WorldWideScience

Sample records for weld tool geometry

  1. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  2. Effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot welding of polypropylene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Bilici

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tool geometry and properties on friction stir spot welding properties of polypropylene sheets were studied. Four different tool pin geometries, with varying pin angles, pin lengths, shoulder diameters and shoulder angles were used for friction stir spot welding. All the welding operations were done at the room temperature. Lap-shear tensile tests were carried out to find the weld static strength. Weld cross section appearance observations were also done. From the experiments the effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot weld formation and weld strength were determined. The optimum tool geometry for 4 mm thick polypropylene sheets were determined. The tapered cylindrical pin gave the biggest and the straight cylindrical pin gave the lowest lap-shear fracture load.

  3. Influence of tool geometry and process parameters on macrostructure and static strength in friction stir spot welded polyethylene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Mustafa Kemal; Yuekler, Ahmet Irfan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → All velding parameters and different tool geometries have demonstrated a different effects on weld strength. → Friction stir spot welding of polyethylene mechanical scission is very important. → Metric screw the tool has a great influence on the weld strength of FSSW. -- Abstract: The effect of important welding parameters and tool properties that are effective on static strength in friction stir spot welds of polyethylene sheets were studied. Six different tool pin profiles (straight cylindrical, tapered cylindrical, threaded cylindrical, triangular, square and hexagonal) with different shoulder geometries, different pin length, pin angle and concavity angle were used to fabricate the joints. The tool rotational speed, tool plunge depth and dwell time were determined welding parameters. All the welding operations were done at the room temperature. Welding force and welding zone material temperature measurements were also done. Lap-shear tests were carried out to find the weld static strength. Weld cross section appearance observations were also done. From the experiments, the effect of pin profile, pin length, pin angle, dwell time and tool rotational speed on friction stir spot welding formation and weld strength was determined.

  4. Influence of tool geometry and processing parameters on welding defects and mechanical properties for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneji, A.; Ali, M.; Pervaiz, S.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a form of solid state welding process for joining metals, alloys, and selective composites. Over the years, FSW development has provided an improved way of producing welding joints, and consequently got accepted in numerous industries such as aerospace, automotive, rail and marine etc. In FSW, the base metal properties control the material’s plastic flow under the influence of a rotating tool whereas, the process and tool parameters play a vital role in the quality of weld. In the current investigation, an array of square butt joints of 6061 Aluminum alloy was to be welded under varying FSW process and tool geometry related parameters, after which the resulting weld was evaluated for the corresponding mechanical properties and welding defects. The study incorporates FSW process and tool parameters such as welding speed, pin height and pin thread pitch as input parameters. However, the weld quality related defects and mechanical properties were treated as output parameters. The experimentation paves way to investigate the correlation between the inputs and the outputs. The correlation between inputs and outputs were used as tool to predict the optimized FSW process and tool parameters for a desired weld output of the base metals under investigation. The study also provides reflection on the effect of said parameters on a welding defect such as wormhole.

  5. Tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds effects on the properties of dissimilar magnesium/aluminum friction stir welded lap joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, J.; Behnamian, Y.; Mostafaei, A.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds show great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • Increasing rotation and travel speeds resulted in increasing the tensile strength and ductility of the joints. • Better intermixing between Al/Mg alloys was obtained by tapered threaded pin. • A mechanical interlocking mechanism proposed for higher ductility and superior tensile properties in FSW joints. - Abstract: Lap joint friction stir welding (FSW) between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloys sheets was conducted using various welding parameters including tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds. Tapered threaded pin and tapered pin tools were applied to fabricate FSW joints, using different rotation and travel speeds. Metallurgical investigations including X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were used to characterize joints microstructures made with different welding parameters. Intermetallic phases were detected in the weld zone (WZ). Various microstructures were observed in the stir zone which can be attributed to using different travel and rotation speeds. Mechanical evaluation including lap shear fracture load test and microhardness measurements indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum value. Microhardness studies and extracted results from stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW process. Furthermore, phase analyses by XRD indicated the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. Finally, in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld, fractography studies showed that intermetallic compounds formation in the weld zone had an influence on the failure mode

  6. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded butt joint of steel/aluminium alloys: effect of tool geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafiq, W. M.; Afendi, M.; Daud, R.; Mazlee, M. N.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Lee, Y. S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper described the mechanical properties from hardness testing and tensile testing of Friction Stir Welded (FSW) materials. In this project, two materials of aluminium and steel are welded using conventional milling machine and tool designed with different profile and shoulder size. During welding the temperature along the weld line is collected using thermocouples. Threaded pins was found to produce stronger joints than cylindrical pins. 20 mm diameter shoulder tool welded a slightly stronger joint than 18 mm diameter one, as well as softer nugget zone due to higher heat input. Threaded pins also contributed to higher weld temperature than cylindrical pins due to increase in pin contact surface. Generally, higher temperatures were recorded in aluminium side due to pin offset away from steel.

  7. MM99.81 Projection welding of complex geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars

    The objective of this work has been to establish a profound knowledge about design rules for projection welding geometries dependent of the actual material combination.Design rules and recommendations for geometries and projections in projection welding given in literature is summarised...... and these are catalogued into geometry-classes. A simulation software, SORPAS, based on the finite element method (FEM) is chosen as tool to investigate projection weld quality. SORPAS needs input of the material flow stress as function of strain, strain rate and temperature. Flow stress experiments are performed using...... been investigated.Two different welding geometries, disc with triangular ring projection welded to ring and hat welded to inside hole in ring, are both experimentally and numerically used to investigate the influence of different geometric parameters (thicknesses and angles) on weldability and weld...

  8. Influence of tool geometry and rotational speed on mechanical properties and defect formation in friction stir lap welded 5456 aluminum alloy sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salari, Emad; Jahazi, Mohammad; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Ghasemi-Nanesa, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Successful lap joint friction stir welding of AA5456 with two different tempers. • New stepped conical threaded pin for FSW of lap joints is introduced. • Investigated interactions between tool geometry and mechanical properties. • Microstructure and fracture surface analysis of dissimilar lap welds. - Abstract: Friction stir welding of AA5456 aluminum alloy in lap joint configuration is with two different tempers, T321 and O, and different thicknesses, 5 mm and 2.5 mm was investigated. The influences of tool geometry and various rotational speeds on macrostructure, microstructure and joint strength are presented. Specifically, four different tool pin profiles (a conical thread pin, a cylindrical–conical thread pin, a stepped conical thread pin and Flared Triflute pin tool) and two rotational speeds, 600 and 800 rpm, were used. The results indicated that, tool geometry influences significantly material flow in the nugget zone and accordingly control the weld mechanical properties. Of particular interest is the stepped conical threaded pin, which is introduced for the first time in the present investigation. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of the fracture location of samples was carried out and the findings correlated with tool geometry features and their influences on material flow and tension test results. The optimum microstructure and mechanical properties were obtained for the joints produced with the stepped conical thread pin profile and rotational speed of 600 rpm. The characteristics of the nugget zone microstructure, hooking height, and fracture location of the weld joints were used as criteria to quantify the influence of processing conditions on joint performance and integrity. The results are interpreted in the framework of physical metallurgy properties and compared with published literature

  9. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  10. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  11. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  12. Pearson's Functions to Describe FSW Weld Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacombe, D.; Coupard, D.; Tcherniaeff, S.; Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for aluminium alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this study, the geometry of the weld has been investigated and modelled using Pearson's functions. It has been demonstrated that the Pearson's parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis and geometric constant) can be used to characterize the weld geometry and the tensile strength of the weld assembly. Pearson's parameters and process parameters are strongly correlated allowing to define a control process procedure for FSW assemblies which make radiographic or ultrasonic controls unnecessary. Finally, an optimisation using a Generalized Gradient Method allows to determine the geometry of the weld which maximises the assembly tensile strength.

  13. Effect of welding parameters (plunge depths of shoulder, pin geometry, and tool rotational speed) on the failure mode and stir zone characteristics of friction stir spot welded aluminum 2024-T3 sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Lali; Taheri, Morteza; Khodabandeh, Alireza [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the failure mode and stir zone characteristics of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 joined by friction stir spot welding. The welding parameters in this work are tool rotational speed, plunge depths of shoulder, and pin geometry. In accordance with the methods of previous investigations, the rotational speeds were set to 630 rpm to 2000 rpm. Two pin geometries with concave shoulder were used: triangular and cylindrical. The plunge depths of the shoulder were 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 mm. The shoulder diameter and pin height for both geometries were 14 and 2.4 mm, respectively. The diameter of the cylindrical and triangular pins was 5 mm. Results show that the parameters mentioned earlier influence fracture mode under tension shear loading. Two different fracture modes were observed during the examinations. Low-penetration depths and low-rotational speeds lead to shear fracture, whereas high values of these factors cause the tension-shear fracture mode. Fracture of the lower sheet sometimes occurs at high rotational speeds.

  14. Experimental study on the effect of welding speed and tool pin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a novel solid state welding process for joining metallic alloys and ... compared with conventional welding methods such as TIG or MIG. ... Conventional fusion welding of aluminium alloys often produces a weld which .... Ti. 0.1%. Cr. 0.25%. Al. Balance. 3.1 Configuration of welding tool geometry.

  15. Effect of Welding Parameters on Dilution and Weld Bead Geometry in Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) variables on the dilution and weld bead geometry in cladding X65 pipeline steel with 316L stainless steel was studied. Using a full factorial method, a series of experiments were carried out to know the effect of wire feed rate, welding speed, distance between gas nozzle and plate, and the vertical angle of welding on dilution and weld bead geometry. The findings indicate that the dilution of weld metal and its dimension i.e. width, height and depth increase with the feed rate, but the contact angle of the bead decreases first and then increases. Meantime, welding speed has an opposite effect except for dilution. There is an interaction effect between welding parameters at the contact angle. The results also show forehand welding or decreasing electrode extension decrease the angle of contact. Finally,a mathematical model is contrived to highlight the relationship between welding variables with dilution and weld bead geometry.

  16. The Influence of Friction Stir Weld Tool Form and Welding Parameters on Weld Structure and Properties: Nugget Bulge in Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Brendel, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) was patented in 1991, process development has been based upon trial and error and the literature still exhibits little understanding of the mechanisms determining weld structure and properties. New concepts emerging from a better understanding of these mechanisms enhance the ability of FSW engineers to think about the FSW process in new ways, inevitably leading to advances in the technology. A kinematic approach in which the FSW flow process is decomposed into several simple flow components has been found to explain the basic structural features of FSW welds and to relate them to tool geometry and process parameters. Using this modelling approach, this study reports on a correlation between the features of the weld nugget, process parameters, weld tool geometry, and weld strength. This correlation presents a way to select process parameters for a given tool geometry so as to optimize weld strength. It also provides clues that may ultimately explain why the weld strength varies within the sample population.

  17. Optimization of weld bead geometry of MS plate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The considered specimen was checked to harmonize the optimum setting between input factors, for example, welding current, open circuit voltage, and thickness of plate, with respect to obtaining prosperous weld strength as well as bead geometry quality characteristics, for example, tensile strength, bead width, ...

  18. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE DEFORMATION OF RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELD GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The resistance spot welding process is accomplished by forcing huge amounts of current flow from the upper electrode tip through the base metals to the lower electrode tip, or vice versa or in both directions. A weld joint is established between the metal sheets through fusion, resulting in a strong bond between the sheets without occupying additional space. The growth of the weld nugget (bond between sheets is therefore determined from the welding current density; sufficient time for current delivery; reasonable electrode pressing force; and the area provided for current delivery (electrode tip. The welding current and weld time control the root penetration, while the electrode pressing force and electrode tips successfully accomplish the connection during the welding process. Although the welding current and weld time cause the heat generation at the areas concerned (electrode tip area, the electrode tips’ diameter and electrode pressing forces also directly influence the welding process. In this research truncated-electrode deformation and mushrooming effects are observed, which result in the welded areas being inconsistent due to the expulsion. The copper to chromium ratio is varied from the tip to the end of the electrode whilst the welding process is repeated. The welding heat affects the electrode and the electrode itself influences the shape of the weld geometry.

  19. Prediction of the weld pool geometry of TIG arc welding by using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prediction of the weld pool geometry of TIG arc welding by using fuzzy logic controller. ... The experimental data were then used for building a fuzzy logic model to predict the effects of control factors on the responses. A graphical mapping scheme was employed for the graphical representation of the macrostructure zones' ...

  20. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  1. Inspection tool for butt-welded tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horman, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    Inspection tool for tubing consists of metal casing housing elastic collar. Collar is clamped around weld site under test. Leakage through weld is contained within chamber and is bled to detector via tubing attached to fitting. Tool, originally designed to detect fluid leakage in tubing, can be used to detect gas leaks.

  2. Tailoring weld geometry during keyhole mode laser welding using a genetic algorithm and a heat transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, R; DebRoy, T

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of weld attributes based on scientific principles remains an important goal in welding research. The current generation of unidirectional laser keyhole models cannot determine sets of welding variables that can lead to a particular weld attribute such as specific weld geometry. Here we show how a computational heat transfer model of keyhole mode laser welding can be restructured for systematic tailoring of weld attributes based on scientific principles. Furthermore, the model presented here can calculate multiple sets of laser welding variables, i.e. laser power, welding speed and beam defocus, with each set leading to the same weld pool geometry. Many sets of welding variables were obtained via a global search using a real number-based genetic algorithm, which was combined with a numerical heat transfer model of keyhole laser welding. The reliability of the numerical heat transfer calculations was significantly improved by optimizing values of the uncertain input parameters from a limited volume of experimental data. The computational procedure was applied to the keyhole mode laser welding of the 5182 Al-Mg alloy to calculate various sets of welding variables to achieve a specified weld geometry. The calculated welding parameter sets showed wide variations of the values of welding parameters, but each set resulted in a similar fusion zone geometry. The effectiveness of the computational procedure was examined by comparing the computed weld geometry for each set of welding parameters with the corresponding experimental geometry. The results provide hope that systematic tailoring of weld attributes via multiple pathways, each representing alternative welding parameter sets, is attainable based on scientific principles

  3. TIG-dressing of High Strength Steel Butt Welded Connections. Part 1 : Weld Toe Geometry and Local Hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld

  4. TIG-dressing of high strength steel butt welded connections - Part 1: weld toe geometry and local hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld

  5. Effect of Pin Geometry on the Mechanical Strength of Friction-Stir-Welded Polypropylene Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordestani, F.; Ashenai Ghasemi, F.; Arab, N. B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, which has successfully been applied in aerospace and automotive industries for joining materials. The friction stir tool is the key element in the FSW process. In this study, the effect of four different tool pin geometries on the mechanical properties of two types of polypropylene composite plates, with 30% glass and carbon fiber, respectively, were investigated. For this purpose, four pins of different geometry, namely, a threaded-tapered pin, square pin, four-flute threaded pin, and threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer were made and used to carry out the butt welding of 5-mm-thick plates. The standard tensile and Izod impact tests were performed to evaluate the tensile strength and impact toughness of welded specimens. The results indicated that the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer produced welds with a better surface appearance and higher tensile and impact strengths. The tests also showed that, with the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer, the impact strength of the glass- and carbon-fiber composite welds were about 40 and 50%, respectively, of that of the base materials.

  6. Some studies on weld bead geometries for laser spot welding process using finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva Shanmugam, N.; Buvanashekaran, G.; Sankaranarayanasamy, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, a 2 kW Nd:YAG laser welding system is used to conduct laser spot welding trials. → The size and shape of the laser spot weld is predicted using finite element simulation. → The heat input is assumed to be a three-dimensional conical Gaussian heat source. → The result highlights the effect of beam incident angle on laser spot welds. → The achieved results of numerical simulation are almost identical with a real weldment. -- Abstract: Nd:YAG laser beam welding is a high power density welding process which has the capability to focus the beam to a very small spot diameter of about 0.4 mm. It has favorable characteristics namely, low heat input, narrow heat affected zone and lower distortions, as compared to conventional welding processes. In this study, finite element method (FEM) is applied for predicting the weld bead geometry i.e. bead length (BL), bead width (BW) and depth of penetration (DP) in laser spot welding of AISI 304 stainless steel sheet of thickness 2.5 mm. The input parameters of laser spot welding such as beam power, incident angle of the beam and beam exposure time are varied for conducting experimental trials and numerical simulations. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of AISI 304 stainless steel, the effect of latent heat of fusion, and the convective and radiative aspects of boundary conditions are considered while developing the finite element model. The heat input to the developed model is assumed to be a three-dimensional conical Gaussian heat source. Finite-element simulations of laser spot welding were carried out by using Ansys Parametric Design Language (APDL) available in finite-element code, ANSYS. The results of the numerical analysis provide the shape of the weld beads for different ranges of laser input parameters that are subsequently compared with the results obtained through experimentation and it is found that they are in good agreement.

  7. The Effect of Tool Pin Shape of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) on Polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik, Z. C.; Ishak, M.; Othman, N. H.

    2017-09-01

    This experiment deals with similar joining of polypropylene (PP) with thickness of 3 mm was carried out by using friction stir welding (FSW) technique. The process parameters, rotational speed, welding speed and tilt angle were fixed of experiments. The tool geometry shapes were the main parameters which were taken into consideration. The optimum designs of tool geometry shape were determined with reference to tensile strength of the joint. During the tensile testing experiment, the results show that all fractured occurs in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) on the polypropylene (PP). Results show that the optimum design can be obtained with same rotational speed, welding speed and tilt angle.

  8. The effect of microstructure and geometry on the fatigue behaviour of bundle assembly welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, B.A.; Gabbani, M.

    1997-01-01

    Cracking of end plates, in the Darlington NGS, was attributed to high-cycle fatigue resulting from flow-induced vibrations. Because the cracks were predominantly associated with the bundle assembly welds and with certain element positions, a program was initiated to study whether the microstructure and geometry of the weld zone affected the fatigue behaviour of the assembly welds. Assembly weld samples were subjected to different heat treatments, resulting in different microstructures of the weld zone. Results of fatigue testing suggest that heat treatment of the welds (i.e., microstructure) had little effect on the fatigue life. Assembly welds were also produced with different weld notch geometries, and compared with samples having notches produced by machining (instead of welding). The results of these tests showed that geometry of the weld had a significant effect on fatigue life. However, the geometry of the weld notch required to significantly improve fatigue life is not achievable using the current assembly welding process. A small improvement in fatigue life of welded samples appears possible by increasing the weld diameter. (author)

  9. Implicit Geometry Meshing for the simulation of Rotary Friction Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmicker, D.; Persson, P.-O.; Strackeljan, J.

    2014-08-01

    The simulation of Rotary Friction Welding (RFW) is a challenging task, since it states a coupled problem of phenomena like large plastic deformations, heat flux, contact and friction. In particular the mesh generation and its restoration when using a Lagrangian description of motion is of significant severity. In this regard Implicit Geometry Meshing (IGM) algorithms are promising alternatives to the more conventional explicit methods. Because of the implicit description of the geometry during remeshing, the IGM procedure turns out to be highly robust and generates spatial discretizations of high quality regardless of the complexity of the flash shape and its inclusions. A model for efficient RFW simulation is presented, which is based on a Carreau fluid law, an Augmented Lagrange approach in mapping the incompressible deformations, a penalty contact approach, a fully regularized Coulomb-/fluid friction law and a hybrid time integration strategy. The implementation of the IGM algorithm using 6-node triangular finite elements is described in detail. The techniques are demonstrated on a fairly complex friction welding problem, demonstrating the performance and the potentials of the proposed method. The techniques are general and straight-forward to implement, and offer the potential of successful adoption to a wide range of other engineering problems.

  10. Design of Friction Stir Welding Tool for Avoiding Root Flaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shude; Xing, Jingwei; Yue, Yumei; Ma, Yinan; Zhang, Liguo; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2013-12-12

    In order to improve material flow behavior during friction stir welding and avoid root flaws of weld, a tool with a half-screw pin and a tool with a tapered-flute pin are suggested. The effect of flute geometry in tool pins on material flow velocity is investigated by the software ANSYS FLUENT. Numerical simulation results show that high material flow velocity appears near the rotational tool and material flow velocity rapidly decreases with the increase of distance away from the axis of the tool. Maximum material flow velocity by the tool with the tapered-flute pin appears at the beginning position of flute and the velocity decreases with the increase of flow length in flute. From the view of increasing the flow velocity of material near the bottom of the workpiece or in the middle of workpiece, the tool with the half-screw pin and the tool with the tapered-flute pin are both better than the conventional tool.

  11. A Study on Tooling and Its Effect on Heat Generation and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikader, Sujoy; Biswas, Pankaj; Puri, Asit Baran

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been the most attracting solid state welding process as it serves numerous advantages like good mechanical, metallurgical properties etc. Non weldable aluminium alloys like 5XXX, 7XXX series can be simply joined by this process. In this present study a mathematical model has been developed and experiments were successfully performed to evaluate mechanical properties of FSW on similar aluminium alloys i.e. AA1100 for different process parameters and mainly two kind of tool geometry (straight cylindrical and conical or cylindrical tapered shaped pin with flat shoulder). Tensile strength and micro hardness for different process parameters are reported of the welded plate sample. It was noticed that in FSW of similar alloy with tool made of SS-310 tool steel, friction is the major contributor for the heat generation. It was seen that tool geometry, tool rotational speed, plunging force by the tool and traverse speed have significant effect on tensile strength and hardness of friction stir welded joints.

  12. Friction Stir Welding of Tapered Thickness Welds Using an Adjustable Pin Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn; Venable, Richard; Lawless, Kirby

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) can be used for joining weld lands that vary in thickness along the length of the weld. An adjustable pin tool mechanism can be used to accomplish this in a single-pass, full-penetration weld by providing for precise changes in the pin length relative to the shoulder face during the weld process. The difficulty with this approach is in accurately adjusting the pin length to provide a consistent penetration ligament throughout the weld. The weld technique, control system, and instrumentation must account for mechanical and thermal compliances of the tooling system to conduct tapered welds successfully. In this study, a combination of static and in-situ measurements, as well as active control, is used to locate the pin accurately and maintain the desired penetration ligament. Frictional forces at the pin/shoulder interface were a source of error that affected accurate pin position. A traditional FSW pin tool design that requires a lead angle was used to join butt weld configurations that included both constant thickness and tapered sections. The pitch axis of the tooling was fixed throughout the weld; therefore, the effective lead angle in the tapered sections was restricted to within the tolerances allowed by the pin tool design. The sensitivity of the FSW process to factors such as thickness offset, joint gap, centerline offset, and taper transition offset were also studied. The joint gap and the thickness offset demonstrated the most adverse affects on the weld quality. Two separate tooling configurations were used to conduct tapered thickness welds successfully. The weld configurations included sections in which the thickness decreased along the weld, as well as sections in which the thickness increased along the weld. The data presented here include weld metallography, strength data, and process load data.

  13. Development of thick wall welding and cutting tools for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Akou, Kentaro; Koizumi, Koichi

    1998-01-01

    The Vacuum Vessel, which is a core component of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is required to be exchanged remotely in a case of accident such as superconducting coil failure. The in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor are planned to be exchanged or fixed. In these exchange or maintenance operations, the thick wall welding and cutting are inevitable and remote handling tools are necessary. The thick wall welding and cutting tools for blanket are under developing in the ITER R and D program. The design requirement is to weld or cut the stainless steel of 70 mm thickness in the narrow space. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding, plasma cutting and iodine laser welding/cutting are selected as primary option. Element welding and cutting tests, design of small tools to satisfy space requirement, test fabrication and performance tests were performed. This paper reports the tool design and overview of welding and cutting tests. (author)

  14. Development of thick wall welding and cutting tools for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Akou, Kentaro; Koizumi, Koichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    The Vacuum Vessel, which is a core component of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is required to be exchanged remotely in a case of accident such as superconducting coil failure. The in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor are planned to be exchanged or fixed. In these exchange or maintenance operations, the thick wall welding and cutting are inevitable and remote handling tools are necessary. The thick wall welding and cutting tools for blanket are under developing in the ITER R and D program. The design requirement is to weld or cut the stainless steel of 70 mm thickness in the narrow space. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding, plasma cutting and iodine laser welding/cutting are selected as primary option. Element welding and cutting tests, design of small tools to satisfy space requirement, test fabrication and performance tests were performed. This paper reports the tool design and overview of welding and cutting tests. (author)

  15. Process parameters-weld bead geometry interactions and their influence on mechanical properties: A case of dissimilar aluminium alloy electron beam welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mastanaiah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of weld bead geometry is always an interesting and challenging research topic as it involves understanding of complex multi input and multi output system. The weld bead geometry has a profound impact on the load bearing capability of a weld joint, which in-turn decides the performance in real time service conditions. The present study introduces a novel approach of detecting a relationship between weld bead geometry and mechanical properties (e.g. tensile load for the purpose of catering the best the process could offer. The significance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a case of dissimilar aluminium alloy (AA2219 and AA5083 electron beam welds. A mathematical model of tensile braking load as a function of geometrical attributes of weld bead geometry is presented. The results of investigation suggests the effective thickness of weld – a geometric parameter of weld bead has the most significant influence on tensile breaking load of dissimilar weld joint. The observations on bead geometry and the mechanical properties (microhardness, ultimate tensile load and face bend angle are correlated with detailed metallurgical analysis. The fusion zone of dissimilar electron beam weld has finer grain size with a moderate evaporation and segregation of alloying elements magnesium and copper respectively. The mechanical properties of weld joint are controlled by optimum bead geometry and HAZ softening in weaker AA5083 Al alloy. Keywords: Electron beam welding, AA2219, AA5083, Bead geometry, Tensile breaking load

  16. Analysis of Pulsed Laser Welding Parameters Effect on Weld Geometry of 316L Stainless Steel using DOE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Pakmanesh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the optimization of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding parameters was done on a lap-joint of a 316L stainless steel foil in order to predict the weld geometry through response surface methodology. For this purpose, the effects of laser power, pulse duration, and frequency were investigated. By presenting a second-order polynomial, the above-mentioned statistical method was managed to be well employed to evaluate the effect of welding parameters on weld width. The results showed that the weld width at the upper, middle and lower surfaces of weld cross section increases by increasing pulse durationand laser power; however, the effects of these parameters on the mentioned levels are different. The effect of pulse duration in the models of weld upper, middle and lower widths was calculated as 76, 73 and 68%, respectively. Moreover, the effect of power on theses widths was determined as 18, 24 and 28%, respectively. Finally, by superimposing these models, optimum conditions were obtained to attain a full penetration weld and the weld with no defects.

  17. Retractable Pin Tools for the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Two companies have successfully commercialized a specialized welding tool developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Friction stir welding uses the high rotational speed of a tool and the resulting frictional heat created from contact to crush, 'stir' together, and forge a bond between two metal alloys. It has had a major drawback, reliance on a single-piece pin tool. The pin is slowly plunged into the joint between two materials to be welded and rotated as high speed. At the end of the weld, the single-piece pin tool is retracted and leaves a 'keyhole,' something which is unacceptable when welding cylindrical objects such as drums, pipes and storage tanks. Another drawback is the requirement for different-length pin tools when welding materials of varying thickness. An engineer at the MSFC helped design an automatic retractable pin tool that uses a computer-controlled motor to automatically retract the pin into the shoulder of the tool at the end of the weld, preventing keyholes. This design allows the pin angle and length to be adjusted for changes in material thickness and results in a smooth hole closure at the end of the weld. Benefits of friction stir welding, using the MSFC retractable pin tool technology, include the following: The ability to weld a wide range of alloys, including previously unweldable and composite materials; provision of twice the fatigue resistance of fusion welds and no keyholes; minimization of material distortion; no creation of hazards such as welding fumes, radiation, high voltage, liquid metals, or arcing; automatic retraction of the pin at the end of the weld; and maintaining full penetration of the pin.

  18. Development of bore tools for pipe welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Akira; Takiguchi, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    In the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in-vessel components replacement and maintenance requires that connected cooling pipes be cut and removed beforehand and that new components be installed to which cooling pipes must be rewelded. All welding must be inspected for soundness after completion. These tasks require a new task concept for ensuring shielded areas and access from narrow ports. Thus, it became necessary to develop autonomous locomotion welding and cutting tools for branch and main pipes to weld pipes by in-pipe access; a system was proposed that cut and welded branch and main pipes after passing inside pipe curves, and elemental technologies developed. This paper introduces current development in tools for welding and cutting branch pipes and other tools for welding and cutting the main pipe. (author)

  19. Development of bore tools for pipe welding and cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Akira; Takiguchi, Yuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    In the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in-vessel components replacement and maintenance requires that connected cooling pipes be cut and removed beforehand and that new components be installed to which cooling pipes must be rewelded. All welding must be inspected for soundness after completion. These tasks require a new task concept for ensuring shielded areas and access from narrow ports. Thus, it became necessary to develop autonomous locomotion welding and cutting tools for branch and main pipes to weld pipes by in-pipe access; a system was proposed that cut and welded branch and main pipes after passing inside pipe curves, and elemental technologies developed. This paper introduces current development in tools for welding and cutting branch pipes and other tools for welding and cutting the main pipe. (author)

  20. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Chetan Aneja; Amit Handa

    2016-01-01

    In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW) process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases w...

  1. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  2. Effect of Heat Input on Geometry of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Bead on Low Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Manas Kumar; Hazra, Ritesh; Mondal, Ajit; Das, Santanu

    2018-05-01

    Among different weld cladding processes, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) cladding becomes a cost effective, user friendly, versatile method for protecting the surface of relatively lower grade structural steels from corrosion and/or erosion wear by depositing high grade stainless steels onto them. The quality of cladding largely depends upon the bead geometry of the weldment deposited. Weld bead geometry parameters, like bead width, reinforcement height, depth of penetration, and ratios like reinforcement form factor (RFF) and penetration shape factor (PSF) determine the quality of the weld bead geometry. Various process parameters of gas metal arc welding like heat input, current, voltage, arc travel speed, mode of metal transfer, etc. influence formation of bead geometry. In the current experimental investigation, austenite stainless steel (316) weld beads are formed on low alloy structural steel (E350) by GMAW using 100% CO2 as the shielding gas. Different combinations of current, voltage and arc travel speed are chosen so that heat input increases from 0.35 to 0.75 kJ/mm. Nine number of weld beads are deposited and replicated twice. The observations show that weld bead width increases linearly with increase in heat input, whereas reinforcement height and depth of penetration do not increase with increase in heat input. Regression analysis is done to establish the relationship between heat input and different geometrical parameters of weld bead. The regression models developed agrees well with the experimental data. Within the domain of the present experiment, it is observed that at higher heat input, the weld bead gets wider having little change in penetration and reinforcement; therefore, higher heat input may be recommended for austenitic stainless steel cladding on low alloy steel.

  3. Refurbishment of damaged tools using the combination of GTAW and laser beam welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tušek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of two welding processes for the refurbishment of damaged industrial tools. In the first part the problem is presented followed by the comparison of GTAW and laser welding in terms of repair welding of damaged tools. The macrosections of the welds show the difference between both welding processes in repairing of damaged tools. At the conclusion the main findings are presented. In many cases it is useful to use both welding processes in order to achieve better weld quality and to make welding more economical. The order of the technology used depends on the tool material, the use of the tool and the tool damage.

  4. A Shape Optimization Study for Tool Design in Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogomolny, Michael; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply shape optimization tools for design of resistance welding electrodes. The numerical simulation of the welding process has been performed by a simplified FEM model implemented in COMSOL. The design process is formulated as an optimization problem where...... the objective is to prolong the life-time of the electrodes. Welding parameters like current, time and electrode shape parameters are selected to be the design variables while constraints are chosen to ensure a high quality of the welding. Surrogate models based on a Kriging approximation has been used in order...

  5. Real weld geometry determining mechanical properties of high power laser welded medium plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sang; Mi, Gaoyang; Yan, Fei; Wang, Chunming; Li, Peigen

    2018-06-01

    Weld width is commonly used as one of main factors to assess joint performances in laser welding. However, it changes significantly through the thickness direction in conditions of medium or thick plates. In this study, high-power autogenous laser welding was conducted on 7 mm thickness 201 stainless steel to elucidate the factor of whole weld transverse shape critically affecting the mechanical properties with the aim of predicting the performance visually through the weld appearance. The results show that single variation of welding parameters could result in great changes of weld pool figures and subsequently weld transverse shapes. All the obtained welds are composed of austenite containing small amount of cellular dendritic δ-Ferrite. The 0.2% proof stresses of Nail- and Peanut-shaped joint reach 458 MPa and 454 MPa, 88.2% and 87.5% of the base material respectively, while that of Wedge-shaped joint only comes to 371 MPa, 71.5% of the base material. The deterioration effect is believed to be caused by the axial grain zone in the weld center. The fatigue strength of joint P is a bit lower than N, but much better than W. Significant deformation incompatibility through the whole thickness and microstructure resistance to crack initiation should be responsible for the poor performance of W-shaped joints.

  6. Partial safety factor calibration from stochastic finite element computation of welded joint with random geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoefs, Franck; Chevreuil, Mathilde; Pasqualini, Olivier; Cazuguel, Mikaël

    2016-01-01

    Welded joints are used in various structures and infrastructures like bridges, ships and offshore structures, and are submitted to cyclic stresses. Their fatigue behaviour is an industrial key issue to deal with and still offers original research subjects. One of the available methods relies on the computing of the stress concentration factor. Even if some studies were previously driven to evaluate this factor onto some cases of welded structures, the shape of the weld joint is generally idealized through a deterministic parametric geometry. Previous experimental works however have shown that this shape plays a key role in the lifetime assessment. We propose in this paper a methodology for computing the stress concentration factor in presence of random geometries of welded joints. In view to make the results available by engineers, this method merges stochastic computation and semi-probabilistic analysis by computing partial safety factors with a dedicated method. - Highlights: • Numerical computation of stress concentration factor with random geometry of weld. • Real data are used for probabilistic modelling. • Identification of partial safety factor from SFEM computation in case of random geometries.

  7. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  8. FUZZY REGRESSION MODEL TO PREDICT THE BEAD GEOMETRY IN THE ROBOTIC WELDING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.S. Sung; I.S. Kim; Y. Xue; H.H. Kim; Y.H. Cha

    2007-01-01

    Recently, there has been a rapid development in computer technology, which has in turn led todevelop the fully robotic welding system using artificial intelligence (AI) technology. However, therobotic welding system has not been achieved due to difficulties of the mathematical model andsensor technologies. The possibilities of the fuzzy regression method to predict the bead geometry,such as bead width, bead height, bead penetration and bead area in the robotic GMA (gas metalarc) welding process is presented. The approach, a well-known method to deal with the problemswith a high degree of fuzziness, is used to build the relationship between four process variablesand the four quality characteristics, respectively. Using these models, the proper prediction of theprocess variables for obtaining the optimal bead geometry can be determined.

  9. Friction Stir Weld Application and Tooling Design for the Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle Stage Adapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorn, John

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), commonly known as the Orion capsule, is planned to be the United States' next manned spacecraft for missions beyond low earth orbit. Following the cancellation of the Constellation program and creation of SLS (Space Launch System), the need arose for the MPCV to utilize the Delta IV Heavy rocket for a test launch scheduled for 2014 instead of the previously planned Ares I rocket. As a result, an adapter (MSA) must be used in conjunction with the MPCV to account for the variation in diameter of the launch vehicles; 5.5 meters down to 5.0 meters. Prior to ight article fabrication, a path nder (test article) will be fabricated to ne tune the associated manufacturing processes. The adapter will be comprised of an aluminum frustum (partial cone) that employs isogrid technology and circumferential rings on each end. The frustum will be fabricated by friction stir welding (FSW) three individual panels together on a Vertical Weld Tool (VWT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Subsequently, each circumferential ring will be friction stir welded to the frustum using a Robotic Weld Tool (RWT). The irregular geometry and large mass of the MSA require that extensive tooling preparation be put into support structures for the friction stir weld. The tooling on the VWT will be comprised of a set of conveyors mounted on pre-existing stanchions so that the MSA will have the ability to be rotated after each of the three friction stir welds. The tooling requirements to friction stir weld the rings with the RWT are somewhat more demanding. To support the mass of the MSA and resist the load of the weld tool, a system of mandrels will be mounted to stanchions and assembled in a circle. The goal of the paper will be to explain the design, fabrication, and assembly of the tooling, to explain the use of friction stir welding on the MSA path nder, and also to discuss the lessons learned and modi cations made in preparation for ight article fabrication

  10. Mathematical modeling for prediction and optimization of TIG welding pool geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Esme

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, nonlinear and multi-objective mathematical models were developed to determine the process parameters corresponding to optimum weld pool geometry. The objectives of the developed mathematical models are to maximize tensile load (TL, penetration (P, area of penetration (AP and/or minimize heat affected zone (HAZ, upper width (UW and upper height (UH depending upon the requirements.

  11. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  12. Development of neural network models for the prediction of solidification mode, weld bead geometry and sensitisation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Raj, B.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative models describing the effect of weld composition on the solidification mode, ferrite content and process parameters on the weld bead geometry are necessary in order to design composition of the welding consumable to ensure primary ferritic solidification mode, proper ferrite content and to ensure right choice of process parameters to achieve good bead geometry. A quantitative model on sensitisation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels is also necessary to optimise the composition of the austenitic stainless steel and to limit the strain on the material in order to enhance the resistance to sensitisation. The present paper discuss the development of quantitative models using artificial neural networks to correlate weld metal composition with solidification mode, process parameter with weld bead geometry and time for sensitisation with composition, strain in the material before welding and the temperature of exposure in austenitic stainless steels. (author)

  13. Friction stir weld tools having fine grain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Glenn J.; Frye, John G.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-03-15

    Tools for friction stir welding can be made with fewer process steps, lower cost techniques, and/or lower cost ingredients than other state-of-the-art processes by utilizing improved compositions and processes of fabrication. Furthermore, the tools resulting from the improved compositions and processes of fabrication can exhibit better distribution and homogeneity of chemical constituents, greater strength, and/or increased durability. In one example, a friction stir weld tool includes tungsten and rhenium and is characterized by carbide and oxide dispersoids, by carbide particulates, and by grains that comprise a solid solution of the tungsten and rhenium. The grains do not exceed 10 micrometers in diameter.

  14. Metallurgical Characterization of a Weld Bead Coating Applied by the PTA Process on the D2 Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tahaei

    Full Text Available Abstract In this investigation, a nickel-base powder mixed with tungsten carbide particles was applied by Plasma Transferred Arc welding (PTA on the surface of the D2 cold work tool steel to improve surface quality and to extend its lifetime during applications. The Design of Experiment (DoE method was applied to obtain the appropriate combination of hardfacing parameters and to run the minimum number of tests. Current, travel speed and preheat were considered as variable parameters. These parameters are important to reach a final layer with an appropriate bead geometry accompanied with good metallurgical properties. All samples were prepared for metallurgical investigations and the effect of process parameters on the weld bead geometry was considered. For each experiment run, weld bead geometry parameters were measured including dilution, penetration and reinforcement. Microstructures and the distribution of tungsten carbide particles after welding were analyzed by Optical Microscopy (OM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM equipped with an EDS microprobe. In addition, hardness tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld bead layers. Finally, among all the experiments, the best sample with appropriate bead geometry and microstructure was selected.

  15. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Muhič

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repair welding process parameters and techniques are considered. A microstructural analysis is conducted to detect defect formation and reveal the best laser welding method for duplex-treated tools.

  16. Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A tool that would be useable in both conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding (FSW) has been proposed. The tool would embody both a prior tooling concept for self-reacting FSW and an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability developed previously as an augmentation for conventional FSW. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed tool. In conventional FSW, depicted in Figure 1, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a rotating pin that protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. The main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional FSW is augmented with an APT capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or force-control system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding (SR-FSW), there are two rotating shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft, back into the FSW machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. A tool for SRFSW embodying this concept was reported in "Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding" (MFS-31914), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 53. In its outward appearance, the proposed tool (see Figure 2) would fit the above description of an SR

  17. Automatic welding detection by an intelligent tool pipe inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizmendi, C. J.; Garcia, W. L.; Quintero, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    This work provide a model based on machine learning techniques in welds recognition, based on signals obtained through in-line inspection tool called “smart pig” in Oil and Gas pipelines. The model uses a signal noise reduction phase by means of pre-processing algorithms and attribute-selection techniques. The noise reduction techniques were selected after a literature review and testing with survey data. Subsequently, the model was trained using recognition and classification algorithms, specifically artificial neural networks and support vector machines. Finally, the trained model was validated with different data sets and the performance was measured with cross validation and ROC analysis. The results show that is possible to identify welding automatically with an efficiency between 90 and 98 percent.

  18. Thermomechanical conditions and stresses on the friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atthipalli, Gowtam

    Friction stir welding has been commercially used as a joining process for aluminum and other soft materials. However, the use of this process in joining of hard alloys is still developing primarily because of the lack of cost effective, long lasting tools. Here I have developed numerical models to understand the thermo mechanical conditions experienced by the FSW tool and to improve its reusability. A heat transfer and visco-plastic flow model is used to calculate the torque, and traverse force on the tool during FSW. The computed values of torque and traverse force are validated using the experimental results for FSW of AA7075, AA2524, AA6061 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The computed torque components are used to determine the optimum tool shoulder diameter based on the maximum use of torque and maximum grip of the tool on the plasticized workpiece material. The estimation of the optimum tool shoulder diameter for FSW of AA6061 and AA7075 was verified with experimental results. The computed values of traverse force and torque are used to calculate the maximum shear stress on the tool pin to determine the load bearing ability of the tool pin. The load bearing ability calculations are used to explain the failure of H13 steel tool during welding of AA7075 and commercially pure tungsten during welding of L80 steel. Artificial neural network (ANN) models are developed to predict the important FSW output parameters as function of selected input parameters. These ANN consider tool shoulder radius, pin radius, pin length, welding velocity, tool rotational speed and axial pressure as input parameters. The total torque, sliding torque, sticking torque, peak temperature, traverse force, maximum shear stress and bending stress are considered as the output for ANN models. These output parameters are selected since they define the thermomechanical conditions around the tool during FSW. The developed ANN models are used to understand the effect of various input parameters on the total

  19. Influence of heat input on weld bead geometry using duplex stainless steel wire electrode on low alloy steel specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Mondal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas metal arc welding cladding becomes a popular surfacing technique in many modern industries as it enhances effectively corrosion resistance property and wear resistance property of structural members. Quality of weld cladding may be enhanced by controlling process parameters. If bead formation is found acceptable, cladding is also expected to be good. Weld bead characteristics are often assessed by bead geometry, and it is mainly influenced by heat input. In this paper, duplex stainless steel E2209 T01 is deposited on E250 low alloy steel specimens with 100% CO2 gas as shielding medium with different heats. Weld bead width, height of reinforcement and depth of penetration are measured. Regression analysis is done on the basis of experimental data. Results reveal that within the range of bead-on-plate welding experiments done, parameters of welding geometry are on the whole linearly related with heat input. A condition corresponding to 0.744 kJ/mm heat input is recommended to be used for weld cladding in practice.

