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Sample records for weld solidification cracking

  1. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  2. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  3. Experimental and theoretical evaluation of solidification cracking in weld metal

    OpenAIRE

    F.M.L. Arantes; Trevisan, R. E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this work is to compare the compatibility and reliability of the theoretical andexperimental methodologies in the evaluation of the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainlesssteel weld metal, using three different electrodes.Design/methodology/approach: The cracking susceptibility of welds is described here through an experimentalprocedure using the transvarestraint test, and a theoretical procedure developed as a function of the chemicalcomp...

  4. Predicting weld solidification cracking using damage mechanics -- LDRD summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.; Krafcik, J.S.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the efforts to develop and validate a finite element based model to predict weld solidification cracking behavior. Such a model must capture the solidification behavior, the thermal behavior in the weld pool region, the material mechanical response, and some failure criteria to determine when solidification cracking will occur. For such a program to be successful, each aspect of the model had to be accurately modeled and verified since the output of one portion of the model served as the input to other portions of the model. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was developed and used in both the thermal and mechanical finite element analysis. High magnification video techniques were developed to measure strains for validation of the mechanical predictions using a strain rate and temperature dependent constitutive model. This model was coupled with a ductile void growth damage model and correlated with experimental observations to determine capabilities of predicting cracking response. A two phase (solid + liquid) material model was also developed that can be used to more accurately capture the mechanics of weld solidification cracking. In general, reasonable agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment for location of crack initiation and extent of cracking for 6061-T6 aluminum. 35 refs.

  5. Mechanisms for Solidification Crack Initiation and Growth in Aluminum Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniglio, N.; Cross, C. E.

    2009-11-01

    In the present work, mechanisms are proposed for solidification crack initiation and growth in aluminum alloy 6060 arc welds. Calculations for an interdendritic liquid pressure drop, made using the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) model, demonstrate that cavitation as a liquid fracture mechanism is not likely to occur except at elevated levels of hydrogen content. Instead, a porosity-based crack initiation model has been developed based upon pore stability criteria, assuming that gas pores expand from pre-existing nuclei. Crack initiation is taken to occur when stable pores form within the coherent dendrite region, depending upon hydrogen content. Following initiation, crack growth is modeled using a mass balance approach, controlled by local strain rate conditions. The critical grain boundary liquid deformation rate needed for solidification crack growth has been determined for a weld made with a 16 pct 4043 filler addition, based upon the local strain rate measurement and a simplified strain rate partitioning model. Combined models show that hydrogen and strain rate control crack initiation and growth, respectively. A hypothetical hydrogen strain rate map is presented, defining conceptually the combined conditions needed for cracking and porosity.

  6. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. U. Anaele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated, E 308-16(lime-titania coated electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range of 1.5≤Creq./Nieq.≤1.9 and solidified with a duplex mode and were found to be resistant to solidification cracking. The E 308-16 weld metal had the greatest resistance to solidification cracking. Joints produced from E 310-16 had Creq./Nieq. ratio 1.9 and solidified with ferrite mode. It had a low resistance to solidification cracking.

  7. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (ΔT) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. ΔT increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of ΔT was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in ΔT and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  8. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (Δ T) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. Δ T increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of Δ T was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in Δ T and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  9. Thermal-mechanical modeling and experimental validation of weld solidification cracking in 6061-T6 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.

    1997-12-31

    Finite element simulation using an internal state variable constitutive model coupled with a void growth and damage model are used to study weld solidification cracking of 6061-T6 aluminum. Calculated results are compared with data from an experimental program determining the locations of failure as a function of weld process parameters and specimen geometry. Two types of weld solidification cracking specimen were studied. One specimen, in which cracking did not occur, was used to evaluate finite element simulations of the thermal response and calculations of average strain across the weld. The other specimen type was used to determine the location of crack initiation as a function of weld process parameters. This information was used to evaluate the finite element simulations of weld solidification cracking. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was used in both thermal and mechanical finite element analyses. A strain rate and temperature history dependent constitutive model is coupled with a ductile void growth damage model in the mechanical analyses. Stresses near the weld pool are examined to explain results obtained in the finite element analyses and correlated with experimental observations. Good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment for locations of crack initiation and extent of cracking. Some effects of uncertainties in material parameters are discussed.

  10. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    OpenAIRE

    J. U. Anaele; O. O. ONYEMAOBI; C. S. Nwobodo; C. C. Ugwuegbu

    2015-01-01

    The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated), E 308-16(lime-titania coated) electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range...

  11. Development of laser beam welding transverse-varestraint test for assessment of solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Eun-Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds of type 310S stainless steel, a transverse-Varestraint testing system using a laser beam welding apparatus was newly constructed. The timing-synchronization between the laser oscillator, welding robot and hydraulic pressure devices was established by employing high-speed camera observations together with electrical signal control among the three components. Moreover, the yoke-drop time measured by the camera was used to prevent underestimation of the crack length. The laser beam melt-run welding used a variable welding speed from 10.0 to 40.0 mm/s, while the gas tungsten arc welding varied the welding speed from 1.67 to 5.00 mm/s. As the welding speed increased from 1.67 to 40.0mm/s, the solidification brittle temperature range of type 310S stainless steel welds was reduced from 146 to 120 K. It follows that employing the laser beam welding process mitigates the solidification cracking susceptibility for type 310S stainless steel welds.

  12. Towards a Map of Solidification Cracking Risk in Laser Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, María-Asunción Valiente; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Hurtig, Kjell; Karlsson, Leif; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    In this work, two series of specimens with Hammar and Svensson's Cr- and Ni-equivalents (Creq+Nieq) = 35 and 45 wt% were used to cover a wide range of austenitic grades. These were laser welded with different energy inputs achieving cooling rates in the range of 103 °C/s to 104 °C/s. As high cooling rates and rapid solidification conditions could favour fully austenitic solidification and therefore raise susceptibility to solidification cracking, the solidification modes of the laser welded specimens were compared to the ones experienced by the same alloys under arc welding conditions. It was found that high cooling rates experienced in laser welding promoted fully austenitic solidification for a wider range of compositions, for example specimens with (Creq+Nieq) = 35% under arc welding cooling conditions at 10 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.30, whilst the same specimens laser cooled at 103 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.50 and those cooled at 104 °C/s showed it up to Creq/Nieq = 1.68. Therefore, high cooling rates extended the solidification cracking risk to a wider range of Creq/Nieq values. This work also compares the cooling rates experimentally determined by thermocouples to the computed cooling rates calculated by a highly-advanced computational model. The distance between the thermocouple's wires and the thermal resistance of thermocouples together with the small size of the weld pools proved to be practical limitations in the experimental determination of cooling rates. However, an excellent agreement was found between computed and experimental solidus isotherms at high energy input settings. For low energy input settings cooling rate was in the order of magnitude of 104 °C/s, whilst for high energy input settings cooling rate was found to be in the order of magnitude of 103 °C/s.

  13. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present thesis is to make advancements in understanding solidification crack formation in aluminum welds, by investigating in particular the aluminum 6060/4043 system. Alloy 6060 is typical of a family of Al-Mg-Si extrusion alloys, which are considered weldable only when using an appropriate filler alloy such as 4043 (Al-5Si). The effect of 4043 filler dilution (i.e. weld metal silicon content) on cracking sensitivity and solidification path of Alloy 6060 welds are investigated. Afterwards, cracking models are developed to propose mechanisms for solidification crack initiation and growth. Cracking Sensitivity. Building upon the concept that silicon improves weldability and that weldability can be defined by a critical strain rate, strain rate-composition combinations required for solidification crack formation in the Al- 6060/4043 system were determined using the newly developed Controlled Tensile Weldability (CTW) test utilizing local strain extensometer measurements. Results, presented in a critical strain rate - dilution map, show a crack - no crack boundary which reveals that higher local strain rates require higher 4043 filler dilution to avoid solidification cracking when arc welding Alloy 6060. Using the established crack - no crack boundary as a line of reference, additional parameters were examined and their influence on cracking characterized. These parameter influences have included studies of weld travel speed, weld pool contaminants (Fe, O, and H), and grain refiner additions (TiAl{sub 3} + Boron). Each parameter has been independently varied and its effect on cracking susceptibility quantified in terms of strain rate - composition combinations. Solidification Path. Solidification path of the Al-6060/4043 system was characterized using thermal analysis and phase identification. Increasing 4043 filler dilution from 0 to 16% in Alloy 6060 arc welds resulted in little effect on thermal arrests and microstructure, no effect on

  14. Initiation and growth kinetics of solidification cracking during welding of steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucott, L; Huang, D; Dong, H B; Wen, S W; Marsden, J A; Rack, A; Cocks, A C F

    2017-01-11

    Solidification cracking is a key phenomenon associated with defect formation during welding. To elucidate the failure mechanisms, solidification cracking during arc welding of steel are investigated in situ with high-speed, high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography. Damage initiates at relatively low true strain of about 3.1% in the form of micro-cavities at the weld subsurface where peak volumetric strain and triaxiality are localised. The initial micro-cavities, with sizes from 10 × 10-6 m to 27 × 10-6 m, are mostly formed in isolation as revealed by synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography. The growth of micro-cavities is driven by increasing strain induced to the solidifying steel. Cavities grow through coalescence of micro-cavities to form micro-cracks first and then through the propagation of micro-cracks. Cracks propagate from the core of the weld towards the free surface along the solidifying grain boundaries at a speed of 2-3 × 10-3 m s-1.

  15. Initiation and growth kinetics of solidification cracking during welding of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucott, L.; Huang, D.; Dong, H. B.; Wen, S. W.; Marsden, J. A.; Rack, A.; Cocks, A. C. F.

    2017-01-01

    Solidification cracking is a key phenomenon associated with defect formation during welding. To elucidate the failure mechanisms, solidification cracking during arc welding of steel are investigated in situ with high-speed, high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography. Damage initiates at relatively low true strain of about 3.1% in the form of micro-cavities at the weld subsurface where peak volumetric strain and triaxiality are localised. The initial micro-cavities, with sizes from 10 × 10-6 m to 27 × 10-6 m, are mostly formed in isolation as revealed by synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography. The growth of micro-cavities is driven by increasing strain induced to the solidifying steel. Cavities grow through coalescence of micro-cavities to form micro-cracks first and then through the propagation of micro-cracks. Cracks propagate from the core of the weld towards the free surface along the solidifying grain boundaries at a speed of 2-3 × 10-3 m s-1.

  16. Finite element modeling of the effect of welding parameters on solidification cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steel 310

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam Ranjbarnodeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A transient thermo-mechanical model is employed to study the effects of welding parameters on the occurrence of solidification cracking. A finite element program, ANSYS, is employed to solve the thermal and mechanical equations while the different variables such as welding current, speed and sequence are considered in the simulation. The studied geometry was butt joint of two stainless steel plates with the thickness of 2 mm. Then, the samples were welded by TIG method without filler. To verify the numerical results, the model outputs were checked with the experimental observations and good agreement was observed. It was found that the increasing of welding current from 70 A to 100 A resulted in the increase in transverse tensile strain from 1.2 to 2.1 which can facilitate the occurrence of solidification cracking. Furthermore, the application of symmetric welding layout is an effective method to prevent solidification cracking.

  17. Studies of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    During the present work crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including ·Application of known information to predict solidification phases from the alloy...... composition. ·Weld metal solidification rate measurements for prediction of phases. ·Various crack tests to assess the crack susceptibility of alloys. ·A combination of the above for selection of suitable, weldable alloys. The possibility of using such specific methods for alloys and applications has been...... investigated and recommendations are given. From studies of literature it is found that the austenitic stainless steels have lowest crack susceptibility by a solidification course leaving approximately 15% rest ferrite in the weld metal. The alloys properties and the solidification rate determines the amount...

  18. Hot cracking of Structural Steel during Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda Huitron, Rosa M.; Vuorinen, Esa

    2017-10-01

    Laser welding is an important technique in many industries due to its high precision in operation, its local and fast processing, narrow welds and its good weld surface quality. However, the process can involve some complications due to the rapid heating and cooling of the material processed, resulting in physical and metallurgical effects as thermal contraction during solidification, giving as a result the presence of residual stresses in the narrow weld. Formation of defects during the process is an important topic to be evaluated in order to achieve better performance of the steels in use. In the present work, defects formed during laser welding of a structural steel have been investigated. The defects formed have been identified and the causes of the defects are discussed. Possible strategies for improvement of the welding procedure and final weld result are proposed. The defects were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and hardness measurement. Cracks were located in the middle of the fusion zone and followed both inter-granular and trans-granular paths. Impurities as manganese sulphides were found along the welding direction, and could act as sites for crack formation. The cracks formed during solidification of the weld are identified as solidification cracks. This kind of cracks is usually caused by solidification shrinkage and thermal contractions during the process, which appear in the fusion zone and sometimes in the heat affected zone.

  19. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate...... measurements for prediction of phases, (3) Various crack tests to assess the crack susceptibility of alloys and (4) A combination of the above for selection of suitable, weldable alloys. The possibility of using such specific methods for alloys and applications has been investigated and recommendations...... crack tests, the Weeter spot weld test has been chosen to form a basis for the development of a practicable method to select specific alloys for welding applications. A new test, the Groove weld test was developed, which has reduced the time consumption and lightened the analysis effort considerably...

  20. Development of a High Chromium Ni-Base Filler Metal Resistant to Ductility Dip Cracking and Solidification Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Adam T.

    Many nuclear reactor components previously constructed with Ni-based alloys containing 20 wt% Cr have been found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The nuclear power industry now uses high chromium (˜30wt%) Ni-based filler metals to mitigate stress corrosion cracking. Current alloys are plagued with weldability issues, either solidification cracking or ductility dip cracking (DDC). Solidification cracking is related to solidification temperature range and the DDC is related to the fraction eutectic present in the microstructure. It was determined that an optimal alloy should have a solidification temperature range less than 150°C and at least 2% volume fraction eutectic. Due to the nature of the Nb rich eutectic that forms, it is difficult to avoid both cracking types simultaneously. Through computational modeling, alternative eutectic forming elements, Hf and Ta, have been identified as replacements for Nb in such alloys. Compositions have been optimized through a combination of computational and experimental techniques combined with a design of experiment methodology. Small buttons were melted using commercially pure materials in a copper hearth to obtain the desired compositions. These buttons were then subjected to a gas tungsten arc spot weld. A type C thermocouple was used to acquire the cooling history during the solidification process. The cooling curves were processed using Single Sensor Differential Thermal Analysis to determine the solidification temperature range, and indicator of solidification cracking susceptibility. Metallography was performed to determine the fraction eutectic present, an indicator of DDC resistance. The optimal level of Hf to resist cracking was found to be 0.25 wt%. The optimal level of Ta was found to be 4 wt%. gamma/MC type eutectics were found to form first in all Nb, Ta, and Hf-bearing compositions. Depending on Fe and Cr content, gamma/Laves eutectic was sometimes found in Nb and Ta-bearing compositions, while

  1. [Cracking in laser welds of dental Ni-Cr alloys. Effect of alloy composition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Y

    1990-06-01

    For the purpose of clarifying the effect of alloy compositions on cracking in laser welds of dental Ni-Cr alloys, 12 commercial and 11 experimental Ni-Cr alloys for crown and bridges were subjected to pulsed YAG laser spot welding, and their welds were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, and EDX and thermal analysis methods. Main conclusions are as follows. 1. Cracks in laser welds were solidification cracks at grain boundaries in weld fusion zones. 2. In the case of commercial dental Ni-Cr alloys, a considerable number of eutectics enriched in Si, A1 and/or S were formed. Greater cracking susceptibility was interpreted by considering that these eutectics solidified at solidification temperatures far lower than the nominal solidus. 3. In the case of experimental Ni-Cr alloys with a small amount of eutectics, S and Si enhanced cracking sensitivity, but Mn reduced cracking. 4. The above results suggest that it is beneficial to the prevention or reduction of cracking to decrease harmful elements such as Si and S forming low solidification temperature eutectics or to add some elements such as Mn forming higher solidification temperature eutectics instead of lower ones.

