Framework longevity is a key factor for the success of complete-arch prostheses and commonly depends on the welding methods. However, no consensus has been reached on the joint design and welding type for improving framework resistance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of different joint designs and welding methods with tungsten inert gas (TIG) or laser to join titanium alloy bars (Ti-6Al-4V). Seventy titanium alloy bar specimens were prepared (3.18 mm in diameter × 40.0 mm in length) and divided into 7 groups (n=10): the C-control group consisting of intact specimens without joints and the remaining 6 groups consisting of specimens sectioned perpendicular to the long-axis and rejoined using an I-, X30-, or X45-shaped joint design with TIG welding (TI, TX30, and TX45) or laser welding (LI, LX30, and LX45). The specimens were tested with 3-point bending. The fracture surfaces were first evaluated with stereomicroscopy to measure the weld penetration area and then analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test, 1-way ANOVA and the Dunnett test, and the Pearson correlation test (α=.05). Specimens from the X30 and X45 groups showed higher flexural strength (Pwelded area (Pwelding type. TIG welded groups showed significantly higher flexural strength than the laser groups (PTIG welding also resulted in higher welded areas than laser welding for the I-shaped specimens. No significant differences were found for the weld penetration area in the X45 group, either for laser or TIG welding. SEM analysis showed more pores at the fracture surfaces of the laser specimens. Fracture surfaces indicative of regions of increased ductility were detected for the TIG specimens. TIG welding resulted in higher flexural strength for the joined titanium specimens than laser welding. For both welding methods, X30- and X45-shaped joint designs resulted in higher flexural strength and

  11. Advanced welding for closed structure. Pt. 3 The thermal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacripanti, A.; Bonanno, G.; Paoloni, M.; Sagratella, G. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Arborino, A.; Varesi, R.; Antonucci, A. [DUNE, (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    This report describes the activities developed for the European Contract BRITE AWCS III to study the use of thermal sensing techniques to obtain an accurate detection of the internal reinforcement of the closed steel structures employed in the shipbuilding industry. After a description of the methods, normally developed in Russia, about the techniques and problems, for the thermal testing of materials in the conventional approach, a new thermal detector was utilized, a new bolometric thermo camera is introduced with a special software for the on line image analysis, there are also shown the experimental tests and results. The obtained conclusion shows that the thermal non destructive testing techniques with the new detector should be useful to assemble a complete sensing system with one ultrasonic head. [Italian] Questo rapporto descrive le attivita' sperimentali sviluppate nell'ambito del contratto europeo BRITE AWCS III, in cui si sono utilizzate tecniche termiche per ottenere un preciso rilevamento dei rinforzi interni di strutture metalliche chiuse utilizzate nell'industria delle costruzioni navali. Dopo la descrizione dei metodi sviluppati essenzialmente in Russia, circa le tecniche e i problemi riguardanti il testing termico dei materiali, e' stato introdotto un approccio innovativo basato su un nuovo sensore: una termocamera bolometrica connessa con un software dedicato per l'analisi online del setto; vengono inoltre mostrati i risultati sperimentali ottenuti. Le conclusioni ottenute mostrano che nel nuovo approccio, il testing termico non distruttivo dovrebbe essere utile per assemblare un sistema sensoriale completo che utilizzi anche un sensore di tipo ultrasonico.

  12. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel-Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin; Lee, Bong Ho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  13. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong Ho [National Center for Nanomaterials Technology (NCNT), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheongam-ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  14. [Spectra and thermal analysis of the arc in activating flux plasma arc welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guo-Ming; Zhu, Yi-Feng

    2010-04-01

    In activating flux plasma arc welding the welding arc was analyzed by spectra analysis technique, and the welding arc temperature field was measured by the infrared sensing and computer image technique. The distribution models of welding arc heat flow density of activating flux PAW welding were developed. The composition of welding arc affected by activated flux was studied, and the welding arc temperature field was studied. The results show that the spectral lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are the main spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The spectra lines of weld metal are inappreciable in the spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The gas particle is the main in the conventional plasma welding arc. The conventional plasma welding arc is gas welding arc. The spectra lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are intensified in the activating flux plasma welding arc, and the spectra lines of Ti, Cr and Fe elements are found in the activating flux plasma welding arc. The welding arc temperature distribution in activating flux plasma arc welding is compact, the outline of the welding arc temperature field is narrow, the range of the welding arc temperature distribution is concentrated, the welding arc radial temperature gradient is large, and the welding arc radial temperature gradient shows normal Gauss distribution.

  15. Effect of Thermal Cycle on the Formation of Intermetallic Compounds in Laser Welding of Aluminum-Steel Overlap Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Thomy, C.; Vollertsen, F.

    The intermetallic compound (IMC) (or intermetallic phase layer) has a significant influence on the mechanical properties ofjoints between dissimilar metals obtained by thermal processes such as laser welding. Its formation is basically affected by thermal cycles in the joining or contact zone, where the IMC is formed. Within this study, the influence of the thermal cycle on the formation of the IMC during laser welding of an aluminum-steel (Al99.5-DC01) overlap joint was investigated. The temperature was measured directly by a thermocouple, and the weld seam was analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The influence of peak temperature, cooling time and the integral of the thermal cycle on the thickness of the IMC was identified and discussed. It was identified that cooling time has the biggest influence on the thickness of the IMC.

  16. Analysis of thermal cycles and microstructure of heat affected zone for a low alloy carbon steel pipe under multipass weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Woan; Ha, Joon Wook; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jeong Tae [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze thermal cycles and to investigate microstructures of heat affected zones for a low alloy carbon steel pipe under a multipass weld. The commercial finite element code SYSWELD is used to compute thermal cycles during multipass weld. The numerical results such as thermal cycles and size of heat affected zone are compared with those of the experiment and the two results show a good agreement. In addition, the microstructure and hardness and investigated from the weldment in detail. The weakest location is founded at intercritical region near the base metal.

  17. A Comparison of Different Finite Element Methods in the Thermal Analysis of Friction Stir Welding (FSW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Meyghani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a novel kind of welding for joining metals that are impossible or difficult to weld by conventional methods. Three-dimensional nature of FSW makes the experimental investigation more complex. Moreover, experimental observations are often costly and time consuming, and usually there is an inaccuracy in measuring the data during experimental tests. Thus, Finite Element Methods (FEMs has been employed to overcome the complexity, to increase the accuracy and also to reduce costs. It should be noted that, due to the presence of large deformations of the material during FSW, strong distortions of mesh might be happened in the numerical simulation. Therefore, one of the most significant considerations during the process simulation is the selection of the best numerical approach. It must be mentioned that; the numerical approach selection determines the relationship between the finite grid (mesh and deforming continuum of computing zones. Also, numerical approach determines the ability of the model to overcome large distortions of mesh and provides an accurate resolution of boundaries and interfaces. There are different descriptions for the algorithms of continuum mechanics include Lagrangian and Eulerian. Moreover, by combining the above-mentioned methods, an Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian (ALE approach is proposed. In this paper, a comparison between different numerical approaches for thermal analysis of FSW at both local and global scales is reviewed and the applications of each method in the FSW process is discussed in detail. Observations showed that, Lagrangian method is usually used for modelling thermal behavior in the whole structure area, while Eulerian approach is seldom employed for modelling of the thermal behavior, and it is usually employed for modelling the material flow. Additionally, for modelling of the heat affected zone, ALE approach is found to be as an appropriate approach. Finally, several

  18. A thermal-metallurgical model of laser beam welding simulation for carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Gaoyang; Zhan, Xiaohong; Wei, Yanhong; Ou, Wenmin; Gu, Cheng; Yu, Fengyi

    2015-04-01

    A coupled thermal-metallurgical model is developed to predict the temperature fields and spatial distribution of volume fraction of phases during laser beam welding of 1020, 1045, and 1060 steels. The classical transient heat conduction model is used to calculate the temperature fields during laser beam welding. For phase transformation, the austenization, the austenite-to-pearlite/ferrite transformation, the austenite-to-bainite transformation, and the austenite-to-martensite transformation are modeled respectively. All of these transformation models are solved by the finite element method (FEM) based on the simulated temperature fields. The thermal properties of the three steels are determined by the linear interpolation base of the phase fractions, and thermal properties for each pure phase. The temperature fields and spatial distribution of phases are predicted by 3D finite element method (FEM) code which is developed by the authors to solve the thermal-metallurgical models. In addition, comparison between the coupled model and the pure conduction model without considering phase transformations is carried out to study the influence of phase transformation on temperature fields during welding. According to the comparison, the temperature of the coupled model is higher than the pure conduction model in the temperature region above 1000 °C, but the temperature profiles are very similar at the temperature region under 1000 °C. The predicted volume fractions of 1020 and 1060 steels are close to experimental results. However, there is an obvious difference between predicted and experimental results of the phase fraction of 1045 steels.

  19. Effects of thermal aging on microstructure and hardness of China low activation martensitic steel welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Junyu [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Xu, Gang, E-mail: gang.xu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The hardness of HAZ and WM decreases obviously after aging. • The precipitation of the Laves-phase in BM is similar to that in HAZ. • M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles are conducive to the nucleation of Laves-phase. • Ta may have a role to retard the early precipitation of the Laves-phase. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate the microstructure evolution and the change in hardness distribution of China low activation martensitic steel welded joints after thermal aging at 550 °C for 6000 h. The joint was processed by electron beam welding. Compared to the base metal (BM) and heat affected zone (HAZ), Laves-phase was not formed in weld metal (WM) in the as-aged condition due to the higher tantalum content and less precipitation in WM before aging. The dislocation density decreased in HAZ and WM after aging for 6000 h. The property results showed that hardness of WM and HAZ was decreased significantly after aging for 6000 h due to the weakening of solution strengthening and dislocations strengthening. However, the change in the hardness of the base metal by aging remained at a minor level.

  20. Simulation of Solid-State Weld Microstructures in Ti-17 via Thermal and Thermo- Mechanical Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsborn, Jonathan

    Solid-state welding processes are very important to the advancement of aviation technology; since they enable the joining of dissimilar metals without the additional weight and bulk of fastening systems, the processes can create for stronger and lighter parts to increase payload and efficiency. However, since the processes are not equilibrium, not much is understood about what happens to the materials during the process. During a solid-state weld, the materials being welded are exposed to rapid heating rates, high maximum temperatures, large and varying amounts of deformation, short hold times at temperature, and fast cooling rates. Due to the dynamic nature of the process it is very hard to measure the strains and temperatures experienced by the materials. This work attempted to simulate the microstructures observed in solid-state welds of Ti-5Al-2Sn-2Zr-4Cr-4Mo, or Ti-17. If the microstructures could be replicated in a controlled and repeatable fashion, then perhaps the conditions of the welding process could be indirectly determined. The simulations were performed by rapidly heating Ti-17 specimens, holding them for a very short time, and rapidly cooling. Some of the samples were also subjected to deformation while at high temperatures. The microstructures resulting from the thermal and thermo-mechanical exposures were then compared with microstructures from an actual solid-state weld of Ti-17. It was determined that the presence of untransformed secondary alpha indicates the temperature did not exceed the beta transus of the alloy (˜900 °C), the presence of untransformed primary alpha indicates that the temperature did not exceed ˜1100 °C, homogenized beta grains indicate that the temperature did exceed 1100°C, and the presence of ghost alpha is indicative that the temperature likely exceeded ˜950 °C. These numbers are rough estimates, as time at temperature and heating rate both factor into the process, and shorter times at higher temperatures can

  1. Effect of weld thermal cycle on the electrochemical corrosion of Q315NS steel in acidic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suqiang; Shu, Fengyuan; Zhao, Hongyun; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Wenjian

    2017-04-01

    The effect of welding thermal process on the electrochemical corrosion of Q315NS in H2SO4 and HCl solution were investigated. Different weld thermal cycles with different peak temperatures were used in a Gleeble thermal-force simulation testing machine to simulate weld HAZ, and electrochemical measurements were carried out. The results demonstrate that a microstructure of granular bainite was generated in CGHAZ while others consisted of ferrite and pearlite. The electrochemical corrosion of different HAZ was different in H2SO4 and HCl, due to different microstructure. The BM and HAZs in 50 wt. % H2SO4 solution has a certain passivation behavior, while there was no passivation behavior in 3.5 wt. % HCl solution. The corrosion resistances in HAZs are inferior to that in BM. In addition, the corrosion resistance in the CGHAZ is the weakest.

  2. Development and actual application of new welding process for weld-type piston crown in LMC diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, H.; Shimizu, H.; Fujiwara, F.; Tokuoka, T.; Nishimoto, T.; Fujita, R.; Matsui, S.; Nakayama, S.

    1985-04-01

    In the improved LMC diesel engines for saving fuel oil, the piston crown becomes more rigid. Unibody casting cannot achieve sufficiently high quality for piston crowns, in the smoothness of the inner surface of the cooling hole, for example. A welded piston crown would solve this problem, in which various pieces could be machined smoothly and then welded together. Joint locations are selected to satisfy welding and design requirements. Welding sequence and welding restraint are analysed using the finite element method. Because pistons can be welded from outside only, narrow gap TIG welding is applied to obtain a smooth bead. Then, narrow gap MAG welding is applied to reduce welding time. TIG-MAG combined welding equipment including welding torchs manipulator, positioner and controller is designed, fabricated, and assembled. Utilizing this equipment, experiments such as welding condition test, restraint crack test, joint property test, operation tests, and mock-up tests are carried out. Then, the products are welded and welds are inspected by an optical fiber for the appearance of the bead and also by ultrasonic and magnetic tests for defects.

  3. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  4. Physical and Theoretical Models of Heat Pollution Applied to Cramped Conditions Welding Taking into Account the Different Types of Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulygin, Y. I.; Koronchik, D. A.; Legkonogikh, A. N.; Zharkova, M. G.; Azimova, N. N.

    2017-05-01

    The standard k-epsilon turbulence model, adapted for welding workshops, equipped with fixed workstations with sources of pollution took into account only the convective component of heat transfer, which is quite reasonable for large-volume rooms (with low density distribution of sources of pollution) especially the results of model calculations taking into account only the convective component correlated well with experimental data. For the purposes of this study, when we are dealing with a small confined space where necessary to take account of the body heated to a high temperature (for welding), located next to each other as additional sources of heat, it can no longer be neglected radiative heat exchange. In the task - to experimentally investigate the various types of heat transfer in a limited closed space for welding and behavior of a mathematical model, describing the contribution of the various components of the heat exchange, including radiation, influencing the formation of fields of concentration, temperature, air movement and thermal stress in the test environment. Conducted field experiments to model cubic body, allowing you to configure and debug the model of heat and mass transfer processes with the help of the developed approaches, comparing the measurement results of air flow velocity and temperature with the calculated data showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between process parameters, that is an indicator of the adequacy of heat and mass transfer model.

  5. Mechanical properties of type 316L stainless steel welded joint for ITER vacuum vessel (1). Experiment of unirradiated welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shigeru; Fukaya, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ishiyama, Shintaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Kouichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    In design activity of ITER, the vacuum vessel (VV) is ranked as one of the most important components in core reactor from the view point of first barrier to tritium release from the reactor. The VV of ITER is designed as double walled structure so that some parts of them are not qualified in the conventional design standards. So it is necessary to prepare the new design standards to be applied them. JAERI has executed the preparation activity of the new design standards and the technical data to support them. In this study, the results of metallographic observation and mechanical properties of unirradiated type 316L stainless steel welded joint were reported. (author)

  6. Fatigue properties and fracture mechanism of load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Abe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the hydraulic excavator and the crane have numerous one-sided welded joints. However, attachments with box like structures are difficult to weld at both sides. Therefore, high accurate evaluation method is needed. In this study, the fatigue properties and the fracture mechanism of the load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding were investigated experimentally to evaluate its fatigue damage with high accuracy based on the experimental results. As the results, fatigue cracks in the test piece initiated from the tip of the unwelded portion and propagated into the welding materials. Multiple welding defects were observed in the unwelded portion, but did not appear to be crack origins. Although these welding defects affected the direction of crack propagation they exerted minimal influence. The three-dimensional observations revealed that fatigue cracks initiate at an early stage of the fatigue development. We infer that the fatigue lifetime is chiefly governed by the crack propagation lifetime. Cracks were initiated at multiple sites in the test piece. As the number of cycles increased, these cracks propagated and combined. So considering the combination of cracks from multiple crack origins is important for a precise evaluation of fatigue damage.

  7. Fatigue properties and fracture mechanism of load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Abe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the hydraulic excavator and the crane have numerous one-sided welded joints. However, attachments with box like structures are difficult to weld at both sides. Therefore, high accurate evaluation method is needed. In this study, the fatigue properties and the fracture mechanism of the load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding were investigated experimentally to evaluate its fatigue damage with high accuracy based on the experimental results. As the results, fatigue cracks in the test piece initiated from the tip of the unwelded portion and propagated into the welding materials. Multiple welding defects were observed in the unwelded portion, but did not appear to be crack origins. Although these welding defects affected the direction of crack propagation they exerted minimal influence. The three-dimensional observations revealed that fatigue cracks initiate at an early stage of the fatigue development. We infer that the fatigue lifetime is chiefly governed by the crack propagation lifetime. Cracks were initiated at multiple sites in the test piece. As the number of cycles increased, these cracks propagated and combined. So considering the combination of cracks from multiple crack origins is important for a precise evaluation of fatigue damage.

  8. Residual stress simulation of circumferential welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melicher R.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses are an important consideration in the component integrity and life assessment of welded structure. The welding process is very complex time dependent physical phenomenon with material nonlinearity. The welding is a thermal process with convection between fluid flow and welding body, between welding bodyand environment. Next type of boundary conditions is radiation and thermo-mechanical contact on the outer surface of gas pipe in the near of weld. The temperature variation so obtained is utilised to find the distribution of the stress field.In this paper, a brief review of weld simulation and residual stress modelling using the finite element method (FEM by commercial software ANSYS is presented. Thermo-elastic-plastic formulations using a von Mises yield criterion with nonlinear kinematics hardening has been employed. Residual axial and hoop stresses obtained from the analysis have been shown. The commercial FEM code ANSYS was used for coupled thermalmechanical analysis.

  9. A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Mannan, S. L.

    1995-05-01

    A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joints was carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 × 10-3 s-1 with strain amplitudes in the range ±0.20 to ±1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. From TEM, the cyclic softening in weld metal was ascribed to the annihilation of dislocations during LCF. Type 316LN base metal exhibits better fatigue resistance than weld metal at 773 K, whereas the reverse holds true at 873 K. The weld joint shows the lowest life at both temperatures. The better fatigue resistance of weld metal is related to the brittle transformed delta ferrite structure and the high density of dislocations at the interface, which inhibits the growth rate of cracks by deflecting the crack path. The lower fatigue endurance of the weld joint was ascribed to the shortening of the crack initiation phase caused by surface intergranular crack initiation and to the poor

  10. An investigation of reheat cracking in the weld heat affected zone of type 347 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung-On, Isaratat

    2007-12-01

    Reheat cracking has been a persistent problem for welding of many alloys such as the stabilized stainless steels: Types 321 and 347 as well as Cr-Mo-V steels. Similar problem occurs in Ni-base superalloys termed "strain-age cracking". Cracking occurs during the post weld heat treatment. The HAZ is the most susceptible area due to metallurgical reactions in solid state during both heating and cooling thermal cycle. Many investigations have been conducted to understand the RHC mechanism. There is still no comprehensive mechanism to explain its underlying mechanism. In this study, there were two proposed cracking mechanisms. The first is the formation of a PFZ resulting in local weakening and strain localization. The second is the creep-like grain boundary sliding that causes microvoid formation at the grain boundaries and the triple point junctions. Cracking occurs due to the coalescence of the microvoids that form. In this study, stabilized grade stainless steel, Type 347, was selected for investigation of reheat cracking mechanism due to the simplicity of its microstructure and understanding of its metallurgical behavior. The Gleeble(TM) 3800 system was employed due to its capability for precise control of both thermal and mechanical simulation. Cylindrical samples were subjected to thermal cycles for the HAZ simulation followed by PWHT as the reheat cracking test. "Susceptibility C-curves" were plotted as a function of PWHT temperatures and time to failure at applied stress levels of 70% and 80% yield strength. These C-curves show the possible relationship of the reheat cracking susceptibility and carbide precipitation behavior. To identify the mechanism, the sample shape was modified containing two flat surfaces at the center section. These flat surfaces were electro-polished and subjected to the HAZ simulation followed by the placement of the micro-indentation arrays. Then, the reheat cracking test was performed. The cracking mechanism was identified by tracing

  11. Improving fatigue performance of rail thermite welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiar L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Rail transport development offers economic and ecological interests. Nevertheless, it requires heavy investments in rolling material and infrastructure. To be competitive, this transportation means must rely on safe and reliable infrastructure, which requires optimization of all implemented techniques and structure. Rail thermite (or aluminothermic welding is widely used within the railway industry for in-track welding during re-rail and defect replacement. The process provides numerous advantages against other welding technology commonly used. Obviously, future demands on train traffic are heavier axle loads, higher train speeds and increased traffic density. Thus, a new enhanced weld should be developed to prevent accidents due to fracture of welds and to lower maintenance costs. In order to improve such assembly process, a detailed metallurgical study coupled to a thermomechanical modelling of the phenomena involved in the thermite welding process is carried out. Obtained data enables us to develop a new improved thermite weld (type A. This joint is made by modifying the routinely specified procedure (type B used in a railway rail by a standard gap alumino-thermic weld. Joints of type A and B are tested and compared. Based on experimental temperature measurements, a finite element analysis is used to calculate the thermal residual stresses induced. In the vicinity of the weld, the residual stress patterns depend on the thermal conditions during welding as it also shown by litterature [1, 2]. In parallel, X-Ray diffraction has been used to map the residual stress field that is generated in welded rail of types A and B. Their effect on fatigue crack growth in rail welds is studied. An experimental study based on fatigue tests of rails welded by conventional and improved processes adjudicates on the new advances and results will be shown.

  12. The Effect of Welding Parameters on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of HSLA S960QL Type Steel with Submerged Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet TÜRKER

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, S960QL steels were welded with submerged arc welding process in order to examine microstructural and mechanical properties. For the microstructural investigation, microscopical examination methods were used for weld zones. Tensile, impact toughness and micro hardness tests were made for different samples obtained from the weld zone and the base metal. The examinations of fracture surfaces were made by using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The flat type tensile strength values were near to the base materials. Charpy impact toughness tests were made for the base metal, the weld metal center line, the fusion line, the zone between weld metal centerline and the fusion line. Impact energy of the weld metal was obtained lower than the base metal. The lowest impact energy was obtained at the fusion line. Heat affected zone had the highest value in micro hardness tests. In microstructure evaluation, the interface of the fusion zone-heat affected zone and heat affected zone had coarser grain structure than the base metal. Alloy carbides dissolved because of the high temperature values occurred at heat affected zone.

  13. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  14. A comparison of two types of neural network for weld quality prediction in small scale resistance spot welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaodong; Wang, Yuanxun; Zhao, Dawei; Huang, YongAn

    2017-09-01

    Our study aims at developing an effective quality monitoring system in small scale resistance spot welding of titanium alloy. The measured electrical signals were interpreted in combination with the nugget development. Features were extracted from the dynamic resistance and electrode voltage curve. A higher welding current generally indicated a lower overall dynamic resistance level. A larger electrode voltage peak and higher change rate of electrode voltage could be detected under a smaller electrode force or higher welding current condition. Variation of the extracted features and weld quality was found more sensitive to the change of welding current than electrode force. Different neural network model were proposed for weld quality prediction. The back propagation neural network was more proper in failure load estimation. The probabilistic neural network model was more appropriate to be applied in quality level classification. A real-time and on-line weld quality monitoring system may be developed by taking advantages of both methods.

  15. Friction Stir Welding of Stainless Steel to Al Alloy: Effect of Thermal Condition on Weld Nugget Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Husain, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials is always a global challenge. Sometimes it is unavoidable to execute multifarious activities by a single component. In the present investigation, 6061 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel were joined by friction stir welding (FSW) at different tool rotational rates. Welded joints were characterized in optical and scanning electron microscopes. Reaction products in the stirring zone (SZ) were confirmed through X-ray diffraction. Joint strength was evaluated by tensile testing. It was found that the increment in average heat input and temperature at the weld nugget (WN) facilitated iron enrichment near the interface. Enhancement in the concentration of iron shifted the nature of intermetallics from the Fe2Al5 to Fe-rich end of the Fe-Al binary phase diagram. The peak microhardness and ultimate tensile strength were found to be maxima at the intermediate tool rotational rate, where Fe3Al and FeAl2 appeared along with Fe2Al5.

  16. Flow sensor of the thermal type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jeroen Wouter; Hoitink, Ronald Wilhelmus Johannes; Besseling, Johannes Henricus; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A flow sensor of the thermal type having a U-shaped sensor tube with two legs and a connecting limb with two adjoining electrical resistance elements, and with a housing. The sensor tube has an inlet side and an outlet side. The housing has a first and a second housing part of a thermally

  17. Flow sensor of the thermal type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Jeroen Wouter; Hoitink, Ronald Wilhelmus Johannes; Besseling, Johannes Henricus; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2007-01-01

    A flow sensor of the thermal type having a U-shaped sensor tube with two legs and a connecting limb with two adjoining electrical resistance elements, and with a housing. The sensor tube has an inlet side and an outlet side. The housing has a first and a second housing part of a thermally

  18. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  19. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  20. Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A tool that would be useable in both conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding (FSW) has been proposed. The tool would embody both a prior tooling concept for self-reacting FSW and an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability developed previously as an augmentation for conventional FSW. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed tool. In conventional FSW, depicted in Figure 1, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a rotating pin that protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. The main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional FSW is augmented with an APT capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or force-control system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding (SR-FSW), there are two rotating shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft, back into the FSW machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. A tool for SRFSW embodying this concept was reported in "Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding" (MFS-31914), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 53. In its outward appearance, the proposed tool (see Figure 2) would fit the above description of an SR

  1. Robust Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding Using Manifold Mapping Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Lahaye, Domenico; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a friction stir welding process taking robustness into account. The optimization problems are formulated with the goal of obtaining desired mean responses while reducing the variance of the response. We restrict ourselves to a thermal model of the process...... and use the manifold mapping technique to solve the optimization problems using a fast analytical coarse and an expensive accurate fine model. The statistics of the response are calculated using Taylor expansions and are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the use of manifold...... mapping reduces the number of fine model evaluations required and that the Taylor expansion approach gives good results when compared to Monte Carlo simulations....

  2. Numerical Modelling Of Thermal And Structural Phenomena In Yb:YAG Laser Butt-Welded Steel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubiak M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The numerical model of thermal and structural phenomena is developed for the analysis of Yb:YAG laser welding process with the motion of the liquid material in the welding pool taken into account. Temperature field and melted material velocity field in the fusion zone are obtained from the numerical solution of continuum mechanics equations using Chorin projection method and finite volume method. Phase transformations in solid state are analyzed during heating and cooling using classical models of the kinetics of phase transformations as well as CTA and CCT diagrams for welded steel. The interpolated heat source model is developed in order to reliably reflect the real distribution of Yb:YAG laser power obtained by experimental research on the laser beam profile.

  3. Relationship between pulmonary and systemic markers of exposure to multiple types of welding particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdely, Aaron; Salmen-Muniz, Rebecca; Liston, Angie; Hulderman, Tracy; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M; Simeonova, Petia P

    2011-09-05

    Welding results in a unique and complex occupational exposure. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of cardiovascular disease following welding fume exposure. In this study, we compared the induction of pulmonary and systemic inflammation following exposure to multiple types of welding fumes. Mice were exposed to 340μg of manual metal arc stainless steel (MMA-SS), gas metal arc-SS (GMA-SS) or GMA-mild steel (GMA-MS) by pharyngeal aspiration. Mice were sacrificed at 4 and 24h post-exposure to evaluate various parameters of pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Alterations in pulmonary gene expression by a custom designed TaqMan array showed minimal differences between the fumes at 4h. Conversely at 24h, gene expression changes were further increased by SS but not GMA-MS exposure. These findings were associated with the surrogate marker of systemic inflammation, liver acute phase gene induction. Interestingly, stress response genes in cardiovascular tissues were only increased following MMA-SS exposure. These effects were related to the initial level of pulmonary cytotoxicity, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase activity, which was greatest following MMA-SS exposure. In conclusion, varying types of welding fumes elicit quantitatively different systemic inflammatory and/or stress responses. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F. [NDE Center, Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp. (Japan); Brziak, P. [Welding Research Inst. - Industrial Inst. of Slovak Republic (Slovakia); Lomozik, M. [Inst. of Welding (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  5. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  6. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  7. The Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Welding Quality of R65 Type Rail

    OpenAIRE

    Mindaugas Rauduvė; Vitalijus Rudzinskas

    2014-01-01

    This article is about the aluminothermic welding quality ofrail joints, using different parameters. The thermit portion andpreheat time estimated for quality of welded joints as well asthe mechanical characteristics of aluminothermic welds in railshave been examined.

  8. The Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Welding Quality of R65 Type Rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Rauduvė

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the aluminothermic welding quality ofrail joints, using different parameters. The thermit portion andpreheat time estimated for quality of welded joints as well asthe mechanical characteristics of aluminothermic welds in railshave been examined.

  9. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of a New Type of 10% Cr Martensitic Steel Welded Joints with Ni-Based Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunbing; Zhang, Jianxun

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a new type of 10% Cr martensitic steel welded joints with Ni-based weld metal was comparatively studied for different regions including base metal (BM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM). FCG results indicated that the tempered lath martensite BM has a higher fatigue crack growth resistance than the tempered granular martensite HAZ that without a typical lath structure. In comparison, the austenitic WM has the highest fatigue crack growth threshold. Meanwhile, due to the microstructural and chemical compositional differences between BM and WM, a clear interface existed in the welded joints. At the region of the interface, the microstructures were physically connected and an element transition layer was formed. Although the starter notch was positioned at the region of interface, the fatigue crack gradually deviated from the interface and ultimately propagated along the inter-critically heat-affected zone. The difference in microstructure is considered as the primary factor that resulted in the different fatigue crack growth behaviors of the welded joints. In addition, the continuous microstructure connection and composition transition at the interface contributed to the good fatigue resistance at this region.

  10. Thermal Behavior of an HSLA Steel and the Impact in Phase Transformation: Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) Process Approach to Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, P. S.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.; Saldaña-Garcés, R.; Delgado, E. R.; Salinas-Rodríguez, A.

    Heat input during welding metal fusion generates different transformations, such as grain growth, hydrogen cracking, and the formation of brittle structures, generally associated with the heat-affected zone (HAZ). For this reason, it is very important to know the behavior of this area before welding. This paper presents a study of the thermal behavior and its effect on phase transformations in the HAZ, depending on cooling rates (0.1-200 °C/s) to obtain continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curves for an high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. In order to determine the formed phases, optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness measurement were used. The experimental CCT curve was obtained from an HSLA steel, and the results showed that, with the used cooling conditions, the steel did not provide formation of brittle structures. Therefore, it is unlikely that welds made by submerged arc welding (SAW) may lead to hydrogen embrittlement in the HAZ, which is one of the biggest problems of cracking in gas conduction pipelines. In addition, with these results, it will be possible to control the microstructure to optimize the pipe fabrication with SAW process in industrial plants.

  11. Corrosion resistance of «tube – tubesheet» weld joint obtained by friction welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIZVANOV Rif Garifovich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are widely applied for implementation of various processes at ventures of fuel and energy complex. Cost of production and reliability of heat exchangers of this type is to a wide extent determined by corresponding characteristics of tube bundle, «tube – tubesheet» is its typical joint in particular when welding operations are used in order to attach tubes to tubesheet in addition to expansion. When manufacturing such equipment of heat-resistant chrome-bearing or chromium-molybdenum steels including steel 15H5M, the process of fixed joint manufacturing gets significantly more complicated and costly due to the necessity to use thermal treatment before, during and after welding (this problem is particularly applicable for manufacturing of large-size equipment. One of the options to exclude thermal treatment from manufacturing process is to use «non-arc» welding methods – laser welding, explosion welding as well as friction welding. Use of each of the welding methods mentioned above during production of heat-exchange equipment has its process challenges and peculiarities. This article gives a comparative analysis of weld structure and distribution of electrode potentials of welded joints and parent metal of the joints simulating welding of tube to tubesheet of steel 15H5M using the following welding methods: shielded manual arc welding, tungsten-arc inert-gas welding and friction welding. Comparative analysis of macro- and microstructures of specific zones of the studied welded joints showed that the joints produced by arc welding methods do not exhibit evident inhomogeneity of the structure after application of thermal treatment which is explained by the correctness of thermal treatment. Joints obtained via friction welding are characterized by structural inhomogeneity of the welded joint zone metal microstructure. The ultra-fine-grained structure obtained as a result of friction welding makes it possible to

  12. Flow sensor of the thermal type

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, Jeroen Wouter; Hoitink, Ronald Wilhelmus Johannes; Besseling, Johannes Henricus; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A flow sensor of the thermal type having a U-shaped sensor tube with two legs and a connecting limb with two adjoining electrical resistance elements, and with a housing. The sensor tube has an inlet side and an outlet side. The housing has a first and a second housing part of a thermally well-conducting material, each with an inner surface provided with cavities and with an outer surface. The housing parts are placed with their inner surfaces against each other, while the U-shaped sensor tub...

  13. TRANSIENT FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION OF AA2219 WELD JOINT USING GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman Arunkumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we focus on finite element simulation of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW of AA2219 aluminum alloy and the behavioral of the microstructure before and after weld. The simulations were performed using commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software. The thermal history of the weld region was studied by initially developed mathematical model. A sweep type meshing was used and transient analysis was performed for one welding cycle. The highest temperature noted was 3568 °C during welding. The welding operation was performed on 200×100×25 mm plates. Through metallurgical characterization, it was observed that a fair copper rich cellular (CRC network existed in the weld region. A small amount of intermetallic compounds like Al2Cu is observed through the XRD pattern.

  14. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 K to 1173 K (700 °C to 900 °C), was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/and above 1073 K (800 °C). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 °C). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine-grained heat-affected zone region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard "normalization and tempering" processes. The steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room temperature toughness. The above data are also analyzed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.

  15. Simulation Study on Multipassed Welding Distortion of Combined Joint Types using Thermo-Elastic-Plastic FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RN Lidam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the angular distortion induced by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW process on the combined butt and T-joint with a thickness of 9 mm. The material used in this study was low manganese carbon steel S355J2G3. A 2-D and 3-D thermo-elastic-plastic finite element (FE analysis has been developed to simulate the induced distortion of multipassed welding. In this research, SYSWELD 2010 with its computation management tool, known as multipassed welding advisor (MPA, was applied to analyze the distortion behavior of combined joint types. To model the heat source of GMAW, Goldak's double ellipsoid representation, which is available within this finite element analysis (FEA code was selected. Prior to the results discussion, this paper also shows the step-bystep procedures to simulate combined jointing which begins with metallurgical and customized heat source modeling, and is followed by creating geometrical mesh using Visual-Mesh 6.5 for analyzing and processing the results. Apart from 2-D and 3-D comparison analysis, the final objective of this research is also aimed to be a baseline study to provide preliminary information in preparing the tools and equipment for experimental investigation.

  16. Type IIIa cracking at 2CrMo welds in 1/2CrMoV pipework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, S.J.; Smith, P.A. [National Power plc, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    The most common form of in-service defect found today on the welds of National Power`s 1/2CrMoV pipework systems is Type IV cracking which occurs in intercritically transformed material at the edge of the heat affected zone. However an alternate form of cracking, termed IIIa, which occurs close to the weld fusion line in fully grain refined heat affected zones, has also been observed. The incidence of Type IIIa cracking has increased in recent years and these defects now constitute a significant part of the total recorded crack population. This presentation describes Type IIIa cracking and compares and contrasts it with the better documented Type IV cracking. Particular reference is made to the role of carbon diffusion at the weld fusion line in promoting Type IIIa damage in preference to Type IV. (orig.) 5 refs.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF THERMAL BOUNDARY CONDITIONS AND THERMO-METALLURGICAL BEHAVIOUR OF X10CrMoVNb9-1 STEEL DURING SIMPLE TIG WELDING TESTS

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Guilhem; Billardon, René

    2006-01-01

    International audience; To validate the thermo-metallurgical models that are used during finite element simulations of multi-pass TIG welding, two simple experiments – called "disk-spot" and "disk-cycle" TIG welding tests- have been designed. A procedure has been developed to identify the thermal boundary conditions that are imposed to the specimen during these experiments. These boundary conditions include the heat source that is equivalent to the TIG torch as well as the heat flux by convec...

  18. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Laser Welded Si-Al TRIP-Type Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with issues related to laser welding of Si-Al type TRIP steels with Nb and Ti microadditions. The tests of laser welding of thermomechanically rolled sheet sections were carried out using keyhole welding and a solid-state laser. The tests carried out for various values of heat input were followed by macro- and microscopic metallographic investigations as well as by microhardness measurements of welded areas. A detailed microstructural analysis was carried out in the penetration area and in various areas of the heat affected zone (HAZ. Special attention was paid to the influence of cooling conditions on the stabilisation of retained austenite, the most characteristic structural component of TRIP steels. The tests made it possible to determine the maximum value of heat input preventing the excessive grain growth in HAZ and to identify the areas of the greatest hardness reaching 520 HV0.1.

  19. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  20. Solidification Behavior and Weldability of Dissimilar Welds Between a Cr-Free, Ni-Cu Welding Consumable and Type 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Liang, Dong; Alexandrov, Boian T.; Frankel, Gerald S.; Lippold, John C.