  20. Characterization of Friction Welded Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel with a Novel Interlayer Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Balasubramanian, M.

    The main purpose of the current research work is to identify and investigate a novel method of holding an intermediate metal and to evaluate its metallurgical and mechanical properties. Copper was used as an interlayer material for the welding of this dissimilar Ti-6Al-4V (Ti alloy) and 304L stainless steel (SS). The study shows that the input parameters and surface geometry played a very significant role in producing a good quality joints with minimum heat affected zone and metal loss. A sound weld was achieved between Ti-6Al-4V and SS304L, on the basis of the earlier experiments conducted by the authors in their laboratory, by using copper rod as intermediate metal. Box-Behnken method was used for performing a minimum number of experiments for the study. In the present study, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and SS304L were joined by a novel method of holding the interlayer and new surface geometry for the interlayer. Initially, the drop test was used for determining the quality of the fabricated joint and, subsequently, non-destructive techniques like radiography and C-scan were used. Further optical micrograph, SEM-EDS, hardness and tensile test were done for understanding the performance of the joint.

  1. Effect of tool rotational speed on force generation, microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Al–Mg–Cr–Mn (AA 5052-O) alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshwan, Raza; Yusof, Farazila; Hassan, M.A.; Rahmat, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 3 mm thick AA 5052-O alloy plates were successfully joined by FSW process. • The joint was produced at 1000 rpm yielded a maximum tensile strength of 132 MPa. • The dissolution of β-Mg 2 Al 3 intermetallic phases of FSWed joints were reported. • Different axial forces acted on welding tool during welding were investigated. - Abstract: Friction stir welding (FSW) between 3 mm thick AA 5052-O aluminum alloy plates was investigated in the present study. Different welded specimens were produced by employing a constant tool traverse speed of 120 mm/min and by varying rotating speeds from 800 to 3000 rpm. The welded joints were characterized by its appearances, microstructural and mechanical properties at room temperature. The measurement of different forces acted on the tool during the FSW of AA 5052-O plates provided a significant insight to determine the quality of the welded joints. From the appearances of the welded joints it was evident that, except the tool rotational speed of 3000 rpm all other rotational speeds produced sound welded joints with smooth surface. The joint produced at 1000 rpm yielded a maximum tensile strength of 132 MPa which was 74% of the base material strength. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analyses on the stir zone suggested that, β-Mg 2 Al 3 intermetallic phases of the base material were mechanically fractured, smeared and mixed to different geometries due to tool stirring. The dissolution and redistribution of β-Mg 2 Al 3 second phase particles in the stir zone had a considerable effect on the reduction of the tensile strength of the welded joints. The reduction in hardness at the nugget zone (NZ) of the welded joints under different tool rotational speeds could be attributed to the dislocation of Mg-rich phases and segregation of Mg solute atoms at grain boundaries, which drew solute Mg atoms away from the α-aluminum matrix

  2. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    OpenAIRE

    T. Muhič; J. Tušek; M. Pleterski; D. Bombač

    2009-01-01

    The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repa...

  3. Effect of tool rotational speed and penetration depth on dissimilar aluminum alloys friction stir spot welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín M. Piccini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the automotive industry is looking for the use of aluminum parts in replace of steel parts in order to reduce the vehicles weight. These parts have to be joined, for instance, by welding processes. The more common welding process in the automotive industry is the Resistance Spot Welding (RSW technique. However, RSW of aluminum alloys has many disadvantages. Regarding this situation, a variant of the Friction Stir Welding process called Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW has been developed, showing a strong impact in welding of aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials in thin sheets. Process parameters affect the characteristics of the welded joints. However, the information available on this topic is scarce, particularly for dissimilar joints and thin sheets. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the rotational speed and the tool penetration depth on the characteristics of dissimilar FSS welded joints. Defects free joints have been achieved with higher mechanical properties than the ones reported. The maximum fracture load was 5800 N. It was observed that the effective joint length of the welded spots increased with the tool penetration depth, meanwhile the fracture load increased and then decreased. Finally, welding at 1200 RPM produced welded joints with lower mechanical properties than the ones achieved at 680 and 903 RPM.

  4. Process Damping and Cutting Tool Geometry in Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C. M.; Sims, N. D.; Turner, S.

    2011-12-01

    Regenerative vibration, or chatter, limits the performance of machining processes. Consequences of chatter include tool wear and poor machined surface finish. Process damping by tool-workpiece contact can reduce chatter effects and improve productivity. Process damping occurs when the flank (also known as the relief face) of the cutting tool makes contact with waves on the workpiece surface, created by chatter motion. Tool edge features can act to increase the damping effect. This paper examines how a tool's edge condition combines with the relief angle to affect process damping. An analytical model of cutting with chatter leads to a two-section curve describing how process damped vibration amplitude changes with surface speed for radiussed tools. The tool edge dominates the process damping effect at the lowest surface speeds, with the flank dominating at higher speeds. A similar curve is then proposed regarding tools with worn edges. Experimental data supports the notion of the two-section curve. A rule of thumb is proposed which could be useful to machine operators, regarding tool wear and process damping. The question is addressed, should a tool of a given geometry, used for a given application, be considered as sharp, radiussed or worn regarding process damping.

  5. Process Damping and Cutting Tool Geometry in Machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C M; Sims, N D; Turner, S

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative vibration, or chatter, limits the performance of machining processes. Consequences of chatter include tool wear and poor machined surface finish. Process damping by tool-workpiece contact can reduce chatter effects and improve productivity. Process damping occurs when the flank (also known as the relief face) of the cutting tool makes contact with waves on the workpiece surface, created by chatter motion. Tool edge features can act to increase the damping effect. This paper examines how a tool's edge condition combines with the relief angle to affect process damping. An analytical model of cutting with chatter leads to a two-section curve describing how process damped vibration amplitude changes with surface speed for radiussed tools. The tool edge dominates the process damping effect at the lowest surface speeds, with the flank dominating at higher speeds. A similar curve is then proposed regarding tools with worn edges. Experimental data supports the notion of the two-section curve. A rule of thumb is proposed which could be useful to machine operators, regarding tool wear and process damping. The question is addressed, should a tool of a given geometry, used for a given application, be considered as sharp, radiussed or worn regarding process damping.

  6. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  7. Effect of pin tool design on the material flow of dissimilar AA7075-AA6061 friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammed M.; Ishak, M.; Rejab, M. R. M.

    2017-10-01

    Tool design is the most influential aspect in the friction stir welding (FSW) technology. Influence of pin tool geometry on material flow pattern are studied in this work during the FSW of dissimilar AA7075 and AA6061 aluminium alloys. Three truncated pin tool profiles (threaded, threaded with single flat, and unthreaded with single flat) were used to prepare the weldments. The workpieces were joined using a custom-made clamping system under 1100 rpm of spindle speed, 300 mm/min of traverse rate and 3° of tilt angle. The metallographic analysis showed that defect-free welds can be produced using the three pin tools with significant changes in the mixing stir zone structure. The results declared that the introducing of the flat on the cone of the probe deviates the pattern of the onion rings without changing the chemical composition of the created layers. This in turn improves the hardness distribution and tensile strength of the welded joint. It was also noted that both heat affected zone (HAZ) and thermal-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) are similar in composition to their corresponding base materials (BM).

  8. Development of remote pipe welding tool for divertor cassettes in JT-60SA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Takao, E-mail: hayashi.takao@jaea.go.jp [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Sakurai, Shinji; Sakasai, Akira; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Kono, Wataru; Ohnawa, Toshio; Matsukage, Takeshi [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Remote pipe welding tool accessing from inside of the pipe has been newly developed. • Cooling pipe with a jut on the edge expands the acceptable welding gap up to 0.5 mm. • Positioning accuracy of the laser beam is realized to be less than ±0.1 mm. • We have achieved robust welding for an angular misalignment of 0.5°. - Abstract: Remote pipe welding tool accessing from inside of the pipe has been newly developed for JT-60SA. Remote handling (RH) system is necessary for the maintenance and repair of the divertor cassette in JT-60SA. Because the space around the cooling pipe connected with the divertor cassette is very limited, the cooling pipe is to be remotely cut and welded from inside for the maintenance. A laser welding method was employed to perform circumferential welding by rotating the focusing mirror inside the pipe. However, the grooves of connection pipes are not precisely aligned for welding. The most critical issue is therefore to develop a reliable welding tool for pipe connection without a defect such as undercut weld due to a gap caused by angular and axial misalignments of grooves. In addition, an angular misalignment between two pipes due to inclination of pipe has to be taken into account for the positioning of the laser beam during welding. In this paper, the followings are proposed to solve the above issues: (1) Cooling pipe connected with the divertor is machined to have a jut on the edge so as to expand the acceptable welding gap up to 0.5 mm by filling the gap with welded jut. (2) Positioning accuracy of the laser beam for reliable welding is realized to be less than ±0.1 mm along the circumferential target for welding by a position control mechanism provided in the tool even in the case of up to angular misalignment of 0.5° between connection pipes. Based on the above proposals, we have achieved robust welding for a large gap up to 0.5 mm as well as the maximum angular misalignment of 0.5° between connection pipes

  9. Interoperable mesh and geometry tools for advanced petascale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diachin, L; Bauer, A; Fix, B; Kraftcheck, J; Jansen, K; Luo, X; Miller, M; Ollivier-Gooch, C; Shephard, M S; Tautges, T; Trease, H

    2007-01-01

    SciDAC applications have a demonstrated need for advanced software tools to manage the complexities associated with sophisticated geometry, mesh, and field manipulation tasks, particularly as computer architectures move toward the petascale. The Center for Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations (ITAPS) will deliver interoperable and interchangeable mesh, geometry, and field manipulation services that are of direct use to SciDAC applications. The premise of our technology development goal is to provide such services as libraries that can be used with minimal intrusion into application codes. To develop these technologies, we focus on defining a common data model and data-structure neutral interfaces that unify a number of different services such as mesh generation and improvement, front tracking, adaptive mesh refinement, shape optimization, and solution transfer operations. We highlight the use of several ITAPS services in SciDAC applications

  10. Laser penetration spike welding: a welding tool enabling novel process and design opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijken, Durandus K.; Hoving, Willem; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2002-06-01

    A novel method for laser welding for sheet metal. is presented. This laser spike welding method is capable of bridging large gaps between sheet metal plates. Novel constructions can be designed and manufactured. Examples are light weight metal epoxy multi-layers and constructions having additional strength with respect to rigidity and impact resistance. Its capability to bridge large gaps allows higher dimensional tolerances in production. The required laser systems are commercially available and are easily implemented in existing production lines. The lasers are highly reliable, the resulting spike welds are quickly realized and the cost price per weld is very low.

  11. Analysis and Prediction of Micromilling Stability with Variable Tool Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyang Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micromilling can fabricate miniaturized components using micro-end mill at high rotational speeds. The analysis of machining stability in micromilling plays an important role in characterizing the cutting process, estimating the tool life, and optimizing the process. A numerical analysis and experimental method are presented to investigate the chatter stability in micro-end milling process with variable milling tool geometry. The schematic model of micromilling process is constructed and the calculation formula to predict cutting force and displacements is derived. This is followed by a detailed numerical analysis on micromilling forces between helical ball and square end mills through time domain and frequency domain method and the results are compared. Furthermore, a detailed time domain simulation for micro end milling with straight teeth and helical teeth end mill is conducted based on the machine-tool system frequency response function obtained through modal experiment. The forces and displacements are predicted and the simulation result between variable cutter geometry is deeply compared. The simulation results have important significance for the actual milling process.

  12. Slab2 - Updated Subduction Zone Geometries and Modeling Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G.; Hayes, G. P.; Portner, D. E.; Furtney, M.; Flamme, H. E.; Hearne, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey database of global subduction zone geometries (Slab1.0), is a highly utilized dataset that has been applied to a wide range of geophysical problems. In 2017, these models have been improved and expanded upon as part of the Slab2 modeling effort. With a new data driven approach that can be applied to a broader range of tectonic settings and geophysical data sets, we have generated a model set that will serve as a more comprehensive, reliable, and reproducible resource for three-dimensional slab geometries at all of the world's convergent margins. The newly developed framework of Slab2 is guided by: (1) a large integrated dataset, consisting of a variety of geophysical sources (e.g., earthquake hypocenters, moment tensors, active-source seismic survey images of the shallow slab, tomography models, receiver functions, bathymetry, trench ages, and sediment thickness information); (2) a dynamic filtering scheme aimed at constraining incorporated seismicity to only slab related events; (3) a 3-D data interpolation approach which captures both high resolution shallow geometries and instances of slab rollback and overlap at depth; and (4) an algorithm which incorporates uncertainties of contributing datasets to identify the most probable surface depth over the extent of each subduction zone. Further layers will also be added to the base geometry dataset, such as historic moment release, earthquake tectonic providence, and interface coupling. Along with access to several queryable data formats, all components have been wrapped into an open source library in Python, such that suites of updated models can be released as further data becomes available. This presentation will discuss the extent of Slab2 development, as well as the current availability of the model and modeling tools.

  13. Stir zone microstructure of commercial purity titanium friction stir welded using pcBN tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu; Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Park, Seung Hwan C.; Hirano, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was applied to commercial purity titanium using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool, and microstructure and hardness in the weld were examined. Additionally, the microstructural evolution during friction stir welding was also discussed. The stir zone consisted of fine equiaxed α grains surrounded by serrate grain boundaries, which were produced through the β → α allotropic transformation during the cooling cycle of friction stir welding. The fine α grains caused higher hardness than that in the base material. A lath-shaped α grain structure containing Ti borides and tool debris was observed in the surface region of the stir zone, whose hardness was the highest in the weld

  14. Effect of the Cutting Tool Geometry on the Tool Wear Resistance When Machining Inconel 625

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Zlámal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the design of a suitable cutting geometry of a tool for the machining of the Inconel 625 nickel alloy. This alloy is among the hard-to-machine refractory alloys that cause very rapid wear on cutting tools. Therefore, SNMG and RCMT indexable cutting insert were used to machine the alloy. The selected insert geometry should prevent notch wear and extend tool life. The alloy was machined under predetermined cutting conditions. The angle of the main edge and thus the size and nature of the wear changed with the depth of the material layer being cut. The criterion for determining a more suitable cutting geometry was the tool’s durability and the roughness of the machined surface.

  15. Effect of the Cutting Tool Geometry on the Tool Wear Resistance when Machining Inconel 625

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Zlámal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the design of a suitable cutting geometry of a tool for the machining of the Inconel 625 nickel alloy. This alloy is among the hard-to-machine refractory alloys that cause very rapid wear on cutting tools. Therefore, SNMG and RCMT indexable cutting insert were used to machine the alloy. The selected insert geometry should prevent notch wear and extend tool life. The alloy was machined under predetermined cutting conditions. The angle of the main edge and thus the size and nature of the wear changed with the depth of the material layer being cut. The criterion for determining a more suitable cutting geometry was the tool’s durability and the roughness of the machined surface.

  16. Statistical analysis of weld bead geometry in Ti6Al4V laser cladding. Comparison of central composite design and five step full factorial test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marko, Angelina [Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany); Graf, Benjamin; Rethmeier, Michael [Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany). Dept. for Joining and Coating Technology

    2017-11-01

    The process of laser cladding has become more important during recent years because of its broad application for cladding, repair or additive manufacturing. In the field of mechanical engineering, one use is the repair of turbine blades. For high quality and reliability of the repaired components, it is necessary to adjust the weld bead geometry to the specific repair task. The bead geometry influences the metallurgical bonding and the degree of dilution as well as the formation of defects like pores or cracks. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of the different parameters on the welding bead. A valuable tool to meet this industrial challenge is the design of experiments (DoE). In this context, the user can choose between a huge number of test plans. Greater profit of information is expected by a larger test range. In order to confirm the acceptance, a five-step full factorial test plan is compared to a central composite design in this paper. Moreover, the limits of the experimental range are indicated and restrictions can be derived. As the results show, the essential effects are detected with a full factorial test plan as well as with a central composite design. Merely the effect strength could not always be specified unambiguously. On this account and in consideration of cost efficiency, the use of central compound design is recommended in industrial applications.

  17. Statistical analysis of weld bead geometry in Ti6Al4V laser cladding. Comparison of central composite design and five step full factorial test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, Angelina; Graf, Benjamin; Rethmeier, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The process of laser cladding has become more important during recent years because of its broad application for cladding, repair or additive manufacturing. In the field of mechanical engineering, one use is the repair of turbine blades. For high quality and reliability of the repaired components, it is necessary to adjust the weld bead geometry to the specific repair task. The bead geometry influences the metallurgical bonding and the degree of dilution as well as the formation of defects like pores or cracks. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of the different parameters on the welding bead. A valuable tool to meet this industrial challenge is the design of experiments (DoE). In this context, the user can choose between a huge number of test plans. Greater profit of information is expected by a larger test range. In order to confirm the acceptance, a five-step full factorial test plan is compared to a central composite design in this paper. Moreover, the limits of the experimental range are indicated and restrictions can be derived. As the results show, the essential effects are detected with a full factorial test plan as well as with a central composite design. Merely the effect strength could not always be specified unambiguously. On this account and in consideration of cost efficiency, the use of central compound design is recommended in industrial applications.

  18. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kirk A; St-Georges, Lyne; Kiss, Laszlo I

    2014-04-30

    Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges), being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS). A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed) is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  19. Performance Improvement of Friction Stir Welds by Better Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Sam; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The as-welded friction stir weld has a cross section that may act as a stress concentrator. The geometry associated with the stress concentration may reduce the weld strength and it makes the weld challenging to inspect with ultrasound. In some cases, the geometry leads to false positive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) indications and, in many cases, it requires manual blending to facilitate the inspection. This study will measure the stress concentration effect and develop an improved phased array ultrasound testing (PAUT) technique for friction stir welding. Post-welding, the friction stir weld (FSW) tool would be fitted with an end mill that would machine the weld smooth, trimmed shaved. This would eliminate the need for manual weld preparation for ultrasonic inspections. Manual surface preparation is a hand operation that varies widely depending on the person preparing the welds. Shaving is a process that can be automated and tightly controlled.

  20. Role of Tool Shoulder End Features on Friction Stir Weld Characteristics of 6082 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugada, Krishna Kishore; Adepu, Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the temperature generation around the tool shoulder contact is one of the important aspects of the friction stir welding process. In the present study, the effects of various tool shoulder end feature on the temperature and mechanical properties of the 6082 aluminum alloy were investigated. The experimental results show that the axial force during the welding is considerably reduced by using tools with shoulder end features. The detailed observation revealed that around the tool shoulder contact, the amount of heat generation is higher between trialing edge (TE) to retreating side-leading edge corner (RS-LE) counter clockwise direction and lower between RS-LE to TE clockwise direction. Out of the four shoulder end featured tools, the welds produced with ridges shoulder tool resulted in superior properties with significantly lower axial force (approximately 32%) compared to plane shoulder tool.

  1. Measurement of laser welding pool geometry using a closed convex active contour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Rui; Zhang, Pu; Duan, Aiqing; Xiao, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computer vision method to measure geometric parameters of the weld pool in a deep penetration CO 2 laser welding system. Accurate measurement was achieved by removing a huge amount of interference caused by spatter, arc light and plasma to extract the true weld pool contour. This paper introduces a closed convex active contour (CCAC) model derived from the active contour model (snake model), which is a more robust high-level vision method than the traditional low-level vision methods. We made an improvement by integrating an active contour with the information that the weld pool contour is almost a closed convex curve. An effective thresholding method and an improved greedy algorithm are also given to complement the CCAC model. These influences can be effectively removed by using the CCAC model to acquire and measure the weld pool contour accurately and relatively fast. (paper)

  2. 49 CFR 176.54 - Repairs involving welding, burning, and power-actuated tools and appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-actuated tools and appliances. 176.54 Section 176.54 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to..., burning, and power-actuated tools and appliances. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, repairs or work involving welding or burning, or the use of power-actuated tools or appliances which may...

  3. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  4. Corrosion Properties of Cryorolled AA2219 Friction Stir Welded Joints Using Different Tool Pin Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal Babu, K.; Panneerselvam, K.; Sathiya, P.; Noorul Haq, A.; Sundarrajan, S.; Mastanaiah, P.; Srinivasa Murthy, C. V.

    The purpose of this paper is to present the corrosion behavior of the Cryorolled (CR) material and its Friction Stir Welded joints. Due to the thermal cycles of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process, the corrosion behavior of the material gets affected. Here, the cryorolling process was carried out on AA2219 alloy and CR material was joined by FSW process using four different pin tool profiles such as cylindrical, threaded cylindrical, square and hexagonal pin. The FSW joints were analyzed by corrosion resistance with the help of potentiodynamic polarization test with 3.5% NaCl solution. From the analysis, it is found that CR AA2219 material exhibits good corrosion resistance compared to the base AA2219 material, and also a hexagonal pin profile FSW joint exhibits high corrosion resistance. Among the weld joints created by four different tools, the lowest corrosion resistance was found in the cylindrical pin tool FSW welds. Further, the corroded samples were investigated through metallurgical investigations like OM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). It was found that the amount of dissolution of Al2Cu precipitate was present in the weld nugget. The amount of dissolution of Al2Cu precipitate is higher in the weld nugget produced by hexagonal pin tool. This is due to the enhancement of the corrosion resistance.

  5. Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Sossinsky, A B

    2012-01-01

    The book is an innovative modern exposition of geometry, or rather, of geometries; it is the first textbook in which Felix Klein's Erlangen Program (the action of transformation groups) is systematically used as the basis for defining various geometries. The course of study presented is dedicated to the proposition that all geometries are created equal--although some, of course, remain more equal than others. The author concentrates on several of the more distinguished and beautiful ones, which include what he terms "toy geometries", the geometries of Platonic bodies, discrete geometries, and classical continuous geometries. The text is based on first-year semester course lectures delivered at the Independent University of Moscow in 2003 and 2006. It is by no means a formal algebraic or analytic treatment of geometric topics, but rather, a highly visual exposition containing upwards of 200 illustrations. The reader is expected to possess a familiarity with elementary Euclidean geometry, albeit those lacking t...

  6. Boride Formation Induced by pcBN Tool Wear in Friction-Stir-Welded Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Hwan C.; Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Hirano, Satoshi; Inagaki, Masahisa

    2009-03-01

    The wear of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (pcBN) tool and its effect on second phase formation were investigated in stainless steel friction-stir (FS) welds. The nitrogen content and the flow stress were analyzed in these welds to examine pcBN tool wear. The nitrogen content in stir zone (SZ) was found to be higher in the austenitic stainless steel FS welds than in the ferritic and duplex stainless steel welds. The flow stress of austenitic stainless steels was almost 1.5 times larger than that of ferritic and duplex stainless steels. These results suggest that the higher flow stress causes the severe tool wear in austenitic stainless steels, which results in greater nitrogen pickup in austenitic stainless steel FS welds. From the microstructural observation, a possibility was suggested that Cr-rich borides with a crystallographic structure of Cr2B and Cr5B3 formed through the reaction between the increased boron and nitrogen and the matrix during FS welding (FSW).

  7. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In the previous article we looked at the origins of synthetic and analytic geometry. More practical minded people, the builders and navigators, were studying two other aspects of geometry- trigonometry and integral calculus. These are actually ...

  8. Development of pipe welding, cutting and inspection tools for the ITER blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Akira; Taguchi, Kou; Takiguchi, Yuji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tada, Eisuke

    1999-07-01

    In D-T burning reactors such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), an internal access welding/cutting of blanket cooling pipe with bend sections is inevitably required because of spatial constraint due to nuclear shield and available port opening space. For this purpose, internal access pipe welding/cutting/inspection tools for manifolds and branch pipes are being developed according to the agreement of the ITER R and D task (T329). A design concept of welding/cutting processing head with a flexible optical fiber has been developed and the basic feasibility studies on welding, cutting and rewelding are performed using stainless steel plate (SS316L). In the same way, a design concept of inspection head with a non-destructive inspection probe (including a leak-testing probe) has been developed and the basic characteristic tests are performed using welded stainless steel pipes. In this report, the details of welding/cutting/inspection heads for manifolds and branch pipes are described, together with the basic experiment results relating to the welding/cutting and inspection. In addition, details of a composite type optical fiber, which can transmit both the high-power YAG laser and visible rays, is described. (author)

  9. Study of hybrid laser / MAG welding process: characterization of the geometry and the hydrodynamics of the melt pool and development of a 3D thermal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, E.

    2010-11-01

    Hybrid laser/MIG-MAG welding shows high advantages compared to laser welding or GMAW arc welding used separately. Thanks to this process, higher productivity can be gained through higher welding speed, higher squeeze tolerance moreover possible improvement of the metallurgical properties of the weld seam can be obtained. However, many operating parameters have to be set up in order to achieve optimal process. The complex physical phenomena, which govern welding process, have to be understood in order to use efficiently this technique in mass production. Understanding of these phenomena is also necessary to program numerical simulations which fit to this process. In the first step, experimental studies have been carried out with GMAW, laser and hybrid welding on samples of S355 steel. Influence of operating parameters has been analyzed through films performed with speed camera and macro-graphies of weld seam cross section. Surface deformations of the melt pool, induced by the arc pressure, weld pool length, droplet detachment and welding speed, have been analyzed precisely from images of the surface melt pool. In a second step, a numerical model was developed using the COMSOL Multiphysics software for MAG, laser and hybrid laser/MAG welding processes. A 3D quasi-stationary model has been calculated from the temperature field within the metal. The originality of the MAG and hybrid model lies in the prediction of the melt pool surface profile used to determine the 3D geometry, by taking into account the material input. The influence of different parameters such as arc power and speed welding on the efficiency as well as the distribution radius of the arc power and the arc pressure are analyzed through validations with different experimental results and different calculation configurations. (author)

  10. A novel tool for automated evaluation of radiographic weld images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, C.; Venkatraman, B.; Jayakumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Raj, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radiography is one of the oldest and the most widely used NDT method for the detection of volumetric defects in welds and castings. Once a radiograph of a weld or a casting or an assembly is taken, the radiographer examines the same. The task of the radiographer consists of identifying the defects and quantitatively evaluating the same based on codes and specifications. Radiographic interpretation primarily depends on the expertise of the individual radiographer. To overcome the subjectivity involved in human interpretation, it is thus desirable to develop a computer based automated system to aid in the interpretation of radiographs. Towards this goal, the authors have developed a flowchart chalking out the various stages involved. Typical weld images of tube to tubesheet weld joints were digitised using high resolution digitiser. The images were segmented and 52 invariant moments were computed to be used as features. The results of these are presented in this paper. Once the features (invariant moments) are extracted and ranked, a neural network classifier based on error back-propagation has to classify the (top ranking) features and evaluate the image for acceptance or rejection. (author)

  11. Improving the particle distribution and mechanical properties of friction-stir-welded composites by using a smooth pin tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huijie; Hu, Yanying; Zhao, Yunqiang; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a very promising technique for joining particle-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (PRAMCs), but with increase in the volume fraction of reinforcing particles, their distribution in welds becomes inhomogeneous. This leads to an inconsistent deformation of welds and their destruction at low stresses. In order to improve the weld microstructure, a smooth pin tool was used for the friction stir welding of AC4A + 30 vol.% SiC particle-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. The present work describes the effect of welding parameters on the characteristics of particle distribution and the mechanical properties of welds. The ultimate strength of weld reached, 309 MPa, was almost 190% of that of the basic material. The mechanism of SiC particle conglomeration is clearly illustrated by means of schematic illustrations.

  12. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Prasolov, V V

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic introduction to various geometries, including Euclidean, affine, projective, spherical, and hyperbolic geometries. Also included is a chapter on infinite-dimensional generalizations of Euclidean and affine geometries. A uniform approach to different geometries, based on Klein's Erlangen Program is suggested, and similarities of various phenomena in all geometries are traced. An important notion of duality of geometric objects is highlighted throughout the book. The authors also include a detailed presentation of the theory of conics and quadrics, including the theory of conics for non-Euclidean geometries. The book contains many beautiful geometric facts and has plenty of problems, most of them with solutions, which nicely supplement the main text. With more than 150 figures illustrating the arguments, the book can be recommended as a textbook for undergraduate and graduate-level courses in geometry.

  13. Aluminum 6060-T6 friction stir welded butt joints: fatigue resistance with different tools and feed rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragetti, S.; D'Urso, G.

    2014-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of AA6060-T6 friction stir welded butt joints was investigated. The joints were produced by using both a standard and a threaded tri-flute cylindrical-tool with flat shoulder. The friction stir welding process was carried out using different feed rates. Preliminary tensile tests, micrograph analyses and hardness profile measurements across the welds were carried out. Welded and unwelded fatigue samples were tested under axial loading (R = 0.1) with upper limits of 10 4 and 10 5 cycles, using threaded and unthreaded (standard) tools at different feed rates. The best tensile and fatigue performance was obtained using the standard tool at low feed rate.

  14. Tool material effect on the friction stir butt welding of AA2124-T4 Alloy Matrix MMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Bozkurt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is to study on the effect of material properties tool on friction stir butt welding of AA2124-T4 alloy matrix MMC. Uncoated tool, coated tool with a CrN, and coated tool with AlTiN were used to weld aluminum MMC plates. Macrostructure and microstructure observations, ultimate tensile strength, wear resistance, and chemical analysis were carried out to determine the appropriate tool for joining these composite plates. Results showed that the good welded joints could be obtained when a tool is coated with AlTiN.

  15. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  16. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  17. Mechanical Property Analysis in the Retracted Pin-Tool (RPT) Region of Friction Stir Welded (FSW) Aluminum Lithium 2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Oelgoetz, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    The "Auto-Adjustable Pin Tool for Friction Stir Welding", was developed at The Marshall Space Flight Center to address process deficiencies unique to the FSW process. The auto-adjustable pin tool, also called the retractable pin-tool (R.PT) automatically withdraws the welding probe of the pin-tool into the pin-tool's shoulder. The primary function of the auto-adjustable pin-tool is to allow for keyhole closeout, necessary for circumferential welding and localized weld repair, and, automated pin-length adjustment for the welding of tapered material thickness. An overview of the RPT hardware is presented. The paper follows with studies conducted using the RPT. The RPT was used to simulate two capabilities; welding tapered material thickness and closing out the keyhole in a circumferential weld. The retracted pin-tool regions in aluminum- lithium 2195 friction stir weldments were studied through mechanical property testing and metallurgical sectioning. Correlation's can be =de between retractable pin-tool programmed parameters, process parameters, microstructure, and resulting weld quality.

  18. Lightweight solar array blanket tooling, laser welding and cover process technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    A two phase technology investigation was performed to demonstrate effective methods for integrating 50 micrometer thin solar cells into ultralightweight module designs. During the first phase, innovative tooling was developed which allows lightweight blankets to be fabricated in a manufacturing environment with acceptable yields. During the second phase, the tooling was improved and the feasibility of laser processing of lightweight arrays was confirmed. The development of the cell/interconnect registration tool and interconnect bonding by laser welding is described.

  19. Influence of friction stir welding process and tool parameters on strength properties of AA7075-T6 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Muralidharan, C.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    The aircraft aluminium alloys generally present low weldability by traditional fusion welding process. The development of the friction stir welding has provided an alternative improved way of satisfactorily producing aluminium joints, in a faster and reliable manner. In this present work, the influence of process and tool parameters on tensile strength properties of AA7075-T 6 joints produced by friction stir welding was analysed. Square butt joints were fabricated by varying process parameters and tool parameters. Strength properties of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the microstructure, microhardness of weld nugget. From this investigation it is found that the joint fabricated at a tool rotational speed of 1400 rpm, welding speed of 60 mm/min, axial force of 8 kN, using the tool with 15 mm shoulder diameter, 5 mm pin diameter, 45 HRc tool hardness yielded higher strength properties compared to other joints.

  20. Use of Ultrasound in Reconditioning by Welding of Tools Used in the Process of Regenerating Rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrotă, Dan; Petrescu, Valentin

    2018-02-10

    Addressing the problem of reconditioning large parts is of particular importance, due to their value and to the fact that the technologies for their reconditioning are very complex. The tools used to refine regenerated rubber which measure 660 mm in diameter and 2130 mm in length suffer from a rather fast dimensional wear. Within this research, the authors looked for a welding reconditioning procedure that would allow a very good adhesion between the deposited material layer and the base material. In this regard, the MAG (Metal Active Gas) welding process was used, but the ultrasonic activation of the welding process was also considered. Thus, the wire used for welding was activated considering a variation of the frequency of ultrasounds in the range f = 18-22 kHz respectively of the oscillation amplitude A = 30-60 μm. Under these conditions it was found that the presence of ultrasonic waves during the welding cladding process results in uniform deposition of hard carbons at the grain boundary and in the elimination of any existing oxides on the deposition surface, but at the same time increases the adhesion between the base material and the additional material, all of which positively influence the wear and corrosion resistance of the tools used to refine the regenerated rubber.

  1. Mechanical Properties and Wear Behavior of AA5182/WC Nanocomposite Fabricated by Friction Stir Welding at Different Tool Traverse Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidar, Moslem; Asgari, Ali; Ojo, Olatunji Oladimeji; Saberi, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Grain growth inhibition at the heat-affected zone, improved weld strength and superior tribological properties of welds are desirable attributes of modern manufacturing. With the focused on these attributes, tungsten carbide (WC) nanoparticles were employed as reinforcements for the friction stir welding of 5-mm-thick AA5182 aluminum alloy by varying tool traverse speeds. The microstructure, microhardness, ultimate tensile strength, fracture and wear behavior of the resultant WC-reinforced welds were investigated, while unreinforced AA5182 welds were employed as controls for the study. The result shows that the addition of WC nanoparticles causes substantial grain refinement within the weld nugget. A decrease in traverse speed caused additional particle fragmentation, improved hardness value and enhanced weld strength in the reinforced welds. Improved wear rate and friction coefficient of welds were attained at a reduced traverse speed of 100 mm/min in the WC-reinforced welds. This improvement is attributed to the effects of reduced grain size/grain fragmentation and homogeneous dispersion of WC nanoparticles within the WC-reinforced weld nugget.

  2. Geometric calculus: a new computational tool for Riemannian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussiaux, A.; Tombal, P.

    1988-01-01

    We compare geometric calculus applied to Riemannian geometry with Cartan's exterior calculus method. The correspondence between the two methods is clearly established. The results obtained by a package written in an algebraic language and doing general manipulations on multivectors are compared. We see that the geometric calculus is as powerful as exterior calculus

  3. Laser welding to expand the allowable gap in bore welding for ITER blanket hydraulic connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Hisashi, E-mail: tanigawa.hisashi@jaea.go.jp; Maruyama, Takahito; Noguchi, Yuto; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    For application to bore welding of hydraulic connection in the ITER blanket module, laser welding presents the following benefits: low weld heat input is preferred for re-welding of the irradiated material. Its contactless process can intrinsically avoid a failure mode of the tool sticking on the weld. The exact requirements for pipe alignment were assessed in comparison with the assembly tolerance. The groove geometry was modified to expand the allowable initial gap. The groove was machined to be partially thick to obviate the filler wire. First, plates with partially thick grooves were welded to elucidate the preferred groove geometry and welding conditions. With the modified groove, the plates were welded for the initial gap of 1.0 mm. Then the groove geometry and welding conditions were adjusted based on results of pipe welding tests. By application of the additional 0.5-mm-thick and 2.5-mm-wide metal in the groove, pipes with an initial gap of 0.7 mm were welded successfully.

  4. Welding of Invar Fe-36 Ni Alloy used for tooling of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbacho, J.L.; Suarez, J.C.; Molleda, F.

    1997-01-01

    Invar alloy has been used for a long time almost exclusively for the manufacturing of high precision devices. Recently, however, new structural uses, such as bulky composite tooling for aerospace industry, have forced to reconsider all the welding procedures previously used. The aim of this research work is to get some insight into several of the problems of welding of invar, while proposing solutions concerned with experience or actual uses. Several issues have been considered, such as precautions with regards the purity of the inert shielding gas and the absence of residues on the surface, role of the titanium added with the filler metal, sensitivity of the alloy to reheat cracking, existence of precipitates and inclusions, etc. The presence of a characteristic banding on the weld pool, its origin and incidence on joint's properties have been also investigated. (Author) 28 refs

  5. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pedoe, Dan

    1988-01-01

    ""A lucid and masterly survey."" - Mathematics Gazette Professor Pedoe is widely known as a fine teacher and a fine geometer. His abilities in both areas are clearly evident in this self-contained, well-written, and lucid introduction to the scope and methods of elementary geometry. It covers the geometry usually included in undergraduate courses in mathematics, except for the theory of convex sets. Based on a course given by the author for several years at the University of Minnesota, the main purpose of the book is to increase geometrical, and therefore mathematical, understanding and to he

  6. Wear of Cutting Tool with Excel Geometry in Turning Process of Hardened Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samardžiová Michaela

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with hard turning using a cutting tool with Xcel geometry. This is one of the new geometries, and there is not any information about Xcel wear in comparison to the conventional geometry. It is already known from cutting tools producers that using the Xcel geometry leads to higher quality of machined surface, perticularly surface roughness. It is possible to achieve more than 4 times lower Ra and Rz values after turning than after using conventional geometry with radius. The workpiece material was 100Cr6 hardened steel with hardness of 60 ± 1 HRC. The machine used for the experiment was a lathe with counter spindle DMG CTX alpha 500, which is located in the Centre of Excellence of 5–axis Machining at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava. The cutting tools made by CBN were obtained from Sandvik COROMANT Company.

  7. Analysis of weld-cracking and improvement of the weld-repair process of superplastic forming tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchosal, A.; Deschaux-Beaume, F.; Lours, P.; Haro, S.; Fras, G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Characterisation of the microstructure of a heat-resistant austenitic cast steel. ► Failure analysis using in situ tensile tests and isothermal fatigue tests. ► Analyses of weld cracking mechanism during shielded metal arc welding process. ► Improvement of weld-repair method by re-melting of the base material surface with GTAW process. - Abstract: Superplastic forming (SPF) dies are generally made of using heat resistant cast steels, which are very sensitive to weld cracking. In order to improve the weld-repair process of such dies to prevent weld-cracking, the microstructure and the mechanical behaviour of a typical heat-resistant cast steel was first studied, using isothermal low-cycle fatigue tests and in situ tensile tests. The welding behaviour of such steel was also investigated, using a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process and welding conditions similar to those employed for weld repair industrial dies. The comparison of the aspect of weld-cracking with the fracture mechanisms observed at room temperature or during isothermal low-cycle fatigue tests suggests a similar brittle failure mechanism, due to the presence of large interdendritic carbides in the cast steel. The melting of the cast steel surface using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process allowed to refine the primary carbides, and then to reduce the weld-cracking sensitivity. The refining method with GTAW before welding has been successfully tested to weld-repair a sample representative of SPF dies, and is recommended for subsequent repairs of such dies

  8. Mathematical support for automated geometry analysis of lathe machining of oblique peakless round-nose tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2017-01-01

    Automatization of engineering processes requires developing relevant mathematical support and a computer software. Analysis of metal cutting kinematics and tool geometry is a necessary key task at the preproduction stage. This paper is focused on developing a procedure for determining the geometry of oblique peakless round-nose tool lathe machining with the use of vector/matrix transformations. Such an approach allows integration into modern mathematical software packages in distinction to the traditional analytic description. Such an advantage is very promising for developing automated control of the preproduction process. A kinematic criterion for the applicable tool geometry has been developed from the results of this study. The effect of tool blade inclination and curvature on the geometry-dependent process parameters was evaluated.

  9. Effects of welding parameters on friction stir spot welding of high density polyethylene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Mustafa Kemal; Yukler, Ahmet Irfan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) Schematic illustration of the cross section of a friction stir spot weld and (b) Geometry of the weld bonded area, x: nugget thickness and y: the thickness of the upper sheet. Highlights: → Welding parameters affect the FSSW nugget formation and the strength of the joint. → Melting of polyethylene occurred in the vicinity of the tool pin. → The joint that fractures with a pull nugget failure mode has a higher strength. -- Abstract: Friction stir spot welding parameters affect the weld strength of thermoplastics, such as high density polyethylene (HDPE) sheets. The effects of the welding parameters on static strength of friction stir spot welds of high density polyethylene sheets were investigated. For maximizing the weld strength, the selection of welding parameters is very important. In lap-shear tests two fracture modes were observed; cross nugget failure and pull nugget failure. The tool rotational speed, tool plunge depth and dwell time were determined to be important in the joint formation and its strength. The joint which had a better strength fails with a pull nugget failure morphology. Weld cross section image analysis of the joints were done with a video spectral comparator. The plunge rate of the tool was determined to have a negligible effect on friction stir spot welding.

  10. Experimental investigation and optimization of welding process parameters for various steel grades using NN tool and Taguchi method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sourabh Kumar; Thomas, Benedict

    2018-04-01

    The term "weldability" has been used to describe a wide variety of characteristics when a material is subjected to welding. In our analysis we perform experimental investigation to estimate the tensile strength of welded joint strength and then optimization of welding process parameters by using taguchi method and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) tool in MINITAB and MATLAB software respectively. The study reveals the influence on weldability of steel by varying composition of steel by mechanical characterization. At first we prepare the samples of different grades of steel (EN8, EN 19, EN 24). The samples were welded together by metal inert gas welding process and then tensile testing on Universal testing machine (UTM) was conducted for the same to evaluate the tensile strength of the welded steel specimens. Further comparative study was performed to find the effects of welding parameter on quality of weld strength by employing Taguchi method and Neural Network tool. Finally we concluded that taguchi method and Neural Network Tool is much efficient technique for optimization.

  11. Wear of Cutting Tool with Excel Geometry in Turning Process of Hardened Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardžiová, Michaela

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with hard turning using a cutting tool with Xcel geometry. This is one of the new geometries, and there is not any information about Xcel wear in comparison to the conventional geometry. It is already known from cutting tools producers that using the Xcel geometry leads to higher quality of machined surface, perticularly surface roughness. It is possible to achieve more than 4 times lower Ra and Rz values after turning than after using conventional geometry with radius. The workpiece material was 100Cr6 hardened steel with hardness of 60 ± 1 HRC. The machine used for the experiment was a lathe with counter spindle DMG CTX alpha 500, which is located in the Centre of Excellence of 5-axis Machining at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava. The cutting tools made by CBN were obtained from Sandvik COROMANT Company. The aim of this paper is to investigate the cutting tool wear in hard turning process by the Xcel cutting tool geometry.