  2. Investigation of welding crack in micro laser welded NiTiNb shape memory alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy dissimilar metals joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhua, Chen; Yuqing, Mao; Weiwei, Lu; Peng, He

    2017-06-01

    Dissimilar metals of NiTiNb shape memory alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy with a same thickness of 0.2 mm were joined by micro laser welding. The effect of laser power on crack sensitivity of the weld was investigated. The results show that full penetrated welds are obtained when the laser power of 7.2 W is used, many cracks are observed in the weld. With increasing the laser power to 12 W, the number of all cracks and cracking width first increase and then decrease. By XRD analysis, three different kinds of Ti2Ni, NbNi3 and AlNbTi2 intermetallic compounds are found in the weld. According to the formation enthalpy and binary phase diagram, brittle Ti2Ni phase with more contents is existed in the weld due to final solidification, and which is the main reason of crack formation along with large stress concentration. Moreover, the welding cracks like the weld center longitudinal solidification cracks, weld metal toe transversal liquid cracks, heat-affected-zone hot cracks and crater cracks are classified in the laser welded joints. A brittle cleavage fracture with cleavage planes and river patterns in the joints is presented from the fracture surface.

  3. Solidification Behavior and Weldability of Dissimilar Welds Between a Cr-Free, Ni-Cu Welding Consumable and Type 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Liang, Dong; Alexandrov, Boian T.; Frankel, Gerald S.; Lippold, John C.

    2012-04-01

    The solidification behavior of a Cr-free welding consumable based on the Ni-Cu system was evaluated in conjunction with Type 304L stainless steel. The weld metal microstructure evolution was evaluated with optical and secondary electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, button melting, and thermodynamic (CALPHAD-based) modeling. Solidification partitioning patterns showed that higher dilutions of the filler metal by Type 304L increased segregation of Ti, Cu, and Si to interdendritic regions. Button melting experiments showed a widening of the solidification temperature range with increasing dilution because of the expansion of the austenite solidification range and formation of Ti(C,N) via a eutectic reaction. The model predictions showed good correlation with button melting experiments and were used to evaluate the nature of the Ti(C,N) precipitation reaction. Solidification cracking susceptibility of the weld metal was shown to increase with dilution of 304L stainless steel based on testing conducted with the cast pin tear test. The increase in cracking susceptibility is associated with expansion of the solidification temperature range and the presence of eutectic liquid at the end of solidification that wets solidification grain boundaries.

  4. Experimental study of hot cracking at circular welding joints of 42CrMo steel

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    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Genyu; Chen, Binghua; Wang, Jinhai; Zhou, Cong

    2017-12-01

    The hot cracking at circular welding joints of quenched and tempered 42CrMo steel were studied. The flow of the molten pool and the solidification process of weld were observed with a high-speed video camera. The information on the variations in the weld temperature was collected using an infrared (IR) thermal imaging system. The metallurgical factors of hot cracking were analyzed via metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result shows that leading laser laser-metal active gas (MAG) hybrid welding process has a smaller solid-liquid boundary movement rate (VSL) and a smaller solid-liquid boundary temperature gradient (GSL) compared with leading arc laser-MAG hybrid welding process and laser welding process. Additionally, the metal in the molten pool has superior permeability while flowing toward the dendritic roots and can compensate for the inner-dendritic pressure balance. Therefore, leading laser laser-MAG hybrid welding process has the lowest hot cracking susceptibility.

  5. Numerical Analysis of Hot Cracking in Laser-Hybrid Welded Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Oliver Gebhardt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In welding experiments conducted on heavy wall pipes, the penetration mode (full or partial penetration occurred to be a significant factor influencing appearance of solidification cracks. To explain the observed phenomena and support further optimization of manufacturing processes, a computational model was developed, which used a sophisticated strategy to model the material. High stresses emerged in the models in regions which showed cracking during experiments. In partial penetration welding, they were caused by the prevention of weld shrinkage due to the cold and strong material below the joint. Another identified factor having an influence on high stress localization is bulging of the weld.

  6. Hot cracking during laser welding of steel: influence of the welding parameters and prevention of cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Marcel; Kessler, Steffen; Scheible, Philipp; Speker, Nicolai; Harrer, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    In continuous wave keyhole-mode laser welding of high strength steel alloys hot cracking can occur. The hot crack susceptibility depends on the mutual interaction of several factors like the welding parameters, the alloy composition and the weld fixturing. In this paper we focus on the influence of the welding parameters and investigate the dependency of the laser power, the welding speed and the laser wavelength on the crack formation. X-ray images are used to visualize the hot crack patterns, which exhibit a pronounced periodicity. To influence the hot crack formation, the incident energy input into the process was adapted. For specific welding parameters, we show exemplarily the prevention of hot cracking by the use of a twin-spot optics.

  7. The use of new PHACOMP in understanding the solidification microstructure of nickel base alloy weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, M. J.; Knorovsky, G. A.; Headley, T. J.; Romig, A. D.

    1986-12-01

    The weld metal microstructures of five commercial nickel base alloys (HASTELLOYS* C-4, C-22, and C-276, and INCONELS* 625 and 718) have been examined by electron probe microanalysis and analytical electron microscopy. It has been found that solidification terminates in many of these alloys with the formation of a constituent containing a topologically-close-packed (TCP) intermetallic phase (i.e., σ, P, Laves). Electron microprobe examination of gas-tungsten-arc welds revealed a solidification segregation pattern of Ni depletion and solute enrichment in interdendritic volumes. New PHACOMP calculations performed on these segregation profiles revealed a pattern of increasing M d (metal- d levels) in traversing from a dendrite core to an adjacent interdendritic volume. In alloys forming a terminal solidification TCP constituent, the calculated M d values in interdendritic regions were greater than the critical M d values for formation of σ as stated by Morinaga et al. Implications of the correlation between TCP phase formation and M d in the prediction of weld metal solidification microstructure, prediction of potential hot-cracking behavior, and applications in future alloy design endeavors are discussed.

  8. Arc termination cracks in Inconel 718 and Incoloy 903

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E.; Mccaig, J.; Poorman, R.

    1978-01-01

    The welding of the nickel base, heat resistant alloys that are used extensively for welded Shuttle engine components revealed solidification cracking characteristics at weld termination points. If not detected and removed, these crater cracks may cause costly component failure. To better understand this characteristic, welding termination techniques were studied and methods developed to eliminate crater cracks. It was determined that weld termination solidification cracking can be eliminated by controlled decrease of welding current, welding voltage, wire feed, and travel speed.

  9. Strain signatures associated to the formation of hot cracks during laser beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenlocher, Christian; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The local surface displacement during the laser beam welding process of MgSi alloyed aluminum sheets (AA6014) in overlap configuration was optically determined near the weld seam by means of digital correlation of images recorded with a high-speed video camera. The analysis allowed the time- and space-resolved determination of the plane strain in the immediate vicinity of the solidification zone behind the weld pool. The observations revealed characteristic signatures in the temporal evolution of the strain that are related to the formation of centerline cracks in laser beam welding.

  10. Solidification paths in modified Inconel 625 weld overlay material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Karthik; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hald, John

    2009-01-01

    Inconel 625 is commonly used for overlay welding to protect the base metal against high temperature corrosion. The efficiency of corrosion protection depends on effective mixing of the overlay weld with the base metal and the subsequent segregation of alloy elements during solidification......, focus is put on how the composition of the dendrite core is affected by modifications to the alloy. It has previously been shown that when the overlay material corrodes, the corrosion take place in the dendrite core. Therefore, the discussion will be directed towards explaining the extent to which...

  11. Assessment of The Cracking Properties of Stainless Steel Alloys and their Usability for Laser Welding in Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    2001-01-01

    Methods to assess stainless steel alloys’ cracking properties and usability for laser welding has been studied. Also tests to assess alloys’ susceptibility to hot cracking has been conducted. Among these is the so-called Weeter test which assesses the alloy by executing a number of spot welds...... to provoke cracking in the alloy. In this work the Weeter test has been modified and changed in order to develop a faster and easier test also applicable to small specimens. The new test, called a Groove test differs from the Weeter test by its procedure in which linear seam welds are conducted instead...... of spot welds. The Groove test has the advantage of an easier microscopy and analysis in the welds. Results from crack tests was partly confirmed by predictions made on the basis of the alloy’s constituents and solidification growth rate....

  12. Root Cracking and Maximum Hardness in High-Strength Steel Welds

    OpenAIRE

    Haruyoshi, SUZUKI; Head Office, Nippon Steel Corporation

    1984-01-01

    Effects of maximum hardness in the HAZ on root crack initiation in the JIS-y (oblique- Y groove) cracking test are discussed. The values of critical hydrogen concentration Hc at the location of root crack initiation at 100゜C during cooling, were calculated assuming uniform diffusion of hydrogen through the weld zone. Hc is proportional to the deposited diffusible hydrogen content H_D and is a function of cooling time t_100, from solidification to 100゜C. The values of log Hc decreased linearly...

  13. Contribution to the determination of priority constructive influences on the hot crack initiation of welded components; Beitrag zur Ermittlung vorrangig konstruktiver Einflussgroessen auf die Heissrissinitiierung an geschweissten Bauteilen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollnow, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The previous research results do not allow a general hot crack characterisation although a variety of experimental and numerical knowledge is available. The reason for this is mainly the large number of influencing factors that complicate a complete description of the hot cracking phenomenon and especially solidification cracking. The hot crack formation and thus the solidification crack initiation can be described by the interaction of process, metallurgy and design. However, the literature examination shows that in the solidifaction crack characterisation the influence of the design aspect is often underestimated. The pre-stresses of the structural components is up to now not considered as an essential cause for the formation of solidification cracks. The evaluation of the influence of the various parameters is presented partly inconsistent. In addition, the targeted presentation of the design influence with respect to the solidification cracks in the weld is because the limited transferability of the various component-specific stresses on a laboratory scale and thus to the respective hot cracking tests restricted. Hence, the difficulty to transfer the results between laboratory specimen and component as well as the general hot crack characterisation is given. In this work the different types of stresses from the component welding in the laboratory and to quantify experimentally the solidification crack critical values, displacements and displacement rates were detected. In this regard external loaded hot cracking tests were carried out by using the advantages of contactless measurement techniques close to the weld and to analyse the welding process with respect to various local and global design-specific factors influencing the formation of solidification cracks in high alloyed steel. These investigations were performed on austenitic (1.4828) and ferritic (1.4509) materials with different mechanical and technological properties. To reflect the praxis relevant

  14. Fatigue Crack Growth in Peened Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Scott C.; Hatamleh, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding induces residual stresses that accelerates fatigue crack growth in the weld nugget. Shot peening over the weld had little effect on growth rate. Laser peening over the weld retarded the growth rate: Final crack growth rate was comparable to the base, un-welded material. Crack tunneling evident from residual compressive stresses. 2195-T8 fracture surfaces were highly textured. Texturing makes comparisons difficult as the material system is affecting the data as much as the processing. Material usage becoming more common in space applications requiring additional work to develop useful datasets for damage tolerance analyses.

  15. Effects of the Hot Isostatic Pressing Process on Crack Healing of the Laser Repair-Welded CM247LC Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng-Tu Hsu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of the hot isostatic pressing process on the crack healing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of the laser repair-welded CM247LC precipitation-hardened superalloy. To ensure the strength of the repair-welded area, this study used the direct re-melting approach, and simulated the repair welding with the filler addition, which has a chemical composition matching that of the base superalloy. As expected, different types of cracks, including the solidification crack in the weld fusion zone and various types of liquidation cracks in the heat-affected zone, were observed. Through a proper hot isostatic pressing healing process, all cracks in the weld fusion zone and the heat-affected zone of the repair-welded pieces were healed. At the same time, some nano- and micro-sized carbides tended to form discontinuously along the healed crack trace. A micro-hardness test was conducted in the repair-welded area, and the results were similar to that of the as-cast material.

  16. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be ...

  17. Crack trajectory near a weld: Modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, M.M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2008-01-01

    A 2D computational model of ductile fracture, in which arbitrary crack extension through the mesh is accommodated without mesh bias, is used to study ductile fracture near the weld line in welded aluminum plates. Comparisons of the calculated toughness behavior and crack trajectory are made...

  18. On post-weld heat treatment cracking in tig welded superalloy ATI 718Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Asala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ to cracking in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG welded Allvac 718Plus superalloy during post-weld heat treatment (PWHT was studied. Contrary to the previously reported case of low heat input electron beam welded Allvac 718Plus, where HAZ cracking occurred during PWHT, the TIG welded alloy is crack-free after PWHT, notwithstanding the presence of similar micro-constituents that caused cracking in the low input weld. Accordingly, the formation of brittle HAZ intergranular micro-constituents may not be a sufficient factor to determine cracking propensity, the extent of heat input during welding may be another major factor that influences HAZ cracking during PWHT of the aerospace superalloy Allvac 718Plus.

  19. On post-weld heat treatment cracking in tig welded superalloy ATI 718Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asala, G.; Ojo, O. A.

    The susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ) to cracking in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welded Allvac 718Plus superalloy during post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was studied. Contrary to the previously reported case of low heat input electron beam welded Allvac 718Plus, where HAZ cracking occurred during PWHT, the TIG welded alloy is crack-free after PWHT, notwithstanding the presence of similar micro-constituents that caused cracking in the low input weld. Accordingly, the formation of brittle HAZ intergranular micro-constituents may not be a sufficient factor to determine cracking propensity, the extent of heat input during welding may be another major factor that influences HAZ cracking during PWHT of the aerospace superalloy Allvac 718Plus.