    2012-04-01

    The solidification behavior of a Cr-free welding consumable based on the Ni-Cu system was evaluated in conjunction with Type 304L stainless steel. The weld metal microstructure evolution was evaluated with optical and secondary electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, button melting, and thermodynamic (CALPHAD-based) modeling. Solidification partitioning patterns showed that higher dilutions of the filler metal by Type 304L increased segregation of Ti, Cu, and Si to interdendritic regions. Button melting experiments showed a widening of the solidification temperature range with increasing dilution because of the expansion of the austenite solidification range and formation of Ti(C,N) via a eutectic reaction. The model predictions showed good correlation with button melting experiments and were used to evaluate the nature of the Ti(C,N) precipitation reaction. Solidification cracking susceptibility of the weld metal was shown to increase with dilution of 304L stainless steel based on testing conducted with the cast pin tear test. The increase in cracking susceptibility is associated with expansion of the solidification temperature range and the presence of eutectic liquid at the end of solidification that wets solidification grain boundaries.

  1. An investigation on thermal and friction effect produced by friction welding of SA 213 tube to SA 387 tube plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pandia Rajan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the effect of thermal and friction produced in the tube to tube plate during the friction welding process by using a Tungsten carbide external tool. In this process, the fictional welding of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate was done by using an external tool. Modeling of tool and wok piece is done by using Solid works and to study the thermal and frictional effect by using Ansys. In this research work, joining of SA 213 tube to SA 387 tube plate was done by using two different techniques such as with hole [WH] and without hole [WOH]. The stress value of with hole and without hole such as 18,782 MPa and 10,486 MPa respectively and the ultimate heat flux generated with hole and without hole such as 0.80475 W/mm2 and 1.1344 W/mm2 respectively were observed.

  2. On the development of a new pre-weld thermal treatment procedure for preventing heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking in nickel-base IN 738 superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, O. T.; Ojo, O. A.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2014-10-01

    Hot cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloys, such as IN 738, during fusion welding remains a major factor limiting reparability of nickel-base gas turbine components. The problem of HAZ intergranular cracking can be addressed by modifying the microstructure of the pre-weld material through thermal treatment, which requires significant understanding of the critical factors controlling cracking behaviour. The decomposition of Mo-Cr-W-and Cr-rich borides in the alloy, among other factors, has been observed to contribute significantly to non-equilibrium intergranular liquation and, hence, intergranular liquation cracking during welding. Gleeble physical simulation of HAZ microstructure has also shown that non-equilibrium liquation is more severe in the vicinity of decomposed borides in the alloy and can occur at temperatures as low as 1,150 °C. Although currently existing pre-weld heat treatments for IN 738 superalloy minimize the contributions of dissolution of second phases, including borides, to HAZ intergranular liquation, these heat treatments are not industrially feasible due to process-related difficulties. Therefore, a new industrially feasible and effective pre-weld thermal treatment process, designated as FUMT, was developed during the present research by controlling both the formation of borides and the segregation of boron at the grain boundaries in the pre-weld heat-treated material. This thermal treatment was observed to very significantly reduce intergranular HAZ cracking in welded IN 738 superalloy. The details of the development process and developed procedure are presented in this paper.

  3. Modeling Stress-Strain State in Butt-Welded Joints after TIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Atroshenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper mathematical model was developed for definition of thermal-welding cycle influence on welding deformations distribution in flat samples of austenitic steels after TIG welding and developed recommendations to reduce the welding deformation on o the machinery for welding with a copper backing.

  4. Weld heat-affected zone in Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Part 1: Computer simulation of the effect of weld variables on the thermal cycles in the HAZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, A.K. [Naval Dockyard, Bombay (India). Naval Chemical and Metallurgical Lab.; Kulkarni, S.D.; Gopinathan, V. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Bombay (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering; Krishnan, R. [Gas Turbine Research Establishment, Bangalore (India)

    1995-09-01

    The weld thermal cycles encountered in the HAZ of titanium alloys have been characterized using modified Rosenthal equations. The results are shown in the form of axonometric plots depicting the effect of two weld variables keeping the other variables fixed. Computer simulation results show that the heat input and the plate thickness are the major variables affecting the thermal cycles in the HAZ. The effects of changes in welding speed are reflecting in the variation in the heat input. The electrode radius has minimal effect and can be termed as the minor variable. Preheat or interpass temperatures have an intermediate effect. An increase in electrode radius or decrease in plate thickness requires large apparent displacement of the heat source above the plate surface to be incorporated in the analytical solutions. The melt pool width increases sharply with an increase in the heat input (a/v) or a decrease in plate thickness (d); however, preheat temperature (T{sub 0}) has negligible effect. The effect of weld variables on the effective heat input is also similar. The t{sub 8/5} parameter increases sharply with reducing plate thickness or increasing heat input.

  5. Performance improvement and development of design and manufacturing technology of KAERI type laser welding tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Soo; Kim, Heung Cheol; Im Wan Seong [Chungnam National University, Taejon(Korea)

    1998-04-01

    Laser welding technology for repair of steam generator in nuclear power plants is an important research issue for the development of nuclear industry. In order to make credible laser repair welding inside steam generator pipe, it is necessary to device a welding tool which will succeed in accurate laser welding. There have been accomplished drawing including assembly drawing, isometric perspective drawing, dimension of parts, machining accuracy, materials, and machining methods of 3/4 inch laser welding tool to repair steam generator pipe, and also manufacture specification mentioning methods, machining process, test standard, and test methods. The design drawing and manufacture specification will contribute to producing laser welding tool. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteucci, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Zor, Kinga

    2016-01-01

    We compare ultrasonic welding (UW) and thermal bonding (TB) for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM) microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones...

  7. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  8. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect of aging and neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29{degrees}C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) but no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging alone. Irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. Other results from tensile, CVN, and fracture toughness specimens showed that the effects of thermal aging at 288 or 343{degrees}C for 20,000 h each were very small and similar to those at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. The effects of long-term thermal exposure time (50,000 h and greater) at 288{degrees}C will be investigated as the specimens become available in 1996 and beyond.

  9. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3 aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5 and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12. Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The highest strength and quality of welds was obtained when the Al99.5 filler metal was used in a braze welding process. The tests enabled the development of the most convenient braze welding conditions and parameters.

  10. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Woong Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  11. Effect of Heat Treatment on Low Temperature Toughness of Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Weld Metal of Type 316L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, H.; Fujii, H.; Tamura, M.

    2006-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered to be the candidate materials for liquid hydrogen vessels and the related equipments, and those welding parts that require high toughness at cryogenic temperature. The authors have found that the weld metal of Type 316L stainless steel processed by reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding has high toughness at cryogenic temperature, which is considered to be due to the single-pass welding process without reheating effect accompanied by multi-pass welding process. In this work, the effect of heat treatment on low temperature toughness of the RPEB weld metal of Type 316L was investigated by Charpy impact test at 77K. The absorbed energy decreased with higher temperature and longer holding time of heat treatment. The remarkable drop in the absorbed energy was found with heat treatment at 1073K for 2 hours, which is as low as that of conventional multi-pass weld metal such as tungsten inert gas welding. The observations of fracture surface and microstructure revealed that the decrease in the absorbed energy with heat treatment resulted from the precipitation of intermetallic compounds near delta-ferrite phase.

  12. The application of neutron diffraction to a study of phases in type 316 stainless steel weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, G. F.; Windsor, C. G.

    1983-10-01

    Neutron diffraction techniques have been utilised to study the phases in type 316 austenitic stainless steel weld metal, both in the as-welded condition and after stress-relieving and ageing heat-treatments. The amounts of the principal crystallographic phases present in bulk specimens have been measured. Two compositions of weld metal were selected to provide a "low" (6%) and "high" (16%) initial ferrite level and the subsequent volume fractions of transformation products were measured after heat-treatment. Some retained ferrite was observed in all the heat-treated specimens, ranging from 4% for specimens of both initial ferrite levels treated at 625°C for 1000 h, to around 1% for the specimens treated at 850°C for 6 h. The high initial ferrite specimen produced 0.9% of sigma phase after the 850°C treatment and 0.2% sigma after the 625°C treatment. The low initial ferrite specimen produced 1.5% M 23C 6 carbide after both heat-treatments. The results compare well with previous findings on similar samples of weld metal using optical and electron microscopy.

  13. Metal ion release from silver soldering and laser welding caused by different types of mouthwash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Ayse Tuygun; Nalbantgil, Didem; Ulkur, Feyza; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2015-07-01

    To compare metal ion release from samples welded with silver soldering and laser welding when immersed into mouthwashes with different ingredients. A total of 72 samples were prepared: 36 laser welded and 36 silver soldered. Four samples were chosen from each subgroup to study the morphologic changes on their surfaces via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Each group was further divided into four groups where the samples were submerged into mouthwash containing sodium fluoride (NaF), mouthwash containing sodium fluoride + alcohol (NaF + alcohol), mouthwash containing chlorhexidine (CHX), or artificial saliva (AS) for 24 hours and removed thereafter. Subsequently, the metal ion release from the samples was measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The metal ion release among the solutions and the welding methods were compared. The Kruskal-Wallis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were used for the group comparisons, and post hoc Dunn multiple comparison test was utilized for the two group comparisons. The level of metal ion release from samples of silver soldering was higher than from samples of laser welding. Furthermore, greater amounts of nickel, chrome, and iron were released from silver soldering. With regard to the mouthwash solutions, the lowest amounts of metal ions were released in CHX, and the highest amounts of metal ions were released in NaF + alcohol. SEM images were in accord with these findings. The laser welding should be preferred over silver soldering. CHX can be recommended for patients who have welded appliances for orthodontic reasons.

  14. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  15. Effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinlabi OYETUNJI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of AISI 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS was studied. The tensile strength property of ASS welded samples was evaluated. Prepared samples of the ASS were welded under these three various variables. Tensile test was then carried out on the welded samples. It was found that the reduction in ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the butt joint samples increases with increase in core diameter of the electrode. Also, the best electrode for welding 304L ASS is 308L stainless steel-core electrode of 3.2 mm core diameter. It is recommended that the findings of this work can be applied in the chemical, food and oil industries where 304L ASS are predominantly used.

  16. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  17. Irradiation and thermal effects on the tensile properties of Inconel alloy 718. [Wrought and weld-deposited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, A.L.; Steichen, J.M.; Knecht, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation and out-of-flux aging on the tensile properties of wrought and weld-deposited Inconel 718 were investigated following fast-reactor (EBR-II) irradiation to total fluences ranging from 0.55 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup 2/ (approximately 400/sup 0/C) to 6.6 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (649/sup 0/C) and thermal exposure at 538/sup 0/C and 649/sup 0/C for durations to 10,000 hours. Classical irradiation hardening is exhibited by this very strong material following irradiation at low temperature (approximately 400/sup 0/C) to relatively low fluence (approximately 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/) and also at high temperature when very high fluence (6.6 x 10/sub 22/n/cm/sup 2/) is accumulated. At test temperatures less that 538/sup 0/C, ductility losses arising from helium embrittlement are evident for all irradiation conditions and at high fluences are so severe as to restrict the strength to lower than expected values. Low postirradiation strength, compared to that following out-of-flux aging for equivalent durations, suggests that irradiation accelerates the thermal overaging process at 538/sup 0/C. At 649/sup 0/C, the results are obscured by embrittlement and coincident limitations on strain hardenability. 8 fig.

  18. Effects of thermal aging on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Suzuki, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The effects of thermal aging of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels on the microstructure and hardness of the claddings were investigated using atom probe tomography and nanoindentation testing. The claddings were aged at 400 °C for periods of 100–10,000 h. The fluctuation in Cr concentration in the δ-ferrite phase, which was caused by spinodal decomposition, progressed rapidly after aging for 100 h, and gradually for aging durations greater than 1000 h. On the other hand, NiSiMn clusters, initially formed after aging for less than 1000 h, had the highest number density after aging for 2000 h, and coarsened after aging for 10,000 h. The hardness of the δ-ferrite phase also increased rapidly for short period of aging, and saturated after aging for longer than 1000 h. This trend was similar to the observed Cr fluctuation concentration, but different from the trend seen in the formation of the NiSiMn clusters. These results strongly suggest that the primary factor responsible for the hardening of the δ-ferrite phase owing to thermal aging is Cr spinodal decomposition.

  19. Inclusions and Microstructure of Ce-Added Weld Metal Coarse Grain Heat-Affected Zone in Twin-Wire Submerged-Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S. F.; Yan, N.; Chen, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In high heat-input multi-pass twin-wire submerged-arc welding, weld metal of previous pass will be affected by the heat input of subsequent one and form coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ). This study focused on the effects of welding thermal cycle on the inclusions and microstructure of Ce-alloyed weld metal CGHAZ. According to the study of inclusions and microstructure of weld metal CGHAZ, it was found that the composition and type of the inclusions did not change under the effect of welding thermal cycle. Although the inclusions were coarsened slightly, the promoting ability to acicular ferrite (AF) was not deprived after thermal cycling. There are three types of AF in weld metal CGHAZ, which include oxy-sulfides of Ce inclusions-promoted AF, home-position-precipitated AF, and sympathetic AF. Results showed more than 80% of microstructure was AF, which greatly benefited the mechanical properties of weld metal CGHAZ, even though granular bainite and M-A constituents were generated.

  20. Model for Estimation of Thermal History Produced by a Single Pass Underwater Wet Weld

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dill, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Thermal history calculations for single pass underwater wet weldments were made by solving the appropriate beat transfer equations using the three-dimensional Crank-Nicholson finite difference method...

  1. Thermal elongations in steam turbines with welded rotors made of advanced materials at supercritical steam parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech, Kosman; Maciej, Roskosz; Krzysztof, Nawrat

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents research results obtained for supercritical steam turbines. The analysis aims to develop data, knowledge bases and procedures to support the operational control of these turbines. The control involves thermal and strength states of the main components. The thermal states and axial elongation in turbine rotors and casings are modeled, and the results are analyzed. The components under investigation are made of more than one material. correspondance: ...

  2. Numerical aspects for efficient welding computational mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aburuga Tarek Kh.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the residual stresses and strains is one of the most important parameter in the structure integrity assessment. A finite element model is constructed in order to simulate the multi passes mismatched submerged arc welding SAW which used in the welded tensile test specimen. Sequentially coupled thermal mechanical analysis is done by using ABAQUS software for calculating the residual stresses and distortion due to welding. In this work, three main issues were studied in order to reduce the time consuming during welding simulation which is the major problem in the computational welding mechanics (CWM. The first issue is dimensionality of the problem. Both two- and three-dimensional models are constructed for the same analysis type, shell element for two dimension simulation shows good performance comparing with brick element. The conventional method to calculate residual stress is by using implicit scheme that because of the welding and cooling time is relatively high. In this work, the author shows that it could use the explicit scheme with the mass scaling technique, and time consuming during the analysis will be reduced very efficiently. By using this new technique, it will be possible to simulate relatively large three dimensional structures.

  3. Thermal expansion of spinel-type Si3N4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paszkowics, W.; Minkikayev, R.; Piszora, P.

    2004-01-01

    The lattice parameter and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) for the spinel-type Si3N4 phase prepared under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions are determined for 14 K......The lattice parameter and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) for the spinel-type Si3N4 phase prepared under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions are determined for 14 K...

  4. Weldability with Process Parameters During Fiber Laser Welding of a Titanium Plate (I) - Effect of Type and Flow Rate of Shielding Gases on Weldability -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Ji Sung [Korea Maritime and Ocean Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, welding of pure titanium was carried out by using a continuous wave fiber laser with a maximum output of 6.3 kW. Because brittle regions form easily in titanium as a result of oxidation or nitriding, the weld must be protected from the atmosphere by using an appropriate shielding gas. Experiments were performed by changing the type and the flow rate of shielding gases to obtain the optimal shielding condition, and the weldability was then evaluated. The degree of oxidation and nitriding was distinguished by observing the color of beads, and weld microstructure was observed by using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The mechanical properties of the weld were examined by measuring hardness. When the weld was oxidized or nitrified, the bead color was gray or yellow, and the oxygen or nitrogen content in the bead surface and overall weld tended to be high, as a result of which the hardness of the weld was thrice that of the base metal. A sound silvery white bead was obtained by using Ar as the shielding gas.

  5. Thickness and multi-axial stress creep rupture criteria of the Type IV component of a ferritic steel weld

    OpenAIRE

    Hayhurst, R James; Vakili-Tahami, Farid; Mustata, Radu; Hayhurst, David

    2004-01-01

    The paper summarises previously derived constitutive parameters for the temperatures 575, 590, 600, 620 and 640oC. Values of the multi-axial stress rupture parameter are reviewed and recorded. This constitutive parameter set is used to determine the thickness of the Type IV material zone to be 0.7mm. Next, values of Type IV multi-axial stress rupture parameter are determined for a wide range of butt-welded pipe and crosswelded uni-axial specimens, and an interpolation equation has been derive...

  6. Review on thermal insulation performance in various type of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahedan, Noor Fifinatasha; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Mahmed, Norsuria; Kusbiantoro, Andri; Binhussain, Mohammed; Zailan, Siti Norsaffirah

    2017-04-01

    Thermal insulation concrete building plays an important role in environment sustainability especially energy saving buildings. Buildings are one of the largest consumers of energy worldwide. Therefore, significant energy saving can be realized by buildings with proper materials, design and operation. Thermal insulation systems are nowadays mostly applied for such building envelopes where the materials of load bearing structure such as concrete do not have a substantial thermal insulation capability. Thermal insulation in concrete are materials or combinations of materials that are used to provide resistance to heat flow, should have low conductivity for building application in order to represence of a temperature gradient, has an important effect on the heat exchange between the building interior and the ambiance. The aim of this paper is to review the thermal properties include thermal conductivity and specific heat on various types of concrete.

  7. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  8. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    OpenAIRE

    Winiowski A.; Majewski D.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3) aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5) and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12). Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy disp...

  9. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  10. Use of high-power diode lasers for hardening and thermal conduction welding of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Fritz; Demmer, Axel; Zaboklicki, A.

    1997-08-01

    CO2 and Nd:YAG high power lasers have become established as machining tools in industrial manufacturing over the last few years. The most important advantages compared to conventional processing techniques lie in the absence of forces introduced by the laser into the workpiece and in the simple arid highly accurate control in terms ofpositioning and timing making the laser a universally applicable, wear-free and extremely flexible tool /1,2/. The laser can be utilised costeffectively in numerous manufacturing processes but there are also further applications for the laser which produce excellent results from a technical point of view, but are not justified in terms of cost. The extensive use of lasers, particularly in small companies and workshops, is hindered by two main reasons: the complexity and size ofthe laser source and plant and the high investment costs /3/. A new generation of lasers, the high power diode lasers (HDL), combines high performance with a compact design, making the laser a cheap and easy to use tool with many applications /3,4,5,6/. In the diode laser, the laser beam is generated by a microelectronic diode which transforms electrical energy directly into laser energy. Diode lasers with low power outputs have, for some time, been making their mark in our everyday lives: they are used in CD players, laser printers and scanners at cash tills. Modern telecommunications would be impossible without these lasers which enable information to be transmitted in the form oflight impulses through optical fibres. They can also be found in compact precision measurement instrumentation - range fmders, interferometers and pollutant analysis devices /3,6/. In the field of material processing, the first applications ofthe laser, such as for soldering, inscribing, surface hardening and plastic or heat conduction welding, will exceed the limits ofthe relatively low performance output currently available. The diode laser has a shorter wavelength than the CO2 and

  11. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  12. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  13. Solar array welding developement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  14. Reheat cracking susceptibility of P23 (7CrWVMoNb9-6) steel welds made using matching and mis-matching filler metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevasmaa, Pekka; Salonen, Jorma; Auerkari, Pertti; Rantala, Juhani; Holmstroem, Stefan [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Reheat cracking sensitivity of 7CrWVMoNb9-6 (P23) thick-section multipass welds has been investigated by Gleeble simulation, mechanical testing, fractography and metallography. The results demonstrate that the experimental weld metal made using a high-Nb-W-Ti-B type filler metal was sensitive to reheat cracking, with a reduction of area no more than 2-3% in the BWI reheat cracking (RC) test. Welds made using a high-W -low-Ti type filler metal with Nb content similar to the parent steel, as well as welds make using a Ni-Nb-Ti-free-(W-free) type filler metal with the chemical composition closer to P24 grade material, were more ductile and crack-resistant, though with reduced cross-weld creep strength. Fractography of RC test specimens showed evidence of pronounced localisation of damage at the prior austenite grain boundaries of the thermally reheated, experimental P23 weld metal. The reheat cracking susceptibility of the less ductile weld metal was apparently related both to the chemical composition (higher B, Nb and Ti content) and sub-structural features of the coarse-grained reheated weld metal microstructure. Appropriate single- and multi-cycle thermal Gleeble simulations to produce representative HAY and reheated weld metal microstructures (as function of peak temperature), in conjunction with the BWI RC test were successfully applied to characterise the reheat cracking sensitivity of the candidate weld metals and parent steel HAZ. (orig.)

  15. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  16. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  17. STUDY AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF WELDING PROCESS ON DISTORTION WITH 304L STAINLESS STEEL WELD JOINTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dhananjay Kumar*, Dharamvir mangal

    2017-01-01

    The effect of welding process on the distortion with 304L stainless steel 12thk weld joints made by TIG (tungsten inert gas) and SMAW (Shielded metal arc welding) welding process involving different type joint configuration have been studied. The joint configurations employed were double V-groove edge preparation for double side SMAW welding and square – butt preparation for double side TIG welding. All weld joints passed by radiographic. Distortion measurements were carried out using height ...

  18. Effect of Welding Thermal Cycles on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Simulated Heat Affected Zone for a Weldox 1300 Ultra-High Strength Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węglowski M. St.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the investigation of weldability of ultra-high strength steel has been presented. The thermal simulated samples were used to investigate the effect of welding cooling time t8/5 on microstructure and mechanical properties of heat affected zone (HAZ for a Weldox 1300 ultra-high strength steel. In the frame of these investigation the microstructure was studied by light and transmission electron microscopies. Mechanical properties of parent material were analysed by tensile, impact and hardness tests. In details the influence of cooling time in the range of 2,5 ÷ 300 sec. on hardness, impact toughness and microstructure of simulated HAZ was studied by using welding thermal simulation test. The microstructure of ultra-high strength steel is mainly composed of tempered martensite. The results show that the impact toughness and hardness decrease with increase of t8/5 under condition of a single thermal cycle in simulated HAZ. The increase of cooling time to 300 s causes that the microstructure consists of ferrite and bainite mixture. Lower hardness, for t8/5 ≥ 60 s indicated that low risk of cold cracking in HAZ for longer cooling time, exists.

  19. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  20. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of the High-Strength Shipbuilding Steels: Equipment and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G.; Kuznetsov, M.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Firsova, A.

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) allows getting weld joints with thickness up to 35 mm for one pass, provide good quality formation of joints, minimal thermal deformations, the productivity in 10 times more in comparison with arc welding. In addition, replacement arc welding to the HLAW allows economizing filler materials, shielding gas and consumable electricity more than 4 times. Therefore, HLAW is actually technology for basic engineering branches and especially for shipbuilding. The Institute of Laser and Welding Technologies (ILWT) developed laser and hybrid laser-arc welding technologies for different type of steels and alloys including high-strength shipbuilding steels. Also ILWT produced portal and robotic systems for HLAW process realization. Portal system for hybrid laser-arc welding of panels with dimensions 6x6 m using at the manufacturing of flat curvilinear sections in the shipbuilding is depicted in the article. Results of experimental researches of the hybrid laser-arc welding parameters influence on the formation and mechanical properties of weld joint are described at the publication also. Experimental part was made with using of the portal system.

  1. Portable electron beam weld chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Dimino, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of portable vacuum chamber for skate type electron beam welding are discussed. Construction and operational details of equipment are presented. Illustrations of equipment are provided.

  2. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  3. Thermal Simulation Analysis of Microstructure and Hardness for CrMoV with PWHT in Type IV Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Xue, Song; Cai, Yong; Niu, Jitai; Li, Liangchao

    2017-12-01

    Welded components of CrMoV steam pipe exhibit a pernicious form of type IV cracking after long-term service at elevated temperature. To investigate the cracking mechanism, the type IV microstructure and hardness were characterized after thermal simulation of post-weld heat treatment. Below 1098 K (825 °C), loss of carbon from the pearlite region was apparent, and the work zone exhibited a slightly lower hardness than the parent material because of a minor amount of austenite transformation. In addition, for peak temperatures above 1133 K (860 °C), additional transformation into austenite occurred and was followed by retransformation into ferrite upon further increasing the temperature. The pearlite formed at 1173 K to 1223 K (900 °C to 950 °C) resulted in an increase of the volume fraction of pearlite and microstructural refinement, which yielded a remarkable increase of hardness in the work zone. For the peak temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C), previous austenite grains were coarsened and alloy carbides were dissolved in the austenite, which significantly hardened the work zone.

  4. The Dielectric Bolometer, A New Type of Thermal Radiation Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1960-01-01

    Thermal detectors for the infrared, such as thermocouples and bolometers, are limited in their ultimate sensitivity predominantly by Johnson noise rather than temperature noise. Low noise figures are hard to achieve since Johnson noise preponderates temperature noise, which is the only essential noise for thermal detectors. The dielectric constants of some materials are sufficiently temperature dependent to make a new type of bolometer feasible. The basic theory of a dielectric bolometer, as shown here, promises noise figures below 3 decibels even at chopper frequencies well above the 1/tau value of the detector. Ferroelectrics such as barium-strontium titanate and others seem to be well suited for radiation-cooled dielectric bolometers.

  5. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  6. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Po-Yu

    2014-06-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO₂ and Al₂O₃ were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO₂ leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al₂O₃. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO₂, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO₂ has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al₂O₃ does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO₂ uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al₂O₃ results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  7. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Hung Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  8. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  9. Laser welding of biological tissue: experimental studies in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Roberto; Rossi, Francesca; Menabuoni, Luca

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we present an original approach to laser welding of ocular media. Attention is focused on laser welding of the cornea and lens capsule. The process is based on the interaction of near infrared diode laser radiation (at 810 nm) with tissue that was previously stained with an Indocyanine Green solution in sterile water. The topical application of the chromophore makes possible a selective heating of the tissue, which results in a homogenous welding effect with low thermal damage to the surrounding tissue. Experimental tests were performed ex vivo on both capsule and cornea, and in vivo (rabbits) only on the cornea, in order to characterize the process as a whole. Spectrophotometric, biomechanical, and thermal measurements were carried out in order to study the laser-tissue interaction, while morphological, histological and auto-florescence microscopy analyses made during a follow-up study provided information on the healing process in welded rabbit corneas. The welding procedure was set up according to the type of tissue, with the staining procedure and irradiation conditions being optimized in each case. Our test indicated that: 1) laser welding of corneal wounds, which is a non contact technique performed at low continuous wave laser power (12 W/cm2), can be proposed as a support to or substitute for the standard suturing technique in cataract surgery and in penetrating keratoplasty (in corneal transplants); 2) laser welding of the lens capsule requires a "contact irradiating technique" in order to be efficiently performed, since the tissue is in underwater conditions, with single spot pulses of about 100 J/cm2 fluence and pulse duration around 100 ms. In the latter case, laser welding was proposed as a tool for assisting closure of the lens capsule after the lens refilling procedure (Phaco-ersatz), or for repairing capsular breaks induced by accidental traumas or produced intraoperatively.

  10. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  11. Strong anisotropic thermal expansion in cristobalite-type BPO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2004-11-01

    In this communication, the thermal expansion behavior of cristobalite-type BPO 4, determined from high-temperature X-ray diffraction studies, is being reported. BPO 4 crystallizes in tetragonal lattice, with space group I-4 (No. 82) at room temperature, with unit cell parameters: a=4.3447(2), c=6.6415(5) Å and V=125.37(1) Å 3. The tetragonal unit cell parameters at 900 °C are: a=4.3939(2), c=6.6539(6) Å and V=128.46(1) Å 3. The results show a very strong anisotropic expansion in the lattice, with the typical thermal expansion coefficients along a- and c-axis 12.9×10 -6 and 2.1×10 -6/°C, respectively. The volume thermal expansion coefficient of the lattice is 28.2×10 -6/°C in the temperature range of 25-900 °C. The variation of the crystal structure with temperature and the thermal expansion behavior are explained in this manuscript. The role of inter-polyhedral angle on the thermal expansion behavior has also been established.

  12. Thermomechanical Modelling of Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a generic programme for analysis, optimization and development of resistance spot and projection welding. The programme includes an electrical model determining electric current and voltage distribution as well as heat generation, a thermal model calculating heat...

  13. Thermal Aging Effects on Residual Stress and Residual Strain Distribution on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Junhyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consisting of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, has been widely used as a joining material of the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its good mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance. Residual tensile stress is mainly nominated as a cause of SCC in light water reactors by IAEA report. So, to relax the residual stress, post-weld heat treatment is required after manufacturing process such as welding. However, thermal treatment has a great effect on the microstructure and the chromium depletion profile on Alloy 600, so called sensitization. By this reason, HAZ on Alloy 600 is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al., Crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions. And according to Z.P. Lu et al., CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. There are some methods to measure the exact value of residual stress on the material surface. The most common way is X-ray diffraction method (XRD). The principle of XRD is based on lattice strains and depends on the changes in the spacing of the atomic planes in material. And there is a computer simulation method to estimate residual stress distribution which is called ANSYS. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects residual stress and residual strain distribution of Alloy 600 HAZ. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. According to preceding researches and this study, both the relaxation of residual stress and the change of residual strain follow as similar way, spreading out from concentrated region. The result of Vickers micro-hardness tester shows that tensile residual stresses are distributed broadly on the material aged by 15 years. Therefore, HT400{sub Y}15 material is weakest state for PWSCC. The

  14. Effect of weld spacing on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM electron beam welding joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yutao; Huang, Bo, E-mail: aufa0007@163.com; Zhang, Junyu; Zhang, Baoren; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding, and a simplified model of CLAM sheet was proposed. • The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). • The effect of the welding thermal cycle was significantly when the weld spacings were smaller than 4 mm. • When the weld spacing was small enough, the original microstructures would be fragmented with the high heat input. - Abstract: China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel has been chosen as the primary structural material in the designs of dual function lithium-lead (DFLL) blanket for fusion reactors, China helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) for ITER and China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) blanket. The cooling components of the blankets are designed with high density cooling channels (HDCCs) to remove the high nuclear thermal effectively. Hence, the welding spacing among the channels are small. In this paper, the welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding (EBW). The weld spacing was designed to be 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm. The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The PWHT is tempering at 740 °C for 120 min. The results showed that the grain size in the heat affected zone (HAZ) increased with the increasing weld spacing, and the joint with small weld spacing had a better performance after PWHT. This work would give useful guidance to improve the preparation of the cooling components of blanket.

  15. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  16. Simplified welding distortion analysis for fillet welding using composite shell elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the simplified welding distortion analysis method to predict the welding deformation of both plate and stiffener in fillet welds. Currently, the methods based on equivalent thermal strain like Strain as Direct Boundary (SDB has been widely used due to effective prediction of welding deformation. Regarding the fillet welding, however, those methods cannot represent deformation of both members at once since the temperature degree of freedom is shared at the intersection nodes in both members. In this paper, we propose new approach to simulate deformation of both members. The method can simulate fillet weld deformations by employing composite shell element and using different thermal expansion coefficients according to thickness direction with fixed temperature at intersection nodes. For verification purpose, we compare of result from experiments, 3D thermo elastic plastic analysis, SDB method and proposed method. Compared of experiments results, the proposed method can effectively predict welding deformation for fillet welds.

  17. Temperature Histories of Ti-6Al-4V Pulsed-Mode Laser Welds Calculated Using Multiple Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-12

    welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that provides for...Modeling of titanium welding Contents 1. Introduction………………………………………………………………………………….…..1 2. Inverse Analysis Procedure ...parameter optimization for a specific type of Ti-alloy weld , which uses initial estimates of parameter values corresponding to a different type of

  18. Self-welding evaluation of type 304 and A286 stainless steel in the temperature range 800/sup 0/-1140/sup 0/F in flowing sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.Y.; Flagella, P.N.; Schrock, S.L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper covers two material combinations, Type 304 SS vs Type 304 SS and Type 304 SS vs A286, tested at temperatures from 800 to 1140/sup 0/F for time periods up to six months in flowing sodium. Contact stresses ranged from 2 to 30 ksi on contact areas for 0.63 to 1.00 in./sup 2/. Tests were performed in either tensile or shear modes on the flat-on-flat samples. Surface morphologies of the sample before and after the test were presented. Self-welding of Type 304 SS was significant at temperatures above 1080/sup 0/F while no self-welding was detected at 800/sup 0/F. Sliding friction coefficient (..mu..) data for a Type 304 SS couple at 800/sup 0/F under compressive stresses from 2000 to 30,000 psi in sodium could be correlated quite accurately by W/sigma = 0.08e/sup 9..mu../, where W is the waviness height in microinches and sigma is the compressive stress in kilo-pound per square inch. One self-weld couple of Type 304 SS/Type 304 SS exposed at 1080/sup 0/F for 3 months was not separated but rather removed intact from the test apparatus and examined in cross-section. Scanning electron micrographs of the contacted area revealed that portions of the original interface were no longer discernible. (auth)

  19. FOURCRACK advanced coal-fired power plant steels - avoidance of early weld failure by 'Type IV' cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.J.; Harvey, B.; Brett, S.J. [E.ON UK plc., Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    Project 'FOURCRACK' was undertaken to improve understanding of the problem, assist materials selection, and clarify the effective limits on plant design conditions and temperatures. The main project was based on cross-weld creep rupture testing. Tests were carried out to assess the high temperature performance of welds in seven different casts of leading advanced high alloy ferritic steels, E911, P92 and P122, supplied as forging, casting, plate, and pipe components, and in a weak cast of Grade 91 steel which was welded following different heat treatments to compare the performance of as received, renormalised and tempered and preaged parent material conditions. A novel form of test matrix was devised to investigate variations in both stress and temperature and compare the performance of a large number of different weldment over a range of different test conditions. To generate better long term data on Type IV cracking in the heat-affected zone, the main test programme was followed by additional testing using a special waited specimen geometry. The test data included many short term failures in the weld metal. However, there was a clear trend toward HAZ failure at lower temperature and stresses, and it could be concluded that HAZ Type IV failure is the main long term risk under plant operating conditions. 15 refs., 29 figs., 26 abs., 5 apps.

  20. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  1. Development of method to remove weld scallop and ceramic backing material of wedge type and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Yang, Jong-Soo; Kim, Ho-Kyung

    2015-06-01

    The weld scallop has been used for joining T-bars. There are a lot of weld scallops in shipbuilding. It is difficult to perform scallop welding due to the inconvenient welding position. This results in many problems such as porosity, slag inclusion, etc. In this study, a new method is devised to remove weld scallops by incorporating a Ceramic Backing Material (CBM). The weld scallop is removed by an elongation of the v groove. In order to insert a CBM into the groove without a weld scallop, a wedge-shaped CBM is developed. The top side of the developed CBM is similar to the shape of a general back bead. The bottom surface has a saw-toothed shape for cutting at a suitable length. This can be attached to the root side of a face plate using adhesive tape, just like a general CBM. Welding experiments in normal and abnormal conditions are carried out and the possibility of burn-through is examined. This CBM's applicability to shipbuilding is verified.

  2. Development of method to remove weld scallop and ceramic backing material of wedge type and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Koo Kang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The weld scallop has been used for joining T-bars. There are a lot of weld scallops in shipbuilding. It is difficult to perform scallop welding due to the inconvenient welding position. This results in many problems such as porosity, slag inclusion, etc. In this study, a new method is devised to remove weld scallops by incorporating a Ceramic Backing Material (CBM. The weld scallop is removed by an elongation of the v groove. In order to insert a CBM into the groove without a weld scallop, a wedge-shaped CBM is developed. The top side of the developed CBM is similar to the shape of a general back bead. The bottom surface has a saw-toothed shape for cutting at a suitable length. This can be attached to the root side of a face plate using adhesive tape, just like a general CBM. Welding experiments in normal and abnormal conditions are carried out and the possibility of burn-through is examined. This CBM’s applicability to shipbuilding is verified.

  3. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...... with the simulation prediction, showing the validity of the algorithm....

  4. Effects of laser offset and hybrid welding on microstructure and IMC in Fe–Al dissimilar welding

    OpenAIRE

    Casalino, Giuseppe; Leo, Paola; Mortello, Michelangelo; Perulli, Patrizia; Varone, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Welding between Fe and Al alloys is difficult because of a significant difference in thermal properties and poor mutual solid-state solubility. This affects the weld microstructure and causes the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The present study aims to explore the weld microstructure and those compounds over two different technologies: the laser offset welding and the hybrid laser-MIG (Metal inert gas) welding. The former consists of focusing the laser beam on the top su...