  12. The application of springback compensation to the CAD geometries of forming tools: Milestone 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lingbeek, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    For car body parts, generally a surface modeling CAD system is used. The geometry of the tools that are used for forming the parts is based directly on this description. To compensate for springback after forming, the tools have to be modified. This turns out to be a complicated and time consuming

  13. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  14. 3D Modeling and Testing of Contact Problems in Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    A generic, electro-thermo-mechanically coupled finite element program is developed for three-dimensional simulation of resistance welding. The developed computer program has reached a level of a complete standalone software that can be utilized as a tool in the analysis of resistance welding...... of resistance welding processes, which cover a wide range of spot welding and projection welding applications. Three-dimensional simulation of spot welding enables the analysis of critical effects like electrode misalignment and shunt effects between consecutive spots. A single-sided spot welding case involving...... three-dimensional contact is also presented. This case was suggested by and discussed with a German steel manufacturer. When it comes to projection welding, a natural need for three-dimensional analysis arises in many cases because of the involved geometries. Cross-wire welding and welding of square...

  15. Influence of Tool Rotational Speed and Post-Weld Heat Treatments on Friction Stir Welded Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manugula, Vijaya L.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Mythili, R.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of tool rotational speed (200 and 700 rpm) on evolving microstructure during friction stir welding (FSW) of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (RAFMS) in the stir zone (SZ), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) have been explored in detail. The influence of post-weld direct tempering (PWDT: 1033 K (760 °C)/ 90 minutes + air cooling) and post-weld normalizing and tempering (PWNT: 1253 K (980 °C)/30 minutes + air cooling + tempering 1033 K (760 °C)/90 minutes + air cooling) treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties has also been assessed. The base metal (BM) microstructure was tempered martensite comprising Cr-rich M23C6 on prior austenite grain and lath boundaries with intra-lath precipitation of V- and Ta-rich MC precipitates. The tool rotational speed exerted profound influence on evolving microstructure in SZ, TMAZ, and HAZ in the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated states. Very high proportion of prior austenitic grains and martensite lath boundaries in SZ and TMAZ in the as-welded state showed lack of strengthening precipitates, though very high hardness was recorded in SZ irrespective of the tool speed. Very fine-needle-like Fe3C precipitates were found at both the rotational speeds in SZ. The Fe3C was dissolved and fresh precipitation of strengthening precipitates occurred on both prior austenite grain and sub-grain boundaries in SZ during PWNT and PWDT. The post-weld direct tempering caused coarsening and coalescence of strengthening precipitates, in both matrix and grain boundary regions of TMAZ and HAZ, which led to inhomogeneous distribution of hardness across the weld joint. The PWNT heat treatment has shown fresh precipitation of M23C6 on lath and grain boundaries and very fine V-rich MC precipitates in the intragranular regions, which is very much similar to that prevailed in BM prior to FSW. Both the PWDT and PWNT treatments caused considerable reduction in the hardness of SZ

  16. Effects of various tool pin profiles on mechanical and metallurgical properties of friction stir welded joints of cryorolled AA2219 aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal Babu, Karupannan; Panneerselvam, Kavan; Sathiya, Paulraj; Noorul Haq, Abdul Haq; Sundarrajan, Srinivasan; Mastanaiah, Potta; Srinivasa Murthy, Chunduri Venkata

    2018-02-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) process was conducted on cryorolled (CR) AA2219 plate using different tool pin profiles such as cylindrical pin, threaded cylindrical pin, square pin and hexagonal pin profiles. The FSW was carried out with pairs of 6 mm thick CR aluminium plates with different tool pin profiles. The different tool pin profile weld portions' behaviors like mechanical (tensile strength, impact and hardness) and metallurgical characteristics were analyzed. The results of the mechanical analysis revealed that the joint made by the hexagonal pin tool had good strength compared to other pin profiles. This was due to the pulsating action and material flow of the tool resulting in dynamic recrystallization in the weld zone. This was confirmed by the ultra fine grain structure formation in Weld Nugget (WN) of hexagonal pin tool joint with a higher percentage of precipitate dissolution. The fractograph of the hexagonal tool pin weld portion confirmed the finer dimple structure morphology without having any interior defect compared to other tool pin profiles. The lowest weld joint strength was obtained from cylindrical pin profile weld joint due to insufficient material flow during welding. The Transmission Electron Microscope and EDX analysis showed the dissolution of the metastable θ″, θ' (Al2Cu) partial precipitates in the WN and proved the influence of metastable precipitates on enhancement of mechanical behavior of weld. The XRD results also confirmed the Al2Cu precipitation dissolution in the weld zone.

  17. Influence of tool shape on lattice rearrangement under loading conditions reproducing friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Metal behavior under loading conditions that reproduce friction stir welding was studied on the atomic scale. Calculations were conducted based on molecular dynamics simulation with potentials calculated within the embedded atom method. The loading of the interface between two crystallites, whose structure corresponded to aluminum alloy 2024, was simulated by the motion of a cone-shaped tool along the interface with constant angular and translational velocities. The motion of the rotating tool causes fracture of the workpiece crystal structure with subsequent mixing of surface atoms of the interfacing crystallites. It is shown that the resistance force acting on the moving tool from the workpiece and the process of structural defect formation in the workpiece depend on the tool shape.

  18. The Influence of Tool Geometry towards Cutting Performance in Machining Aluminium 7075

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Syafik Jumali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace industries often use Computer Numerical Control (CNC machining in manufacturing aerospace parts. Aluminium 7075 is the most common material used as aircraft components. This research aims to produce end mill with optimum geometry in terms of the helix angle, primary radial relief angle and secondary relief angle. End mills with different geometry parameters are tested on Aluminium 7075 and data on surface roughness and tool wear were collected. The results were then analysed to determine which parameters brought the optimum result with regards to surface roughness and tool wear.

  19. TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF DEPOSIT WELDING AND GAS LASER CUTTING TO INCREASE THE EFFICIENCY OF THE BIMETALLIC TOOL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burlachenko Oleg Vasil’evich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Deposit welding is the application of a layer of metal on the surface of a product using fusion welding. In this paper, we consider the method of improving the technology of gas laser cutting, which makes it possible to achieve a high productivity of manufacturing a bimetallic tool. The present paper is concerned with the advantages of gas laser cutting which allows to consider this particular process of separating materials as highly-productive, low-waste, and advanced method of removing allowances of weld-deposit high-speed steel on the working surfaces of bimetallic tool. Urgency of the use of deposit welding and gas laser cutting to improve the efficiency of production of bimetallic tool is shown. The comparative analysis of gas-laser cutting and other cutting methods is given according to the geometrical parameters of cutting and surface quality. Analysis of the results of experimental studies has confirmed the high technological attractiveness and economic efficiency of manufacturing composite structures of punches and matrices when applying deposit welding of cutting parts with high-speed steels. The cost of dimensional processing of the welded cutting part is reduced by 4 to 6 times, while the manufacturing time is reduced by 6 to 12 times.

  20. The Effect of Tool Profiles on Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Al5052 T-Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Jin; Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur

    2018-03-01

    Al5052 T butt joints with two skins (5 mm) and one stringer (3 mm) has been successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW). Notably, this paper has been investigated the effect of tool shape on welded formation mechanism and mechanical properties. The used shapes of tool pin are two types which are cylinder (type 1) and frustum (type 2). Dimension on two types of tool pin shape is respectively pin length of 4.7 mm and pin diameter of frustum type of top (5 mm) and bottom (3 mm). The results of experiment show that inner defects in FSWed T-joints increase significantly in accordance with traverse speed. The maximum tensile strength of welded joint fabricated using type 1 is equivalent to 85% that of the base metal, which is approximately 10% higher than that of type 2. Because welded joint of type 1 has more smoothly plastic flow in comparison with type 2. Consequently, the results show that type 1 is better appropriate for friction stir welded Al5052 T butt joints than type 2.

  1. Simple Design Tool for Development of Well Insulated Window Frames and Optimization of the Frame Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zajas, Jan Jakub; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    in order to approach an optimal solution. The program was also used to conduct an optimization process of the frame geometry. A large number of various window frame designs were created and evaluated, based on their insulation properties. The paper presents the investigation process and some of the best......This paper describes a design tool created with the purpose of designing highly insulated window frames. The design tool is based on a parametric model of the frame geometry, where various parameters describing the frame can be easily changed by the user. Based on this input, geometry of the frame...... is generated by the program and is used by the finite element simulator to calculate the thermal performance of the frame (the U value). After the initial design is evaluated, the user can quickly modify chosen parameters and generate a new design. This process can then be repeated in multiple iterations...

  2. KENO3D Visualization Tool for KENO V.a and KENO-VI Geometry Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwedel, J.E.; Bowman, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Criticality safety analyses often require detailed modeling of complex geometries. Effective visualization tools can enhance checking the accuracy of these models. This report describes the KENO3D visualization tool developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide visualization of KENO V.a and KENO-VI criticality safety models. The development of KENO3D is part of the current efforts to enhance the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations) computer software system

  3. Effect of FSW welding speed on microstructure and microhardness of Al-0.84Mg-0.69Si-0.76Fe alloy at moderate rotational tool velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Suresh; Vineetha, S.; Madhusudhan, D.; Sai Krishna, CH; Kusuma Devi, G.; Bhawani; Hemarao, K.; Ganesh Naidu, G.

    2018-03-01

    The plate of 7.0 mm thickness was double side welded using friction stir welding is investigated. The rotational velocity of friction stir welding tool is used 1400 rpm. The influence of welding speed on the microstructure and microhardness values of Al-0.84Mg-0.69Si-0.76Fe aluminum alloy is presented. Two welding speeds 25 mm/min and 31.5 mm/min are used. The microhardness values of friction stir weld are measured at various locations from the weld interface. The microhardness values in stir zone of weld are found larger than lower welding speed at constant rotational velocity of 1400 rpm of friction stir welding tool. The similar effects on microhardness values are found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and heat affected zone. The fine microstructure is observed at 31.5 mm/min welding speed compared to the 25 mm/min welding speed at 1400 rpm.

  4. Outlook for a new design application for the joint union geometry of zircaloy-4 pipe-plug welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, R.L; Corso, H.L; Ausas, J; Fernandez, L

    2008-01-01

    The potential advantages are described and the test results shown for a new joint design for the Zircaloy-4 sheath-plug welding, used in the production of fuel elements for nuclear reactor power generators. Samples taken from sheaths and plugs similar to those used in the Atucha I Reactor were welded using the orbital GTAW process (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), using a new joint design and equipment that is now applied to the production of high quality welding, with very low levels of contamination. The test results from the experiments with hydrogen content, corrosion, metallographic and traction on samples of these welds are compared with those obtained in simples taken from the conventionally processed fuel elements for Atucha I. The results are also presented for the characterization of samples obtained with the same orbital welding method, but with a smaller protective chamber. This work aimed to verify the influence of the welding chamber size on the contamination with hydrogen. The utility of applying the new design together with the orbital GTAW method to the fabrication process for fuel elements is discussed

  5. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  6. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  7. Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Al/Al and Al/Non-Al Alloys: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangbin; Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2018-05-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid-state welding technique that has many advantages over traditional fusion welding, and has been widely adopted in the aerospace and automotive industries. This article reviews research developments in friction stir welding of dissimilar alloys systems, including combinations of aluminum alloys with Mg alloys, Cu, and steel. Microstructural evolution, hardness, tensile and fatigue properties, residual stresses, and corrosion behavior of dissimilar welds will be reported. The effects of processing parameters such as tool rotation and traverse speeds, tool position, material position, and tool geometry on the weld quality are also presented. Discussions on future research directions in friction stir welding will also be provided in the context of existing literature and future high-integrity applications.

  8. KENO3D, Visualisation Tool for KENO V.A and KENO-VI Geometry Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The KENO3D Visualization Tool for KENO Geometry Models is a powerful state-of-the-art visualization tool that enables KENO V.a users and KENO-VI to interactively display their three-dimensional geometry models. The KENO3D interactive options include: - Shaded or wire-frame images ; - Standard views such as top view, side view, front view, and isometric(3-D) view; - Rotating the model ; - Zooming in on selected locations ; - Selecting parts of the model to display ; - Editing colors and displaying legends ; - Displaying properties of any unit in the model ; - Creating cut-away views ; - Removing units from the model; - Printing image or saving image to a common graphics formats. KENO3D was developed for use by criticality safety specialists that use the KENO three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code. KENO V.a and KENO-VI are part of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations) computer software system developed at Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. 2 - Methods: KENO3D reads CSAS, KENO V.a, or KENO-VI input files. It attempts to verify that the KENO geometry input is 'legal', i.e., it conforms to the code input guidelines. KENO3D prints a warning message for illegal geometry input, and if possible, it displays the illegal KENO geometry to facilitate debugging of the input. Problems with more than 300,000 KENO V.a bodies have been successfully tested and displayed. KENO3D has the look and feel of a typical PC Windows application. Toolbar buttons are included for all major menu options. There is a setup dialog that allows the user to specify toolbars that should be displayed

  9. Effect of tool offsetting on microstructure and mechanical properties dissimilar friction stir welded Mg-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, Amir Hossein; Fazilah Mohamad Selamat, Nor; Sajuri, Zainuddin

    2017-09-01

    Automotive and aerospace industries are attempting to produce lightweight structure by using materials with low density such as aluminum and magnesium alloys to increase the fuel efficiency and consequently reduce the environmental pollution. It can be beneficial to join Mg to Al to acquire ideal performance in special applications. Friction stir welding (FSW) is solid state welding processes and relatively lower temperature of the process compared to fusion welding processes. This makes FSW a potential joining technique for joining of the dissimilar materials. In this study, Mg-Al butt joints were performed by FSW under different tool offset conditions, rotation rates (500-600 rpm) and traverse speeds (20 mm/min) with tool axis offset 1 mm shifted into AZ31B or Al6061 (T6), and without offset. During the welding process AZ31B was positioned at the advancing side (AS) and Al6061 (T6) was located at the retreating side (RS). Defect free AZ31B-Al6061 (T6) dissimilar metal FSW joints with good mechanical properties were obtained with the combination of intermediate rotation rate and low traverse speed pin is in the middle. When tool positioned in -1 mm or +1 mm offsetting, some defects were found in SZ of dissimilar FSWed joints such as cavity, tunnel, and crack. Furthermore, a thin layer of intermetallic compounds was observed in the stir zone at the interface between Mg-Al plates. The strength of the joint was influenced by FSW parameters. Good mechanical properties obtained with the combination of intermediate rotational speed of 600 rpm and low travelling speed of 20 mm/min by locating Mg on advancing side when pin is in the middle. Also, Joint efficiency of the welds prepared in the present study was between 29% and 68% for the different welding parameters.

  10. Thermo-Mechanical Effect on Poly Crystalline Boron Nitride Tool Life During Friction Stir Welding (Dwell Period)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoussawi, M.; Smith, A. J.

    2018-03-01

    Poly Crystalline Boron Nitride (PCBN) tool wear during the friction stir welding of high melting alloys is an obstacle to commercialize the process. This work simulates the friction stir welding process and tool wear during the plunge/dwell period of 14.8 mm EH46 thick plate steel. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model was used for simulation and the wear of the tool is estimated from temperatures and shear stress profile on the tool surface. Two sets of tool rotational speeds were applied including 120 and 200 RPM. Seven plunge/dwell samples were prepared using PCBN FSW tool, six thermocouples were also embedded around each plunge/dwell case in order to record the temperatures during the welding process. Infinite focus microscopy technique was used to create macrographs for each case. The CFD result has been shown that a shear layer around the tool shoulder and probe-side denoted as thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) was formed and its size increase with tool rotational speed increase. Maximum peak temperature was also found to increase with tool rotational speed increase. PCBN tool wear under shoulder was found to increase with tool rotational speed increase as a result of tool's binder softening after reaching to a peak temperature exceeds 1250 °C. Tool wear also found to increase at probe-side bottom as a result of high shear stress associated with the decrease in the tool rotational speed. The amount of BN particles revealed by SEM in the TMAZ were compared with the CFD model.

  11. Thermo-Mechanical Effect on Poly Crystalline Boron Nitride Tool Life During Friction Stir Welding (Dwell Period)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoussawi, M.; Smith, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Poly Crystalline Boron Nitride (PCBN) tool wear during the friction stir welding of high melting alloys is an obstacle to commercialize the process. This work simulates the friction stir welding process and tool wear during the plunge/dwell period of 14.8 mm EH46 thick plate steel. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model was used for simulation and the wear of the tool is estimated from temperatures and shear stress profile on the tool surface. Two sets of tool rotational speeds were applied including 120 and 200 RPM. Seven plunge/dwell samples were prepared using PCBN FSW tool, six thermocouples were also embedded around each plunge/dwell case in order to record the temperatures during the welding process. Infinite focus microscopy technique was used to create macrographs for each case. The CFD result has been shown that a shear layer around the tool shoulder and probe-side denoted as thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) was formed and its size increase with tool rotational speed increase. Maximum peak temperature was also found to increase with tool rotational speed increase. PCBN tool wear under shoulder was found to increase with tool rotational speed increase as a result of tool's binder softening after reaching to a peak temperature exceeds 1250 °C. Tool wear also found to increase at probe-side bottom as a result of high shear stress associated with the decrease in the tool rotational speed. The amount of BN particles revealed by SEM in the TMAZ were compared with the CFD model.

  12. A fundamental study on the structural integrity of magnesium alloys joined by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harish Mangebettu

    The goal of this research is to study the factors that influence the physical and mechanical properties of lap-shear joints produced using friction stir welding. This study focuses on understanding the effect of tool geometry and weld process parameters including the tool rotation rate, tool plunge depth and dwell time on the mechanical performance of similar magnesium alloy and dissimilar magnesium to aluminum alloy weld joints. A variety of experimental activities were conducted including tensile and fatigue testing, fracture surface and failure analysis, microstructure characterization, hardness measurements and chemical composition analysis. An investigation on the effect of weld process conditions in friction stir spot welding of magnesium to magnesium produced in a manner that had a large effective sheet thickness and smaller interfacial hook height exhibited superior weld strength. Furthermore, in fatigue testing of friction stir spot welded of magnesium to magnesium alloy, lap-shear welds produced using a triangular tool pin profile exhibited better fatigue life properties compared to lap-shear welds produced using a cylindrical tool pin profile. In friction stir spot welding of dissimilar magnesium to aluminum, formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of the weld had a dominant effect on the weld strength. Lap-shear dissimilar welds with good material mixture and discontinues intermetallic compounds in the stir zone exhibited superior weld strength compared to lap-shear dissimilar welds with continuous formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone. The weld structural geometry like the interfacial hook, hook orientation and bond width also played a major role in influencing the weld strength of the dissimilar lap-shear friction stir spot welds. A wide scatter in fatigue test results was observed in friction stir linear welds of aluminum to magnesium alloys. Different modes of failure were observed under fatigue loading including crack

  13. Weld Bead Geometry of Ni-Based Alloy Deposited by PTA Process for Pipe Conduction of Shale Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echavarria-Figueroa, C.; García-Vázquez, F.; Ruiz-Mondragón, J.; Hernández-García, H. M.; González-González, D.; Vargas, A.

    The transportation of shale gas has the problem that the piping used for the extraction does not resist the erosion generated by the amount of solids causing cracks over the surface and it is necessary to extend the life of the pipelines. Plasma transferred arc (PTA) welded coatings are used to improve the surface properties of mechanical parts. Therefore, in this paper is studied the use of Ni-based filler metal as weld bead deposits on A36 steel substrates by PTA. In order to determine the suitable conditions to ensure coating quality on the substrate a design of experiments (DOE) was determined. Welding current, feed rate, and travel speed were used as input parameters and the dilution percentage as the response variable. The composition and properties of hardfacing or overlay deposited are strongly influenced by the dilution obtained. Control of dilution is important, where typically low dilution is desirable. When the dilution is low, the final deposit composition will be closer to that of the filler metal, and the wear and corrosion resistance of the hardfacing will also be maintained. To evaluate the features on the weld beads/substrate interface a microstructural characterization was performed by using scanning electron microscopy and to evaluate the mechanical properties was carried out hardness test.

  14. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  15. Assessment of the effect of Nd:YAG laser pulse operating parameters on the metallurgical characteristics of different tool steels using DOE software

    OpenAIRE

    Muhič, T.; Kosec, L.; Liedl, G.; Pleterski, M.

    2011-01-01

    To ensure the reliability of repair welded tool surfaces, clad quality should be improved. The relationships between metallurgical characteristics of cladding and laser input welding parameters were studied using the design of experiments software. The influence of laser power, welding speed, focal point position and diameter of welding wire on the weld-bead geometry (i.e. penetration, cladding zone width and heat-affected-zone width), microstructural homogeneity, dilution and bond strength w...

  16. Effect of tool pin profile on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded AZ31B magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motalleb-nejad, P.; Saeid, T.; Heidarzadeh, A.; Darzi, Kh.; Ashjari, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FSW conditions for defect free joints of AZ31B magnesium alloy were reached. • The effect of FSW factors such pin design on the features of the welds was studied. • Taper pin caused to finest grains and highest mechanical properties. • The superior properties of the joints were achieved at the condition of ω 2 /υ = 6300. • All the tensile fractures occurred at the interface of the SZ and base metal. - Abstract: In this investigation the effect of friction stir welding pin geometry on the microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ31B magnesium alloy joints is studied. The considered pin geometries are simple cylindrical, screw threaded cylindrical and taper. The joints are friction stir welded at different traverse and rotational speeds. Microstructures of the joints are examined using the optical and scanning electron microscopes. Also, the tensile properties and hardness of the joints are measured. The results show that taper and screw threaded cylindrical pins produce defect free joints. In addition, the taper pin results in finest microstructure and highest mechanical properties. Furthermore, it is found that rotational speed has a more significant role on the final microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, compared to the traverse speed

  17. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  18. APPLICATION OF QC TOOLS FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT IN AN EXPENSIVE SEAT HARDFACING PROCESS USING TIG WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yunus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is carried out to improve quality level by identifying the prime reasons of the quality related problems in the seat hardfacing process involving the deposition of cobalt based super alloy in I.C. Engine valves using TIG welding process. During the Process, defects like stellite deposition overflow, head melt, non-uniform stellite merging, etc., are observed and combining all these defects, the rejection level was in top position in Forge shop. We use widely referred QC tools of the manufacturing field to monitor the complete operation and continuous progressive process improvement to ensure ability and efficiency of quality management system of any firm. The work aims to identify the various causes for the rejection by the detailed study of the operation, equipment, materials and the various process parameters that are very important to get defects-free products. Also, to evolve suitable countermeasures for reducing the rejection percentage using seven QC tools. To further understand and validate the obtained results, we need to address other studies related to motivations, advantages, and disadvantages of applying quality control tools.

  19. CasimirSim - A Tool to Compute Casimir Polder Forces for Nontrivial 3D Geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedmik, Rene; Tajmar, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The so-called Casimir effect is one of the most interesting macro-quantum effects. Being negligible on the macro-scale it becomes a governing factor below structure sizes of 1 μm where it accounts for typically 100 kN m-2. The force does not depend on gravity, or electric charge but solely on the materials properties, and geometrical shape. This makes the effect a strong candidate for micro(nano)-mechanical devices M(N)EMS. Despite a long history of research the theory lacks a uniform description valid for arbitrary geometries which retards technical application. We present an advanced state-of-the-art numerical tool overcoming all the usual geometrical restrictions, capable of calculating arbitrary 3D geometries by utilizing the Casimir Polder approximation for the Casimir force

  20. Development of remote bore tools for pipe welding/cutting by YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Kakudate, Satoshi; Tada, Eisuke; Obara, Kenjiro; Taguchi, Kou; Nakamori, Naokazu

    1996-07-01

    In D-T burning reactors such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), an internal access welding/cutting of blanket cooling pipe with bend sections is inevitably required because of spatial constraint due to nuclear shield and available port opening space. For this purpose, an internal access pipe welding/cutting using YAG laser beam is being developed according to the agreement of the ITER R and D task (T44). A design concept of welding/cutting processing head with a flexible optical fiber has been developed and the basic feasibility studies on welding, cutting and rewelding are performed using stainless steel plate (SS316L). In this report, the details of a welding/cutting head with a flexible optical fiber for YAG laser are described, together with the basic experiment results relating to the welding/cutting and rewelding. (author)

  1. Numerical and experimental investigation of geometric parameters in projection welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    parameters by numerical modeling and experimental studies. SORPAS, an FEM program for numerical modeling of resistance welding, is developed as a tool to help in the phase of product design and process optimization in both spot and projection welding. A systematic experimental investigation of projection...... on the numerical and experimental investigations of the geometric parameters in projection welding, guidelines for selection of the geometry and material combinations in product design are proposed. These will be useful and applicable to industry.......Resistance projection welding is widely used for joining of workpieces with almost any geometric combination. This makes standardization of projection welding impossible. In order to facilitate industrial applications of projection welding, systematic investigations are carried out on the geometric...

  2. Influence of tool pin profile on microstructure and corrosion behaviour of AA2219 Al–Cu alloy friction stir weld nuggets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Venkata Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the problems of fusion welding of aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW is recognized as an alternative joining method to improve the mechanical and corrosion properties. Tool profile is one of the important variables which affect the performance of the FS weld. In the present work, the effect of tool profile on the weld nugget microstructure and pitting corrosion of AA2219 aluminium–copper alloy was studied. FSW of AA2219 alloy was carried out using five profiles, namely conical, square, triangle, pentagon and hexagon. The temperature measurements were made in the region adjacent to the rotating pin. It was observed that the peak temperature is more in hexagonal tool pin compared to the welds produced with other tool pin profiles. It is observed that the extensive deformation experienced at the nugget zone and the evolved microstructure strongly influences the hardness and corrosion properties of the joint during FSW. It was found that the microstructure changes like grain size, misorientation and precipitate dissolution during FSW influence the hardness and corrosion behaviour. Pitting corrosion resistance of friction stir welds of AA2219 was found to be better for hexagon profile tool compared to other profiles, which was attributed to material flow and strengthening precipitate morphology in nugget zone. Higher amount of heat generation in FS welds made with hexagonal profile tool may be the reason for greater dissolution of strengthening precipitates in nugget zone.

  3. Shear punch testing as a tool for evaluating welded pipeline steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, G.R.; Elwazri, A.; Varano, R.; Yue, S.; Jonas, J.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering; Pokutylowicz, N. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

    2005-07-01

    This study examined the mechanical properties across a welded joint in a 35 mm steel pipe. Results were compared with microhardness measurements. The chemical composition of the 4130 steel and welding wire included carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, chromium and molybdenum. The thermal cycles experienced during welding can result in differences in the grain size, phase, composition and morphology of precipitates. These thermal cycles can upset the balance of high strength and good toughness in steels, producing poor toughness in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the shear punch test, a flat-ended cylindrical punch was used to produce a 3 mm diameter disk from a sheet specimen with a recommended thickness of 300 to 350 {mu}m. The shear punch test provided tensile property data with only a very small amount of material, which is ideal for testing welds. It also provides full tensile data (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and elongation) which are not specifically provided by hardness testing. Shear punch techniques can also improve the across-weld resolution of tensile testing. The results showed that the changes in strength properties across the weld were consistent with the microhardness measurements. The change in elongation across the weld joint was successfully measured using the punch test method. The HAZ in the welded joint in this study had a good combination of high strength and ductility, while the weld bead had moderate strength and relatively low ductility. 7 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  4. Tool geometry and damage mechanisms influencing CNC turning efficiency of Ti6Al4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Sangeeth; Hamid, Darulihsan Abdul; Yazid, M. Z. A.; Nasuha, Nurdiyanah; Ain, Siti Nurul

    2017-12-01

    Ti6Al4V or Grade 5 titanium alloy is widely used in the aerospace, medical, automotive and fabrication industries, due to its distinctive combination of mechanical and physical properties. Ti6Al4V has always been perverse during its machining, strangely due to the same mix of properties mentioned earlier. Ti6Al4V machining has resulted in shorter cutting tool life which has led to objectionable surface integrity and rapid failure of the parts machined. However, the proven functional relevance of this material has prompted extensive research in the optimization of machine parameters and cutting tool characteristics. Cutting tool geometry plays a vital role in ensuring dimensional and geometric accuracy in machined parts. In this study, an experimental investigation is actualized to optimize the nose radius and relief angles of the cutting tools and their interaction to different levels of machining parameters. Low elastic modulus and thermal conductivity of Ti6Al4V contribute to the rapid tool damage. The impact of these properties over the tool tips damage is studied. An experimental design approach is utilized in the CNC turning process of Ti6Al4V to statistically analyze and propose optimum levels of input parameters to lengthen the tool life and enhance surface characteristics of the machined parts. A greater tool nose radius with a straight flank, combined with low feed rates have resulted in a desirable surface integrity. The presence of relief angle has proven to aggravate tool damage and also dimensional instability in the CNC turning of Ti6Al4V.

  5. KENO3D visualization tool for KENO V.a geometry models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, S.M.; Horwedel, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluations (SCALE) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. SCALE includes the well-known KENO V.a three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code. Criticality safety analysis often require detailed modeling of complex geometries. Checking the accuracy of these models can be enhanced by effective visualization tools. To address this need, ORNL has recently developed a powerful state-of-the-art visualization tool called KENO3D that enables KENO V.a users to interactively display their three-dimensional geometry models. The interactive options include the following: (1) having shaded or wireframe images; (2) showing standard views, such as top view, side view, front view, and isometric three-dimensional view; (3) rotating the model; (4) zooming in on selected locations; (5) selecting parts of the model to display; (6) editing colors and displaying legends; (7) displaying properties of any unit in the model; (8) creating cutaway views; (9) removing units from the model; and (10) printing image or saving image to common graphics formats

  6. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanare, S. P.; Kalyankar, V. D.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding is emerging as a promising technique for joining of lighter metal alloys due to its several advantages over conventional fusion welding processes such as low thermal distortion, good mechanical properties, fine weld joint microstructure, etc. This review article mainly focuses on analysis of microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints. Various microstructure characterization techniques used by previous researchers such as optical microscopes, x-ray diffraction, electron probe microscope, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscopes with electron back scattered diffraction, electron dispersive microscopy, etc. are thoroughly overviewed and their results are discussed. The effects of friction stir welding process parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, tool plunge depth, axial force, tool shoulder diameter to tool pin diameter ratio, tool geometry etc. on microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joints are studied and critical observations are noted down. The microstructure examination carried out by previous researchers on various zones of welded joints such as weld zone, heat affected zone and base metal are studied and critical remarks have been presented. Mechanical performances of friction stir welded joints based on tensile test, micro-hardness test, etc. are discussed. This article includes exhaustive literature review of standard research articles which may become ready information for subsequent researchers to establish their line of action.

  7. Microstructural Evolution in Friction Stir Welding of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubisoff, H.; Querin, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a thermo-mechanical process that utilizes a nonconsumable rotating pin tool to consolidate a weld joint. In the conventional FSW process, the pin tool is responsible for generating both the heat required to soften the material and the forces necessary to deform and combine the weld seam. As such, the geometry of the pin tool is important to the quality of the weld and the process parameters required to produce the weld. Because the geometry of the pin tool is limitless, a reduced set of pin tools was formed to systematically study their effect on the weldment with respect to mechanical properties and resultant microstructure. In this study 0deg, 15deg, 30deg, 45deg, and 60deg tapered, microwave sintered, tungsten carbide (WC) pin tools were used to FSW Ti-6Al-4V. Transverse sections of the weld were used to test for mechanical properties and to document the microstructure using optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was also used to characterize the microstructure in the welds. FSW results for the 45deg and 60deg pin tools are reported in this paper.

  8. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  9. Effect of flux powder SiO2 for the welding of 304-austenitic stainless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    optimal weld pool geometry in the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of ..... Flux assisted gas tungsten arc and laser welding of titanium with cryolite containing fluxes: arc spectroscopy and corrosion resistance studies, Welding Journal, Vol.

  10. Pulsed TIG welding of pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killing, U.

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigates into the effects of impulse welding parameters on weld geometry in the joint welding of thin-walled sheets and pipes (d=2.5 mm), and it uses random samples of thick-walled sheets and pipes (d=10 mm), in fixed positions. (orig./MM) [de

  11. Developments of modeling tools for the ultrasonic propagation in bimetallic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardahaut, A.

    2013-01-01

    This study fits into the field of ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation. It consists in the development of a dynamic ray tracing model to simulate the ultrasonic propagation in bimetallic welds. The approach has been organised in three steps. First of all, an image processing technique has been developed and applied on the macro-graphs of the weld in order to obtain a smooth cartography of the crystallographic orientation. These images are used as input data for a dynamic ray tracing model adapted to the study of anisotropic and inhomogeneous media such as bimetallic welds. Based on a kinematic and a dynamic ray tracing model, usually used in geophysics, it allows the evaluation of ray trajectories between a source point and an observation point, and the computation of the ultrasonic amplitude through the geometrical spreading of an elementary ray tube. This model has been validated in 2D by comparison of the results with a hybrid semi-analytical/finite elements code, then in 3D thanks to experimental results made on the mock-ups of the studied bimetallic welds. (author) [fr

  12. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, H.M.; Ghaffari, B.; Yuan, W.; Jordon, J.B.; Badarinarayan, H.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  13. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, H.M. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Ghaffari, B. [Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121 (United States); Yuan, W., E-mail: wei.yuan@hitachi-automotive.us [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Jordon, J.B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Badarinarayan, H. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  14. 3D printing technology as innovative tool for math and geometry teaching applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huleihil, M.

    2017-01-01

    The industrial revolution and automation of production processes have changed the face of the world. Three dimensional (3D) printing has the potential to revolutionize manufacturing and further change methods of production toward allowing in increasing number of people to produce products at home. According to a recent OECD (see Backer [1]) publication, “…tapping into the next industrial revolution requires actions on many levels and in many different areas. In particular, unlocking the potential of emerging and enabling technologies requires policy development along a number of fronts, from commercialization to regulation and the supply of skills through education.” In this paper we discuss the role of schools and their responsibility to act as quickly as possible to design a plan of action that will prepare the future citizens to deal with this new reality. This requires planning of action in different directions and on different planes, such as labs, teachers, and curricula. 3D printing requires higher levels of thinking, innovation and creativity. It has the power to develop human imagination and give students the opportunity to visualize numbers, two- dimensional shapes, and three-dimensional objects. The combination of thinking, design, and production has immense power to increase motivation and satisfaction, with a highly probable increase in a student’s math and geometry achievements. The CAD system includes a measure tool which enables and alternative way for calculating properties of the objects under consideration and allows development of reflection and critical thinking. The research method was based on comparison between a reference group and a test group; it was found that intervention significantly improved the reflection abilities of 6th grade students in mathematics.

  15. Investigation of the Effect of Tool Edge Geometry upon Cutting Variables, Tool Wear and Burr Formation Using Finite Element Simulation — A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartkulvanich, Partchapol; Al-Zkeri, Ibrahim; Yen, Yung-Chang; Altan, Taylan

    2004-06-01

    This paper summarizes some of the progress made on FEM simulations of metal cutting processes conducted at the Engineering Research Center (ERC/NSM). Presented research focuses on the performance of various cutting edge geometries (hone and chamfer edges) for different tool materials and specifically on: 1) the effect of round and chamfer edge geometries on the cutting variables in machining carbon steels and 2) the effect of the edge hone size upon the flank wear and burr formation behavior in face milling of A356-T6 aluminum alloy. In the second task, an innovative design of edge preparation with varying hone size around the tool nose is also explored using FEM. In order to model three-dimensional conventional turning and face milling with two-dimensional orthogonal cutting simulations, 2D simulation cross-sections consisting of the cutting speed direction and chip flow direction are selected at different locations along the tool nose radius. Then the geometries of the hone and chamfer edges and their associated tool angles as well as uncut chip thickness are determined on these planes and employed in cutting simulations. The chip flow direction on the tool rake face are obtained by examining the wear grooves on the experimental inserts or estimated by using Oxley's approximation theory of oblique cutting. Simulation results are compared with the available experimental results (e.g. cutting forces) both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  16. Investigation of the effect of tool edge geometry upon cutting variables, tool wear and burr formation using finite element simulation - A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartkulvanich, Partchapol; Al-Zkeri, Ibrahim; Yen Yungchang; Altan, Taylan

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the progress made on FEM simulations of metal cutting processes conducted at the Engineering Research Center (ERC/NSM). Presented research focuses on the performance of various cutting edge geometries (hone and chamfer edges) for different tool materials and specifically on: 1) the effect of round and chamfer edge geometries on the cutting variables in machining carbon steels and 2) the effect of the edge hone size upon the flank wear and burr formation behavior in face milling of A356-T6 aluminum alloy. In the second task, an innovative design of edge preparation with varying hone size around the tool nose is also explored using FEM.In order to model three-dimensional conventional turning and face milling with two-dimensional orthogonal cutting simulations, 2D simulation cross-sections consisting of the cutting speed direction and chip flow direction are selected at different locations along the tool nose radius. Then the geometries of the hone and chamfer edges and their associated tool angles as well as uncut chip thickness are determined on these planes and employed in cutting simulations. The chip flow direction on the tool rake face are obtained by examining the wear grooves on the experimental inserts or estimated by using Oxley's approximation theory of oblique cutting. Simulation results are compared with the available experimental results (e.g. cutting forces) both qualitatively and quantitatively

  17. Weld analysis and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  18. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  19. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    distance equal to the thickness of the material being welded. The TSW process can be significantly improved by reducing the draw forces. This can be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the weld workpieces and the containment plates. High-power ultrasonic (HPU) vibrations of the containment plates achieve friction reduction in the TSW process. Furthermore, integration of the HPU energy into the TSW stir rod can increase tool life of the stir rod, and can reduce shear forces to which the stir rod is subjected during the welding process. TSW has been used to successfully join 0.500-in (˜13-mm) thick commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium 6AL- 4V, and titanium 6AL-4V ELI in weld joint lengths up to 9 ft (˜2.75-m) long. In addition, the TSW process was used to fabricate a sub-scale hexagonally shaped gun turret component for the U.S. Navy. The turret is comprised of six 0.5000-in (˜13-mm) thick angled welds. Each angled weld joint was prepared by machining the mating surfaces to 120deg. The angled weld joint was then fixtured using an upper and lower containment plate of the same geometry of the angled weld joint. The weld joint was then stirred by the stir rod as it and the upper and lower containment plates traverse through the angled joint prep.

  20. Sierpinski triangles as a tool to introduce fractal geometry to children and their parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Schertzer, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    There are currently two somehow contradictory trends in the public debates involving scientific issues. On the one hand there is a need to address topics of increasing complexity, while on the other hand simple(istic) solutions are suggested by numerous people (including high level ones). Meanwhile there seems to be growing defiance towards science findings. Such problems are faced in numerous fields including geosciences where famous examples are the debates dealing with climate change, or water / air contamination. Such unfortunate trends means that the input of scientists in the society and public debates is strongly required. Although it not actually their job, scientists should get involved as a citizens. They should try to explain the complexity of the issues at stake, and take the necessary time to achieve this; not all problems can be explained with the help of a 140 characters tweet! Rather than hiding the uncertainties, they should try to explain this notion often not well understood, and admit the current limitations of knowledge. In the meantime it would be positive if this dialogue could help children and their parents to get familiarized with science and scientists, show that science is not obscure and actually present in everyday life. Scientists obviously also have the hope of fostering a desire for understanding, enhancing scientific culture and even promoting careers in this field. Fractals and fractal geometry are actually a rather good tool to achieve this. Indeed through numerous iterations of a simple process, one can easily obtain a rather complex shape, exhibiting some of the features observed in the nature. Fractal shapes are scale invariant, i.e. the more you zoom in, the more details you see; a portion of the shape is similar to the full one. This paper aims at presenting a series of activities presenting fractals to young people developed primarily around the famous Sierpinski triangles. Two types of activities were carefully designed

  1. Friction Stir Welding of Copper Canisters Using Power and Temperature Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederqvist, Lars

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the development to reliably seal 50 mm thick copper canisters containing the Swedish nuclear waste using friction stir welding. To avoid defects and welding tool fractures, it is important to control the tool temperature within a process window of approximately 790 to 910 deg C. The welding procedure requires variable power input throughout the 45 minute long weld cycle to keep the tool temperature within its process window. This is due to variable thermal boundary conditions throughout the weld cycle. The tool rotation rate is the input parameter used to control the power input and tool temperature, since studies have shown that it is the most influential parameter, which makes sense since the product of tool rotation rate and spindle torque is power input. In addition to the derived control method, the reliability of the welding procedure was optimized by other improvements. The weld cycle starts in the lid above the joint line between the lid and the canister to be able to abort a weld during the initial phase without rejecting the canister. The tool shoulder geometry was modified to a convex scroll design that has shown a self-stabilizing effect on the power input. The use of argon shielding gas reduced power input fluctuations i.e. process disturbances, and the tool probe was strengthened against fracture by adding surface treatment and reducing stress concentrations through geometry adjustments. In the study, a clear relationship was shown between power input and tool temperature. This relationship can be used to more accurately control the process within the process window, not only for this application but for other applications where a slow responding tool temperature needs to be kept within a specified range. Similarly, the potential of the convex scroll shoulder geometry in force-controlled welding mode for use in applications with other metals and thicknesses is evident. The variable thermal boundary conditions throughout the weld

  2. Weld pool and keyhole dynamic analysis based on visual system and neural network during laser keyhole welding

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Masiyang

    2014-01-01

    In keyhole fiber laser welding processes, the weld pool behavior and keyhole dynamics are essential to determining welding quality. To observe and control the welding process, the accurate extraction of the weld pool boundary as well as the width is required. In addition, because of the cause-and-effect relationship between the welding defects and stability of the keyhole, which is primarily determined by keyhole geometry during the welding process, the stability of keyhole needs to be consid...

  3. Evaluation on machined surface of hardened stainless steel generated by hard turning using coated carbide tools with wiper geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordin, M.Y.; Kurniawan, D.; Sharif, S.

    2007-01-01

    Hard turning has been explored to be the finish machining operation for parts made of hardened steel. Its feasibility is determined partially by the quality of the resulting machined surface. This study evaluates the surface integrity of martensitic stainless steel (48 HRC) resulting from hard turning using coated carbide tool with wiper geometry at various cutting speed and feed and compares to that obtained using coated carbide tool with conventional geometry. The wiper coated carbide tool is able to produce machined surface which is of finer finish (Ra is finer than 0.4 μm at most cutting parameters) and yet is similarly inducing only minor microstructural alteration compared to its conventional counterpart. From the view of the chip morphology where continuous type of chip is desired rather than sawtooth chip type, the wiper tool generates continuous chip at almost similar range of cutting parameters compared to the case when using conventional tool. Additionally, the use of wiper tool also induces the preferred compressive residual stress at the machined surface. (author)

  4. Optimization of friction welding by taguchi and ANOVA method on commercial aluminium tube to Al 2025 tube plate with backing block using an external tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanna, S.; Kumaraswamidhs, L. A.; Kumaran, S. Senthil

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to optimize the Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) with clearance fit of commercial aluminum tube to Al 2025 tube plate using an external tool. Conventional frictional welding is suitable to weld only symmetrical joints either tube to tube or rod to rod but in this research with the help of external tool, the welding has been done by unsymmetrical shape of tube to tube plate also. In this investigation, the various welding parameters such as tool rotating speed (rpm), projection of tube (mm) and depth of cut (mm) are determined according to the Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The two conditions were considered in this process to examine this experiment; where condition 1 is flat plate with plain tube Without holes [WOH] on the circumference of the surface and condition 2 is flat plate with plane tube has holes on its circumference of the surface With holes [WH]. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was utilized to find the most significant control factors which will yield better joint strength. Besides, the most influential process parameter has been determined using statistical Analysis of variance (ANOVA). Finally, the comparison of each result has been done for conditions by means percentage of contribution and regression analysis. The general regression equation is formulated and better strength is obtained and it is validated by means of confirmation test. It was observed that value of optimal welded joint strength for both tube without holes and tube with holes are to be 319.485 MPa and 264.825 MPa, respectively.