  20. Microstructural analysis of weld cracking in 718 Plus superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Krutika

    chemistries. The main discernible difference was the formation of gamma' as the main strengthening precipitate in 718 Plus alloys in the as received and 950°C solution heat treated condition. The other phases present in the pre-weld microstructure were Nb rich MC type carbides, Ti rich carbonitrides and grain boundary delta phase. Solution heat treated plates of all the three alloys were welded with a sharp focus electron beam with the welding parameters of 44 kV voltage, 79 mA current and 152 cm/min speed. The microsegregation pattern of 718 Plus during solidification of the fusion zone indicated that while Fe, Co, W and Cr segregated to the core of the gamma dendrites, Nb, Ti and Al were extensively rejected into the interdendritic liquid. Electron diffraction and x-ray microanalysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the fusion zone showed that the major secondary phases that formed from the interdendritic liquid were gamma/MC type carbide eutectic and gamma/Laves eutectic constituents. Heat affected Zone (HAZ) microfissuring due to liquation was observed in all the alloys with resolidified products on the liquated and resolidified grain boundaries. Grain boundary liquation and segregation of minor alloying elements was considered to he the primary reason for liquation of HAZ grain boundaries which caused cracking. Evidence of constitutional liquation of Nb rich MC type carbides in 718 Plus was found in the region adjacent to the fusion zone and also on the cracked grain boundaries. The resolidified products along the microfissures consisted of gamma + Laves and gamma + MC type carbide eutectics. Complete and partial healing of microfissuring by backfilling was also observed. Segregation of B was detected by SIMS on the grain boundaries of both the 718 Plus alloys, with higher concentration of Bon HC 49 grain boundaries. Also, for the first time, P was detected by SIMS on the cracked grain boundaries on both the alloys, which confirmed that grain boundary

  1. Cracking in fusion zone and heat affected zone of electron beam welded Inconel-713LC gas turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamanfar, A., E-mail: achamanfar@gmail.com [Département de Génie Mécanique, École de Technologie Supérieure, 1100 rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada); Jahazi, M. [Département de Génie Mécanique, École de Technologie Supérieure, 1100 rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada); Bonakdar, A.; Morin, E. [Siemens Canada Limited, 9545 Côte-de-Liesse, Dorval, Québec, Canada H9P 1A5 (Canada); Firoozrai, A. [Département de Génie Mécanique, École de Technologie Supérieure, 1100 rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada)

    2015-08-26

    Electron beam welding (EBW) of shrouds in Inconel-713LC low pressure gas turbine blades was associated with cracking in fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) leading to a high scrap rate in manufacturing of gas turbine blades. In this study, in order to develop a detailed map of cracks and understand the root cause of cracking, a comprehensive microstructural and numerical analysis was performed. The elemental mapping in scanning electron microscope (SEM)-energy dispersive spectral analysis revealed segregation of alloying elements in the cracked area of FZ and HAZ. In other words, one of the cracking mechanisms in FZ and HAZ was found to be segregation induced liquation and subsequent cracking due to thermal and mechanical tensile stresses generated during EBW. Cracking in FZ also occurred because of low strength of the solidifying weld metal as well as solidification contraction. As well, γ′ dissolution and reprecipitation in HAZ leading to decreased ductility and generation of contraction stresses was another mechanism for cracking in HAZ. The numerical model was capable to predict the cracking location as well as cracking orientation with respect to the weld line.

  2. Cracking susceptibility of aluminum alloys during laser welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Abbaschian

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of laser parameters in welding aluminum alloys was studied in order to reduce hot cracking. The extension of cracks at the welding surface was used as a cracking susceptibility (CS index. It has been shown that the CS changes with changing welding velocity for binary Al-Cu alloys. In general, the CS index increased until a maximum velocity and then dropped to zero, generating a typical lambda-curve. This curve is due to two different mechanisms: 1 the refinement of porosities with increasing velocity and 2 the changes in the liquid fraction due to decreasing microsegregation with increasing velocities.

  3. The cause of welding cracks in aircraft steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J

    1940-01-01

    The discussion in this article refers to gas welding of thin-walled parts of up to about 3 mm thickness. It was proven that by restricting the sulphur, carbon, and phosphorous content, and by electric-furnace production of the steel, it was possible in a short time to remove this defect. Weld hardness - i.e., martensite formation and hardness of the overheated zone - has no connection with the tendency to weld-crack development. Si, Cr, Mo, or V content has no appreciable effect, while increased manganese content tends to reduce the crack susceptibility.

  4. Heat Sink Welding for Preventing Hot Cracking in Alloy 2195 Intersection Welds: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Pingsha; Rogers, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Two concepts, stationary cooling and trailing cooling, were proposed to prevent weld intersection cracking. Finite element analysis was used to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of those two concepts. Both stationary and trailing heat sink setups were proposed for preventing intersection cracking. The cooling media could be liquid nitrogen, or pressured air knife. Welding experiments on the small test panel with the localized heat sink confirmed the feasibility of using such a stationary cooling technique. The required cooling was achieved in this test panel. Systematic welding experiments should be conducted in the future to validate and refine the heat sink technique for preventing intersection cracking.

  5. Prediction of solidification and phase transformation in weld metals for welding of high performance stainless steels; Kotaishoku kotainetsu stainless koyo yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko hentai no yosoku gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, T.; Inoue, H.; Morimoto, H.; Okita, S. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    Prediction technology is introduced on the solidification and transformation of weld metals used for high performance stainless steel. A model has been developed which uses Thermo Calc, a multiple balanced calculation program, as a means to analyze the solidification of multi-component alloys including the polyphase solidification such as eutectic and peritectic. Verification has been in progress concerning the adequacy of this model and the adaptability as a practical steel. The following are the prediction technologies for solidification and transformation which have been derived from experiments and applied to welding techniques: the effects of nitrogen on the solidification mode and residual {gamma}quantity of a welding metal that is required for controlling the welding/solidification of high nitrogen content {gamma}system stainless steel; the structural control of weld metal for high corrosion resistance high Mo stainless steel, in which high Ni and high Mo contents are indispensable for attaining the optimum structure; the structural control of weld metal for two-phase stainless steel containing Mo and N, in which it is essential to secure a high nitrogen content and a {delta}/{gamma}phase balance in a weld metal; and the precipitation prediction of intermetallic compound in a high alloy weld metal for a high alloy stainless steel, for which an explanation is there by Cieslak et al. based on the phase stability theory. 22 refs., 16 figs.

  6. Surface cracking in resistance seam welding of coated steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonyi, Y.; Kimchi, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this experimental work, the focus was on the understanding the electrode-wheel/coated steel surface phenomena by building operational lobes and by correlating the weld quality with static-and dynamic-contact-resistance variation during welding. Conventional AC, DC, and electrode-wire resistance-seam weldability of printed zinc-coated and hot-dipped tin-coated steel was performed in this work, as compared with traditional lead-tin (terne) coating used as reference material. Variables included steel substrate type, welding equipment type, electrode-wheel cleaning practice, and electrode-wire geometry. Optic and electron microscopy were used for the evaluation of specimens extracted from longitudinal cross-sections of representative welds. The size and morphology of surface cracks was characterized and correlated with variations in the above-mentioned parameters. It was found that the tin-coated (unpainted) steel sheet had a superior all-together performance to the zinc-coated steel and terne-coated steel, both in terms of wider weldability lobes and lesser surface cracking. The extent of surface cracking was greatly reduced by using the electrode-wire seam welding process using a longitudinally grooved wire profile, which also widened the corresponding weldability lobes. It was also found that the extent of cracking depended on the electrode knurl geometry, substrate type, and the presence of conductive paint applied on top of the metallic coating. An attempt was made to characterize the specific mechanisms governing the LME phenomenon for the lead-, zinc and tin-based coating systems and to assess the potential for crack propagation in the welds. The dynamic contact resistance was found to be a good measure of the welding process stability and an indicator of defect formation. It was found that the ratio between the static and dynamic contact resistances of the tin-coated sheet was considerably lower than similar ratios for bare and zinc-coated sheet.

  7. Perspective on Double Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Leilei Wang; Jiaxiang Xue

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum alloy welding suffers from problems such as solidification cracking and hydrogen-induced porosity, which are sufficiently severe to limit its potential applications. Because mitigated porosity incidence and solidification cracking are observed in aluminum welds using double pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW), a comprehensive review of the mechanism is necessary, but absent from the literature. The oscillation of arc force and droplet pressure causes a weld pool stir effect. The e...

  8. Probabilistic Model for Fatigue Crack Growth in Welded Bridge Details

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Yalamas, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a probabilistic model for fatigue crack growth in welded steel details in road bridges is presented. The probabilistic model takes the influence of bending stresses in the joints into account. The bending stresses can either be introduced by e.g. misalignment or redistributio...

  9. Rapid solidification in laser welding of stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambon, A. (Univ. di Padova (Italy)); Bonollo, F.

    1994-04-30

    The microstructural characterization of both weld beads and heat affected zones (HAZ) was carried out on austenitic (AISI 304, 316) and duplex (UNS 31803) stainless steels, laser welded under various working parameters (power, traverse speed, shielding gas), by means of light microscopy, SEM, TEM, and image analysis, with the aim of pointing out changes in the amounts of the present phases, with respect to those predicted by equilibrium diagrams. Moreover, an analytical thermal model of laser beam welding was employed in order to evaluate the cooling rates involved in the process. The thermal field analysis, checked by comparing the calculated and the actual weld beads, has been used as a tool aimed at correlating cooling rates and microstructural characteristics. (orig.)

  10. An Experimental Analysis to Reduce Cracks in Arc Welding in MS and SS 304 (L)

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekanand Jha; Mohd. Abbas

    2014-01-01

    cracks are very common welding defects .Cracks can be hot or cold cracks .Cracks can be reduced by various parameters keeping in mind. The various parameters are 1. Preheat 2.Interpass heating 3.Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) 4. Welding speed 5. Energy input 6. Thickness of joint 7. Stresses 8. High current 9. High carbon content. The aim of this experiment was to study different types of cracks formed during welding process and to reduce the cracking of SS 304 (L) and M.S in...

  11. On crack propagation in the welded polyolefin pipes with and without the presence of weld beads

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Jakub; Hutař, Pavel; Nezbedová, E.; Lach, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Ševčík, Martin; Pinter, G.; Grellmann, W.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, DEC (2015), s. 95-104 ISSN 0264-1275 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1560; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Slow crack growth * Butt weld * Lifetime estimation * Polyolefin pipes * Weld bead Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 3.997, year: 2015

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of welded Alloy 600 penetration mockups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarver, J.M. [Babcock and Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.; Pathania, R.S. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Stuckey, K.; Fyfitch, S. [B and W Nuclear Technologies, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Gelpi, A.; Foucault, M. [Framatome, Paris La Defense (France); Hunt, E.S. [Dominion Engineering, McLean, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 in components other than steam generators is a problem of increasing concern for nuclear power plants. Of greatest concern at the present time is the PWSCC of Alloy 600 vessel head penetrations. The common elements of these components are threefold: (1) the Alloy 600 material has a susceptible microstructure, (2) the Alloy 600 material is either a thick-walled tube or a bar which has been machined into a thick-walled tube, and (3) the Alloy 600 material has been welded into a structure such that high residual welding stresses exist in the postwelded Alloy 600 material. The objectives of the present program were to evaluate the PWSCC behavior of various configurations of welded Alloy 600 penetrations, and possible remedial measures which would prevent or retard PWSCC in these components. Mockups were instrumented to permit instantaneous remote sensing of through-wall cracking and were autoclave tested along with control C-rings in a doped steam environment. Following the test exposures, the mockups were split and examined to characterize the cracking morphology and the material microstructure. A Weibull distribution was used to analyze the time-to-failure results, and the observed cracking locations were compared to residual stress levels predicted by an elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the mockups.

  13. Probabilistic Model for Fatigue Crack Growth in Welded Bridge Details

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Yalamas, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a probabilistic model for fatigue crack growth in welded steel details in road bridges is presented. The probabilistic model takes the influence of bending stresses in the joints into account. The bending stresses can either be introduced by e.g. misalignment or redistribution...... of stresses in the structure. The fatigue stress ranges are estimated from traffic measurements and a generic bridge model. Based on the probabilistic models for the resistance and load the reliability is estimated for a typical welded steel detail. The results show that large misalignments in the joints can...

  14. Experimental Determination of the Primary Solidification Phase dependency on the solidification velocity for 17 different austenitic stainless steel compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birthe Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Yardy, John

    1997-01-01

    , the primary solidification phase is found to change from ferrite to austenite.A novel laser remelting technique has been modified to enable the transition velocity for laser welded austenitic stainless steels to be deermined experimentally and on the basis of results from 17 different alloy compositions......When studying laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, hot cracking is frequently observed. To prevent hot cracking in laser welded stainless steel it is advantageous to obtain primary solidification of the ferrite phase that subsequently, on cooling, transforms in the solid state...... to the austenite phase.Most stainless steels are weldable by conventional welding techniques. However, during laser weldng the solidification velocities can be very much higher than by conventional welding techniques. By increasing the solidification velocity to a critical value known as the transition velocity...

  15. Evaluation of cold crack susceptibility on HSLA steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverio-Freire Júnior, R. C.

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study addresses an evaluation of the effect of several welding parameters on cold cracking formation in welded joints of High Strength and Low Alloy steels, as well as the resulting microstructures and hardness values. The main parameters studied include the variation of the preheating temperature, drying time of the electrode, chemical composition and thickness of the base metal. The presence of cold cracking in the joints was analyzed from Tekken tests using steel plates made of SAR 80 T, 100 T and 120 T with of various thickness. The plates were welded by Shielded Metal Arc Welding either with or without pre-heating. Different preheating temperatures were studied, i.e., 375, 455 and 525 K. AWS E 12018 G and 11018 G electrodes were used under different conditions, i.e., not dried or dried up to 2, 3 and 4 h at 515 K. The results indicated the presence of cracks in the welded metals with the combination of hardness values above 230 HV and the formation of high contents of acicular ferrite (above 93 % in the welds without preheating. Higher crack susceptibility was also observed in the thick welded metal plates.

    Este trabajo evalúa la influencia de la variación de temperatura de precalentamiento, del tiempo de secado del electrodo, de la composición química y del espesor del metal base sobre la formación de fisuras en frío, inducidas por el hidrógeno en juntas soldadas de aceros de alta resistencia y baja aleación y su relación con la microestructura y dureza resultante. Para esto, se analizó la presencia de fisuras en frío en probetas para ensayos Tekken, fabricadas a partir de chapas de aceros SAR 80 T, 100 T y 120 T, con diferentes espesores y soldados por proceso de arco eléctrico con electrodo revestido, sin precalentamiento y con precalentamiento, a 375, 455 y 525 K, empleando electrodos AWS E 12018 G y 11018 G no secados y secados durante 2, 3 y 4 h. Los resultados obtenidos indicaron la presencia de fisuras

  16. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  17. Literature Survey on Weld-Metal Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-08-01

    Granj6n, H., "Hardenability and Metallurgical Weldability of Steels" Soudure Techniques Connexes, Vol 1, November-December, 1947, pp 230-242. WADC TR 52...September, 1939, pp 312s-317s. H142. Jaeger, H. E., "Shrinkage and Shrinkage Phenomena Resulting From Arc Welding" (In French), Rev. soudure ...Ductility" (In French), Soudure techniques connexes, Vol 3, May-June 1949, pp 115-124; Discussionpp 124-126. H152. Klinke, H. 0., "Impact Strength of Arc

  18. Predictions for fatigue crack growth life of cracked pipes and pipe welds using RMS SIF approach and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Punit, E-mail: punit@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Department of Atomic Energy, Maharashtra, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Singh, P.K.; Bhasin, Vivek; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Department of Atomic Energy, Maharashtra, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pukazhendhi, D.M.; Gandhi, P.; Raghava, G. [Structural Engineering Research Centre, Chennai 600 113 (India)

    2011-10-15

    The objective of the present study is to understand the fatigue crack growth behavior in austenitic stainless steel pipes and pipe welds by carrying out analysis/predictions and experiments. The Paris law has been used for the prediction of fatigue crack growth life. To carry out the analysis, Paris constants have been determined for pipe (base) and pipe weld materials by using Compact Tension (CT) specimens machined from the actual pipe/pipe weld. Analyses have been carried out to predict the fatigue crack growth life of the austenitic stainless steel pipes/pipes welds having part through cracks on the outer surface. In the analyses, Stress Intensity Factors (K) have been evaluated through two different schemes. The first scheme considers the 'K' evaluations at two points of the crack front i.e. maximum crack depth and crack tip at the outer surface. The second scheme accounts for the area averaged root mean square stress intensity factor (K{sub RMS}) at deepest and surface points. Crack growth and the crack shape with loading cycles have been evaluated. In order to validate the analytical procedure/results, experiments have been carried out on full scale pipe and pipe welds with part through circumferential crack. Fatigue crack growth life evaluated using both schemes have been compared with experimental results. Use of stress intensity factor (K{sub RMS}) evaluated using second scheme gives better fatigue crack growth life prediction compared to that of first scheme. Fatigue crack growth in pipe weld (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) can be predicted well using Paris constants of base material but prediction is non-conservative for pipe weld (Shielded Metal Arc Welding). Further, predictions using fatigue crack growth rate curve of ASME produces conservative results for pipe and GTAW pipe welds and comparable results for SMAW pipe welds. - Highlights: > Predicting fatigue crack growth of Austenitic Stainless Steel pipes and pipe welds. > Use of RMS-SIF and

  19. Methodologies for Crack Initiation in Welded Joints Applied to Inspection Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Guang; Banisoleiman, Kian; González, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Crack initiation and propagation threatens structural integrity of welded joints and normally inspections are assigned based on crack propagation models. However, the approach based on crack propagation models may not be applicable for some high-quality welded joints, because the initial flaws in them may be so small that it may take long time for the flaws to develop into a detectable size. This raises a concern regarding the inspection planning of high-quality welded joins, as there is no g...