  5. Quality improvement of steel cast-welded constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аркадій Васильович Лоза

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various types of metallurgical equipment there are structures which are welded compounds of a cast base and additional elements produced by casting or any other means. Such structures are called cast-welded constructions. Besides new working properties such constructions appear to be more efficient and provide better durability as compared to the similar structures produced by other industrial means. Meanwhile the advantages of the technology are not used in full. One reason is low quality of the compound products caused by lack of proper preparation of the elements to be welded and poor quality of the welds themselves. In the article the methods of quality production and the maintenance of steel cast-welded constructions have been considered. A ladle of a blast-furnace slag car is used as the subject of investigation and further testing of the mentioned above technologies. The ladle is a cast product. Under operating conditions, the ladle undergoes mechanical and thermal load, which results in deformation of its sides that deflect inside. To prevent the deflection stiffening ribs are welded onto the outer surface of the ladle. However, there may be casting defects in the base metal that could reduce the durability of the welds. It has been proved that welds on the unprepared cast base of the steel product cannot guarantee the combination’s durability and reliability. To prevent the influence of the casting defects it has been recommended to cover the base metal with one more metal layer before welding the elements on. Two-layer surfacing provides best result as the first layer serves for the weld penetration of the casting defects since this layer has a significant share of base metal therefore it is less malleable; the second layer is necessary for making the layer viscous enough. The viscous layer ensures the absence of sharp transition from the deposited metal to the base metal and increases the crack resistance of the weld. In

  6. Tailoring defect free fusion welds based on phenomenological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit

    In the last few decades, phenomenological models of fusion welding have provided important understanding and information about the welding processes and welded materials. For example, numerical calculations of heat transfer and fluid flow in welding have enabled accurate quantitative calculations of thermal cycles and fusion zone geometry in fusion welding. In many simple systems such as gas tungsten arc (GTA) butt welding, the computed thermal cycles have been used to quantitatively understand weld metal phase compositions, grain sizes and inclusion structure. However, fabrication of defect free welds with prescribed attributes based on scientific principles still remains to be achieved. In addition, higher fabrication speeds are often limited by the occurrence of humping defects which are characterized by periodic bead-like appearance. Furthermore, phenomenological models have not been applied to tailor welds with given attributes. The goal of the present work is to apply the principles of heat transfer and fluid flow to attain defects free welds with prescribed attributes. Since there are a large number of process variables in welding, the desired weld attributes such as the weld geometry and structure are commonly produced by empirically adjusting the welding variables. However, this approach does not always produce optimum welds and inappropriate choice of variables can lead to poor welds. The existing transport phenomena based models of welding can only predict weld characteristics for a given set of input welding variables. What is needed, and not currently available, is a capability to systematically determine multiple paths to tailor weld geometry and assess robustness of each individual solution to achieve safe, defect free welds. Therefore, these heat transfer and fluid flow based models are restructured to predict the welding conditions to achieve the defect free welds with desired attributes. Systematic tailoring of weld attributes based on scientific

  7. Metallography of Battery Resistance Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. E.; Johannes, L. B.; Gonzalez, D.; Yayathi, S.; Figuered, J. M.; Darcy, E. C.; Bilc, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion cells provide an energy dense solution for systems that require rechargeable electrical power. However, these cells can undergo thermal runaway, the point at which the cell becomes thermally unstable and results in hot gas, flame, electrolyte leakage, and in some cases explosion. The heat and fire associated with this type of event is generally violent and can subsequently cause damage to the surrounding system or present a dangerous risk to the personnel nearby. The space flight environment is especially sensitive to risks particularly when it involves potential for fire within the habitable volume of the International Space Station (ISS). In larger battery packs such as Robonaut 2 (R2), numerous Li-ion cells are placed in parallel-series configurations to obtain the required stack voltage and desired run-time or to meet specific power requirements. This raises a second and less obvious concern for batteries that undergo certification for space flight use: the joining quality at the resistance spot weld of battery cells to component wires/leads and battery tabs, bus bars or other electronic components and assemblies. Resistance spot welds undergo materials evaluation, visual inspection, conductivity (resistivity) testing, destructive peel testing, and metallurgical examination in accordance with applicable NASA Process Specifications. Welded components are cross-sectioned to ensure they are free of cracks or voids open to any exterior surface. Pore and voids contained within the weld zone but not open to an exterior surface, and are not determined to have sharp notch like characteristics, shall be acceptable. Depending on requirements, some battery cells are constructed of aluminum canisters while others are constructed of steel. Process specific weld schedules must be developed and certified for each possible joining combination. The aluminum canisters' positive terminals were particularly difficult to weld due to a bi-metal strip that comes ultrasonically

  8. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteucci

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compare ultrasonic welding (UW and thermal bonding (TB for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones obtained using TB. Parameters such as metal thickness of electrodes, depth of electrode embedding, delivered power, and height of energy directors (for UW, as well as pressure and temperature (for TB, were systematically studied to evaluate the two bonding methods and requirements for optimal electrochemical performance. The presented technology is intended for easy and effective integration of polymeric Lab-on-Chip systems to encourage their use in research, commercialization and education.

  9. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  10. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  11. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  12. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  13. Study of the temperature distribution on welded thin plates of duplex steel to be used for the external clad of a cask for transportation of radiopharmaceuticals products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Ceoni, Francisco C.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Politano, Rodolfo; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: egbetini@ipen.br, E-mail: fceoni@hotmail.com, E-mail: csmucsi@ipen.br, E-mail: politano@ipen.br, E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Orlando, Marcos T.D., E-mail: mtdorlando@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCE/DFIS/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas. Departamento de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    The clad material for a proprietary transport device for radiopharmaceutical products is the main focus of the present work. The production of {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc transport cask requires a receptacle or cask where the UNS S32304 duplex steel sheet has shown that it meets high demands as the required mechanical strength and the spread of impact or shock waves mitigation. This work reports the experimental efforts in recording the thermal distribution on autogenous thin plates of UNS S32304 steel during welding. The UNS S32304 duplex steel is the most probable candidate for the external clad of the containment package for the transport of radioactive substances so it is highly relevant the understanding of all its physical parameters and its behavior under the thermal cycle imposed by a welding process. For the welding of the UNS S32304 autogenous plates the GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) process was used with a pure argon arc protection atmosphere in order to simulate a butt joint weld on a thin duplex steel plate without filler metal. The thermal cycles were recorded by means of K-type thermocouples embedded by electrical spot welding near the weld region and connected to a multi-channel data acquisition system. The obtained results validate the reliability of the experimental apparatus for the future complete analysis of the welding experiment and further comparison to numerical analysis. (author)

  14. Fatigue strength: effect of welding type and joint design executed in Ti-6Al-4V structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Juliana M C Nuñez; Farina, Ana P; Vaz, Luis G; Consani, Rafael L X; Nóbilo, Mauro A de Arruda; Mesquita, Marcelo F

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated the fatigue strength of Ti-6Al-4V-machined structures submitted to laser (L)-welding and TIG (TIG)-welding procedures, varying the joint designs. Seventy dumbbell rods were machined in Ti-6Al-4V alloy with central diameters of 3.5 mm. The specimens were sectioned and welded using TIG or L and three joint designs {'I' design, varying welding distances [0.0 mm (I00) or 0.6 mm (I06)], or 'X' [X] design}. The combinations of variables created six groups, which, when added to the intact group, made a total of seven groups (n = 10). L was executed as follows: 360 V/8 ms (X) and 390 V/9 ms (I00 and I06), with focus and frequency regulated to zero. TIG was executed using 2:2 (X) and 3:2 (I00 and I06) as welding parameters. Joints were finished, polished and submitted to radiographic examination to be analysed visually for the presence of porosity. The specimens were then subjected to mechanical cyclic tests, and the number of cycles completed until failure was recorded. The fracture surface was examined using a scanning electron microscope. The Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test (α = 0.05) indicated that the number of cycles resisted for fracture was higher to X for both welding procedures. To L, I06 was as resistant as X. The Mann-Whitney U-test (α = 0.05) indicated that L joints were more resistant than TIG to I00 and I06. Spearman's correlation coefficient (α = 0.05) indicated a negative correlation between the number of cycles and presence of porosity. Thus, to weld Ti-6Al-4V structures, the best condition is X, independent of the welding method employed. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. In-vivo argon laser vascular welding using thermal feedback: open- and closed-loop patency and collagen crosslinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Ward, IV; Celliers, Peter M.; Kopchok, George E.; Reiser, Karen M.; Heredia, Nicholas J.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Eder, David C.; London, Richard A.; Heilbron, Mauricio; Hussain, Farabi; White, Rodney A.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    1997-05-01

    An in vivo study of vascular welding with a fiber-delivered argon laser was conducted using a canine model. Longitudinal arteriotomies and venotomies were treated on femoral vein and artery. Laser energy was delivered to the vessel wall via a 400 micrometer optical fiber. The surface temperature at the center of the laser spot was monitored in real time using a hollow glass optical fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. The surface temperature was limited by either a room-temperature saline drip or direct feedback control of the laser using a mechanical shutter to alternately pass and block the laser. Acute patency was evaluated either visually (leak/no leak) or by in vivo burst pressure measurements. Biochemical assays were performed to investigate the possible laser-induced formation or destruction of enzymatically mediated covalent crosslinks between collagen molecules. Viable welds were created both with and without the use of feedback control. Tissues maintained at 50 degrees Celsius using feedback control had an elevated crosslink count compared to controls, while those irradiated without feedback control experienced a decrease. Differences between the volumetric heating associated with open and closed loop protocols may account for the different effects on collagen crosslinks. Covalent mechanisms may play a role in argon laser vascular fusion.

  16. In vivo argon laser vascular welding using thermal feedback: open and closed loop patency and collagen crosslinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, W., LLNL

    1997-02-28

    An in vivo study of vascular welding with a fiber-delivered argon laser was conducted using a canine model. Longitudinal arteriotomies and venotomies were treated on femoral vein and artery. Laser energy was delivered to the vessel wall via a 400 {micro}m optical fiber. The surface temperature at the center of the laser spot was monitored in real time using a hollow glass optical fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. The surface temperature was limited by either a room-temperature saline drip or direct feedback control of the laser using a mechanical shutter to alternately pass and block the laser. Acute patency was evaluated either visually (leak/no leak) or by in vivo burst pressure measurements. Biochemical assays were performed to investigate the possible laser-induced formation or destruction of enzymatically mediated covalent crosslinks between collagen molecules. Viable welds were created both with and without the use of feedback control. Tissues maintained at 50 C using feedback control had an elevated crosslink count compared to controls, while those irradiated without feedback control experienced a decrease. Differences between the volumetric heating associated with open and closed loop protocols may account for the different effects on collagen crosslinks. Covalent mechanisms may play a role in argon laser vascular fusion.

  17. Thermal effects on weld and unweld tensile properties of injection moulded short glass fibre reinforced ABS composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on weldline properties of injection moulded acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS reinforced with short glass fibres was investigated in tension between 25 and 100°C. Tensile modulus of both weld and unweld specimens increased linearly with increasing fibre concentration and decreased linearly with increasing temperature. It was found that the presence of weldline had no significant effect upon tensile modulus and this was reflected by weldline integrity factors in the range 0.98 to 0.95. Tensile strength of both weld and unweld tensile specimens increased nonlinearly with increasing fibre concentration and in the case of weldline specimens showed a maximum at fibre concentration of approximately 10% v/v. A linear dependence with respect to volume fraction of fibres was found for specimens without weldline for fibre concentrations in the range 0–10% v/v. The weldline integrity factor for tensile strength decreased significantly with increasing fibre concentration and increased with increasing temperature. The effect of temperature on tensile modulus and strength was satisfactorily modelled using the Kitagawa power law relationship..

  18. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Duplex Steel Multipass Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giętka T.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses based on FEM calculations have significantly changed the possibilities of determining welding strains and stresses at early stages of product design and welding technology development. Such an approach to design enables obtaining significant savings in production preparation and post-weld deformation corrections and is also important for utility properties of welded joints obtained. As a result, it is possible to make changes to a simulated process before introducing them into real production as well as to test various variants of a given solution. Numerical simulations require the combination of problems of thermal, mechanical and metallurgical analysis. The study presented involved the SYSWELD software-based analysis of GMA welded multipass butt joints made of duplex steel sheets. The analysis of the distribution of stresses and displacements were carried out for typical welding procedure as during real welding tests.

  20. Effect of Zr Addition on the Microstructure and Toughness of Coarse-Grained Heat-Affected Zone with High-Heat Input Welding Thermal Cycle in Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-hao; Yuan, Xiao-guang; Huang, Hong-jun; Zhang, Si

    2017-07-01

    Microstructures and toughness of coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) with high-heat input welding thermal cycle in Zr-containing and Zr-free low-carbon steel were investigated by means of welding thermal cycle simulation. The specimens were subjected to a welding thermal cycle with heat inputs of 100, 400, and 800 kJ cm-1 at peak temperature of 1673 K (1400 °C) using a thermal simulator. The results indicate that excellent impact toughness at the CGHAZ was obtained in Zr-containing steel. The Zr oxide is responsible for AF transformation, providing the nucleation site for the formation AF, promoting the nucleation of AF on the multi-component inclusions. High fraction of acicular ferrite (AF) appears in Zr-containing steel, acting as an obstacle to cleavage propagation due to its high-angle grain boundary. The morphology of M-A constituents plays a key role in impact toughness of CGHAZ. Large M-A constituents with lath form can assist the micro-crack initiation and seriously decrease the crack initiation energy. The relationship of AF transformation and M-A constituents was discussed in detail.

  1. A round-robin test with thermal simulation of the welding HAZ to draw CCT diagrams: a need for harmonized procedures and microconstituent terminologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Scotti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal simulations of heat affected zone (HAZ have been widely used. This is an economic expedite process for phase transformation evaluations in steels when subjected to weld thermal cycles as well as to draw continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagrams. Different approaches for the simulation and parameter settings have been used by several researchers, yet leading to not always even results. Thus, it was proposed a round-robin test trial performed by different laboratories, aiming to evidence potential sources of error or inadequacy of the approaches. A High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA steel was used as a case study. Despite the limited number of tests, the results show low robustness when comparing the outcomes from the different laboratories and point out for the need to take three actions. The first one is to implement a cooperative and multi-institutional program to assess the effect of relevant simulation parameters, such as the heating rate and holding time at peak temperature, on the final microstructure and transformation temperatures as well as on the hardness for a given cooling rate. The second is to propose calibration procedures for the simulation and measurement systems. The third action is to stimulate experts in this area to develop a guideline of terminology for constituents in the heat affected zone of ferritic steels.

  2. Comparing thermal welding instrument-assisted laparoscopic radical hysterectomy versus conventional radical hysterectomy in the management of FIGO IB1 squamous cell cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C H; Wang, P H; Chiu, L H; Chang, W H

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of using the thermal welding technique with thermal ligating shear (TWT-TLS)-assisted laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (LRH) and systemic pelvic lymphadenectomy (SPL) in the management of Stage IB1 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. The authors compared operating time, blood loss, and other intra- and postoperative parameters and outcomes in 53 patients between May 2003 and April 2007. Twenty-three patients were treated with TWT-TLS-assisted LRH and SPL (TWT-TLS group) and 30 patients with abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH) and SPL (ARH group). The surgical time of the TWT-TLS group was significantly shorter than that of the ARH group (221.4 vs 264.6 min, p TWT-TLS group was less than that of the ARH group (195.7 vs 1,214.7 ml, p TWT-TLS group compared with the ARH group (1.4 vs 3.5 days for full diet, p TWT-TLS is a safe and efficient method for laparoscopic RH and SPL with reduction of morbidity for early-stage cervical cancer. A further study is needed to confirm the above observation.

  3. Thermal Preconditioning of MIMS Type K Thermocouples to Reduce Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    Type K thermocouples are the most widely used temperature sensors in industry and are often used in the convenient mineral-insulated metal-sheathed (MIMS) format. The MIMS format provides almost total immunity to oxide-related drift in the 800°C-1000°C range. However, crystalline ordering of the atomic structure causes drift in the range 200°C-600°C. Troublesomely, the effects of this ordering are reversible, leading to hysteresis in some applications. Typically, MIMS cable is subjected to a post-manufacturing high-temperature recrystallization anneal to remove cold-work and place the thermocouple in a `known state.' However, variations in the temperatures and times of these exposures can lead to variations in the `as-received state.' This study gives guidelines on the best thermal preconditioning of 3 mm MIMS Type K thermocouples in order to minimize drift and achieve the most reproducible temperature measurements. Experimental results demonstrate the consequences of using Type K MIMS thermocouples in different states, including the as-received state, after a high-temperature recrystallization anneal and after preconditioning anneals at 200°C, 300°, 400°C and and 500°C. It is also shown that meaningful calibration is possible with the use of regular preconditioning anneals.

  4. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  5. Numerical methods in simulation of resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2015-01-01

    Finite element simulation of resistance welding requires coupling betweenmechanical, thermal and electrical models. This paper presents the numerical models and theircouplings that are utilized in the computer program SORPAS. A mechanical model based onthe irreducible flow formulation is utilized...... a resistance welding point of view, the most essential coupling between the above mentioned models is the heat generation by electrical current due to Joule heating. The interaction between multiple objects is anothercritical feature of the numerical simulation of resistance welding because it influences...

  6. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2017-11-20

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable allo ys) that has been applied successfully in the aerospace industry. However, the full potential of FSW on more cost-sensitive applications is still limited by the production rate, namely the welding speed of the process. The majority of literature evaluating FSW of aluminum alloys is based on welds made in the range of welding speeds around hundreds of millimeters per minute, and only a handful are at a moderate speed of 1 m/min. In this study we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with welding speeds up to 3 m/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. Results are coupled with welding parameters to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high speed processing.

  7. Repair of gear-type pumps for hydraulic systems of construction machines

    OpenAIRE

    Posviatenko, Ye; Kropivniy, V.; Posviatenko, N.; Rousskykh, V.

    2007-01-01

    Investigation into resource-saving technology of repair of gear-type pumps by contact welding -on some wear-resistant composite sintered powders on the top of teeth with further thermal-cycle treatment has been described.

  8. Effects of Thermal Aging on Type 316H Stainless Steel for Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hong, Seok Min; Lee, Bong Sang; Koo, Gyeong Hoi [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Type 316H stainless steel is a prime candidate for reactor vessel material of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) which has been developed as one of the Gen IV nuclear reactors in Korea. The reactor vessel steel will be exposed to higher temperature for an extended design life time. It is known that austenitic stainless steel such as Type 316H stainless steel shows excellent toughness and adequate strength at a moderate temperature. However, the previous researches reported the mechanical properties of Type 316H stainless weld would be deteriorated by the aging at the elevated temperature range.

  9. Laser welding of micro plastic parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberstroh, E.; Hoffmann, W.-M.

    2007-02-01

    Most welding processes for plastics do not meet the demands of micro technology and thus cannot be applied in this innovative industrial sector. One of the few techniques which are applicable in this sector is the laser transmission welding, which has distinctive advantages like low mechanical and thermal load of the joining parts. This makes the laser particularly suitable for the welding of micro plastics parts. Thereby, contour welding is a process variant of laser transmission welding enabling the welding of complex and even three-dimensional weld contours. But so far it has not yet been applied for welding plastics parts of micro scale in the industrial practice. Recent research at the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at the RWTH Aachen University shows the feasibility of this process to weld small and complex micro parts. Good mechanical properties can be achieved. However, it is necessary to apply measures to reduce the formation of flash. Moreover, it can be shown that there is a strong influence of some material parameters on the laser welding process so that some plastics are more suitable than others for the contour welding in micro technology.

  10. Changes in Precipitate Distributions and the Microstructural Evolution of P24/P91 Dissimilar Metal Welds During PWHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Karl E.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Chi, Kuangnan; Barnard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The effect of post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) on the evolution of precipitate phases in dissimilar metal welds made between 9 pct Cr P91 alloy and 2.25 pct Cr T/P24-type weld metal has been investigated. Sections of multi-pass fusion welds were analyzed in their as welded condition and after PWHTs of 2 and 8 hour duration at 1003 K (730 °C). Thin foil specimens and carbon extraction replicas have been examined in transmission electron microscopes in order to identify precipitate phases and substantiate their distributions in close proximity to the fusion line. The findings of these studies confirm that a carbon-depleted region develops in the lower alloyed weld material, adjacent to the weld interface, during thermal processing. A corresponding carbon enriched region is formed, simultaneously, in the coarse grain heat affected zone of the P91 parent alloy. It has been demonstrated that carbon depletion from the weld alloy results in the dissolution of M7C3 and M23C6 chromium carbides. However, micro-alloying additions of vanadium and niobium which are made to both the P24 and P91 alloys facilitate the precipitation of stable, nano-scale, MX carbonitride particles. This work demonstrates that these particles, which are of key importance to the strength of ferritic creep resistant alloys, are retained in carbon-depleted regions. The microstructural stability which is conferred by their retention means that the pernicious effects of recrystallization are largely avoided.

  11. The influence of screw type, alloy and cylinder position on the marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilio, Daniela; Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; Rossetti, Leylha Maria Nunes; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso

    2006-04-01

    Misfit at the abutment-prosthetic cylinder interface can cause loss of preload, leading to loosening or fracture of gold and titanium screws. To evaluate the influence of screw type, alloy, and cylinder position on marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding. After Estheticone-like abutments were screwed to the implants, thirty plastic prosthetic cylinders were mounted and waxed-up to fifteen cylindrical bars. Each specimen had three interconnected prosthetic components. Five specimens were one-piece cast in titanium and five in cobalt-chromium alloy. On each specimen, tests were conducted with hexagonal titanium and slotted gold screws separately, performing a total of thirty tested screws. Measurements at the interfaces were performed using an optical microscope with 5mm accuracy. After sectioning, specimens were laser welded and new measurements were obtained. Data were submitted to a four-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (alpha=0.05). Slotted and hexagonal screws did not present significant differences regarding to the fit of cylinders cast in titanium, either in one-piece casting framework or after laser welding. When slotted and hexagonal screws were tested on the cobalt-chromium specimens, statistically significant differences were found for the one-piece casting condition, with the slotted screws presenting better fit (24.13 microm) than the hexagonal screws (27.93 microm). Besides, no statistically significant differences were found after laser welding. 1) The use of different metal alloys do exert influence on the marginal fit, 2) The slotted and hexagonal screws play the exclusive role of fixing the prosthesis, and did not improve the fit of cylinders, and 3) cylinder position did not affect marginal fit values.

  12. Slag-metal reactions during welding: Part II. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, U.; Eagar, T. W.

    1991-02-01

    A kinetic model is developed to describe the transfer of alloying elements between the slag and the metal during flux-shielded welding. The model accounts for changes in alloy recovery based on the geometry of the resulting weld bead. It also distinguishes compositional differences between single-pass and multiple-pass weld beads. It is further shown that the final weld metal oxygen content is directly related to the weld solidification time as well as the type of flux used.

  13. Numerical evaluation of multipass welding temperature field in API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nóbrega

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many are the metallurgical changes suffered by materials when subjected to welding thermal cycle, promoting a considerable influence on the welded structures thermo mechanical properties. In project phase, one alternative for evaluating the welding cycle variable, would be the employment of computational methods through simulation. So, this paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field in a multipass welding of API 5L X80 steel used for oil and gas transportation, using the ABAQUS ® software, based on Finite Elements Method (FEM. During the simulation complex phenomena are considerable including: Variation in physical and mechanical properties of materials as a function of temperature, welding speed and the different mechanisms of heat exchange with the environment (convection and radiation were used. These considerations allow a more robust mathematical modeling for the welding process. An analytical heat source proposed by Goldak, to model the heat input in order to characterize the multipass welding through the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process on root and the SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes were used. So, it was possible to evaluate the effect of each welding pass on the welded joint temperature field, through the temperature peaks and cooling rates values during the welding process.

  14. Evaluation of Hydrogen Cracking in Weld Metal Deposited using Cellulosic-Coated Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-16

    Cellulosic-coated electrodes (primarily AWS EXX10-type) are traditionally used for "stovepipe" welding of pipelines because they are well suited for deposition of pipeline girth welds and are capable of high deposition rates when welding downhill. De...

  15. Numerical modeling of electron-beam welding of dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krektuleva, R. A.; Cherepanov, O. I.; Cherepanov, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to numerical modeling of heat transfer processes and estimation of thermal stresses in weld seams created by electron beam welding of heterogeneous metals. The mathematical model is based on a system of equations that includes the Lagrange's variational equation of theory of plasticity and variational equation of M. Biot's principle to simulate the heat transfer processes. The two-dimensional problems (plane strain and plane stress) are considered for estimation of thermal stresses in welds considering differences of mechanical properties of welded materials. The model is developed for simulation of temperature fields and stresses during electron beam welding.

  16. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  17. Process Simulation of Resistance Weld Bonding and Automotive Light-weight Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Chergui, Azeddine; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    This paper presents the latest developments in numerical simulation of resistance welding especially with the new functions for simulation of microstructures, weld bonding and spot welding of new light-weight materials. The fundamental functions in SORPAS® are built on coupled modeling...... of mechanical, electrical, thermal and metallurgical processes, which are essential for simulation of resistance welding process to predict the welding results and evaluate the weldability of materials. These functions have been further extended with new functions for optimization of welding process parameters...... and predicting welding process window, for weld planning with optimal welding parameter settings, and for modeling microstructures and hardness distribution after welding. Latest developments have been made on simulation of resistance welding with nonconductive materials for applications in weld bonding...

  18. Weld microstructure and hardness prediction for in-service hot-tap welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wentao Cheng; Yong-Yi Wang [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, OH (United States)]. E-mail: wcheng@emc-sq.com; ywang@emc-sq.com; Amend, William [Southern California Gas Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]. E-mail: bamend@semprautilities.com

    2005-07-01

    Welding onto an in-service pipeline is frequently required to repair damaged areas and for system modifications. There are often significant economic and environmental incentives to perform in-service welding, including the ability to maintain operations during welding and to avoid venting the contents to the atmosphere. Welds made onto in-service pipelines tend to cool at an accelerated rate. These welds are likely to have high heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness which increases their susceptibility to hydrogen cracking. Accurate prediction of HAZ hardness is critical in developing successful welding procedures for in-service hot-tap welds. The present PRCI thermal analysis software for hot-tap welding uses an empirical-formula-based HAZ hardness prediction procedure. This paper describes an effort funded by PRCI to produce a significantly improved HAZ hardness prediction procedure over the procedure in the current PRCI thermal analysis software. A markedly improved hardness prediction procedure was developed and systematically validated using extensive experimental data of actual welds. The underlying hardness calculation algorithms were based on the proven state-of-the-art phase transformation models. Although on the average the procedure under-predicts the measured hardness by a small amount, the new hardness prediction procedure is a significant improvement in overall accuracy over the procedure in the current PRCI thermal analysis software. The procedure developed here lays the foundation for a much more accurate hardness prediction module in the future version of the PRCI thermal analysis software. (author)

  19. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  20. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  1. Influence of Welding Current and Joint Design on the Tensile Properties of SMAW Welded Mild Steel Joints Prof. Rohit Jha1 , Dr. A.K. Jha

    OpenAIRE

    Prof. Rohit Jha; Dr. A.K. Jha

    2014-01-01

    Present study includes welding characteristics of weldment with respect to different types of weld design and welding current. Mild steel plates of 6mm were welded using different joint designs. Single V, Double V and Flat surfaces were joined by Shielded Metal Arc Welding process. Welding current was varied in all the cases. Mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and percentage elongation were evaluated. Results indicated that the single V join...

  2. Online resistance spot weld NDE using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2017-04-01

    A new online resistance spot weld non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique based on infrared (IR) thermography has been developed. It is capable of both real-time online (during welding) and post-weld online/offline (after welding) inspections. The system mainly consists of an IR camera and a computer program with proprietary thermal imaging analysis algorithms integrated into existing production lines. For real-time inspection, the heat flow generated from the welding process (with temperature exceeding 1000°C) is monitored by the IR camera. For post-weld inspection, a novel auxiliary heating device is applied to locally heat the weld region, resulting in temperature changes on the order of 10°C, and the transmitted heat flow is monitored. Unlike the conventional IR NDE method that requires surface coating to reduce the influence of unknown emissivity, the new method can be applied on as-is bare metal surface thanks to the unique "thermal signatures" extracted from infrared thermal images, which positively correlates to weld quality with a high degree of confidence. The new method can be used to reliably detect weld size, surface indents and defects such as cold weld with sufficient accuracy for welds made from various combinations of materials, thickness, stack-up configuration, surface coating conditions and welding conditions.

  3. Characterization of the Multi-Pass Weld Metal and the Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Its Microstructure and Toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuelin; Shang, Chengjia; Wang, Xuemin

    In multi-pass welding process, various thermal cycle of both weld metal (WM) and heat affected zone (HAZ) will be subjected several times. This will make the initial microstructure occur an irreversible transformation. As the transformed microstructure become extremely complex, the mechanical properties, especially the low temperature toughness are very much fluctuant. In this research, the microstructure and low temperature toughness of WM obtained from a real multi-pass weld joint (up to 55 mm) by submerged arc welding have been elaborated. The results indicated that the necklace-type coarse martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent formed in interlayer heat affected zone (IHAZ) of WM and the impact energy of WM at -40 °C was only 39 J. Furthermore, by conventional tempering with holding time of 30 min, the toughness of WM can't be effectively improved. However, by a new developed heat treatment process, the toughness of WM could be significantly improved, and it is believed to be caused by the composition of weld metal and the post-welding heat treatment process. It also shows that the decomposition of M-A constituent and formation of the retained austenite are the mechanism of the improvement of low temperature toughness.

  4. The influence of manual metal arc multiple repair welding of long operated waterwall on the structure and hardness of the heat affected zone of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikuła J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Welded installations failures of power plants, which are often result from a high degree of wear, requires suitable repairs. In the case of cracks formed in the weld bead of waterwall, weld bead is removed and new welded joint is prepared. However, it is associated with consecutive thermal cycles, which affect properties of heat affected zone of welded joint. This study presents the influence of multiple manual metal arc welding associated with repair activities of long operated waterwall of boiler steel on properties of repair welded joints. The work contains the results of macro and microscopic metallographic examination as well as the results of hardness measurements.

  5. Analysis of welding distortion due to narrow-gap welding of upper port plug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Pankaj, E-mail: panu012@yahoo.co.i [Department of Ocean Engineering and Naval Architecture, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Pin 721302 (India); Mandal, N.R., E-mail: nrm@naval.iitkgp.ernet.i [Department of Ocean Engineering and Naval Architecture, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Pin 721302 (India); Vasu, Parameswaran, E-mail: parameswaran.vasu@iter-india.or [ITER-India, Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad (India); Padasalag, Shrishail B., E-mail: subhasis.panja@iter-india.or [ITER-India, Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad (India)

    2010-08-15

    Narrow-gap welding is a low distortion welding process. This process allows very thick plates to be joined using fewer weld passes as compared to conventional V-groove or double V-groove welding. In case of narrow-gap arc welding as the heat input and weld volume is low, it reduces thermal stress leading to reduction of both residual stress and distortion. In this present study the effect of narrow-gap welding was studied on fabrication of a scaled down port plug in the form of a trapezoidal box made of 10 mm thick mild steel (MS) plates using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Inherent strain method was used for numerical prediction of resulting distortions. The numerical results compared well with that of the experimentally measured distortion. The validated numerical scheme was used for prediction of weld induced distortion due to narrow-gap welding of full scale upper port plug made of 60 mm thick SS316LN material as is proposed for use in ITER project. It was observed that it is feasible to fabricate the said port plug keeping the distortions minimum within about 7 mm using GTAW for root pass welding followed by SMAW for filler runs.

  6. Solar Thermal AIR Collector Based on New Type Selective Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musiy, R.Y; Midyana, G.G; Makitra, R.G; Vasyutin, J.M; Khovanets, G.I; Zaborowskiy, A.B

    2014-01-01

    Based on the best for optical performance and selective coating solar thermal air collector, which operates by solar power on the principle of simultaneous ventilation and heating facilities, is designed...

  7. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  8. effects of metal inert gas welding parameters on some mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    MIG) welding parameters on the mechanical properties (hardness, tensile and impact) of type 304 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) immersed in 0.5M hydrochloric acid at ambient temperature. The MIG welding was applied to 3mm thick ASS.

  9. EFFECTS OF METAL INERT GAS WELDING PARAMETERS ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MIG) welding parameters on the mechanical properties (hardness, tensile and impact) of type 304 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) immersed in 0.5M hydrochloric acid at ambient temperature. The MIG welding was applied to 3mm thick ASS.

  10. INFLUENCE OF THERMAL BARRIER TYPE CERAMIC LAYER’S CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND QUICK THERMAL SCHOCK ON THEIR POROSITY AND ADHERENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Ciofu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents several types of thermal barrier type ceramic layers and the variations concerningtheir porosity and adherence related with their chemical composition. The structural and compositionalcharacterization of the obtained layers was performed by electron microscopy, one of the most relevantinvestigation methods in order to choose the optimum composition for the external layer deposited on copperdevices. The effect of quick thermal shock on the samples porosity and on chemical elements distribution alongthe layer’s thickness was also taken into account.

  11. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  12. Experimental and simulation study on the microstructure of TA15 titanium alloy laser beam welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Peng, Qingyu; Wei, Yanhong; Ou, Wenmin

    2017-09-01

    Laser beam welding technique offers obvious advantages over other fusion welding processes in terms of joining titanium alloy. The microstructure of welded seam and heat affected zone resulted from diverse welding speeds and laser powers were investigated after simulating welding heat treatment. The analysis of the thermal transport properties successfully explained the morphology. Optimal process parameters were obtained. The simulation results were consistent with the corresponding experimental observations.

  13. Effects of high thermal neutron fluences on Type 6061 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Farrell, K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The control rod drive follower tubes of the High Flux Beam Reactor are contructed from precipitation-hardened 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and they operate in the high thermal neutron flux regions of the core. It is shown that large thermal neutron fluences up to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} at 333K cause large increases in tensile strength and relatively modest decreases in tensile elongation while significantly reducing the notch impact toughness at room temperature. These changes are attributed to the development of a fine distribution of precipitates of amorphous silicon of which about 8% is produced radiogenically. A proposed role of thermal-to-fast flux ratio is discussed.

  14. Effects of high thermal neutron fluences on Type 6061 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Farrell, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-09-01

    The control rod drive follower tubes of the High Flux Beam Reactor are contructed from precipitation-hardened 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and they operate in the high thermal neutron flux regions of the core. It is shown that large thermal neutron fluences up to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} at 333K cause large increases in tensile strength and relatively modest decreases in tensile elongation while significantly reducing the notch impact toughness at room temperature. These changes are attributed to the development of a fine distribution of precipitates of amorphous silicon of which about 8% is produced radiogenically. A proposed role of thermal-to-fast flux ratio is discussed.

  15. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  17. Influence of welding parameter on texture distribution and plastic deformation behavior of as-rolled AZ31 Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Renlong, E-mail: rlxin@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); Liu, Dejia; Shu, Xiaogang; Li, Bo; Yang, Xiaofang; Liu, Qing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has promising application potential for Mg alloys. However, softening was frequently occurred in FSW Mg joints because of the presence of a β-type fiber texture. The present study aims to understand the influence of texture distribution in stir zone (SZ) on deformation behavior and joint strength of FSW Mg welds. AZ31 Mg alloy joints were obtained by FSW with two sets of welding speed and rotation rate. Detailed microstructure and texture evolutions were examined on Mg welds by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that the changes of welding parameters can affect texture distribution and the characteristic of texture in the transition region between SZ and thermal-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ). As a consequence, the activation ability of basal slip and extension twinning was changed, which therefore influenced joint strength, inhomogeneous plastic deformation and fracture behaviors. The present work provided some insights into understanding the texture–property relationship in FSW Mg welds and indicated that it is effective to tailor the joint performance by texture control. - Highlights: • Welding parameters largely affect the inclination angle of SZ/TMAZ boundary. • Fracture morphology is associated with the characteristic of SZ/TMAZ boundary. • The characteristic of plastic deformation is explained from the activation of basal slip.

  18. New welding information system on the internet (Prediction of the properties of weld heat-affected zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fujita

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available To promote continuous transfer and development of welding technology, a new system for predicting the microstructures and mechanical properties of welded joins has been built on the Internet. It combines a database system containing continuous cooling transformation diagrams (CCT diagrams for welding and an expert system for computing weld thermal histories. In addition, this system employs a technique which was invented during the development of another distributed database system called "Data-Free-Way" , which was designed to contain information advanced nuclear materials and materials obtained from other programs of welding research at NIMS in the past. This paper describes the current state of our new system for computing weld thermal histories to predict the properties of welded joints using the CCT diagrams database, which is now available on the Internet. Some problems encountered with the database used in such a system are also referred to.

  19. Calorimetric and spectroscopic investigations of the thermal denaturation of wild type nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stirpe, A; Guzzi, R; Wijma, H; Verbeet, MP; Canters, GW; Sportelli, L

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) is a multicopper protein, with a trimeric structure containing two types of copper site: type I is present in each subunit whereas type 2 is localized at the subunits interface. The paper reports on the thermal behaviour of wild type NiR from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6. The

  20. Solar Thermal AIR Collector Based on New Type Selective Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musiy, R.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the best for optical performance and selective coating solar thermal air collector, which operates by solar power on the principle of simultaneous ventilation and heating facilities, is designed. It can be used for vacation homes, museums, wooden churches, warehouses, garages, houses, greenhouses etc.

  1. DEFORMATION INFLUENCE ON A LIFETIME OF WELDING ELECTRODE TIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Viňáš

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the influence of welding electrode tips deformation on their lifetime. The influence of material properties, production technology and the intensity of welding electrodes load on their lifetime are presented. The electrode tips of the most used type of CuCr1Zr alloy of three basic standard shapes before and after the process of welding are evaluated. The process of welding is realized with low, middle and maximum welding parameters on programmable pneumatic spot welding machine VTS BPK 20. The influence of welding parameters on chosen material characteristics of welding tips is observed. Through the use of upsetting test, dependency of forming strength and deformation of material on used technology of welding tip production is observed.