  5. Optimization of friction welding by taguchi and ANOVA method on commercial aluminium tube to Al 2025 tube plate with backing block using an external tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanna, S.; Kumaraswamidhs, L. A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Dhanbad (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil [RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul (India)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of the present work is to optimize the Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) with clearance fit of commercial aluminum tube to Al 2025 tube plate using an external tool. Conventional frictional welding is suitable to weld only symmetrical joints either tube to tube or rod to rod but in this research with the help of external tool, the welding has been done by unsymmetrical shape of tube to tube plate also. In this investigation, the various welding parameters such as tool rotating speed (rpm), projection of tube (mm) and depth of cut (mm) are determined according to the Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The two conditions were considered in this process to examine this experiment; where condition 1 is flat plate with plain tube Without holes [WOH] on the circumference of the surface and condition 2 is flat plate with plane tube has holes on its circumference of the surface With holes [WH]. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was utilized to find the most significant control factors which will yield better joint strength. Besides, the most influential process parameter has been determined using statistical Analysis of variance (ANOVA). Finally, the comparison of each result has been done for conditions by means percentage of contribution and regression analysis. The general regression equation is formulated and better strength is obtained and it is validated by means of confirmation test. It was observed that value of optimal welded joint strength for both tube without holes and tube with holes are to be 319.485 MPa and 264.825 MPa, respectively.

  6. THE ANALYSIS OF THE EVOLUTION OF THE FUNCTIONAL GEOMETRY OF THE TOOL AT THE LATHING WITH A TRANSVERSE ADVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan DOBROTĂ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of processing by machining is to generate surfaces that have to meet the requirements imposed by the designer through the execution drawing of the piece. The study aims to analyze how the functional geometry of the tool evolves when lathing with a transverse advance. The technological process of lathing with transverse advance is realized with a variable machining speed, and this also causes a variation of the functional geomtry of the tool. Thus, in the paper was established the optimal construction geometry of a lathe knife that can be used for lathing a piece of a certain diameter. Under these conditions, a correlation was established between the values of the geometrical constructive parameters of the knife used for the transverse lathing and the diameter of the workpiece which can be processed in optimal conditions

  7. Assessment of the effect of Nd:YAG laser pulse operating parameters on the metallurgical characteristics of different tool steels using DOE software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Muhič

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To ensure the reliability of repair welded tool surfaces, clad quality should be improved. The relationships between metallurgical characteristics of cladding and laser input welding parameters were studied using the design of experiments software. The influence of laser power, welding speed, focal point position and diameter of welding wire on the weld-bead geometry (i.e. penetration, cladding zone width and heat-affected-zone width, microstructural homogeneity, dilution and bond strength was investigated on commonly used tool steels 1,2083, 1,2312 and 1,2343, using DOE software.

  8. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  9. Analysis of the tool plunge in friction stir welding - comparison of aluminium alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, plastic strain and heat generation during the plunge stage of the friction stir welding (FSW of high-strength aluminium alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351 are considered in this work. The plunging of the tool into the material is done at different rotating speeds. A three-dimensional finite element (FE model for thermomechanical simulation is developed. It is based on arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, and Johnson-Cook material law is used for modelling of material behaviour. From comparison of the numerical results for alloys 2024 T3 and 2024 T351, it can be seen that the former has more intensive heat generation from the plastic deformation, due to its higher strength. Friction heat generation is only slightly different for the two alloys. Therefore, temperatures in the working plate are higher in the alloy 2024 T3 for the same parameters of the plunge stage. Equivalent plastic strain is higher for 2024 T351 alloy, and the highest values are determined under the tool shoulder and around the tool pin. For the alloy 2024 T3, equivalent plastic strain is the highest in the influence zone of the tool pin. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34016 i br. TR 35006

  10. Effects of tool speeds and corresponding torque/energy on stir zone formation during friction stir welding/processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, S; Chen, Z W

    2009-01-01

    The way processing parameters and the measurable thermomechanical responses relate to the individual and combined flows forming the different processed zones during friction stir welding/processing has been studied. Experimentally, a cast Al-7Si-0.3Mg alloy was used to provide readily identifiable processed zones. A series of friction stir experiments covering a wide range of tool forward and rotation speeds were conducted followed by the measurement of individual and combined stir areas. It has been found that the basic modes of material flow did not change but the relative volume of each flow depended on both forward and rotation speeds. The trends observed in the present data explain how pin rotation relates to the material transportation mechanism and the associated torque required. This data also explains how forward speed, not rotation speed, relates to specific energy and the volume of the total stir zone.

  11. Application of Interactive Multimedia Tools in Teaching Mathematics--Examples of Lessons from Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Marina; Obradovic, Jasmina; Milajic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the benefits and importance of using multimedia in the math classes by the selected examples of multimedia lessons from geometry (isometric transformations and regular polyhedra). The research included two groups of 50 first year students of the Faculty of the Architecture and the Faculty of Civil Construction Management.…

  12. Proof and Proving in the Classroom: Dynamic Geometry Systems as Tools of Semiotic Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Maria Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the didactic potential offered by the use of a Dynamic Geometry System (DGS) in introducing students to theoretical thinking and specifically to the practice of proof. Starting from a discussion about what constitutes the general objective in developing students' sense of proof, the notion of Theorem is…

  13. Influence of Lubricant Pocket Geometry upon Lubrication Mechanisms on Tool-Workpiece Interfaces in Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimizu, I; Martins, P.A.F.; Bay, Niels

    2004-01-01

    mechanisms, during upsetting and strip drawing, by means of a rigid viscoplastic finite element formulation. Special emphasis is placed on the effect of pocket geometry on the build up of hydrostatic pressure, which is responsible for the onset of micro lubrication mechanisms. A good agreement is found...... between the numerically predicted and the experimentally measured distributions of hydrostatic stress....

  14. Calculation of the apparent neutron parameters in a borehole geometry for neutron porosity tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.; Drabina, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the next step of a development of the theoretical solutions, which gives a possibility to calculate the apparent neutron slowing down and migration lengths in the three region cylindrical system which represents the borehole, the intermediate zone (e.g. mud cake at the borehole walls), and the geological formation. A solution of the neutron diffusion equation in energy two-group approach for spatial moments of the neutron flux is given for the three-region cylindrical coaxial geometry. The influence of the intermediate zone is presented. The numerical code MOM3 has been written to calculate the apparent slowing down and migration lengths for the three-region cylindrical system as mentioned above. Additionally the MCNP calculation for the three-region borehole geometry is presented in the paper

  15. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija KOVACEVIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Presented are the basic analytical formulations for the definition of temperature fields. Analysis of influential parameters of welding FSW technology at the zone of the weld material and mechanical properties of the realized joint was performed. Influential welding parameters were defined based on tool geometry, technological parameters of processing and the axial load of tool. Specific problems with the FSW process are related to gaps (holes left behind by a tool at the end of the process and inflexibility of welding regarding the degree of variation of material thickness. Numerical simulation of process welding FSW proceeding was carried out on the example of Aluminum Alloy (AA 2219 using the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL (Transient Thermal software package. The defined was the temperature field in the welding process at specified time intervals.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10022

  16. PENTrack-a simulation tool for ultracold neutrons, protons, and electrons in complex electromagnetic fields and geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, W.; Kikawa, T.; Losekamm, M. J.; Paul, S.; Picker, R.

    2017-06-01

    Modern precision experiments trapping low-energy particles require detailed simulations of particle trajectories and spin precession to determine systematic measurement limitations and apparatus deficiencies. We developed PENTrack, a tool that allows to simulate trajectories of ultracold neutrons and their decay products-protons and electrons-and the precession of their spins in complex geometries and electromagnetic fields. The interaction of ultracold neutrons with matter is implemented with the Fermi-potential formalism and diffuse scattering using Lambert and microroughness models. The results of several benchmark simulations agree with STARucn v1.2, uncovered several flaws in Geant4 v10.2.2, and agree with experimental data. Experiment geometry and electromagnetic fields can be imported from commercial computer-aided-design and finite-element software. All simulation parameters are defined in simple text files allowing quick changes. The simulation code is written in C++ and is freely available at github.com/wschreyer/PENTrack.git.

  17. PENTrack—a simulation tool for ultracold neutrons, protons, and electrons in complex electromagnetic fields and geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, W., E-mail: w.schreyer@tum.de [Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kikawa, T. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver (Canada); Losekamm, M.J.; Paul, S. [Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Picker, R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver (Canada); Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby (Canada)

    2017-06-21

    Modern precision experiments trapping low-energy particles require detailed simulations of particle trajectories and spin precession to determine systematic measurement limitations and apparatus deficiencies. We developed PENTrack, a tool that allows to simulate trajectories of ultracold neutrons and their decay products—protons and electrons—and the precession of their spins in complex geometries and electromagnetic fields. The interaction of ultracold neutrons with matter is implemented with the Fermi-potential formalism and diffuse scattering using Lambert and microroughness models. The results of several benchmark simulations agree with STARucn v1.2, uncovered several flaws in Geant4 v10.2.2, and agree with experimental data. Experiment geometry and electromagnetic fields can be imported from commercial computer-aided-design and finite-element software. All simulation parameters are defined in simple text files allowing quick changes. The simulation code is written in C++ and is freely available at (github.com/wschreyer/PENTrack.git).

  18. Defining the effect of sweep tillage tool cutting edge geometry on tillage forces using 3D discrete element modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ucgul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The energy required for tillage processes accounts for a significant proportion of total energy used in crop production. In many tillage processes decreasing the draft and upward vertical forces is often desired for reduced fuel use and improved penetration, respectively. Recent studies have proved that the discrete element modelling (DEM can effectively be used to model the soil–tool interaction. In his study, Fielke (1994 [1] examined the effect of the various tool cutting edge geometries, namely; cutting edge height, length of underside rub, angle of underside clearance, on draft and vertical forces. In this paper the experimental parameters of Fielke (1994 [1] were simulated using 3D discrete element modelling techniques. In the simulations a hysteretic spring contact model integrated with a linear cohesion model that considers the plastic deformation behaviour of the soil hence provides better vertical force prediction was employed. DEM parameters were determined by comparing the experimental and simulation results of angle of repose and penetration tests. The results of the study showed that the simulation results of the soil-various tool cutting edge geometries agreed well with the experimental results of Fielke (1994 [1]. The modelling was then used to simulate a further range of cutting edge geometries to better define the effect of sweep tool cutting edge geometry parameters on tillage forces. The extra simulations were able to show that by using a sharper cutting edge with zero vertical cutting edge height the draft and upward vertical force were further reduced indicating there is benefit from having a really sharp cutting edge. The extra simulations also confirmed that the interpolated trends for angle of underside clearance as suggested by Fielke (1994 [1] where correct with a linear reduction in draft and upward vertical force for angle of underside clearance between the ranges of −25 and −5°, and between −5 and 0°. The

  19. In-process tool rotational speed variation with constant heat input in friction stir welding of AZ31 sheets with variable thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Forcellese, Archimede; Fratini, Livan; Simoncini, Michela

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, friction stir welding experiments on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets, characterized by a variable thickness along the welding line, were carried out. The approach adapted during welding consisted in maintaining constant the heat input to the joint. To this purpose, the rotational speed of the pin tool was increased with decreasing thickness and decreased with increasing thickness in order to obtain the same temperatures during welding. The amount by which the rotational speed was changed as a function of the sheet thickness was defined on the basis of the results given by FEM simulations of the FSW process. Finally, the effect of the in-process variation of the tool rotational speed on the mechanical and microstructural properties of FSWed joints was analysed by comparing both the nominal stress vs. nominal strain curves and microstructure of FSWed joints obtained in different process conditions. It was observed that FSW performed by keeping constant the heat input to the joint leads to almost coincident results both in terms of the curve shape, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation values, and microstructure.

  20. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  1. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-beam equipment is considered along with fixed and mobile electron-beam guns, questions of weld environment, medium and nonvacuum welding, weld-joint designs, tooling, the economics of electron-beam job shops, aspects of safety, quality assurance, and repair. The application of the process in the case of individual materials is discussed, giving attention to aluminum, beryllium, copper, niobium, magnesium, molybdenum, tantalum, titanium, metal alloys, superalloys, and various types of steel. Mechanical-property test results are examined along with the areas of application of electron-beam welding

  2. On the Generalized Correlation Equation of Welding Current for the Tig Welding Machine Used in Nuclear Fuel Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Efrizon

    1995-01-01

    In nuclear fuel fabrication, welding plays a very important role to join the end cap to the tube. In order to determine the welding current in TIG welding process for various materials, weld geometries and welding rates, the correlation between the welding current and the other parameters are needed. This paper presents the correlation of those parameters mentioned above. The proposed correlation was tested and produced satisfactory results. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  3. Multipass welding of nuclear reactor components - computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedblom, E.

    2002-01-01

    The finite element method is used to compare different welding procedures. The simulations are compared with measurements. Two different geometries and two different welding procedures are evaluated. It is found that a narrow gap weld gives smaller tensile residual axial stresses on the inside of the pipe. This is believed to reduce the risk for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

  4. TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES IN MECHANISED FEED WIG/TIG WELDING SURFACING OF WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BURCA Mircea

    2016-09-01

    manual welding tests in the light of using the process for welding surfacing being known that in such applications mechanised operations are recommended whenever possible given the latter strengths i.e. increased productivity and quality deposits. The research also aims at achieving a comparative a study between wire mechanised feed based WIG manual welding and the manual rod entry based manual welding in terms of geometry deposits, deposits aesthetics, operating technique, productivity, etc . In this regard deposits were made by means of two welding procedures, and subsequently welding surfacing was made with the optimum values of the welding parameters in this case.

  5. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  6. Research Activities at IPT, DTU on Resistance Projection Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Resistance welding processes and among these especially the resistance projection welding is considered an industrially strategic process with increasing applications as alternative to other welding processes, soldering, brazing and mechanical assembling. This is due to increasing requirements...... as regards quality assurance and the special possibilities of joining complex metal combinations and geometries using resistance projection welding....

  7. Electron beam welding of aluminium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maajid, Ali; Vadali, S.K.; Maury, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is one of the most widely used materials in industries like transportation, shipbuilding, manufacturing, aerospace, nuclear, etc. The challenges in joining of aluminium are distortion, cleanliness and quality. Main difficulties faced during fusion welding of aluminium components are removal of surface oxide layer, weld porosity, high heat input requirement, distortion, hot cracking, etc. Physical properties of aluminium such as its high thermal conductivity, high coefficient of thermal expansion, no change in colour at high temperature, large difference in the melting points of the metal and its oxide (∼ 1400 °C) compound the difficulties faced during welding. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), etc are generally used in industries for fusion welding of aluminium alloys. However in case of thicker jobs the above processes are not suitable due to requirements of elaborate edge preparation, preheating of jobs, fixturing to prevent distortion, etc. Moreover, precise control over the heat input during welding and weld bead penetration is not possible with above processes. Further, if heat sensitive parts are located near the weld joint then high energy density beam welding process like Electron Beam Welding (EBW) is the best possible choice for aluminium welding.This paper discusses EB welding of aluminium components, typical geometry of components, selection/optimization of welding parameters, problems faced during standardization of welding and process parameters and their remedies etc.

  8. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  9. Olive Actual "on Year" Yield Forecast Tool Based on the Tree Canopy Geometry Using UAS Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola-Guirado, Rafael R; Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J; Jiménez-Jiménez, Francisco; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A

    2017-07-30

    Olive has a notable importance in countries of Mediterranean basin and its profitability depends on several factors such as actual yield, production cost or product price. Actual "on year" Yield (AY) is production (kg tree -1 ) in "on years", and this research attempts to relate it with geometrical parameters of the tree canopy. Regression equation to forecast AY based on manual canopy volume was determined based on data acquired from different orchard categories and cultivars during different harvesting seasons in southern Spain. Orthoimages were acquired with unmanned aerial systems (UAS) imagery calculating individual crown for relating to canopy volume and AY. Yield levels did not vary between orchard categories; however, it did between irrigated orchards (7000-17,000 kg ha -1 ) and rainfed ones (4000-7000 kg ha -1 ). After that, manual canopy volume was related with the individual crown area of trees that were calculated by orthoimages acquired with UAS imagery. Finally, AY was forecasted using both manual canopy volume and individual tree crown area as main factors for olive productivity. AY forecast only by using individual crown area made it possible to get a simple and cheap forecast tool for a wide range of olive orchards. Finally, the acquired information was introduced in a thematic map describing spatial AY variability obtained from orthoimage analysis that may be a powerful tool for farmers, insurance systems, market forecasts or to detect agronomical problems.

  10. CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY TOOL (CMT): A GIS-BASED AUTOMATED EXTRACTION MODEL FOR CHANNEL GEOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JUDI, DAVID [Los Alamos National Laboratory; KALYANAPU, ALFRED [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BERSCHEID, ALAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-17

    This paper describes an automated Channel Morphology Tool (CMT) developed in ArcGIS 9.1 environment. The CMT creates cross-sections along a stream centerline and uses a digital elevation model (DEM) to create station points with elevations along each of the cross-sections. The generated cross-sections may then be exported into a hydraulic model. Along with the rapid cross-section generation the CMT also eliminates any cross-section overlaps that might occur due to the sinuosity of the channels using the Cross-section Overlap Correction Algorithm (COCoA). The CMT was tested by extracting cross-sections from a 5-m DEM for a 50-km channel length in Houston, Texas. The extracted cross-sections were compared directly with surveyed cross-sections in terms of the cross-section area. Results indicated that the CMT-generated cross-sections satisfactorily matched the surveyed data.

  11. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  12. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  13. TIG-dressing of High Strength Butt Welded Connection. Part 2 : Physical Testing and Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  14. TIG-dressing of high strength butt welded connection - Part 2: physical testing and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  15. Development of automatic laser welding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Katsura

    2002-01-01

    Laser are a new production tool for high speed and low distortion welding and applications to automatic welding lines are increasing. IHI has long experience of laser processing for the preservation of nuclear power plants, welding of airplane engines and so on. Moreover, YAG laser oscillators and various kinds of hardware have been developed for laser welding and automation. Combining these welding technologies and laser hardware technologies produce the automatic laser welding system. In this paper, the component technologies are described, including combined optics intended to improve welding stability, laser oscillators, monitoring system, seam tracking system and so on. (author)

  16. Investigation and modelling of friction stir welded copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellgren, Therese

    2010-02-15

    This work has been focused on characterisation of FSW joints, and modelling of the process, both analytically and numerically. The Swedish model for final deposit of nuclear fuel waste is based on copper canisters as a corrosion barrier with an inner pressure holding insert of cast iron. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is the method to seal the copper canister, a technique invented by The Welding Institute (TWI). The first simulations were based on Rosenthal's analytical medium plate model. The model is simple to use, but has limitations. Finite element models (FEM) were developed, initially with a two-dimensional geometry. Due to the requirements of describing both the heat flow and the tool movement, three-dimensional models were developed. These models take into account heat transfer, material flow, and continuum mechanics. The geometries of the models are based on the simulation experiments carried out at TWI and at Swedish Nuclear Fuel Waste and Management Co (SKB). Temperature distribution, material flow and their effects on the thermal expansion were predicted for a full-scale canister and lid. The steady state solutions have been compared with temperature measurements, showing good agreement. In order to understand the material flow during welding a marker technique is used, which involves inserting dissimilar material into the weld zone before joining. Different materials are tested showing that brass rods are the most suitable material in these welds. After welding, the weld line is sliced, etched and examined by optical microscope. To understand the material flow further, and in the future predict the flow, a FEM is developed. This model and the etched samples are compared showing similar features. Furthermore, by using this model the area that is recrystallised can be predicted. The predicted area and the grain size and hardness profile agree well

  17. ICT (Information Communication Technologies) in mathematics education: Exploring students' learning experiences when using a Dynamic geometry Software (DGS) tool in geometry class

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehdiyev, R.; Vos, P.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional approaches in teaching geometry are pedagogically authoritative in nature and thus, students are not encouraged to question the validity or construction of geometrical entities. The use of technological resources with a variety of learning activities is usually limited. This book,

  18. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  19. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  20. Weld pool boundary and weld bead shape reconstruction based on passive vision in P-GMAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhihong; Zhang Guangjun; Gao Hongming; Wu Lin

    2006-01-01

    A passive visual sensing system is established in this research, and clear weld pool images in pulsed gas metal arc welding ( P-GMA W) can be captured with this system. The three-dimensional weld pool geometry, especially the weld height,is not only a crucial factor in determining workpiece mechanical properties, but also an important parameter for reflecting the penetration. A new three-dimensional (3D) model is established to describe the weld pool geometry in P-GMAW. Then, a series of algorithms are developed to extract the model geometrical parameters from the weld pool images. Furthermore, the method to reconstruct the 3D shape of weld pool boundary and weld bead from the two-dimensional images is investigated.

  1. A sampler of useful computational tools for applied geometry, computer graphics, and image processing foundations for computer graphics, vision, and image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Or, Daniel; Ju, Tao; Mitra, Niloy J; Shamir, Ariel; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Zhang, Hao (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    A Sampler of Useful Computational Tools for Applied Geometry, Computer Graphics, and Image Processing shows how to use a collection of mathematical techniques to solve important problems in applied mathematics and computer science areas. The book discusses fundamental tools in analytical geometry and linear algebra. It covers a wide range of topics, from matrix decomposition to curvature analysis and principal component analysis to dimensionality reduction.Written by a team of highly respected professors, the book can be used in a one-semester, intermediate-level course in computer science. It

  2. Evolutionary algorithm based optimization of hydraulic machines utilizing a state-of-the-art block coupled CFD solver and parametric geometry and mesh generation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Kyriacou; E, Kontoleontos; S, Weissenberger; L, Mangani; E, Casartelli; I, Skouteropoulou; M, Gattringer; A, Gehrer; M, Buchmayr

    2014-03-01

    An efficient hydraulic optimization procedure, suitable for industrial use, requires an advanced optimization tool (EASY software), a fast solver (block coupled CFD) and a flexible geometry generation tool. EASY optimization software is a PCA-driven metamodel-assisted Evolutionary Algorithm (MAEA (PCA)) that can be used in both single- (SOO) and multiobjective optimization (MOO) problems. In MAEAs, low cost surrogate evaluation models are used to screen out non-promising individuals during the evolution and exclude them from the expensive, problem specific evaluation, here the solution of Navier-Stokes equations. For additional reduction of the optimization CPU cost, the PCA technique is used to identify dependences among the design variables and to exploit them in order to efficiently drive the application of the evolution operators. To further enhance the hydraulic optimization procedure, a very robust and fast Navier-Stokes solver has been developed. This incompressible CFD solver employs a pressure-based block-coupled approach, solving the governing equations simultaneously. This method, apart from being robust and fast, also provides a big gain in terms of computational cost. In order to optimize the geometry of hydraulic machines, an automatic geometry and mesh generation tool is necessary. The geometry generation tool used in this work is entirely based on b-spline curves and surfaces. In what follows, the components of the tool chain are outlined in some detail and the optimization results of hydraulic machine components are shown in order to demonstrate the performance of the presented optimization procedure.

  3. Evolutionary algorithm based optimization of hydraulic machines utilizing a state-of-the-art block coupled CFD solver and parametric geometry and mesh generation tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriacou S; Kontoleontos E; Weissenberger S; Mangani L; Casartelli E; Skouteropoulou I; Gattringer M; Gehrer A; Buchmayr M

    2014-01-01

    An efficient hydraulic optimization procedure, suitable for industrial use, requires an advanced optimization tool (EASY software), a fast solver (block coupled CFD) and a flexible geometry generation tool. EASY optimization software is a PCA-driven metamodel-assisted Evolutionary Algorithm (MAEA (PCA)) that can be used in both single- (SOO) and multiobjective optimization (MOO) problems. In MAEAs, low cost surrogate evaluation models are used to screen out non-promising individuals during the evolution and exclude them from the expensive, problem specific evaluation, here the solution of Navier-Stokes equations. For additional reduction of the optimization CPU cost, the PCA technique is used to identify dependences among the design variables and to exploit them in order to efficiently drive the application of the evolution operators. To further enhance the hydraulic optimization procedure, a very robust and fast Navier-Stokes solver has been developed. This incompressible CFD solver employs a pressure-based block-coupled approach, solving the governing equations simultaneously. This method, apart from being robust and fast, also provides a big gain in terms of computational cost. In order to optimize the geometry of hydraulic machines, an automatic geometry and mesh generation tool is necessary. The geometry generation tool used in this work is entirely based on b-spline curves and surfaces. In what follows, the components of the tool chain are outlined in some detail and the optimization results of hydraulic machine components are shown in order to demonstrate the performance of the presented optimization procedure

  4. Geometry Revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Both classical geometry and modern differential geometry have been active subjects of research throughout the 20th century and lie at the heart of many recent advances in mathematics and physics. The underlying motivating concept for the present book is that it offers readers the elements of a modern geometric culture by means of a whole series of visually appealing unsolved (or recently solved) problems that require the creation of concepts and tools of varying abstraction. Starting with such natural, classical objects as lines, planes, circles, spheres, polygons, polyhedra, curves, surfaces,

  5. Spinning geometry = Twisted geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Ziprick, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the SU(2)-gauge invariant phase space of loop gravity can be represented in terms of twisted geometries. These are piecewise-linear-flat geometries obtained by gluing together polyhedra, but the resulting geometries are not continuous across the faces. Here we show that this phase space can also be represented by continuous, piecewise-flat three-geometries called spinning geometries. These are composed of metric-flat three-cells glued together consistently. The geometry of each cell and the manner in which they are glued is compatible with the choice of fluxes and holonomies. We first remark that the fluxes provide each edge with an angular momentum. By studying the piecewise-flat geometries which minimize edge lengths, we show that these angular momenta can be literally interpreted as the spin of the edges: the geometries of all edges are necessarily helices. We also show that the compatibility of the gluing maps with the holonomy data results in the same conclusion. This shows that a spinning geometry represents a way to glue together the three-cells of a twisted geometry to form a continuous geometry which represents a point in the loop gravity phase space. (paper)

  6. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  7. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  8. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  9. Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

    2006-05-25

    The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

  10. Experimental studies of parameters affecting the heat generation in friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat generation is a complex process of transformation of a specific type of energy into heat. During friction stir welding, one part of mechanical energy delivered to the welding tool is consumed in the welding process, another is used for deformational processes etc., and the rest of the energy is transformed into heat. The analytical procedure for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding is very complex because it includes a significant number of variables and parameters, and many of them cannot be fully mathematically explained. Because of that, the analytical model for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding defines variables and parameters that dominantly affect heat generation. These parameters are numerous and some of them, e. g. loads, friction coefficient, torque, temperature, are estimated experimentally. Due to the complex geometry of the friction stir welding process and requirements of the measuring equipment, adequate measuring configurations and specific constructional solutions that provide adequate measuring positions are necessary. This paper gives an overview of the process of heat generation during friction stir welding, the most influencing parameters on heat generation, constructional solutions for the measuring equipment needed for these experimental researches and examples of measured values.

  11. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  12. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  13. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  14. Fusion welding of thin metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aspects of fusion welding of thin metal foils are reviewed and the current techniques employed at LASL to join foils are described. Techniques for fusion welding approximately 0.025-mm-thick foils of copper, aluminum, and stainless steels have been developed using both electron beam and laser welding equipment. These techniques, together with the related aspects of joint design, tooling and fixturing, joint preparation, and modifications to the commercially available welding equipment, are included in the review. (auth)

  15. Vision-based weld pool boundary extraction and width measurement during keyhole fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Masiyang; Shin, Yung C.

    2015-01-01

    In keyhole fiber laser welding processes, the weld pool behavior is essential to determining welding quality. To better observe and control the welding process, the accurate extraction of the weld pool boundary as well as the width is required. This work presents a weld pool edge detection technique based on an off axial green illumination laser and a coaxial image capturing system that consists of a CMOS camera and optic filters. According to the difference of image quality, a complete developed edge detection algorithm is proposed based on the local maximum gradient of greyness searching approach and linear interpolation. The extracted weld pool geometry and the width are validated by the actual welding width measurement and predictions by a numerical multi-phase model.

  16. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, E.

    2015-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters.

  17. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleki, E

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters. (paper)

  18. Linear discriminant analysis for welding fault detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Simpson, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a new method for real time welding fault detection in industry based on Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). A set of parameters was calculated from one second blocks of electrical data recorded during welding and based on control data from reference welds under good conditions, as well as faulty welds. Optimised linear combinations of the parameters were determined with LDA and tested with independent data. Short arc welds in overlap joints were studied with various power sources, shielding gases, wire diameters, and process geometries. Out-of-position faults were investigated. Application of LDA fault detection to a broad range of welding procedures was investigated using a similarity measure based on Principal Component Analysis. The measure determines which reference data are most similar to a given industrial procedure and the appropriate LDA weights are then employed. Overall, results show that Linear Discriminant Analysis gives an effective and consistent performance in real-time welding fault detection.

  19. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    Optical and X-ray metallography combined with ultrasonic testing by compression waves was used for inspection of stainless steel weld metal produced by three different welding techniques. X-ray diffraction showed that each weld possessed a characteristic fibre textured structure which was shown by optical microscopy to be parallel to columnar grain boundaries. Metallographic evidence suggested that the development of fibre texture is due to the mechanism of competitive growth. From observations made as a result of optical metallographic examination the orientation of the fibre axis could be predicted if the weld geometry and welding procedure were known. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements as a continuous function of grain orientation, made on cylinders machined from weld samples, showed that attenuation was strongly orientation dependent. It was concluded that the sensitivity of ultrasonic inspection to small defects is unlikely to be as high for austenitic welds as for ferritic even when transmission is improved by modifying the welding procedure to improve the ultrasonic transmission. (U.K.)

  20. 3D Modelling of Flash Formation in Linear Friction Welded 30CrNiMo8 Steel Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Effertz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Linear friction welding (LFW is a solid-state welding process that has been thoroughly investigated for chain welding in recent years in order to replace the currently in use Flash Butt Welding (FBW process. Modelling has proven to be an indispensable tool in LFW, thus providing necessary insight to the process, regardless of its final application. This article describes a 3D model developed in the commercial software DEFORM to study the LFW process of 30CrNiMo8 high strength steel in the Hero chain. Hence, a weakly coupled thermal and mechanical model were used, by means of the process experimental input such as displacement histories. The flash morphology and intervening mechanisms were analyzed. A thermal evaluation of different regions in the studied geometry was considered, and a correlation of the modeled and experimental width of the extrusion zone was established.

  1. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  2. Sensor based robot laser welding - based on feed forward and gain sceduling algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik John

    2001-01-01

    A real-time control system forlaser welding of thick steel plates are developed and tested in a industrial environment. The robotic execution of the laser welding process is based on measure weld joint geometry and impirically established welding procedures. The influence of industrial production...

  3. A Neural Network Approach for GMA Butt Joint Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Hardam; Sørensen, Torben

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the neural network technology for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) control. A system has been developed for modeling and online adjustment of welding parameters, appropriate to guarantee a certain degree of quality in the field of butt joint welding with full...... penetration, when the gap width is varying during the welding process. The process modeling to facilitate the mapping from joint geometry and reference weld quality to significant welding parameters has been based on a multi-layer feed-forward network. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear least...

  4. A Neural Network Approach for GMA Butt Joint Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Hardam; Sørensen, Torben

    2003-01-01

    penetration, when the gap width is varying during the welding process. The process modeling to facilitate the mapping from joint geometry and reference weld quality to significant welding parameters has been based on a multi-layer feed-forward network. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear least......This paper describes the application of the neural network technology for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) control. A system has been developed for modeling and online adjustment of welding parameters, appropriate to guarantee a certain degree of quality in the field of butt joint welding with full...

  5. Residual stress reduction in beam welded joints by means of stress redistribution using defocused electron or laser beams; Eigenspannungsreduktion in strahlgeschweissten Naehten mittels Spannungsumlagerung durch den Einsatz defokussierter Elektronen- bzw. Laserstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelle, Florian

    2013-08-01

    Among the multiple advantages of beam welding processes the high longitudinal residual stresses in beam welds ranging till the local yield stress are one disadvantage. These high stresses can influence the service life of the welded components. The residual stresses in other welding processes exist in an equal high level but primarily in the transverse direction to the weld. To mitigate the high residual stresses a couple of methods were developed for these welding processes in the last decades. However these methods need large contact surfaces next to the welds for the installation of matched heating and cooling elements and other additional equipment. Furthermore, the previous developed stress mitigating processes offer a low efficiency for the small beam welds. The stress reduction by using the welding source after the welding process for a remote heat treatment of the welded components afford a flexible tool for the stress mitigation in beam welds. This method does not need any additional equipment and it is applicable for complex welding and component geometries. During this post welding heat treatment the material next to the weld is heated by the defocused electron or by the defocused laser beam, respectively, to temperatures of some hundreds degree Celsius. Hereby low plastic deformations in these regions are generated. While cooling down due to the thermal shrinkage the material between the weld and the heat treated region is compressed in longitudinal direction to the weld. This intermediate material zone constrained the shrinkage of the weld while cooling down from the melting temperature and leads to the high longitudinal residual stresses in the weld. In consequence of the compression of this intermediate zones by the heat treated zones the resistance to the shrinkage of the weld is lowered and the longitudinal stresses in the weld are reduced. In the process the quantity of the stress reduction is controlled by the selection of the process parameters

  6. Advances in welding science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.; Vitek, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Over the years, welding has been more of an art than a science, but in the last few decades major advances have taken place in welding science and technology. With the development of new methodologies at the crossroads of basic and applied sciences, enormous opportunities and potential exist to develop a science-based design of composition, structure, and properties of welds with intelligent control and automation of the welding processes. In the last several decades, welding has evolved as an interdisciplinary activity requiring synthesis of knowledge from various disciplines and incorporating the most advanced tools of various basic applied sciences. A series of international conferences and other publications have covered the issues, current trends and directions in welding science and technology. In the last few decades, major progress has been made in (i) understanding physical processes in welding, (ii) characterization of microstructure and properties, and (iii) intelligent control and automation of welding. This paper describes some of these developments

  7. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  8. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  9. Effect of welding current and speed on occurrence of humping bead in high-speed GMAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ji; Wu Chuansong

    2009-01-01

    The developed mathematical model of humping formation mechanism in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is used to analyze the effects of welding current and welding speed on the occurrence of humping bead. It considers both the momentum and heat content of backward flowing molten jet inside weld pool. Three-dimensional geometry of weld pool, the spacing between two adjacent humps and hump height along humping weld bead are calculated under different levels of welding current and welding speed. It shows that wire feeding rate, power intensity and the moment of backward flowing molten jet are the major factors on humping bead formation.

  10. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  11. Friction Stir Welding of Copper Canisters for Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellgren, Therese

    2005-07-01

    The Swedish model for final disposal of nuclear fuel waste is based on copper canisters as a corrosion barrier with an inner pressure holding insert of cast iron. One of the methods to seal the copper canister is to use the Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a method invented by The Welding Institute (TWI). This work has been focused on characterisation of the FSW joints, and modelling of the process, both analytically and numerically. The first simulations were based on Rosenthal's analytical medium plate model. The model is simple to use, but has limitations. Finite element models were developed, initially with a two-dimensional geometry. Due to the requirements of describing both the heat flow and the tool movement, three-dimensional models were developed. These models take into account heat transfer, material flow, and continuum mechanics. The geometries of the models are based on the simulation experiments carried out at TWI and at Swedish Nuclear Fuel Waste and Management Co (SKB). Temperature distribution, material flow and their effects on the thermal expansion were predicted for a full-scale canister and lid. The steady state solutions have been compared with temperature measurements, showing good agreement. Microstructure and hardness profiles have been investigated by optical microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) and Rockwell hardness measurements. EBSD visualisation has been used to determine the grain size distribution and the appearance of twins and misorientation within grains. The orientation maps show a fine uniform equiaxed grain structure. The root of the weld exhibits the smallest grains and many annealing twins. This may be due to deformation after recrystallisation. The appearance of the nugget and the grain size depends on the position of the weld. A large difference can be seen both in hardness and grain size between the start of the weld and when the steady state is reached.

  12. Arithmetic noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Marcolli, Matilde

    2005-01-01

    Arithmetic noncommutative geometry denotes the use of ideas and tools from the field of noncommutative geometry, to address questions and reinterpret in a new perspective results and constructions from number theory and arithmetic algebraic geometry. This general philosophy is applied to the geometry and arithmetic of modular curves and to the fibers at archimedean places of arithmetic surfaces and varieties. The main reason why noncommutative geometry can be expected to say something about topics of arithmetic interest lies in the fact that it provides the right framework in which the tools of geometry continue to make sense on spaces that are very singular and apparently very far from the world of algebraic varieties. This provides a way of refining the boundary structure of certain classes of spaces that arise in the context of arithmetic geometry, such as moduli spaces (of which modular curves are the simplest case) or arithmetic varieties (completed by suitable "fibers at infinity"), by adding boundaries...

  13. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  14. Friction stir welding of single crystal aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonda, Richard Warren; Wert, John A.; Reynolds, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution...... of crystallographic texture around the tool in each weld. The extent of both dynamic recrystallisation and conventional recrystallisation varied considerably as a function of weld orientation. As the base plate begins to interact with the deformation field surrounding the tool, regions of the single crystal rotate...

  15. Recognition and automatic tracking of weld line in fringe welding by autonomous mobile robot with visual sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Yasuo; Saito, Keishin; Ishii, Hideaki.

    1994-01-01

    An autonomous mobile robot with visual sensor and four driving axes for welding of pipe and fringe was constructed. The robot can move along a pipe, and detect the weld line to be welded by visual sensor. Moreover, in order to perform welding automatically, the tip of welding torch can track the weld line of the joint by rotating the robot head. In the case of welding of pipe and fringe, the robot can detect the contact angle between the two base metals to be welded, and the torch angle changes according to the contact angle. As the result of tracking test by the robot system, it was made clear that the recognition of geometry of the joint by the laser lighting method and automatic tracking of weld line were possible. The average tracking error was ±0.3 mm approximately and the torch angle could be always kept at the optimum angle. (author)

  16. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  17. geomIO: A tool for geodynamicists to turn 2D cross-sections into 3D geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Tobias; Bauville, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    In numerical deformation models, material properties are usually defined on elements (e.g., in body-fitted finite elements), or on a set of Lagrangian markers (Eulerian, ALE or mesh-free methods). In any case, geometrical constraints are needed to assign different material properties to the model domain. Whereas simple geometries such as spheres, layers or cuboids can easily be programmed, it quickly gets complex and time-consuming to create more complicated geometries for numerical model setups, especially in three dimensions. geomIO (geometry I/O, http://geomio.bitbucket.org/) is a MATLAB-based library that has two main functionalities. First, it can be used to create 3D volumes based on series of 2D vector drawings similar to a CAD program; and second, it uses these 3D volumes to assign material properties to the numerical model domain. The drawings can conveniently be created using the open-source vector graphics software Inkscape. Adobe Illustrator is also partially supported. The drawings represent a series of cross-sections in the 3D model domain, for example, cross-sectional interpretations of seismic tomography. geomIO is then used to read the drawings and to create 3D volumes by interpolating between the cross-sections. In the second part, the volumes are used to assign material phases to markers inside the volumes. Multiple volumes can be created at the same time and, depending on the order of assignment, unions or intersections can be built to assign additional material phases. geomIO also offers the possibility to create 3D temperature structures for geodynamic models based on depth dependent parameterisations, for example the half space cooling model. In particular, this can be applied to geometries of subducting slabs of arbitrary shape. Yet, geomIO is held very general, and can be used for a variety of applications. We present examples of setup generation from pictures of micro-scale tectonics and lithospheric scale setups of 3D present-day model

  18. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  19. Electron beam welding of iridium heat source capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustaleski, T.M.; Yearwood, J.C.; Burgan, C.E.; Green, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the welding procedures for the production of DOP-26 iridium alloy cups for heat source encapsulation is described. All the final assembly welds were made using the electron beam welding process. The welding of the 0.13-mm weld shield required the use of computer controlled X-Y table and a run-off tab. Welding of the frit vent to the cup required that a laser weld be made to hold the frit assembly edges together for the final electron beam weld. Great care is required in tooling design and beam placement to achieve acceptable results. Unsuccessful attempts to use laser beam welding for heat shield butt weld are discussed

  20. Formation Mechanisms for Entry and Exit Defects in Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Tamadon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW is an innovative variant for the solid state welding process whereby a rotating symmetrical tool causes a fully penetrated bond. Despite the process development, there are still unknown variables in the characterization of the process parameters which can cause uncontrolled weld defects. The entry zone and the exit zone consist of two discontinuity-defects and removing them is one of the current challenges for improving the weld quality. In the present research, the characteristic features of the entry and exit defects in the weld structure and formation mechanism of them during the BFSW processing was investigated. Using stacked layers of multi-colour plasticine the material flow, analogous to metal flow, can be visualised. By using different colours as the path markers of the analogue model, the streamline flow can be easily delineated in the discontinuity defects compared with the metal welds. AA6082-T6 aluminium plates and multi-layered plasticine slabs were employed to replicate the entry-exit defects in the metal weld and analogue samples. The fixed-bobbin tool utilized for this research was optimized by adding a thread feature and tri-flat geometry to the pin and closed-end spiral scrolls on both shoulder surfaces. Samples were processed at different rotating and longitudinal speeds to show the degree of dependency on the welding parameters for the defects. The analogue models showed that the entry zone and the exit zone of the BFSW are affected by the inhomogeneity of the material flow regime which causes the ejection or disruption of the plastic flow in the gap between the bobbin shoulders. The trial aluminium welds showed that the elimination of entry-exit defects in the weld body is not completely possible but the size of the defects can be minimized by modification of the welding parameters. For the entry zone, the flow pattern evolution suggested formation mechanisms for a sprayed tail, island zone

  1. Counterrotating-Shoulder Mechanism for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A counterrotating-shoulder mechanism has been proposed as an alternative to the mechanism and fixtures used in conventional friction stir welding. The mechanism would internally react most or all of the forces and torques exerted on the workpiece, making it unnecessary to react the forces and torques through massive external fixtures. In conventional friction stir welding, a rotating pin tool is inserted into, and moved along, a weld seam. As the pin tool moves, it stirs together material from the opposite sides of the seam to form the weld. A large axial plunge force must be exerted upon the workpiece through and by the pin tool and a shoulder attached above the pin tool in order to maintain the pressure necessary for the process. The workpiece is secured on top of an anvil, which supports the workpiece against the axial plunge force and against the torque exerted by the pin tool and shoulder. The anvil and associated fixtures must be made heavy (and, therefore, are expensive) to keep the workpiece stationary. In addition, workpiece geometries must be limited to those that can be accommodated by the fixtures. The predecessor of the proposed counterrotating-shoulder mechanism is a second-generation, self-reacting tool, resembling a bobbin, that makes it possible to dispense with the heavy anvil. This tool consists essentially of a rotating pin tool with opposing shoulders. Although the opposing shoulders maintain the necessary pressure without need to externally apply or react a large plunge force, the torque exerted on the workpiece remains unreacted in the absence of a substantial external fixture. Depending on the RPM and the thickness of the workpiece, the torque can be large. The proposed mechanism (see figure) would include a spindle attached to a pin tool with a lower shoulder. The spindle would be coupled via splines to the upper one of three bevel gears in a differential drive. The middle bevel gear would be the power-input gear and would be coupled to the

  2. Laser welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhieh, N. M.; El Eesawi, M. E.; Hashkel, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding was in its early life used mainly for unusual applications where no other welding process would be suitable that was twenty five years ago. Today, laser welding is a fully developed part of the metal working industry, routinely producing welds for common items such as cigarette lighters, which springs, motor/transformer lamination, hermetic seals, battery and pacemaker cans and hybrid circuit packages. Yet very few manufacturing engineering have seriously considers employing lasers in their own operations. Why? There are many reasons, but a main one must be not acquainted with the operation and capabilities of a laser system. Other reasons, such as a relatively high initial cost and a concern about using lasers in the manufacturing environment, also are frequently cited, and the complexity of the component and flexibility of the light delivery system. Laser welding could be used in place of many different standard processes, such as resistance (spot or seam), submerged arc, RF induction, high-frequency resistance, ultrasonic and electronic and electron-beam. while each of these techniques has established an independent function in the manufacturing world, the flexible laser welding approach will operate efficiently and economically in many different applications. Its flexibility will even permit the welding system to be used for other machining function, such as drilling, scribing, sealing and serializing. In this article, we will look at how laser welding works and what benefits it can offer to manufacturing engineers. Some industry observers state that there are already 2,000 laser machine tools being used for cutting, welding and drilling and that the number could reach 30,000 over the next 15 years as manufacturing engineers become more aware of the capabilities of lasers [1). While most laser applications are dedicated to one product or process that involves high-volume, long-run manufacturing, the flexibility of a laser to supply energy to hard

  3. Hybrid Search for Faster Production and Safer Process Conditions in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate optimum process parameters and tool geometries in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) to minimize temperature difference between the leading edge of the tool probe and the work piece material in front of the tool shoulder, and simultaneously maximize traverse...... welding speed, which conflicts with the former objective. An evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm (i.e. NSGA-II), is applied to find multiple trade-off solutions followed by a gradient-based local search (i.e. SQP) to improve the convergence of the obtained Pareto-optimal front. In order...... choices have been offered based on several process specific performance and cost related criteria....