  20. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  1. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Said, E-mail: Said.taheri@edf.fr [EDF-LAB, IMSIA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Julan, Emricka [EDF-LAB, AMA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tran, Xuan-Van [EDF Energy R& D UK Centre/School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Robert, Nicolas [EDF-DPN, UNIE, Strategic Center, Saint Denis (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  2. Acoustic determination of cracks in welded joints. [by resonant structural vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltanoiu, M.; Criciotoiu, E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic analysis method permits detection of any cracks that might take place and their manner of propagation. The study deals with the cracks produced in experiments to determine the welding technology for a welded gray cast iron workpiece by using piezoelectric transducers to determine vibration acceleration.

  3. Three Dimensional Numerical Simulation and Characterization of Crack Growth in the Weld Region of a Friction Stir Welded Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Banavara R.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) fabrication technology is being adopted in aerospace applications. The use of this technology can reduce production cost, lead-times, reduce structural weight and need for fasteners and lap joints, which are typically the primary locations of crack initiation and multi-site fatigue damage in aerospace structures. FSW is a solid state welding process that is well-suited for joining aluminum alloy components; however, the process introduces residual stresses (both tensile and compressive) in joined components. The propagation of fatigue cracks in a residual stress field and the resulting redistribution of the residual stress field and its effect on crack closure have to be estimated. To insure the safe insertion of complex integral structures, an accurate understanding of the fatigue crack growth behavior and the complex crack path process must be understood. A life prediction methodology for fatigue crack growth through the weld under the influence of residual stresses in aluminum alloy structures fabricated using FSW will be detailed. The effects and significance of the magnitude of residual stress at a crack tip on the estimated crack tip driving force are highlighted. The location of the crack tip relative to the FSW and the effect of microstructure on fatigue crack growth are considered. A damage tolerant life prediction methodology accounting for microstructural variation in the weld zone and residual stress field will lead to the design of lighter and more reliable aerospace structures

  4. Environmental cracking behavior of submerged arc-welded supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Sharkawy, S. W.; Dietzel, W.

    2004-04-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steel welds produced by submerged are welding were assessed for their microstructure and properties. Slow strain rate tests conducted on these specimens revealed that both the parent material and the weld metals are susceptible to cracking under conditions of hydrogen (H) charging.

  5. Welding hot cracking in an austenitic stainless steel; Fissuration a chaud en soudage d'un acier inoxydable austenitique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrouault, N

    2001-07-01

    validated, the thermomechanical simulation brings new interpretations of the tests observations and instrumentation results. The comparison of experimental and numerical results make it possible to determine a thermomechanical welding hot cracking criterion during solidification. This criterion simultaneously considers mechanical (strain and strain rates threshold) and thermal (temperature range, thermal gradient) parameters which give the position and orientation of the first crack initiation. The criterion precision are in good agreement with the observations on the two considered weldability tests. (author)

  6. Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-05-31

    In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

  7. Influence of heat input on HAZ liquation cracking in laser welded GH909 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Hu, Chongjing; Zhang, Xiong; Cai, Yuanzheng; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Jun; Hu, Xiyuan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we describe influence of heat input on HAZ liquation cracking in laser welded GH909 alloy. The results demonstrated that more cracks were produced using high laser power and welding speed. The presence of cracks greatly weakened the hot ductility of this material and the binding force between the adjacent grains, resulting in reducing the tensile strength of welded joints. The occurrence of HAZ cracking was mainly attributable to the coarseness of microstructures and large tensile stresses. A new method was proposed to prevent HAZ liquation cracking using low laser power and welding speed at a constant heat input. The simulated results were consistent with the experimental results, verifying the correctness and feasibility of the method.

  8. Upper Bound Limit Load Solutions for Welded Joints with Cracks

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    The present short monograph concerns analytic and semi-analytic techniques for finding an approximate value of the limit load. The limit load is an essential input parameter of flaw assessment procedures. In most cases, finding the limit load involves some numerical calculations of different levels of complexity, including numerical minimization of functions of one or several arguments, the slip-line technique and the finite element method. This book shows in particular how to use singular behavior of the real velocity field in the vicinity of bi-material interfaces in kinematically admissible velocity fields to increase the accuracy of upper bound solutions. An approach to recalculate the limit load for a class of structures with defects with the use of its value for the corresponding structure with no defect is discussed. The upper bound technique is applied to evaluate the limit load of overmatched and undermatched welded joints with cracks subject to various loading conditions of practical importance in c...

  9. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  10. Quantitative Acoustic Emission Fatigue Crack Characterization in Structural Steel and Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adutwum Marfo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue crack growth characteristics of structural steel and weld connections are analyzed using quantitative acoustic emission (AE technique. This was experimentally investigated by three-point bending testing of specimens under low cycle constant amplitude loading using the wavelet packet analysis. The crack growth sequence, that is, initiation, crack propagation, and fracture, is extracted from their corresponding frequency feature bands, respectively. The results obtained proved to be superior to qualitative AE analysis and the traditional linear elastic fracture mechanics for fatigue crack characterization in structural steel and welds.

  11. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  12. Spacing of crack patterns driven by steady-state cooling or drying and influenced by a solidification boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Martin; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiss, Hans-Jürgen; Bahr, Ute; Balke, Herbert

    2011-03-01

    Regular columnar joints that originate from networklike crack patterns can be observed in basalt and, on a much smaller scale, in dried starch slurry. Here, the basalt columns are idealized by a periodic array of parallel cracks driven by steady-state cooling. By means of a bifurcation analysis, the minimal possible crack spacing for sustained propagation of the crack array is calculated. It can be shown qualitatively that the minimal possible crack spacing for sustained propagation increases with decreasing velocity. This is confirmed by numerical calculations. The latent heat released at the solidification front is taken into account in the thermomechanical linear-elastic model of propagating shrinkage. Our calculations show that the solidification front is positioned not far ahead of the crack tips, which influences the result considerably. The results agree reasonably well with new measured data of basalt columns. By use of the analogy between contraction due to cooling and that due to drying the model is applied for columns in dried cornstarch, too, showing good agreement with recent experimental data.

  13. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G. [and others

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  14. Laser-multi-pass-narrow-gap-welding of hot crack sensitive thick aluminum plates

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, D.; Schedewy, R.; Brenner, B.; Standfuß, J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the current process limitations for laser beam welding of thick aluminum plates (>10 mm) have been overcome by high brilliant multi-kilowatt laser, there are still difficulties resulting from the material physical properties, e.g. the high heat conductivity, the large heat capacity and the high thermal expansion coefficient of aluminum. Especially for very deep weld seams, insufficient dilution of filler wire material in the root of the weld seam and the danger of hot cracks increase...

  15. Lamb wave line sensing for crack detection in a welded stiffener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Kim, Jae Hong; Yim, Hong Jae

    2014-07-18

    This paper proposes a novel Lamb wave line sensing technique for crack detection in a welded stiffener. The proposed technique overcomes one of the biggest technical challenges of Lamb wave crack detection for real structure applications: crack-induced Lamb waves are often mixed with multiple reflections from complex waveguides. In particular, crack detection in a welded joint, one of the structural hot spots due to stress concentration, is accompanied by reflections from the welded joint as well as a crack. Extracting and highlighting crack-induced Lamb wave modes from Lamb wave responses measured at multi-spatial points along a single line can be accomplished through a frequency-wavenumber domain analysis. The advantages of the proposed technique enable us not only to enhance the crack detectability in the welded joint but also to minimize false alarms caused by environmental and operational variations by avoiding the direct comparison with the baseline data previously accumulated from the pristine condition of a target structure. The proposed technique is experimentally and numerically validated in vertically stiffened metallic structures, revealing that it successfully identifies and localizes subsurface cracks, regardless of the coexistence with the vertical stiffener.

  16. Lamb Wave Line Sensing for Crack Detection in a Welded Stiffener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Kyu An

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel Lamb wave line sensing technique for crack detection in a welded stiffener. The proposed technique overcomes one of the biggest technical challenges of Lamb wave crack detection for real structure applications: crack-induced Lamb waves are often mixed with multiple reflections from complex waveguides. In particular, crack detection in a welded joint, one of the structural hot spots due to stress concentration, is accompanied by reflections from the welded joint as well as a crack. Extracting and highlighting crack-induced Lamb wave modes from Lamb wave responses measured at multi-spatial points along a single line can be accomplished through a frequency-wavenumber domain analysis. The advantages of the proposed technique enable us not only to enhance the crack detectability in the welded joint but also to minimize false alarms caused by environmental and operational variations by avoiding the direct comparison with the baseline data previously accumulated from the pristine condition of a target structure. The proposed technique is experimentally and numerically validated in vertically stiffened metallic structures, revealing that it successfully identifies and localizes subsurface cracks, regardless of the coexistence with the vertical stiffener.

  17. TIG Dressing Effects on Weld Pores and Pore Cracking of Titanium Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weld pores redistribution, the effectiveness of using tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing to remove weld pores, and changes in the mechanical properties due to the TIG dressing of Ti-3Al-2.5V weldments were studied. Moreover, weld cracks due to pores were investigated. The results show that weld pores less than 300 μm in size are redistributed or removed via remelting due to TIG dressing. Regardless of the temperature condition, TIG dressing welding showed ductility, and there was a loss of 7% tensile strength of the weldments. Additionally, it was considered that porosity redistribution by TIG dressing was due to fluid flow during the remelting of the weld pool. Weld cracks in titanium weldment create branch cracks around pores that propagate via the intragranular fracture, and oxygen is dispersed around the pores. It is suggested that the pore locations around the LBZ (local brittle zone and stress concentration due to the pores have significant effects on crack initiation and propagation.

  18. Brittle crack arrestability of thick steel plate welds in large structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Gyu Baek; Park, Joon Sik

    2011-10-01

    Recently, there has been such a critical issue in shipbuilding industry that much larger and stronger ships are required to develop oil and gas in the Arctic region. Attention has been paid to obtaining high strength, good toughness at low temperature, and good weldability. An experimental study was performed to evaluate the brittle crack arrest toughness value (Kca) and brittle crack arrest method of welded joints using EH40 grade steel with a thickness of 80 mm. The test specimens were made by both flux cored arc welding (FCAW) and combined welding (EGW+FCAW) processes. Temperature gradient ESSO test was performed to measure the Kca of the base metal. Also, a constant temperature (-10 °C) ESSO test was performed to establish a brittle crack arrest method using high toughness welding consumable with real structural specimens. The research aims in this study were to investigate the effect of joint design and welding consumable for the crack arrestability of thick steel plates using EH40 grade shipbuilding steel of straight block joint weld line with two kinds of welding processes.

  19. Cold weld cracking susceptibility of high strength low alloyed (HSLA steel NIONIKRAL 70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tawengi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In view of the importance of high strength low alloy (HSLA steels, particularly for critical applications such as offshore plat forms, pipeline and pressure vessels, this paper reports on an investigation of how to weld this type of steel without cold cracking. Using manual metal arc welding process and Tekken test (Y - Grove test has been carried out both to observe the cold cracking phenome non, and to investigate the influencing factors, such as preheating temperature and energy input, as well as electrode strength and diameter. How ever the results of the experiments show that there is a risk of cold cracking.

  20. Hot cracking in Al-Mg-Si alloy laser welding - operating parameters and their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicala, E. [Polytechnic University, Mechanical Faculty, 1 blv. Mihai Viteazu, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Duffet, G. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France)]. E-mail: g.duffet@u-bourgogne.fr; Andrzejewski, H. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Grevey, D. [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Ignat, S. [Polytechnic University, Mechanical Faculty, 1 blv. Mihai Viteazu, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire Laser et Traitements des Materiaux (LTm), 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France)

    2005-03-25

    Hot cracking is a phenomenon that frequently occurs in the laser welding of some 'special' alloys, such as the aluminium-magnesium-silicon type. Each occurrence of this phenomenon needs to be studied in itself, taking into account not only the individual, but also the interactive, influences of the various parameters. The advantage of using laser beams in welding processes lies in the speeds that can be reached. The disadvantage, however, is that, owing to the high cooling rates characteristic of the interaction between the laser beam and the material, the welding speed itself becomes a cause of hot cracking. The aim of this paper is to see how this disadvantage may be eliminated. We consider what the most important parameters may be, relating to tensile strength and the quantity of cracks produced, that might influence the presence or absence of hot cracking. The most influential factors in avoiding hot cracking are the welding speed and wire parameters. Also important is welding stability, as instability generates cracks. We can then determine a technological window, useful for industrial applications, which takes into account the values of these influential factors and stability.

  1. Thermo-mechanical cracking of a new and laser repair welded die casting die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of thermo-mechanical fatigue cracking of die casting die during industrial use. An innovative, production friendly approach to monitor the surface crack dimensions was introduced, which is based on measuring defect-fin on the casting part. A new four moulds die casting die was monitored 40 000 cycles in order to complete the production series. The production was stopped three times for laser repair welding of cracks since the defect-fins were not acceptable. The defect-fin heights were measured every 1 000 cycles on the castings before and after repair welding of die surface cracks. The in-service die life can be prolonged with laser repair welding for several times, even thought that in-service die life for a particular repair varies.