  2. Gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding of ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel: Microstructural and mechanical behavior characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, S., E-mail: s.sabooni@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ngan, A.H.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Jabbari, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In the present study, an ultrafine grained (UFG) AISI 304L stainless steel with the average grain size of 650 nm was successfully welded by both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW). GTAW was applied without any filler metal. FSW was also performed at a constant rotational speed of 630 rpm and different welding speeds from 20 to 80 mm/min. Microstructural characterization was carried out by High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) with Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation, microhardness measurements and tensile tests were also performed to study the mechanical properties of the base metal and weldments. The results showed that the solidification mode in the GTAW welded sample is FA (ferrite–austenite) type with the microstructure consisting of an austenite matrix embedded with lath type and skeletal type ferrite. The nugget zone microstructure in the FSW welded samples consisted of equiaxed dynamically recrystallized austenite grains with some amount of elongated delta ferrite. Sigma phase precipitates were formed in the region ahead the rotating tool during the heating cycle of FSW, which were finally fragmented into nanometric particles and distributed in the weld nugget. Also there is a high possibility that the existing delta ferrite in the microstructure rapidly transforms into sigma phase particles during the short thermal cycle of FSW. These suggest that high strain and deformation during FSW can promote sigma phase formation. The final austenite grain size in the nugget zone was found to decrease with increasing Zener–Hollomon parameter, which was obtained quantitatively by measuring the peak temperature, calculating the strain rate during FSW and exact examination of hot deformation activation energy by considering the actual grain size before the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. Mechanical properties observations showed that the welding

  3. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of a Single-Pass Weld Overlay and Girth Welding in Lined Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Obeid; Alfano, Giulio; Bahai, Hamid

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a nonlinear heat-transfer and mechanical finite-element (FE) analyses of a two-pass welding process of two segments of lined pipe made of a SUS304 stainless steel liner and a C-Mn steel pipe. The two passes consist of the single-pass overlay welding (inner lap weld) of the liner with the C-Mn steel pipe for each segment and the single-pass girth welding (outer butt weld) of the two segments. A distributed power density of the moving welding torch and a nonlinear heat-transfer coefficient accounting for both radiation and convection have been used in the analysis and implemented in user subroutines for the FE code ABAQUS. The modeling procedure has been validated against previously published experimental results for stainless steel and carbon steel welding separately. The model has been then used to determine the isotherms induced by the weld overlay and the girth welding and to clarify their influence on the transient temperature field and residual stress in the lined pipe. Furthermore, the influence of the cooling time between weld overlay and girth welding and of the welding speed have been examined thermally and mechanically as they are key factors that can affect the quality of lined pipe welding.

  4. A review of welding radiation and associated protection measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenkate, T.

    1996-10-01

    Welding processes emit electromagnetic radiation that poses risk to the eyes and skin of workers. This paper reviews the health effects associated with exposure to welding radiation, the types of radiation emitted and the factors that influence the radiation emission. Studies on personal ultraviolet radiation levels of workers exposed to welding are reviewed, and engineering and personal protective measures that limit welding radiation are discussed. These measures include the design of the work area, and the use of semi-transparent welding curtains, protective clothing, safety spectacles and welding helmets. 41 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  5. Laser welding of polypropylene using two different sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Brabazon, Dermot; McCarthy, Éanna; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla; Ahad, Inam Ul

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, laser weldability of neutral polypropylene has been investigated using fibre and carbon dioxide lasers. A design of experiment (DoE) was conducted in order to establish the influence of the main working parameters on the welding strength of the two types of laser. The welded samples were characterized by carrying out visual and microscopic inspection for the welding morphology and cross-section, and by distinguishing the tensile strength. The resulting weld quality was investigated by means of optical microscopy at weld cross-sections. The tensile strength of butt-welded materials was measured and compared to that of a corresponding bulk material.

  6. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless-Steel Pipes Welded by TIG Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Albdiry

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel (type 204 pipes welded by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG welding process. Testing of hardness (HRC, tensile strength and bending strength was performed for the steel pipes welded at two different welding temperatures (700 °C and 900 °C with and without using the weld filler wire. The microstructure of the welding regions was examined by using an optical microscopy. The properties showed that the steel pipes welded by 900 °C with using the weld filler obtained the highest tensile strength and bending strength versus these welded by 700 °C without the use of the weld filler. This is attributed to the weld filler heated and melt at sufficient temperature (900 °C and compensate losing in the Ni metal occurred in the base steel metal during the welding process.

  7. Energetic peculiarities of metal heating under laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oparin, M.I.; Nikiforov, G.D.; Fedorov, S.A. (Moskovskij Aviatsionnyj Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1981-07-01

    A connection between the energy and thermal parameters of the welding process of laser welding is studied. It is established that the connection between energy and thermal parameters of laser welding regime is carried out through the coefficient of metal absorption. Experimental determination of absorption coefficients of various metals (aluminium alloys, copper, 12Kh18N10T steel, St 3 steel, 0T4 titanium alloy, VN2 niobium alloy) has permitted to develope the methodics of approximated thermal calculations and to built up a nomogram for determining parameters of lazer welding regime. Limits of the thickness of welded sheets of the above materials in dependence on the welding speed are determined according to the nomogram.

  8. Modelling of the temperature field that accompanies friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosal Przemysław

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal modelling of the Friction Stir Welding process allows for better recognition and understanding of phenomena occurring during the joining process of different materials. It is of particular importance considering the possibilities of process technology parameters, optimization and the mechanical properties of the joint. This work demonstrates the numerical modelling of temperature distribution accompanying the process of friction stir welding. The axisymmetric problem described by Fourier’s type equation with internal heat source is considered. In order to solve the diffusive initial value problem a fully implicit scheme of the finite difference method is applied. The example under consideration deals with the friction stir welding of a plate (0.7 cm thick made of Al 6082-T6 by use of a tool made of tungsten alloy, whereas the material subjected to welding was TiC powder. Obtained results confirm both quantitatively and qualitatively experimental observations that the superior temperature corresponds to the zone where the pin joints the shoulder.

  9. The optimization of welding regime parameters at shielded metal arc welding (SMAW by mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Petrescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The realized researches followed the determining of mathematical models that allow the optimization of the welding process in order to obtain welded joints with certain values of the mechanical characteristics. Thus, there were established mathematical models of dependence of mechanical characteristics of welded joints (Rm, Rp02, Z, A, KCV 20°C of each parameter of welding regime (Iw, Uw, and also, mathematical models that offer cumulative dependence of mechanical characteristics of both parameters of welding regime.The researches have been carried out using steel E 36-4 as base material and as filler material basic electrodes, type E7018 and the applied welding procedure was the process: shielded metal arc welding (SMAW.

  10. Models for selecting GMA Welding Parameters for Improving Mechanical Properties of Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, P.; Ramachandran, Pragash; Jebaraj, S.

    2016-02-01

    During the process of Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) welding, the weld joints mechanical properties are influenced by the welding parameters such as welding current and arc voltage. These parameters directly will influence the quality of the weld in terms of mechanical properties. Even small variation in any of the cited parameters may have an important effect on depth of penetration and on joint strength. In this study, S45C Constructional Steel is taken as the base metal to be tested using the parameters wire feed rate, voltage and type of shielding gas. Physical properties considered in the present study are tensile strength and hardness. The testing of weld specimen is carried out as per ASTM Standards. Mathematical models to predict the tensile strength and depth of penetration of weld joint have been developed by regression analysis using the experimental results.

  11. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Le Barbier, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Määttä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  12. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat...... generation and local material deformation (often referred to as flow) during the welding process itself. ii) Prediction of the residual stresses that will be present in the joint structure post to welding. While the former in general will call for a fully-coupled thermomechanical procedure, however...... for the FSW process at hand, the heat generation must either be prescribed analytically or based on a fully coupled analysis of the welding process itself. Along this line, a recently proposed thermal-pseudo-mechanical model is presented in which the temperature dependent yield stress of the weld material...

  13. Analysis of the Corrosion Behavior of an A-TIG Welded SS 409 Weld Fusion Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.

    2017-11-01

    AISI 409 (SS 409) ferritic stainless steel is generally used as the thick gauge section in freight train wagons, in ocean containers, and in sugar refinery equipment. Activating the flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding process can reduce the welding cost during fabrication of thick sections. However, corrosion behavior of the A-TIG weld fusion zone is a prime concern for this type of steel. In the present work, the effect of the A-TIG welding process parameters on the corrosion behavior of a weld fusion zone made of 8-mm-thick AISI 409 ferritic stainless-steel plate has been analyzed. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion behavior. The maximum corrosion potential ( E corr) was shown by the weld made using a welding current of 215 A, a welding speed of 95 mm/min, and a flux coating density of 0.81 mg/cm2. The minimum E corr was observed in the weld made using a welding current of 190 A, a welding speed of 120 mm/min, and a flux coating density of 1.40 mg/cm2. The current study also presents the inclusive microstructure-corrosion property relationships using the collective techniques of scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction.

  14. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  15. GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) process development for girth welding of high strength pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Vaidyanath; Daniel, Joe; Quintana, Marie [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yaoshan [Center for Reliable Energy Systems (CRES), Dublin, OH (United States); Souza, Antonio [Lincoln Electric do Brasil, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and findings from the first phase of a consolidated program co-funded by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and Pipeline Research Council Inc (PRCI) to develop pipe weld assessment and qualification methods and optimize X 100 pipe welding technologies. One objective of the program is to establish the range of viable welding options for X 100 line pipe, and define the essential variables to provide welding process control for reliable and consistent mechanical performance of the weldments. In this first phase, a series of narrow gap girth welds were made with pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW), instrumented with thermocouples in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal to obtain the associated thermal profiles, and instrumented to measure true energy input as opposed to conventional heat input. Results reveal that true heat input is 16%-22% higher than conventional heat input. The thermal profile measurements correlate very well with thermal model predictions using true energy input data, which indicates the viability of treating the latter as an essential variable. Ongoing microstructural and mechanical testing work will enable validation of an integrated thermal-microstructural model being developed for these applications. Outputs from this model will be used to correlate essential welding process variables with weld microstructure and hardness. This will ultimately enable development of a list of essential variables and the ranges needed to ensure mechanical properties are achieved in practice, recommendations for controlling and monitoring these essential variables and test methods suitable for classification of welding consumables. (author)

  16. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mitiaev

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of ark welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc welding by the electrode with a diameter of 3 mm of AK-5 alloy. Metal structure of the welded joint was examined under the light microscope at a magnification of 200 and under the scanning electronic microscope «JSM-6360 LA». The Rockwell hardness (HRF was used as a strength characteristic of alloy. Hardness measuring of the phase constituents (microhardness was carried out using the device PМТ-3, with the indenter loadings 5 and 10 g. The crystalline structure parameters of alloy (dislocation density, second kind of the crystalline grid distortion and the scale of coherent scattering regions were determined using the methods of X-ray structural analysis. Electric pulse treatment (ET was carried out on the special equipment in the conditions of the DS enterprise using two modes A and В. Findings. On the basis of researches the previously obtained microhardness redistribution effect in the area of welded connection after ET was confirmed. As a result of use of the indicated treatment it was determined not only the reduction of microhardness gradient but also the simultaneous hardening effect in the certain thermal affected areas near the welding seam. During study of chemical composition of phase constituents it was discovered, that the structural changes of alloy as a result of ET first of all are caused by the redistribution of chemical elements, which form the connections themselves. By the nature of the influence the indicated treatment can be

  17. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  18. Possibilities of using welding-on technologies in crane wheel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The paper deals with analysis of welds-on quality of traverse crane wheels made from gr. 90–60 mate- rial, ASTM A148. Three types of welding-on technology with various filling materials were used. On wheel after wearing was welded-on one interlayer by a combination of additional materials, wire A 106 with F 11 ...

  19. Determination of optimum welding parameters in connecting high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    performance. The most suitable method of joining two different alloyed steel is welding (Anık 1983). After welding process, the properties of welding zone naturally become different from the properties of alloyed steels ... diesel engines are manufactured from two different types of steels. The 'handling' parts of exhaust valves ...

  20. Real Time Ultrasonic Aluminum SPOT Weld Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, W. Pérez; Chertov, A. M.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2010-02-01

    Aluminum alloys pose several properties that make them one of the most popular engineering materials: they have excellent corrosion resistance, and high weight-to-strength ratio. Resistance spot welding of aluminum alloys is widely used today but oxide film and aluminum thermal and electrical properties make spot welding a difficult task. Electrode degradation due to pitting, alloying and mushrooming decreases the weld quality and adjustment of parameters like current and force is required. To realize these adjustments and ensure weld quality, a tool to measure weld quality in real time is required. In this paper, a real time ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation system for aluminum spot welds is presented. The system is able to monitor nugget growth while the spot weld is being made. This is achieved by interpreting the echoes of an ultrasound transducer located in one of the welding electrodes. The transducer receives and transmits an ultrasound signal at different times during the welding cycle. Valuable information of the weld quality is embedded in this signal. The system is able to determine the weld nugget diameter by measuring the delays of the ultrasound signals received during the complete welding cycle. The article presents the system performance on aluminum alloy AA6022.

  1. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  2. Thermal conductivity of rare earth-uranium ternary oxides of the type RE 6UO 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaiah, M. V.; Seenivasan, G.; Srirama Murti, P.; Mathews, C. K.

    2002-11-01

    The knowledge of thermophysical properties of the rare earth uranium ternary oxides of the type RE 6UO 12 (RE=La, Gd and Dy) is essential to understand the fuel performance during reactor operation and for modeling fuel behavior. Literature on the high temperature properties of this compound is not available and there is no report at all on the thermal conductivity of these compounds. Hence a study of thermal conductivity of this compound has been taken up. The compounds were synthesized by a solution combustion method using metal nitrates and urea. Thermal diffusivity of these compounds was measured by the laser flash method in the temperature range 673-1373 K. The specific heat data was computed using Neumann-Kopp's law. Thermal conductivity was calculated using the measured thermal diffusivity value, density and specific heat data for different temperatures. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity and the implication of structural aspects of these compounds on the data are discussed here.

  3. Effect of Submerged Arc Welding Parameters on the Microstructure of SA516 and A709 Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanie, James

    The effects of submerged arc welding (SAW) current and speed on the microstructures of SA516 grade 70 and A709 grade 50 steel welds were studied in this research. Steel plates 17 mm-thick were submerged arc welded using different welding currents (from 700 to 850 A) and welding speeds (from 5.3 to 15.3 mm/s). The effect of heat input on the weld metal chemistry, morphologies and chemistry of inclusions and nucleation of acicular ferrite (AF), grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) were evaluated. Optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the microstructures of the developed weld joints. PAX-it image analysis software program was utilized for quantitative analysis of the microstructures. The results showed that it is difficult to ascribe changes in the microstructure that occurred in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal regions to a single welding process parameter. Inclusion analysis revealed two types of inclusions formed in the weld metals for both steels. They are spherical and faceted inclusions. It was also observed that acicular ferrite nucleated only on the spherical inclusions. EDS analysis showed that the two inclusions have different chemical compositions. The results further showed that the total oxygen content of the weld metals of both steels generally increased with welding current, but decreased with increasing welding speed. The prior austenite grain width decreased with increasing welding speed, but increased with increasing welding current (increased heat input). For both SA516 and A709 steel welds, the proportion of acicular ferrite (AF) in the weld metals increased initially, while those of grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) decreased with increasing welding current when welding current was increased from 700 A to 800 A. With further increase in the

  4. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  5. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  6. Critical Assessment of Temperature Distribution in Submerged Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Negi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature distribution during any welding process holds the key for understanding and predicting several important welding attributes like heat affected zone, microstructure of the weld, residual stress, and distortion during welding. The accuracy of the analytical approaches for modeling temperature distribution during welding has been constrained by oversimplified assumptions regarding boundary conditions and material properties. In this paper, an attempt has been made to model the temperature distribution during submerged arc welding process using finite element modeling technique implemented in ANSYS v12. In the present analysis, heat source is assumed to be double-ellipsoidal with Gaussian volumetric heat generation. Furthermore, variation of material properties with temperature and both convective and radiant heat loss boundary condition have been considered. The predicted temperature distribution is then validated against the experimental results obtained by thermal imaging of the welded plate, and they are found to be in a good agreement.

  7. Optical investigations on thermal conductivity in n- and p-type porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettieri, S.; Bernini, U.; Maddalena, P. [Coherentia-INFM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Complesso Universitario di M. S. Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Massera, E. [CR-ENEA Portici, Loc. Granatello, Portici (Italy)

    2005-06-01

    Determination of thermal conductivity of top side illuminated n-type and p-type porous silicon (PS) samples have been performed by means of photo-acoustic and optical pump-probe techniques. Concerning the n-type samples, the values found can be explained in the framework of Looyenga effective medium theory, leading to a thermal conductivity of the solid phase of 13 W/mK. This result suggests that n-type thick PS samples formed by top side illumination has a complex multilayer morphology in which mesophases, nanophases and macrophases coexist. The investigation on p-type nanoporous silicon shows that the thermal conductivity does not scale with porosity p as (1-p){sup 3}, suggesting that the percolation of the solid phase is more pronounced respect to the case of a regular ''Looyoenga-like'' mesophase. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. 46 CFR 2.75-70 - Welding procedure and performance qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedure and performance qualifications. 2.75... for Construction Personnel § 2.75-70 Welding procedure and performance qualifications. (a) Welding... requirements for the welding of pressure piping, boilers, pressure vessels, and nonpressure vessel type tanks...

  9. Training Materials Sourcebook. Welding, Brazing, and Flame-Cutting. Voc./Tec. Resources Series Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Commission of Employment and Immigration, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Second in a resource series (see note), this annotated bibliography provides detailed information on training curriculum and instructional materials for welding, brazing, and flame-cutting. The materials are divided into thirty-fie sections by topic and type. Specific topic areas include gas and arc welding; arc welding; oxyacetylene welding and…

  10. An Approach to Maximize Weld Penetration During TIG Welding of P91 Steel Plates by Utilizing Image Processing and Taguchi Orthogonal Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Debnath, Tapas; Dey, Vidyut; Rai, Ram Naresh

    2017-10-01

    P-91 is modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Fabricated structures and components of P-91 has a lot of application in power and chemical industry owing to its excellent properties like high temperature stress corrosion resistance, less susceptibility to thermal fatigue at high operating temperatures. The weld quality and surface finish of fabricated structure of P91 is very good when welded by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG). However, the process has its limitation regarding weld penetration. The success of a welding process lies in fabricating with such a combination of parameters that gives maximum weld penetration and minimum weld width. To carry out an investigation on the effect of the autogenous TIG welding parameters on weld penetration and weld width, bead-on-plate welds were carried on P91 plates of thickness 6 mm in accordance to a Taguchi L9 design. Welding current, welding speed and gas flow rate were the three control variables in the investigation. After autogenous (TIG) welding, the dimension of the weld width, weld penetration and weld area were successfully measured by an image analysis technique developed for the study. The maximum error for the measured dimensions of the weld width, penetration and area with the developed image analysis technique was only 2 % compared to the measurements of Leica-Q-Win-V3 software installed in optical microscope. The measurements with the developed software, unlike the measurements under a microscope, required least human intervention. An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) confirms the significance of the selected parameters. Thereafter, Taguchi's method was successfully used to trade-off between maximum penetration and minimum weld width while keeping the weld area at a minimum.

  11. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  12. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  13. Hardness variation of welded boron steel using continuous wave (CW) and pulse wave (PW) mode of fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, K. I.; Ishak, M.; Idris, S. R. A.; Aiman, M. H.; Khalil, N. Z.

    2017-09-01

    Recent car manufacturer requirement in lightweight and optimum safety lead to utilization of boron steel with tailor welded blank approach. Laser welding process in tailor welded blank (TWB) production can be applied in continuous wave (CW) of pulse wave (PW) which produce different thermal experience in welded area. Instead of microstructure identification, hardness properties also can determine the behavior of weld area. In this paper, hardness variation of welded boron steel using PW and CW mode is investigated. Welding process is conducted using similar average power for both welding mode. Hardness variation across weld area is observed. The result shows similar hardness pattern across weld area for both welding mode. Hardness degradation at fusion zone (FZ) is due to ferrite formation existence from high heat input applied. With additional slower cooling rate for CW mode, the hardness degradation is become obvious. The normal variation of hardness behavior with PW mode might lead to good strength.

  14. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  15. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  16. Comparing the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Welds on Ductile Cast Iron (700 MPa under Different Heat Treatment Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny M. Gouveia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The weldability of ductile iron, as widely known, is relatively poor, essentially due to its typical carbon equivalent value. The present study was developed surrounding the heat treatability of welded joints made with a high strength ductile cast iron detaining an ultimate tensile strength of 700 MPa, and aims to determine which heat treatment procedures promote the best results, in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. These types of alloys are suitable for the automotive industry, as they allow engineers to reduce the thickness of parts while maintaining mechanical strength, decreasing the global weight of vehicles and providing a path for more sustainable development. The results allow us to conclude that heat treatment methodology has a large impact on the mechanical properties of welded joints created from the study material. However, the thermal cycles suffered during welding promote the formation of ledeburite areas near the weld joint. This situation could possibly be dealt through the implementation of post-welding heat treatments (PWHT with specific parameters. In contrast to a ductile cast iron tested in a previous work, the bull-eye ductile cast iron with 700 MPa ultimate tensile strength presented better results during the post-welding heat treatment than during preheating.

  17. Assessment of delta ferrite in multipass TIG welds of 40 mm thick SS 316L: A comparative study of ferrite number (FN) prediction and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Raole, P. M.; Sarkar, B.

    2017-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the fabrication of fusion reactor major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, cryostat and other structural components development. Multipass welding is used for the development of thick plates for the structural components fabrication. Due to the repeated weld thermal cycles, the microstructure adversely alters owing to the presence of complex phases like austenite, ferrite and delta ferrite and subsequently influences the mechanical properties like tensile and impact toughness of joints. The present paper reports the detail analysis of delta ferrite phase in welded region of 40 mm thick SS316L plates welded by special design multipass narrow groove TIG welding process under three different heat input conditions. The correlation of delta ferrite microstructure of different type structures acicular and vermicular is observed. The chemical composition of weld samples was used to predict the Ferrite Number (FN), which is representative form of delta ferrite in welds, with Schaeffler’s, WRC-1992 diagram and DeLong techniques by calculating the Creq and Nieq ratios and compared with experimental data of FN from Feritescope measurements. The low heat input conditions (1.67 kJ/mm) have produced higher FN (7.28), medium heat input (1.72 kJ/mm) shown FN (7.04) where as high heat input (1.87 kJ/mm) conditions has shown FN (6.68) decreasing trend and FN data is compared with the prediction methods.

  18. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II: Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Woong Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO2 laser welding. Kim et al. (2013 proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  19. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II : Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jae Woong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO₂laser welding. Kim et al. (2013 proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  20. The Effect of Welding-Pass Grouping on the Prediction Accuracy of Residual Stress in Multipass Butt Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongung Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The residual stress analysis of a thick welded structure requires a lot of time and computer memory, which are different from those in thin welded structure analysis. This study investigated the effect of residual stress due to welding-pass grouping as a way to reduce the analysis time in multipass thick butt welding joint. For this purpose, the parametric analysis which changes the number of grouping passes was conducted in the multipass butt weld of a structure with a thickness of 25 mm and 70 mm. In addition, the residual stress by thermal elastoplastic FE analysis is compared with the results by the neutron diffraction method for verifying the reliability of the FE analysis. The welding sequence is considered in order to predict the residual stress more accurately when using welding-pass grouping method. The results of the welding-pass grouping model and half model occurred between the results of the left/right of the full model. If the total number of welding-pass grouping is less than half of that of welding pass, a large difference with real residual stress is found. Therefore, the total number of the welding-pass grouping should not be reduced to more than half.

  1. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, the vorticity of melt motion in the keyhole and weld pool has been evaluated in case of high power CO2 laser beam welding. The circulation of vorticity is obtained as a function of Reynolds number for a given keyhole volume which is linked to Mach number variation. The shear stress and thermal fluxes ...

  2. Finite element simulation of laser transmission welding of dissimilar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Now-a-days, metal to plastic micro-welding is of great interest in the field of biomedical and electronics applications. Laser transmission welding (LTW) has emerged as the most suitable technique for such applications. In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) thermal model is developed to simulate the laser ...

  3. Laser micro welding of copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mys, Ihor; Schmidt, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Aluminum combines comparably good thermal and electrical properties with a low price and a low material weight. These properties make aluminum a promising alternative to copper for a large number of electronic applications, especially when manufacturing high volume components. However, a main obstacle for a wide use of this material is the lack of a reliable joining process for the interconnection of copper and aluminum. The reasons for this are a large misalignment in the physical properties and even more a poor metallurgical affinity of both materials that cause high crack sensitivity and the formation of brittle intermetallic phases during fusion welding. This paper presents investigations on laser micro welding of copper and aluminum with the objective to eliminate brittle intermetallic phases in the welding structure. For these purposes a combination of spot welding, a proper beam offset and special filler material are applied. The effect of silver, nickel and tin filler materials in the form of thin foils and coatings in a thickness range 3-100 μm has been investigated. Use of silver and tin filler materials yields to a considerable improvement of the static and dynamic mechanical stability of welded joints. The analysis of the weld microstructure shows that an application even of small amounts of suitable filler materials helps to avoid critical, very brittle intermetallic phases on the interface between copper and solidified melt in the welded joints.

  4. Development of laser beam welding transverse-varestraint test for assessment of solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Eun-Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds of type 310S stainless steel, a transverse-Varestraint testing system using a laser beam welding apparatus was newly constructed. The timing-synchronization between the laser oscillator, welding robot and hydraulic pressure devices was established by employing high-speed camera observations together with electrical signal control among the three components. Moreover, the yoke-drop time measured by the camera was used to prevent underestimation of the crack length. The laser beam melt-run welding used a variable welding speed from 10.0 to 40.0 mm/s, while the gas tungsten arc welding varied the welding speed from 1.67 to 5.00 mm/s. As the welding speed increased from 1.67 to 40.0mm/s, the solidification brittle temperature range of type 310S stainless steel welds was reduced from 146 to 120 K. It follows that employing the laser beam welding process mitigates the solidification cracking susceptibility for type 310S stainless steel welds.

  5. Review of techniques for on-line monitoring and inspection of laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, J.; Yan, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Laser welding has been applied to various industries, in particular, automotive, aerospace and microelectronics. However, traditional off-line testing of the welds is costly and inefficient. Therefore, on-line inspection systems with low cost have being developed to increase productivity and maintain high welding quality. This paper presents the applications of acoustic, optical, visual, thermal and ultrasonic techniques and latest development of laser welding monitoring. The advantages and limitations of these techniques are also discussed.

  6. Quantification of Microtexture at Weld Nugget of Friction Stir-Welded Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Md M.; Sarkar, R.; Pal, T. K.; Ghosh, M.; Prabhu, N.

    2017-05-01

    Friction stir welding of C-Mn steel was carried out under 800-1400 rpm tool rotation. Tool traversing speed of 50 mm/min remained same for all joints. Effect of thermal state and deformation on texture and microstructure at weld nugget was investigated. Weld nugget consisted of ferrite + bainite/Widmanstatten ferrite with different matrix grain sizes depending on peak temperature. A texture around ( ϕ 2 = 0°, φ = 30°, ϕ 2 = 45°) was developed at weld nugget. Grain boundary misorientation at weld nugget indicated that continuous dynamic recrystallization influenced the development of fine equiaxed grain structure. Pole figures and orientation distribution function were used to determine crystallographic texture at weld nugget and base metal. Shear texture components D1, D2 and F were present at weld nugget. D1 shear texture was more prominent among all. Large number of high-angle grain boundaries ( 60-70%) was observed at weld nugget and was the resultant of accumulation of high amount of dislocation, followed by subgrain formation.

  7. Influence of the welding parameters on the heat affected zone for aluminium welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meseguer-Valdenebro José L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the Heat Affected Zone in an aluminum alloy welded assembly using the Metal Inert Gas welding technique. Making use of numerical simulations of the involved thermal processes, the aluminum alloy cooling curve is calculated and the extension of the Heat Affected Zone is evaluated. The connection between this last parameter, the cooling rate, and the maximum obtained temperature is assessed. Additionally, the response surface method is exploited to fit the dependence of the Heat Affected Zone with the welding parameters and to optimize these parameters in order to minimize that region.

  8. Exploring the thermal expansion of fluorides and oxyfluorides with rhenium trioxide-type structures: From negative to positive thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Benjamin K.

    This thesis explores the thermal expansion and high pressure behavior of some materials with the ReO3 structure type. This structure is simple and has, in principle, all of the features necessary for negative thermal expansion (NTE) arising from the transverse thermal motion of the bridging anions and the coupled rotation of rigid units; however, ReO 3 itself only exhibits mild NTE across a narrow temperature range at low temperatures. ReO3 is metallic because of a delocalized d-electron, and this may contribute to the lack of NTE in this material. The materials examined in this thesis are all based on d 0 metal ions so that the observed thermal expansion behavior should arise from vibrational, rather than electronic, effects. In Chapter 2, the thermal expansion of scandium fluoride, ScF3 , is examined using a combination of in situ synchrotron X-ray and neutron variable temperature diffraction. ScF3 retains the cubic ReO3 structure across the entire temperature range examined (10 - 1600 K) and exhibits pronounced negative thermal expansion at low temperatures. The magnitude of NTE in this material is comparable to that of cubic ZrW2O8, which is perhaps the most widely studied NTE material, at room temperature and below. This is the first report of NTE in an ReO3 type structure across a wide temperature range. Chapter 3 presents a comparison between titanium oxyfluoride, TiOF 2, and a vacancy-containing titanium hydroxyoxyfluoride, Ti x(O/OH/F)3. TiOF2 was originally reported to adopt the cubic ReO3 structure type under ambient conditions, therefore the initial goal for this study was to examine the thermal expansion of this material and determine if it displayed interesting behavior such as NTE. During the course of the study, it was discovered that the original synthetic method resulted in Tix(O/OH/F)3, which does adopt the cubic ReO3 structure type. The chemical composition of the hydroxyoxyfluoride is highly dependent upon synthesis conditions and subsequent

  9. Hot cracking of Structural Steel during Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda Huitron, Rosa M.; Vuorinen, Esa

    2017-10-01

    Laser welding is an important technique in many industries due to its high precision in operation, its local and fast processing, narrow welds and its good weld surface quality. However, the process can involve some complications due to the rapid heating and cooling of the material processed, resulting in physical and metallurgical effects as thermal contraction during solidification, giving as a result the presence of residual stresses in the narrow weld. Formation of defects during the process is an important topic to be evaluated in order to achieve better performance of the steels in use. In the present work, defects formed during laser welding of a structural steel have been investigated. The defects formed have been identified and the causes of the defects are discussed. Possible strategies for improvement of the welding procedure and final weld result are proposed. The defects were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and hardness measurement. Cracks were located in the middle of the fusion zone and followed both inter-granular and trans-granular paths. Impurities as manganese sulphides were found along the welding direction, and could act as sites for crack formation. The cracks formed during solidification of the weld are identified as solidification cracks. This kind of cracks is usually caused by solidification shrinkage and thermal contractions during the process, which appear in the fusion zone and sometimes in the heat affected zone.

  10. Bond strength of gold alloys laser welded to cobalt-chromium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Wallace, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the joint properties between cast gold alloys and Co-Cr alloy laser-welded by Nd:YAG laser. Cast plates were fabricated from three types of gold alloys (Type IV, Type II and low-gold) and a Co-Cr alloy. Each gold alloy was laser-welded to Co-Cr using a dental laser-welding machine. Homogeneously-welded and non-welded control specimens were also prepared. Tensile testing was conducted and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The homogeneously-welded groups showed inferior fracture load compared to corresponding control groups, except for Co-Cr. In the specimens welded heterogeneously to Co-Cr, Type IV was the greatest, followed by low-gold and Type II. There was no statistical difference (Palloys tested, the Type IV gold alloy was the most suitable alloy for laser-welding to Co-Cr.

  11. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  12. Structural and Thermal Safety Analysis Report for the Type B Radioactive Waste Transport Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S

    2007-09-15

    We carried out structural safety evaluation for the type B radioactive waste transport package. Requirements for type B packages according to the related regulations such as IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1, Korea Most Act. 2001-23 and US 10 CFR Part 71 were evaluated. General requirements for packages such as those for a lifting attachment, a tie-down attachment and pressure condition were considered. For the type B radioactive waste transport package, the structural, thermal and containment analyses were carried out under the normal transport conditions. Also the safety analysis were conducted under the accidental transport conditions. The 9 m drop test, 1 m puncture test, fire test and water immersion test under the accidental transport conditions were consecutively done. The type B radioactive waste transport packages were maintained the structural and thermal integrities.

  13. Measurement of Laser Weld Temperatures for 3D Model Input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagel, Daryl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grossetete, Grant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maccallum, Danny O. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Laser welding is a key joining process used extensively in the manufacture and assembly of critical components for several weapons systems. Sandia National Laboratories advances the understanding of the laser welding process through coupled experimentation and modeling. This report summarizes the experimental portion of the research program, which focused on measuring temperatures and thermal history of laser welds on steel plates. To increase confidence in measurement accuracy, researchers utilized multiple complementary techniques to acquire temperatures during laser welding. This data serves as input to and validation of 3D laser welding models aimed at predicting microstructure and the formation of defects and their impact on weld-joint reliability, a crucial step in rapid prototyping of weapons components.

  14. An overview of the welding technologies of CLAM steels for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Huang Yuming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech. of University of Montana, Butte, MT 59701 (United States); Zhou Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 221013 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welding technologies of China Low Activation Martensitic steel is overviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most welding technologies in use are discussed and suggestions are given. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper welding technologies could ensure weld properties but more detailed work are necessary. - Abstract: China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAMs), a kind of RAFM steel with Chinese intellectual property rights, is considered as the primary structural material for the China-designed ITER test blanket module (TBM). As one of the key issues in the fabrication of the fusion reactor, the welding technologies of CLAMs are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the weldability of CLAMs by different welding methods, and on the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints. Recent highlights in research and development for the welding of CLAMs show that proper welding procedure could provide welds with adequate tensile strength but the welds exhibit lower impact toughness compared with the base metal. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and the application of ultrasonic energy during TIG welding could dramatically improve impact toughness. Research also shows that welds in CLAMs have sufficient resistance to swelling under irradiation as well as suitable compatibility with liquid LiPb. The microstructure, mechanical and other physical properties of welds are significantly different from those of the base metal due to the complicated welding thermal cycle. The weld joint is the area most likely to fail one or more of the design requirements within the fusion reactor. Therefore significant additional research is necessary to ensure safe application of welded CLAM steel for fusion reactor construction.

  15. ANALISA ELECTRODE CONSUMABLE TYPE OK AUTROD 12.10 DENGAN PENGELASAN SUBMERGED ARC WELDING (SAW PADA BLOCK KAPAL DCV 18500 DWT DI PT. JASA MARINA INDAH SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiryanto Kiryanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this of globalization is growing very rapidly advancing technology. As well as in shipyard industry is toshipbuilding process. Submerged Arch Welding (SAW is as joint methode of ship construction. Purpose ofresearch know number of electrodes wich requirement on block welding the ship DCV 18500 DWT in JasaMarina Indah Shipyard Semarang.The specimen experiment used is ST 42 low carbon steel. Variation of plates tickness is 12, 13, 14, 17, 19 and24 mm. Research step is carried out by making the specimen with variation thickness respectively. Specimendimensions length x width is 500 mm x 50 mm. The number of each specimen was made of three pieces. Thendo the measurement welding length, length and weight electrodes and slag welding.The analysis result of data welding on the specimen can be known number of electrode s and fluxs inSubmerged Arch Welding (SAW. The aplication of this research is the block DB 5(p/c/s, SS5A(p/s, SS5B(p/s, UD 5C, and TB 102 (p/c/s. Weight of consumable electrodes is 2185.31 kg (73 roll and number offlux used wight is 2967.95 kg (119 bag.

  16. Influence of energy input in friction stir welding on structure evolution and mechanical behaviour of precipitation-hardening in aluminium alloys (AA2024-T351, AA6013-T6 and Al-Mg-Sc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis Olea, Cesar Afonso [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2008-12-04

    friction stir welded joints, produced using different weld energy inputs. In addition, it is intended to establish the microstucture/properties/weld energy input relationships of the resultant joints, in order to understand the precipitates evolution and its consequences. Metallurgical characterization of the base material and welded joints was performed using optical microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical assessment was carried out using microhardness, conventional flat tensile and microflat tensile testing. Microstructural investigation of the friction stir welded joints showed similar weld zone formation (heat affected zone - HAZ, thermomechanical affected zone - TMAZ, and stir zone - SZ) for the different Al alloys, but presented specific precipitation features, according to weld zone and energy input. In the case of Al-Mg-Sc joints, Al3Sc precipitates present in the base material were very stable and the thermal cycle produced during welding was not able to significantly deteriorate the strengthening effect, as evidenced by mechanical testing. The Al-Mg-Sc joints presented, in general, a similar mechanical behaviour to the base material. Strengthening precipitates S'' type and Guinier Preston Bagariastkij (GPB) zones, previously present in the base material of AA2024 T351 joints were dissolved in the SZ and coarse round-type precipitates were found. In the TMAZ, overaging was observed with rod and lath-type precipitates beyond precipitate free zones, which resulted in deteriorated mechanical properties in this region. Joints in AA2024 T351 showed a loss of strength in the TMAZ of up to 30 %, compared to the base material. In AA6013 T6 joints, needle-type {beta}'' precipitates (Mg-Si) were fully dissolved in the SZ. TMAZ was characterized essentially by lath-type Q' (Mg-Si-Cu) precipitates and particularly rod-type precipitates for the lower heat inputs, beyond the presence of dispersoids. Such precipitate

  17. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  18. Correlation of aging and thermal stability of commercial 18650-type lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, M.; Friesen, A.; Grützke, M.; Stenzel, Y. P.; Brunklaus, G.; Haetge, J.; Nowak, S.; Schappacher, F. M.; Winter, M.