  4. Weld nugget formation in resistance spot welding of new lightweight sandwich material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sagüés Tanco, J.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Chergui, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    Weldability of a new lightweight sandwich material, LITECOR®, by resistance spot welding is analyzed by experiments and numerical simulations. The spot welding process is accommodated by a first pulse squeezing out the non-conductive polymer core of the sandwich material locally to allow metal......–metal contact. This is facilitated by the use of a shunt tool and is followed by a second pulse for the actual spot welding and nugget formation. A weldability lobe in the time-current space of the second pulse reveals a process window of acceptable size for automotive assembly lines. Weld growth curves...... with experimental results in the range of welding parameters leading to acceptable weld nugget sizes. The validated accuracy of the commercially available software proves the tool useful for assisting the choice of welding parameters....

  5. PAF: A software tool to estimate free-geometry extended bodies of anomalous pressure from surface deformation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, A. G.; Fernández, J.; Cannavò, F.

    2018-02-01

    We present a software package to carry out inversions of surface deformation data (any combination of InSAR, GPS, and terrestrial data, e.g., EDM, levelling) as produced by 3D free-geometry extended bodies with anomalous pressure changes. The anomalous structures are described as an aggregation of elementary cells (whose effects are estimated as coming from point sources) in an elastic half space. The linear inverse problem (considering some simple regularization conditions) is solved by means of an exploratory approach. This software represents the open implementation of a previously published methodology (Camacho et al., 2011). It can be freely used with large data sets (e.g. InSAR data sets) or with data coming from small control networks (e.g. GPS monitoring data), mainly in volcanic areas, to estimate the expected pressure bodies representing magmatic intrusions. Here, the software is applied to some real test cases.

  6. Fine tuning of dwelling time in friction stir welding for preventing material overheating, weld tensile strength increase and weld nugget size decrease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After successful welding, destructive testing into test samples from Al 2024-T351 friction stir butt welds showed that tensile strength of the weld improve along the joint line, while dimensions of the weld nugget decrease. For those welds, both the base material and the welding tool constantly cool down during the welding phase. Obviously, the base material became overheated during the long dwelling phase what made conditions for creation of joints with the reduced mechanical properties. Preserving all process parameters but varying the dwelling time from 5-27 seconds a new set of welding is done to reach maximal achievable tensile strength. An analytical-numerical-experimental model is used for optimising the duration of the dwelling time while searching for the maximal tensile strength of the welds

  7. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the final chapter of this book, there is basic introduction on welding process. The good radiography must know somehow on welding process so that they can know what kind of welding that must rejected or not. All of the exposure technique that mention in earlier chapter almost applicable in this field because welding process is critical problem if there is no inspection will be done. So, for this chapter, all the discontinuity that usually appeared will be discussed and there is another discontinuity maybe not to important and do not give big impact if found it, do not described here. On top of that, the decision to accept or reject based on code, standard and specification that agreed by both to make sure that decision that agreed is corrected and more meaningful.

  8. Friction stir welding of 6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, M.A.M.S.

    2009-01-01

    6061 AA (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance such as marine frames, pipelines, storage tanks, and aircraft components [1]. It is also used for the manufacturing of fuel elements in the nuclear research reactors. Compared to many of the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural alloys, friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded is not melted and recast [2]. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding traverse speed, and tool profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. Several FSW tools (differ from each other in pin angle, shoulder diameter, and shoulder concavity) have been used to fabricate a number of joints in order to obtain a tool with which a sound weld can be produced. It was found that the FSW tool with tapered cone pin, concave shoulder, and shoulder diameter equal to four times the welded plate thickness is suitable to produce a sound weld. The effect of the traverse speed on the global and local tensile properties of friction stir welded joints has been investigated in the 6061-T6 AA. The global tensile properties of the FSW joints were improved with increasing the traverse speed at constant rotation rate. It is found that the global tensile strength of the FSW joint is limited by the local tensile strength of the nearest region to the weld center at which the cross section is composed mainly of the HAZ. The effect of the initial butt surface on the formation of the zigzag line on the tensile properties of the welds was examined by using three types of welding samples differ in the preparation of the initial butt surface. The first type of samples welded without removing the oxide layer from the initial butt surface (uncleaned butt surfaces joint). In the second type of samples the oxide layer was removed from

  9. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  10. Laser based spot weld characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  11. Study of the Tool Geometry Influence in Indentation for the Analysis and Validation of the New Modular Upper Bound Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bermudo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on incremental bulk metal forming processes, the indentation process is gaining interest as a fundamental part of these kinds of processes. This paper presents the analysis of the pressure obtained in indentation under the influence of different punch geometries. To this end, an innovative Upper Bound Theorem (UBT based solution is introduced. This new solution can be easily applied to estimate the necessary force that guarantees plastic deformation by an indentation process. In this work, we propose an accurate analytical approach to analyse indentation under different punches. The new Modular Upper Bound (MUB method presents a simpler and faster application. Additionally, its complexity is not considerably increased by the addition of more Triangular Rigid Zones. In addition, a two-dimensional indentation model is designed and implemented using the Finite Element Method (FEM. The comparison of the two methods applied to the indentation process analysed—the new Modular Upper Bound technique and the Finite Element Method—reveal close similarities, the new Modular Upper Bound being more computationally efficient.

  12. Mechanical behaviour of dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaravage, C.

    1990-01-01

    This report addresses the problems of dissimilar metal welds connecting an austenitic stainless steel component to a ferritic steel component. In LMFBRs such welds appear at the junction of the austenitic stainless steel vessel with the ferritic steel roof and in sodium and water or steam pipes. The latter are exposed to high temperatures in the creep range. A wide range of austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels (carbon steels, low allow steels and alloy steels) are covered; the study encompasses more than 20 different weld metals (austenitic stainless steels and nickel base alloys). The report begins with a presentation of the materials, geometries and welding procedures treated in the study, followed by a review of service experience from examinations of dissimilar metal welds after elevated temperature service, in particular failed welds. Results of laboratory tests performed for reproducing service failures are then discussed. A further section is devoted to a review of test results on fatigue behaviour and impact toughness for dissimilar metal welded joints when creep is not significant. Finally, the problem of residual life assessment is addressed. A set of recommendations concludes the report. They concern the material selection, welding procedure, life prediction and testing of dissimilar metal welds. 84 refs

  13. Friction stir welding of T joints of dissimilar aluminum alloy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakare, Shrikant B.; Kalyankar, Vivek D.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum alloys are preferred in the mechanical design due to their advantages like high strength, good corrosion resistance, low density and good weldability. In various industrial applications T joints configuration of aluminum alloys are used. In different fields, T joints having skin (horizontal sheet) strengthen by stringers (vertical sheets) were used to increase the strength of structure without increasing the weight. T joints are usually carried out by fusion welding which has limitations in joining of aluminum alloy due to significant distortion and metallurgical defects. Some aluminum alloys are even non weldable by fusion welding. The friction stir welding (FSW) has an excellent replacement of conventional fusion welding for T joints. In this article, FSW of T joints is reviewed by considering aluminum alloy and various joint geometries for defect analysis. The previous experiments carried out on T joints shows the factors such as tool geometry, fixturing device and joint configurations plays significant role in defect free joints. It is essential to investigate the material flow during FSW to know joining mechanism and the formation of joint. In this study the defect occurred in the FSW are studied for various joint configurations and parameters. Also the effect of the parameters and defects occurs on the tensile strength are studied. It is concluded that the T-joints of different joint configurations can be pretended successfully. Comparing to base metal some loss in tensile strength was observed in the weldments as well as overall reduction of the hardness in the thermos mechanically affected zone also observed.

  14. Welding feasibility study of U-shape lips at ITER Port-Plug with new laser beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, W., E-mail: w.behr@fz-juelich.de; Faidel, D.; Fischer, K.; Pap, M.; Offermanns, G.

    2013-10-15

    A “Cut and weld feasibility study of U shape lips” shown on June 2007 was initial of the following investigations. A new solution for Port Plug sealing at ITER was demanded and the experience in laser beam welding of the ZAT (Central Institute of Technology) in Jülich (Research Centre Jülich) offered an alternative solution. Up to now mechanically fixed sealing or sealing by TIG welding is used with typical benefits and problems, as heat input, shrinkage or limited room for tools. New disc-laser application for tight welding (leakage rate < 10{sup −9} mbar l/s) of the sealing lips is presented in the following. Both in the metallographic investigation and by means of leakage rate investigation the suitability of the selected procedure as seal alternative at the ITER Port Plug could be pointed out. The distance between two connections can be reduced to approx. 5 mm. The presented milling process for weld seam removal offers an option additionally to laser beam cutting. Final tests with a new disc-laser source offered additional benefits concerning seam quality, process stability and seam geometry. The distance between two connections will be reduced to less than 3 mm in next investigations. Construction unit near investigations and a demo part in original size underline finally the industrial suitability of the laser-welding-process for Port-Plug sealing at ITER.

  15. The Geometry Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bárány, Imre; Vilcu, Costin

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents easy-to-understand yet surprising properties obtained using topological, geometric and graph theoretic tools in the areas covered by the Geometry Conference that took place in Mulhouse, France from September 7–11, 2014 in honour of Tudor Zamfirescu on the occasion of his 70th anniversary. The contributions address subjects in convexity and discrete geometry, in distance geometry or with geometrical flavor in combinatorics, graph theory or non-linear analysis. Written by top experts, these papers highlight the close connections between these fields, as well as ties to other domains of geometry and their reciprocal influence. They offer an overview on recent developments in geometry and its border with discrete mathematics, and provide answers to several open questions. The volume addresses a large audience in mathematics, including researchers and graduate students interested in geometry and geometrical problems.

  16. 3D modeling and visualization software for complex geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guse, Guenter; Klotzbuecher, Michael; Mohr, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    The reactor safety depends on reliable nondestructive testing of reactor components. For 100% detection probability of flaws and the determination of their size using ultrasonic methods the ultrasonic waves have to hit the flaws within a specific incidence and squint angle. For complex test geometries like testing of nozzle welds from the outside of the component these angular ranges can only be determined using elaborate mathematical calculations. The authors developed a 3D modeling and visualization software tool that allows to integrate and present ultrasonic measuring data into the 3D geometry. The software package was verified using 1:1 test samples (example: testing of the nozzle edge of the feedwater nozzle of a steam generator from the outside; testing of the reactor pressure vessel nozzle edge from the inside).

  17. Hyperbolic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Iversen, Birger

    1992-01-01

    Although it arose from purely theoretical considerations of the underlying axioms of geometry, the work of Einstein and Dirac has demonstrated that hyperbolic geometry is a fundamental aspect of modern physics

  18. VISUALIZATION IN THE PACKAGE AUTODESK INVENTOR SKETCH GEOMETRY WHEN USING TOOLS IN THE THEORY OF R-FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Іvanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with possibility of automation and control of the computational process when using the tools in the theory of R-functions possessing the properties of logic algebra, while not going beyond the elementary functions, make it possible to build the equations of geometric objects with an almost arbitrary shape. And the use of computer graphics makes it posible to represent the equation of the boundar surface and the conical region of the curved tooth coupling and the whole disk in on analytical form with possible visualization in the Autodesk Inventor package.

  19. Passive Visual Sensing in Automatic Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao

    For decades much work has been devoted to the research and development of automatic arc welding systems. However, it has remained a challenging problem. Besides the very complex arc welding process itself, the lack of ability to precisely sense the welding process, including the seam geometry...... and the weld pool, has also prevented the realization of a closed-loop control system for many years, even though a variety of sensors have been developed. Among all the sensor systems, visual sensors have the advantage of receiving visual information and have been drawn more and more attentions. Typical...... industrial solutions for seam detection such as using laser scanners suer from several limitations. For instance, it must be positioned some distance ahead to the molten pool and may cause problem when dealing with shiny surfaces. Existing techniques for weld pool sensing mostly rely on auxiliary light...

  20. Twistor geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a detailed exposition of the relation between the geometry of twistor space and the geometry of Minkowski space. The paper has a didactical purpose; no use has been made of differential geometry and cohomology.

  1. Olive Actual “on Year” Yield Forecast Tool Based on the Tree Canopy Geometry Using UAS Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael R. Sola-Guirado

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Olive has a notable importance in countries of Mediterranean basin and its profitability depends on several factors such as actual yield, production cost or product price. Actual “on year” Yield (AY is production (kg tree−1 in “on years”, and this research attempts to relate it with geometrical parameters of the tree canopy. Regression equation to forecast AY based on manual canopy volume was determined based on data acquired from different orchard categories and cultivars during different harvesting seasons in southern Spain. Orthoimages were acquired with unmanned aerial systems (UAS imagery calculating individual crown for relating to canopy volume and AY. Yield levels did not vary between orchard categories; however, it did between irrigated orchards (7000–17,000 kg ha−1 and rainfed ones (4000–7000 kg ha−1. After that, manual canopy volume was related with the individual crown area of trees that were calculated by orthoimages acquired with UAS imagery. Finally, AY was forecasted using both manual canopy volume and individual tree crown area as main factors for olive productivity. AY forecast only by using individual crown area made it possible to get a simple and cheap forecast tool for a wide range of olive orchards. Finally, the acquired information was introduced in a thematic map describing spatial AY variability obtained from orthoimage analysis that may be a powerful tool for farmers, insurance systems, market forecasts or to detect agronomical problems.

  2. Olive Actual “on Year” Yield Forecast Tool Based on the Tree Canopy Geometry Using UAS Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola-Guirado, Rafael R.; Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Jiménez-Jiménez, Francisco; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L.; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A.

    2017-01-01

    Olive has a notable importance in countries of Mediterranean basin and its profitability depends on several factors such as actual yield, production cost or product price. Actual “on year” Yield (AY) is production (kg tree−1) in “on years”, and this research attempts to relate it with geometrical parameters of the tree canopy. Regression equation to forecast AY based on manual canopy volume was determined based on data acquired from different orchard categories and cultivars during different harvesting seasons in southern Spain. Orthoimages were acquired with unmanned aerial systems (UAS) imagery calculating individual crown for relating to canopy volume and AY. Yield levels did not vary between orchard categories; however, it did between irrigated orchards (7000–17,000 kg ha−1) and rainfed ones (4000–7000 kg ha−1). After that, manual canopy volume was related with the individual crown area of trees that were calculated by orthoimages acquired with UAS imagery. Finally, AY was forecasted using both manual canopy volume and individual tree crown area as main factors for olive productivity. AY forecast only by using individual crown area made it possible to get a simple and cheap forecast tool for a wide range of olive orchards. Finally, the acquired information was introduced in a thematic map describing spatial AY variability obtained from orthoimage analysis that may be a powerful tool for farmers, insurance systems, market forecasts or to detect agronomical problems. PMID:28758945

  3. Welding parameter optimization of alloy material by friction stir welding using Taguchi approach and design of experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwande, Amit H.; Rao, Seeram Srinivasa

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) a welding process in which metals are joint by melting them at their solid state. In different engineering areas such as civil, mechanical, naval and aeronautical engineering beams are widely used of the magnesium alloys for different applications and that are joined by conventional inert gas welding process. Magnesium metal has less density and low melting point for that reason large heat generation in the common welding process so its necessity to adapt new welding process. FSW process increases the weld quality which observed under various mechanical testing by using different tool size.

  4. CRADA Final Report: Weld Predictor App

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, Jay Jay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Welding is an important manufacturing process used in a broad range of industries and market sectors, including automotive, aerospace, heavy manufacturing, medical, and defense. During welded fabrication, high localized heat input and subsequent rapid cooling result in the creation of residual stresses and distortion. These residual stresses can significantly affect the fatigue resistance, cracking behavior, and load-carrying capacity of welded structures during service. Further, additional fitting and tacking time is often required to fit distorted subassemblies together, resulting in non-value added cost. Using trial-and-error methods to determine which welding parameters, welding sequences, and fixture designs will most effectively reduce distortion is a time-consuming and expensive process. For complex structures with many welds, this approach can take several months. For this reason, efficient and accurate methods of mitigating distortion are in-demand across all industries where welding is used. Analytical and computational methods and commercial software tools have been developed to predict welding-induced residual stresses and distortion. Welding process parameters, fixtures, and tooling can be optimized to reduce the HAZ softening and minimize weld residual stress and distortion, improving performance and reducing design, fabrication and testing costs. However, weld modeling technology tools are currently accessible only to engineers and designers with a background in finite element analysis (FEA) who work with large manufacturers, research institutes, and universities with access to high-performance computing (HPC) resources. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the US do not typically have the human and computational resources needed to adopt and utilize weld modeling technology. To allow an engineer with no background in FEA and SMEs to gain access to this important design tool, EWI and the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) developed the online weld

  5. Probing weld quality monitoring in friction stir welding through characterization of signals by fractal theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Bipul; Bag, Swarup; Pal, Sukhomay [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam (India)

    2017-05-15

    Providing solutions towards the improvisation of welding technologies is the recent trend in the Friction stir welding (FSW) process. We present a monitoring approach for ultimate tensile strength of the friction stir welded joints based on information extracted from process signals through implementing fractal theory. Higuchi and Katz algorithms were executed on current and tool rotational speed signals acquired during friction stir welding to estimate fractal dimensions. Estimated fractal dimensions when correlated with the ultimate tensile strength of the joints deliver an increasing trend with the increase in joint strength. It is observed that dynamicity of the system strengthens the weld joint, i.e., the greater the fractal dimension, the better will be the quality of the weld. Characterization of signals by fractal theory indicates that the single-valued indicator can be an alternative for effective monitoring of the friction stir welding process.

  6. Probing weld quality monitoring in friction stir welding through characterization of signals by fractal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Bipul; Bag, Swarup; Pal, Sukhomay

    2017-01-01

    Providing solutions towards the improvisation of welding technologies is the recent trend in the Friction stir welding (FSW) process. We present a monitoring approach for ultimate tensile strength of the friction stir welded joints based on information extracted from process signals through implementing fractal theory. Higuchi and Katz algorithms were executed on current and tool rotational speed signals acquired during friction stir welding to estimate fractal dimensions. Estimated fractal dimensions when correlated with the ultimate tensile strength of the joints deliver an increasing trend with the increase in joint strength. It is observed that dynamicity of the system strengthens the weld joint, i.e., the greater the fractal dimension, the better will be the quality of the weld. Characterization of signals by fractal theory indicates that the single-valued indicator can be an alternative for effective monitoring of the friction stir welding process.

  7. Influence of tools geometry and processing conditions on behavior of a difficult-to-work Al-Mg alloy during equal channel angular pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comǎneci, Radu Ioachim; Nedelcu, Dumitru; Bujoreanu, Leandru Gheorghe

    2017-10-01

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is a well-established method for grain refinement in metallic materials by large shear plastic deformation, being the most promising and effective severe plastic deformation (SPD) technique. ECAP is a discontinuous process, so the billet removal implies a new development of the procedure: the new sample pushes out the previous sample. In resuming the process the head and the tail ends of the work piece which becomes strongly distorted and receiving different amount of strain have to be removed. Due to the path difference in material flow between upper and lower region of the outlet channel, a non-uniform strain and stress distribution across the width of the workpiece leaving the plastic deformation zone (PDZ) is achieved. A successful ECAP requires surpassing two obstacles: the necessary load level which directly affects tools and a favorable stress distribution so the material withstanding the accumulated strain of repeated deformation. Under back pressure (BP), materials have shown to be able to withstand more passes. As soon as the billet passes the PDZ along the bisector plane of the two channels, the compressive mean stress changes to tensile (leading to crack initiation), while in the presence of BP, a negative (compressive) stress is applied during the process. In this paper a comparative tridimensional finite element analysis (FEA) is performed to evaluate the behavior of a difficult-to-work Al-Mg alloy depending on tools geometry and process parameters. The results in terms of load level and strain distribution show the influence of the punch geometry and BP on the material behavior.

  8. Power characteristics of the metal compounds formation process during the friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzaev Radmir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An influence of the power characteristics on the formation process of the uniform metals compound during the welding with friction stirringis being examined in this article.A dependency between the machine-tool engine power input and the instrument tilt during the FSW for the aluminum alloy AD31, copper alloy M1, titanium alloy OT4-1 and steel St-3 low-alloyed has been explored. A question of the stabilization of power consumption process while the establishment of superplastic condition of welded metal during the FSW has also been reviewed. A dependency revealed between the power characteristics, the geometry of the formation, the rotation speeds, the longitudinal displacement of the tool and its dimensions for fixed values of the parameters during the FSW.

  9. Longitudinal Weld Land Buckling in Compression-Loaded Orthogrid Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Large stiffened cylinders used in launch vehicles (LV), such as the Space Shuttle External Tank, are manufactured by welding multiple curved panel sections into complete cylinders. The effects of the axial weld lands between the panel sections on the buckling load were studied, along with the interaction between the acreage stiffener arrangement and the weld land geometry. This document contains the results of the studies.

  10. Welding with high power fiber lasers - A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintino, L.; Costa, A.; Miranda, R.; Yapp, D.; Kumar, V.; Kong, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The new generation of high power fiber lasers presents several benefits for industrial purposes, namely high power with low beam divergence, flexible beam delivery, low maintenance costs, high efficiency and compact size. This paper presents a brief review of the development of high power lasers, and presents initial data on welding of API 5L: X100 pipeline steel with an 8 kW fiber laser. Weld bead geometry was evaluated and transition between conduction and deep penetration welding modes was investigated

  11. Welding template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Venue, R.J. of.

    1976-01-01

    A welding template is described which is used to weld strip material into a cellular grid structure for the accommodation of fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. On a base plate the template carries a multitude of cylindrical pins whose upper half is narrower than the bottom half and only one of which is attached to the base plate. The others are arrested in a hexagonal array by oblong webs clamped together by chuck jaws which can be secured by means of screws. The parts are ground very accurately. The template according to the invention is very easy to make. (UWI) [de

  12. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  13. Nucleus geometry and mechanical properties of resistance spot ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Automotive steels; resistance spot welding; mechanical properties; nucleus geometry. 1. .... High va- lues of hardness can be explained with martensitic forma- ... interface of DP450–DP600 steels may have stainless steel properties.

  14. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weld pool has been evaluated in case of high power CO2 laser beam welding. The ... The experiments based on twin or triple spot interaction geometry have also ... while the other one is between the liquid and the solid states of the metal.

  15. Keyhole behaviour during laser welding of zinc-coated steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Y.; Richardson, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    The production of consistent, high-quality laser welds on zinc-coated steels for the automotive industry remains a challenge. A simple overlap joint geometry is desirable in these applications but has been shown to be extremely detrimental to laser welding because the zinc vapour formed at the

  16. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T.; Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M.; Le Barbier, R.; Määttä, T.; Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  17. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Le Barbier, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Määttä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  18. The Effect of Weld Reinforcement and Post-Welding Cooling Cycles on Fatigue Strength of Butt-Welded Joints under Cyclic Tensile Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araque, Oscar; Arzola, Nelson; Hernández, Edgar

    2018-04-12

    This research deals with the fatigue behavior of butt-welded joints, by considering the geometry and post-welding cooling cycles, as a result of cooling in quiet air and immersed in water. ASTM A-36 HR structural steel was used as the base metal for the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process with welding electrode E6013. The welding reinforcement was 1 mm and 3 mm, respectively; axial fatigue tests were carried out to determine the life and behavior in cracks propagation of the tested welded joints, mechanical characterization tests of properties in welded joints such as microhardness, Charpy impact test and metallographic analysis were carried out. The latter were used as input for the analysis by finite elements which influence the initiation and propagation of cracks and the evaluation of stress intensity factors (SIF). The latter led to obtaining the crack propagation rate and the geometric factor. The tested specimens were analyzed, by taking photographs of the cracks at its beginning in order to make a count of the marks at the origin of the crack. From the results obtained and the marks count, the fatigue crack growth rate and the influence of the cooling media on the life of the welded joint are validated, according to the experimental results. It can be concluded that the welded joints with a higher weld reinforcement have a shorter fatigue life. This is due to the stress concentration that occurs in the vicinity of the weld toe.

  19. Effect of rotation speed and welding speed on Friction Stir Welding of AA1100 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, P.; Bojanampati, S.; Karthikeyan, R.; Ganithi, R.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum AA1100 is the most widely used grade of Aluminium due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high ductility and reflective finish, the selected material was welded with Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process on a CNC machine, using a combination of different tool rotation speed (1500 rpm, 2500 rpm, 3500 rpm) and welding speed (10 mm/min, 30 mm/min, 50 mm/min) as welding parameters. The effect of FSW using this welding parameter was studied by measuring the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints. A high-speed steel tool was prepared for welding the Aluminium AA1100 alloy having an 8mm shoulder diameter and pin dimension of 4mm diameter and 2.8 mm length. The welded joints were tested using the universal testing machine. It was found that Ultimate Tensile Strength of FSW specimen was highest with a value of 98.08 MPa when the weld was performed at rotation speed of 1500 RPM and welding speed of 50 mm/min.

  20. On use of weld zone temperatures for online monitoring of weld quality in friction stir welding of naturally aged aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Murshid; Biswas, Kajal; Racherla, Vikranth

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • FSWs for 6063-T4 AA are done at different process parameters and sheet thicknesses. • Weld nugget zone and heat affected zone temperatures are monitored for each case. • Microstructural and mechanical characterisation of welds is done in all cases. • Weld ductility is found to be particularly sensitive to weld zone temperatures. • Strong correlation is found between WNZ and HAZ temperatures and weld properties. - Abstract: 6063-T4 aluminium alloy sheets of 3 and 6 mm thicknesses were friction stir butt welded using a square tool pin at a wide range of tool rotational speeds. Properties of obtained welds were characterised using tensile tests, optical micrographs, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Shape, size, and distribution of precipitates in weld zones, and strength and ductility of welds were seen to directly correlate with peak temperatures in weld nugget and heat affected zones, independent of sheet thickness. In addition, fluctuations in measured temperature profiles, for 3 mm sheets, were seen to correlate with an increase in scatter of weld nugget zone properties for 3 mm sheets. Optimal weld strength and ductility were obtained for peak weld nugget zone temperatures of around 450 °C and corresponding peak heat affected zone temperatures of around 360–380 °C. Results obtained suggest that, at least for naturally aged aluminium alloys, nature of temperature evolution and magnitudes of peak temperatures in weld nugget and heat affected zones provide information on uniformity of properties in weld zones, overaging of heat affected zones, and formation of tunnel defects from improper material mixing at low weld zone temperatures

  1. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  2. Predicting of bead undercut defects in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jing XU; Chuan-song WU; De-gang ZOU

    2008-01-01

    In the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, when the welding speed reaches a certain threshold, there will be an onset of weld bead undercut defects which limit the further increase of the welding speed. Establishing a mathematical model for high-speed GMAW to predict the tendency of bead undercuts is of great significance to pre-vent such defects. Under the action of various forces, the transferred metal from filler wire to the weld pool, and the geometry and dimension of the pool itself decide if the bead undercut occurs or not. The previous model simpli-fied the pool shape too much. In this paper, based on the actual weld pool geometry and dimension calculated from a numerical model, a hydrostatic model for liquid metal surface is used to study the onset of bead undercut defects in the high-speed welding process and the effects of dif-ferent welding parameters on the bead undercut tendency.

  3. Studies on hyperbaric WIG welding in the pressure range between 1 and 16 bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huismann, G.

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of this paper the following individual investigations were carried out for the application of the TIG process under hyperbar conditions (underwater welding): 1. Influence of the pressure on the formation and efficiency of the inert gas shield. 2. Influence of the materials and point geometry of the tungsten electrode on the erosion of those and the effect thereof on the welding process under increased pressure. 3. Influence of the pressure on the welding material geometry in blind-welding without welding material as well as built-in welding and root welding. 4. Influence of the pressure on the gas-metal reactions. The changes of the electric, mechanical and geometrical properties and characteristics of the electric arc by increased pressure are the fundamentals for understanding the resulting influences of the pressure on the properties of welded joints. (orig./MM) [de

  4. Fiber Laser Welding of Dissimilar 2205/304 Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an attempt on pulsed-fiber laser welding on an austenitic-duplex stainless steel butt joint configuration was investigated. The influence of various welding parameters, such as beam diameter, peak power, pulse repetition rate, and pulse width on the weld beads geometry was studied by checking the width and depth of the welds after each round of welding parameters combination. The weld bead dimensions and microstructural progression of the weld joints were observed microscopically. Finally, the full penetration specimens were subjected to tensile tests, which were coupled with the analysis of the fracture surfaces. From the results, combination of the selected weld parameters resulted in robust weldments with similar features to those of duplex and austenitic weld metals. The weld depth and width were found to increase proportionally to the laser power. Furthermore, the weld bead geometry was found to be positively affected by the pulse width. Microstructural studies revealed the presence of dendritic and fine grain structures within the weld zone at low peak power, while ferritic microstructures were found on the sides of the weld metal near the SS 304 and austenitic-ferritic microstructure beside the duplex 2205 boundary. Regarding the micro-hardness tests, there was an improvement when compared to the hardness of duplex and austenitic stainless steels base metals. Additionally, the tensile strength of the fiber laser welded joints was found to be higher when compared to the tensile strength of the base metals (duplex and austenitic in all of the joints.

  5. Effect of weld morphology on mechanical response and failure of friction stir welds in a naturally aged aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Murshid; Biswas, Kajal; Racherla, Vikranth

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Friction stir welds of AA 6063-T4 are obtained using three tool pin profiles. ► Signature of weld defects in mechanical response of welds is investigated. ► Correlation between peak temperatures in HAZs and their hardness is studied. ► Reasons for strengthening of WNZ and softening of HAZs are found using TEM and XRD. ► A FEM model for the weld zone is developed and validated. -- Abstract: Friction stir butt welds in 6063-T4 aluminium alloy were obtained using square and two tapered tool pin profiles. Tensile tests at 0°, 45°, and 90° to the weld line, hardness contours in the weld cross-section, temperatures in the heat affected zones, cross-sectional macrographs, transmission electron micrographs, and X-ray diffraction studies were used to characterize the welds. In transverse weld specimen, tunnel defects appearing at higher weld speeds for tapered pin profiles, were found to result in mechanical instabilities, i.e. sharp drops in load–displacement curves, much before macroscopic necking occured. Further, in comparison to the base metal, a marked reduction in ductility was observed even in transverse specimen with defect free welds. Hardness contours in the weld cross-section suggest that loss in ductility is due to significant softening in heat affected zone on the retreating side. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrate that while recovery and overaging are responsible for softening in the heat affected zone, grain size refinement from dynamic recrystallization is responsible for strengthening of the weld nugget zone. X-ray diffraction studies in the three weld zones: weld nugget zone, heat affected zone, and the base metal corroborate these findings. A weld zone model, for use in forming simulations on friction stir welded plates of naturally aged aluminium alloys, was proposed based on mechanical characterization tests. The model was validated using finite element analysis.

  6. Gas metal arc welding of butt joint with varying gap width based on neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Hardam; Sørensen, Torben

    2005-01-01

    penetration, when the gap width is varying during the welding process. The process modeling to facilitate the mapping from joint geometry and reference weld quality to significant welding parameters, has been based on a multi-layer feed-forward network. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear least......This paper describes the application of the neural network technology for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) control. A system has been developed for modeling and online adjustment of welding parameters, appropriate to guarantee a certain degree of quality in the field of butt joint welding with full...

  7. WELDABILITY, WELDING METALLURGY, WELDING CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjito Jokosisworo

    2012-01-01

    Sambungan las merupakan bagian penting dari stuktur/bangunan yang dilas, dan kunci dari logam induk yang baik adalah kemampuan las (weld ability). Kemampuan las yang baik dan kemudahan dalam fabrikasi dari suatu logam merupakan pertimbangan dalam memilih suatu logam untuk konstruksi.

  8. Optical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.; Trautman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of classical physics is Lorentzian; but weaker geometries are often more appropriate: null geodesics and electromagnetic fields, for example, are well known to be objects of conformal geometry. To deal with a single null congruence, or with the radiative electromagnetic fields associated with it, even less is needed: flag geometry for the first, optical geometry, with which this paper is chiefly concerned, for the second. The authors establish a natural one-to-one correspondence between optical geometries, considered locally, and three-dimensional Cauchy-Riemann structures. A number of Lorentzian geometries are shown to be equivalent from the optical point of view. For example the Goedel universe, the Taub-NUT metric and Hauser's twisting null solution have an optical geometry isomorphic to the one underlying the Robinson congruence in Minkowski space. The authors present general results on the problem of lifting a CR structure to a Lorentz manifold and, in particular, to Minkowski space; and exhibit the relevance of the deviation form to this problem

  9. Microstructures and mechanical properties of friction stir welded dissimilar steel-copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, M.; Abbasi, M.; Poursina, D.; Gheysarian, A. [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, B. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Welding dissimilar metals by fusion welding is challenging. It results in welding defects. Friction stir welding (FSW) as a solid-state joining method can overcome these problems. In this study, 304L stainless steel was joined to copper by FSW. The optimal values of the welding parameters traverse speed, rotational speed, and tilt angle were obtained through Response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal welding conditions, the effects of welding pass number on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the welded joints were investigated. Results indicated that appropriate values of FSW parameters could be obtained by RSM and grain size refinement during FSW mainly affected the hardness in the weld regions. Furthermore, the heat from the FSW tool increased the grain size in the Heat-affected zones (HAZs), especially on the copper side. Therefore, the strength and ductility decreased as the welding pass number increased because of grain size enhancement in the HAZs as the welding pass number increased.

  10. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  11. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  12. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, Amir; Wallner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  13. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  14. Tensile Properties of Friction Stir Welded Joints of AA 2024-T6 Alloy at Different Welding Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Dhananjayulu; Devuri, Venkateswarlu; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Dwivedi, Dheerendra Kumar

    2018-03-01

    The influence of welding speed on the friction stir welded joint properties of hardness, tensile properties, defects and microstructure characterization are studied in the present study. The friction stir welding was conducted on AA2014-T6 heat treated alloy with 5 mm thickness plate in butt joint configuration. The welding speed was varied from 8 mm/min to 120 mm/min at the fixed travel speed and load conditions. It is observed that the welding speeds at higher rate with wide range can be possible to weld this alloy at higher rates of tool revolution suggesting that the inherent capability of friction stir welding technique for aluminum 2014 alloys. The strength of the joints gradually increases with enhancing of welding speed. The micro structural observations exhibited the formation of equiaxed grains in the stir zone and slightly in the thermo-mechanically affected zone. In addition, the size of the grains decreases with increase in welding speed owing to the presence of low heat input. Hence the hardness of the joints slightly increased in the stir zones over the other zones of the weld nugget. The joint strength initially increases with the welding speed and starts to decreases after reaching to the maximum value. The relationship between the welding conditions and friction stir welded joint properties has been discussed.

  15. Metallurgical joining of engine parts. Inertia welding of nickel superalloy HP compressor disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferte, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The main part of this paper describes upside metallurgical and mechanical work done at SNECMA, on inertia welding of powder metallurgy nickel base superalloys ASTROLOY and N18, allowing appliance of this process to engine parts : Inertia welding of superalloys leads to deap microstructural changes in the H.A.Z. which have been, as well as upset, correlated to process parameters, weld geometry and base material microstructure; a full mechanical testing of welds shown properties equivalent to base material ones up to 650 C except for fatigue crack growth behavior under specific conditions (T>600 C-hold time at maximum load) which is drastically reduced for in weld plane propagation. A significant improvement of this later property has been done through post-welding heat treatment and optimization of welding parameters. Last part of this paper summarize the main teachings gained, on the complete welding procedure, from welding of scale one parts. (orig.)

  16. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    These instructional materials assist teachers in improving instruction on the fundamentals of welding. The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and 27 references. Seven units of…

  17. Beautiful geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, Eli

    2014-01-01

    If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configur

  18. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  19. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Sabina Luisa; Casalino, Giuseppe; Casavola, Caterina; Moramarco, Vincenzo

    2013-12-18

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e. , no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  20. Physics-based process model approach for detecting discontinuity during friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Amber; Pfefferkorn, Frank E.; Duffie, Neil A.; Ferrier, Nicola J.; Smith, Christopher B.; Malukhin, Kostya; Zinn, Michael

    2015-02-12

    The goal of this work is to develop a method for detecting the creation of discontinuities during friction stir welding. This in situ weld monitoring method could significantly reduce the need for post-process inspection. A process force model and a discontinuity force model were created based on the state-of-the-art understanding of flow around an friction stir welding (FSW) tool. These models are used to predict the FSW forces and size of discontinuities formed in the weld. Friction stir welds with discontinuities and welds without discontinuities were created, and the differences in force dynamics were observed. In this paper, discontinuities were generated by reducing the tool rotation frequency and increasing the tool traverse speed in order to create "cold" welds. Experimental force data for welds with discontinuities and welds without discontinuities compared favorably with the predicted forces. The model currently overpredicts the discontinuity size.

  1. On the shakedown analysis of welded pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianbai; Chen Haofeng; Chen Weihang; Ure, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the shakedown analysis of welded pipes subjected to a constant internal pressure and a varying thermal load. The Linear Matching Method (LMM) is applied to investigate the upper and lower bound shakedown limits of the pipes. Individual effects of i) geometry of weld metal, ii) ratio of inner radius to wall thickness and iii) all material properties of Weld Metal (WM), Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Parent Material (PM) on shakedown limits are investigated. The ranges of these variables are chosen to cover the majority of common pipe configurations. Corresponding individual influence functions on the shakedown limits are generated. These are then combined to allow the creation of a safety shakedown envelope, which can be used for the design of any welded pipes within the specified ranges. The effect of temperature-dependent yield stress (in PM, HAZ and WM) on these shakedown limits is also investigated.

  2. Electron beam welding of high-purity copper accelerator cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delis, K.; Haas, H.; Schlebusch, P.; Sigismund, E.

    1986-01-01

    The operating conditions of accelerator cells require high thermal conductivity, low gas release in the ultrahigh vacuum, low content of low-melting metals and an extremely good surface quality. In order to meet these requirements, high-purity copper (OFHC, Grade 1, according to ASTM B 170-82 and extra specifications) is used as structural material. The prefabricated components of the accelerator cells (noses, jackets, flanges) are joined by electron beam welding, the weld seam being assessed on the basis of the same criteria as the base material. The welding procedures required depend, first, on the material and, secondly, on the geometries involved. Therefore experimental welds were made first on standardized specimens in order to study the behaviour of the material during electron beam welding and the influence of parameter variations. The welded joints of the cell design were planned on the basis of these results. Seam configuration, welding procedures and the parameters were optimized on components of original geometry. The experiments have shown that high-quality joints of this grade of copper can be produced by the electron beam welding process, if careful planning and preparation of the seams and adequate containment of the welding pool are assured. (orig.)

  3. Study on the welding process of the CTB outbox prototype of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chen; Lu, Kun; Song, Yuntao; Zhu, Rui; Bao, Hongwei; Li, Shoukang; Zhang, Chunjie; Tuo, Fuxing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Welding progress simulation of ITER CTB outbox by SYSWELD. • 2 m length box mockup welding for R&D. • Special welding tooling and groove design for welding deformation control and improvement of welding quality. • Double torch automatic MIG welding method application. - Abstract: The current study investigated the main welding process of the box. We first performed a simple simulation of the welding process for the four long weld lines on CTB (Coil Terminal Box) outbox by using the finite element analysis mode of SYSWELD. Then a 2 m length mock up box was welded for R&D to optimize the welding parameters and deformation distribution. Base on the R&D experiences, we designed a special tooling of the prototype box which can be used to control the deformation during the welding process. A 8 m length CTB outbox prototype was successfully welded by using double torch automatic MIG (Metal Inert-Gas) welding. The dimension inspection results confirmed that the welding deformation of the box can be controlled within 3 mm on each side. Based on the ultrasonic inspection, all the welding seams met quality level B by standard EN 5817.