  2. Perspective on Double Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy welding suffers from problems such as solidification cracking and hydrogen-induced porosity, which are sufficiently severe to limit its potential applications. Because mitigated porosity incidence and solidification cracking are observed in aluminum welds using double pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW, a comprehensive review of the mechanism is necessary, but absent from the literature. The oscillation of arc force and droplet pressure causes a weld pool stir effect. The expansion and shrinkage of the weld pool cause unusual remelting and resolidification of the previously solidified metal. DP-GMAW has an increased solidification growth rate and cooling rate, compared with conventional pulsed welding at same heat input. Both numerical and experimental results reveal the remarkable concept that refined microstructure in the fusion zone is obtained by using DP-GMAW. The mechanism of microstructural refinement is revealed as a weld pool stir effect and increased cooling rate. Hydrogen bubbles easily float out and then release from the weld pool originated from the weld pool stir effect. Reduced solidification cracking is achieved due to the refined solidification structure that originated from the increased cooling rate. The advantages, evolution process, and future trend of DP-GMAW are discussed.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded super austenitic stainless steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinoth Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Super 304H austenitic stainless steel with 3% of copper posses excellent creep strength and corrosion resistance, which is mainly used in heat exchanger tubing of the boiler. Heat exchangers are used in nuclear power plants and marine vehicles which are intended to operate in chloride rich offshore environment. Chloride stress corrosion cracking is the most likely life limiting failure with austenitic stainless steel tubing. Welding may worsen the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the material. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Super 304H parent metal and gas tungsten arc (GTA welded joints were studied by constant load tests in 45% boiling MgCl2 solution. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of Super 304H stainless steel was deteriorated by GTA welding due to the formation of susceptible microstructure in the HAZ of the weld joint and the residual stresses. The mechanism of cracking was found to be anodic path cracking, with transgranular nature of crack propagation. Linear relationships were derived to predict the time to failure by extrapolating the rate of steady state elongation.

  4. A FEM based methodology to simulate multiple crack propagation in friction stir welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepore, Marcello; Carlone, Pierpaolo; Berto, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    In this work a numerical procedure, based on a finite element approach, is proposed to simulate multiple three-dimensional crack propagation in a welded structure. Cracks are introduced in a friction stir welded AA2024-T3 butt joint, affected by a process-induced residual stress scenario....... The residual stress field was inferred by a thermo-mechanical FEM simulation of the process, considering temperature dependent elastic-plastic material properties, material softening and isotropic hardening. Afterwards, cracks introduced in the selected location of FEM computational domain allow stress...... insertion, as well as with respect to crack sizes measured in three different points for each propagation step. This FEM-based approach simulates the fatigue crack propagation by considering accurately the residual stress field generated by plastic deformations imposed on a structural component and has...

  5. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  6. Multiple Crack Growth Prediction in AA2024-T3 Friction Stir Welded Joints, Including Manufacturing Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Citarella, Roberto; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2016-01-01

    boundary element method (FEM-DBEM) procedure, coupling the welding process simulation to the subsequent crack growth assessment, is proposed and applied to simulate multiple crack propagation, with allowance for manufacturing effects. The friction stir butt welding process of the precipitation hardened AA......A great deal of attention is currently paid by several industries toward the friction stir welding process to realize lightweight structures. Within this aim, the realistic prediction of fatigue behavior of welded assemblies is a key factor. In this work an integrated finite element method - dual......2024-T3 alloy was simulated using a thermo-mechanical FEM model to predict the process induced residual stress field and material softening. The computed stress field was transferred to a DBEM environment and superimposed to the stress field produced by a remote fatigue traction load applied...

  7. Reasons for crack nucleation in welded joints of main gas-pipelines after a long-term operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruschak, P. O.; Bishchak, R. T.; Shlapak, L. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    A crack of operational origin in the welded joint of the main gas pipeline is analyzed. The reasons for its nucleation and impact on technological microdefects that were formed earlier during the welding are found. Micromechanisms and stages of nucleation and propagation of the crack are investigated.

  8. PFM Analysis for Pre-Existing Cracks on Alloy 182 Weld in PWR Primary Water Environment using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Phil; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) analysis was generally used to consider the scatter and uncertainty of parameters in complex phenomenon. Weld defects could be present in weld regions of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), which cannot be considered by the typical fracture mechanics analysis. It is necessary to evaluate the effects of the pre-existing cracks in welds for the integrity of the welds. In this paper, PFM analysis for pre-existing cracks on Alloy 182 weld in PWR primary water environment was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. PFM analysis for pre-existing cracks on Alloy 182 weld in PWR primary water environment was carried out. It was shown that inspection decreases the gradient of the failure probability. And failure probability caused by the pre-existing cracks was stabilized after 15 years of operation time in this input condition.

  9. Use of the laser for welding cracks on the dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammour, S; Carleer, M; Renneboog-Squilbin, C; Dourov, N

    1987-03-01

    An all line argon laser beam of initial power 2W (4000W/cm2-800 J/cm2, after focusing), was used to weld enamel cracks on extracted human teeth. The welding, observed with the naked eye, caused a small heightening in the welded area which was whiter in color than the rest of the enamel. Examinations were performed on the outer surface of the welding with an inverted metallurgical microscope and using a microdurometer. Sections were then made and studied, on the one hand with a light microscope, and on the other using microradiographical methods. The welding was seen to reach across half the enamel thickness. The possibilities for therapeutic applications of this work are discussed.

  10. Solidification and transformation behavior of Cr-Ni stainless steel weld metals with ferritic single phase solidification mode. Report 4. Study on solidification and subsequent transformation of Cr-Ni stainless steel weld metals; Feraito tanso de gyokosuru Cr-Ni kei sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko/hendo kyodo. 4. Cr-Ni kei sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko/hentai ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Koseki, T.; Okita, S.; Fuji, M. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    The solidification modes of {gamma} stainless steel that solidifies at initial crystal {delta} are classified into FA mode where solidification at two phase of {delta}+{gamma} takes place after crystallization at {gamma} phase during solidification and F mode where solidification is completed at {delta} single phase, and solidification transformation behaviors of weld metal of FA mode are reported in the previous paper. Hereupon, in this report, solidification and transformation behaviors of stainless steel weld metal of F mode are studied. Cr-Ni stainless steel of F mode consists of two phase stainless steel with two phase base metal structure of {delta}+{gamma} besides {gamma} stainless steel. Further, two phase stainless steel with higher alloy compared to conventional one has been developed. In this report, not only the {gamma} stainless steel but also two phase stainless weld metals with varied amount of alloying metal are studied. The welding method and welding conditions are same as that of previous paper. Observation of structure was carried out by optical microscope, and crystal orientation and element distribution were measured by EBSP and CMA respectively. 11 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-11-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  12. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded super austenitic stainless steel joints

    OpenAIRE

    Vinoth Kumar, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Rajakumar, S.; Albert, Shaju K.

    2015-01-01

    Super 304H austenitic stainless steel with 3% of copper posses excellent creep strength and corrosion resistance, which is mainly used in heat exchanger tubing of the boiler. Heat exchangers are used in nuclear power plants and marine vehicles which are intended to operate in chloride rich offshore environment. Chloride stress corrosion cracking is the most likely life limiting failure with austenitic stainless steel tubing. Welding may worsen the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of t...

  14. Development of a test method for determining the cracking susceptibility of resistance spot welded high strength steel sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    In this study a test method for determining the cracking susceptibility of resistance spot welded high strength steel sheets was investigated. The development of a suitable test procedure is based on the External-Loaded Hot Crack Test (PVC-Test). The test modification for resistance spot welding contains a constant tensile force load. The test method for determining the cracking susceptibility was experimentally verified for a high strength steel, a transformation induced plasticity steel (TR...

  15. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

    OpenAIRE

    B. Vargas-Arista; J. Teran-Guillen; Solis, J.; García-Cerecero,G.; Martínez-Madrid,M.

    2013-01-01

    The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughne...

  16. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quenched and Tempered (Q&T steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC in the heat affected zone (HAZ after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  17. Weldability of High-tensile Steels from Experience in Airplane Construction, with Special Reference to Welding Crack Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J

    1935-01-01

    The concept of welding crack tendency is explained and illustrated with practical examples. All pertinent causes are enumerated, and experimental measures are given through which the secondary effects can be removed and the principal causes analyzed: 1) welding stresses; and 2) material defects. The variations in length and stresses incident to welding a small bar as free weld, with restrained elongation and restrained elongation and contraction, are explored in three fundamental experiments.

  18. Creep-Fatigue Cracking Near the Welded Interface in Friction Welding Dissimilar Superalloys INCONEL 718 and MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tra, Tran Hung; Okazaki, Masakazu

    2017-08-01

    A forged INCONEL 718 and a cast MAR-M247 alloy were joined by a friction welding process. The creep-fatigue strength of this joint was investigated. The life of the joint was significantly shorter than that of the base alloys. The joint failed near the interface of the INCONEL 718 side, although the life of INCONEL 718 was longer than that of MAR-M247. To understand this behavior, the stress field in the welding was numerically analyzed using a visco-elastic model. The results suggested that triaxiality in the stress state could be promoted near the welded interface and lead to an acceleration of creep-fatigue crack nucleation.

  19. The stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloys 690 and 152 weld in a PWR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O.; Shack, W. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2007-07-01

    'Full text:' Alloys 690 and 152 are the replacement materials of choice for Alloys 600 and, respectively, 182. The objective of this work was to determine the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth rates (CGRs) in a simulated PWR water environment for the two replacement alloys. The study involved cold-rolled Alloy 690 and a laboratory-prepared Alloy 152 double-V weld. In testing in primary water, both alloys sustained SCC cracking under constant loading conditions in the 10E-11 m/s range. (author)

  20. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  1. The synthesis of organic charge transfer hetero-microtubules by crack welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Chung, J; Hyon, J; Kwon, T; Seo, C; Nam, J; Kang, Y

    2014-09-14

    The strain-induced cracks in organic microtubules composed of an organic charge transfer (CT) complex of 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene (TCNB) and naphthalene were selectively welded via the formation of secondary CT complexes; this process, in turn, led to the formation of organic hetero-microtubules consisting of multiple segments of two organic CT complexes.

  2. Geometry and Material Constraint Effects on Creep Crack Growth Behavior in Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wang, G. Z.; Xuan, F. Z.; Tu, S. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the geometry and material constraint effects on creep crack growth (CCG) and behavior in welded joints were investigated. The CCG paths and rates of two kinds of specimen geometry (C(T) and M(T)) with initial cracks located at soft HAZ (heat-affected zone with lower creep strength) and different material mismatches were simulated. The effect of constraint on creep crack initiation (CCI) time was discussed. The results show that there exists interaction between geometry and material constraints in terms of their effects on CCG rate and CCI time of welded joints. Under the condition of low geometry constraint, the effect of material constraint on CCG rate and CCI time becomes more obvious. Higher material constraint can promote CCG due to the formation of higher stress triaxiality around crack tip. Higher geometry constraint can increase CCG rate and reduce CCI time of welded joints. Both geometry and material constraints should be considered in creep life assessment and design for high-temperature welded components.

  3. Diffractive optics for reduction of hot cracking in pulsed mode Nd:YAG laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olesen, Søren; Roos, Sven-Olov

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the susceptibility to hot cracking in pulsed mode laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, an optical system for reduction of the cooling rate is sought developed. Based on intensive numerical simulations, an optical system producing three focused spots is made. In a number...

  4. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi, O.; Aghion, E. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Goldman, J., E-mail: jgoldman@mtu.edu [Biomedical Engineering Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, 49931 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg–6%Nd–2%Y–0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Here we have evaluated the corrosion resistance of a novel Mg alloy (EW62). • Rapid solidification reduces the hydrogen gas evolution and hydrogen embrittlement. • Rapid solidification increases the stress corrosion cracking resistance of EW62. • Improvement is due to enrichment with supersaturated Nd in the external oxide film. • Rapidly solidified and extruded EW62 may serve as a biodegradable medical implant.

  5. Influence of electron beam welding parameters and metallurgical factors on intergranular liquation cracking susceptibility of cast alloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Insu; Kang, Chungyun; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2001-07-01

    The factors affecting intergranular liquation cracking susceptibility in electron beam welds were investigated for cast alloy 718. The materials used were as-received plates and heat-treated plates with three different levels of grain size. Liquation cracking susceptibility in HAZ was evaluated by a bead-on-plate test and a restraint/relaxation U-type hot cracking test. The penetrated shapes in the welds were classified into wine cup-like Type W and nail head-like Type N. For a given beam current, Type w and Type N were observed at the lower and higher welding speeds, respectively. Welding defects, i.e., underfills and microcracks were seen in the electron beam welds. Compared with Type W, the liquation cracking was more sensitive for the Type N bead cross sectional shape. Furthermore, it easily occurred at grain boundaries in Region II, i.e., very near the nail head necked part. According to the restraint/relaxation U-type hot cracking test, the liquation cracking susceptibility decreased with decreasing grain size or with homogenization heat treatment. These results suggested that the liquation cracking susceptibility in cast alloy 718 electron beam welds could be improved by using the Type W bead cross sectional shape, a decreasing the grain size and using appropriate heat treatment before welding.

  6. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  7. Influence of temperature and exploitation period on fatigue crack growth parameters in different regions of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Camagic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of exploitation period and temperature on the fatigue crack growth parameters indifferent regions of a welded joint is analysed for new and exploited low-alloyed Cr-Mo steel A-387 Gr. B. The parent metal is a part of a reactor mantle which was exploited for over 40 years, and recently replaced with new material. Fatigue crack growth parameters, threshold value Kth, coefficient C and exponent m, have been determined, both at room and exploitation temperature. Based on testing results, fatigue crack growth resistance in different regions of welded joint is analysed in order to justify the selected welding procedure specification.

  8. Type IIIa cracking at 2CrMo welds in 1/2CrMoV pipework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, S.J.; Smith, P.A. [National Power plc, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    The most common form of in-service defect found today on the welds of National Power`s 1/2CrMoV pipework systems is Type IV cracking which occurs in intercritically transformed material at the edge of the heat affected zone. However an alternate form of cracking, termed IIIa, which occurs close to the weld fusion line in fully grain refined heat affected zones, has also been observed. The incidence of Type IIIa cracking has increased in recent years and these defects now constitute a significant part of the total recorded crack population. This presentation describes Type IIIa cracking and compares and contrasts it with the better documented Type IV cracking. Particular reference is made to the role of carbon diffusion at the weld fusion line in promoting Type IIIa damage in preference to Type IV. (orig.) 5 refs.

  9. Different types of cracking of P91 steel weld joints after long-term creep tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, D.; Kasl, J.; Chvostova, E. (SKODA VYZKUM s.r.o., Plzen (Czech Republic))

    2010-05-15

    This paper deals with creep testing and microstructural investigation of trial weld joints prepared of wrought and cast 9Cr-1Mo-V steels using GTAW & SMAW method. Creep testing was carried out at temperature range from 525 degC to 625 degC, the longest time to rupture of 45 811 hrs was achieved. The creep strengths of weld joints for 100 000 hrs were calculated. Different types of cracking were observed in dependency on conditions of creep test and the type of weld joint. Type 1 and Type 2 fractures occurred at high applied stress at relatively low temperatures in the tube weld joint and also in two speciments of the cast plate weld joint after creep test at the lowest temperature and the highest temperature. All other fractures were of the Type 4. Causes of different fracture location in tested weld joints were elucidated on the base of substructure evolution in individual zones - the weld metal, the heat affected zone and the base material. Two processes occur simultaneously, which result in the creep damage: (i) softening of solid solution as a result of Laves phase precipitation and (ii) formation and coalescence of cavities in the soft fine grained parts of heat affected zone. (orig.)