    2017-02-01

    Established safety of lithium ion batteries is key for the vast diversity of applications. The influence of aging on the thermal stability of individual cell components and complete cells is of particular interest. Commercial 18650-type lithium ion batteries based on LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2/C are investigated after cycling at different temperatures. The variations in the electrochemical performance are mainly attributed to aging effects on the anode side considering the formation of an effective solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) during cycling at 45 °C and a thick decomposition layer on the anode surface at 20 °C. The thermal stability of the anodes is investigated including the analysis of the evolving gases which confirmed the severe degradation of the electrolyte and active material during cycling at 20 °C. In addition, the presence of metallic lithium deposits could strongly affect the thermal stability. Thermal safety tests using quasi-adiabatic conditions show variations in the cells response to elevated temperatures according to the state-of-charge, i.e. a reduced reactivity in the discharged state. Furthermore, it is revealed that the onset of exothermic reactions correlates with the thermal stability of the SEI, while the thermal runaway is mainly attributed to the decomposition of the cathode and the subsequent reactions with the electrolyte.

  19. Thermal conductivities study of new types of compound adsorbents used in solar adsorption refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Huizhong [College of Urban Construction and Environment Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China)], E-mail: zhz@usst.edu.cn; Zhang Min [College of Food Science Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Lv Jing; Yu Guoqing; Zou Zhijun [College of Urban Construction and Environment Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2009-05-15

    In this paper, the thermal probe is firstly introduced and used in adsorption refrigeration to measure the working pair's thermal conductivities. Different types of compound adsorbents were prepared, and the thermal conductivities of all the types were measured with different adsorption capacities. Experimental results demonstrate that: with the same adsorption capacity, the conductivities of the compound adsorbents increase with the quantity of sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) content. The conductivities of the compound adsorbents increase sharply when the sodium silicate content is between 0% and 7.5% and increase slowly when the content is 7.5-20%. For 13x zeolite and compound adsorbents Z3 and Z4, their thermal conductivities increase as a quadratic polynomial with their adsorption capacities. The conductivities increase more than 158.2% when the adsorption capacities increase from 0% to 25%. The thermal conductivities of compound adsorbent Z3 and Z4 are 0.183 and 0.199 W (m K){sup -1}, respectively, and increase about 65.4% and 80.1%, respectively, compared with the 13x zeolite. With these test results, the compound adsorbent Z4 is used for making an adsorption bed, and the experimental coefficient of performance (COP) of the solar cooling tube is about 0.26.

  20. Thermal Casimir-Polder forces on a V-type three-level atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen-Ran; Xu, Jing-Ping; Al-amri, M.; Zhu, Cheng-Jie; Xie, Shuang-Yuan; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2017-09-01

    We study the thermal Casimir-Polder (CP) forces on a V-type three-level atom. The competition between the thermal effect and the quantum interference of the two transition dipoles on the force is investigated. To shed light onto the role of the quantum interference, we analyze two kinds of initial states of the atom, i.e., the superradiant state and the subradiant state. Considering the atom being in the thermal reservoir, the resonant CP force arising from the real photon emission dominates in the evolution of the CP force. Under the zero-temperature condition, the quantum interference can effectively modify the amplitude and the evolution of the force, leading to a long-time force or even the cancellation of the force. Our results reveal that in the finite-temperature case, the thermal photons can enhance the amplitude of all force elements, but have no influence on the net resonant CP force in the steady state, which means that the second law of thermodynamics still works. For the ideal degenerate V-type atom with parallel dipoles under the initial subradiant state, the robust destructive quantum interference overrides the thermal fluctuations, leading to the trapping of the atom in the subradiant state and the disappearance of the CP force. However, in terms of a realistic Zeeman atom, the thermal photons play a significant role during the evolution of the CP force. The thermal fluctuations can enhance the amplitude of the initial CP force by increasing the temperature, and weaken the influence of the quantum interference on the evolution of the CP force from the initial superradiant (subradiant) state to the steady state.

  1. Flow Accelerated Corrosion of Carbon Steel in the Feedwater System of PWR Plants - Behaviour of Welds and Weld Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, C.; Pavageau, E. M.; Faucher, A.; Inada, F.; Yoneda, K.; Miller, C.; Bretelle, J.-L.

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is a phenomenon that has been studied for many years. However, to date, the specific behavior of welds and weld assemblies of carbon steel towards this phenomenon has been scarcely examined. An experimental program of FAC of welds and weld assemblies is being conducted by EDF and CRIEPI. This paper describes the results obtained on the behavior of weld metal independently of its behavior in a weld assembly as well as the sensitivity to FAC of various weld assembly configurations. Tests are performed, at EDF, in the CIROCO loop which permits to follow the FAC rate by gammametry measurements, and at CRIEPI, in the PRINTEMPS loop where FAC is measured by laser displacement sensor. Welds are performed by two different methods: Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). The influence of several parameters on FAC of welds is examined: welding method, chromium content and temperature. For weld assemblies, only the impact of chromium content is studied. All the tests are conducted in ammonia medium at pH 9.0 and oxygen concentration lower then 1 ppb. Chemical parameters, as the pH, the conductivity and oxygen concentration, are measured in situ during the test and surface characterizations are performed after the test. The results show that, with more than 0.15% chromium, no FAC is detected on the weld metal, which is similar to the base metal behaviour. For the same and lower chromium content, the two types of metal have the same FAC rate. Concerning the temperature effect, for both metals FAC rate decreases with temperature increase above 150°C. Below 150 °C, their behaviour seems to be different. For weld assemblies, the study of different configurations shows that the chromium content is the main parameter affecting the behaviour of the specimens. Additional tests and modeling studies will be conducted in order to complete the results.

  2. Modeling Fluid and Heat Transport in a New Type Thermal Isomerization Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Zewu; Zhao, Yuying; Liu, Liujun; Li, Rui

    2017-10-01

    In the current work, with a new concept of resident ratio which impacts the reaction time, a fluid flow and heat transfer model were employed for simulating pressure drop, temperature profile and fluid flow properties of new type thermal isomerization reactor. The thermal isomerization experiment of β-pinenewas performed using the reactor. Momentum equation, energy equation and kinetic equationswere used to describe the fluid flow and heat transfer. The experimental results were in good agreement with theoretical simulation which indicated that the temperature difference between boundary and initial can be decreased by using steel balls and this modified fluidized bed can improve the yield and selectivity of the products effectively.

  3. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  4. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  5. Residual Stress and Fatigue Strength of Hybrid Laser-MIG-Welded A7N01P-T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuying; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Peixian; Zhu, Zongtao

    2017-02-01

    A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy is widely used in some important welded components of high-speed trains. The hybrid laser-metal inert gas (MIG) welding process was studied to solve problems associated with the MIG welding process, such as low welding efficiency, high residual stress and deformation, and serious loss of strength. A high-speed camera, a voltage and current collection system, and NI DAQ were used to acquire arc profiles, welding voltage, and welding current simultaneously. Thermal cycle tests were carried out. Residual stresses induced by the welding process and fatigue strength of the joint were investigated. Large-size fatigue specimens were used in fatigue tests. The results show that the energy of the hybrid welding process is focused, and the power density of hybrid welding process is intense. The heat input per unit of the hybrid welding process is only half of that of the MIG welding process. Compared with the MIG welded joint, the overall residual stress level of the hybrid-welded joint is lower. The peak longitudinal stress of the hybrid-welded joint is reduced by 20 pct. The fatigue strength of hybrid joints is 14 pct higher than that of MIG-welded joints. Narrow weld and HAZ, weak softening behavior, and low residual stress level are the causes of the improvement of fatigue strength.

  6. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: "Ex vivo" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-30

    Stabilization of implant abutments through electric impulses at high voltage for a very short time (electrowelding) was developed in the Eighties. In 2009, the same procedure was performed through the use of laser (laser welding) The aim of this study is to compare electrowelding and laser welding for intra-oral implant abutments stabilization on "ex vivo models" (pig jaws). Six bars were welded with two different devices (Nd:YAG laser and Electrowelder) to eighteen titanium implant abutment inserted in three pig jaws. During the welding process, thermal increase was recorded, through the use of k-thermocouples, in the bone close to the implants. The strength of the welded joints was evaluated by a traction test after the removal of the implants. For temperature measurements a descriptive analysis and for traction test "values unpaired t test with Welch's correction" were performed: the significance level was set at Pwelding gives a lower thermal increase than Electrowelding at the bone close to implants (Mean: 1.97 and 5.27); the strength of laser welded joints was higher than that of Electrowelding even if nor statistically significant. (Mean: 184.75 and 168.29) CONCLUSION: Electrowelding seems to have no advantages, in term of thermal elevation and strength, while laser welding may be employed to connect titanium implants for immediate load without risks of thermal damage at surrounding tissues.

  7. Research of the temperature field of welding of saddle branch to polyethylene pipe at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostin, Nikolai P.; Vasileva, Maria A.; Andreev, Boris I.

    2017-11-01

    The thermal process of welding a saddle branch to a polyethylene pipe is considered with the heat of the phase transition taken into account. The corresponding three-dimensional nonlinear equation of thermal conductivity is solved by the finite element method in a complex domain. The technological operations necessary for welding the saddle branch to the polyethylene pipe at air temperatures below standard are defined based on the study of the dynamics of the temperature field during welding at various ambient temperatures.

  8. The Effect of Welding Current and Composition of Stainless steel on the Panetration in GTAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yılmaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, welding was performed on the plates of two different types of AISI 316 and AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steels by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding without using welding consumable in flat position. Automatic GTAW welding machine was used to control and obtain the exact values. The effects of welding currents used in welding process and the compositions of the stainless steels materials on the penetration were investigated. Weld bead size and shape such as bead width and dept were important considerations for penetration. Welding process was performed using various welding current values. The study showed that both welding parameters and composition of the stainless steels has influence on the penetration and It is increased with increasing of welding current. Besides, P/W rate of the weldments were influenced by the current and hardness values of the weld metal decrease with increasing welding current. The microstructure of the weld metal was also changed by variation of welding current.

  9. State-of-art and prospects of development of electron beam welding of aerospace vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. A.; Nazarenko, O. K.

    The paper presents information about industrial application of technological processes of electron beam welding EBW of aerospace objects. The characteristics of advanced equipment are given for welding electron guns, power sources, and control systems. Different types of EBW equipment of chamber-type, with a local and mobile evacuation of welding zone, are described.

  10. Thermal Characteristics of Conversion-Type FeOF Cathode in Li-ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rutile FeOF was used as a conversion-type cathode material for Li-ion batteries. In the present study, 0.6Li, 1.4Li, and 2.7Li per mole lithiation reactions were carried out by changing the electrochemical discharge reaction depth. The thermal characteristics of the FeOF cathode were investigated by thermogravimetric mass spectrometric (TG-MS and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC systems. No remarkable HF release was detected, even up to 700 °C, which indicated a low toxic risk for the FeOF cathode. Changes in the thermal properties of the FeOF cathode via different conversion reaction depths in the associated electrolyte were studied by changing the cathode/electrolyte ratio in the mixture. LiFeOF was found to exothermically react with the electrolyte at about 210 °C. Similar exothermic reactions were found with charged FeOF cathodes because of the irreversible Li ions. Among the products of the conversion reaction of FeOF, Li2O was found to exothermically react with the electrolyte at about 120 °C, which induced the main thermal risk of the FeOF cathode. It suggests that the oxygen-containing conversion-type cathodes have a higher thermal risk than the oxygen-free ones, but controlling the cathode/electrolyte ratio in cells successfully reduced the thermal risk. Finally, the thermal stability of the FeOF cathode was evaluated in comparison with FeF3 and LiFePO4 cathodes.

  11. Welding using CO/sub 2/ lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, E.; Behler, K.; Petschke, U.; Scholowski, W.; Rosen, H.G.; Hamann, C.

    1986-03-01

    In laser welding a workpiece is locally heated up to the evaporation temperature. As soon as metallic vapour is formed, a laser induced plasma can be ignited. This plasma causes a conversion of the incident laser energy into thermal energy. As a consequence of this plasma property, the laser radiation is almost completely coupled into the workpiece. Theoretical models of laser radiation absorption are reviewed which enable computing threshold values of the laser beam parameters with respect to the local evaporation of the workpiece material and the ignition and development of the laser induced plasma. The radiation absorption is also dependent on plasma characteristics which can be influenced by shielding gases. The shielding effects are included in the plasma model and are discussed in detail. The influence of laser modes, laser beam caustic as well as polarization of the laser radiation with reference to focusing, welding geometry and the absorption are presented. Typical welding defects as hardening in the area of a welding join and porosity as well as laser applications in welding of various materials, some special requirements concerning laser welding and its economical aspects are described.

  12. Machine-Thermal Coupling Stresses Analysis of the Fin-Type Structural Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Yue, Hao; Chen, Dongbo; Qin, Delei; Chen, Zijian

    2017-05-01

    The design structure and heat-transfer mechanism of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) determine its body temperature state. Thermal stress and thermal deformation generated by the temperature variation directly affect the stress state of thermoelectric modules (TEMs). Therefore, the rated temperature and pressing force of TEMs are important parameters in TEG design. Here, the relationships between structural of a fin-type TEG (FTEG) and these parameters are studied by modeling and "machine-thermal" coupling simulation. An indirect calculation method is adopted in the coupling simulation. First, numerical heat transfer calculations of a three-dimensional FTEG model are conducted according to an orthogonal simulation table. The influences of structural parameters for heat transfer in the channel and outer fin temperature distribution are analyzed. The optimal structural parameters are obtained and used to simulate temperature field of the outer fins. Second, taking the thermal calculation results as the initial condition, the thermal-solid coupling calculation is adopted. The thermal stresses of outer fin, mechanical force of spring-angle pressing mechanism, and clamping force on a TEM are analyzed. The simulation results show that the heat transfer area of the inner fin and the physical parameters of the metal materials are the keys to determining the FTEG temperature field. The pressing mechanism's mechanical force can be reduced by reducing the outer fin angle. In addition, a corrugated cooling water pipe, which has cooling and spring functionality, is conducive to establishing an adaptable clamping force to avoid the TEMs being crushed by the thermal stresses in the body.

  13. Efficient Simulation of Welding Distortion in Large Structures and Its Reduction by Jig Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ninshu; Huang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Two large construction machinery structures were welded separately with and without jig constraints. The welding distortion of the entire structure was measured by a 3D coordinate measuring system and simulated by elastic FEM using the inherent deformation method. To obtain an accurate inherent deformation, a thermal elastoplastic FE analysis of simple one-side fillet joints with and without jig constraints was performed. Efficient simulation of welding distortion in large structures was accomplished by applying inherent deformation in a localized region, and the effect of jig constraint on the reduction of welding distortion was clarified. The computation of inherent deformation, the weld zone definition and the conversion of inherent deformation into inherent strain were automated. Measured and computed welding distortions in large structures had a good correspondence with respect to both tendency and magnitude. Further investigation of jig configuration was performed for enhanced reduction of welding distortion. Alternative controlling techniques for common welded structures were also addressed.

  14. Efficient Simulation of Welding Distortion in Large Structures and Its Reduction by Jig Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ninshu; Huang, Hui

    2017-11-01

    Two large construction machinery structures were welded separately with and without jig constraints. The welding distortion of the entire structure was measured by a 3D coordinate measuring system and simulated by elastic FEM using the inherent deformation method. To obtain an accurate inherent deformation, a thermal elastoplastic FE analysis of simple one-side fillet joints with and without jig constraints was performed. Efficient simulation of welding distortion in large structures was accomplished by applying inherent deformation in a localized region, and the effect of jig constraint on the reduction of welding distortion was clarified. The computation of inherent deformation, the weld zone definition and the conversion of inherent deformation into inherent strain were automated. Measured and computed welding distortions in large structures had a good correspondence with respect to both tendency and magnitude. Further investigation of jig configuration was performed for enhanced reduction of welding distortion. Alternative controlling techniques for common welded structures were also addressed.

  15. Nanofluid Types, Their Synthesis, Properties and Incorporation in Direct Solar Thermal Collectors: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsa-ard, Wisut; Brundavanam, Sridevi; Fung, Chun Che; Fawcett, Derek; Poinern, Gerrard

    2017-01-01

    The global demand for energy is increasing and the detrimental consequences of rising greenhouse gas emissions, global warming and environmental degradation present major challenges. Solar energy offers a clean and viable renewable energy source with the potential to alleviate the detrimental consequences normally associated with fossil fuel-based energy generation. However, there are two inherent problems associated with conventional solar thermal energy conversion systems. The first involves low thermal conductivity values of heat transfer fluids, and the second involves the poor optical properties of many absorbers and their coating. Hence, there is an imperative need to improve both thermal and optical properties of current solar conversion systems. Direct solar thermal absorption collectors incorporating a nanofluid offers the opportunity to achieve significant improvements in both optical and thermal performance. Since nanofluids offer much greater heat absorbing and heat transfer properties compared to traditional working fluids. The review summarizes current research in this innovative field. It discusses direct solar absorber collectors and methods for improving their performance. This is followed by a discussion of the various types of nanofluids available and the synthesis techniques used to manufacture them. In closing, a brief discussion of nanofluid property modelling is also presented. PMID:28561802

  16. Nanofluid Types, Their Synthesis, Properties and Incorporation in Direct Solar Thermal Collectors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsa-Ard, Wisut; Brundavanam, Sridevi; Fung, Chun Che; Fawcett, Derek; Poinern, Gerrard

    2017-05-31

    The global demand for energy is increasing and the detrimental consequences of rising greenhouse gas emissions, global warming and environmental degradation present major challenges. Solar energy offers a clean and viable renewable energy source with the potential to alleviate the detrimental consequences normally associated with fossil fuel-based energy generation. However, there are two inherent problems associated with conventional solar thermal energy conversion systems. The first involves low thermal conductivity values of heat transfer fluids, and the second involves the poor optical properties of many absorbers and their coating. Hence, there is an imperative need to improve both thermal and optical properties of current solar conversion systems. Direct solar thermal absorption collectors incorporating a nanofluid offers the opportunity to achieve significant improvements in both optical and thermal performance. Since nanofluids offer much greater heat absorbing and heat transfer properties compared to traditional working fluids. The review summarizes current research in this innovative field. It discusses direct solar absorber collectors and methods for improving their performance. This is followed by a discussion of the various types of nanofluids available and the synthesis techniques used to manufacture them. In closing, a brief discussion of nanofluid property modelling is also presented.

  17. Nanofluid Types, Their Synthesis, Properties and Incorporation in Direct Solar Thermal Collectors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisut Chamsa-ard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The global demand for energy is increasing and the detrimental consequences of rising greenhouse gas emissions, global warming and environmental degradation present major challenges. Solar energy offers a clean and viable renewable energy source with the potential to alleviate the detrimental consequences normally associated with fossil fuel-based energy generation. However, there are two inherent problems associated with conventional solar thermal energy conversion systems. The first involves low thermal conductivity values of heat transfer fluids, and the second involves the poor optical properties of many absorbers and their coating. Hence, there is an imperative need to improve both thermal and optical properties of current solar conversion systems. Direct solar thermal absorption collectors incorporating a nanofluid offers the opportunity to achieve significant improvements in both optical and thermal performance. Since nanofluids offer much greater heat absorbing and heat transfer properties compared to traditional working fluids. The review summarizes current research in this innovative field. It discusses direct solar absorber collectors and methods for improving their performance. This is followed by a discussion of the various types of nanofluids available and the synthesis techniques used to manufacture them. In closing, a brief discussion of nanofluid property modelling is also presented.

  18. Conjugation of type I antifreeze protein to polyallylamine increases thermal hysteresis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Ozge; Holland, Nolan B

    2011-10-19

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice binding proteins found in some plants, insects, and Antarctic fish allowing them to survive at subzero temperatures by inhibiting ice crystal growth. The interaction of AFPs with ice crystals results in a difference between the freezing and melting temperatures, termed thermal hysteresis, which is the most common measure of AFP activity. Creating antifreeze protein constructs that reduce the concentration of protein needed to observe thermal hysteresis activities would be beneficial for diverse applications including cold storage of cells or tissues, ice slurries used in refrigeration systems, and food storage. We demonstrate that conjugating multiple type I AFPs to a polyallylamine chain increases thermal hysteresis activity compared to the original protein. The reaction product is approximately twice as active when compared to the same concentration of free proteins, yielding 0.5 °C thermal hysteresis activity at 0.3 mM protein concentration. More impressively, the amount of protein required to achieve a thermal hysteresis of 0.3 °C is about 100 times lower when conjugated to the polymer (3 μM) compared to free protein (300 μM). Ice crystal morphologies observed in the presence of the reaction product are comparable to those of the protein used in the conjugation reaction.

  19. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  20. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  1. Consistent neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculations of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikhomirov Georgy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For modeling the isotopic composition of fuel, and maximum temperatures at different moments of time, one can use different algorithms and codes. In connection with the development of new types of fuel assemblies and progress in computer technology, the task makes important to increase accuracy in modeling of the above characteristics of fuel assemblies during the operation. Calculations of neutronphysical characteristics of fuel rods are mainly based on models using averaged temperature, thermal conductivity factors, and heat power density. In this paper, complex approach is presented, based on modern algorithms, methods and codes to solve separate tasks of thermal conductivity, neutron transport, and nuclide transformation kinetics. It allows to perform neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculation of the reactor with detailed temperature distribution, with account of temperature-depending thermal conductivity and other characteristics. It was applied to studies of fuel cell of the VVER-1000 reactor. When developing new algorithms and programs, which should improve the accuracy of modeling the isotopic composition and maximum temperature in the fuel rod, it is necessary to have a set of test tasks for verification. The proposed approach can be used for development of such verification base for testing calculation of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

  2. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  3. Welding with coated electrodes E 6010 and E 7018 in AISI 1025 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Reyes-Carcasés

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The welding of steel of low carbon content is a common practice in the nickel industry, where components with steels of these characteristics are manufactured. The objective of the paper was to establish the microstructural behavior of the AISI 1025 steel when it was welded with two types of electrodes (E 6010 and E 7018, the first one deposited as a mattress, and the second one to guarantee mechanical resistance; they were made in a 240 x 240 x 10 mm plate with simple bevel preparation. The microstructures obtained with the electrode E 6010 are of the ferrite type Widmanstátten, columnar ferrite and intergranular pearlite, with a hardness of 345 HV, while with the electrode E 7018 the microstructures are ferrite Widmanstátten, austenite and martensite, with hardness of 332 HV . The decrease in hardness in the latter case is associated with the thermal treatment of multipass annealing.

  4. Heat sink welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes to control distortion and residual stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Div., Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-07-01

    Construction of India's Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) involves extensive welding of austenitic stainless steels pipes of different dimensions. Due to high thermal expansion coefficient and poor thermal conductivity of this class of steels, welding can result in significant distortion of these pipes. Attempts to arrest this distortion can lead to high levels of residual stresses in the welded parts. Heat sink welding is one of the techniques often employed to minimize distortion and residual stress in austenitic stainless steel pipe welding. This technique has also been employed to repair welding of the piping of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) subjected to radiation induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In the present study, a comparison of the distortion in two pipe welds, one made with heat sink welding and another a normal welds. Pipes of dimensions 350{phi} x 250(L) x 8(t) mm was fabricated from 316LN plates of dimensions 1100 x 250 x 8 mm by bending and long seam (L-seam) welding by SMAW process. Two fit ups with a root gap of 2 mm, land height of 1mm and a groove angle of 70 were prepared using these pipes for circumferential seam (C-seam) welding. Dimensions at predetermined points in the fit up were made before and after welding to check the variation in radius, circumference and and ovality of the pipes. Root pass for both the pipe fit up were carried out using conventional GTAW process with 1.6 mm AWS ER 16-8-2 as consumables. Welding of one of the pipe fit ups were completed using conventions GTAW process while the other was completed using heat sink welding. For second and subsequent layers of welding using this process, water was sprayed at the root side of the joint while welding was in progress. Flow rate of the water was {proportional_to}6 1/minute. Welding parameters employed were same as those used for the other pipe weld. Results of the dimensional measurements showed that there is no circumferential shrinkage in

  5. The electron beam welding of dissimilar materials - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, A.

    2016-11-01

    The modalities to realize the welding workpieces are multiple. The electron beam welding is one of them. One can weld two different types of materials that give the possibility to reduce the cost of workpiece, if the active part is realised of rich materials welded on components with inferior phisico-mecanical characteristics. The procedure provides great flexibility to the product designs through efficient use of each type of material. So this aspects lead to the necessity to join dissimilar metals. Different tables are given in the specific literature regarding the possible combination. Conflicts may arise by the compromises required for to the optimum heat control of the two dissimilar materials used. But nowadays, more and more frequently are meet the welding of dissimilar metals, thus, the objective of this article is to provide information regarding the particular case of welding between stainless steel and copper without the filler material use.

  6. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  7. Immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable plastic skull model and laser welding. A technical note on the screw-retained type: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ishida, Osamu; Kanitani, Hideo; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a new procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus. Preoperatively, the framework was fabricated on a photocurable resin skull model produced from a CT scan and individually designed guide template. The implants were immediately placed using the guide template; laser welding connected the components of framework. Despite the custom-made prosthesis, the total treatment from implant placement to superstructure placement can be completed within only 1 day. This procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus may be useful for any implant system and patient.

  8. Thermal and ignition type steam explosions of single drops of molten aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, L.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duda, P.M.; Hyndman, D.A. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allison, D.K.; Hyder, M.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Seventeen steam explosion experiments were performed with 2 to 10 g drops of molten, high-purity Al. Seven were successfully initiated with underwater exploding bridgewires. At melt release temperatures up to 1400{degrees}C (1673 K) only moderate thermal-type explosions occurred that produced bubbles with volumes up to approximately 1 L. Bubble growth intensified in the melt temperature range 1400-1525{degrees}C (1673--1798 K) as threshold ignition of Al set in. In this range, one of the explosions emitted a flash of light and generated a bubble that grew very rapidly to approximately 14 L, broke through the water surface, and destroyed the test chamber. We attribute the behavior of this latter bubble, which grew as fast as one produced by the underwater firing of a 0.6 g explosive detonator, to an ignition-type steam explosion. Aluminum oxides could not be detected visually in the debris recovered from either typical thermal-type or the ignition-type explosions, and only traces could be detected by X-ray diffraction. In the ignition-type explosion, it is possible however that some oxidic material, probably the smaller particles, was lost during the flooding that occurred as the chamber failed. Both bubble analyses and the absence of appreciable oxide in the debris suggest that the ignition-type steam explosion was not very efficient, probably involving the combustion of only a small fraction of the original molten aluminum globule.

  9. Keyhole and weld shapes for plasma arc welding under normal and zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keanini, R. G.; Rubinsky, B.

    1990-01-01

    A first order study of the interfacial (keyhole) shape between a penetrating argon plasma arc jet and a stationary liquid metal weld pool is presented. The interface is determined using the Young-Laplace equation by assuming that the plasma jet behaves as a one-dimensional ideal gas flow and by neglecting flow within the weld pool. The solution for the keyhole shape allows an approximate determination of the liquid-solid metal phase boundary location based on the assumption that the liquid melt is a stagnant thermal boundary layer. Parametric studies examine the effect of plasma mass flow rate, initial plasma enthalpy, liquid metal surface tension, and jet shear on weldment shape under both normal and zero gravity. Among the more important findings of this study is that keyhole and weld geometries are minimally affected by gravity, suggesting that data gathered under gravity can be used in planning in-space welding.

  10. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  11. An experimental method for investigating phase transformations in the heat affected zone of welds using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.W.; Wong, J.; Froba, M.; Waide, P.A.; Larson, E.M.

    1995-05-26

    Although welding is an established technology used in many industrial settings, it is least understand terms of the phases that actually exist, the variation of their spatial disposition with time, and the rate of transformation from one phase to another at various thermal coordinates in the vicinity of the weld. With the availability of high flux and, more recently, high brightness synchrotron x-radiation sources, a number of diffraction and spectroscopic methods have been developed for structural characterization with improved spatial and temporal resolutions to enable in-situ measurements of phases under extreme temperature, pressure and other processing conditions not readily accessible with conventional sources. This paper describes the application of spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) for in-situ investigations of phase transformations in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of fusion welds. Results are presented for gas tungsten (GTA) welds in commercially pure titanium that show the existence of the high temperature bcc {beta}-phase in a 3.3 {plus_minus} 0.3 mm wide HA band adjacent to the liquid weld pool. Phase concentration profiles derived from the SRXRD data further show the co-existence of both the low temperature hcp ({alpha}-phase and the {beta}-phase in the partially, transformed region of the HA. These results represent the first direct observations of solid state phase transformations and mapping of phase boundaries in fusion welds. SRXRD experiments of this type are needed as experimental input for modeling of kinetics of phase transformations and microstructural evolution under the highly non-isothermal conditions produced during welding.

  12. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF THE MODIFIED MAGNESIUM-CONTAINING SILUMINS WITH DIFFERENT TYPE OF MODIFIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Rafalskij

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The modification of the eutectic structure in aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloys related to the thermal parameters analysis is investigated. The magnitude of the eutectic undercooling and eutectic arrest depression caused by modifying sodium and strontium has been correlated to the eutectic microstructure accordingly to the type of modifier. The reason for difference of cooling curves and microstructure of aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloys modified sodium and strontium is changing in growth mode of eutectic crystals from the liquid.

  13. Application of infrared imaging for quality inspection in resistance spot welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Wanchuck; Chin, Charles W.; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Hsin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Hanbing; Sklad, Philip S.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared thermal imaging method was applied for the development of a non-destructive inspection technique to determine the quality of resistance spot welds. The current work is an initial feasibility study based on post-mortem inspection. First, resistance spot welds were fabricated on dual phase steel sheets (DP 590 steel) with carefullycontrolled welding parameters. It created welds with desirable and undesirable qualities in terms of nugget size, indentation depth, and voids and cracks. Second, five different heating and cooling methods were evaluated. The heating or cooling source was applied on one side of the weld stack while the surface temperature change on the other side of the weld was recorded using an infrared camera. Correlation between the weld quality and the "thermal signature" of each weld was established. Finally, a simplified thermal finite element analysis was developed to simulate the heat flow during inspection. The thermal model provided insight into the effect of the nugget size and indentation depth on the peak temperature and heating rate. The results reported in this work indicate that the IR thermography technique is feasible for weld quality inspection due to the distinguish temperature profiles for different welds and the repeatability and consistency in measurement.

  14. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  15. Control of Softening Processes in the Heat-Affected Zone During Welding of High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimenko, L. A.; Kapustin, O. E.; Ramus', A. A.; Ramus', R. O.

    2016-11-01

    The hardness and the structure of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under welding of tube steels of strength category K60 - K70 are studied. The steels are treated by regimes imitating the thermal cycles of different welding processes applied to tubes starting with manual arc welding and ending with energy-intensive automatic submerged-arc welding. The welding modes causing maximum decrease in the hardness of HAZ regions are determined. The conditions preventing softening under one-pass and multipass welding of high-strength steels are presented.

  16. Welding Emissions in Shipbuilding and Repair (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-03

    gas – GTAW –uses shield gas, but low emissions –aka TIG – SAW – lowest rate, solid wire weld covered with flux material 7 Naval Facilities...Engineering Service Center Welding Emissions in Shipbuilding and Repair Kathleen M Paulson, PE Port Hueneme, CA 3 September 2009 Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Welding Emissions in Shipbuilding and Repair 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simitses, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and racheting. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this must also be accommodated in the solution procedures.

  18. Influence of Processing Parameters on the Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid phase welding process that unites thermal and mechanical aspects to produce a high quality joint. The process variables are rpm, translational weld speed, and downward plunge force. The strain-temperature history of a metal element at each point on the cross-section of the weld is determined by the individual flow path taken by the particular filament of metal flowing around the tool as influenced by the process variables. The resulting properties of the weld are determined by the strain-temperature history. Thus to control FSW properties, improved understanding of the processing parameters on the metal flow path is necessary.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF POSTHEAT TREATMENT ON FERRITE REDISTRIBUTION IN DUPLEX STEELS ELECTRON BEAM WELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Iždinská

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The duplex stainless steel is two-phase steel with the structure composed of austenite and ferrite with optimum austenite/ferrite proportion 50%. At present, classical arc processes for welding duplex steels are generally regarded as acceptable. On the other hand electron and laser beam welding is up to now considered less suitable for welding duplex steels. The submitted work presents the results of testing various thermal conditions at welding duplex stainless steel with electron beam. It was shown, that application of suitable postheat made possible to reduce the ferrite content in weld metal.

  20. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process

  1. Residual stress distributions in a P91 steel-pipe girth weld before and after post weld heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddea, S., E-mail: s.paddea@open.ac.uk [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Francis, J.A. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX, Oxon (United Kingdom); Bouchard, P.J. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Shibli, I.A. [European Technology Development Ltd., Leatherhead KT22 7RD, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stresses in a pipe girth weld in P91 steel have been measured in both the as-welded and PWHT conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest tensile residual stresses coincided with the HAZ boundary and the microstructural region that is prone to type IV cracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compressive residual stresses were measured in the weld metal, in a location corresponding to the final weld pass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The location of the peak compressive stresses can be explained by the effect of solid-state phase transformation. - Abstract: In this study the residual stresses in a pipe girth weld in a ferritic-martensitic power plant steel were measured by neutron diffraction and compared with the corresponding metallurgical zones in the weld region. It was found that, in both the as-welded and post-weld heat treated condition, the highest tensile stresses resided near the outer boundary of the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and towards the weld root region. Substantial tensile direct and hydrostatic stresses existed across the HAZ, including the fine-grained and intercritically annealed regions, where premature type IV creep failures manifest in 9-12 Cr steel welds. Compressive stresses were found in the weld metal coinciding with the last weld bead to be deposited. Constrained cooling tests on test coupons illustrated that these compressive stresses can be explained in terms of the influence that solid-state phase transformations have on the accumulation of stress in welds.

  2. Simulation of Temperature Distribution in TIG Spot Welds of(Al-Mg) Alloy Using Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlam Abid Ameer Alkhafajy; Abdul Hussain G. Al-Maliky; Muna K Abbas

    2008-01-01

    This research concern to analyse and simulate the temperature distribution in the spot welding joints using tungsten arc welding shielded with inert gas (TIG Spot) for the aluminum-magnesium alloy type (5052-O). The effect of and the quantity of the heat input that enter the weld zone has been investigated welding current, welding time and arc length on temperature distribution. The finite element method (by utilizing programme ANSYS 5.4) is presented the temperature distribution in a circula...

  3. The impacts of land cover types on urban outdoor thermal environment: the case of Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai; Dong, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the microclimatic behavior of different land cover types in urban parks and, the correlation between air temperature and land cover composition to understand how land cover affects outdoor thermal environment during hot summer. To address this issue, air temperatures were measured on four different land cover types at four observation sites inside an urban park in Beijing, China, meanwhile, the land cover composition of each site was quantified with CAD, by drawing corresponding areas on the aerial photographs. The results showed that the average air temperature difference among four land cover types was large during the day and small during the night. At noon, the average air temperature differed significantly among four land cover types, whereas on night, there was no significant difference among different land cover types. Results of the linear regression indicated that during daytime, there was a strong negative correlation between air temperature and percent tree cover; while at nighttime, a significant negative correlation was observed between air temperature and percent lawn cover. It was shown that as the percent tree cover increased by 10 %, the air temperature decreased by 0.26 °C during daytime, while as the percent lawn cover increased by 10 %, the air temperature decreased by 0.56 °C during nighttime. Results of this study help to clarify the effects of land cover on urban outdoor thermal environment, and can provide assistance to urban planner and designer for improving green space planning and design in the future.

  4. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  5. Temperature Changes of Pulp Chamber during In Vitro Laser Welding of Orthodontic Attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşman, Eren; Okşayan, Rıdvan; Sökücü, Oral; Üşümez, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The use of lasers has been suggested for orthodontists to fabricate or repair orthodontic appliances by welding metals directly in the mouth. This work aimed to evaluate the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during welding of an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic molar band using Nd : YAG laser in vitro. A freshly extracted human third molar with eliminated pulpal tissues was used. J-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulp chamber. A conductor gel was used in the transferring of outside temperature changes to the thermocouple wire. An orthodontic band was applied to the molar tooth and bonded using light cured orthodontic cement. Twenty five mm length of 0.6 mm diameter orthodontic stainless steel wires was welded to the orthodontic band using Nd : YAG laser operated at 9.4 watt. Temperature variation was determined as the change from baseline temperature to the highest temperature was recorded during welding. The recorded temperature changes were between 1.8 and 6.8°C (mean: 3.3 ± 1.1°C). The reported critical 5.5°C level was exceeded in only one sample. The results of this study suggest that intraoral use of lasers holds great potential for the future of orthodontics and does not present a thermal risk. Further studies with larger samples and structural analysis are required. PMID:24550714

  6. Temperature Changes of Pulp Chamber during In Vitro Laser Welding of Orthodontic Attachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren İşman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of lasers has been suggested for orthodontists to fabricate or repair orthodontic appliances by welding metals directly in the mouth. This work aimed to evaluate the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during welding of an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic molar band using Nd : YAG laser in vitro. A freshly extracted human third molar with eliminated pulpal tissues was used. J-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulp chamber. A conductor gel was used in the transferring of outside temperature changes to the thermocouple wire. An orthodontic band was applied to the molar tooth and bonded using light cured orthodontic cement. Twenty five mm length of 0.6 mm diameter orthodontic stainless steel wires was welded to the orthodontic band using Nd : YAG laser operated at 9.4 watt. Temperature variation was determined as the change from baseline temperature to the highest temperature was recorded during welding. The recorded temperature changes were between 1.8 and 6.8°C (mean: 3.3 ± 1.1°C. The reported critical 5.5°C level was exceeded in only one sample. The results of this study suggest that intraoral use of lasers holds great potential for the future of orthodontics and does not present a thermal risk. Further studies with larger samples and structural analysis are required.