  4. Analytische Geometrie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnitz, Arnfried

    Der Grundgedanke der Analytischen Geometrie besteht darin, dass geometrische Untersuchungen mit rechnerischen Mitteln geführt werden. Geometrische Objekte werden dabei durch Gleichungen beschrieben und mit algebraischen Methoden untersucht.

  5. Algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lefschetz, Solomon

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to algebraic geometry and a bridge between its analytical-topological and algebraical aspects, this text for advanced undergraduate students is particularly relevant to those more familiar with analysis than algebra. 1953 edition.

  6. Information geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ay, Nihat; Lê, Hông Vân; Schwachhöfer, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive introduction and a novel mathematical foundation of the field of information geometry with complete proofs and detailed background material on measure theory, Riemannian geometry and Banach space theory. Parametrised measure models are defined as fundamental geometric objects, which can be both finite or infinite dimensional. Based on these models, canonical tensor fields are introduced and further studied, including the Fisher metric and the Amari-Chentsov tensor, and embeddings of statistical manifolds are investigated. This novel foundation then leads to application highlights, such as generalizations and extensions of the classical uniqueness result of Chentsov or the Cramér-Rao inequality. Additionally, several new application fields of information geometry are highlighted, for instance hierarchical and graphical models, complexity theory, population genetics, or Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The book will be of interest to mathematicians who are interested in geometry, inf...

  7. Corrosion resistance of copper canister weld material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubner, Rolf; Andersson, Urban

    2007-03-01

    mechanical solid-state process, i.e. not a fusion welding method. The FSW tool consists of two parts: a tapered pin (or probe) and a shoulder. The function of the tool is to heat up the material by means of friction and, by virtue of its shape, force the material to flow around it and create a joint. This means that the problems encountered in fusion welding, for example unfavourable grain structure and size and segregation phenomena, can be avoided. The microstructure in copper resulting from FSW resembles the microstructure resulting from hot forming of the copper components in the canister. However, some impurities from the tool, such as metal particles, have been detected in the weld material. This study aimed to investigate whether the driving force of galvanic corrosion between weld material and base material could pose a problem and whether metallic particles originating from the FSW tool could induce and sustain corrosion. In this study, a surface untreated FSW tool was used to simulate the worst case scenario. For today's FSW welds, the tools have been surface treated which results in no detectable levels of metal particles in the weld. For the study described in this report, 9 samples from FSW (produced with surface untreated tools) and 1 EBW sample were investigated in this study. As result, the FSW samples show less corrosion compared to EBW and the residues from FSW tool do not influence corrosion adversely. Furthermore, copper oxides do not influence the corrosion properties of FSW welds noticeably. In conclusion, FSW for sealing copper canisters for spend nuclear fuel provides more durable welds from a corrosion point of view

  8. Corrosion resistance of copper canister weld material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubner, Rolf; Andersson, Urban [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, Sto ckholm (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    mechanical solid-state process, i.e. not a fusion welding method. The FSW tool consists of two parts: a tapered pin (or probe) and a shoulder. The function of the tool is to heat up the material by means of friction and, by virtue of its shape, force the material to flow around it and create a joint. This means that the problems encountered in fusion welding, for example unfavourable grain structure and size and segregation phenomena, can be avoided. The microstructure in copper resulting from FSW resembles the microstructure resulting from hot forming of the copper components in the canister. However, some impurities from the tool, such as metal particles, have been detected in the weld material. This study aimed to investigate whether the driving force of galvanic corrosion between weld material and base material could pose a problem and whether metallic particles originating from the FSW tool could induce and sustain corrosion. In this study, a surface untreated FSW tool was used to simulate the worst case scenario. For today's FSW welds, the tools have been surface treated which results in no detectable levels of metal particles in the weld. For the study described in this report, 9 samples from FSW (produced with surface untreated tools) and 1 EBW sample were investigated in this study. As result, the FSW samples show less corrosion compared to EBW and the residues from FSW tool do not influence corrosion adversely. Furthermore, copper oxides do not influence the corrosion properties of FSW welds noticeably. In conclusion, FSW for sealing copper canisters for spend nuclear fuel provides more durable welds from a corrosion point of view.

  9. Recent Developments and Research Progress on Friction Stir Welding of Titanium Alloys: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Sivaji; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Venkateswarulu, D.; Srikanth, V.

    2018-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys are joined by various welding processes. However, Fusion welding of titanium alloys resulted solidification problems like porosity, segregation and columnar grains. The problems occurred in conventional welding processes can be resolved using a solid state welding i.e. friction stir welding. Aluminium and Magnesium alloys were welded by friction stir welding. However alloys used for high temperature applications such as titanium alloys and steels are arduous to weld using friction stir welding process because of tool limitations. Present paper summarises the studies on joining of Titanium alloys using friction stir welding with different tool materials. Selection of tool material and effect of welding conditions on mechanical and microstructure properties of weldments were also reported. Major advantage with friction stir welding is, we can control the welding temperature above or below β-transus temperature by optimizing the process parameters. Stir zone in below beta transus condition consists of bi-modal microstructure and microstructure in above β-transus condition has large prior β- grains and α/β laths present in the grain. Welding experiments conducted below β- transus condition has better mechanical properties than welding at above β-transus condition. Hardness and tensile properties of weldments are correlated with the stir zone microstructure.

  10. Introduction to tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maclagan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Tropical geometry is a combinatorial shadow of algebraic geometry, offering new polyhedral tools to compute invariants of algebraic varieties. It is based on tropical algebra, where the sum of two numbers is their minimum and the product is their sum. This turns polynomials into piecewise-linear functions, and their zero sets into polyhedral complexes. These tropical varieties retain a surprising amount of information about their classical counterparts. Tropical geometry is a young subject that has undergone a rapid development since the beginning of the 21st century. While establishing itself as an area in its own right, deep connections have been made to many branches of pure and applied mathematics. This book offers a self-contained introduction to tropical geometry, suitable as a course text for beginning graduate students. Proofs are provided for the main results, such as the Fundamental Theorem and the Structure Theorem. Numerous examples and explicit computations illustrate the main concepts. Each of t...

  11. Prediction Analysis of Weld-Bead and Heat Affected Zone in TIG welding using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Shamith L.; Kalaichelvi, V.; Karthikeyan, R.

    2018-04-01

    TIG Welding is a high quality form of welding which is very popular in industries. It is one of the few types of welding that can be used to join dissimilar metals. Here a weld joint is formed between stainless steel and monel alloy. It is desired to have control over the weld geometry of such a joint through the adjustment of experimental parameters which are welding current, wire feed speed, arc length and the shielding gas flow rate. To facilitate the automation of the same, a model of the welding system is needed. However the underlying welding process is complex and non-linear, and analytical methods are impractical for industrial use. Therefore artificial neural networks (ANN) are explored for developing the model, as they are well-suited for modelling non-linear multi-variate data. Feed-forward neural networks with backpropagation training algorithm are used, and the data for training the ANN taken from experimental work. There are four outputs corresponding to the weld geometry. Different training and testing phases were carried out using MATLAB software and ANN approximates the given data with minimum amount of error.

  12. IIW guidelines on weld quality in relationship to fatigue strength

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Bertil; Hobbacher, A F; Kassner, M; Marquis, G

    2016-01-01

    This book presents guidelines on quantitative and qualitative measures of the geometric features and imperfections of welds to ensure that it meets the fatigue strength requirements laid out in the recommendations of the IIW (International Institute of Welding). Welds that satisfy these quality criteria can be assessed in accordance with existing IIW recommendations based on nominal stress, structural stress, notch stress or linear fracture mechanics. Further, the book defines more restrictive acceptance criteria based on weld geometry features and imperfections with increased fatigue strength. Fatigue strength for these welds is defined as S-N curves expressed in terms of nominal applied stress or hot spot stress. Where appropriate, reference is made to existing quality systems for welds.In addition to the acceptance criteria and fatigue assessment curves, the book also provides guidance on their inspection and quality control. The successful implementation of these methods depends on adequate training for o...

  13. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  14. Welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Schulze Frielinghaus, W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a survey, with 198 literature references, of the papers published in the fields of welding and cutting within the last three years. The subjects dealt with are: weldability of the materials - Welding methods - Thermal cutting - Shaping and calculation of welded joints - Environmental protection in welding and cutting. (orig.) [de

  15. Laser repair welding of molds with various pulse shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pleterski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Repair welding of cold-work tool steels with conventional methods is very difficult due to cracking during remelting or cladding and is generally performed with preheating. As an alternative, repair welding with laser technology has recently been used. This paper presents the influence of different pulse shapes on welding of such tools with the pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Repair welding tests were carried out on AISI D2 tool steel, quenched and tempered to hardness of 56 HRc, followed by microstructural analysis and investigation of defects with scanning electron microscopy. Test results suggest that it is possible to obtain sound welds without preheating, with the right selection of welding parameters and appropriate pulse shape.

  16. Friction stir welding (FSW process of copper alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miličić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the structure of the weld joint of technically pure copper, which is realized using friction stir welding (FSW. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical processes of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Parameters of the FSW welding technology influencing the zone of the seam material and the mechanical properties of the resulting joint were analyzed. The physical joining consists of intense mixing the base material along the joint line in the “doughy” phase. Substantial plastic deformations immediately beneath the frontal surface of tool provide fine-grained structure and a good quality joint. The optimum shape of the tool and the optimum welding regime (pressure force, rotation speed and the traverse speed of the tool in the heat affected zone enable the achievement of the same mechanical properties as those of the basic material, which justifies its use in welding reliable structures.

  17. Application Regarding the Butt-Welding Through Intermediate Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorel Ene

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available It consists in presenting butt welding procedure through intermediate melting and its usage for manufacturing cutting tools type drill, tap screw, reamer by welding the active part (made of high-speed steel to the tool tail (made of unalloyed steel wit low carbon.

  18. Friction stir spot welding of dissimilar aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozkurt, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) has been proposed as an effective technology to spot weld the so-called “difficult to be welded” metal alloys such as thin sheets aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials. FSSW is derived from friction stir welding technology, its principle benefit being low cost joining, lower welding temperature and shorter welding time than conventional welding methods. In this study, dissimilar AlMg 3 and AlCu 4 Mg 1 aluminium alloy plates were FSSWed by offsetting the low strength sheet on upper side of the weld. The effects of tool rotation speed on the microstructure, lap shear fracture load (LSFL), microhardness and fracture features of the weld are investigated by constant welding parameters. The maximum LSFL was obtained by increasing the tool rotational speed. However, the joints exhibited pull-out nugget fracture mode under lap shear tensile testing conditions. The largest completely bonded zone was observed as 5.86 mm which was narrower at the opposite position of the joint. Key words: friction stir spot welding, aluminium alloys, mechanical properties, dissimilar joint, welding parameters

  19. Advances in automatic welding control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.; Woodacre, A.; Taylor, A.F.

    1972-01-01

    The development at the Reactor Fuel Element Laboratories, UKAEA Springfields, of a computer-based welding process control system, was aimed initially at the TIG welding of the end seals of nuclear fuel elements. The system provides for mixed multi-station operation with on-line real-time capability and can be used either as a research tool or for production requirements at competitive costs. The operation of the control system, the form of power source, and the servo motor control units are described. Typically, continuous or pulse-arc welding sequences can be digitally programmed on 0.1 sec increments, with current in 0.5 A increments up to a maximum of 256 A; up to three servo motors can be operated with speeds selected in 0.1 percent increments of their maximum. Up to six welding parameters can be monitored digitally at speeds from once every 10 msec. Some applications are described and it is shown that the equipment has wider uses outside the nuclear fuel element field. High quality industrial welding requirements can also be met and the system is not limited to the TIG process

  20. Advances in automatic welding control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.; Woodacre, A.; Taylor, A.F.

    1972-01-01

    The development at the Reactor Fuel Element Laboratories, UKAEA Springfields, of a computer-based welding process control system, was aimed initially at the TIG welding of the end seals of nuclear fuel elements. The system provides for mixed multi-station operation with on-line real-time capability and can be used either as a research tool or for production requirements at competitive costs. The operation of the control system, the form of power source and servo motor control units are described. Typically, continuous or pulse-arc welding sequences can be digitally programmed on 0.1 sec increments, with current in 0.5 A increments up to a maximum of 256 A; up to three servo motors can be operated with speeds selected in 0.1% increments of their maximum. Up to six welding parameters can be monitored digitally at speeds from once every 10 msec. Some applications are described and it is shown that the equipment has wider uses outside the nuclear fuel element field. High quality industrial welding requirements can also be met and the system is not limited to the TIG process. (author)

  1. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  2. Pulsed infrared thermography for assessment of ultrasonic welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Megan E.; Rinker, Teresa J.; Sekol, Ryan C.

    2018-03-01

    Battery packs are a critical component in electric vehicles. During pack assembly, the battery cell tab and busbar are ultrasonically welded. The properties of the welds ultimately affect battery pack durability. Quality inspection of these welds is important to ensure durable battery packs. Pack failure is detrimental economically and could also pose a safety hazard, such as thermal runaway. Ultrasonic welds are commonly checked by measuring electrical resistance or auditing using destructive mechanical testing. Resistance measurements are quick, but sensitive to set-up changes. Destructive testing cannot represent the entire weld set. It is possible for a weak weld to satisfy the electrical requirement check, because only sufficient contact between the tabs and busbar is required to yield a low resistance measurement. Laboratory techniques are often not suitable for inline inspection, as they may be time-consuming, use couplant, or are only suitable for coupons. The complex surface geometry also poses difficulties for conventional nondestructive techniques. A method for inspection of ultrasonic welds is proposed using pulsed infrared thermography to identify discrepant welds in a manufacturing environment. Thermal measurements of welds were compared to electrical and mechanical measurements. The heat source distribution was calculated to obtain thermal images with high temporal and spatial resolution. All discrepant welds were readily identifiable using two thermographic techniques: pixel counting and the gradient image. A positive relationship between pixel count and mechanical strength was observed. The results demonstrate the potential of pulsed thermography for inline inspection, which can complement, or even replace, conventional electrical resistance measurements.

  3. A comparative study of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding and TIG welding of thin Ti6Al4V titanium alloy plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a study aiming at comparing properties of the Ti6Al4V titanium alloy joints between pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding and traditional fusion welding. To achieve the research purpose, Ti6Al4V titanium alloy plates with a thickness of 0.8 mm were welded using pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (TIG), respectively. Residual distortions, weld geometry, microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints produced with LBW and TIG welding were compared. During the tensile test, with the aid of a high speed infrared camera, evolution of the plastic strain within tensile specimens corresponding to LBW and TIG welding were recorded and analyzed. Compared with the TIG, the welded joint by LBW has the characters of small overall residual distortion, fine microstructure, narrow heat-affected zone (HAZ), high Vickers hardness. LBW welding method can produce joints with higher strength and ductility. It can be concluded that Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding is much more suitable for welding the thin Ti6Al4V titanium alloy plate than TIG welding.

  4. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  5. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  6. Noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Connes, Alain

    1994-01-01

    This English version of the path-breaking French book on this subject gives the definitive treatment of the revolutionary approach to measure theory, geometry, and mathematical physics developed by Alain Connes. Profusely illustrated and invitingly written, this book is ideal for anyone who wants to know what noncommutative geometry is, what it can do, or how it can be used in various areas of mathematics, quantization, and elementary particles and fields.Key Features* First full treatment of the subject and its applications* Written by the pioneer of this field* Broad applications in mathemat

  7. Intelligent Modeling Combining Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System and Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Welding Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowtham, K. N.; Vasudevan, M.; Maduraimuthu, V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is used as a structural material for steam generator components of power plants. Generally, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding is preferred for welding of these steels in which the depth of penetration achievable during autogenous welding is limited. Therefore, activated flux TIG (A-TIG) welding, a novel welding technique, has been developed in-house to increase the depth of penetration. In modified 9Cr-1Mo steel joints produced by the A-TIG welding process, weld bead width, depth of penetration, and heat-affected zone (HAZ) width play an important role in determining the mechanical properties as well as the performance of the weld joints during service. To obtain the desired weld bead geometry and HAZ width, it becomes important to set the welding process parameters. In this work, adaptative neuro fuzzy inference system is used to develop independent models correlating the welding process parameters like current, voltage, and torch speed with weld bead shape parameters like depth of penetration, bead width, and HAZ width. Then a genetic algorithm is employed to determine the optimum A-TIG welding process parameters to obtain the desired weld bead shape parameters and HAZ width.

  8. Qualification of final closure for disposal container I - applicability of TIG and EBW for overpack welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, H.; Kawahara, K.; Ishii, J.; Shige, T.

    2002-01-01

    Regarding the final sealing technique of the overpack using carbon steel, one of the candidate materials for the disposal container in the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Japan, welding tests were conducted using TIG (GTAW), a typical arc welding process, and electron beam welding (EBW), a high-energy beam welding process. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate the applicability, the scope of the applications and the conditions for the application of the existing techniques; while also examining the welding conditions and the weld quality. Regarding TIG, the optimum welding conditions (the conditions pertaining to the welding procedures and the groove geometry) were checked by using a specimen with a plate thickness of 50 mm, and then circumferential welding tests were conducted for cylindrical specimens with a groove depth of 100 mm and 150 mm. Radiographic testing showed that there was no significant weld defect in the weld and that the welding characteristics were satisfactory. The results of the test of the mechanical properties of the joint were also satisfactory. Measurement of the temperature distribution and the residual stress distribution at the time of the welding was conducted for an evaluation of the residual stress caused by the welding, and an appropriate residual stress analysis method was developed, which confirmed the generation of tensile stress along the circumferential direction of the weld. Then it was pointed out that a necessity of further consideration of how to reduce the stress and to examine the influence that residual stress has on corrosion property. The goal in the EBW test was to achieve a one-pass full penetration welding process for 190 mm while conducting a partial penetration welding test for a welding depth of 80 mm. Subsequent radiographic testing confirmed that there was no significant weld defect. (orig.)

  9. CMS geometry through 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, I; Brownson, E; Eulisse, G; Jones, C D; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Lange, D J

    2014-01-01

    CMS faces real challenges with upgrade of the CMS detector through 2020 and beyond. One of the challenges, from the software point of view, is managing upgrade simulations with the same software release as the 2013 scenario. We present the CMS geometry description software model, its integration with the CMS event setup and core software. The CMS geometry configuration and selection is implemented in Python. The tools collect the Python configuration fragments into a script used in CMS workflow. This flexible and automated geometry configuration allows choosing either transient or persistent version of the same scenario and specific version of the same scenario. We describe how the geometries are integrated and validated, and how we define and handle different geometry scenarios in simulation and reconstruction. We discuss how to transparently manage multiple incompatible geometries in the same software release. Several examples are shown based on current implementation assuring consistent choice of scenario conditions. The consequences and implications for multiple/different code algorithms are discussed.

  10. Modelling the Thermomechanical Conditions in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich

    Friction Stir Welding is a solid-state welding process invented by TWI in 1991. The FSW process is unique in the sense that joining of un-weldable alloys readily can be made. The thermomechanical conditions present in the workpiece during the welding process are of great interest since...... these control the properties of the weld. In the present work, a set of experimental, analytical and numerical analyses are carried out in order to evaluate the thermomechanical conditions descriptive for welding of aluminium, in this case AA2024-T3, under a specific set of welding parameters. Despite...... these specific data, the developed models can be applied for other alloys and welding parameters as well. A detailed experiment is carried out which constitutes the basis for the development and validation of the numerical and analytical models presented in this work. The contact condition at the tool...

  11. Low temperature friction stir welding of P91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Rao Kalvala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bead-on-plate friction stir welds were made on P91 alloy with low and high rotational speeds (100 and 1000 RPM to study their effects on weld microstructural changes and impression creep behavior. Temperatures experienced by the stir zone were recorded at the weld tool tip. Different zones of welds were characterized for their microstructural changes, hardness and creep behavior (by impression creep tests. The results were compared with submerged arc fusion weld. Studies revealed that the stir zone temperature with 100 RPM was well below Ac1 temperature of P91 steel while it was above Ac3 with 1000 RPM. The results suggest that the microstructural degradation in P91 welds can be controlled by low temperature friction stir welding technique.

  12. Projective Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mathematicians are trained to use very precise language, and so find it hard to simplify and state .... thing. If you take a plane on which there are two such triangles which enjoy the above ... within this geometry to simplify things if needed.

  13. Geometry -----------~--------------RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parallel: A pair of lines in a plane is said to be parallel if they do not meet. Mathematicians were at war ... Subsequently, Poincare, Klein, Beltrami and others refined non-. Euclidean geometry. ... plane divides the plane into two half planes and.

  14. Quantification of Microtexture at Weld Nugget of Friction Stir-Welded Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Md M.; Sarkar, R.; Pal, T. K.; Ghosh, M.; Prabhu, N.

    2017-05-01

    Friction stir welding of C-Mn steel was carried out under 800-1400 rpm tool rotation. Tool traversing speed of 50 mm/min remained same for all joints. Effect of thermal state and deformation on texture and microstructure at weld nugget was investigated. Weld nugget consisted of ferrite + bainite/Widmanstatten ferrite with different matrix grain sizes depending on peak temperature. A texture around ( ϕ 2 = 0°, φ = 30°, ϕ 2 = 45°) was developed at weld nugget. Grain boundary misorientation at weld nugget indicated that continuous dynamic recrystallization influenced the development of fine equiaxed grain structure. Pole figures and orientation distribution function were used to determine crystallographic texture at weld nugget and base metal. Shear texture components D1, D2 and F were present at weld nugget. D1 shear texture was more prominent among all. Large number of high-angle grain boundaries ( 60-70%) was observed at weld nugget and was the resultant of accumulation of high amount of dislocation, followed by subgrain formation.

  15. Selected Welding Techniques, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1964-01-01

    Partial contents: CONVENTIONAL WELD JOINTS VERSUS BUTT JOINTS IN 1-INCH ALUMINUM PLATE, SPECIAL WELD JOINT PREPARATION, UPSET METAL EDGES FOR INCREASED WELD JOINT STRENGTH, OUT-OF-POSITION WELDING OF HEAVY GAGE...

  16. Investigation of Laser Welding of Ti Alloys for Cognitive Process Parameters Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizia Caiazzo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding of titanium alloys is attracting increasing interest as an alternative to traditional joining techniques for industrial applications, with particular reference to the aerospace sector, where welded assemblies allow for the reduction of the buy-to-fly ratio, compared to other traditional mechanical joining techniques. In this research work, an investigation on laser welding of Ti–6Al–4V alloy plates is carried out through an experimental testing campaign, under different process conditions, in order to perform a characterization of the produced weld bead geometry, with the final aim of developing a cognitive methodology able to support decision-making about the selection of the suitable laser welding process parameters. The methodology is based on the employment of artificial neural networks able to identify correlations between the laser welding process parameters, with particular reference to the laser power, welding speed and defocusing distance, and the weld bead geometric features, on the basis of the collected experimental data.

  17. Investigation of Laser Welding of Ti Alloys for Cognitive Process Parameters Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Caggiano, Alessandra

    2018-04-20

    Laser welding of titanium alloys is attracting increasing interest as an alternative to traditional joining techniques for industrial applications, with particular reference to the aerospace sector, where welded assemblies allow for the reduction of the buy-to-fly ratio, compared to other traditional mechanical joining techniques. In this research work, an investigation on laser welding of Ti⁻6Al⁻4V alloy plates is carried out through an experimental testing campaign, under different process conditions, in order to perform a characterization of the produced weld bead geometry, with the final aim of developing a cognitive methodology able to support decision-making about the selection of the suitable laser welding process parameters. The methodology is based on the employment of artificial neural networks able to identify correlations between the laser welding process parameters, with particular reference to the laser power, welding speed and defocusing distance, and the weld bead geometric features, on the basis of the collected experimental data.

  18. Numerical estimation of temperature field in a laser welded butt joint made of dissimilar materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saternus Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns numerical analysis of thermal phenomena occurring in the butt welding of two different materials by a laser beam welding. The temperature distribution for the welded butt-joint is obtained on the basis of numerical simulations performed in the ABAQUS program. Numerical analysis takes into account the thermophysical properties of welded plate made of two different materials. Temperature distribution in analysed joints is obtained on the basis of numerical simulation in Abaqus/Standard solver, which allowed the determination of the geometry of laser welded butt-joint.

  19. Automatic welding of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, J.

    1958-01-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [fr

  20. Detecting flaws in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodacre, A.; Lawton, H.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for detecting flaws in welds in a workpiece, the portion of the workpiece containing the weld is maintained at a constant temperature and the weld is scanned by an infra red detector. The weld is then scanned again with the workpiece in contact with a cooling probe to produce a steeper temperature gradient across the weld. Comparison of the signals produced by each scan reveals the existence of defects in the welds. The signals may be displayed on an oscilloscope and the display may be observed by a TV camera and recorded on videotape. (UK)

  1. Fusion welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  2. Weld controller for automated nuclear service welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfield, K.L.; Strubhar, P.M.; Green, D.I.

    1995-01-01

    B and W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) uses many different types of weld heads for automated welding in the commercial nuclear service industry. Some weld heads are purchased as standard items, while others are custom designed and fabricated by BWNT requiring synchronized multiaxis motion control. BWNT recently completed a development program to build a common weld controller that interfaces to all types of weld heads used by BWNT. Their goal was to construct a system that had the flexibility to add different modules to increase the capability of the controller as different application needs become necessary. The benefits from having a common controller are listed. This presentation explains the weld controller system and the types of applications to which it has been applied

  3. Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intended for a one year course, this text serves as a single source, introducing readers to the important techniques and theorems, while also containing enough background on advanced topics to appeal to those students wishing to specialize in Riemannian geometry. This is one of the few Works to combine both the geometric parts of Riemannian geometry and the analytic aspects of the theory. The book will appeal to a readership that have a basic knowledge of standard manifold theory, including tensors, forms, and Lie groups. Important revisions to the third edition include: a substantial addition of unique and enriching exercises scattered throughout the text; inclusion of an increased number of coordinate calculations of connection and curvature; addition of general formulas for curvature on Lie Groups and submersions; integration of variational calculus into the text allowing for an early treatment of the Sphere theorem using a proof by Berger; incorporation of several recent results about manifolds with posit...

  4. Special geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1990-01-01

    A special manifold is an allowed target manifold for the vector multiplets of D=4, N=2 supergravity. These manifolds are of interest for string theory because the moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau threefolds and c=9, (2,2) conformal field theories are special. Previous work has given a local, coordinate-dependent characterization of special geometry. A global description of special geometries is given herein, and their properties are studied. A special manifold M of complex dimension n is characterized by the existence of a holomorphic Sp(2n+2,R)xGL(1,C) vector bundle over M with a nowhere-vanishing holomorphic section Ω. The Kaehler potential on M is the logarithm of the Sp(2n+2,R) invariant norm of Ω. (orig.)

  5. Determination of type, magnitude and direction of residual stresses generated in the welding of AISI H-13 steel with the hole drilling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia; I; Maldonado, C; Bedolla, A; Velez, M; Medina, A; Bejar, L

    2006-01-01

    AISI H-13 steel is considered to be a highly ultra resistant steel because its resistance to stress surpasses 1380 MPa. This steel is widely used in tools that heavily used, especially under high temperatures, such as: awls, molds for pressing, extrusion dies, extrusion tools from heat impact, tools for producing screws, bolts, rivets and taps, molds for centrifugal smelting, tools for presses with shaped pieces, knives for hot cutting, among others. The weldability of AISI H-13 steel is generally poor, but it is possible if the proper precautions are taken. Cracking is perhaps the factor that most limits the weldability of AISI H-13 steel. The tendency to crack during welding for this type of steel occurs in the base metal and the zone close to the supporting material (cold cracking). The interlayer covering technique is used in the repair, welding and recovery of pieces of high alloy steels in order to avoid cracking and to lower the residual stresses generated by obstructed contraction and martensitic transformation. This work defined the type, magnitude and direction of residual stresses at different distances starting from the center of the welded union on the 25.4 mm thick AISI H-13 steel sheet. The welding was carried out in a test piece with Y-Groove geometry following JIS Z 3158 standard, using the SMAW process and an AISI 312 stainless steel interlayer between the base metal and the supporting metal. The hole-drilling method was used to measure the type, magnitude and direction of residual stresses using extensometric gauge rosette CEA-06-062UM-120 and CEA-06-062RE-120 following the guidelines established by ASTM E 837 standard. Based on the relaxed deformations that were measured, the type, magnitude and direction of residual stresses were determined with the H-DRILL residual stress program for biaxial condition. The results indicate that under these welding conditions the residual strains at different distances from the welded union are from stress and

  6. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    improvements for the actual can welding process, however, did not result in an improved weld geometry. Several possibilities for the lack of positive response exist, some of which are that (1) an insufficient number of test articles were welded under prototypic conditions, (2) the process was not optimized so that significant improvements were observable over the 'noise', and (3) the in-situ arc anneal closed the gap down too much so the can was unable to exhaust pressure ahead of the weld. Several operational and mechanical improvements were identified. The weld clamps were changed to a design consistent with those used in the legacy operations. A helium puff operation was eliminated; it is believed that this operation was the cause of the original weld defect. Also, timing of plug mast movement was found to correspond with weld irregularities. The timing of the movement was changed to occur during weld head travel between tacks. In the end a three sequential tack weld process followed by a pulse weld at the same current and travel speed as was used for the legacy processes was suggested for use during the IC qualification effort. Relative to legacy welds, the PDC IC weld demonstrates greater fluctuation in the region of the weld located between tack welds. However, canister weld response (canister to canister) is consistent and with the aid of the optical mapping system (for targeting the cut position) is considered adequate. DR measurements and METs show the PDC IC welds to have sufficient ligament length to ensure adequate canister pressure/impact capacity and to ensure adequate stub function. The PDC welding process has not been optimized as a result of this effort. Differences remain between the legacy BTC welds and the PDC IC weld, but these differences are not sufficient to prevent resumption of the current PDC IC qualification effort. During the PDC IC qualification effort, a total of 17 cans will be welded and a variety of tests/inspections will be

  7. Friction Stir Welding of Al-B4C Composite Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding: Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Faradonbeh, Alireza; Shamanian, Morteza; Edris, Hossein; Paidar, Moslem; Bozkurt, Yahya

    2018-02-01

    In this investigation, friction stir welding (FSW) of Al-B4C composite fabricated by 10 cycles accumulative roll bonding was conducted. In order to investigate the influences of pin geometry on microstructure and mechanical properties, four different pin geometries (cylindrical, square, triangular and hexagonal) were selected. It was found that FSW parameters had a major effect on the fragmentation and distribution of reinforcement particles in stir zone. When the tool travel speed was increased, the distribution of B4C particles was become gradually uniform in the aluminum matrix. The effect of tool rotational speed on the peak temperature was determined to be greater than the tool travel speed. The attained data of tensile properties and microhardness tests showed that the tool travel speed had bilateral effect on the tensile strength. The maximum tensile joint efficiency was obtained as 238% for FSWed of Al-2%B4C composite to annealed base Al sheet.

  8. General Geometry and Geometry of Electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Shahverdiyev, Shervgi S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that Electromagnetism creates geometry different from Riemannian geometry. General geometry including Riemannian geometry as a special case is constructed. It is proven that the most simplest special case of General Geometry is geometry underlying Electromagnetism. Action for electromagnetic field and Maxwell equations are derived from curvature function of geometry underlying Electromagnetism. And it is shown that equation of motion for a particle interacting with electromagnetic...

  9. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  10. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  11. An introduction to incidence geometry

    CERN Document Server

    De Bruyn, Bart

    2016-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to the field of Incidence Geometry by discussing the basic families of point-line geometries and introducing some of the mathematical techniques that are essential for their study. The families of geometries covered in this book include among others the generalized polygons, near polygons, polar spaces, dual polar spaces and designs. Also the various relationships between these geometries are investigated. Ovals and ovoids of projective spaces are studied and some applications to particular geometries will be given. A separate chapter introduces the necessary mathematical tools and techniques from graph theory. This chapter itself can be regarded as a self-contained introduction to strongly regular and distance-regular graphs. This book is essentially self-contained, only assuming the knowledge of basic notions from (linear) algebra and projective and affine geometry. Almost all theorems are accompanied with proofs and a list of exercises with full solutions is given at the end...

  12. Nondestructive testing: welding industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Subramanian, C.V.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter highlights various conventional and advanced nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques that have been used for weld evaluation. Welding Codes and Standards of International and National organisations that have been followed in India for various weld evaluation purposes are also included. The chapter also emphasises the importance of NDT by way of a few case studies that have been carried out on important critical welded components. (author). 12 refs., 17 figs., 1 appendix

  13. Solid state impact welding of BMG and copper by vaporizing foil actuator welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivek, Anupam, E-mail: vivek.4@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Presley, Michael [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Flores, Katharine M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Hutchinson, Nicholas H.; Daehn, Glenn S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    The objective of this study was to create impact welds between a Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) and copper at a laboratory scale and subsequently investigate the relationship between interfacial structure and mechanical properties. Vaporizing Foil Actuator (VFA) has recently been demonstrated as a versatile tool for metalworking applications: impact welding of dissimilar materials being one of them. Its implementation for welding is termed as VFA Welding or VFAW. With 8 kJ input energy into an aluminum foil actuator, a 0.5 mm thick Cu110 alloy sheet was launched toward a BMG target resulting in an impact at a velocity of nearly 600 m/s. For this experiment, the welded interface was straight with a few BMG fragments embedded in the copper sheet in some regions. Hardness tests across the interface showed increase in strength on the copper side. Instrumented peel test resulted in failure in the parent copper sheet. A slower impact velocity during a separate experiment resulted in a weld, which had wavy regions along the interface and in peel failure again happened in the parent copper sheet. Some through-thickness cracks were observed in the BMG plate and there was some spall damage in the copper flyers. TEM electron diffraction on a sample, cut out from the wavy weld interface region using a focused ion beam, showed that devitrification of the BMG was completely avoided in this welding process.

  14. Application of Taguchi approach to optimize friction stir welding parameters of polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bejaoui S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical results of butt friction stir welding of high density polyethylene. The FSW designed tool insulates the welded samples and preserves the heat gained from friction thus avoiding the appearance of blisters and splits after welding. The experimental tests, conducted according to combinations of process factors such as rotation speed, welding speed, pin diameter and hold time at beginning welding, were carried out according the Taguchi orthogonal table L27 in randomized way. Temperatures in the joint during the welding operation and flow stresses from the tensile tests of welded samples were measured and variances were analyzed. Identified models were used to simulate, by finite elements, the tensile tests performed on specimens having a weld cordon in their active area. The results show coherence between the numerical predictions and experimental observations in different cases of weld cordon mechanical behaviour.

  15. Drawing Dynamic Geometry Figures Online with Natural Language for Junior High School Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wing-Kwong; Yin, Sheng-Kai; Yang, Chang-Zhe

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a tool for drawing dynamic geometric figures by understanding the texts of geometry problems. With the tool, teachers and students can construct dynamic geometric figures on a web page by inputting a geometry problem in natural language. First we need to build the knowledge base for understanding geometry problems. With the…

  16. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  17. Laser beam welding of titanium additive manufactured parts

    OpenAIRE

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Jauregui Becker, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the joinability of titanium Additive Manufactured (AM) parts is explored. Keyhole welding, using a pulsed laser beam, of conventionally produced parts is compared to AM parts. Metal AM parts are notorious for having remaining porosities and other non-isotropic properties due to the layered manufacturing process. This study shows that due to these deficiencies more energy per unit weld length is required to obtain a similar keyhole geometry for titanium AM parts. It is also demon...

  18. Method of measuring misalignment of welded threaded connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasatkin, V I

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for measuring misalignment of welded connections by special attachment, superposed indicator. Requirements are analyzed for welding the threaded sleeves established by specifications. It is shown that measurement of the slack only in one section on the selected base is insufficient for monitoring the geometry of the connected pipe parts. It is suggested that in order to evaluate the misalignment the concept of total slack be used and formulas are derived to define it.

  19. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  20. Underwater welding of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  1. Welding Over Paint Primer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Kevin S; Liu, Stephen; Olson, David L

    1998-01-01

    .... According to the hydrogen-oxygen and }hydrogen-fluorine equilibrium considerations, an increase in the partial pressure of oxygen or fluorine could decrease the partial pressure of hydrogen within the welding arc. Consequently, a welding consumable that contains chemical ingredients of high oxygen and fluorine potential would be capable of minimizing hydrogen pick-up in the weld pool.

  2. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    CERN Document Server

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  3. Problems in laser repair welding of polished surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Skumavc

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents problems in laser repair welding of the tools for injection moulding of plastics and light metals. Tools for injection moulding of the car headlamps are highly polished in order to get a desirable quality of the injected part. Different light metals, glasses, elastomers, thermoplastics and thermosetting polymers are injected into the die cavity under high pressures resulting in the surface damages of the tool. Laser welding is the only suitable repair welding technique due to the very limited sputtering during deposition of the filler metal. Overlapping of the welds results in inhomogeneous hardness of the remanufactured surface. Results have shown strong correlation between hardness and surface waviness after final polishing of the repair welded surface.

  4. Automatic weld torch guidance control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaith, H. E.; Wall, W. A.; Burns, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A highly reliable, fully digital, closed circuit television optical, type automatic weld seam tracking control system was developed. This automatic tracking equipment is used to reduce weld tooling costs and increase overall automatic welding reliability. The system utilizes a charge injection device digital camera which as 60,512 inidividual pixels as the light sensing elements. Through conventional scanning means, each pixel in the focal plane is sequentially scanned, the light level signal digitized, and an 8-bit word transmitted to scratch pad memory. From memory, the microprocessor performs an analysis of the digital signal and computes the tracking error. Lastly, the corrective signal is transmitted to a cross seam actuator digital drive motor controller to complete the closed loop, feedback, tracking system. This weld seam tracking control system is capable of a tracking accuracy of + or - 0.2 mm, or better. As configured, the system is applicable to square butt, V-groove, and lap joint weldments.

  5. Risk communication concerning welding fumes for the primary preventive care of welding apprentices in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Vaz, Joana Cezar

    2015-01-19

    This study's aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% confidence interval and 5% (p ≤ 0.05) significance level. Significant association was found between perceptions of worsened symptoms of respiratory disorders caused by welding fumes and educational level (p = 0.049), the use of goggles to protect against ultraviolet rays (p = 0.023), and access to services in private health facilities without insurance coverage (p = 0.001). Apprentices younger than 25 years old were 4.9 times more likely to perceive worsened cardiovascular symptoms caused by welding fumes after risk communication (RR = 4.91; CI 95%: 1.09 to 22.2). The conclusion is that risk communication as a primary preventive measure in continuing education processes implemented among apprentices, who are future welders, was efficacious. Thus, this study confirms that risk communication can be implemented as a primary prevention tool in welding apprenticeships.

  6. Pulse current gas metal arc welding characteristics, control and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Prakriti Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is a first-of-its-kind compilation on high deposition pulse current GMAW process. The nine chapters of this monograph may serve as a comprehensive knowledge tool to use advanced welding engineering in prospective applications. The contents of this book will prove useful to the shop floor welding engineer in handling this otherwise critical welding process with confidence. It will also serve to inspire researchers to think critically on more versatile applications of the unique nature of pulse current in GMAW process to develop cutting edge welding technology.

  7. Unraveling the Processing Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is translated along a weld seam, literally stirring the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path or paths is required. In this study, various markers are used to trace the flow paths of the metal. X-ray radiographs record the segmentation and position of the wire. Several variations in the trajectories can be differentiated within the weld zone.

  8. Process Model for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new process being applied for joining of metal alloys. The process was initially developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The FSW process is being investigated at NASA/MSEC as a repair/initial weld procedure for fabrication of the super-light-weight aluminum-lithium shuttle external tank. The FSW investigations at MSFC were conducted on a horizontal mill to produce butt welds of flat plate material. The weldment plates are butted together and fixed to a backing plate on the mill bed. A pin tool is placed into the tool holder of the mill spindle and rotated at approximately 400 rpm. The pin tool is then plunged into the plates such that the center of the probe lies at, one end of the line of contact, between the plates and the shoulder of the pin tool penetrates the top surface of the weldment. The weld is produced by traversing the tool along the line of contact between the plates. A lead angle allows the leading edge of the shoulder to remain above the top surface of the plate. The work presented here is the first attempt at modeling a complex phenomenon. The mechanical aspects of conducting the weld process are easily defined and the process itself is controlled by relatively few input parameters. However, in the region of the weld, plasticizing and forging of the parent material occurs. These are difficult processes to model. The model presented here addresses only variations in the radial dimension outward from the pin tool axis. Examinations of the grain structure of the weld reveal that a considerable amount of material deformation also occurs in the direction parallel to the pin tool axis of rotation, through the material thickness. In addition, measurements of the axial load on the pin tool demonstrate that the forging affect of the pin tool shoulder is an important process phenomenon. Therefore, the model needs to be expanded to account for the deformations through the material thickness and the

  9. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the ma...... electron microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction. Microhardness measurements and lap-shear tensile tests completed the investigations of the welded samples and allow evaluation of the quality of the welds.......In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the main...... parameters to control friction stir welding, the influence of the rotational speed of the tool was investigated. Three different rotational speeds (500 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1500 rpm, respectively) were applied. The microstructure of the welded samples was investigated with reflected light microscopy, scanning...

  10. 3D finite element simulation of TIG weld pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X.; Asserin, O.; Gounand, S.; Gilles, P.; Bergheau, J. M.; Medale, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a three-dimensional weld pool model for the moving gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, in order to understand the main factors that limit the weld quality and improve the productivity, especially with respect to the welding speed. Simulation is a very powerful tool to help in understanding the physical phenomena in the weld process. A 3D finite element model of heat and fluid flow in weld pool considering free surface of the pool and traveling speed has been developed for the GTAW process. Cast3M software is used to compute all the governing equations. The free surface of the weld pool is calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. The combined effects of surface tension gradient, buoyancy force, arc pressure, arc drag force to drive the fluid flow is included in our model. The deformation of the weld pool surface and the welding speed affect fluid flow, heat flow and thus temperature gradients and molten pool dimensions. Welding trials study is presented to compare our numerical results with macrograph of the molten pool.

  11. Orbital welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The TIG (Tungsten-inert gas) orbital welding technique is applied in all areas of pipe welding. The process is mainly used for austenitic and ferritic materials but also for materials like aluminium, nickel, and titanium alloys are commonly welded according to this technique. Thin-walled as well as thick-walled pipes are welded economically. The application of orbital welding is of particular interest in the area of maintenance of thick-walled pipes that is described in this article. (orig.) [de

  12. Friction stir welding of Aluminium matrix composites – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanya Prabhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is established as one of the prominent welding techniques to join aluminium matrix composites (AMCs. It is a solid state welding process, takes place well below the melting temperature of the material, eliminates the detrimental effects of conventional fusion welding process. Although the process is capable to join AMCs, challenges are still open that need to be fulfill to widen its applications. This paper gives the outline of the friction stir welding technique used to join AMCs. Effect of process variables on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints, behavior of reinforcing materials during welding, effect of tool profiles on the joint strength are discussed in detail. Few improvements and direction for future research are also proposed.