  10. Relaxation cracking in austenitic welded joints: an underestimated problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.C. van

    1995-01-01

    In both power generation and chemical process industries austenitic materials, including 800H, 321H and 316H, are often used at temperatures between 500 and 700 degrees Celsius. The critical pressure containment components typically contain circumferential and longitudinal welded joints of varying

  11. An investigation of reheat cracking in the weld heat affected zone of type 347 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung-On, Isaratat

    2007-12-01

    Reheat cracking has been a persistent problem for welding of many alloys such as the stabilized stainless steels: Types 321 and 347 as well as Cr-Mo-V steels. Similar problem occurs in Ni-base superalloys termed "strain-age cracking". Cracking occurs during the post weld heat treatment. The HAZ is the most susceptible area due to metallurgical reactions in solid state during both heating and cooling thermal cycle. Many investigations have been conducted to understand the RHC mechanism. There is still no comprehensive mechanism to explain its underlying mechanism. In this study, there were two proposed cracking mechanisms. The first is the formation of a PFZ resulting in local weakening and strain localization. The second is the creep-like grain boundary sliding that causes microvoid formation at the grain boundaries and the triple point junctions. Cracking occurs due to the coalescence of the microvoids that form. In this study, stabilized grade stainless steel, Type 347, was selected for investigation of reheat cracking mechanism due to the simplicity of its microstructure and understanding of its metallurgical behavior. The Gleeble(TM) 3800 system was employed due to its capability for precise control of both thermal and mechanical simulation. Cylindrical samples were subjected to thermal cycles for the HAZ simulation followed by PWHT as the reheat cracking test. "Susceptibility C-curves" were plotted as a function of PWHT temperatures and time to failure at applied stress levels of 70% and 80% yield strength. These C-curves show the possible relationship of the reheat cracking susceptibility and carbide precipitation behavior. To identify the mechanism, the sample shape was modified containing two flat surfaces at the center section. These flat surfaces were electro-polished and subjected to the HAZ simulation followed by the placement of the micro-indentation arrays. Then, the reheat cracking test was performed. The cracking mechanism was identified by tracing

  12. Crack growth rate in core shroud horizontal welds using two models for a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis Juárez, C.R., E-mail: carlos.arganis@inin.gob.mx; Hernández Callejas, R.; Medina Almazán, A.L.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Two models were used to predict SCC growth rate in a core shroud of a BWR. • A weld residual stress distribution with 30% stress relaxation by neutron was used. • Agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions. • Slip–oxidation model is better at low fluences and empirical model at high fluences. - Abstract: An empirical crack growth rate correlation model and a predictive model based on the slip–oxidation mechanism for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) were used to calculate the crack growth rate in a BWR core shroud. In this study, the crack growth rate was calculated by accounting for the environmental factors related to aqueous environment, neutron irradiation to high fluence and the complex residual stress conditions resulting from welding. In estimating the SCC behavior the crack growth measurements data from a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant are referred to, and the stress intensity factor vs crack depth throughout thickness is calculated using a generic weld residual stress distribution for a core shroud, with a 30% stress relaxation induced by neutron irradiation. Quantitative agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions of the slip–oxidation mechanism model for relatively low fluences (5 × 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}), and the empirical model predicted better the SCC growth rate than the slip–oxidation model for high fluences (>1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}). The relevance of the models predictions for SCC growth rate behavior depends on knowing the model parameters.

  13. Crack propagation modelling for high strength steel welded structural details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecséri, B. J.; Kövesdi, B.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays the barrier of applying HSS (High Strength Steel) material in bridge structures is their low fatigue strength related to yield strength. This paper focuses on the fatigue behaviour of a structural details (a gusset plate connection) made from NSS and HSS material, which is frequently used in bridges in Hungary. An experimental research program is carried out at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics to investigate the fatigue lifetime of this structural detail type through the same test specimens made from S235 and S420 steel grades. The main aim of the experimental research program is to study the differences in the crack propagation and the fatigue lifetime between normal and high strength steel structures. Based on the observed fatigue crack pattern the main direction and velocity of the crack propagation is determined. In parallel to the tests finite element model (FEM) are also developed, which model can handle the crack propagation. Using the measured strain data in the tests and the calculated values from the FE model, the approximation of the material parameters of the Paris law are calculated step-by-step, and their calculated values are evaluated. The same material properties are determined for NSS and also for HSS specimens as well, and the differences are discussed. In the current paper, the results of the experiments, the calculation method of the material parameters and the calculated values are introduced.

  14. Fatigue Behaviour of CFRP Strengthened Out-of-Plane Gusset Welded Joints with Double Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Qian Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the fatigue behaviour of out-of-plane gusset welded joints strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates. Two notches were introduced at the weld toes adjacent to longitudinal plate ends to simulate the initial damage. Variables including the stress range, single- or double-sided strengthening and modulus of CFRP materials were considered. It was found that both cracks propagated under fatigue loading. All the specimens fractured along one predefined notch when the fatigue crack reached a certain length while the other crack also grew to some extent. Test results showed that the addition of composite materials significantly prolonged the fatigue life of specimens by as much as 1.28 to 8.17 times. Double-sided bond and ultra-high modulus CFRP materials led to a better strengthening efficiency. Thereafter, a series of numerical analyses were performed to study the stress intensity factor (SIF and crack opening displacement (COD. Local debonding around the crack tip at the adhesive-steel interface was taken into consideration. Finally, the fatigue life of all the specimens was evaluated based on the linear elastic fracture mechanism (LEFM theory and the predicted results agreed well with the experimental data.

  15. Relationship Between Solidification Microstructure and Hot Cracking Susceptibility for Continuous Casting of Low-Carbon and High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steels: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2013-08-01

    Hot cracking is one of the major defects in continuous casting of steels, frequently limiting the productivity. To understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low-carbon and two high-strength low-alloyed steels. 2D simulation of the initial stage of solidification is performed in a moving slice of the slab using proprietary multiphase-field software and taking into account all elements which are expected to have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during solidification. To account for the correct thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the multicomponent alloy grades, the simulation software is online coupled to commercial thermodynamic and mobility databases. A moving-frame boundary condition allows traveling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. From the simulation results, significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are quantitatively evaluated and correlated with their hot cracking behavior according to the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) hot cracking criterion. The possible role of the microalloying elements in hot cracking, in particular of traces of Ti, is analyzed. With the assumption that TiN precipitates trigger coalescence of the primary dendrites, quantitative evaluation of the critical strain rates leads to a full agreement with the observed hot cracking behavior.

  16. Fatigue Crack Growth Characteristics of Cold Stretched STS 304 Welded Joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won; Na, Seong Hyeon; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jae Hoon [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kyun; Kim, Ki Dong [Korea Gas Coporation R& D Division, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    STS 304 steel is used as pressure vessel material, and although it exhibits excellent mechanical characteristics at a low temperature, it is heavier than other materials. To address this issue, a method using cold-stretching techniques for STS 304 can be applied. In this study, a cold-stretching part and welded joint specimen were directly obtained from a cold-stretching pressure vessel manufactured according to ASME code. Fatigue crack propagation tests were carried out at room temperature and -170℃ using the compliance method for stress ratios of 0.1 and 0.5. The results indicate that crack growth rate of the welded joint is higher than that of the cold-stretching part within the same stress intensity factor range. The outcome of this work is expected to serve as a basis for the development of a cold-stretched STS 304 pressure vessel.

  17. Numerical investigation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of dissimilar weld joints in pressurized water reactor plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been incidents recently where stress corrosion cracking (SCC observed in the dissimilar metal weld (DMW joints connecting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV nozzle with the hot leg pipe. Due to the complex microstructure and mechanical heterogeneity in the weld region, dissimilar metal weld joints are more susceptible to SCC than the bulk steels in the simulated high temperature water environment of pressurized water reactor (PWR. Tensile residual stress (RS, in addition to operating loads, has a great contribution to SCC crack growth. Limited experimental conditions, varied influence factors and diverging experimental data make it difficult to accurately predict the SCC behavior of DMW joints with complex geometry, material configuration, operating loads and crack shape. Based on the film slip/dissolution oxidation model and elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM, an approach is developed to quantitatively predict the SCC growth rate of a RPV outlet nozzle DMW joint. Moreover, this approach is expected to be a pre-analytical tool for SCC experiment of DMW joints in PWR primary water environment.

  18. The stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloys 690 and 152 WELD in a PWR environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( EVS); ( ESE)

    2009-01-01

    Alloys 690 and 152 are the replacement materials of choice for Alloys 600 and 182, respectively. The latter two alloys are used as structural materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and have been found to undergo stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The objective of this work is to determine the crack growth rates (CGRs) in a simulated PWR water environment for the replacement alloys. The study involved Alloy 690 cold-rolled by 26% and a laboratory-prepared Alloy 152 double-J weld in the as-welded condition. The experimental approach involved pre-cracking in a primary water environment and monitoring the cyclic CGRs to determine the optimum conditions for transitioning from the fatigue transgranular to intergranular SCC fracture mode. The cyclic CGRs of cold-rolled Alloy 690 showed significant environmental enhancement, while those for Alloy 152 were minimal. Both materials exhibited SCC of 10{sup -11} m/s under constant loading at moderate stress intensity factors. The paper also presents tensile property data for Alloy 690TT and Alloy 152 weld in the temperature range 25--870 C.

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of a New Type of 10% Cr Martensitic Steel Welded Joints with Ni-Based Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunbing; Zhang, Jianxun

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a new type of 10% Cr martensitic steel welded joints with Ni-based weld metal was comparatively studied for different regions including base metal (BM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM). FCG results indicated that the tempered lath martensite BM has a higher fatigue crack growth resistance than the tempered granular martensite HAZ that without a typical lath structure. In comparison, the austenitic WM has the highest fatigue crack growth threshold. Meanwhile, due to the microstructural and chemical compositional differences between BM and WM, a clear interface existed in the welded joints. At the region of the interface, the microstructures were physically connected and an element transition layer was formed. Although the starter notch was positioned at the region of interface, the fatigue crack gradually deviated from the interface and ultimately propagated along the inter-critically heat-affected zone. The difference in microstructure is considered as the primary factor that resulted in the different fatigue crack growth behaviors of the welded joints. In addition, the continuous microstructure connection and composition transition at the interface contributed to the good fatigue resistance at this region.

  20. Influence of structure on static cracking resistance and fracture of welded joints of pipe steels of strength class K60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, N. A.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Makovetskii, A. N.; Shander, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    The static cracking resistance of a number of welded joints made from pipe steels of K60 strength class has been determined. It has been established that the deformation parameter CTOD varies significantly at identical parameters of weldability of steels. The character of fracture has been investigated and the zone of local brittleness of welded joints has been studied. It has been shown that the ability of a metal to resist cracking is determined by the austenite grain size and by the bainite morphology in the region of overheating in the heat-affected zone of a welded joint.

  1. Contribution of precipitate on migrated grain boundaries to ductility-dip cracking in Alloy 625 weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Kim, Youn Soo; Shin, Yong Taek; Jeon, Eon Chan; Lee, Sang Hwa; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Lee, Sung Keun; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Hae Woo

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the crack properties in Alloy 625 weld metals and their characteristics using experimentally designed filler wires fabricated by varying the niobium and manganese contents in the flux with the shield metal arc welding (SMAW) process. The fast diffusivity of niobium on the migrated grain boundary (MGB) under strong restraint tensile stress, which was induced by the hardened matrix in weld metal containing high niobium and manganese, accelerated the growth of niobium carbide (NbC) in multipass deposits. Coalescence of microvoids along with incoherent NbC and further propagation induced ductility-dip cracking (DDC) on MGB.

  2. Hot cracking investigation during laser welding of high-strength steels with multi-scale modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, H.; Agarwal, G.; Amirthalingam, M.; Hermans, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Hot cracking during laser welding of advanced high-strength steels is reported to be a serious problem by automotive manufacturers. In this work, hot cracking susceptibilities of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) and dual-phase (DP) steels are studied based on a multi-scale modelling

  3. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vargas-Arista

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughness and critical crack length, and a transgranular brittle final fracture with an area fraction of dimple zones connecting cleavage facets. A fractographic analysis proved that as the normalizing time increased the crack length decreased. The increase in the river patterns on the fatigue crack propagation in zone II was also evidenced and final brittle fracture because of transgranular quasicleavage was observed. Larger grains induced a deterioration of the fatigue resistance of the HAZ.

  4. Susceptibility of Welded and Non-Welded Titanium Alloys to Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, D V; Estill, J C; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-10-14

    The engineering barriers for the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain include a double walled container and a detached drip shield. The material selected to construct the drip shield will be Titanium Grade 7 (Ti Gr 7 or R52400). Ti Gr 7 is highly resistant to corrosion and consequently it is widely used to handle aggressive industrial environments. The model for the degradation of the engineering barriers includes three modes of corrosion, namely general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the susceptibility of three titanium alloys to EAC in several environmental conditions with varying solution composition, pH and temperature. The susceptibility to EAC was evaluated using constant deformation (deflection) U-bend specimens in both the non-welded and welded conditions. Results show that after more than five years exposure in the vapor and liquid phases of alkaline (pH {approx} 10) and acidic (pH {approx} 3) multi-ionic environments at 60 C and 90 C, most of the specimens were free from EAC. The only specimens that suffered EAC were welded Ti Gr 12 (R53400) exposed to liquid simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C.

  5. Crack-free conditions in welding of glass by ultrashort laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Isamu; Cvecek, Kristian; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-06-17

    The spatial distribution of the laser energy absorbed by nonlinear absorption process in bulk glass w(z) is determined and thermal cycles due to the successive ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) is simulated using w(z) based on the transient thermal conduction model. The thermal stress produced in internal melting of bulk glass by USLP is qualitatively analyzed based on a simple thermal stress model, and crack-free conditions are studied in glass having large coefficient of thermal expansion. In heating process, cracks are prevented when the laser pulse impinges into glass with temperatures higher than the softening temperature of glass. In cooling process, shrinkage stress is suppressed to prevent cracks, because the embedded molten pool produced by nonlinear absorption process behaves like an elastic body under the compressive stress field unlike the case of CW-laser welding where the molten pool having a free surface produced by linear absorption process is plastically deformed under the compressive stress field.