  7. Laser welding of Zn-coated sheet steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Marianne P.; Kerr, Hugh W.; Weckman, David C.

    1996-04-01

    Compared to other welding processes, laser welding of sheet steels coated with various zinc- rich layers (galvanized, electrogalvanized, galvannealed, etc.) can permit weight reduction of automobiles plus increase in productivity. Some instances of laser welding of such coated steels have been reported. However, wider applications of lasers for this purpose are hampered by the low boiling temperature of zinc compared to the melting temperature of steel. During laser welding in the lap-joint configuration, the presence of vaporized zinc between the steel sheets often leads to expulsion of the weld metal or considerably weld porosity. Attempts to overcome this problem using Nd:YAG laser welding are reviewed. For the lap-joint configuration, techniques examined include provision of a gap between the sheets, use of geometrical solutions such as concave or convex surfaces, and pulsing or modulating the laser waveform. The effects on weld quality of power density, pulse time and pulse shaping (for pulsed welding), the coating type and weight, the location of the beam axis and beam focus with respect to the sheet surface(s) and the joint geometry (lap and edge) have been examined. The results provide insight into the weldability of coated sheet steels by the laser welding process as well as better assessment of viable approaches to this problem.

  8. Automatic weld torch guidance control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaith, H. E.; Wall, W. A.; Burns, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A highly reliable, fully digital, closed circuit television optical, type automatic weld seam tracking control system was developed. This automatic tracking equipment is used to reduce weld tooling costs and increase overall automatic welding reliability. The system utilizes a charge injection device digital camera which as 60,512 inidividual pixels as the light sensing elements. Through conventional scanning means, each pixel in the focal plane is sequentially scanned, the light level signal digitized, and an 8-bit word transmitted to scratch pad memory. From memory, the microprocessor performs an analysis of the digital signal and computes the tracking error. Lastly, the corrective signal is transmitted to a cross seam actuator digital drive motor controller to complete the closed loop, feedback, tracking system. This weld seam tracking control system is capable of a tracking accuracy of + or - 0.2 mm, or better. As configured, the system is applicable to square butt, V-groove, and lap joint weldments.

  9. An analysis of factors causing the occurrence of off-design thermally induced force effects in the zone of weld joint no. 111-1 in a PGV-1000M steam generator and recommendations on excluding them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakirov, M. B.; Levchuk, V. I.; Povarov, V. P.; Gromov, A. F.

    2014-08-01

    Inadmissible operational flaws occurring in the critical zones of heat-transfer and mechanical equipment are commonly revealed in all nuclear power plant units both in Russia and abroad. The number of such flaws will only grow in the future because the majority of nuclear power plants have been in operation for a time that is either close to or even exceeds the assigned service life. In this connection, establishing cause-and-effect relations with regard to accelerated incipience and growth of flaws, working out compensating measures aimed at reducing operational damageability, and setting up monitoring of equipment integrity degradation of during operation are becoming the matters of utmost importance. There is a need to introduce new approaches to comprehensive diagnostics of the technical state of important nuclear power plant equipment, including continuous monitoring of its operational damageability and the extent of its loading in the most critical zones. Starting from 2011, such a monitoring system has successfully been used for the Novovoronezh NPP Unit 5 in the zone of weld joint no. 111-1 of steam generator no. 4. Based on the results from operation of this system in 2011-2013, unsteady thermally induced force effects (periodic thermal shocks and temperature abnormalities) were reveled, which had not been considered in the design, and which have an essential influence on the operational loading of this part. Based on an analysis of cause-and-effect relations pertinent to temperature abnormalities connected with technological operations, a set of measures aimed at reducing the thermally induced force loads exerted on pipeline sections was developed, which includes corrections to the process regulations for safe operation and to the operating manuals (involving changes in the algorithms for manipulating with the stop and control valves in the steam generator blowdown system).

  10. Animal Personality Relates to Thermal Preference in Wild-Type Zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Sonia; Digka, Nikoletta; MacKenzie, Simon

    2015-06-01

    It has been widely supported that individual animals express different strategies to cope with environmental challenge. In ectothermic species such as fish, individuals must use behavioral thermoregulation mechanisms to optimize physiological performance. In the present study, thermal preference was tested in groups of wild-type zebrafish, Danio rerio, screened for proactive and reactive animal personalities. Three replicate groups of proactive, reactive, and naive randomly sampled non-screened controls were used for the experiments. The frequency distribution of the animals was recorded in a custom-built multichamber tank under both constant temperature (temperature restricted conditions: TR) and a continuous thermal gradient profile (temperature choice: TCh ranging from 21°C to 35°C). Proactive and reactive animal personalities expressed significantly different thermal preferences and general activity within the temperature gradient. Our results show that proactive fish, generally characterized as being more aggressive, bold risk takers, and prone to routine formation, have a preference for higher temperature environments. Reactive fish, which are shy, less risk-prone, and more flexible, favor medium colder temperatures. This is the first report of thermopreferendum in zebrafish where individual animal personality coupled to freedom of thermal choice has been applied to understand variation in individual preferences within a population.

  11. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  12. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  13. Treatment of 14 sludge types from wastewater treatment plants using bench and pilot thermal hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wei; Sun, Yifei; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A total of 14 types of sludge from household sewage, mixture of domestic and industrial wastewater, and industrial and oil wastewater treatment plants were selected to evaluate the effectiveness and adaptability of thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment. Organic solubilization, dewatering improvement, volume reduction, high-strength filtrate biodegradation, and dewatered sludge incineration were investigated using bench and pilot thermal hydrolysis experiments (170 °C/60 min). Results showed that sludge types significantly affected the treatment effects. Organic content has a primary influence on thermal effects. The relationship between suspended solid (SS) solubilization and raw sludge organic content was linear with an R(2) of 0.73. The relationship between raw sludge organic content and treated sludge dewatering was linear with an R(2) of 0.86 and 0.65 for pilot and bench pre-treatments, respectively. Household and oil sludge possessed incineration possibilities with high heat value. Industrial and oil sludge filtrate was unsuitable for digestion to recover bioenergy.

  14. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  15. Microstructural Aspects of Bifocal Laser Welding of Trip Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with comparative tests involving single-spot and twin-spot laser welding of thermomechanically rolled TRIP steel. The welding tests were carried out using keyhole welding and a solid state laser. In the case of twin-spot laser beam welding, the power distribution of beams was 50%:50%. The changes in macro- and microstructures were investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy. Three main zones subjected to the tests included the fusion zone, the heat affected zone and the intercritical heat affected zone (transition zone between the base material and the HAZ. Special attention was paid to the effect of various thermal cycles on the microstructure of each zone and on martensite morphology. The tests involved hardness measurements carried out in order to investigate the effect of different microstructures on mechanical properties of welds.

  16. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  17. Bond Strength of Gold Alloys Laser Welded to Cobalt-Chromium Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Wallace, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the joint properties between cast gold alloys and Co-Cr alloy laser-welded by Nd:YAG laser. Cast plates were fabricated from three types of gold alloys (Type IV, Type II and low-gold) and a Co-Cr alloy. Each gold alloy was laser-welded to Co-Cr using a dental laser-welding machine. Homogeneously-welded and non-welded control specimens were also prepared. Tensile testing was conducted and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The homogeneo...

  18. Functional differential equations of neutral type with integrable weak singularity: hydrogen thermal desorption model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Yury V.; Kostikova, Ekaterina K.

    2017-11-01

    One of the technological challenges for hydrogen materials science (including the ITER project) is the currently active search for structural materials with various potential applications that will have predetermined limits of hydrogen permeability. One of the experimental methods is thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). A hydrogen-saturated sample is degassed under vacuum and monotone heating. The desorption flux is measured by mass spectrometer to determine the character of interactions of hydrogen isotopes with the solid. We are interested in such transfer parameters as the coefficients of diffusion, dissolution, desorption. The paper presents a thermal desorption functional differential equations of neutral type with integrable weak singularity and a numerical method for TDS spectrum simulation, where only integration of a nonlinear system of low order ordinary differential equations (ODE) is required. This work is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 15-01-00744).

  19. Comparative study of TIG and SMAW root welding passes on ductile iron cast weldability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cárcel-Carrasco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the weldability of ductile iron when: (I a root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG process using an Inconel 625 source rod and filler welds are subsequently applied using coated electrodes with 97,6%Ni; and (II welds on ductile iron exclusively made using the manual shielded metal arc welding technique (SMAW. Both types of welds are performed on ductile iron specimen test plates that are subjected to preheat and post-weld annealing treatments. Samples with TIG root-welding pass shown higher hardness but slightly lower ductility and strength. Both types of welding achieved better ductile and strength properties than ones found in literature.

  20. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  1. Bead-On-Plate Welding on S235JR Steel by Underwater Local Dry Chamber Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogalski Grzegorz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the effect of parameters of underwater local dry chamber welding on the properties of padding welds. The effect of heat input and the type of shielding gas on the structure and hardness of welds was established. the functions for estimating the maximum hardness of the heat affected zone have been also elaborated

  2. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  3. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  4. Measurement of the Residual Stresses and Investigation of Their Effects on a Hardfaced Grid Plate due to Thermal Cycling in a Pool Type Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Balaguru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR, grid plate is a critical component which is made of 316 L(N SS. It is supported on core support structure. The grid plate supports the core subassemblies and maintains their verticality. Most of the components of SFR are made of 316 L(N/304 L(N SS and they are in contact with the liquid-metal sodium which acts as a coolant. The peak operating temperature in SFR is 550°C. However, the self-welding starts at 500°C. To avoid self-welding and galling, hardfacing of the grid plate has become necessary. Nickel based cobalt-free colmonoy 5 has been identified as the hardfacing material due to its lower dose rate by Plasma Transferred Arc Welding (PTAW. This paper is concerned with the measurement and investigations of the effects of the residual stress generated due to thermal cycling on a scale-down physical model of the grid plate. Finite element analysis of the hardfaced grid plate model is performed for obtaining residual stresses using elastoplastic analysis and hence the results are validated. The effects of the residual stresses due to thermal cycling on the hardfaced grid plate model are studied.

  5. Evaluación de diferentes tipos de barnices en la protección de electrodos para la soldadura subacuática//Evaluation of different types of varnishs to protect underwater welding electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rodríguez-Pérez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available El artículo tiene como objetivo evaluar  las posibilidades de empleo de diferentes tipos de barnices como impermeabilizantes para los electrodos del tipo AWS E 6013, cuando se realiza la soldadura  en condiciones subacuática mojada. Los barnices evaluados son el Vinílico, Marítimo, base Poliuretano y una nueva variante base Isopor. Los métodos de evaluación incluye el comportamiento de la resistencia mecánica que le confiere al revestimiento a cada uno de los barnices, el agua adsorbida y el tipo de estructura en el cordón, utilizando microscopía óptica convencional. En este aspecto, la estructura en todos los cordones realizados con el electrodo E 6013, independientemente del impermeabilizante utilizado es similar, caracterizada por ferrita primaria o de contorno de grano y del tipo Widmanstätten, sin embargo, se determinó, que el impermeabilizante base Isopor, garantiza una mejor protección del electrodo en cuanto a la cantidad de agua adsorbida y adherencia del revestimiento.Palabras claves: soldadura subacuática, impermeabilizante, electrodos._______________________________________________________________________________The article aims to assess the potential use of different types of paints and waterproofing materials for the electrodes of type AWS E 6013, when performing underwater welding in wet conditions. The coatings evaluated are Vinyl, Maritime, polyurethane base and a new variant Isopor base. Evaluation methods include the behavior of the mechanical strength to the coating gives each of the varnishes, the adsorbed water and the type of structure in the welds, using conventional microscopy. In this sense, the structure in all the welds made with the electrode E 6013, regardless of waterproofed used is similar, characterized by primary or ferrite grain boundary and Widmanstätten type, however, it was determined that the base waterproofing Isopor, guarantees better protection of the electrode in terms of the amount of

  6. Efeito do tipo de revestimento na soldagem a ponto de aços galvanizados Effect of coating type on spot welding of galvanized steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcélio Anício da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Os aços galvanizados são cada vez mais utilizados pela indústria automobilística devido à sua excelente resistência à corrosão e boa trabalhabilidade. A soldagem a pontos por resistência de aços galvanizados apresenta o inconveniente de um maior desgaste dos eletrodos quando comparada com a soldagem de aços não revestidos. Este é causado pela reação do zinco com o cobre do eletrodo, formando uma liga Zn-Cu (latão que diminui a vida útil do eletrodo. No presente trabalho, foram feitos testes de soldagem a ponto utilizando aços livres de intersticiais (IF, revestidos por imersão a quente com zinco puro (GI e liga Zn-Fe (GA. Foram determinados os campos de soldabilidade dinâmicos e a vida útil dos eletrodos para juntas formadas pelas combinações GA/GA, GI/GI e GA/GI. O estudo do campo de soldabilidade dinâmica mostrou que os valores de corrente necessários para a obtenção de uma solda adequada aumentam mais rapidamente para a junta de materiais GI/GI e este efeito foi associado com a maior contaminação do eletrodo pelo Zn do revestimento. Por sua vez, a soldagem da junta GA/GI apresenta taxas de variação desta corrente um pouco maiores do que a da junta GA/GA, mas menores que a da junta GI/GI. Em geral, a junta GA/GI apresentou resultados nos testes de soldagem mais próximos dos da junta GA/GA em comparação com os testes com a junta GI/GI. Isto mostra a influência positiva, do revestimento GA, no aumento do número de pontos de solda, mesmo quando a junta é constituída de aços com dois tipos de revestimentos diferentes (GA e GI.Steels coated with zinc and zinc-iron alloys are being increasingly used by the car industry due to their excellent corrosion resistance and good workability. Spot welding of coated steels has the disadvantage of increasing electrodes wear when compared to uncoated steels. Such wear is caused by the reaction of the zinc coating with the copper of the electrode forming an alloy Zn

  7. Effect of Interfacial Reaction on the Mechanical Performance of Steel to Aluminum Dissimilar Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Ying-Chun; Robson, Joe D.; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) have been investigated in dissimilar aluminum to steel welds, manufactured by high power (2.5 kW) ultrasonic spot welding (USW). To better understand the influence of alloy composition, welds were produced between a low-carbon steel (DC04) and two different aluminum alloys (6111 and 7055). The joint strengths were measured in lap shear tests and the formation and growth behavior of IMCs at the weld interface were characterized by electron microscopy, for welding times from 0.2 to 2.4 seconds. With the material combinations studied, the η (Fe2Al5) intermetallic phase was found to form first, very rapidly in the initial stage of welding, with a discontinuous island morphology. Continuous layers of η and then θ (FeAl3) phase were subsequently seen to develop on extending the welding time to greater than 0.7 second. The IMC layer formed in the DC04-AA7055 combination grew thicker than for the DC04-AA6111 welds, despite both weld sets having near identical thermal histories. Zinc was also found to be dissolved in the IMC phases when welding with the AA7055 alloy. After post-weld aging of the aluminum alloy, fracture in the lap shear tests always occurred along the joint interface; however, the DC04-AA6111 welds had higher fracture energy than the DC04-AA7055 combination.

  8. XRD and DTA Analysis of Developed Agglomerated Fluxes for Submerged Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique study of structural and chemical analysis of crystalline phases in developed agglomerated fluxes was carried out. Thirty-two fluxes were developed by using a mixture of oxides, halides, carbonates, silicates, and ferroalloys for submerged arc welding. The present paper focuses on only ten (out of thirty-two fluxes which were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD to know the different types of oxides formed and changed in oxidation number of metallic centers after sintering process at around 850∘C. To know the effect of temperature over phase transformation and melting of different compounds, differential thermal analysis (DTA was carried out from 1000 to 1400∘C. This study aims to know the quantity of ions present (percentage and melting behavior of developed agglomerated fluxes for submerged arc welding process.

  9. Non-Destructive Assessment of Residual Strength of Thermally Damaged Concrete Made with Different Aggregate Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mróz, Katarzyna; Hager, Izabela

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results obtained for four concretes made with four different aggregate types: basalt, granite, dolomite and riverbed gravel. In this study, the cement paste and mortar compositions and their volumes remained the same for all the four concretes that allow clear comparisons and conclusions of aggregate type effect. Moreover, the aggregate particle size distribution is chosen to be quasi identical for all concretes so that this factor does not affect the concrete behaviour. The residual material properties (after heating and cooling down) are determined with the use of destructive and non-destructive testing methods for each concrete type being not thermally damaged and after thermal exposure at temperature of 200 °C. 400 °C, 600 °C, 800 °C and 1000 °C. Residual mechanical properties are compared with diagnostic parameters obtained with NDT methods. The aim of this study is to provide and compare the regression curves between selected non-destructive diagnostic parameters and the residual values of mechanical properties. The NDT methods used in this experiment are: surface hardness and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity.

  10. Analysis on Development of Transverse - Sectioned Weld Zone using FEM Verified with Multipulsed Resistance Seam Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper details an investigation, through an experimental study, of the development of weld nuggets and a heat-affected zone (HAZ in resistance seam welding(RSEW using a numerical simulation approach. SYSWELD software for the simulation of heat treatment, welding, and welding assembly was utilized for the simulation process. The integrated Spot Weld Advisor (SWA in SYSWELD was applied to simulate the RSEW model using a two-dimensional axis-symmetric FE model with customized electrode meshing. The thermal-mechanical-electrical characteristic and contact condition were taken into account throughout this study. The developed model comprised a transverse cross section for welding two layers of low carbon steel with a thickness of 1 mm. For the experimental verification, three-pulsed RSEW with two different current stages was carried out. It was discovered that this program code, Spotweld Advisor, when used with the meshing method, was capable of offering results that were in agreement with physical experiments.

  11. Production of Manual Metal Arc Welding Electrodes with Local Raw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manual arc welding using flux coated electrodes is carried out by producing an electric arc between the base metal and a flux covered metal electrode with electric current that depends on the type of electrode, material, welding position and the desired strength. The composition of flux coated electrodes is complex and a ...

  12. production of manual arc welding electrodes with local raw materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHUKSSUCCESS 4 LOVE

    ABSTRACT. Manual arc welding using flux coated electrodes is carried out by producing an electric arc between the base metal and a flux covered metal electrode with electric current that depends on the type of electrode, material, welding position and the desired strength. The composition of flux coated electrodes is ...

  13. Rapid solidification in laser welding of stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambon, A. (Univ. di Padova (Italy)); Bonollo, F.

    1994-04-30

    The microstructural characterization of both weld beads and heat affected zones (HAZ) was carried out on austenitic (AISI 304, 316) and duplex (UNS 31803) stainless steels, laser welded under various working parameters (power, traverse speed, shielding gas), by means of light microscopy, SEM, TEM, and image analysis, with the aim of pointing out changes in the amounts of the present phases, with respect to those predicted by equilibrium diagrams. Moreover, an analytical thermal model of laser beam welding was employed in order to evaluate the cooling rates involved in the process. The thermal field analysis, checked by comparing the calculated and the actual weld beads, has been used as a tool aimed at correlating cooling rates and microstructural characteristics. (orig.)

  14. Quantum discord of thermal states of a spin chain with Calogero-Moser type interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, XiaoSan; Qiao, Ying; Zhao, GuangXing; Wang, AnMin

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of Calogero-Moser type interaction on the quantum discord of thermal states of a spin chain. Our results imply that the quantum discord depends on the relative distance between the spins, the external magnetic field, and the temperature. By a comparison between the quantum discord and the entanglement of formation, the quantum discord is more robust than the entanglement of formation in the sense that the latter takes a zero value in a large range of the parameters, while the former takes a nonzero value.

  15. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  16. Characterization of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welded DP600 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ramazani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW as a predominant welding technique used for joining steels in automotive applications needs to be studied carefully in order to improve the mechanical properties of the spot welds. The objectives of the present work are to characterize the resistance spot weldment of DP600 sheet steels. The mechanical properties of the welded joints were evaluated using tensile-shear and cross-tensile tests. The time-temperature evolution during the welding cycle was measured. The microstructures observed in different sites of the welds were correlated to thermal history recorded by thermocouples in the corresponding areas. It was found that cracks initiated in the periphery region of weld nuggets with a martensitic microstructure and a pull-out failure mode was observed. It was also concluded that tempering during RSW was the main reason for hardness decrease in HAZ.

  17. Experimental study of hot cracking at circular welding joints of 42CrMo steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Genyu; Chen, Binghua; Wang, Jinhai; Zhou, Cong

    2017-12-01

    The hot cracking at circular welding joints of quenched and tempered 42CrMo steel were studied. The flow of the molten pool and the solidification process of weld were observed with a high-speed video camera. The information on the variations in the weld temperature was collected using an infrared (IR) thermal imaging system. The metallurgical factors of hot cracking were analyzed via metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result shows that leading laser laser-metal active gas (MAG) hybrid welding process has a smaller solid-liquid boundary movement rate (VSL) and a smaller solid-liquid boundary temperature gradient (GSL) compared with leading arc laser-MAG hybrid welding process and laser welding process. Additionally, the metal in the molten pool has superior permeability while flowing toward the dendritic roots and can compensate for the inner-dendritic pressure balance. Therefore, leading laser laser-MAG hybrid welding process has the lowest hot cracking susceptibility.

  18. Gas and RRR distribution in high purity Niobium EB welded in Ultra-High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anakhov, S.; Singer, X.; Singer, W.; Wen, H.

    2006-05-01

    Electron beam (EB) welding in UHV (ultra-high vacuum, 10-5÷10-8 mbar) is applied in the standard fabrication of high gradient niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities of TESLA design. The quality of EB welding is critical for cavity performance. Experimental data of gas content (H2, O2, N2) and RRR (residual resistivity ratio) measurements in niobium (Nb) welding seams are presented. EB welding in UHV conditions allow to preserve low gas content (1÷3 wt. ppm hydrogen and 5÷7 ppm oxygen and nitrogen), essential for high values of RRR — 350÷400 units. Gas content redistribution in the electron beam welded and heat affected region take place in the welding process. Correlation between gas solubility parameters, RRR and thermal conductivity are presented. Mechanisms of gas solubility in EB welding process are discussed.

  19. Thermal-Induced Refractive Index Change Effects on Distributed Modal Filtering Properties of Rod-Type Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, E.; Poli, Federica; Jørgensen, Mette Marie

    2012-01-01

    The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change on distributed modal filtering rod-type photonic crystal fibers are numerically investigated. Results have shown a significant blue-shift of the single-mode range for increasing temperature.......The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change on distributed modal filtering rod-type photonic crystal fibers are numerically investigated. Results have shown a significant blue-shift of the single-mode range for increasing temperature....

  20. 3D modelling of a multi pass dissimilar tube welding and post weld heat treatment of nickel based alloy and chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar-Krishnasamy, Ram, E-mail: ram.kumar.krishnasamy@iwm.fraunhofer.d [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials, Woehlerstrasse 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Siegele, Dieter [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials, Woehlerstrasse 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    A dissimilar tube welding is performed between the nickel based Alloy617 and creep resistant steel VM12 using the former as the weld material. SYSWELD welding software is used to model the thermal and mechanical analysis. A readily available thermal history is used to calibrate the heat source input for the thermal analysis to generate the adequate thermal cycle by fitting the welding velocity, heat intensity factor of the GOLDAK heat source and the length of molten zone. The transient temperature field is then incorporated as the input for the mechanical analysis to obtain the residual stresses in which the phase transformation of the materials during welding is taken into account. Subsequently, the weld materials are characterized by using the Norton's creep law to determine the Norton parameters based on relaxation experiments. The residual stresses generated after the multi pass welding by SYSWELD is transferred into ABAQUS as the initial condition for the post weld heat treatment (PWHT) simulation. The simulations show that the residual stresses reduce in magnitude but still present even after PWHT.

  1. Types and analysis of defects in welding junctions of the header to steam generator shells on power-generating units with VVER-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhigov, L. S.; Voevodin, V. N.; Mitrofanov, A. S.; Vasilenko, R. L.

    2016-10-01

    Investigation objects were metal templates, which were cut during the repair of welding junction no. 111 (header to the steam generator shell) on a power-generating unit with VVER-1000 of the South-Ukraine NPP, and substances of mud depositions collected from walls of this junction. Investigations were carried out using metallography, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion microanalysis by an MMO-1600-AT metallurgical microscope and a JEOL JSM-7001F scanning electron microscope with the Shottky cathode. As a result of investigations in corrosion pits and mud depositions in the area of welding junction no. 111, iron and copper-enriched particles were revealed. It is shown that, when contacting with the steel header surface, these particles can form microgalvanic cells causing reactions of iron dissolution and the pit corrosion of metal. Nearby corrosion pits in metal are microcracks, which can be effect of the stress state of metal under corrosion pits along with revealed effects of twinning. The hypothesis is expressed that pitting corrosion of metal occurred during the first operation period of the power-generating unit in the ammonia water chemistry conditions (WCC). The formation of corrosion pits and nucleating cracks from them was stopped with the further operation under morpholine WCC. The absence of macrocracks in metal of templates verifies that, during operation, welding junction no. 111 operated under load conditions not exceeding the permissible ones by design requirements. The durability of the welding junction of the header to the steam generator shell significantly depends on the technological schedule of chemical cleaning and steam generator shut-down cooling.

  2. Laser beam welding of titanium nitride coated titanium using pulse-shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Sergio Fernandes de Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new welding method which allows the assembly of two titanium nitride coated titanium parts is proposed. The welding procedure utilizes the possibility for pulse-shaping in order to change the energy distribution profile during the laser pulse. The pulse-shaping is composed of three elements: a a short high power pulse for partial ablation at the surface; b a long pulse for thermal penetration; and c a quenching slope for enhanced weldability. The combination of these three elements produces crack-free welds. The weld microstructure is changed in comparison to normal welding, i.e. with a rectangular pulse, as the nitrogen and the microhardness are more homogenously distributed in the weld under pulse-shaping conditions. This laser pulse dissolves the TiN layer and allows nitrogen to diffuse into the melt pool, also contributing to an enhanced weldability by providing suitable thermal conditions.

  3. Thermal history of type-3 chondrites in the NASA antarctic collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, L.; Quirico, E.; Montagnac, G.

    2014-07-01

    Chondrites are the most primitive meteorites. However, they were all modified in some ways by post-accretion geological processes operating on their asteroidal parent bodies. Hence, to decipher the formation(s) and origin(s) of their components, we must first understand how chondritic materials were modified in their asteroidal parent bodies. The modifications induced by secondary processes should not be underestimated and have to be precisely estimated before any interpretation of chondrite properties in terms of cosmochemistry. In particular, all chondrites contain some organic components that were potentially chemically and physically modified through post-accretion processes. A thin understanding of the induced evolution is required to allow for pertinent comparisons with other primitive extraterrestrial materials, such as cometary grains, to finally address questions such as the origin of organics in the Solar System. Type 3 chondrites experienced thermal metamorphism on their asteroidal parent body due to the radioactive decay of elements such as ^{26}Al. Temperatures higher than 300 °C were experienced on timescales of several thousands of years. Still, type 3 chondrites remain as unequilibrated rocks and common mineralogical thermometers cannot be applied. The polyaromatic carbonaceous matter is sensitive to thermal episodes (of long and short duration) experienced by the host meteorite. In particular, its structural order directly reflects the thermal history experienced on their parent bodies. The structural modification of the aromatic carbonaceous matter towards a higher order is irreversible, and independent of the mineralogy and degree of aqueous alteration. It is mainly controlled by the peak metamorphic temperature. Moreover, under the assumption of fairly similar organic precursors among chondrites of distinct groups, the structural order of polyaromatic organic matter allows for a direct comparison of their metamorphic grades. It is then possible

  4. Development of Alternative Technology to PWHT in Site Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. D.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, K. B.; Sung, K. W

    2007-04-15

    ASME Section IX added requirements for qualification when using temper bead welding in the 2004 edition. The temper bead welding techniques which can satisfy the requirements of the Code are needed to use them in the site repair welding. The optimized welding parameters can be obtained when controlling the process to supercritically-reheat and to subcritically-reheat the coarse grain region sequently. The microstructures of SCFGCG obtained from the Gleegle simulated specimens and those of post weld heat treated coarse grain region are compared. The obtained both microstructures showed almost similar patterns. mid bead deposition technique Suggested in this study has a technical concept that the mid beads are deposited between the deposited initial beads repeatedly in a bead layer, which gives a lot of reheating effects on brittle microstructure in HAZ. This newly suggested technique is considered to have more effective tempering effect than the conventional temper bead technique which has concept to deposit one type of beads in a bead layer. The suggested modeling in this study can simulate well the SMAW process. Hence this modeling was used in analyzing the more complicated welding process of multi-layer welding. The modeling was used to analyze the tempering effect on the microstructures of HAZ by considering the patterns of overlapping of the reheating regions under the consequently deposited beads. When considering the crack path in the ever-matched weld metal condition, the interface may have a resistance against the crack propagation. A182 filler and A625 filler were used to make the weld specimens which have different weld metal conditions. The crack directed toward the under-matched weld metal may propagate across the fusion line easier than that of the even-matched weld metal condition.

  5. Life time assessment and repair of dissimilar metal welds. Part 1; Livslaengdsbedoemning och reparation av blandsvetsskarvar. Etapp 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld

    2005-04-01

    Research on the performance of dissimilar metal welds in high temperature plant has been performed for many years. Nevertheless damages are frequent in such welds. In order to decrease the damage problems and make it possible to estimate residual lifetimes of dissimilar metal welds in our Nordic countries it is first essential to i) collect the knowledge in the literature and ii) map current dissimilar metal welds and their condition in Swedish and Danish plants. The present report describes this first part of the work. There is a comprehensive literature of she subject. Most work has been performed on ferritic/austenitic dissimilar welds. In Swedish and Danish plants the dominating type is ferritic/martensitic dissimilar welds. The damage mechanisms are about the same in the two types, creep is the dominating mechanism, but plant experience indicates that the ferritic/austenitic combination is more prone to damage than the ferritic/martensitic one. An important difference between the two types is that Ni-base weld metal generally prolongs the lifetime for ferritic/austenitic dissimilar welds whereas it shows an opposite effect in ferritic/martensitic ones. In the latter case use of a 5 % Cr weld metal seems to be the best choice but the experiences of such welds are limited. The mapping of dissimilar welds indicates that there are predominantly special kinds of welds which fail whereas ordinary butt welds and branch welds are relatively free from damage.

  6. The algorithm of verification of welding process for plastic pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzasinski, R.

    2017-08-01

    The study analyzes the process of butt welding of PE pipes in terms of proper selection of connector parameters. The process was oriented to the elements performed as a series of types of pipes. Polymeric materials commonly referred to as polymers or plastics, synthetic materials are produced from oil products in the polyreaction compounds of low molecular weight, called monomers. During the polyreactions monomers combine to build a macromolecule material monomer named with the prefix poly polypropylene, polyethylene or polyurethane, creating particles in solid state on the order of 0,2 to 0,4 mm. Finished products from polymers of virtually any shape and size are obtained by compression molding, injection molding, extrusion, laminating, centrifugal casting, etc. Weld can only be a thermoplastic that softens at an elevated temperature, and thus can be connected via a clamp. Depending on the source and method of supplying heat include the following welding processes: welding contact, radiant welding, friction welding, dielectric welding, ultrasonic welding. The analysis will be welding contact. In connection with the development of new generation of polyethylene, and the production of pipes with increasing dimensions (diameter, wall thickness) is important to select the correct process.

  7. ULiAS 4 - Experimental validation of a software that models ultrasonic wave propagation through an anisotropic weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirdelius, Haakan; Persson, Gert; Hamberg, Kenneth (SCeNDT, Chalmers Univ. Of Tech., SE-412 96 Goeteborg (SE)); Hoegberg, Kjell (SQC Kvalificeringscentrum AB, SE-183 25 Taeby (SE))

    2008-07-01

    New and stronger demands on reliability of used NDE/NDT procedures and methods have evolved in Europe during the last decade. In order to elaborate these procedures, efforts have to be taken towards the development of mathematical models of applied NDT methods. Modelling of ultrasonic non-destructive testing is useful for a number of reasons, e.g. physical understanding, parametric studies, and the qualification of procedures and personnel. An important issue regarding all models is the validation, i.e. securing that the results of the model and the corresponding computer programs are correct. This can be accomplished by comparisons with other models, but ultimately by comparisons with experiments. In this study a numerical model and experimental results are compared and the work has been performed in collaboration with SQC Kvalificeringscentrum AB. Four different welds have been investigated to give basic data to a mathematical model that describes the ultra sonic wave paths through the welds in these materials. The welds are made in austenitic stainless steel (type 18-8) and in Inconel 182. Two cuts outs are made in each weld, one longitudinal and one transversal cut across the welds, in order to determine the material orientation. In the numerical model the incident field, described by rays, is given by a P wave probe model. The ray tracing technique is based on geometrical optics and a 2D algorithm has been developed. The model of the weld is based on a relatively primitive assumption of the grain structure for a V-butt weld. The columnar structure of austenitic welds is here modelled as a weld where each sub region corresponds to a grain group. The response of the receiver is calculated according to Auld's reciprocity principle. UT data collection was performed by SQC according to guidelines given from Chalmers. The purpose to collect data from real inspection objects with known material structure is to compare experimental data with theoretically

  8. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  9. Fabrication of Lotus-Type Porous Aluminum through Thermal Decomposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. Y.; Park, J. S.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-04-01

    Lotus-type porous aluminum with cylindrical pores was fabricated by unidirectional solidification through thermal decomposition of calcium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate, or titanium hydride. The pore-forming gas decomposed from calcium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate, and titanium hydride is identified as hydrogen. The elongated pores are evolved due to the solubility gap between liquid and solid when the melt dissolving hydrogen is solidified unidirectionally. The porosity of lotus aluminum is as high as 20 pct despite the type of the compounds. The pore size decreases and the pore density increases with increasing amount of calcium hydroxide, which is explained by an increase in the number of pore nucleation sites. The porosity and pore size in lotus aluminum fabricated using calcium hydroxide decrease with increasing argon pressure, which is explained by Boyle’s law. It is suggested that this fabrication method is simple and safe, which makes it superior to the conventional technique using high-pressure hydrogen gas.

  10. 21 Lutetia and other M-types: Their sizes, albedos, and thermal properties from new IRTF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, M.; Harris, A. W.; Delbo, M.; MIRSI Team

    2005-08-01

    The M-type taxonomic group, introduced by Tholen (1989), contains asteroids with generally featureless spectra and IRAS albedos of around 0.2. M-type asteroids were originally believed to have a metallic surface composition. However, it now seems that other types of surface composition may also give rise to M-type spectra (e.g. Rivkin et al., 2000). One of the Rosetta fly-by targets, M-type asteroid 21 Lutetia, was recently found by several authors to display spectral features indicative of a more primitive surface composition, which is usually associated with a C-type classification and a low albedo incompatible with the IRAS albedo for Lutetia. We report results from new thermal-infrared observations of Lutetia and other M-type asteroids performed at the NASA IRTF. The radiometric sizes and albedos of the targets have been determined and information on thermal properties such as thermal inertia has been derived from the apparent color temperatures of their thermal continua. One might expect metallic surfaces to have higher thermal conductivities and therefore to be associated with higher values of thermal inertia. The diameter and albedo derived for Lutetia are 98.3 +/- 5.9 km and pv = 0.208 +/- 0.025, in excellent agreement with the IRAS values. A C-type albedo (pv up to 0.1) is therefore ruled out but our results are not indicative of an unusually high thermal inertia. We also report on the analysis of observations of the M-type asteroids (129) Antigone and (785) Zwetana, both of which appear to have patches of very high and low radar albedo (M. Shepard, private communication) consistent with (but not restricted to) a metal and non-metal surface composition, respectively.

  11. Thermal Hydraulic Performance in a Solar Air Heater Channel with Multi V-Type Perforated Baffles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics in a solar air heater (SAH channel with multi V-type perforated baffles. The flow passage has an aspect ratio of 10. The relative baffle height, relative pitch, relative baffle hole position, flow attack angle, and baffle open area ratio are 0.6, 8.0, 0.42, 60°, and 12%, respectively. The Reynolds numbers considered in the study was in the range of 3000–10,000. The re-normalization group (RNG k-ε turbulence model has been used for numerical analysis, and the optimum relative baffle width has been investigated considering relative baffle widths of 1.0–7.0.The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data for the range considered in the study. Multi V-type perforated baffles are shown to have better thermal performance as compared to other baffle shapes in a rectangular passage. The overall thermal hydraulic performance shows the maximum value at the relative baffle width of 5.0.

  12. Dry hyperbaric gas metal arc welding of subsea pipelines: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Amin S.