  13. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  14. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  15. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  16. Phased array ultrasound testing on complex geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuan Arif Tuan Mat; Khazali Mohd Zin

    2009-01-01

    Phase array ultrasonic inspection is used to investigate its response to complex welded joints geometry. A 5 MHz probe with 64 linear array elements was employed to scan mild steel T-joint, nozzle and node samples. These samples contain many defects such as cracks, lack of penetration and lack of fusion. Ultrasonic respond is analysed and viewed using the Tomoview software. The results show the actual phase array images on respective types of defect. (author)

  17. Investigation on edge joints of Inconel 625 sheets processed with laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, F.; Alfieri, V.; Cardaropoli, F.; Sergi, V.

    2017-08-01

    Laser welding of Inconel 625 edge joint beads in square groove configuration was investigated. The use of different weld geometries in new aerospace solutions explains research on edge joints. A structured plan was carried out in order to characterize the process defining the influence of laser power and welding speed and to study possible interactions among the governing factors. As weld pool protection is crucial in order to obtain sound joints when processing superalloys, a special glove box for gas supply was designed to upgrade the welding head. Welded joints were characterized referring to bead profile, microstructure and X-rays. It was found that heat input plays an important role as it affects welding stability, porosity content and bead shape. Results suggest operating with low values of heat input to reduce porosity and guarantee stable bead conformation. Furthermore, a decrease in the grain size has been observed as a consequence of decreasing heat input.

  18. Advantages and successful use of TIG narrow-gap welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehberg, R.; Pellkofer, D.; Schmidt, J.

    1986-01-01

    Narrow-gap welding, an advancement of the mechanized TIG impulse welding process with conventional seam geometry (V-shaped and/or U-shaped welds), not only assures great economic efficiency on account of the low weld volume but also offers considerable benefits in terms of quality. Thanks to the low number of beads, the following advantages are gained: less axial and radial shrinkage which reduces the strain in the root area, total heat input and, thus, the dwell time in the critical temperature range from 500 to 800 0 C leading to a chromium depletion at the grain boundaries during the welding process is minimized which markedly reduces the sensitivity of non-stabilized steels to intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking, and a relatively favourable residual welding stress profile in the heat affected zone. The process was used successfully in the past for welds of ferritic and austenitic steel pipes in the construction of nuclear power plants and in the remote-controlled welding during the replacement of piping in plants already in operation. (orig.) [de

  19. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu, Jr.

    2013-12-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu-Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu-Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint.

  20. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu Jr

    2013-01-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu–Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu–Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint. (paper)

  1. Modeling and validation of multiple joint reflections for ultra- narrow gap laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewski, J.; Keel, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sklar, E. [Opticad Corp., Santa Fe, New Mexico (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The effects of multiple internal reflections within a laser weld joint as a function of joint geometry and processing conditions have been characterized. A computer model utilizing optical ray tracing is used to predict the reflective propagation of laser beam energy focused into the narrow gap of a metal joint for the purpose of predicting the location of melting and coalescence which form the weld. The model allows quantitative analysis of the effects of changes to joint geometry, laser design, materials and processing variables. This analysis method is proposed as a way to enhance process efficiency and design laser welds which display deep penetration and high depth to width aspect ratios, reduced occurrence of defects and enhanced melting. Of particular interest to laser welding is the enhancement of energy coupling to highly reflective materials. The weld joint is designed to act as an optical element which propagates and concentrates the laser energy deep within the joint to be welded. Experimentation has shown that it is possible to produce welds using multiple passes to achieve deep penetration and high depth to width aspect ratios without the use of filler material. The enhanced laser melting and welding of aluminum has been demonstrated. Optimization through modeling and experimental validation has resulted in the development of a laser welding process variant we refer to as Ultra-Narrow Gap Laser Welding.

  2. Nd:YAG laser welding of aerospace grade ZE41A magnesium alloy: Modeling and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kazzaz, H.; Medraj, M.; Cao, X.; Jahazi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Keyhole formation as well as the geometry of weld profiles during Nd:YAG laser welding of ZE41A-T5 were studied through combining various models and concepts. The results indicated that weld width and fusion area decrease with increasing welding speed. In the case of partially penetrated welding, penetration depth decreases with increasing welding speed. Also, the model predicted that excessive decrease in laser power or increase in defocusing distance decreases surface power density, thereby changing the welding mode from fully penetrated keyhole, to partially penetrated keyhole, and then to the conduction mode. The predicted conditions for keyhole stability and welding modes as well as the weld profiles for various processing conditions were validated by some selected welding experiments. These experiments included studying the effects of welding speed, laser power, joint gap and laser defocusing on the weld geometry of 2- and 6-mm butt joints or bead-on-plates of ZE41A-T5 sand castings using a continuous wave 4 kW Nd:YAG laser system and 1.6-mm EZ33A-T5 filler wire. Good agreements were found between the model predictions and experimental results indicating the validity of the assumptions made for the development of the model

  3. Research on Heat Source Model and Weld Profile for Fiber Laser Welding of A304 Stainless Steel Thin Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhi Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A heat source model is the key issue for laser welding simulation. The Gaussian heat source model is not suitable to match the actual laser weld profile accurately. Furthermore, fiber lasers are widely recognized to result in good-quality laser beam output, a narrower weld zone, less distortion, and high process efficiency, compared with other types of lasers (such as CO2, Nd : YAG, and diode lasers. At present, there are few heat source models for fiber laser welding. Most of researchers evaluate the weld profile only by the bead width and depth of penetration, which is not suitable for the laser keyhole welding nail-like profile. This paper reports an experimental study and FEA simulation of fiber laser butt welding on 1 mm thick A304 stainless steel. A new heat source model (cylindrical and cylindrical is established to match the actual weld profile using Marc and Fortran software. Four bead geometry parameters (penetration depth, bead width, waist width, and depth of the waist are used to compare between the experimental and simulation results. The results show that the heat source model of cylindrical and cylindrical can match the actual shape of the fiber laser welding feasibly. The error range of the penetration depth, bead width, waist width, and depth of the waist between experimental and simulation results is about 4.1 ± 1.6%, 2.9 ± 2.0%, 13.6 ± 7.4/%, and 18.3 ± 8.0%, respectively. In addition, it is found that the depth of penetration is more sensitive to laser power rather than bead width, waist width, and depth of the waist. Welding speed has a similar influence on the depth of penetration, weld width, waist width, and depth of the waist.

  4. Topology and geometry for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, Charles

    1983-01-01

    Differential geometry and topology are essential tools for many theoretical physicists, particularly in the study of condensed matter physics, gravity, and particle physics. Written by physicists for physics students, this text introduces geometrical and topological methods in theoretical physics and applied mathematics. It assumes no detailed background in topology or geometry, and it emphasizes physical motivations, enabling students to apply the techniques to their physics formulas and research. ""Thoroughly recommended"" by The Physics Bulletin, this volume's physics applications range fr

  5. Effect of Thread and Rotating Speed on Material Flow Behavior and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Lap Welding Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shude; Li, Zhengwei; Zhou, Zhenlu; Wu, Baosheng

    2017-10-01

    This study focused on the effects of thread on hook and cold lap formation, lap shear property and impact toughness of alclad 2024-T4 friction stir lap welding (FSLW) joints. Except the traditional threaded pin tool (TR-tool), three new tools with different thread locations and orientations were designed. Results showed that thread significantly affected hook, cold lap morphologies and lap shear properties. The tool with tip-threaded pin (T-tool) fabricated joint with flat hook and cold lap, which resulted in shear fracture mode. The tools with bottom-threaded pin (B-tool) eliminated the hook. The tool with reverse-threaded pin (R-tool) widened the stir zone width. When using configuration A, the joints fabricated by the three new tools showed higher failure loads than the joint fabricated by the TR-tool. The joint using the T-tool owned the optimum impact toughness. This study demonstrated the significance of thread during FSLW and provided a reference to optimize tool geometry.

  6. The investigation of typical welding defects for 5456 aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huabin; Yan Keng; Lin Tao; Chen Shanben; Jiang Chengyu; Zhao Yong

    2006-01-01

    The external factors on the friction stir welding defects are so abundant that the experiments of friction stir welding were conducted for 5456 aluminum alloy. With the changes of the tool tilt angle and material condition, defects can be generated. These defects can be conventional ones (lack of penetration or voids), or lazy S, which are unique to friction stir welding. However, the origin of the defects remains an area of uncertainty. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate the formation of these defects. The typical welding defects of friction stir welding joint for 5456 aluminum alloy were analyzed and discussed, respectively, by using optical microscopy (OM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microscopic examination of the nugget zone and fracture location of the weld confirms that the tilt angle can change the plastic material flow patterns in the stir zone and accordingly control the weld properties. In addition, the oxide layer from the initial butt surface during FSW is dispersed at the grain boundary. These A1 2 O 3 particles are actually the major cause of failure of the joint

  7. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  8. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  9. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  10. Automatization of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Tomita, Jinji; Nishihara, Katsunori.

    1978-01-01

    Automatization of welding is one of the effective measures for securing high degree of quality of nuclear power equipment, as well as for correspondence to the environment at the site of plant. As the latest ones of the automatic welders practically used for welding of nuclear power apparatuses in factories of Toshiba and IHI, those for pipes and lining tanks are described here. The pipe welder performs the battering welding on the inside of pipe end as the so-called IGSCC countermeasure and the succeeding butt welding through the same controller. The lining tank welder is able to perform simultaneous welding of two parallel weld lines on a large thin plate lining tank. Both types of the welders are demonstrating excellent performance at the shops as well as at the plant site. (author)

  11. Monitoring of Defects in a Pipe Weld by a Comparison of Magnetostrictive Guided Wave Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Yong-Moo; Oh, Se-Beom; Lee, Duck-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study a computer program for an accurate comparison and subtraction of guided wave signals were developed. The program contains an algorithm for calibration with the flight time and phases of ultrasonic signals in the time domain. Once the reference signals were acquired at the beginning of the monitoring, the signals can be compared to the reference. The signals due to the geometry can be eliminated clearly and an evolution of defect in a pipe can be monitored accurately. In order to improve the detectability and solve the problems of the guided wave methods, a magnetostrictive guided wave sensor technique was proposed. Because the waveforms by the magnetostrictive sensors are quite clear and repeatable, it is possible to detect the defects at the weld regions or even monitor the small variations of the defects after a permanent installation of the magnetostrictive strip sensors. In order to eliminate the signals from the geometry, such as weld, pipe support, branch connection, a computer algorithm and program were developed. A notch with 1.5% of CSA of the pipe can be detected with increased accuracy. The guided wave monitoring technique developed in this study can be a promising tool for inspection of the pipe with limited accessibility, such as insulated or buried pipe

  12. Monitoring of Defects in a Pipe Weld by a Comparison of Magnetostrictive Guided Wave Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Yong-Moo; Oh, Se-Beom; Lee, Duck-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study a computer program for an accurate comparison and subtraction of guided wave signals were developed. The program contains an algorithm for calibration with the flight time and phases of ultrasonic signals in the time domain. Once the reference signals were acquired at the beginning of the monitoring, the signals can be compared to the reference. The signals due to the geometry can be eliminated clearly and an evolution of defect in a pipe can be monitored accurately. In order to improve the detectability and solve the problems of the guided wave methods, a magnetostrictive guided wave sensor technique was proposed. Because the waveforms by the magnetostrictive sensors are quite clear and repeatable, it is possible to detect the defects at the weld regions or even monitor the small variations of the defects after a permanent installation of the magnetostrictive strip sensors. In order to eliminate the signals from the geometry, such as weld, pipe support, branch connection, a computer algorithm and program were developed. A notch with 1.5% of CSA of the pipe can be detected with increased accuracy. The guided wave monitoring technique developed in this study can be a promising tool for inspection of the pipe with limited accessibility, such as insulated or buried pipe.

  13. Mechanical Behaviour Investigation Of Aluminium Alloy Tailor Welded Blank Developed By Using Friction Stir Welding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Anggono, Agus; Sugito, Bibit; Hariyanto, Agus; Subroto; Sarjito

    2017-10-01

    The objective on the research was to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructure of tailor welded blank (TWB) made from AA6061-T6 and AA1100 using friction stir welding (FSW) process. Due to the dissimilar mechanical properties of the two aluminium alloys, microhardness test was conducted to measure the hardness distribution across the weld nugget. The mixing of two distinct materials was influenced by tool rotation speed. Therefore, microstructure analysis was carried out to investigate the grain size and shape. The grain size of AA6061-T6 has increased in the heat affected zone (HAZ) while for AA1100 has decreased. In the weld nugget, it has found a hook defects in the dissimilar aluminium joining. By using monotonic tensile load, the different weld line direction was observed with the expansion in tool rotation. The joints failure were consistently on the area of AA1100 series. Furthermore, two specimens were investigated, one through the dissimilar aluminium and the other through similiar material. Inspection of the weld nugget hardness was shown that nonhomogen material intermixing during the stiring process as confirmed by microhardness measurement.

  14. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  15. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  16. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  17. Use of servo controlled weld head for end closure welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, S.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Rao, A.; Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    In the PHWR fuel fabrication line resistance welding processes are used for joining various zirconium based alloy components to fuel tube of similar material. The quality requirement of these welding processes is very stringent and has to meet all the product requirements. At present these welding processes are being carried out by using standard resistance welding machines. In the resistance welding process in addition to current and time, force is one of the critical and important parameter, which influences the weld quality. At present advanced feed back type fast response medium frequency weld controllers are being used. This has upslope/down slope, constant and repetitive weld pattern selection features makes this critical welding process more reliable. Compared to weld controllers, squeeze force application devices are limited and normally standard high response pneumatic cylinders are used in the welding process. With this type of devices the force is constant during welding process and cannot be varied during welding process as per the material deformation characteristics. Similarly due to non-availability of feed back systems in the squeeze force application systems restricts the accuracy and quality of the welding process. In the present paper the influence of squeeze force pattern on the weld quality using advanced feed back type servo based force control system was studied. Different squeeze forces were used during pre and post weld heat periods along with constant force and compared with the weld quality. (author)

  18. Development of the geometry database for the CBM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishina, E. P.; Alexandrov, E. I.; Alexandrov, I. N.; Filozova, I. A.; Friese, V.; Ivanov, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper describes the current state of the Geometry Database (Geometry DB) for the CBM experiment. The main purpose of this database is to provide convenient tools for: (1) managing the geometry modules; (2) assembling various versions of the CBM setup as a combination of geometry modules and additional files. The CBM users of the Geometry DB may use both GUI (Graphical User Interface) and API (Application Programming Interface) tools for working with it.

  19. Behaviour under fatigue of AISI 304-L stainless steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scal, M.W.; Joia, C.J.B.M.; Sousa e Silva, A.S. de

    1979-01-01

    The fatigue behaviour at room temperature of AISI-304-L stainless steel welded joints obtained by two distinct welding methods was studied. The results obtained were compared to those characteristic of the base metal. The welded joint fatigue samples were rectified in order to eliminate the effect of the welded seam geometry. It was concluded that the mechanisms of fatigue crack start in this case is commanded by the austenitic matrix, there being no influence of the delta ferrite rate and distribution present at the melted zone. (Author) [pt

  20. Hot-crack test for aluminium alloys welds using TIG process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niel, A.; Deschaux-Beaume, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.

    2010-06-01

    Hot cracking is a critical defect frequently observed during welding of aluminium alloys. In order to better understand the interaction between cracking phenomenon, process parameters, mechanical factors and microstructures resulting from solidification after welding, an original hot-cracking test during welding is developed. According to in-situ observations and post mortem analyses, hot cracking mechanisms are investigated, taking into account the interaction between microstructural parameters, depending on the thermal cycles, and mechanical parameters, depending on geometry and clamping conditions of the samples and on the thermal field on the sample. Finally, a process map indicating the limit between cracking and non-cracking zones according to welding parameters is presented.

  1. An investigation of fusion zone microstructures in electron beam welding of copper-stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnabosco, I.; Ferro, P.; Bonollo, F.; Arnberg, L.

    2006-01-01

    The article presents a study of three different welded joints produced by electron beam welding dissimilar materials. The junctions were obtained between copper plates and three different austenitic stainless steel plates. Different welding parameters were used according to the different thicknesses of the samples. Morphological, microstructural and mechanical (micro-hardness test) analyses of the weld bead were carried out. The results showed complex heterogeneous fusion zone microstructures characterized both by rapid cooling and poor mixing of the materials which contain main elements which are mutually insoluble. Some defects such as porosity and microfissures were also found. They are mainly due to the process and geometry parameters

  2. Advanced 3D tools used in reverse engineering and ray tracing simulation of phased array inspection of turbine components with complex geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daks, W.; Kovacshazy, C.; Mair, D.; Ciorau, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the practical aspects of reverse engineering and the integration of multiple pieces of software (Drafting, CNC Machining, Ray Tracing, Inspection Simulation Scenario and Phased Array UT Analysis), in order to inspect turbine components comprised of complex geometry. The CNC software, Mastercam, and design software, CADKEY/FastSURF, were used to validate the phased-array automated and manual inspection of blade root, rotor steeples and disk-blade rim attachment. The integration of a 3D part in the software engine, Imagine 3D and SimScan, as well as Tomoview analysis (specimen feature) is based on CADKEY Developer Kit - IGES/SAT file format. A generic Ray Tracing simulation for multi-probe beam was integrated into Imagine 3D. Representative examples of reference blocks and mock-ups, UT simulation and phased-array data comparison are presented. (author)

  3. Effect of process control mode on weld quality of friction stir welded plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Sorour, Sherif; Alian, Ahmed R. [Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process which requires no filler material where the heat input is generated by frictional energy between the tool and workpiece. The objective of the present work is to conduct a fully coupled thermomechanical finite element analysis based on Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation for both 'Force-Controlled' and 'Displacement-Controlled' FSW process to provide more detailed insight of their effect on the resulting joint quality. The developed finite element models use Johnson- Cook material model and temperature dependent physical properties for the welded plates. Efforts on proper modeling of the underlying process physics are done focusing on the heat generation of the tool/workpiece interface to overcome the shortcomings of previous investigations. Finite elements results show that 'Force-Controlled' FSW process provides better joint quality especially at higher traveling speed of the tool which comes to an agreement with published experimental results.

  4. Welding simulation and fatigue assessment of tubular K-joints in high-strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamiri Akhlaghi, F.

    2014-01-01

    conducted to evaluate the residual stress field in the gap region of K-joint, which was critical location for fatigue cracking. Transversal residual stresses of up to 0.60f_y nominal were registered at some depth from the surface of the chord. The σ_r_e_s l_y ratio for the high strength steel S690QH was lower than similar measurements previously done by Acevedo (2011) on steel grade S355J2H. This is believed to be mainly due to welding with low heat input and solid-state phase transformations in high strength steel material. Microstructural changes in the heat affected zone (HAZ) for low alloy carbon steels favorably act in reducing tensile residual stresses by adding compressive residual stresses during part of cooling. These effects were modelled numerically using a coupled thermal mechanical- metallurgical analysis of welding process. Welding sequence was registered and temperature data acquired during fabrication stage of the test trusses; they were employed for creation of calculation model. There has been considerable progress in the methods and tools for computational weld modelling since early 90’s, from 2D to 3D possibilities. Since welded details involved in structural engineering design have generally complex shapes, one major objective of this study was to apply the state of the art in weld modelling into a purposely-selected complex detail with several weld passes. This led to recommendations regarding modelling procedures and simplifying assumptions, as well as FEM practical issues that arise for the case of such intricate geometries. Investigated parameters include weld pass reduction by lumping, welding start/stop positions, and microstructural transformation assumptions. Finally, an extended finite element model (XFEM) was used for fatigue crack propagation analysis in 3D in a K-joint under combined effect of external compressive loading and tensile residual stresses at crack site. Limitations of the utilized finite element code were identified and

  5. Integral geometry and valuations

    CERN Document Server

    Solanes, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Valuations are finitely additive functionals on the space of convex bodies. Their study has become a central subject in convexity theory, with fundamental applications to integral geometry. In the last years there has been significant progress in the theory of valuations, which in turn has led to important achievements in integral geometry. This book originated from two courses delivered by the authors at the CRM and provides a self-contained introduction to these topics, covering most of the recent advances. The first part, by Semyon Alesker, is devoted to the theory of convex valuations, with emphasis on the latest developments. A special focus is put on the new fundamental structures of the space of valuations discovered after Alesker's irreducibility theorem. Moreover, the author describes the newly developed theory of valuations on manifolds. In the second part, Joseph H. G. Fu gives a modern introduction to integral geometry in the sense of Blaschke and Santaló, based on the notions and tools presented...

  6. Development of Stand Alone Application Tool for Processing and Quality Measurement of Weld Imperfection Image Captured by μ-Focused Digital Radiography Using MATLAB- Based Graphical User Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PZ Nadila

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital radiography incresingly is being applied in the fabrication industry. Compared to film- based radiography, digitally radiographed images can be acquired with less time and fewer exposures. However, noises can simply occur on the digital image resulting in a low-quality result. Due to this and the system’s complexity, parameters’ sensitivity, and environmental effects, the results can be difficult to interpret, even for a radiographer. Therefore, the need of an application tool to improve and evaluate the image is becoming urgent. In this research, a user-friendly tool for image processing and image quality measurement was developed. The resulting tool contains important components needed by radiograph inspectors in analyzing defects and recording the results. This tool was written by using image processing and the graphical user interface development environment and compiler (GUIDE toolbox available in Matrix Laboratory (MATLAB R2008a. In image processing methods, contrast adjustment, and noise removal, edge detection was applied. In image quality measurement methods, mean square error (MSE, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR, modulation transfer function (MTF, normalized signal-to-noise ratio (SNRnorm, sensitivity and unsharpness were used to measure the image quality. The graphical user interface (GUI wass then compiled to build a Windows, stand-alone application that enables this tool to be executed independently without the installation of MATLAB.

  7. Fatigue Assessment of High Strength Steel Welded Joints Under Bending Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myeong-Woo; Kim, Yun-Jae; Park, Jun-Hyub

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a fatigue assessment method for vehicle suspension systems having welded geometries was established under a bending loading condition. For the fatigue life estimation of the actual product s welded joints made of different steels, bending fatigue tests were performed on welded specimens with a simplified shape for obtaining the moment-fatigue-life plot. Further, geometry modeling of the simplified welded specimens was conducted. Results of finite element analysis were used to obtain the stress-fatigue-life plot. The analysis results were also used to calculate the stress concentration factors for notch-factor-based fatigue life estimation. The test results were compared with results of the general notch-factor-based fatigue life estimation for improving fatigue assessment. As a result, it was concluded that both the welded fatigue tests and the notch-factor-based fatigue life estimation are necessary for accurate fatigue assessment

  8. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A., E-mail: eak@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Andrey I., E-mail: dmitr@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G., E-mail: sp@ms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  9. Results of ITER toroidal field coil cover plate welding test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Norikiyo; Matsui, Kunihiro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Hideo; Iijima, Ami; Makino, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    In ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils, cover plates (CP) are welded to the teeth of the radial plate (RP) to fix conductors in the grooves of the RP. Though the total length of the welds is approximately 1.5 km and the height and width of the RP are 14 and 9 m, respectively, welding deformation of smaller than 1 mm for local out-of-plane distortion and smaller than several millimeters for in-plane deformation is required. Therefore, laser welding is used for CP welding to reduce welding deformation as much as possible. However, the gap in welding joints is expected to be a maximum of 0.5 mm. Thus, a laser welding technique to enable welding of joints with a gap of 0.5 mm in width has been developed. Applying this technology, a CP welding trial using an RP mock-up was successfully performed. The achieved local flatness, that is, the flatness of the cross-section of the RP mock-up, is 0.6 mm. The analysis using inherent strains, which are derived from the welding test using flat plates, also indicates that better local flatness can be achieved if the initial distortion is zero. In addition, the welding deformation of a full-scale RP is evaluated via analysis using the inherent strain. The analytical results show that in-plane deformation is approximately 5 mm and large out-of-plane deformation, consisting of approximately 5 mm-long wave distortion and a twist of approximately 1.5 mm in the RP cross-section, is generated. It is expected that the required profile can be achieved by determining the original geometry of an RP by simulating deformation during welding. It is also expected that the required local flatness of a DP can be achieved, since out-of-plane deformation can be reduced by increasing the number of RPs turned over during CP welding. A more detailed study is required. (author)

  10. Numerical Simulation on the Origin of Solidification Cracking in Laser Welded Thick-Walled Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Bakir

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the main factors affecting the use of lasers in the industry for welding thick structures is the process accompanying solidification cracks. These cracks mostly occurring along the welding direction in the welding center, and strongly affect the safety of the welded components. In the present study, to obtain a better understanding of the relation between the weld pool geometry, the stress distribution and the solidification cracking, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD model was combined with a thermo-mechanical model. The CFD model was employed to analyze the flow of the molten metal in the weld pool during the laser beam welding process. The weld pool geometry estimated from the CFD model was used as a heat source in the thermal model to calculate the temperature field and the stress development and distributions. The CFD results showed a bulging region in the middle depth of the weld and two narrowing areas separating the bulging region from the top and bottom surface. The thermo-mechanical simulations showed a concentration of tension stresses, transversally and vertically, directly after the solidification during cooling in the region of the solidification cracking.

  11. Multi-pass TIG welding process: simulating thermal SS304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harinadh, Vemanaboina; Akella, S.; Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Edision, G.

    2015-01-01

    Welding is basic requirement in the construction of nuclear reactors, power plants and structural components development. A basic studies on various aspects of the welding is essential to ensure the stability and structural requirement conditions. The present study explored the thermo-mechanical analysis of the multipass welds of austenitic stainless steels which are widely used in fusion and fission reactor components development. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model is developed to investigate thermally induced stress field during TIG welding process for SS304 material. The transient thermal analysis is performed to obtain the temperature history, which then is applied to the mechanical (stress) analysis. The present thermal analysis is conducted using element type DC3D8. This element type has a three dimensional thermal conduction capability and eight nodes. The 6 mm thick plated is welded with six numbers of passes. The geometry and meshed model with tetrahedral shape with volume sweep. The analysis is on TIG welding process using 3D-weld interface plug-in on ABAQUS-6.14. The results are reported in the present paper

  12. Study on the Joining Strength of Spot Welding using POMISPOT Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Azhar Ahmad; Siti Aiasah Hashim; Mohd Rizal Chulan

    2015-01-01

    Welding is a process to join metals. Spot welding is commonly used for specific purposes such joining in small areas or making temporary joints. POMISPOT is a spot welder that was designed and built by the ADC group, using capacitive resistance method. This study was made to obtain the welding strength that can be made by this spot welder. The study used stainless steel pieces of different thickness and by varying the applied voltage. The strength of welded pieces is tested by applying loads. The relationship between the thickness, voltage and welding strength will be used as the basis of specifications of this tool. (author)

  13. Influence of Processing Parameters on the Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid phase welding process that unites thermal and mechanical aspects to produce a high quality joint. The process variables are rpm, translational weld speed, and downward plunge force. The strain-temperature history of a metal element at each point on the cross-section of the weld is determined by the individual flow path taken by the particular filament of metal flowing around the tool as influenced by the process variables. The resulting properties of the weld are determined by the strain-temperature history. Thus to control FSW properties, improved understanding of the processing parameters on the metal flow path is necessary.

  14. EFFECT OF PRE-HEAT TREATMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Ti-6Al-4V WELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnofam Jacques TCHEIN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here is related to the optimization of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW process. The objective is to study the influence of some parameters used in the production of welded joints by FSW. The most important parameters are the welding speed and the rotational speed of the tool. The effect of pre-heat treatment on the plates to be welded is also studied by the design of experimental methods. These pre-heat treatments result not only in a change of mechanical properties of plates to be welded, but also of their microstructure. The experiments were performed following a 16 lines fractional Taguchi table.

  15. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  16. Canonical differential geometry of string backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, Frederic P.; Wohlfarth, Mattias N.R.

    2006-01-01

    String backgrounds and D-branes do not possess the structure of Lorentzian manifolds, but that of manifolds with area metric. Area metric geometry is a true generalization of metric geometry, which in particular may accommodate a B-field. While an area metric does not determine a connection, we identify the appropriate differential geometric structure which is of relevance for the minimal surface equation in such a generalized geometry. In particular the notion of a derivative action of areas on areas emerges naturally. Area metric geometry provides new tools in differential geometry, which promise to play a role in the description of gravitational dynamics on D-branes

  17. Complex analysis and CR geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zampieri, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Cauchy-Riemann (CR) geometry is the study of manifolds equipped with a system of CR-type equations. Compared to the early days when the purpose of CR geometry was to supply tools for the analysis of the existence and regularity of solutions to the \\bar\\partial-Neumann problem, it has rapidly acquired a life of its own and has became an important topic in differential geometry and the study of non-linear partial differential equations. A full understanding of modern CR geometry requires knowledge of various topics such as real/complex differential and symplectic geometry, foliation theory, the geometric theory of PDE's, and microlocal analysis. Nowadays, the subject of CR geometry is very rich in results, and the amount of material required to reach competence is daunting to graduate students who wish to learn it. However, the present book does not aim at introducing all the topics of current interest in CR geometry. Instead, an attempt is made to be friendly to the novice by moving, in a fairly relaxed way, f...

  18. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  19. TIG welding method and TIG welding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Eishi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of TIG welding for members having different heat capacities including a cladding tube and an end plug of a fuel rod to be used, for example, in a reactor, and a device therefor. Namely, in the TIG welding method, the flow rate of a sealed gas to the side of a member having smaller heat capacity is made greater than that on the side of the member having greater heat capacity bordered on the top end of a welding electrode. Since the sealed gas is jetted being localized relative to the welding electrode, arc is restricted in a region of the member having smaller heat capacity and is increased at a region having a larger heat capacity. As a result, the arc is localized, so that the heat input amount to the region having a large heat capacity is increased, and then a plurality of members at the abutting portion are melted uniformly thereby capable of obtaining a uniform molten pool. A bead is formed at the abutting portion thereby capable of obtaining a welded portion with less unevenness and having large strength. (I.S.)

  20. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  1. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbay, M.

    1972-01-01

    The bead characteristics and the possible mechanisms of the electron beam penetration are presented. The different welding techniques are exposed and the main parts of an electron beam welding equipment are described. Some applications to nuclear, spatial and other industries are cited [fr

  2. Modeling and design of energy concentrating laser weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewski, J.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sklar, E. [OptiCad Corp., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The application of lasers for welding and joining has increased steadily over the past decade with the advent of high powered industrial laser systems. Attributes such as high energy density and precise focusing allow high speed processing of precision assemblies. Other characteristics of the process such as poor coupling of energy due to highly reflective materials and instabilities associated with deep penetration keyhole mode welding remain as process limitations and challenges to be overcome. Reflective loss of laser energy impinging on metal surfaces can in some cases exceed ninety five percent, thus making the process extremely inefficient. Enhanced coupling of the laser beam can occur when high energy densities approach the vaporization point of the materials and form a keyhole feature which can trap laser energy and enhance melting and process efficiency. The extreme temperature, pressure and fluid flow dynamics of the keyhole make control of the process difficult in this melting regime. The authors design and model weld joints which through reflective propagation and concentration of the laser beam energy significantly enhance the melting process and weld morphology. A three dimensional computer based geometric optical model is used to describe the key laser parameters and joint geometry. Ray tracing is used to compute the location and intensity of energy absorption within the weld joint. Comparison with experimentation shows good correlation of energy concentration within the model to actual weld profiles. The effect of energy concentration within various joint geometry is described. This method for extending the design of the laser system to include the weld joint allows the evaluation and selection of laser parameters such as lens and focal position for process optimization. The design of narrow gap joints which function as energy concentrators is described. The enhanced laser welding of aluminum without keyhole formation has been demonstrated.

  3. IMPACT OF DEPTH OF CUT ON CHIP FORMATION IN AZ91HP MAGNESIUM ALLOY MILLING WITH TOOLS OF VARYING CUTTING EDGE GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gziut

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Safety of Mg milling processes can be expressed by means of the form and the number of fractions of chips formed during milling. This paper presents the state of the art of magnesium alloys milling technology in the aspect of chip fragmentation. Furthermore, the impact of the depth of cut ap and the rake angle γ on the number of chip fractions was analysed in the study. These were conducted on AZ91HP magnesium cast alloy and milling was performed with carbide tools of varying rake angle values (γ = 5º and γ = 30º. It was observed that less intense chip fragmentation occurs with decreasing depth of cut ap. The number of chip fractions was lower at the tool rake angle of γ = 30º. The test results were formulated as technological recommendations according to the number of generated chip fractions.

  4. Fatigue life evaluation based on welding residual stress relaxation and notch strain approach for cruciform welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jeong Woo; Han, Seung Ho; Shin, Byung Chun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue strength of welded joint is influenced by the welding residual stress which is relaxed depending on local stress distributed in vicinity of stress raisers, eg. under cut, overlap and blow hole. To evaluate its fatigue life the geometry of the stress raisers and the welding residual stress should be taken into account. The several methods based on notch strain approach have been proposed in order to consider the two factors above mentioned. These methods, however, have shown considerable differences between analytical and experimental results. It is due to the fact that the amount of the relaxed welding residual stress evaluated by the cyclic stress-strain relationship do not correspond with that occurred in reality. In this paper the residual stress relaxation model based on experimental results was used in order to reduce the discrepancy of the estimated amount of the relaxed welding residual stress. Under an assumption of the superimposition of the relaxed welding residual stress and the local stress, a modified notch strain approach was proposed and verified to the cruciform welded joint

  5. Welding problems in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The problems of welding industry in nuclear power plant engineering, mainly related to the improvement of molten bath protection, are considered. Development of new materials for welding electrodes, for cladding and welding fluxes, is pointed out. Production of the following equipment is brought to a commercial level: welding heads and welding machines for branch pipe welding, anticorrosion cladding, zonal thermal treatment, electron beam welding facilities for the welding and maintenance of turbineblades, equipment for nondestructive testing of welded joints

  6. Method for welding beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  7. Method for welding beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O'Leary, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs

  8. Transition welds in welding of two-ply steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fartushnyj, V.G.; Evsyukov, Yu.G.

    1977-01-01

    Studied were physico-mechanical properties of welds made by various welding wires of chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium steels in submerged arc welding of double-layer steels with main layer of the VSt.3sp. carbon steel. It is shown that service-reliable structures welded of two-layer steels are obtained by providing the content from 11 to 20 % Ni in the automatically welded transition layer

  9. Complex analysis and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this wide-ranging collection report on the results of investigations from a number of linked disciplines, including complex algebraic geometry, complex analytic geometry of manifolds and spaces, and complex differential geometry.

  10. Non-Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhart, Luther Pfahler

    2005-01-01

    This concise text by a prominent mathematician deals chiefly with manifolds dominated by the geometry of paths. Topics include asymmetric and symmetric connections, the projective geometry of paths, and the geometry of sub-spaces. 1927 edition.

  11. Manufacturing and use of spiral welded pipes for high pressure service : state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoop, F.M.; Sommer, B. [Salzgitter GroBrohre GmbH, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    This paper provided details of an improved helical seam 2-step (HTS) manufacturing process used to produce spiral welded large diameter pipes for high pressure transmission pipelines. During the process, pipe forming is combined with continuous tack welding and internal and external submerged arc welding at separate welding stations. The pipe forming unit consists of a 3 roll bending system with an outside roller cage used to guarantee the roundness of the pipe. The converging strip edges of the pipe are joined using a continuous shielded arc tack weld. Tack welding is done automatically with a laser-guided weld head. Run-out angles are adjusted by an automatic gap control system. The formed and tack-welded pipes are then fed to computer-controlled welding stations for final welding, where each pipe is rotated with a precise screw-like motion. The same welding materials used for the helical seam are used for the skelp end welding. The process offers more precise root gap control, as well as improved pipe geometry. Use of the process has also increased production rates and improved weld stability. The dimensions of the spiral-weld pipes are adjustable so that any diameter can be produced from a base material of the same width. The pipes can also be coated externally with fusion-bonded epoxy or 3-layer polyethylene/polypropylene. It was concluded that the process is being further refined to support the use of HTS pipes in high-pressure pipelines. New nondestructive testing techniques used to assess the performance of the line pipes were presented, as well as the results from hot and cold bending tests, field weldability trials, and tests related to the safety of spiral pipes. 16 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  12. Geometry of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L.Eh.; Gliner, Eh.B.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of investigating the Universe space-time geometry are described on a popular level. Immediate space-time geometries, corresponding to three cosmologic models are considered. Space-time geometry of a closed model is the spherical Riemann geonetry, of an open model - is the Lobachevskij geometry; and of a plane model - is the Euclidean geometry. The Universe real geometry in the contemporary epoch of development is based on the data testifying to the fact that the Universe is infinitely expanding

  13. DG-AMMOS: a new tool to generate 3d conformation of small molecules using distance geometry and automated molecular mechanics optimization for in silico screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagorce, David; Pencheva, Tania; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Miteva, Maria A

    2009-11-13

    Discovery of new bioactive molecules that could enter drug discovery programs or that could serve as chemical probes is a very complex and costly endeavor. Structure-based and ligand-based in silico screening approaches are nowadays extensively used to complement experimental screening approaches in order to increase the effectiveness of the process and facilitating the screening of thousands or millions of small molecules against a biomolecular target. Both in silico screening methods require as input a suitable chemical compound collection and most often the 3D structure of the small molecules has to be generated since compounds are usually delivered in 1D SMILES, CANSMILES or in 2D SDF formats. Here, we describe the new open source program DG-AMMOS which allows the generation of the 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and their energy minimization via Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization. The program is validated on the Astex dataset, the ChemBridge Diversity database and on a number of small molecules with known crystal structures extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database. A comparison with the free program Balloon and the well-known commercial program Omega generating the 3D of small molecules is carried out. The results show that the new free program DG-AMMOS is a very efficient 3D structure generator engine. DG-AMMOS provides fast, automated and reliable access to the generation of 3D conformation of small molecules and facilitates the preparation of a compound collection prior to high-throughput virtual screening computations. The validation of DG-AMMOS on several different datasets proves that generated structures are generally of equal quality or sometimes better than structures obtained by other tested methods.

  14. DG-AMMOS: A New tool to generate 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization for in silico Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villoutreix Bruno O

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovery of new bioactive molecules that could enter drug discovery programs or that could serve as chemical probes is a very complex and costly endeavor. Structure-based and ligand-based in silico screening approaches are nowadays extensively used to complement experimental screening approaches in order to increase the effectiveness of the process and facilitating the screening of thousands or millions of small molecules against a biomolecular target. Both in silico screening methods require as input a suitable chemical compound collection and most often the 3D structure of the small molecules has to be generated since compounds are usually delivered in 1D SMILES, CANSMILES or in 2D SDF formats. Results Here, we describe the new open source program DG-AMMOS which allows the generation of the 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and their energy minimization via Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization. The program is validated on the Astex dataset, the ChemBridge Diversity database and on a number of small molecules with known crystal structures extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database. A comparison with the free program Balloon and the well-known commercial program Omega generating the 3D of small molecules is carried out. The results show that the new free program DG-AMMOS is a very efficient 3D structure generator engine. Conclusion DG-AMMOS provides fast, automated and reliable access to the generation of 3D conformation of small molecules and facilitates the preparation of a compound collection prior to high-throughput virtual screening computations. The validation of DG-AMMOS on several different datasets proves that generated structures are generally of equal quality or sometimes better than structures obtained by other tested methods.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Characterization of Friction-Stir-Welded Dual-Phase Brass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.; Dinaharan, I.; Akinlabi, E. T.; Murugan, N.

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an ideal process to join brass to avoid the evaporation of zinc. In the present investigation, 6-mm-thick dual-phase brass plates were joined efficiently using FSW at various tool rotational speeds. The microstructures were studied using optical microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The optical micrographs revealed the evolution of various zones across the joint line. The microstructure of the heat-affected zone was similar to that of base metal. The weld zone exhibited finer grains due to dynamic recrystallization. The recrystallization was inhomogeneous and the inhomogeneity reduced with increased tool rotational speed. The dual phase was preserved in the weld zone due to the retention of zinc. The severe plastic deformation created a lot of dislocations in the weld zone. The weld zone was strengthened after welding. The role of tool rotational speed on the joint strength is further reported.

  16. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  17. Residual stress characterization of welds using x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineault, J.A.; Brauss, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Neglect of residual stresses created during processes lead to stress corrosion cracking, distortion, fatigue cracking, premature failures in components, and instances of over design. Automated residual stress mapping and truly portable equipment have now made the characterization of residual stresses using x-ray diffraction (XRI) practical. The nondestructive nature of the x-ray diffraction technique has made the tile residual stress characterization of welds a useful tool for process optimization and failure analysis, particularly since components can be measured before and after welding and post welding processes. This paper illustrates the importance of residual stress characterization in welds and presents examples where x-ray diffraction techniques were applied in the characterization of various kinds of welds. arc welds, TIG welds, resistance welds, laser welds and electron beam welds. Numerous techniques are available to help manage potentially harmfull residual stresses created during the welding process thus, the effects of a few example post weld processes such as grinding, heat treating and shot peening are also addressed

  18. An investigation on SA 213-Tube to SA 387-Tube plate using friction welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, S. Pandia; Kumaraswamidhas, L. A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Jharkhand (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil [RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Tamil Nadu (India); Muthukumaran, S. [National Institute of Technology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) is a relatively newer solid state welding process used for joining tube to tube plate of either similar or dissimilar materials with enhanced mechanical and metallurgical properties. In the present study, FWTPET has been used to weld SA 213 (Grade T12) tube with SA 387 (Grade 22) tube plate. The welded samples are found to have satisfactory joint strength and the Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that inter metallic compound is absent in the weld zone. The different weld joints have been identified and the phase composition is found using EDX and XRD. Microstructures have been analyzed using optical and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties such as hardness, compressive shear strength and peel test for different weld conditions are studied and the hardness survey revealed that there is increase in hardness at the weld interface due to grain refinement. The corrosion behavior for different weld conditions have been analyzed and the weld zone is found to have better corrosion resistance due to the influence of the grain refinement after FWTPET welding process. Hence, the present investigation is carried out to study the behavior of friction welded dissimilar joints of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate joints and the results are presented. The present study confirms that a high quality tube to tube plate joint can be achieved using FWTPET process at 1120 rpm.