  6. A thermomechanical criterion for hot cracking during electron beam welding of CuCrZr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, J.; Pilvin, R. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DM2S/SEMT/LTA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Carron, D. [Universite de Bretagne-Sud, LET2E (EA3373), 56 - Lorient (France); Ayrault, D. [CEA Saclay (LTA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Durocher, A. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (DSM/DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Primaux, F.; Cauwe, B. [Le Bronze Industriel, 51 - Suippes (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Due to its good thermomechanical and thermophysical properties, precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy is used for structural components in fusion experiments such as Tore Supra, JET, W7X and will find also application in the thermonuclear fusion reactor ITER. In Tore Supra (CEA Cadarache, France) this material is typically used for heat sink structures of plasma facing components. The experience feedback showed that the CuCrZr alloy was very sensitive to the hot tearing phenomenon during electron beam welding, leading to defects in and/or near the melted zone. The objective of the project under consideration is to propose a hot tearing criterion by mean of numerical simulations, in order to define a welding acceptance test which could be applied to the material, delivered from different manufacturers. In order to characterize the hot tearing phenomenon, a laboratory test, inspired by the Shibahara's experiment, is used. An electron beam welding seam is performed on a thin rectangular plate, which is instrumented with thermocouples while a CCD camera allows recording of eventual cracking defects during welding. The image correlation method permits to determine the displacement field in the solidified welding seam as well as in the non melted zone. In order to identify the hot tearing criterion due to the welding process, the stress and strain state in the material during the laboratory test is calculated with a Lagrangian thermomechanical finite element simulation. For high temperatures, the alloy viscosity is taken into account in order to identify an elasto-viscoplastic behaviour law. Thermomechanical experiments are performed with a Gleeble physical simulator. A thermomechanical criterion for the initiation of hot tearing during electron beam welding of a quenched and aged CuCr1Zr alloy (DIN 17672 standard) has been identified. (authors)

  7. Effect of deposit composition on the mechanical properties and cracking tendency of cellulosic-covered SMAW weld deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Matthew J.; Weaver, Robert J.; Quintana, Marie A.; Savrin, Tamara [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio, (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Boron is a concern in the pipeline industry, where its propensity to cause cracking is a concern. The goal of this study is to quantify the effect of changes in deposit composition - specifically boron and Pcm on the properties of cellulosic weld deposits. Four trial electrodes with different concentrations of boron were tested. One, in which the boron was replaced by the same amount of carbon, is the reference test specimen without boron. Gapped bead on plate testing was used to determine the propensity of the electrodes for weld metal cracking. The results do not provide a clear picture of the influence of boron. Replacing boron with carbon showed very slight differences. In most trials, the effect of boron was not found to be significant. In the case of hydrogen assisted cold cracking (HACC), other factors should be investigated but removing the boron is not enough to reduce the sensitivity of cellulosic weld metal to cracking.

  8. Ultrasonic Flaw Detection of Cracks and Machined Flaws as Observed Through Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2009-07-01

    Piping welds in the pressure boundary of light water reactors (LWRs) are subject to a volumetric examination based on Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Due to access limitations and high background radiation levels, the technique used is primarily ultrasonic rather than radiographic. Many of the austenitic welds in safety-related piping systems provide limited access to both sides of the weld, so a far-side examination is necessary. Historically, far-side inspections have performed poorly because of the coarse and elongated grains that make up the microstructures of austenitic weldments. The large grains cause the ultrasound to be scattered, attenuated, and redirected. Additionally, grain boundaries or weld geometry may reflect coherent ultrasonic echoes, making flaw detection and discrimination a more challenging endeavor. Previous studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on ultrasonic far-side examinations in austenitic piping welds involved the application of conventional transducers, use of low-frequency Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT), and ultrasonic phased-array (PA) methods on specimens containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks and machined reflectors [1-2]. From these studies, PA inspection provided the best results, detecting nearly all of the flaws from the far side. These results were presented at the Fifth International Conference on NDE in Relation to Structural Integrity for Nuclear and Pressurised Components in 2006. This led to an invitation to examine field-removed specimens containing service-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) at the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center, in Charlotte, North Carolina. Results from this activity are presented.

  9. Prediction of corrosion fatigue crack initiation behavior of A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, J.; Chen, J.; Gou, G.; Chen, H.; Wang, W.

    2017-07-01

    Through investigating the corrosion fatigue crack initiation behavior of A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy welded joints in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, corrosion fatigue crack initiation life is formulated as Ni = 6.97 × 1012[Δσeqv1.739 - 491.739]-2 and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue crack initiation is proposed. SEM and TEM tests revealed that several corrosion fatigue cracks formed asynchronously and the first crack does not necessarily develop into the leading crack. The uneven reticular dislocations produced by fatigue loading are prone to piling up and tangling near the grain boundaries or the second phases and form the “high dislocation-density region” (HDDR), which acts as an anode in microbatteries and dissolved to form small crack. Thus the etching pits, HDDR near the grain boundaries and second phases are confirmed as the main causes inducing the initiation of fatigue crack.

  10. Microstructural analysis of cracks generated during welding of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.

    1994-01-01

    This research summarizes a series of studies conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center to characterize the properties of 2195 Al-Li alloy. 2195 Al-Li alloy, developed by Martin Marietta laboratories, is designated as a replacement of 2219 Al-Cu alloy for the External Tank (E.T.) of the space shuttle. 2195 Al-Li alloy with its advantage of increased strength per weight over its predecessor, 2219 Al-Cu alloy, also challenges current technology. 2195 Al-Li has a greater tendency to crack than its predecessor. The present study began with the observation of pore formation in 2195 Al-Li alloy in a thermal aging process. In preliminary studies, Talia and Nunes found that most of the two pass welds studied exhibited round and crack-like porosity at the weld roots. Furthermore, the porosity observed was associated with the grain boundaries. The porosity level can be increased by thermal treatment in the air. A solid state reaction proceeding from dendritic boundaries in the weld fusion zone was observed to correlate with the generation of the porosity.

  11. Evaluation of J-groove weld residual stress and crack growth rate of PWSCC in reactor pressure vessel closure head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Hyuk; Ryu, Tae Young; Park, Seung Hyun; Won, Min Gu; Kang, Seok Jun; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sung Ho [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Over the last decade, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been frequently found in pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Especially, PWSCC has occurred in long-term operated PWRs. As this phenomenon leads to serious accidents, we must be beforehand with the anticipated problems. A typical PWR consists of J-groove welded components such as reactor pressure vessel closure head and nozzles. Reactor pressure vessel closure head is made of SA508 and it is covered by cladding. Alloy 600 is used for nozzles. And J-groove weld is conducted with alloy 82/182. Different material properties of these metals lead to residual stress and PWSCC consequentially. In this study, J-groove weld residual stress was investigated by a three-dimensional finite element analysis with an actual asymmetric J-groove weld model and process of construction. Also crack growth rate of PWSCC was evaluated from cracks applied on the penetration nozzles. Based on these two values, one cannot only improve the structural integrity of PWR, but also explain PWSCC behavior such that high residual stress at the J-groove weld area causes crack initiation and propagation through the surface of nozzles. In addition, crack behavior was predicted at the various points around the nozzle.

  12. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF ALLOY 152 WELD BUTTER NEAR THE LOW ALLOY STEEL INTERFACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, Bogdan; Chen, Yiren; Natesan, Ken; Shack, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain SCC growth data in Alloy 152 weld butter near the interface with Low Alloy Steel (LAS), which is a region where some dilution of Cr was expected to have occurred, thus presumably exhibiting an increased SCC-susceptibility vs. the bulk of the weld. The LAS piece used in this application was Alloy 533-Gr B from the Midland reactor lower head, and the Alloy 152 weld butter received a prototypical Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) prior to joining by Alloy 152 to an Alloy 690 piece according to a procedure qualified to ASME IX. The compact tension specimens for SCC testing were aligned in the first layer of the Alloy 152 butter. The experimental approach based on tracking environmental enhancement vs. location was successful in identifying SCC-susceptible locations, and SCC rates ranging from 10-12 m/s to as high as 10-10 m/s were measured. The post-test examination of the specimens found that the fracture had the intergranular/interdendritic appearance typical of welds, and that the propagation was arrested wherever an intersection with the LAS occurred. The large range of SCC rates measured does not appear to correlate well with the local concentration of Cr (approx. 25% at the SCC locations), and, in fact, low Cr (20%) – high Fe “streaks” seemed to slow/arrest crack propagation. In short, simple “Cr dilution” does not seem to fully account for the “SCC-susceptible” microstructure that yielded the 10-10 m/s growth rate in this weld.

  13. Round Robin Analyses on Stress Intensity Factors of Inner Surface Cracks in Welded Stainless Steel Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Gi Han

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  14. Round robin analysis on stress intensity factor of inner surface cracks in welded stainless steel pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chang Gi; Chang, Yoon Suk [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Maan Won [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs) are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs) were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  15. Fundamental Metallurgy of Solidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels

    2004-01-01

    The text takes the reader through some fundamental aspects of solidification, with focus on understanding the basic physics that govern solidification in casting and welding. It is described how the first solid is formed and which factors affect nucleation. It is described how crystals grow from ...

  16. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, O; Aghion, E; Goldman, J

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd2O3 content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reheat cracking susceptibility of P23 (7CrWVMoNb9-6) steel welds made using matching and mis-matching filler metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevasmaa, Pekka; Salonen, Jorma; Auerkari, Pertti; Rantala, Juhani; Holmstroem, Stefan [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Reheat cracking sensitivity of 7CrWVMoNb9-6 (P23) thick-section multipass welds has been investigated by Gleeble simulation, mechanical testing, fractography and metallography. The results demonstrate that the experimental weld metal made using a high-Nb-W-Ti-B type filler metal was sensitive to reheat cracking, with a reduction of area no more than 2-3% in the BWI reheat cracking (RC) test. Welds made using a high-W -low-Ti type filler metal with Nb content similar to the parent steel, as well as welds make using a Ni-Nb-Ti-free-(W-free) type filler metal with the chemical composition closer to P24 grade material, were more ductile and crack-resistant, though with reduced cross-weld creep strength. Fractography of RC test specimens showed evidence of pronounced localisation of damage at the prior austenite grain boundaries of the thermally reheated, experimental P23 weld metal. The reheat cracking susceptibility of the less ductile weld metal was apparently related both to the chemical composition (higher B, Nb and Ti content) and sub-structural features of the coarse-grained reheated weld metal microstructure. Appropriate single- and multi-cycle thermal Gleeble simulations to produce representative HAY and reheated weld metal microstructures (as function of peak temperature), in conjunction with the BWI RC test were successfully applied to characterise the reheat cracking sensitivity of the candidate weld metals and parent steel HAZ. (orig.)

  18. Welding of gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An article made of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, cooling the entire article to a welding temperature of from about 1000.degree. F. to about 1400.degree. F., welding a preselected region in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected region so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected region, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the gamma titanium aluminide alloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  19. Estimation of the resistance to the initiation of fatigue cracks in the welded joints of steel constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odesskii, P. D.; Shuvalov, A. N.; Emel'yanov, O. V.

    2017-04-01

    The problem of choosing an effective approach to determining the fatigue strength of welded butt joints at the stage of crack nucleation is solved. The results of the calculations performed according to the existing building code from the specified strength characteristics and the calculations that take into account local elastoplastic deformation in stress concentration zones are compared. Full-scale specimens of the welded joints of pair angles are tested in the low-cycle fatigue region at a constant load. The kinetics of the state of stress in the zones of terminating flange welded joints is studied by a tensometric method. It is shown that the stage of fatigue crack nucleation is best described using the deformation criterion of fracture: a comparison of the results of calculating the number of cycles to the nucleation of a fatigue crack with experimental data demonstrates good agreement.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Peened Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Singh, Preet M.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2009-06-01

    The surface treatment techniques of laser and shot peening were used to investigate their effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in friction stir welded (FSW) 2195 aluminum alloy joints. The investigation consisted of two parts: the first part explored the peening effects on slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in a 3.5% NaCl solution, while the second part investigated the effects of peening on corrosion while submerged in a 3.5% NaCl solution with no external loads applied. For the SSRT, the laser-peened samples demonstrated superior properties to the other samples, but no signs of corrosion pitting or SCC were evident on any of the samples. For the second part of the study, the FSW plates were inspected periodically for signs of corrosion. After 60 days there were signs of corrosion pitting, but no stress corrosion cracking was noticed in any of the peened and unpeened samples.

  1. Uncertainty quantification methodologies development for stress corrosion cracking of canister welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This letter report presents a probabilistic performance assessment model to evaluate the probability of canister failure (through-wall penetration) by SCC. The model first assesses whether environmental conditions for SCC – the presence of an aqueous film – are present at canister weld locations (where tensile stresses are likely to occur) on the canister surface. Geometry-specific storage system thermal models and weather data sets representative of U.S. spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage sites are implemented to evaluate location-specific canister surface temperature and relative humidity (RH). As the canister cools and aqueous conditions become possible, the occurrence of corrosion is evaluated. Corrosion is modeled as a two-step process: first, pitting is initiated, and the extent and depth of pitting is a function of the chloride surface load and the environmental conditions (temperature and RH). Second, as corrosion penetration increases, the pit eventually transitions to a SCC crack, with crack initiation becoming more likely with increasing pit depth. Once pits convert to cracks, a crack growth model is implemented. The SCC growth model includes rate dependencies on both temperature and crack tip stress intensity factor, and crack growth only occurs in time steps when aqueous conditions are predicted. The model suggests that SCC is likely to occur over potential SNF interim storage intervals; however, this result is based on many modeling assumptions. Sensitivity analyses provide information on the model assumptions and parameter values that have the greatest impact on predicted storage canister performance, and provide guidance for further research to reduce uncertainties.

  2. The Segregation and Liquation Crackings in the HAZ of Multipass Laser-Welded Joints for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaolei; Huang, Jian; Liu, Luwei; Wu, Yixiong

    2017-08-01

    The segregation and liquation crackings in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) beside Inconel 52M overlays of multipass laser-welded joints are investigated for nuclear power plants. The results indicate that Nb-rich precipitates are distributed in chains and some aggregate together as coarse particles in the local regions at the interface. With increasing heat input, the transition width becomes widened and the fraction of the precipitates at the interface significantly increases. Closely associated to Nb segregation, liquation crackings occur along columnar dendrites in the HAZ beside Inconel 52M overlays. Due to no deformation coordination of the columnar dendrites with Nb-rich segregates in Inconel 52M overlays, liquation crackings occur in thermal cycle of multipass laser welding. The enrichment of Nb element in the interdendritic regions increases favorable factors of liquation crackings at grain boundaries.

  3. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  4. Influence of joint line remnant on crack paths under static and fatigue loadings in friction stir welded Al-Mg-Sc alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Besel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the joint line remnant (JLR on tensile and fatigue fracture behaviour has been investigated in a friction stir welded Al-Mg-Sc alloy. JLR is one of the microstructural features formed in friction stir welds depending on welding conditions and alloy systems. It is attributed to initial oxide layer on butting surfaces to be welded. In this study, two different tool travel speeds were used. JLR was formed in both welds but its spatial distribution was different depending on the tool travel speeds. Under the tensile test, the weld with the higher heat input fractured partially along JLR, since strong microstructural inhomogeneity existed in the vicinity of JLR in this weld and JLR had weak bonding. Resultantly, the mechanical properties of this weld were deteriorated compared with the other weld. Fatigue crack initiation was not affected by the existence of JLR in all welds. But the crack propagated preferentially along JLR in the weld of the higher heat input, when it initiated on the retreating side. Consequently, such crack propagation behaviour along JLR could bring about shorter fatigue lives in larger components in which crack growth phase is dominant.