    2012-07-01

    Ambitions in exploration of oil and gas fields at deeper water depth require continuous investigation and maintenance. The transportation pipelines laid in deep waters are both subjected to corrosion and buckling due to environmental phenomena. They may also often undergo branching (namely hot tapping) to redirect (or add to) the transportation paths. Mechanical joints and welding are both considered as available alternatives when sectioning and replacement of the pipes at shallow waters is necessary, yet, welding is more promising for deep waters where remote operation is central. Fusion welding on the other hand comprises several technological detractions for sound operations under high ambient pressures disregarding its low cost and flexibility. The foremost detracting phenomenon in the arc welding is called 'arc root constriction', which is defined as arc geometry shrinkage under the increased pressure. Consequently, the power delivery to the weld pool at different pressure levels is a major worry. Effects of ionization and dissociation energies of different gases and mixtures, partial pressure of environmental gases including hydrogen and oxygen, gasification and degasification of the weld metal, inclusions that affect the phase transformation, absorption and desorption kinetics, oxidation and deoxidation reactions and many more are the phenomena that can possibly be altered by the gas type and ambient pressure level. Spattering and fume generation is a problematic issue since the arc is rather unstable under high pressure. Thus, seeking the effect of different chamber gas mixtures on welding parameters, final microstructure and mechanical properties is the main objective of this work.Statistical analysis of the collected voltage and current waveforms is carried out to identify the source of arc misbehavior and instability (discussed in Paper I). The stochastic parameters is related to the electrical stability and resolved into a number of varying

  13. Gap-bridging During Quasi-simultaneous Laser Transmission Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmailzl, Anton; Hierl, Stefan; Schmidt, Michael

    Tightness is often the main requirement for quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welds. However, remaining gaps cannot be detected by the used set-path monitoring. By using a pyrometer in combination with a 3D-scanner, weld seam interruptions can be localized precisely while welding, due to temperature deviations along the weld contour. To analyze the temperature signal in correlation to the progress of gap-bridging, T-joint samples with predefined gaps are welded. The set-path is measured synchronously. Additionally, the temperature distribution and the influence of the thermal expansion of the polymers are studied by a thermo-mechanical FEM-process simulation. On top of that, the melt blow-out of the welded samples is analyzed using μCT-measurements. The experiments have shown that closing of a gap can be identified reliably by the temperature signal and that the squeezed melt flow into the gap and the thermal expansion in the gap zone accelerates gap-bridging. Furthermore the inserted heat can be adapted in the fault zone, in order to avoid thermal damage.

  14. Laser-multi-pass-narrow-gap-welding of hot crack sensitive thick aluminum plates

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, D.; Schedewy, R.; Brenner, B.; Standfuß, J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the current process limitations for laser beam welding of thick aluminum plates (>10 mm) have been overcome by high brilliant multi-kilowatt laser, there are still difficulties resulting from the material physical properties, e.g. the high heat conductivity, the large heat capacity and the high thermal expansion coefficient of aluminum. Especially for very deep weld seams, insufficient dilution of filler wire material in the root of the weld seam and the danger of hot cracks increase...

  15. Characterising electron beam welded dissimilar metal joints to study residual stress relaxation from specimen extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Abburi Venkata, Kiranmayi; Truman, Christopher E; Smith, David J.; Bhaduri, Arun K

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear power plants require dissimilar metal weld joints to connect the primary steam generator made from ferritic steel to the intermediate heat exchanger made from austenitic steel. Such joints are complex because of the mismatch in the thermal and the mechanical properties of the materials used in the joint. Electron Beam (EB) welding is emerging as a promising technique to manufacture dissimilar joints providing a great many advantages over conventional welding techniques, in terms of lo...

  16. Experimental Investigation on Micro-Welding of Thin Stainless Steel Sheet by Fiber Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd I.S. Ismail; Yasuhiro Okamoto; Akira Okada; Yoshiyuki Uno

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The miniaturization of components plays an important role for manufacturing in electrical and electronic industries. Therefore, the joining technology of thin metal sheets has been strongly required. Laser welding with micro-beam and high-speed scanning is a promising solution in micro-welding, because it has high-potential advantages in welding heat sensitive components with precise control of heat input and minimal thermal distortion. Approach: In this study, the characte...

  17. Mechanical properties and microstructure of F-82H welded joints using CO{sub 2} laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanouchi, N.; Shiba, K.

    1996-10-01

    The laser welding of F-82H was successfully conducted. The heat affected zone of the welding, was about 21 mm width. It was quite adequate to make small specimens, such as SS-3 type sheet tensile specimen.

  18. Microstructure development of welding joints in high Cr ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubushiro, Keiji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morishima, Keiko [IHI Corporation (Japan). Research Lab.

    2010-07-01

    Creep failure in high Cr ferritic steels welding joints are Type IV failure. Type IV-failure was ruptured in fine grained region of heat affected zone, microstructure and phase transformation process at welding in fine grained region were very important to clarify. Microstructure difference of heat affected zone was investigated in Gr.91, Gr.92, Gr.122 welding joint. The fraction of 60 degree block boundary, packet boundary, random boundary (including prior gamma boundary) length was compared in three ferritic steels by EBSP(Electron Backscatter Diffraction Pattern) analysis. HAZ was almost fully martensite phase in Gr.122 weld joint. On the other hand, HAZ in Gr.91 welding joint were some equiaxial grain and martensite structure. (orig.)

  19. X-Ray diffraction technique applied to study of residual stresses after welding of duplex stainless steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monin, Vladimir Ivanovitch; Assis, Joaquim Teixeira de [Instituto Politecnico do Rio e Janeiro (IPRJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Turibus, Sergio Noleto; Payao Filho, Joao C., E-mail: sturibus@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Duplex stainless steel is an example of composite material with approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite phases. Difference of physical and mechanical properties of component is additional factor that contributes appearance of residual stresses after welding of duplex steel plates. Measurements of stress distributions in weld region were made by X-ray diffraction method both in ferrite and austenite phases. Duplex Steel plates were joined by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) technology. There were studied longitudinal and transverse stress components in welded butt joint, in heat affected zone (HAZ) and in points of base metal 10 mm from the weld. Residual stresses measured in duplex steel plates jointed by welding are caused by temperature gradients between weld zone and base metal and by difference of thermal expansion coefficients of ferrite and austenite phases. Proposed analytical model allows evaluating of residual stress distribution over the cross section in the weld region. (author)

  20. Numerical modeling of welded joints by the "Friction Stir Welding" process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego H. Santiago

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed to simulate the Friction Stir Welding process as a three-dimensional thermally coupled viscoplastic flow. A Finite Element technique is employed, within the context of a general purpose FEM framework, to provide the temperature distributions and the patterns of plastic flow for the material involved in the welded joints. The computational tool presented here may be of great relevance for technologist seeking to set the process control variables, as they are intended to obtain suitable material properties that yield the adequate on service response of the structural components.

  1. MODELING OF THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF METALS DURING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    30 juin 2012 ... ABSTRACT. The laser welding provides a very high energy density, this allows the use of welds narrow, deep and at high speeds. Because of its advantages over other joining processes, laser welding is a process of manufacturing the most important. In order to model the thermal behavior, we must study ...

  2. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  3. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  4. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  5. Thermal Recovery from Cold-Working in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenen, A. D.; Webster, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Cold-working of most thermocouples has a significant, direct impact on the Seebeck coefficient which can lead to regions of thermoelectric inhomogeneity and accelerated drift. Cold-working can occur during the wire swaging process, when winding the wire onto a bobbin, or during handling by the end user—either accidentally or deliberately. Swaging-induced cold-work in thermocouples, if uniformly applied, may result in a high level of homogeneity. However, on exposure to elevated temperatures, the subsequent recovery process from the cold-working can then result in significant drift, and this can in turn lead to erroneous temperature measurements, often in excess of the specified manufacturer tolerances. Several studies have investigated the effects of cold-work in Type K thermocouples usually by bending, or swaging. However, the amount of cold-work applied to the thermocouple is often difficult to quantify, as the mechanisms for applying the strains are typically nonlinear when applied in this fashion. A repeatable level of cold-working is applied to the different wires using a tensional loading apparatus to apply a known yield displacement to the thermoelements. The effects of thermal recovery from cold-working can then be accurately quantified as a function of temperature, using a linear gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner. Variation in these effects due to differing alloy compositions in Type K wire is also explored, which is obtained by sourcing wire from a selection of manufacturers. The information gathered in this way will inform users of Type K thermocouples about the potential consequences of varying levels of cold-working and its impact on the Seebeck coefficient at a range of temperatures between ˜ 70°C and 600° C. This study will also guide users on the temperatures required to rapidly alleviate the effects of cold-working using thermal annealing treatments.

  6. Thermal Infrared Imaging Experiments of C-Type Asteroid 162173 Ryugu on Hayabusa2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tatsuaki; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Taguchi, Makoto; Imamura, Takeshi; Arai, Takehiko; Senshu, Hiroki; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Demura, Hirohide; Kitazato, Kohei; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kouyama, Toru; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Wada, Takehiko; Takita, Jun; Sakatani, Naoya; Horikawa, Yamato; Endo, Ken; Helbert, Jörn; Müller, Thomas G.; Hagermann, Axel

    2017-07-01

    The thermal infrared imager TIR onboard Hayabusa2 has been developed to investigate thermo-physical properties of C-type, near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu. TIR is one of the remote science instruments on Hayabusa2 designed to understand the nature of a volatile-rich solar system small body, but it also has significant mission objectives to provide information on surface physical properties and conditions for sampling site selection as well as the assessment of safe landing operations. TIR is based on a two-dimensional uncooled micro-bolometer array inherited from the Longwave Infrared Camera LIR on Akatsuki (Fukuhara et al., 2011). TIR takes images of thermal infrared emission in 8 to 12 μm with a field of view of 16 × 12° and a spatial resolution of 0.05° per pixel. TIR covers the temperature range from 150 to 460 K, including the well calibrated range from 230 to 420 K. Temperature accuracy is within 2 K or better for summed images, and the relative accuracy or noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) at each of pixels is 0.4 K or lower for the well-calibrated temperature range. TIR takes a couple of images with shutter open and closed, the corresponding dark frame, and provides a true thermal image by dark frame subtraction. Data processing involves summation of multiple images, image processing including the StarPixel compression (Hihara et al., 2014), and transfer to the data recorder in the spacecraft digital electronics (DE). We report the scientific and mission objectives of TIR, the requirements and constraints for the instrument specifications, the designed instrumentation and the pre-flight and in-flight performances of TIR, as well as its observation plan during the Hayabusa2 mission.

  7. A New Type of Carbon Resistance Thermometer with Excellent Thermal Contact at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkharadze, Nodar; Kumar, Ashwani; Csáthy, Gábor A.

    2010-09-01

    Using a new brand of commercially available carbon resistor we built a cryogenic thermometer with an extremely good thermal contact to its thermal environment. Because of its superior thermal contact the thermometer is insensitive to low levels of spurious radio frequency heating. We calibrated our thermometer down to 5 mK using a quartz tuning fork He-3 viscometer and measured its thermal resistance and thermal response time.

  8. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  9. Effect of Peculiarities of Heat Transfer, Diffusion and Phase Transformation on Joint Formation During Welding of Dissimilar Materials by High Power Fiber Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, Gleb; Klimova, Olga; Valdaytseva, Ekaterina

    The article describes mathematical models of diffusion and thermal processes for welding of dissimilar materials and kinetic model of diffusion-controlled deposition and growth of intermetallic inclusions in the weld. Developed models were combined and implemented in the model of weld joint formation for dissimilar materials. To verify a model the microstructure analysis of weld joints and elemental analysis in the diffusion zone by SEM has been made for welding of systems Fe-Cu, Al-Ti, Fe-Al. The good agreement between calculated and experimental data has been obtained. Examples of developed technologies of welding of dissimilar materials using high-power fiber lasers were discussed also.

  10. The use of field indentation microprobe in measuring mechanical properties of welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggag, F.M.; Wong, H.; Alexander, D.J.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    A field indentation microprobe (FIM) was conceived for evaluating the structural integrity of metallic components (including base metal, welds, and heat-affected zones) in situ in a nondestructive manner. The FIM consists of an automated ball indentation (ABI) unit for determining the mechanical properties (yield strength, flow properties, estimates of fracture toughness, etc.) and a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) unit (consisting of ultrasonic transducers and a video camera) for determining the physical properties such as crack size, material pileup around indentation, and residual stress presence and orientation. The laboratory version used in this work performs only ABI testing. ABI tests were performed on stainless steel base metal (type 316L), heat-affected zone, and welds (type 308). Excellent agreement was obtained between yield strength and flow properties (true-stress/true-plastic-strain curve) measured by the ABI tests and those from uniaxial tensile tests conducted on 308 stainless steel welds, thermally aged at 343/degree/C for different times, and on the base material. 4 refs., 17 figs.

  11. Thermal properties and flame retardancy of an ether-type UV-cured polyurethane coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A new UV-reactive monomer piperazine-N,N′-bis(acryloxyethylaryl-phosphoramidate (N-PBAAP containing phosphorus and nitrogen was synthesized and used as flame retardant for an ether-type UV-cured polyurethane acrylate (PUA coating. The thermal properties of the PUA films were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA in air and nitrogen atmosphere. The TGA results showed that the incorporation of N-PBAAP can obviously enhance the char residue of the PUA coatings. From the TGA and real time Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (RT-FTIR results, different degradation behaviors were observed in the PUA coatings with different N-PBAAP content. The combustibility of the PUA coatings was evaluated by microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC. The MCC results revealed that the addition of NPBAAP in the coatings can significantly reduce the peak Heat Release Rate (pHRR, Heat Release Capacity (HRC and the Total Heat Release (THR of the samples. Furthermore, dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMA was employed to examine the viscoelastic properties of the PUA films. It was found that the incorporation of N-PBAAP in the formulation can bring in more functional groups to the coatings, which results in an increase of the glass transition temperature (Tg and cross linking density (XLD of the films.

  12. Experimental study of a Darrieus-type wind turbine coupled to an oil-thermal converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driviere, J.

    1980-11-01

    A Darrieus-type wind turbine has been developed for heating applications by the coupling of the turbine apparatus to an oil-thermal converter. The vertical-axis turbine consists of two molded fiberglass-reinforced polyester blades with a NACA 0015 profile making up a rotor 2.2 m in diameter. Preliminary measurements of turbine power curves and power coefficient are in good agreement with predictions and literature values, and have been used as a basis for further testing of the entire windmill-converter apparatus. Wind-tunnel tests have been performed in a return channel of section 3 x 3 sq m in a mean flow of velocity up to 10 m/sec, and confirm predictions of power, inertia and equilibration in turbulence simulating atmospheric conditions. A means for the direction conversion of mechanical energy provided by the wind into thermal energy has been developed based on the motion of a rotating element in a viscous fluid, which is heated with a yield of nearly unity. Tests have shown theoretical determinations of the dimensions of stages for the recovery of losses due to the decrease in oil viscosity with temperature to be correct for oils of relatively low viscosity (30,000 cst at 25 C), although higher viscosity oils would allow a significant reduction in the size of the converter.

  13. Simulation of the welding of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hua Tay

    1989-07-01

    Helium was uniformly implanted using the ''tritium trick'' technique to levels of 0.18, 2.5, 27, 105 and 256 atomic part per million (appm) for type 316 stainless steel, and 0.3 and 1 appm for Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr-1MoVW). Both full penetration as well as partial penetration welds were then produced on control and helium-containing materials using the autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under full constraint conditions. For full penetration welds, both materials were successfully welded when they contained less than 0.3 appm helium. However, welds of both materials, when containing greater than 1 appm helium, were found to develop cracks during cooling of the weld. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the HAZ cracking was caused by the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. This cracking occurred as a result of the combination of high temperatures and high shrinkage tensile stresses. The cracking in the fusion zone was found to result from the precipitation of helium along dendrite interfaces. A model based on the kinetics of diffusive cavity growth is presented to explain the observed results. The model proposes a helium bubble growth mechanism which leads to final intergranular rupture in the heat-affected zone. Results of the present study demonstrate that the use of conventional fusion welding techniques to repair materials degraded by exposure to irradiation environments may be difficult if the irradiation results in the generation of helium equal to or greater than 1 appm.

  14. An analysis of the joints’ properties of thick-grained steel welded by the SAW and ESW methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of properties of welded joints of thick-grained steel of P460NH type used more and more often in the modern constructions. A process of examining a technology of welding has been carried out on the thick-walled butt joints of sheet metal by two methods of welding namely submerged arc welding (SAW - 121 and electroslag (ESW - 722. The article deals with a topic of optimizing a process of welding thick-walled welded joints of fine-grained steel due to their mechanical properties and efficiency.

  15. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  16. Dissimilar ultrasonic spot welding of aerospace aluminum alloy AA2139 to titanium alloy TiAl6V4

    OpenAIRE

    Prangnell, Philip; Zhang, Chaoqun Q; Robson, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure, hardness, lap shear strength and fracture energy of AA2139–TiAl6V4 spot joints produced by ultrasonic welding were investigated and related to the weld thermal cycle. No obvious intermetallic reaction layer was observed in the AA2139–TiAl6V4 welds, even using transmission electron microscopy. The hardness profile of AA2139 side after welding was studied, demonstrating that the heat introduced by the welding process leads to some softening with partial hardness recovery aft...

  17. The Investigation of Mechanical Properties of the Flash Welded Different Steel Bars

    OpenAIRE

    AKKUŞ, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, three type steel bars were selected as experimentalspecimens. The steel types are S235JR (St37), S355JR (St52),AISI 304 stainless steel. Experimental parameters are material type and weldcurrent. The specimens which have Ø24 x 200 mm dimensions flash welded botheach other and different steel bars as using three weld currents. After thewelding operations, the welded specimens were cooled at open - air conditionsand their diameters were dropped by using a lathe machine so that th...

  18. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DRUM TYPE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING ARRAYS IN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, N

    2009-04-27

    Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR 71.[1] In recent years, there has been a greater need to use these packagings to store the excess fissile material, especially plutonium for long term storage. While the design requirements for safe transportation of these packagings are well defined, the requirements for safe long term storage are not well established. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are stored carefully to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals to prevent any leakage and the impact limiter to maintain the package structural integrity. This paper analyzes different storage arrays for a typical 9977 packaging for thermal considerations and makes recommendations for their safe storage under normal operating conditions.

  19. A note on the thermal effects upon a Gurson-type material model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, M.; Andrade Pires, F. M.

    2016-05-01

    Gurson-type material models are based on concepts of porous materials and have been largely used to describe mechanical degradation under inelastic deformation. In addition to mechanical damage, temperature evolution is also relevant to this class of problems owing to thermal softening effects. This work addresses a finite strain thermo-elastic-plastic formulation fully coupled to the energy conservation equation and investigates the sensitivity of the mechanical response with respect to the temperature evolution based on tensile tests for small to moderate temperatures. The results indicate that the initial temperature, sensitivity of the yield stress to temperature and the heat transfer coefficient at the specimen surface play an important role on the evolution of the void fraction, stress distribution and, ultimately, the load-bearing capacity.

  20. Evaluation of welding by MIG in martensitic stainless steel; Avaliacao da soldagem pelo processo MIG em aco inoxidavel martensitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, M.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Mariano, N.A.; Marinho, D.H.C. Marinho, E-mail: neideaparecidamariano@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This work evaluated structure's characterization and mechanical properties after the welding process of the stainless steel CA6NM. The employed welding process was the metal active gas with tubular wire. The control of the thermal cycle in the welding process has fundamental importance regarding the properties of the welded joint, particularly in the thermally affected zone. The mechanical properties were appraised through impact resistance tests and the hardness and microstructure through metallographic characterization and Ray-X diffraction. The parameters and the process of welding used promoted the hardness and toughness appropriate to the applications of the steel. Welding energy's control becomes an essential factor that can affect the temperature of carbide precipitation and the nucleation of the retained austenite in the in the region of the in the thermally affected zone. (author)

  1. Definition of the Mathematical Model Coefficients on the Weld Size of Butt Joint Without Edge Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Vladimir P.; Melzitdinova, Anna V.

    2017-10-01

    This paper represents the definition methods for thermal constants according to the data of the weld width under the normal-circular heat source. The method is based on isoline contouring of “effective power – temperature conductivity coefficient”. The definition of coefficients provides setting requirements to the precision of welding parameters support with the enough accuracy for an engineering practice.

  2. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores - kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Christian A; Reineke, Kai; Knorr, Dietrich; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-01-01

    Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C.) botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores. We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near) isothermal HPT treatments at 300-1200 MPa at 30-75°C for 1 s to 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone), large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated) or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer) spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed first order kinetics. Dipicolinic acid release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective) physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced) germination at ≤450 MPa/≤45°C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60-70°C. Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores compared with the resistance of spores from other C. botulinum types could allow for the implementation of milder

  3. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Christian A.; Reineke, Kai; Knorr, Dietrich; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2015-01-01

    Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C.) botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores. We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near) isothermal HPT treatments at 300–1200 MPa at 30–75°C for 1 s to 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone), large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated) or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer) spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed first order kinetics. Dipicolinic acid release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective) physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced) germination at ≤450 MPa/≤45°C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60–70°C. Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores compared with the resistance of spores from other C. botulinum types could allow for the implementation of

  4. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andreas Lenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C. botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores.We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near isothermal HPT treatments at 300 – 1200 MPa at 30 – 75 °C for 1 s – 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone, large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed 1st order kinetics. DPA release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced germination at ≤ 450 MPa/≤ 45 °C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60 – 70 °C.Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores than spores from other C. botulinum types, could allow for the implementation of milder processes without

  5. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface.

  6. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert. galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, and Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubifiski, and Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above approximately 50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  7. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  8. Temperature measurements during laser skin welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Choi, Bernard; Welch, Ashley J.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1999-06-01

    A thermal camera was used to measure surface temperatures during laser skin welding to provide feedback for optimization of the laser parameters. Two-cm-long, full- thickness incisions were made in guinea pig skin. India ink was used as an absorber. Continuous-wave, 1.06-μm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing a pulse duration of approximately 100 ms. Cooling durations between scans of 1.6, 4.0, and 8.0 s were studied with total operation times of 3, 5, and 10 min, respectively. A laser spot diameter of 5 mm was used with the power constant at 10 W. Thermal images were obtained at 30 frames per second with a thermal camera detecting 3.5 micrometers radiation. Surface temperatures were recorded at 0, 1, and 6 mm from the center line of the incision. Cooling durations between scans of 1.6 s and 4.0 s in vitro resulted in temperatures at the weld site remaining above ~65°C for prolonged periods of time. Cooling durations between scans as long as 8.0 s were sufficient both in vitro and in vivo to prevent a significant rise in baseline temperatures at the weld site over time.

  9. Successive Bifurcation Conditions of a Lorenz-Type Equation for the Fluid Convection Due to the Transient Thermal Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling He

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the convection flow between the two parallel plates in a fluid cell subject to the transient thermal field. We use the modal approximations similar to that of the original Lorenz model to obtain a generalized Lorenz-type model for the flow induced by the transient thermal field at the bottom plate. This study examines the convection flow bifurcation conditions in relation to the transient temperature variations and the flow properties. We formulated successive bifurcation conditions and illustrated the various flow behaviors and their steady-state attractors affected by the thermal field functions and fluid properties.

  10. Investigations on Laser Beam Welding of Different Dissimilar Joints of Steel and Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffer, Oliver; Pfeifer, Ronny; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan

    Due to the enormous potential of weight saving, and the consequential reduction of pollutant emissions, the use of hybrid components made of steel and aluminum alloys is increasing steadily, especially concerning automotive lightweight construction. However, thermal joining of steel and aluminum is still being researched, due to a limited solubility of the binary system of iron and aluminum causing the formation of hard and brittle intermetallic phases, which decrease the strength and the formability of the dissimilar seam. The presented results show the investigation of laser beam welding for joining different dissimilar hybrid components of the steel materials HX220LAD+Z100, 22MnB5+AS150 and 1.4301, as well as the aluminum alloy AA6016-T4 as a lap joint. Among other things, the influences of the energy per unit length, the material grade, the sheet thickness t, the weld type (lap weld, fillet weld) and the arrangement of the base materials in a lap joint (aluminum-sided irradiation, steel-sided irradiation) on the achievable strengths are analyzed. The characterization of the dissimilar joints includes tensile shear tests and metallographic analyses, depending on the energy per unit length.

  11. Metal flow of a tailor-welded blank in deep drawing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Guo, Ruiquan

    2005-01-01

    Tailor welded blanks were used in the automotive industry to consolidate parts, reduce weight, and increase safety. In recent years, this technology was developing rapidly in China. In Chinese car models, tailor welded blanks had been applied in a lot of automobile parts such as rail, door inner, bumper, floor panel, etc. Concerns on the properties of tailor welded blanks had become more and more important for automobile industry. A lot of research had shown that the strength of the welded seam was higher than that of the base metal, such that the weld failure in the aspect of strength was not a critical issue. However, formability of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process was complex. Among them, the metal flow of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process must be investigated thoroughly in order to reduce the scrap rate during the stamping process in automobile factories. In this paper, the behavior of metal flow for tailor welded blanks made by the laser welding process with two types of different thickness combinations were studied in the deep drawing process. Simulations and experiment verification of the movement of weld line for tailor welded blanks were discussed in detail. Results showed that the control on the movement of welded seam during stamping process by taking some measures in the aspect of blank holder was effective.

  12. Prediction of Welding Deformation and Residual Stress of Stiffened Plates Based on Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, R. X.; Guo, Z. F.; Lei, Z. K.

    2017-12-01

    Thermo-elastic-plastic (TEP) method is a method that can accurately predict welding deformation and residual stresses, but the premise is to select the appropriate heat source parameters. Aiming at the two welded joints in the stiffened plate studied in this paper, the welding experiments of simple components were carried out respectively, and the corresponding welding deformation and residual stresses were measured. Based on the welding experiment, the corresponding TEP model was established, and the corresponding heat source parameters were obtained according to the experimental data. The comparison between the experimental results and the numerical results shows that the obtained heat source parameters can well predict the welding deformation and residual stress of the welded structure. And then, the obtained heat source parameters were applied to the TEP model of the stiffened plate. The prediction results show that the T-type fillet welds of the stiffened plate can reduce the angular deformation caused by the butt welds to a certain extent. In addition, we can also find that the heat of the subsequent welds can reduce the residual stresses at the completed welds. This method not only can save a lot of experimental costs and time, but also can accurately predict the welding deformation and residual stresses.

  13. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  14. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  15. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, B., E-mail: mazumderb@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Miller, M.K. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  16. Hydrogen mitigation in submerged arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimowicz, Steven

    With the role of hydrogen in weld metal well understood in its relation to cold cracking, there has been a push to produce welds with lower and lower diffusible hydrogen contents. The push for lower diffusible hydrogen contents has placed pressure on consumables manufactures to create consumables that can achieve the requirements for lower diffusible hydrogen content. Currently EM12K flux is produced so that it can achieve below 4 ml of diffusible hydrogen for every 100g of weld metal deposited (ml/100g) for submerged arc welding (SAW). The recent trend for industry is to preferentially achieve diffusible hydrogen contents below 3 ml/100g. Making it necessary to find a way to modify the flux to achieve a lower diffusible hydrogen content for the welds it produces. To achieve this goal a two phase plan was developed. The first phase was to characterize the entire welding system for hydrogen. Since the goal of the project is hydrogen mitigation, any amount of hydrogen that could be reduced is helpful and therefore must first be discovered. Sources of hydrogen may be found by analyzing the welding wire and base metal, as well as breaking the flux down into its components and production steps. The wire was analyzed for total hydrogen content as was the base metal. The flux and its components were analyzed using differential thermal analysis-simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA-STA) and later vacuum degassing for moisture content. The analysis of the wire showed that the copper coating on the wire was the largest contributor of hydrogen. There was lubricant present on the wire surface as well, but it did not contribute as much as the copper coating. It was found that a simple low temperature baking of the wire was enough to remove the lubricant and coating moisture. The base metal was found to have a similar total hydrogen content to that of the wire. The breakdown of the flux and production process for moisture content analysis revealed that the production process

  17. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  18. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  19. Repairing an implant titanium milled framework using laser welding technology: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Soni; Monaco, Edward A

    2009-04-01

    The application of laser welding technology allows titanium to be welded predictably and precisely to achieve accurate fit of a milled framework. Laser energy results in localized heat production, thereby reducing thermal expansion. Unlike soldering, laser energy can be directed to a small area, making it possible to laser weld close to acrylic resin or ceramic. This article describes the use of laser welding to repair an implant titanium milled fixed denture. A quick, cost-effective, accurate repair was accomplished, and the repaired framework possessed adequate strength and the same precise fit as the original framework.

  20. Three-dimensional simulations of resistance spot welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Zhang, Wenqi; Perret, William

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws from the fundamentals of electro-thermo-mechanical coupling to the main aspects of finite element implementation and three-dimensional modelling of resistance welding. A new simulation environment is proposed in order to perform three-dimensional simulations and optimization...... of resistance welding together with the simulations of conventional and special-purpose quasi-static mechanical tests. Three-dimensional simulations of resistance welding consider the electrical, thermal, mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of the material as well as the operating conditions...... of the welding machines. Simulations of the mechanical tests take into account material softening due to the accumulation of ductile damage and cover conventional tests, such as tensile–shear tests, cross-tension test and peel tests, as well as the possibility of special-purpose tests designed by the users...

  1. Superconducting properties of ultra-pure niobium welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyanov, S. E.; Kaniukov, E. Yu.; Pobol, I. L.; Yurevich, S. V.; Baturitsky, M. A.; Shirkov, G. D.; Budagov, Yu. A.; Demin, D. L.; Azaryan, N. S.

    2015-07-01

    An optimal electron-beam welding operating regime for ultra-pure sheet niobium has been developed for use in a superconducting resonator for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The formation of weld joints is studied and their microstructure and microhardness are investigated taking the required geometry of the weld seams into account. Low-temperature electrical measurements in magnetic fields up to 2 T are used to determine the critical parameters of the superconducting transition in the weld area. From the standpoint of the superconducting properties of the resonator, the slight degradation in the characteristics of sheet niobium observed in the thermally affected area (about 10% on average) is not of fundamental importance.

  2. Effects of frequency and temperature- and strain-wave form on thermal fatigue strength of type 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunenari, Toshiyasu; Horikawa, Takeshi; Okada, Tomonobu; Take, Koji; Miyashita, Takuya (Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Akashi, Hyogo (Japan). Technical Inst.)

    1983-06-01

    The effects of frequency and temperature- and strain-wave form on thermal fatigue strength were examined by conducting out-of-phase and in-phase thermal fatigue tests with three kinds of temperature-wave forms (fast heating and fast cooling, slow heating and slow cooling, slow heating and fast cooling) under temperature cycling between 350 - 650/sup 0/C and by isothermal low-cycle fatigue tests at 650/sup 0/C under cyclic frequencies of 0.5 -- 0.039 cpm. The following results were obtained. (1) The effect of frequency on fatigue life in out-of-phase thermal fatigue was as small as in isothermal low-cycle fatigue, whereas in in-phase thermal fatigue it was much greater and the fatigue life reduction was more remarkable in low frequency. (2) The effect of temperature- and strain-wave form on thermal fatigue life was still smaller than the effect of frequency on out-of-phase thermal fatigue life. (3) The fracture mode of out-of-phase thermal fatigue was the transgranular type even at the lowest frequency tested, but that of in-phase thermal fatigue changed to the intergranular type at low frequency. (4) Out-of-phase and in-phase thermal fatigue data obtained at the test condition of such an extremely low frequency as 0.039 cpm were found to coincide well with ..delta..epsilon sub(PC) - N sub(PC) and ..delta..epsilon sub(CP) - N sub(CP) relations, respectively.

  3. Thermal and infrared-diode laser effects on indocyanine-green-treated corneal collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, George T.; Patmore, Ann; Shallal, Assaad; McHugh, Dominic; Marshall, John

    1993-07-01

    It has been suggested that laser welds of collagenous tissues form by interdigitation and chemical bonding of thermally 'unraveled' collagen fibrils. We investigated this proposal by attempting to weld highly collagenous, avascular corneal tissue with an infrared (IR) diode laser as follows. First, the temperature at which corneal collagen shrinks and collagen fibrils 'split' into subfibrillary components was determined. Second, since use of a near-IR laser wavelength necessitated addition of an absorbing dye (indocyanine green (ICG) to the cornea, we measured absorption spectra of ICG-treated tissue to ensure that peak ICG absorbance did not change markedly when ICG was present in the cornea. Third, using gel electrophoresis of thermally altered corneal collagen, we searched for covalently crosslinked compounds predicted by the proposed welding mechanism. Finally, we attempted to weld partial thickness corneal incisions infused with ICG. Principal experimental findings were as follows: (1) Human corneal (type I) collagen splits into subfibrillary components at approximately 63 degree(s)C, the same temperature that produces collagen shrinkage. (2) Peak ICG absorption does not change significantly in corneal stroma or with laser heating. (3) No evidence was found for the formation of novel compounds or the loss of proteins as a result of tissue heating. All tissue treated with ICG, however, exhibited a novel 244 kD protein band indicating chemical activity between collagen and corneal stromal components. (4) Laser welding corneal incisions was unsuccessful possibly due to shrinkage of the sides of the incision, lack of incision compression during heating, or a less than optimal combination of ICG concentration and radiant exposure. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the biochemical and morphological complexity of ICG-enhanced IR laser-tissue welding and the need for further investigation of laser welding mechanisms.

  4. Fatigue Properties of Welded Butt Joint and Base Metal of MB8 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-xia YU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue properties of welded butt joint and base metal of MB8 magnesium alloy were investigated. The comparative fatigue tests were carried out using EHF-EM200K2-070-1A fatigue testing machine for both welded butt joint and base metal specimens with the same size and shape. The fatigue fractures were observed and analyzed by a scanning electron microscope of 6360 LA type. The experimental results show that the fatigue performance of the welded butt joint of MB8 magnesium alloy is sharply decreased. The conditional fatigue limit (1×107 of base metal and welded butt joint is about 69.41 and 32.76 MPa, respectively. The conditional fatigue limit (1×107 of the welded butt joint is 47.2 % of that of base metal. The main reasons are that the welding can lead to stress concentration in the weld toe area, tensile welding residual stress in the welded joint, as well as grain coarsening in the welding seam. The cleavage steps or quasi-cleavage patterns present on the fatigue fracture surface, indicating the fracture type of the welded butt joint belongs to a brittle fracture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.9132

  5. Advanced Welding Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Accutron Tool & Instrument Co.'s welder was originally developed as a tool specifically for joining parts made of plastic or composite materials in any atmosphere to include the airless environment of space. Developers decided on induction or magnetic heating to avoid causing deformation and it also can be used with almost any type of thermoplastic material. Induction coil transfers magnetic flux through the plastic to a metal screen that is sandwiched between the sheets of plastic to be joined. When welder is energized, alternating current produces inductive heating on the screen causing the adjacent plastic surfaces to melt and flow into the mesh, creating a bond on the total surface area. Dave Brown, owner of Great Falls Canoe and Kayak Repair, Vienna, VA, uses a special repair technique based on operation of the Induction Toroid Welder to fix canoes. Whitewater canoeing poses the problem of frequent gashes that are difficult to repair. The main reason is that many canoes are made of plastics. The commercial Induction model is a self-contained, portable welding gun with a switch on the handle to regulate the temperature of the plastic melting screen. Welder has a broad range of applications in the automobile, appliance, aerospace and construction industries.

  6. Welding rework data acquisition and automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-Lithium is a modern material that NASA MSFC is evaluating as an option for the aluminum alloys and other aerospace metals presently in use. The importance of aluminum-lithium is in it's superior weight to strength characteristics. However, aluminum-lithium has produced many challenges in regards to manufacturing and maintenance. The solution to these problems are vital to the future uses of the shuttle for delivering larger payloads into earth orbit and are equally important to future commercial applications of aluminum-lithium. The Metals Processes Branch at MSFC is conducting extensive tests on aluminum-lithium which includes the collection of large amounts of data. This report discusses the automation and data acquisition for two processes: the initial weld and the repair. The new approach reduces the time required to collect the data, increases the accuracy of the data, and eliminates several types of human errors during data collection and entry. The same material properties that enhance the weight to strength characteristics of aluminum-lithium contribute to the problems with cracks occurring during welding, especially during the repair/rework process. The repairs are required to remove flaws or defects discovered in the initial weld, either discovered by x-ray, visual inspection, or some other type of nondestructive evaluation. It has been observed that cracks typically appear as a result of or beyond the second repair. MSFC scientists have determined that residual mechanical stress introduced by the welding process is a primary cause of the cracking. Two obvious solutions are to either prevent or minimize the stress introduced during the welding process, or remove or reduce the stress after the welding process and MSFC is investigating both of these.

  7. An evaluation of welding processes to reduce hexavalent chromium exposures and reduce costs by using better welding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    A group of stainless steel arc welding processes was compared for emission rates of fume and hexavalent chromium, and costs per meter length of weld. The objective was to identify those with minimal emissions and also compare relative labor and consumables costs. The selection included flux-cored arc welding (FCAW), shielded-metal arc welding (SMAW), and multiple gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, and fume generation rates and hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) were measured. GMAW processes used were short-circuit (SC) and pulsed-spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding. Costs were estimated per meter of a 6.3-mm thick horizontal butt weld. Emission rates of Cr(6+) were lowest for GMAW processes and highest for SMAW; several GMAW processes had less than 2% of the SMAW generation rate. Labor and consumable costs for the processes studied were again highest for SMAW, with those of several GMAW types about half that cost. The results show that use of any of the GMAW processes (and flux-cored welding) could substantially reduce fume and Cr(6+) emissions, and greatly reduce costs relative to SMAW.