  19. Systematic investigation of the fatigue performance of a friction stir welded low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumpis, Athanasios; Galloway, Alexander; Molter, Lars; Polezhayeva, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The fatigue behaviour of a friction stir welded low alloy steel has been assessed. • The welds’ fatigue lives outperform the International Institute of Welding’s recommendations for fusion welds. • The slow weld exhibits the best fatigue performance of the investigated welds. • Fracture surface analysis shows that minor embedded flaws do not offer crack initiation sites. • Process-related surface breaking flaws have a significant effect on the fatigue life. - Abstract: A comprehensive fatigue performance assessment of friction stir welded DH36 steel has been undertaken to address the relevant knowledge gap for this process on low alloy steel. A detailed set of experimental procedures specific to friction stir welding has been put forward, and the consequent study extensively examined the weld microstructure and hardness in support of the tensile and fatigue testing. The effect of varying welding parameters was also investigated. Microstructural observations have been correlated to the weldments’ fatigue behaviour. The typical fatigue performance of friction stir welded steel plates has been established, exhibiting fatigue lives well above the weld detail class of the International Institute of Welding even for tests at 90% of yield strength, irrespective of minor instances of surface breaking flaws which have been identified. An understanding of the manner in which these flaws impact on the fatigue performance has been established, concluding that surface breaking irregularities such as these produced by the tool shoulder’s features on the weld top surface can be the dominant factor for crack initiation under fatigue loading

  20. Capabilities of infrared weld monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, P.G.; Keske, J.S.; Leong, K.H.; Kornecki, G.

    1997-11-01

    A non-obtrusive pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld penetration, while AC portions of the output can be correlated with surface irregularities and part misalignment or contamination. Changes in DC behavior are also noted for both full and deep penetration welds. Full penetration welds are signified by an abrupt reduction in the weld monitor output. Bead on plate welds were made on steel, aluminum, and magnesium with both a CW CO{sub 2} laser and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to explore the relationships between the weld characteristics and the weld monitor output.

  1. Exploring Bundling Theory with Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The author shows how instructors might successfully introduce students in principles and intermediate microeconomic theory classes to the topic of bundling (i.e., the selling of two or more goods as a package, rather than separately). It is surprising how much students can learn using only the tools of high school geometry. To be specific, one can…

  2. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  3. Towards Fast Tracking of the Keyhole Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, C.; Hohenstein, R.; Schmidt, M.

    We describe a sensor principle permitting the fast online measurement of the position of the optical process emissions in deep penetration laser welding. Experiments show a strong correlation between the position of the vapour plume and the keyhole geometry, demonstrated here by varying the penetration depth of the weld. In order to achieve an absolute position measurement, the sensor was calibrated using a light source with well defined characteristics. The setup for the calibration measurements and the corresponding data evaluation methods are discussed. The precision of the calibration with a green LED is 6 μm in lateral and 55 μm in axial direction, for a working distance of 200 mm.

  4. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  5. Validation of Weld Residual Stress Modeling in the NRC International Round Robin Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Weld residual stresses (WRS) have a large influence on the behavior of cracks growing under normal operation loads and on the leakage flow from a through-wall crack. Accurate prediction on weld residual stresses is important to make proper decisions when cracks in weld joints are detected. During the latest years, there has been a strong development in both analytical procedures to numerically determine WRS and experimental measurements of WRS. The USNRC (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission) has formed a program for validation of WRS predictions through comparison of numerically calculated residual stress fields in dissimilar welds measured by different methods. The present report describes the results of the project with special focus on the contribution from Inspecta Technology. Objectives: The principal objective of the project is to compare different WRS predictions for a dissimilar pipe weld with careful measurements on a mock-up weld. The results of the project will make it possible to make recommendations on computational procedures for WRS in dissimilar metal welds. Results: It is concluded that numerical analysis of weld residual stresses using the finite element method is very useful for the estimation of weld residual stresses in complex geometries and dissimilar metal welds. The validation study increases the understanding of uncertainties associated with different modeling approaches and helps to identify the most sensitive parameters

  6. Mechanical behaviour of cracked welded structures including mismatch effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornet, P.

    2002-01-01

    The most important parameters for predicting more precisely the fracture behaviour of welded structures have been identified. In particular, the plasticity development at the crack tip in the ligament appeared as a major parameter to evaluate the yield load of such a complex structure. In this way defect assessments procedures have been developed or modified to take into account the mismatch effect that is to say the mechanical properties of the different material constituting the weld joint. This paper is a synthesis of the work done in the past at Electricite de France on this topic in regards with other work done in France or around the World. The most important parameters which control the plasticity development at the crack tip and so mainly influence the fracture behaviour of welded structures are underlined: the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the ligament size and the weld width. Moreover, commonly used fracture toughness testing procedures developed in case of homogeneous specimens cannot be used in a straight forward manner and so has to be modified to take into account the mismatch effect. Number or defect assessment procedures taking into account the mismatch effect by considering the yield load of the welded structure are shortly described. Then, the 'Equivalent Material Method' developed at EDF which allows a good prediction of the applied J-Integral at the crack tip is more detailed. This procedure includes not only both weld and base metal yield strength, the structure geometry, the crack size and the weld dimension using the yield load of the real structures but also includes the effect of both weld and base metal strain hardening exponents. Some validations of this method are proposed. Finally, the ability of finite element modelling to predict the behaviour of such welded structures is demonstrated by modelling real experiments: crack located in the middle of

  7. A Finite Element Model to Simulate Defect Formation during Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model is developed to predict and analyze the defect formation during friction stir welding based on coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method. The model is validated by comparing the estimated welding temperature, processed zone shape and void size with those obtained experimentally. The results compared indicate that the simulated temperature and the data measured are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the model can predict the plasticized zone shape and the presence of a void in the weld quite accurately. However, the void size is overestimated. The effects of welding parameters and tool pin profile are also analyzed. The results reveal that welding at low welding speed or high tool rotational speed could produce a smaller void. Moreover, compared to a smooth tool pin, a featured tool pin can enhance plastic flow in the weld and achieve defect-free weldment. The results are helpful for the optimization of the welding process and the design of welding tools.

  8. Thermo-Mechanical Calculations of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding at Equal Diameter Copper Bars and Effects of Essential Parameters on Dependent Special Variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, M. H.; Davari, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2007-01-01

    Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding is a modified type of common rotary friction welding processes. In this welding method parameters such as pressure, angular velocity and time of welding control temperature, stress, strain and their variations. These dependent factors play an important rule in defining optimum process parameters combinations in order to improve the design and manufacturing of welding machines and quality of welded parts. Thermo-mechanical simulation of friction welding has been carried out and it has been shown that, simulation is an important tool for prediction of generated heat and strain at the weld interface and can be used for prediction of microstructure and evaluation of quality of welds. For simulation of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding, a commercial finite element program has been used and the effects of pressure and rotary velocity of rotary part on temperature and strain variations have been investigated

  9. Thermo-Mechanical Calculations of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding at Equal Diameter Copper Bars and Effects of Essential Parameters on Dependent Special Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, M. H.; Davari, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2007-05-01

    Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding is a modified type of common rotary friction welding processes. In this welding method parameters such as pressure, angular velocity and time of welding control temperature, stress, strain and their variations. These dependent factors play an important rule in defining optimum process parameters combinations in order to improve the design and manufacturing of welding machines and quality of welded parts. Thermo-mechanical simulation of friction welding has been carried out and it has been shown that, simulation is an important tool for prediction of generated heat and strain at the weld interface and can be used for prediction of microstructure and evaluation of quality of welds. For simulation of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding, a commercial finite element program has been used and the effects of pressure and rotary velocity of rotary part on temperature and strain variations have been investigated.

  10. Automated ultrasonic pipe weld inspection. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karl Deutsch, W.A.; Schulte, P.; Joswig, M.; Kattwinkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    This article contains a brief overview on automated ultrasonic welded inspection for various pipe types. Some inspection steps might by carried out with portable test equipment (e.g. pipe and test), but the weld inspection in all internationally relevant specification must be automated. The pipe geometry, the production process, and the pipe usage determine the number of required probes. Recent updates for some test specifications enforce a large number of ultrasonic probes, e.g. the Shell standard. Since seamless pipes are sometimes replaced by ERW pipes and LSAW pipes (in both cases to save production cost), the inspection methods change gradually between the various pipe types. Each testing system is unique and shows its specialties which have to be discussed by supplier, testing system user and final customer of the pipe. (author)

  11. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  12. TIG welding of aluminium foams. Analysis of foaming operating parameters; Soldadura TIG de espumas de aluminio. Analisis de los parametros operacionales de espumado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portoles, A.; Berenguer, O.; Onoro, J.; Ranninger, C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work the influence of main parameters that take part during TIG welding process are analyzed. Some of these parameters belong to the welding process, as for example the welding speed, intensity and voltage while others are from the material and tooling features, as for example foaming material and tooling design. The result of this work shows a strong dependence on these parameters of the TIG welding process for metallic foams. (Author) 16 refs.

  13. Thermographic Analysis of Stress Distribution in Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domazet Ž.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue life prediction of welded joints based on S-N curves in conjunction with nominal stresses generally is not reliable. Stress distribution in welded area affected by geometrical inhomogeneity, irregular welded surface and weld toe radius is quite complex, so the local (structural stress concept is accepted in recent papers. The aim of this paper is to determine the stress distribution in plate type aluminum welded joints, to analyze the reliability of TSA (Thermal Stress Analysis in this kind of investigations, and to obtain numerical values for stress concentration factors for practical use. Stress distribution in aluminum butt and fillet welded joints is determined by using the three different methods: strain gauges measurement, thermal stress analysis and FEM. Obtained results show good agreement - the TSA mutually confirmed the FEM model and stresses measured by strain gauges. According to obtained results, it may be stated that TSA, as a relatively new measurement technique may in the future become a standard tool for the experimental investigation of stress concentration and fatigue in welded joints that can help to develop more accurate numerical tools for fatigue life prediction.

  14. Thermographic Analysis of Stress Distribution in Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piršić, T.; Krstulović Opara, L.; Domazet, Ž.

    2010-06-01

    The fatigue life prediction of welded joints based on S-N curves in conjunction with nominal stresses generally is not reliable. Stress distribution in welded area affected by geometrical inhomogeneity, irregular welded surface and weld toe radius is quite complex, so the local (structural) stress concept is accepted in recent papers. The aim of this paper is to determine the stress distribution in plate type aluminum welded joints, to analyze the reliability of TSA (Thermal Stress Analysis) in this kind of investigations, and to obtain numerical values for stress concentration factors for practical use. Stress distribution in aluminum butt and fillet welded joints is determined by using the three different methods: strain gauges measurement, thermal stress analysis and FEM. Obtained results show good agreement - the TSA mutually confirmed the FEM model and stresses measured by strain gauges. According to obtained results, it may be stated that TSA, as a relatively new measurement technique may in the future become a standard tool for the experimental investigation of stress concentration and fatigue in welded joints that can help to develop more accurate numerical tools for fatigue life prediction.

  15. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  16. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  17. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  18. Half bead welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Holz, P.P.

    1978-05-01

    The ORNL has employed the Section XI half-bead procedure for six repair welds. Table 2 identifies the repairs and the components upon which they were accomplished. The weld repairs were performed to permit us to evaluate material properties, residual stresses, weld repair procedures, and structural behavior of repaired pressure vessels. As a consequence of our study we concluded that when the half bead procedure is correctly applied: (1) there is no metallurgical degradation of the base material, (2) residual stresses of yield point magnitude will be present, and (3) the structural integrity of the pressure vessel is not impaired at Charpy V-notch upper shelf temperatures

  19. Robotic and automatic welding development at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. S.; Jackson, M. E.; Flanigan, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Welding automation is the key to two major development programs to improve quality and reduce the cost of manufacturing space hardware currently undertaken by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Variable polarity plasma arc welding has demonstrated its effectiveness on class 1 aluminum welding in external tank production. More than three miles of welds were completed without an internal defect. Much of this success can be credited to automation developments which stabilize the process. Robotic manipulation technology is under development for automation of welds on the Space Shuttle's main engines utilizing pathfinder systems in development of tooling and sensors for the production applications. The overall approach to welding automation development undertaken is outlined. Advanced sensors and control systems methodologies are described that combine to make aerospace quality welds with a minimum of dependence on operator skill.

  20. A continuum based fem model for friction stir welding-model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffa, G. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States) and Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: g.buffa@dtpm.unipa.it; Hua, J. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)]. E-mail: hua.14@osu.edu; Shivpuri, R. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)]. E-mail: shivpuri.1@osu.edu; Fratini, L. [Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: abaqus@dtpm.unipa.it

    2006-03-15

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) has been successfully used to join materials that are difficult-to-weld or unweldeable by fusion welding methods, it is still in its early development stage and, therefore, a scientific knowledge based predictive model is of significant help for thorough understanding of FSW process. In this paper, a continuum based FEM model for friction stir welding process is proposed, that is 3D Lagrangian implicit, coupled, rigid-viscoplastic. This model is calibrated by comparing with experimental results of force and temperature distribution, then is used to investigate the distribution of temperature and strain in heat affect zone and the weld nugget. The model correctly predicts the non-symmetric nature of FSW process, and the relationships between the tool forces and the variation in the process parameters. It is found that the effective strain distribution is non-symmetric about the weld line while the temperature profile is almost symmetric in the weld zone.

  1. UNS S32750 super duplex steel welding using pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francini, O.D.; Andrade, G.G.; Clemente, M.S.; Gallego, J.; Ventrella, V.A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser is a flexible and powerful tool with many relevant applications in industry, mainly in the welding area. Lasers today provide the welding industry technical solutions to many problems. This work studied the weld metal obtained by pulsed laser welding of Nd: YAG super duplex stainless steel UNS S32750 employed in the oil and natural gas, analyzing the influence of high cooling rate, due to the laser process, the swing phase ferrite / austenite. Were performed weld beads in butt joint with different repetition rates. The different microstructures were obtained by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the effect of varying the welding energy of Nd: YAG laser on the volume fractions of the phases ferrite/austenite in the weld metal was its ferritization and low austenite amount on the grain boundary. (author)

  2. Monitoring of the submerged arc welding process using current and voltage transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, G.; Velez, M.; Espinosa, M.A.; Santos, O.; Barrera, E.; Gomez, G.

    1996-01-01

    Welding by fusion is one of the most used techniques to join materials in the manufacture industry. given the increase in applications of this welding process and the demand of more quality in the welding deposits, these welding processes are good candidates for the improvement of their instrumentation and control. Any improvement in the control technique will have a positive effect in the quality and productivity of the welding process. Some of the most significant variables in the submerged arc welding process are: current, voltage and torch speed. For the instrumentation of this research work, two transducers were designed, one for CD current monitoring and one for CD voltage monitoring of the welding machine. The design of both transducers includes an isolation amplifier. Graphical programming and the concept of virtual instrumentation were the main tools used for the design of the data acquisition system and the signal processing task. (Author) 9 refs

  3. Friction stir scribe welding technique for dissimilar joining of aluminium and galvanised steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianhao [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Sidhar, Harpreet [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Mishra, Rajiv S. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; Hovanski, Yuri [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Upadhyay, Piyush [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Materials and Manufacturing, Richland, WA, USA; Carlson, Blair [General Motors Technical Center, Warren, MI, USA

    2017-10-04

    Friction stir scribe technology, a derivative of friction stir welding, was applied for the dissimilar lap welding of an aluminum alloy and galvanized mild steel sheets. During the process, the rotating tool with a cobalt steel scribe first penetrated the top material — aluminum — and then the scribe cut the bottom material — steel. The steel was displaced into the upper material to produce a characteristic hook feature. Lap welds were shear tested, and their fracture paths were studied. Welding parameters affected the welding features including hook height, which turned out to be highly related to fracture position. Therefore, in this paper, the relationships among welding parameters, hook height, joint strength and fracture position are presented. In addition, influence of zinc coating on joint strength was also studied. Keywords: friction stir scribe technology; dissimilar material welding; zinc coating; hook height; joint strength; fracture position

  4. A continuum based fem model for friction stir welding-model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffa, G.; Hua, J.; Shivpuri, R.; Fratini, L.

    2006-01-01

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) has been successfully used to join materials that are difficult-to-weld or unweldeable by fusion welding methods, it is still in its early development stage and, therefore, a scientific knowledge based predictive model is of significant help for thorough understanding of FSW process. In this paper, a continuum based FEM model for friction stir welding process is proposed, that is 3D Lagrangian implicit, coupled, rigid-viscoplastic. This model is calibrated by comparing with experimental results of force and temperature distribution, then is used to investigate the distribution of temperature and strain in heat affect zone and the weld nugget. The model correctly predicts the non-symmetric nature of FSW process, and the relationships between the tool forces and the variation in the process parameters. It is found that the effective strain distribution is non-symmetric about the weld line while the temperature profile is almost symmetric in the weld zone

  5. Microstructural evolution and properties of friction stir welded aluminium alloy AA2219

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Biju, S.; Ghosh, B. R.; Sinha, P. P.

    2007-01-01

    Low weld strength of fusion welded joints of aluminium alloy AA2219 is a concern in fabrication of pressure vessels and is attributable to the presence of weld defects, as well as various metallurgical factors. Friction stir welding (FSW), being a solid state joining process has obvious advantages over fusion welding. Results of preliminary FSW experiments conducted on 10 mm thick plate using a particular tool configuration are presented here. Microscopic studies show the presence of very fine equiaxed recrystallised grain at the weld nugget and a flow pattern of grains due to heavy deformation in defect-free weld coupons. Mechanical properties are correlated with the microstructure and process variables. Fractographic analysis complements the observations of optical microscopy and mechanical properties

  6. Limit load solution for electron beam welded joints with single edge weld center crack in tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Shi, Yaowu; Li, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yongping

    2012-05-01

    Limit loads are widely studied and several limit load solutions are proposed to some typical geometry of weldments. However, there are no limit load solutions exist for the single edge crack weldments in tension (SEC(T)), which is also a typical geometry in fracture analysis. The mis-matching limit load for thick plate with SEC(T) are investigated and the special limit load solutions are proposed based on the available mis-matching limit load solutions and systematic finite element analyses. The real weld configurations are simplified as a strip, and different weld strength mis-matching ratio M, crack depth/width ratio a/ W and weld width 2H are in consideration. As a result, it is found that there exists excellent agreement between the limit load solutions and the FE results for almost all the mis-matching ration M, a/ W and ligament-to-weld width ratio ( W-a)/ H. Moreover, useful recommendations are given for evaluating the limit loads of the EBW structure with SEC(T). For the EBW joints with SEC(T), the mis-matching limit loads can be obtained assuming that the components are wholly made of base metal, when M changing from 1.6 to 0.6. When M decreasing to 0.4, the mis-matching limit loads can be obtained assuming that the components are wholly made of base metal only for large value of ( W-a)/ H. The recommendations may be useful for evaluating the limit loads of the EBW structures with SEC(T). The engineering simplifications are given for assessing the limit loads of electron beam welded structure with SEC(T).

  7. Spectral dimension of quantum geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Oriti, Daniele; Thürigen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The spectral dimension is an indicator of geometry and topology of spacetime and a tool to compare the description of quantum geometry in various approaches to quantum gravity. This is possible because it can be defined not only on smooth geometries but also on discrete (e.g., simplicial) ones. In this paper, we consider the spectral dimension of quantum states of spatial geometry defined on combinatorial complexes endowed with additional algebraic data: the kinematical quantum states of loop quantum gravity (LQG). Preliminarily, the effects of topology and discreteness of classical discrete geometries are studied in a systematic manner. We look for states reproducing the spectral dimension of a classical space in the appropriate regime. We also test the hypothesis that in LQG, as in other approaches, there is a scale dependence of the spectral dimension, which runs from the topological dimension at large scales to a smaller one at short distances. While our results do not give any strong support to this hypothesis, we can however pinpoint when the topological dimension is reproduced by LQG quantum states. Overall, by exploring the interplay of combinatorial, topological and geometrical effects, and by considering various kinds of quantum states such as coherent states and their superpositions, we find that the spectral dimension of discrete quantum geometries is more sensitive to the underlying combinatorial structures than to the details of the additional data associated with them. (paper)

  8. Through-Thickness Residual Stress Profiles in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds: A Combined Experimental and Prediction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Moat, R. J.; Paddea, S.; Francis, J. A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; Bouchard, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Economic and safe management of nuclear plant components relies on accurate prediction of welding-induced residual stresses. In this study, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness of austenitic stainless steel welds has been measured using neutron diffraction and the contour method. The measured data are used to validate residual stress profiles predicted by an artificial neural network approach (ANN) as a function of welding heat input and geometry. Maximum tensile stresses with magnitude close to the yield strength of the material were observed near the weld cap in both axial and hoop direction of the welds. Significant scatter of more than 200 MPa was found within the residual stress measurements at the weld center line and are associated with the geometry and welding conditions of individual weld passes. The ANN prediction is developed in an attempt to effectively quantify this phenomenon of `innate scatter' and to learn the non-linear patterns in the weld residual stress profiles. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ANN method for defining through-thickness residual stress profiles in welds for application in structural integrity assessments is evaluated.

  9. Use of eddy current mixes to solve a weld examination application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, R.C.; LaBoissonniere, A.

    1995-01-01

    The augmentation of typical nondestructive (i.e., ultrasound) weld inspection techniques by the use of eddy current tools may significantly enhance the quality and reliability of weld inspections. One recent example is the development of an eddy current technique for use in the examination of BWR core shroud welds, where multi-frequency mixes are used to eliminate signals coming from the weld material so that the examination of the heat affected zone is enhanced. An analysis tool most commonly associated with ultrasound examinations, the C-Scan based on gated information, may be implemented with eddy current data to enhance analysis

  10. Electrostimulated recovery of welded joint durability: experiment and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semakin, E.V.; Chirakadze, D.Z.; Tsellermaer, V.Ya.; Gromov, V.E.; Sosnin, O.V.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility to increase the durability of welded joints operating under conditions of low cycle fatigue is shown to be brought about using electric current pulses. Experimental method of recovery of operational capability is demonstrated on welded joints of tool steels R6M5 and 40Kh/ The onset of critical stage of fatigue in the welded joint was determined by ultrasonic testing. Then the specimens were treated with 20 Hz electric pulses with amplitude of 250 MA/M 2 for 100 μs. Such treatment resulted in an increase of time to fracture. The phenomenological model of the process is proposed

  11. Application of YAG laser processing in underwater welding and cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohwaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro; Kojima, Toshio; Sato, Shuichi [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    The high-power YAG laser is a new fabrication tool. The laser torch is easy to combine with complex with complex mechanics because of beam delivery through optical fiber. A direct underwater laser welding technology has been developed and applied to the preservation, maintenance and removal of nuclear power plants. For subdividing or removing operations for retirement of plants, the laser cutting properties were confirmed to allow a maximum cutting thickness of 80 mm. For repairing inner surface of stainless steel tanks, an underwater laser welding system using a remote-controlled robot was developed and the high quality of underwater laser welding was confirmed. (author)

  12. Burst Test Qualification Analysis of DWPF Canister-Plug Weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.; Gong, Chung.

    1995-02-01

    The DWPF canister closure system uses resistance welding for sealing the canister nozzle and plug to ensure leak tightness. The welding group at SRTC is using the burst test to qualify this seal weld in lieu of the shear test in ASME B ampersand PV Code, Section IX, paragraph QW-196. The burst test is considered simpler and more appropriate than the shear test for this application. Although the geometry, loading and boundary conditions are quite different in the two tests, structural analyses show similarity in the failure mode of the shear test in paragraph QW-196 and the burst test on the DWPF canister nozzle Non-linear structural analyses are performed using finite element techniques to study the failure mode of the two tests. Actual test geometry and realistic stress strain data for the 304L stainless steel and the weld material are used in the analyses. The finite element models are loaded until failure strains are reached. The failure modes in both tests are shear at the failure points. Based on these observations, it is concluded that the use of a burst test in lieu of the shear test for qualifying the canister-plug weld is acceptable. The burst test analysis for the canister-plug also yields the burst pressures which compare favorably with the actual pressure found during burst tests. Thus, the analysis also provides an estimate of the safety margins in the design of these vessels

  13. Micro friction stir welding of copper electrical contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of micro friction stir welding (μFSW of electrolytic tough pitch copper (CuETP in a lap and butt joint. Experimental plan was done in order to investigate the influence of tool design and welding parameters on the formation of defect free joints. The experiments were done using universal milling machine where the tool rotation speed varied between 600 and 1 900 rpm, welding speed between 14 and 93 mm/min and tilt angle between 3° and 5°. From the welds samples for analysis of microstructure and samples for tensile tests were prepared. The grain size in the nugget zone was greatly reduced compared to the base metal and the joint tensile strength exceeded the strength of the base metal.

  14. Probing heat transfer, fluid flow and microstructural evolution during fusion welding of alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    The composition, geometry, structure and properties of the welded joints are affected by the various physical processes that take place during fusion welding. Understanding these processes has been an important goal in the contemporary welding research to achieve structurally sound and reliable welds. In the present thesis research, several important physical processes including the heat transfer, fluid flow and microstructural evolution in fusion welding were modeled based on the fundamentals of transport phenomena and phase transformation theory. The heat transfer and fluid flow calculation is focused on the predictions of the liquid metal convection in the weld pool, the temperature distribution in the entire weldment, and the shape and size of the fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). The modeling of microstructural evolution is focused on the quantitative understanding of phase transformation kinetics during welding of several important alloys under both low and high heating and cooling conditions. Three numerical models were developed in the present thesis work: (1) a three-dimensional heat transfer and free surface flow model for the gas metal arc (GMA) fillet welding considering the complex weld joint geometry, (2) a phase transformation model based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) theory, and (3) a one-dimensional numerical diffusion model considering multiple moving interfaces. To check the capabilities of the developed models, several cases were investigated, in which the predictions from the models were compared with the experimental results. The cases studied are the follows. For the modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow, the welding processes studied included gas tungsten arc (GTA) linear welding, GTA transient spot welding, and GMA fillet welding. The calculated weldment geometry and thermal cycles was validated against the experimental data under various welding conditions. For the modeling of microstructural evolution, the welded

  15. Graphical debugging of combinational geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.; Smith, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A graphical debugger for combinatorial geometry being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described. The prototype debugger consists of two parts: a FORTRAN-based ''view'' generator and a Microsoft Windows application for displaying the geometry. Options and features of both modules are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options available are presented. The potential for utilizing the images produced using the debugger as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is discussed as is the future direction of the development

  16. Recent developments in pipeline welding practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen chapters are included: overview of pipeline welding systems and quality assurance, CRC automatic welding system, H.C. Price Co. automatic welding system, semi-automatic MIG-welding process, partial penetration welding of steel pipes for gas distribution, construction procedures and quality control in offshore pipeline construction, welding in repair and maintenance of gas transmission pipelines, British Gas studies of welding on pressurized gas transmission pipelines, hot tapping pipelines, underwater welding for offshore pipelines and associated equipment, radial friction welding, material composition vs weld properties, review of NDT of pipeline welds, and safety assurance in pipeline construction. A bibliography of approximately 150 references is included, arranged according to subject and year.

  17. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmak, A.; Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Tadić, S.; Djurdjević, A. A.; Čeković, I. R.; Dončeva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2016), s. 637-641 ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding * defect * heat input * maximum temperature Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2016 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-9836/2016/0354-98361500147D.pdf

  18. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  19. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  20. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  1. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  2. Grain structure, texture and mechanical property evolution of automotive aluminium sheet during high power ultrasonic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddadi, Farid; Tsivoulas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (HPUSW) is a joining technique which is performed within less than a second and provides a more energy-efficient alternative to friction stir spot welding (FSSW), which is considered a longer cycle manufacturing process for joining automotive alloys. To date, only a few reports exist on the deformation mechanisms that take place during high power ultrasonic spot welding. In this work, dynamic recrystallization and grain growth were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). HPUSW causes extensive deformation within the weld zone where the temperature increases to 440 °C. An ultra-fine grain structure was observed in a thin band of flat weld interface within a short welding time of 0.10 s. With increasing welding time the interface was displaced and ‘folds’ or ‘crests’ appeared together with shear bands. The weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal and eventually to a convoluted wave-like pattern when the tool fully penetrated the workpiece, having a wavelength of ~ 1 mm after 0.40 s. Finally, the microstructure and texture varied significantly depending on the location within the weld. Although the texture near the weld interface was relatively weak, a shift was observed with increasing welding time from an initially Cube-dominated texture to one where the typical β-fibre Brass component prevailed. - Highlights: •Lap shear strength of ~2.9 kN was achieved in 0.30 sec welding time. •Temperature approached 440 °C along the weld centreline for the highest welding time. •The texture near the teeth was dominated by Brass, P and S components at optimum condition. •The weld interface showed typical β-fibre deformation texture at optimum condition.

  3. Grain structure, texture and mechanical property evolution of automotive aluminium sheet during high power ultrasonic welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddadi, Farid, E-mail: farid.haddadi@gmail.com [Clemson University–International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR), #347, 4 Research Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 (United States); School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Tsivoulas, Dimitrios, E-mail: dim.tsivoulas@gmail.com [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Clean Energy/Nuclear Services, Amec Foster Wheeler, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (HPUSW) is a joining technique which is performed within less than a second and provides a more energy-efficient alternative to friction stir spot welding (FSSW), which is considered a longer cycle manufacturing process for joining automotive alloys. To date, only a few reports exist on the deformation mechanisms that take place during high power ultrasonic spot welding. In this work, dynamic recrystallization and grain growth were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). HPUSW causes extensive deformation within the weld zone where the temperature increases to 440 °C. An ultra-fine grain structure was observed in a thin band of flat weld interface within a short welding time of 0.10 s. With increasing welding time the interface was displaced and ‘folds’ or ‘crests’ appeared together with shear bands. The weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal and eventually to a convoluted wave-like pattern when the tool fully penetrated the workpiece, having a wavelength of ~ 1 mm after 0.40 s. Finally, the microstructure and texture varied significantly depending on the location within the weld. Although the texture near the weld interface was relatively weak, a shift was observed with increasing welding time from an initially Cube-dominated texture to one where the typical β-fibre Brass component prevailed. - Highlights: •Lap shear strength of ~2.9 kN was achieved in 0.30 sec welding time. •Temperature approached 440 °C along the weld centreline for the highest welding time. •The texture near the teeth was dominated by Brass, P and S components at optimum condition. •The weld interface showed typical β-fibre deformation texture at optimum condition.

  4. The Effect of Polymer Pipe Weld Geometry on Creep Lifetime

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ševčík, Martin; Knésl, Zdeněk; Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 175-178 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC101/09/J027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : creep * stress concentration factor * lifetime * triaxiality Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue , Friction Mechanics

  5. Characterization of Cassini GPHS fueled clad production girth welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Moyer, M.W.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Placr, A.; Howard, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Fueled clads for radioisotope power systems are produced by encapsulating 238 PuO 2 in iridium alloy cups, which are joined at their equators by gas tungsten arc welding. Cracking problems at the girth weld tie-in area during production of the Galileo/Ulysses GPHS capsules led to the development of a first-generation ultrasonic test for girth weld inspection at the Savannah River Plant. A second-generation test and equipment with significantly improved sensitivity and accuracy were jointly developed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Westinghouse Savannah River Company for use during the production of Cassini GPHS capsules by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The test consisted of Lamb wave ultrasonic scanning of the entire girth weld from each end of the capsule combined with a time-of-flight evaluation to aid in characterizing nonrelevant indications. Tangential radiography was also used as a supplementary test for further evaluation of reflector geometry. Each of the 317 fueled GP HS capsules, which were girth welded for the Cassini Program, was subjected to a series of nondestructive tests that included visual, dimensional, helium leak rate, and ultrasonic testing. Thirty-three capsules were rejected prior to ultrasonic testing. Of the 44 capsules rejected by the standard ultrasonic test, 22 were upgraded to flight quality through supplementary testing for an overall process acceptance rate of 82.6%. No confirmed instances of weld cracking were found

  6. Underwater Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Esam F. Alajmi; Ahmad A. Alqenaei

    2017-01-01

    Welding demand in offshore and marine applications is increased with the increasing in oil and gas activities as well as increasing in the marine transportation and industrial applications. Applications of underwater welding well be increased in Kuwait in the coming years due to the strategic directive of the country toward starting the offshore oil and gas exploration and production, and the increase in marine transportation projects. Therefore, there is a need to understand the concept of u...

  7. An Investigation on the Influence of Root Defects on the Fatigue Life of the Welded Structure of a Large Two-Stroke Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders V.; Olesen, John Forbes; Agerskov, Henning

    2004-01-01

    -models of the welded joints, are described and the results presented. In addition, large-scale test specimens with controlled lack-of-fusion weld root geometry were manufactured and fatigue tested to develop S-N curves and determine threshold stress intensity factor range values. These were established for opening......The crankshaft housings of large two-stroke diesel engines are welded structures subjected to constant amplitude loading and designed for infinite life at full design load. A new design of the so-called frame box has been introduced in the engine using butt welded joints of thick plates, welded...

  8. Kerr geometry in f(T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, Cecilia; Guzman, Maria Jose [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferraro, Rafael [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-02-01

    Null tetrads are shown to be a valuable tool in teleparallel theories of modified gravity. We use them to prove that Kerr geometry remains a solution for a wide family of f(T) theories of gravity. (orig.)

  9. Kerr geometry in f(T) gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejarano, Cecilia; Guzman, Maria Jose; Ferraro, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Null tetrads are shown to be a valuable tool in teleparallel theories of modified gravity. We use them to prove that Kerr geometry remains a solution for a wide family of f(T) theories of gravity. (orig.)

  10. Study on laser welding of austenitic stainless steel by varying incident angle of pulsed laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Bandyopadhyay, Asish

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, AISI 304 stainless steel sheets are laser welded in butt joint configuration using a robotic control 600 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The objective of the work is of twofold. Firstly, the study aims to find out the effect of incident angle on the weld pool geometry, microstructure and tensile property of the welded joints. Secondly, a set of experiments are conducted, according to response surface design, to investigate the effects of process parameters, namely, incident angle of laser beam, laser power and welding speed, on ultimate tensile strength by developing a second order polynomial equation. Study with three different incident angle of laser beam 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg has been presented in this work. It is observed that the weld pool geometry has been significantly altered with the deviation in incident angle. The weld pool shape at the top surface has been altered from semispherical or nearly spherical shape to tear drop shape with decrease in incident angle. Simultaneously, planer, fine columnar dendritic and coarse columnar dendritic structures have been observed at 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg incident angle respectively. Weld metals with 85.5 deg incident angle has higher fraction of carbide and δ-ferrite precipitation in the austenitic matrix compared to other weld conditions. Hence, weld metal of 85.5 deg incident angle achieved higher micro-hardness of ∼280 HV and tensile strength of 579.26 MPa followed by 89.7 deg and 83 deg incident angle welds. Furthermore, the predicted maximum value of ultimate tensile strength of 580.50 MPa has been achieved for 85.95 deg incident angle using the developed equation where other two optimum parameter settings have been obtained as laser power of 455.52 W and welding speed of 4.95 mm/s. This observation has been satisfactorily validated by three confirmatory tests.

  11. Upgrading weld quality of a friction stir welded aluminum alloys AMG6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, I. K.; Vasil'ev, E. V.; Matuzko, E. N.; Krivonos, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    In the course of introduction of FSW technology into the industry there is a keen interest in this process; there are issues such as how does joining take place, what is the structure of the joint, and where there are dangerous zones. The objective of this research is to obtain information about the structure of the joint, what are the temperatures that arise during the joining, what strength is apply to the tool when joining the material, what tensile strength of joint, and where fracture tended to occur. Specimens were produced at different modes of welding at a tool rotation speed of 315 to 625 rpm and tool travel speed of 40 to 125 mm/min. During the experiment, the strength applied to the tool was measured, which reached 800016000 N (Fz) and 400-1400 N (Fx) and the temperature on the surface of the tool, which is in the range 250-400°C. Before the welding process the tool was heated to a temperature in the range of 100-250 degrees, but the tensile strength is not had a tangible impact. The tensile strength is about 80 % of that of the aluminum alloy base metal tensile strength, and fracture tended is occur not at the line of joint but follow the shape of the tool. In the transverse cross section of a FSW material there is a microstructural regions such as weld nugget, thermomechanically affected zone and heat-affected zone with parent material.

  12. Geometry of Quantum States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hook, D W

    2008-01-01

    applications of the geometric approach. The first four chapters contain the standard mathematics required to understand the rest of the material presented: specific areas in colour theory, set theory, probability theory, differential geometry and projective geometry are all covered with an eye to the material that follows. Chapter 5 starts the first real discussion of quantum theory in GQS and serves as an elegant, succinct introduction to the geometry which underlies quantum theory. This may be the most worthwhile chapter for the casual reader who wants to understand the key ideas in this field. Chapter 6 builds on the discussion in Chapter 5, introducing a group theoretic approach to understand coherent states and Chapter 7 describes a geometric tool in the form of an approach to complex projective geometry called 'the stellar representation'. Chapter 8 returns to a more purely quantum mechanical discussion as the authors turn to study the space of density matrices. This chapter completes the discussion which started in Chapter 5. Chapter 9 begins the part of the book concerned with applications of the geometric approach. From this point on the book aims, specifically, to prepare the reader for the material in Chapter 15 beginning with a discussion on the purification of mixed quantum states. In the succeeding chapters a definite choice has been made to present a geometric approach to certain quantum information problems. For example, Chapter 10 contains an extremely well formulated discussion of measurement and positive operator-valued measures with several well illustrated examples and Chapter 11 reopens the discussion of density matrices. Entropy and majorization are again revisited in Chapter 12 in much greater detail than in previous chapters. Chapters 13 and 14 concern themselves with a discussion of various metrics and their relation to the problem of distinguishing between probability distributions and their suitability as probability measures. (book review)

  13. A Case Study for the Welding of Dissimilar EN AW 6082 and EN AW 5083 Aluminum Alloys by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefika Kasman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of keeping constant the tool rotational speed to the welding speed ratio (υ ratio on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of EN AW6082-T6 and EN AW5083-H111. Two different pins shaped as triangular and pentagonal were associated with the constant υ ratio. From the tensile test results, it was found that the υ ratio does not create an evident change in the weld joint strength. The small cavity- and tunnel-type defects were observed at the nugget zone and located on the advancing side of the pin. These defects caused a decrease in the strength and elongation of the weld joint. The most important inference obtained from the experimental results is that if the υ ratio is kept constant, the weld joint strength for each weld does not correspond to a constant value.

  14. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  15. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens

    2009-06-01

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  16. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  17. Effect of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on the Mechanical and Microstructure Properties of the Al-Cu Butt Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sare Celik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid-state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. FSW is especially suitable to join sheet Al alloys, and this technique allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 Al alloys and commercially pure Cu were produced at three different tool rotation speeds (630, 1330, 2440 rpm and three different tool traverse speeds (20, 30, 50 mm/min with four different tool position (0, 1, 1.5, 2 mm by friction stir welding. The influence of the welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was investigated. Tensile and bending tests and microhardness measurements were used to determine the mechanical properties. The microstructures of the weld zone were investigated by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM and were analyzed in an energy dispersed spectrometer (EDS. Intermetallic phases were detected based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis results that evaluated the formation of phases in the weld zone. When the welding performance of the friction stir welded butt joints was evaluated, the maximum value obtained was 89.55% with a 1330 rpm tool rotational speed, 20 mm/min traverse speed and a 1 mm tool position configuration. The higher tensile strength is attributed to the dispersion strengthening of the fine Cu particles distributed over the Al material in the stir zone region.

  18. Metallurgical and Mechanical Characterization of High Temperature Titanium Alloys Joined by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Kapil Dev

    In the world of joining, riveting and additive manufacturing, weight reduction, and omission of defects (at both macro and micro level) remain of paramount. Therefore, in the wake of ubiquitous fusion welding (FW) and widely accepted approach of riveting using Inconel bolts to resist corrosion at higher temperature, friction stir welding (FSW) has emerged as a novice jewel in friction based additive manufacturing industry. With advancements in automation of welding process and tool material, FSW of materials with higher work hardening such as steel and titanium has also become probable. Process and property relations associated with FSW are inevitable in case of dissimilar titanium alloys, due to presence of heterogeneity (whether atrocious or advantageous) in and around the weld nugget. These process property relationships are needed to be studied and addressed properly in order to optimize the processing window for improved mechanical and metallurgical properties. In this study FSWed similar and dissimilar butt joints of α+β, and near α titanium, alloys have been produced for varying processing conditions in order to study the effect of rotation speed (rpm) and traverse speed (TS; mm-min-1). The aim of this study is to assess the effect of tool geometry, tool rpm, TS on microstructure and mechanical properties of most widely used α+β titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64), standard grain and fine grain in addition to α+β,Ti-5Al-4V (T-54M), standard grain, and near α, Ti-6Al-2Mo-4Zr-2Sn (Ti-6242), standard grain (SG) and fine grain (FG). During FSW, a unique α+β fine-grained microstructure has been formed depending on whether or not the peak temperature in the weld nugget (WN) reached above or below β transus temperature. The resulting microstructure consists of acicular α+β, emanating from the prior β grain boundary as the weld cools off. The changes in the microstructure are observed by optical microscopy (OM). Later, a detailed analysis of material

  19. Advances of orbital gas tungsten arc welding for Brazilian space applications – experimental setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Orlowski de Garcia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes details of the several steps of the technology involved for the orbital Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process of pure commercially titanium tubes. These pieces will be used to connect the several components of the propulsion system of the China-Brazilian Satellite CBERS, and is part of the Brazilian aerospace industry development. The implantation involved the steps of environment control; cut and facing of the base metal; cleaning procedures; piece alignment; choice of the type, geometry and installation of the tungsten electrode; system for the pressure of the purge gas; manual tack welding; choice of the welding parameters; and, finally, the qualification of welding procedures. Three distinct welding programs were studied, using pulsed current with increasing speed, continuous current and pulsed current with decreasing amperage levels. The results showed that the high quality criteria required to the aerospace segment is such that usual welding operations must be carefully designed and executed. The three welding developed programs generated welds free of defects and with adequate morphology, allowing to select the condition that better fits the Brazilian aerospace segment, and to be implanted in the welding of the CBERS Satellite Propulsion System.

  20. Real-Time Measurement of Width and Height of Weld Beads in GMAW Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Emilio Pinto-Lopera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Associated to the weld quality, the weld bead geometry is one of the most important parameters in welding processes. It is a significant requirement in a welding project, especially in automatic welding systems where a specific width, height, or penetration of weld bead is needed. This paper presents a novel technique for real-time measuring of the width and height of weld beads in gas metal arc welding (GMAW using a single high-speed camera and a long-pass optical filter in a passive vision system. The measuring method is based on digital image processing techniques and the image calibration process is based on projective transformations. The measurement process takes less than 3 milliseconds per image, which allows a transfer rate of more than 300 frames per second. The proposed methodology can be used in any metal transfer mode of a gas metal arc welding process and does not have occlusion problems. The responses of the measurement system, presented here, are in a good agreement with off-line data collected by a common laser-based 3D scanner. Each measurement is compare using a statistical Welch’s t-test of the null hypothesis, which, in any case, does not exceed the threshold of significance level α = 0.01, validating the results and the performance of the proposed vision system.