  8. Stress Analysis of Non-Ferrous Metals Welds by Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravarikova Helena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy welded material unevenly heated and thus supports the creation of tension. During the fusing process welding transient tensions generated in the welded material. Generation of the transient tensions depends on the thermal expansion and fixed permanently welded parts. Tensions are the result of the interaction of material particles. For welded parts and constructions it is necessary to know the size and direction of application of tensions. The emerging tensions can cause local change or a total deformation of welded materials. Deformations and residual stresses impair the performance of a welded construction, reduces the stability of the parts. To reduce or eliminate of action or a screening direction stresses and strains it is necessary to know the mechanism of their emergence. It is now possible to examine the emergence of tensions numerical experiments on any model using numerical simulation using FEM. Results of numerical experiment is the analysis of stress and deformation course. In the plane the tension it divided into normal σ and τ tangential folders. Decomposition stress on components simplifies the stress analysis. The results obtained from numerical analysis are correct to predict the stress distribution and size. The paper presents the results of numerical experiments stress analysis solutions fillet welds using FEM numerical simulation of welding of non-ferrous metals.

  9. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of arc welding of DMR-249A steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Pamnani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical attributes of DMR-249A steel weld joints manufactured by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A-GTAW processes were studied using Finite Element Model (FEM simulation. The thermal gradients and residual stresses were analyzed with SYSWELD software using double ellipsoidal heat source distribution model. The numerically estimated temperature distribution was validated with online temperature measurements using thermocouples. The predicted residual stresses profile across the weld joints was compared with the values experimentally measured using non-destructive techniques. The measured and predicted thermal cycles and residual stress profile was observed to be comparable. The residual stress developed in double sided A-GTAW joint were marginally higher in comparison to five pass SMAW joint due to phase transformation associated with high heat input per weld pass for A-GTAW process. The present investigations suggest the applicability of numerical modeling as an effective approach for predicting the thermo-mechanical properties influenced by welding techniques for DMR-249A steel weld joints. The tensile, impact and micro-hardness tests were carried to compare the welds. Considering benefits of high productivity and savings of labor and cost associated with A-GTAW compared to SMAW process, the minor variation in residual stress build up of A-GTAW joint can be neglected to develop A-GTAW as qualified alternative welding technique for DMR-249A steel.

  10. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    CERN Document Server

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  11. Sequential Events in the Irreversible Thermal Denaturation of Human Brain-Type Creatine Kinase by Spectroscopic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Song Gao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The non-cooperative or sequential events which occur during protein thermal denaturation are closely correlated with protein folding, stability, and physiological functions. In this research, the sequential events of human brain-type creatine kinase (hBBCK thermal denaturation were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, CD, and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. DSC experiments revealed that the thermal denaturation of hBBCK was calorimetrically irreversible. The existence of several endothermic peaks suggested that the denaturation involved stepwise conformational changes, which were further verified by the discrepancy in the transition curves obtained from various spectroscopic probes. During heating, the disruption of the active site structure occurred prior to the secondary and tertiary structural changes. The thermal unfolding and aggregation of hBBCK was found to occur through sequential events. This is quite different from that of muscle-type CK (MMCK. The results herein suggest that BBCK and MMCK undergo quite dissimilar thermal unfolding pathways, although they are highly conserved in the primary and tertiary structures. A minor difference in structure might endow the isoenzymes dissimilar local stabilities in structure, which further contribute to isoenzyme-specific thermal stabilities.

  12. Weld formation control at electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Koleva, Elena; Mladenov, Georgy; A. Shcherbakov

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam welding is used extensively to produce essential machine parts. The control of the basic beam parameters beam power or beam current at constant accelerating voltage, welding speed, current of focusing lens and distance between electron gun and welded sample surface is not enough to obtain at most of the regimes sound welds. Control of the focus position using analysis of the high frequency component of the current, collected by plasma, at periodic interactions on the beam (the o...

  13. Cold Plasma Welding System for Surgical Skin Closure: In Vivo Porcine Feasibility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harats, Moti; Lam, Amnon; Maller, Michael; Kornhaber, Rachel; Haik, Josef

    2016-09-29

    Cold plasma skin welding is a novel technology that bonds skin edges through soldering without the use of synthetic materials or conventional wound approximation methods such as sutures, staples, or skin adhesives. The cold plasma welding system uses a biological solder applied to the edges of a skin incision, followed by the application of cold plasma energy. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of a cold plasma welding system in approximating and fixating skin incisions compared with conventional methods and to evaluate and define optimal plasma welding parameters and histopathological tissue response in a porcine model. The cold plasma welding system (BioWeld1 System, IonMed Ltd, Yokneam, Israel) was used on porcine skin incisions using variable energy parameters. Wound healing was compared macroscopically and histologically to incisions approximated with sutures. When compared to sutured skin closure, cold plasma welding in specific system parameters demonstrated comparable and favorable wound healing results histopathologically as well as macroscopically. No evidence of epidermal damage, thermal or otherwise, was encountered in the specified parameters. Notably, bleeding, infection, and wound dehiscence were not detected at incision sites. Skin incisions welded at extreme energy parameters presented second-degree burns. Implementation of cold plasma welding has been shown to be feasible for skin closure. Initial in vivo results suggest cold plasma welding might provide equal, if not better, healing results than traditional methods of closure.

  14. Correlation between microstructure and hardness of the weld HAZ in grade 100 microalloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poorhaydari, K.; Patchett, B.M.; Ivey, D.G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2004-07-01

    High-strength microalloyed steels generally contain low levels of carbon to increase the weldability, and are therefore microalloyed with other elements to increase their strength. Micro alloy carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides play an important role in grain refinement and dispersion hardening. A weld thermal cycle creates changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). Variations in hardness across the HAZ were obtained in a grade 100 microalloyed steel, for different welding heat inputs. Hardness profiles across the HAZ were determined using nano-hardness tests. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to examine the microstructure of the steels and to evaluate the grain size, phase structure and precipitate type, shape and distribution. The uses of carbon extraction replicas in the examination of HSMA steels was demonstrated with particular reference to the systematic measurement of grain size. The properties of the base metal were compared with those of the fine-grained HAZ. The fine-grained HAZ for all heat inputs was composed primarily of polygonal ferrite, with some twinned martensite in the higher heat input samples. Twinned martensite regions were observed in the coarse-grained HAZ. The main cause for changes in hardness in the fine-grained HAZ was grain size changes. However, the relative hardening in the coarse-grained HAZ was due to the large packets of bainitic ferrite and martensite in the coarse-grained HAZ, with small ferrite/martensite laths. 27 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs.

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of the Friction Weld Process on 2195/2219 Grade Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Michael W.; Clark, Linda S.; Cox, Dwight E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center began an ambitious program designed to find alternative methods of repairing conventional TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welds and VPPA (Variable Polarity Plasma Arc) welds on the Space Shuttle External Tank without producing additional heat-related anomalies or conditions. Therefore, a relatively new method, invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, England, called Friction Stir Welding (FSW), was investigated for use in this application, as well as being used potentially as an initial weld process. As with the conventional repair welding processes, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) plays a crucial role in the verification of these repairs. Since it was feared that conventional NDE might have trouble with this type of weld structure (due to shape of nugget, grain structure, etc.) it was imperative that a complete study be performed to address the adequacy of the NDE process. This paper summarizes that process.

  16. Emission of dust and gases in tubular cored wire welding of steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Jolanta; Rams, Beata

    2003-01-01

    The emission of dusts and gases, which are generated during tubular cored wire welding and which are hazardous to health and the environment, were studied. Tests included various kinds of tubular electrode wires used for welding steel, that is, rutile flux cored wires, basic flux cored wires, and metal cored wires for welding unalloyed, low-alloy, and high-alloy steels as well as self-shielded flux cored wires used for welding low-alloy steels. The research results make it possible to assess the influence of the type of wire and welding conditions on the emission volume and to compare chemical hazards generated during tubular cored wire welding with those typical for other arc welding processes.

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Spectral Transmittance of Some Welding Glasses with ANSI Z87.1

    OpenAIRE

    saeed Rahmani; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban; Mohammadreza Nazari; Mohammad Ghassemi-Broumand

    2016-01-01

    Background: Welding emits harmful rays to the eyes. We evaluate and compare the UV, blue light and IR transmittance characteristics of some currently available welding safety protectors with ANSI Z87.1 criteria.Materials and Methods: Three type of welding safety protectors (three of each type) have been evaluated for spectral transmittance. One-sample T-test was performed to establish is there a statistically significant difference between the standard criteria and UV, blue and IR regions for...

  18. Comparative study on transverse shrinkage, mechanical and metallurgical properties of AA2219 aluminium weld joints prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arunkumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium alloy AA2219 is a high strength alloy belonging to 2000 series. It has been widely used for aerospace applications, especially for construction of cryogenic fuel tank. However, arc welding of AA2219 material is very critical. The major problems that arise in arc welding of AA2219 are the adverse development of residual stresses and the re-distribution as well as dissolution of copper rich phase in the weld joint. These effects increase with increase in heat input. Thus, special attention was taken to especially thick section welding of AA2219-T87 aluminium alloy. Hence, the present work describes the 25 mm-thick AA2219-T87 aluminium alloy plate butt welded by GTAW and GMAW processes using multi-pass welding procedure in double V groove design. The transverse shrinkage, conventional mechanical and metallurgical properties of both the locations on weld joints were studied. It is observed that the fair copper rich cellular (CRC network is on Side-A of both the weldments. Further, it is noticed that, the severity of weld thermal cycle near to the fusion line of HAZ is reduced due to low heat input in GTAW process which results in non dissolution of copper rich phase. Based on the mechanical and metallurgical properties it is inferred that GTAW process is used to improve the aforementioned characteristics of weld joints in comparison to GMAW process.

  19. Characterization the microstructure of pulsed Nd:YAG welding method in low frequencies; correlation with tensile and fracture behavior in laser-welded nitinol joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei Zoeram, Ali; Rahmani, Aida; Asghar Akbari Mousavi, Seyed Ali

    2017-05-01

    The precise controllability of heat input in pulsed Nd:YAG welding method provided by two additional parameters, frequency and pulse duration, has made this method very promising for welding of alloys sensitive to heat input. The poor weldability of Ti-rich nitinol as a result of the formation of Ti2Ni IMC has deprived us of the unique properties of this alloy. In this study, to intensify solidification rate during welding of Ti-rich nitinol, pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam in low frequency was employed in addition to the employment of a copper substrate. Specific microstructure produced in this condition was characterized and the effects of this microstructure on tensile and fracture behavior of samples welded by two different procedures, full penetration and double-sided method with halved penetration depth for each side were investigated. The investigations revealed although the combination of low frequencies, the use of a high thermal conductor substrate and double-sided method eliminated intergranular fracture and increased tensile strength, the particular microstructure, built in the pulsed welding method in low frequencies, results to the formation of the longitudinal cracks during the first stages of tensile test at weld centerline. This degrades tensile strength of welded samples compared to base metal. The results showed samples welded in double-sided method performed much better than samples welded in full penetration mode.

  20. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  1. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  2. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project: thermal analysis of spent fuel disposal in vertical emplacement boreholes in a welded tuff repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. John, C.M.

    1985-11-01

    Two- and three-dimensional heat transfer analyses were conducted to determine temperatures in the vicinity of a waste canister and an emplacement drift. The effect of emplacement of canisters containing spent fuel in vertical boreholes was simulated for the cases of an emplacement drift either fully ventilated or sealed immediately after canister emplacement. PORFLOW and THERM3D respectively solve the two- and three-dimensional forms of the diffusion equation. In the unventilated case, the effect of radiation was approximated by defining an equivalent radiation thermal conductivity. A simple code, TEMP3D, based on the closed form solutions for constant and decaying heat sources, was also used. Calculations indicate that the temperature at the canister borehole wall will peak at about 215{sup 0}C if the drift is ventilated and about 240{sup 0}C if it is unventilated. The peak temperature occurs sooner in the ventilated case; after 3 to 4 yr versus 9 yr. For a point 1 m from the wall of the emplacement borehole, the corresponding peak temperatures are 150{sup 0}C for the ventilated case and 185{sup 0}C for the unventilated case and occur at about 5 and 17 yr. We assumed that the effect of drift ventilation would be to maintain a uniform temperature of 30{sup 0}C at the drift perimeter. If the drift is unventilated the wall rock temperature peaks some 75 to 100 yr after waste emplacement; reaching about 125{sup 0}C at the mid-height of the drift wall. Comparisons between the results of the three-dimensional analyses performed using TEMP3D and THERM3D indicated that the simpler modeling technique provided a good estimate of temperatures in the immediate vicinity of the canister for both the ventilated and unventilated cases. Comparisons of the results of two- and three-dimensional analyses performed using the PORFLOW and THERM3D codes indicated that the two-dimensional approximation is excellent, except in the immediate vicinity of the canister.

  3. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  4. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding; Inhibicion de la formacion de compuestos intermetalicos en juntas aluminio-acero soldadas por friccion-agitacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Lopez, E. A.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, composition measurements were carried out by X-EDS and DRX. The experimental results revealed that the maximum temperature on the joint studied is less than 360 degree centigrade. The microstructural characterization in the aluminum-steel interface showed the absence of intermetallic compounds, which is a condition attributed to the use of welding with low thermal input parameters. (Author)

  5. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part I: Algorithms and Numerical Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Finite element analysis of resistance welding involves the contact problems between different parts. The contact problem in resistance welding includes not only mechanical contact but also thermal and electrical contact. In this paper a contact model based on the penalty method is developed for s...... for simulation of resistance spot and projection welding. After a description of the algorithms several numerical examples are presented to validate the mechanical contact algorithm.......Finite element analysis of resistance welding involves the contact problems between different parts. The contact problem in resistance welding includes not only mechanical contact but also thermal and electrical contact. In this paper a contact model based on the penalty method is developed...

  6. Thermal Inertia Determination of C-type Asteroid Ryugu from in-situ Surface Brightness Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Maximilian; Grott, Matthias; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kührt, Ekkehard; Pelivan, Ivanka

    2016-10-01

    The Japanese Hayabusa-2 mission is a sample-return mission currently on its way to the C-type asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa-2 carries the small lander MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout), whose scientific payload includes the infrared radiometer MARA. The primary science goal of MARA is to determine Ryugu's surface brightness temperatures at the landing site for a full asteroid rotation, which will be measured using a long-pass filter, an 8 to 12 µm bandpass, as well as four narrow bandpasses centered at wavelengths between 5 and 15 µm. From these measurements, surface thermal inertia will be derived, but because MARA performs single pixel measurements, heterogeneity in the field of view cannot be resolved. Yet, the surface will likely exhibit different surface textures, and thermal inertia in the field of view could vary from 600 (small rocks) to 50 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 (fine regolith grains). Sub-pixel heterogeneity is a common problem when interpreting radiometer data, since the associated ambiguities cannot be resolved without additional information on surface texture. For MARA, this information will be provided by the MASCOT camera, and in the present paper we have investigated to what extent different thermal inertias can be retrieved from MARA data. To test the applied approach, we generated synthetic MARA data using a thermal model of Ryugu, assuming different thermal inertias for sections of the field of view. We find that sub-pixel heterogeneity systematically deforms the diurnal temperature curve so that it is not possible to fit the data using a single thermal inertia value. However, including the area fractions of the different surface sections enables us to reconstruct the different thermal inertias to within 10% assuming appropriate measurement noise. The presented approach will increase robustness of the Ryugu thermal inertia determination and results will serve as a ground truth for the global measurements performed by the thermal infrared mapper (TIR) on

  7. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  8. Calculation of the technological parameters of electrofusion welding of polyethylene pipes at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostin, N. P.; Ammosova, O. A.

    2017-12-01

    The thermal process of electrofusion welding of polyethylene gas pipelines at air temperatures below the standard is investigated. The mathematical model used in the research takes into account the heat of the phase transition in the temperature interval. Computational experiments show the possibility of regulating the temperature regime for welding at low ambient air temperatures and providing the same temperature field variation in the thermal zone as with the permissible air temperatures.

  9. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  10. Biaxial-Type Concentrated Solar Tracking System with a Fresnel Lens for Solar-Thermal Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung Chieh Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an electromechanical, biaxial-type concentrated solar tracking system was designed for solar-thermal applications. In our tracking system, the sunlight was concentrated by the microstructure of Fresnel lens to the heating head of the Stirling engine and two solar cells were installed to provide the power for tracking system operation. In order to obtain the maximum sun power, the tracking system traces the sun with the altitude-azimuth biaxial tracing method and accurately maintains the sun’s radiation perpendicular to the plane of the heating head. The results indicated that the position of heating head is an important factor for power collection. If the sunlight can be concentrated to completely cover the heating head with small heat loss, we can obtain the maximum temperature of the heating head of the Stirling engine. Therefore, the temperature of heating head can be higher than 1000 °C in our experiment on a sunny day. Moreover, the results also revealed that the temperature decrease of the heating head is less than the power decrease of solar irradiation because of the latent heat of copper and the small heat loss from the heating head.

  11. Physicochemical Characteristics and Lipid Oxidation of Chicken Inner Fillets Subjected to Different Thermal Processing Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NN Arguelo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different types of thermal processing on the physiochemical characteristics and lipid oxidation of chicken inner fillets. The study was divided into three assays. In the first assay, 50 chicken inner fillets were divided into five treatments, totaling 10 samples per treatment. Treatments consisted in cooking in water bath, electric oven, microwave oven, deep frying, or grilling. The analyzed variables were: cooking weight loss (CWL and lipid oxidation determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS. In the second assay, 50 chicken inner fillets were divided into five treatments, totaling 10 samples per treatment. Each treatment consisted of the same cooking methods applied in the first assay, and storage for 48 hours under refrigeration and reheating in a microwave oven. The variable analyzed in the second assay was lipid oxidation (TBARS. In the third assay, 30 samples of chicken inner fillets were subjected to one, four and eight freeze-thaw cycles, after which meat pH, myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI, water retention capacity (WRC, and lipid oxidation (TBARS were determined. Chicken inner fillets submitted to deep frying and cooked in a microwave oven presented greater lipid oxidation than the other cooking methods, and deep frying resulted in the highest cooking weight loss. Reheating chicken inner fillets in a microwave oven caused the highest meat lipid oxidation. Increasing the number of freeze-thaw cycles increases the pH, MFI, WRC and TBARS values of chicken inner fillets.

  12. Comparison of thermal testing of MS9001FA type GTPs at shatura and nizhnevartovsk GRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ol'khovskii, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    Domestic power plants use combined-cycle plants in which a gas-turbine plant (GTP) and a steam turbine rotate a common electric generator. In this instance, it is impossible to measure the power of each of them, so we have to resort to some assumptions. We have succeeded to check the validity of these assumptions and possible errors of their application testing combined-cycle plants (CCP) with the same GTP and a steam turbine but operating each on its own electrical generator. Comparative tests of a MS901FA GTP of the PGU-400 power-generating unit commissioned at Shatura GRES (a thermal power station) and a GTP of the same type installed at Nizhnevartovsk GRES were performed. As a result of these tests, dependences of the electric power of both gas-turbine plants and a turbine outlet temperature on the inlet temperature were obtained. A relation of the GTP efficiency, heat and air rate on the load are determined, and characteristics of compressors and turbines of both GTPs are defined. The performed tests have confirmed the accuracy of the determined characteristics of the two GTPs using both a direct measurement of net power (Nizhnevartovsk GRES) and an indirect measurement (Shatura GRES).

  13. Finite Element Model for Thermal-Structural analysis of CLIC Lab Module type 0#2

    CERN Document Server

    Moilanen, Antti; Vamvakas, Alex; Vainola, Jukka Ilmari; Doebert, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Temperature changes lead to unwanted thermo-mechanical deformations in the components of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) module. There are several sources and sinks of heat around the CLIC two-beam module. Heat is generated in the components that produce, transfer, and extract radio frequency (RF) power. Excess heat is removed from the components by cooling water as well as dissipated to air by convection from the outer surfaces of the components. The ambient temperature might also vary along the tunnel during the operation of CLIC. Due to tight assembling and alignment tolerances, it is necessary to minimize the thermo-mechanical deformations in the components. In this paper, the steps of thermal-structural Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of CLIC lab module type 0#2 are described from geometry model simplification to setting up the simulation. The description is accompanied by useful hints for CATIA and ANSYS users performing similar modelling tasks. A reliable computer simulation is important for studying ...

  14. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  15. Assessment of SAR and thermal changes near a cochlear implant system for mobile phone type exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; McKenzie, Raymond J; Chambers, John; Metzenthen, Bill; Anderson, Vitas

    2008-01-01

    A cochlear implant system is a device used to enable hearing in people with severe hearing loss and consists of an internal implant and external speech processor. This study considers the effect of scattered radiofrequency fields when these persons are subject to mobile phone type exposure. A worst-case scenario is considered where the antenna is operating at nominal full power, the speech processor is situated behind the ear using a metallic hook, and the antenna is adjacent to the hook and the internal ball electrode. The resultant energy deposition and thermal changes were determined through numerical modelling. With a 900 MHz half-wave dipole antenna producing continuous-wave (CW) 250 mW power, the maximum 10 g averaged SAR was 1.31 W/kg which occurred in the vicinity of the hook and the ball electrode. The maximum temperature increase was 0.33 degrees C in skin adjacent to the hook. For the 1800 MHz antenna, operating at 125 mW, the maximum 10 g averaged SAR was 0.93 W/kg in the pinna whilst the maximum temperature change was 0.16 degrees C. The analysis predicts that the wearer complies with the radiofrequency safety limits specified by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) for 900 and 1800 MHz mobile phone type exposure and thus raises no cause for concern. The resultant temperature increase is well below the maximum rise of 1 degrees C recommended by ICNIRP. Effects in the cochlea were insignificant. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  17. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  18. Nondestructive Testing of Residual Stress on the Welded Part of Butt-welded A36 Plates Using Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongsuk Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most manufacturing processes, including welding, create residual stresses. Residual stresses can reduce material strength and cause fractures. For estimating the reliability and aging of a welded structure, residual stresses should be evaluated as precisely as possible. Optical techniques such as holographic interferometry, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI, Moire interferometry, and shearography are noncontact means of measuring residual stresses. Among optical techniques, ESPI is typically used as a nondestructive measurement technique of in-plane displacement, such as stress and strain, and out-of-plane displacement, such as vibration and bending. In this study, ESPI was used to measure the residual stress on the welded part of butt-welded American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM A36 specimens with CO2 welding. Four types of specimens, base metal specimen (BSP, tensile specimen including welded part (TSP, compression specimen including welded part (CSP, and annealed tensile specimen including welded part (ATSP, were tested. BSP was used to obtain the elastic modulus of a base metal. TSP and CSP were used to compare residual stresses under tensile and compressive loading conditions. ATSP was used to confirm the effect of heat treatment. Residual stresses on the welded parts of specimens were obtained from the phase map images obtained by ESPI. The results confirmed that residual stresses of welded parts can be measured by ESPI.

  19. Evaluation of the thermal effect in a KBS-3 type repository. A literary survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goblet, P. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau (France). Centre d' Informatique Geologique; Marsily, Ghislain de [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France). Laboratoire de Geologie Appliquee

    2000-03-01

    This report provides an overview of the existing thermal studies in high-level nuclear waste disposal, based on the available literature assembled during this survey. Although the emphasis is on a granitic repository, some results obtained by experiments or numerical analyses of other rock types are also given. Excessive heat loading can generate mechanical failure of the rock, chemical degradation and transformation of the buffer and rock, water vaporisation and condensation. If the repository is backfilled and resaturated, the heat load can generate convective movement of the water and therefore, transport of dissolved elements away from the repository. The maximum temperature at the repository level is generally reached after a few hundred years, but even if the temperature starts to decrease, the total heat loading of the rock formation continues to increase, until the temperature front reaches the upper boundary of the system and releases the heat into the atmosphere. The total heat load of the host rock typically starts to decrease only after about 10,000 years. The mechanical effects can therefore peak long after the maximum temperature has been reached. The surface deformation of the rock by expansion (on the order of 1 m above a repository) is often reached at such large time-intervals. The maximum heat loading in a repository is an important design parameter when the extent of a repository is determined, given the amount of waste and the age at which this waste must be disposed. To determine this heat loading, it is necessary to define either the maximum acceptable temperature at the buffer-rock contact, and/or at the outer boundary of the canister. Design options include the nature and dimension of the buffer zone, its water saturation (in the case of clay) and the distance between canisters. The temperature distribution in the host rock, in the buffer and inside the waste package can be determined by thermal calculations, if the density of waste in the

  20. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  1. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  2. Gas Control and Thermal Modeling Methods for Pressed Pellet and Fast Rise Thin-Film Thermal Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    high operating battery case temperatures. Acceptable hermetic seals for thermal batteries ordinarily use laser welding , tungsten inert gas ( TIG ... welding , or high temperature (~1000 °C) melting point silver solder methods. 31 Thin-walled thermal battery cases can be hermetically sealed for gas...high temperature attachment of standard gas collection fittings using high temperature attachment methods such as laser welding with external

  3. Technological parameters of welding of branch saddles to polyethylene pipes at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostin, N. P.; Vasilieva, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    The present paper outlines a procedure for determination of dynamics of the temperature field during the welding of the branch saddle to the polyethylene gas pipeline at ambient temperatures below the normative. The analysis is accomplished by the finite element method with the heat of the phase transition taken into account. Methods of the visualization of data sets reveal the possibility of controlling the thermal process by preheating and thermal insulation during welding of the branch saddle to the pipe at low temperatures and the possibility of obtaining the dynamics of the temperature field at which a high-quality welded joint is formed.

  4. Thermal signatures of urban land cover types: High-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing of urban heat island in Huntsville, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chor Pang

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to apply airborne high-resolution thermal infrared imagery for urban heat island studies, using Huntsville, AL, a medium-sized American city, as the study area. The occurrence of urban heat islands represents human-induced urban/rural contrast, which is caused by deforestation and the replacement of the land surface by non-evaporating and non-porous materials such as asphalt and concrete. The result is reduced evapotranspiration and more rapid runoff of rain water. The urban landscape forms a canopy acting as a transitional zone between the atmosphere and the land surface. The composition and structure of this canopy have a significant impact on the thermal behavior of the urban environment. Research on the trends of surface temperature at rapidly growing urban sites in the United States during the last 30 to 50 years suggests that significant urban heat island effects have caused the temperatures at these sites to rise by 1 to 2 C. Urban heat islands have caused changes in urban precipitation and temperature that are at least similar to, if not greater than, those predicted to develop over the next 100 years by global change models. Satellite remote sensing, particularly NOAA AVHRR thermal data, has been used in the study of urban heat islands. Because of the low spatial resolution (1.1 km at nadir) of the AVHRR data, these studies can only examine and map the phenomenon at the macro-level. The present research provides the rare opportunity to utilize 5-meter thermal infrared data acquired from an airplane to characterize more accurately the thermal responses of different land cover types in the urban landscape as input to urban heat island studies.

  5. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: “Ex vivo” study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleti, Marco; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Stabilization of implant abutments through electric impulses at high voltage for a very short time (electrowelding) was developed in the Eighties. In 2009, the same procedure was performed through the use of laser (laser welding) The aim of this study is to compare electrowelding and laser welding for intra-oral implant abutments stabilization on “ex vivo models” (pig jaws). Materials and methods: Six bars were welded with two different devices (Nd:YAG laser and Electrowelder) to eighteen titanium implant abutment inserted in three pig jaws. During the welding process, thermal increase was recorded, through the use of k-thermocouples, in the bone close to the implants. The strength of the welded joints was evaluated by a traction test after the removal of the implants. For temperature measurements a descriptive analysis and for traction test “values unpaired t test with Welch's correction” were performed: the significance level was set at Pwelding gives a lower thermal increase than Electrowelding at the bone close to implants (Mean: 1.97 and 5.27); the strength of laser welded joints was higher than that of Electrowelding even if nor statistically significant. (Mean: 184.75 and 168.29) Conclusion: Electrowelding seems to have no advantages, in term of thermal elevation and strength, while laser welding may be employed to connect titanium implants for immediate load without risks of thermal damage at surrounding tissues. PMID:24511205

  6. Effect of welding processes on mechanical and microstructural characteristics of high strength low alloy naval grade steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ragu Nathan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Naval grade high strength low alloy (HSLA steels can be easily welded by all types of fusion welding processes. However, fusion welding of these steels leads to the problems such as cold cracking, residual stress, distortion and fatigue damage. These problems can be eliminated by solid state welding process such as friction stir welding (FSW. In this investigation, a comparative evaluation of mechanical (tensile, impact, hardness properties and microstructural features of shielded metal arc (SMA, gas metal arc (GMA and friction stir welded (FSW naval grade HSLA steel joints was carried out. It was found that the use of FSW process eliminated the problems related to fusion welding processes and also resulted in the superior mechanical properties compared to GMA and SMA welded joints.

  7. Weld bead profile of laser welding dissimilar joints stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghusoon R.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.; Abdulhadi, Hassan A.

    2017-10-01

    During the process of laser welding, the material consecutively melts and solidifies by a laser beam with a peak high power. Several parameters such as the laser energy, pulse frequency, pulse duration, welding power and welding speed govern the mode of the welding process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of peak power, incident angle, and welding speed on the weld bead geometry. The first investigation in this context was conducted using 2205-316L stainless steel plates through the varying of the welding speed from 1.3 mm/s to 2.1 mm/s. The second investigation was conducted by varying the peak power from 1100 W to 1500 W. From the results of the experiments, the welding speed and laser power had a significant effect on the geometry of the weld bead, and the variation in the diameter of the bead pulse-size. Due to the decrease in the heat input, welding speed affected penetration depth more than bead width, and a narrow width of heat affected zone was achieved ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Conclusively, weld bead geometry dimensions increase as a function of peak power; at over 1350 W peak power, the dimensions lie within 30 μm.

  8. Origin of type-2 thermal-ion upflows in the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kagan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of thermal ion outflows exceeding 1km/s in the high-latitude F-region has been a subject of considerable debate. For cases with strong convection electric fields, the "evaporation" of the ions due to frictional heating below 400-500km has been shown to provide some satisfactory answers. By contrast, in the more frequent subclass of outflow events observed over auroral arcs, called type-2, there is no observational evidence for ion frictional heating. Instead, an electron temperature increase of up to 6000° K is observed over the outflow region. In this case, field-aligned electric fields have long been suspected to be involved, but this explanation did not seem to agree with expectations from the ion momentum balance. In the present work we provide a consistent scenario for the type-2 ion upflows based on our case study of an event that occurred on 20 February 1990. We introduce, for the first time, the electron energy balance in the analysis. We couple this equation with the ion momentum balance to study the salient features of the observations and conclude that type-2 ion outflows and the accompanying electron heating events are indeed consistent with the existence of a field-aligned electric field. However, for our explanation to work, we have to require that an allowance be made for electron scattering by high frequency turbulence. This turbulence could be generated at first by the very fast response of the electrons themselves to a newly imposed electric field that would be partly aligned with the geomagnetic field. The high frequencies of the waves would make it impossible for the ions to react to the waves. We have found the electron collision frequency associated with scattering from the waves to be rather modest, i.e. comparable to the ambient electron-ion collision frequency. The field-aligned electric field inferred from the observations is likewise of the same order of magnitude as the normal ambipolar field, at least for

  9. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  10. Pulsed welding plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in order to form the current pulse of a near rectangular shape, which provides conversion of the welding arc into a dynamic mode, it is rational to connect a forming element made on the basis of an artificial forming line in series to the welding DC circuit. The paper presents a diagram of a pulsed device for welding with a non-consumable electrode in argon which was developed using the forming element. The conversion of the arc into the dynamic mode is illustrated by the current and voltage oscillograms of the arc gap and the dynamic characteristic of the arc within the interval of one pulse generation time in the arc gap. The background current travels in the interpulse interval.

  11. The Investigation of Structure Heterogeneous Joint Welds in Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubimova Lyudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding joints of dissimilar steels don’t withstand design life. One of the important causes of premature destructions can be the acceleration of steel structural degradation due to cyclic mechanical and thermal gradients. Two zones of tube from steel 12H18N9T, exhibiting the structural instability at early stages of the decomposition of a supersaturated solid austenite solution, were subjected to investigation. Methods of x-ray spectral and structure analysis, micro hardnessmetry were applied for the research. Made the following conclusions, inside and outside tube wall surfaces of hazardous zones in welding joint have different technological and resource characteristics. The microhardness very sensitive to changes of metal structure and can be regarded as integral characteristic of strength and ductility. The welding processes are responsible for the further fibering of tube wall structure, they impact to the characteristics of hot-resistance and long-term strength due to development of ring cracks in the welding joint of pipeline. The monitoring of microhardness and structural phase conversions can be used for control by changes of mechanical properties in result of post welding and reductive heat treatment of welding joints.

  12. A Case Study for the Welding of Dissimilar EN AW 6082 and EN AW 5083 Aluminum Alloys by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefika Kasman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of keeping constant the tool rotational speed to the welding speed ratio (υ ratio on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of EN AW6082-T6 and EN AW5083-H111. Two different pins shaped as triangular and pentagonal were associated with the constant υ ratio. From the tensile test results, it was found that the υ ratio does not create an evident change in the weld joint strength. The small cavity- and tunnel-type defects were observed at the nugget zone and located on the advancing side of the pin. These defects caused a decrease in the strength and elongation of the weld joint. The most important inference obtained from the experimental results is that if the υ ratio is kept constant, the weld joint strength for each weld does not correspond to a constant value.

  13. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  14. Finite element simulation of laser transmission welding of dissimilar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    parametrically built using a scripting language, APDL (ANSYS® Parametric Design Language) provided by the commercial code. ANSYS 10. The thermal model encompasses the whole laser transmission welding process including the heating and cooling phases with a moving heat flux. 2. Materials and Process. The ideal ...

  15. ANSYS Simulation of Residual Strains in Butt-welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Atroshenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal-strain cycle on residual strains in thin-walled circular seams of cylindrical shells using TIG butt welds was studied. Estimates were calculated using numerical modelling. The structure was made of corrosion-resistant austenitic steels.

  16. More About Brazing Or Welding NiAl Without Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about two processes for joining, brazing, or welding workpieces made of nickel aluminide alloys, without use of filler metal. Joining processes involve uniform heating in vacuum-controlled furnace. Eliminates internal thermal gradients in workpieces joined and greatly reduces tendency toward cracking.

  17. Welding, a risk factor of lung cancer: the ICARE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrat, Mireille; Guida, Florence; Mattei, Francesca; Cénée, Sylvie; Cyr, Diane; Févotte, Joëlle; Sanchez, Marie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Radoï, Loredana; Schmaus, Annie; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between lung cancer and occupational exposure to welding activity in ICARE, a population-based case-control study. Analyses were restricted to men (2276 cases, 2780 controls). Welding exposure was assessed through detailed questionnaires, including lifelong occupational history. ORs were computed using unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for lifelong cigarette smoking and occupational exposure to asbestos. Among the regular welders, welding was associated with a risk of lung cancer (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.5), which increased with the duration (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.0 to 3.9 when duration >10 years), and was maximum 10-20 years since last welding. The risk was more pronounced in case of gas welding (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3), when the workpiece was covered by paint, grease, or other substances (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4) and when it was cleaned with chemical substances before welding. No statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk was observed among occasional welders. Although these results should be confirmed, we showed that type of welding and mode of workpiece preparation are important determinants of the lung cancer risk in regular welders. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Investigation into Interface Lifting Within FSW Lap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle; D. E. Clark; C. I. Nichol; T. R. McJunkin; H. B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is rapidly penetrating the welding market in many materials and applications, particularly in aluminum alloys for transportation applications. As this expansion outside the research laboratory continues, fitness for service issues will arise, and process control and NDE methods will become important determinants of continued growth. The present paper describes research into FSW weld nugget flaw detection within aluminum alloy lap welds. We present results for two types of FSW tool designs: a smooth pin tool and a threaded pin tool. We show that under certain process parameters (as monitored during welding with a rotating dynamometer that measures x, y, z, and torque forces) and tooling designs, FSW lap welds allow significant nonbonded interface lifting of the lap joint, while forming a metallurgical bond only within the pin region of the weld nugget. These lifted joints are often held very tightly together even though unbonded, and might be expected to pass cursory NDE while representing a substantial compromise in joint mechanical properties. The phenomenon is investigated here via radiographic and ultrasonic NDE techniques, with a copper foil marking insert (as described elsewhere) and by the tensile testing of joints. As one would expect, these results show that tool design and process parameters significantly affect plactic flow and this lifted interface. NDE and mechanical strength ramifications of this defect are discussed.

  19. Electric pulse treatment of welded joint of aluminum alloy

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Mitiaev; I. P. Volchok; Yu. L. Nadezhdin; V.A. Sokirko; I. A. Vakulenko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Explanation of the redistribution effect of residual strengthes after electric pulse treatment of arc welding seam of the aluminum alloy. Methodology. Alloy on the basis of aluminium of АК8М3 type served as the research material. As a result of mechanical treatment of the ingots after alloy crystallization the plates with 10 mm thickness were obtained. After edge preparation the elements, which are being connected were butt welded using the technology of semiautomatic argon arc weldi...

  20. Plasmonic welding of hybrid Au-ZnO nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Yang, H. B.; Ghosh, P.; Li, Q.; Qiu, M.

    2017-06-01

    We report that 532 nm CW laser can be used to obtain non-wetting metal-semiconductor (Au-ZnO) Schottky heterojunctions by plasmonic welding. Single crystal Au and n-type ZnO nanowires are placed on gold (Au) and titanium (Ti) electrodes, respectively, and the junction welding is realized. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve of the single Schottky rectifier is also measured.