  5. Study on influence of three kinds of stress on crack propagation in butt welds of spiral coil waterwall for ultra supercritical boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhenrong; Si, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The spiral coil waterwall is the main pressure parts and the core functional components of Ultra Supercritical Boiler. In the process of operation, the spiral coil waterwall is under the combined action of welding residual stress, installation defects stress and working fluid stress, Cracks and crack propagation are easy to occur in butt welds with defects. In view of the early cracks in the butt welds of more T23 water cooled walls, in this paper, the influence of various stresses on the crack propagation in the butt welds of spiral coil waterwall was studied by numerical simulation. Firstly, the welding process of T23 water cooled wall tube was simulated, and the welding residual stress field was obtained. Then,on the basis, put the working medium load on the spiral coil waterwall, the supercoated stress distribution of the welding residual stress and the stress of the working medium is obtained. Considering the bending moment formed by stagger joint which is the most common installation defects, the stress field distribution of butt welds in T23 water-cooled wall tubes was obtained by applying bending moment on the basis of the stress field of the welding residual stress and the working medium stress. The results show that, the welding residual stress is small, the effect of T23 heat treatment after welding to improve the weld quality is not obvious; The working medium load plays a great role in the hoop stress of the water cooled wall tube, and promotes the cracks in the butt welds; The axial stress on the water cooled wall tube produced by the installation defect stress is obvious, the stagger joint, and other installation defects are the main reason of crack propagation of spiral coil waterwall. It is recommended that the control the bending moment resulting from the stagger joint not exceed 756.5 NM.

  6. Improved Formula for the Stress Intensity Factor of Semi-Elliptical Surface Cracks in Welded Joints under Bending Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Peng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Welded joints are prone to fatigue cracking with the existence of welding defects and bending stress. Fracture mechanics is a useful approach in which the fatigue life of the welded joint can be predicted. The key challenge of such predictions using fracture mechanics is how to accurately calculate the stress intensity factor (SIF. An empirical formula for calculating the SIF of welded joints under bending stress was developed by Baik, Yamada and Ishikawa based on the hybrid method. However, when calculating the SIF of a semi-elliptical crack, this study found that the accuracy of the Baik-Yamada formula was poor when comparing the benchmark results, experimental data and numerical results. The reasons for the reduced accuracy of the Baik-Yamada formula were identified and discussed in this paper. Furthermore, a new correction factor was developed and added to the Baik-Yamada formula by using theoretical analysis and numerical regression. Finally, the predictions using the modified Baik-Yamada formula were compared with the benchmark results, experimental data and numerical results. It was found that the accuracy of the modified Baik-Yamada formula was greatly improved. Therefore, it is proposed that this modified formula is used to conveniently and accurately calculate the SIF of semi-elliptical cracks in welded joints under bending stress.

  7. Improved Formula for the Stress Intensity Factor of Semi-Elliptical Surface Cracks in Welded Joints under Bending Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yang; Wu, Chao; Zheng, Yifu; Dong, Jun

    2017-02-13

    Welded joints are prone to fatigue cracking with the existence of welding defects and bending stress. Fracture mechanics is a useful approach in which the fatigue life of the welded joint can be predicted. The key challenge of such predictions using fracture mechanics is how to accurately calculate the stress intensity factor (SIF). An empirical formula for calculating the SIF of welded joints under bending stress was developed by Baik, Yamada and Ishikawa based on the hybrid method. However, when calculating the SIF of a semi-elliptical crack, this study found that the accuracy of the Baik-Yamada formula was poor when comparing the benchmark results, experimental data and numerical results. The reasons for the reduced accuracy of the Baik-Yamada formula were identified and discussed in this paper. Furthermore, a new correction factor was developed and added to the Baik-Yamada formula by using theoretical analysis and numerical regression. Finally, the predictions using the modified Baik-Yamada formula were compared with the benchmark results, experimental data and numerical results. It was found that the accuracy of the modified Baik-Yamada formula was greatly improved. Therefore, it is proposed that this modified formula is used to conveniently and accurately calculate the SIF of semi-elliptical cracks in welded joints under bending stress.

  8. The Effect of Welding Residual Stress for Making Artificial Stress Corrosion Crack in the STS 304 Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion crack is one of the fracture phenomena for the major structure components in nuclear power plant. During the operation of a power plant, stress corrosion cracks are initiated and grown especially in dissimilar weldment of primary loop components. In particular, stress corrosion crack usually occurs when the following three factors exist at the same time: susceptible material, corrosive environment, and tensile stress (residual stress included. Thus, residual stress becomes a critical factor for stress corrosion crack when it is difficult to improve the material corrosivity of the components and their environment under operating conditions. In this study, stress corrosion cracks were artificially produced on STS 304 pipe itself by control of welding residual stress. We used the instrumented indentation technique and 3D FEM analysis (using ANSYS 12 to evaluate the residual stress values in the GTAW area. We used the custom-made device for fabricating the stress corrosion crack in the inner STS 304 pipe wall. As the result of both FEM analysis and experiment, the stress corrosion crack was quickly generated and could be reproduced, and it could be controlled by welding residual stress.

  9. Crack initiation and growth in welded structures; Amorcage et propagation de la fissuration dans les jonctions soudees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assire, A

    2000-10-13

    This work concerns the remaining life assessment of a structure containing initial defects of manufacturing. High temperature crack initiation and growth are studied for austenitic stainless steels, and defect assessment methods are improved in order to take into account welded structures. For these one, the probability to have a defect is significant. Two kinds of approaches are commonly used for defect assessment analysis. Fracture mechanics global approach with an energetic criterion, and local approach with a model taking into account the physical damage mechanism. For both approaches mechanical fields (stress and strain) have to be computed everywhere within the structure. Then, Finite Element computation is needed. The first part of the thesis concerns the identification of non linear kinematic and isotropic constitutive models. A pseudo-analytical method is proposed for a 'Two Inelastic Strain' model. This method provides a strategy of identification with a mechanical meaning, and this enables to associate each parameter to a physical phenomenon. Existing identifications are improved for cyclic plasticity and creep on a large range of stress levels. The second part concerns high temperature crack initiation and growth in welded structures. Finite Element analysis on plate and tube experimental configuration enable to understand the phenomenons of interaction between base metal and weld metal under mechanical and thermal loading. Concerning global approach, criteria based on C* parameter (Rice integral for visco-plasticity) are used. Finite Element computations underline the fact that for a defect located in the weld metal, C* values strongly depend on the base metal creep strain rate, because widespread visco-plasticity is located in both metals. A simplified method, based on the reference stress approach, is proposed and validated with Finite Element results. Creep crack growth simplified assessment is a quite good validation of the experimental

  10. Laser Ultrasonic System for Surface Crack Visualization in Dissimilar Welds of Control Rod Drive Mechanism Assembly of Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shil Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a J-groove dissimilar weld crack visualization system based on ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI technology. A full-scale control rod drive mechanism (CRDM assembly specimen was fabricated to verify the proposed system. An ultrasonic sensor was contacted at one point of the inner surface of the reactor vessel head part of the CRDM assembly. Q-switched laser beams were scanned to generate ultrasonic waves around the weld bead. The localization and sizing of the crack were possible by ultrasonic wave propagation imaging. Furthermore, ultrasonic spectral imaging unveiled frequency components of damage-induced waves, while wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging enhanced damage visibility by generating a wave propagation video focused on the frequency component of the damage-induced waves. Dual-directional anomalous wave propagation imaging with adjacent wave subtraction was also developed to enhance the crack visibility regardless of crack orientation and wave propagation direction. In conclusion, the full-scale specimen test demonstrated that the multiple damage visualization tools are very effective in the visualization of J-groove dissimilar weld cracks.

  11. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Test Results for Al-Li 2195 Parent Metal, Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welds and Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Wagner, John A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy 2195 plate and weldments was determined at 200-F, ambient temperature and -320-F. The effects of stress ratio (R), welding process, orientation and thickness were studied. Results are compared with plate data from the Space Shuttle Super Lightweight Tank (SLWT) allowables program. Data from the current series of tests, both plate and weldment, falls within the range of data generated during the SLWT allowables program.

  12. Creep and Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth at Structural Discontinuities and Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. F. W. Brust; Dr. G. M. Wilkowski; Dr. P. Krishnaswamy; Mr. Keith Wichman

    2010-01-27

    The subsection ASME NH high temperature design procedure does not admit crack-like defects into the structural components. The US NRC identified the lack of treatment of crack growth within NH as a limitation of the code and thus this effort was undertaken. This effort is broken into two parts. Part 1, summarized here, involved examining all high temperature creep-fatigue crack growth codes being used today and from these, the task objective was to choose a methodology that is appropriate for possible implementation within NH. The second part of this task, which has just started, is to develop design rules for possible implementation within NH. This second part is a challenge since all codes require step-by-step analysis procedures to be undertaken in order to assess the crack growth and life of the component. Simple rules for design do not exist in any code at present. The codes examined in this effort included R5, RCC-MR (A16), BS 7910, API 579, and ATK (and some lesser known codes). There are several reasons that the capability for assessing cracks in high temperature nuclear components is desirable. These include: (1) Some components that are part of GEN IV reactors may have geometries that have sharp corners - which are essentially cracks. Design of these components within the traditional ASME NH procedure is quite challenging. It is natural to ensure adequate life design by modeling these features as cracks within a creep-fatigue crack growth procedure. (2) Workmanship flaws in welds sometimes occur and are accepted in some ASME code sections. It can be convenient to consider these as flaws when making a design life assessment. (3) Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and inspection methods after fabrication are limited in the size of the crack or flaw that can be detected. It is often convenient to perform a life assessment using a flaw of a size that represents the maximum size that can elude detection. (4) Flaws that are observed using in-service detection

  13. Evaluation of Hydrogen Cracking in Weld Metal Deposited using Cellulosic-Coated Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-16

    Cellulosic-coated electrodes (primarily AWS EXX10-type) are traditionally used for "stovepipe" welding of pipelines because they are well suited for deposition of pipeline girth welds and are capable of high deposition rates when welding downhill. De...

  14. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  15. Effect of Heat Treatment on Liquation Cracking in Continuous Fiber and Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of HASTELLOY X Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakniat, M.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Torkamany, M. J.

    2017-11-01

    Laser welding of HASTELLOY X is highly feasible; however, hot cracking can be a matter of concern. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of solution heat treatment on susceptibility to liquation cracking in welding of a 2-mm-thick HASTELLOY X plate. In addition, Nd-YAG pulsed laser (400 W) and continuous wave (CW) fiber laser (600 W) were compared with each other in this respect. Results revealed that performing the prewelding solution heat treatment reduces the tendency for occurrence of liquation cracking. Furthermore, it was established that by increasing pulse frequency, there was a significant reduction in the tendency for liquation cracking. With CW laser welding of HASTELLOY X in the solution-heat-treated condition, the tendency for heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking was found to be minimized.

  16. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  17. Weld Properties of a Free Machining Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. A. Brooks; S. H. Goods; C. V. Robino

    2000-08-01

    The all weld metal tensile properties from gas tungsten arc and electron beam welds in free machining austenitic stainless steels have been determined. Ten heats with sulfur contents from 0.04 to 0.4 wt.% and a wide range in Creq/Nieq ratios were studied. Tensile properties of welds with both processes were related to alloy composition and solidification microstructure. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratios and ferrite content, whereas the ductility measured by RA at fracture decreased with sulfur content. Nevertheless, a range in alloy compositions was identified that provided a good combination of both strength and ductility. The solidification cracking response for the same large range of compositions are discussed, and compositions identified that would be expected to provide good performance in welded applications.

  18. Determination of the activation energy for SCC crack growth for Alloy 182 weld in a PWR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the activation energy for stress corrosion cracking growth rates in a simulated PWR water environment for Alloy 182 weld metals. For this purpose, the crack growth rates (CGRs) of two heats of Alloy 182 were measured as a function of temperature between 290{sup o}C and 350{sup o}C. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed. (author)

  19. Experimental Evaluation and Characterization of Electron Beam Welding of 2219 AL-Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Sobih; Zuhair Elseddig; Khalid Almazy; Mohamed Sallam

    2016-01-01

    Aiming to reduce the weight of components, thus allowing a profit in terms of energy saving, automotive industry as well as aircraft industry extensively uses aluminum alloys. The most widely used joining technology in aircraft industry is riveting, while welding seems to be used in the car industry in the case of aluminum alloys. However, welding technology is characterized by many defects, such as gas porosity; oxide inclusions; solidification cracking (hot tearing); and reduced strength in...

  20. Stripe-PZT Sensor-Based Baseline-Free Crack Diagnosis in a Structure with a Welded Stiffener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Kyu An

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a stripe-PZT sensor-based baseline-free crack diagnosis technique in the heat affected zone (HAZ of a structure with a welded stiffener. The proposed technique enables one to identify and localize a crack in the HAZ using only current data measured using a stripe-PZT sensor. The use of the stripe-PZT sensor makes it possible to significantly improve the applicability to real structures and minimize man-made errors associated with the installation process by embedding multiple piezoelectric sensors onto a printed circuit board. Moreover, a new frequency-wavenumber analysis-based baseline-free crack diagnosis algorithm minimizes false alarms caused by environmental variations by avoiding simple comparison with the baseline data accumulated from the pristine condition of a target structure. The proposed technique is numerically as well as experimentally validated using a plate-like structure with a welded stiffener, reveling that it successfully identifies and localizes a crack in HAZ.

  1. Investigation of possible causes for appearance of a crack in the welded joint of the ship winch frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos S. Matejic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ship winches are one of the most important parts of the ship equipment since they perform the most responsible tasks on various ships. In the majority of cases, the ship winches are welded structures. All the necessary calculations according to required standards, that have to be done prior to actual execution of the structure, should also include the verification by the finite elements method. For the high reliability requirements to be met, the welded joints integrity of all the parts must be examined before they are assembled into the winch. After all the tests are conducted and parts are assembled into the winch, the factory acceptance test (FAT must be done. During those tests all the flaws, which can appear during manufacturing, must show. An appearance of a very unusual crack in the ship winch frame, which happened during the FAT, is described in this paper. The simulation by the finite elements method was performed to obtain the stresses at which the crack appeared. The possible causes for that crack appearance are considered. Some measures for reducing appearance of such cracks to a minimum are proposed, as well as certain directions for further research of this problem. 

  2. Effect of postweld treatment on the fatigue crack growth rate of electron-beam-welded AISI 4130 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Chun; Chang, Yih

    1996-10-01

    This article studies the effect of in-chamber electron beam and ex-chamber furnace postweld treatments on the fatigue crack growth rate of electron-beam-welded AISI 4130 steel. Mechanical properties of the weldment are evaluated by tensile testing, while the fatigue properties are investigated by a fatigue crack propagation method. Microstructural examination shows that both postweld treatments temper the weldment by the appropriate control of beam pattern width, input beam energy, and furnace temperature. In addition, the ductility, strength, and microhardness of the weldment also reflect this tempering effect. The fatigue crack growth rate is decreased after both postweld treatments. This is mainly caused by the existence of a toughened microstructure and relief of the residual stress due to the fact that (1) the residual stress becomes more compressive as more beam energy is delivered into the samples and (2) postweld furnace tempering effectively releases the tensile stress into a compressive stress state.

  3. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  4. Solidification microstructure development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Primary manufacturing processes such as ingot casting, continuous casting, squeeze casting, pressure casting and atomization, and secondary manufacturing processes such as welding, soldering, brazing, cladding and sintering, involve solidification as an important stage of the process. Thermal and solutal conditions that ...

  5. In situ strain investigation during laser welding using digital image correlation and finite-element-based numerical simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agarwal, G.; Gao, H.; Amirthalingam, M.; Hermans, M.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    In situ strain evolution during laser welding has been measured by means of digital image correlation to assess the susceptibility of an advanced high strength automotive steel to solidification cracking. A novel method realised using auxiliary illumination and optical narrow bandpass filter

  6. In situ strain investigation during laser welding using digital image correlation and finite-element-based numerical simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agarwal, G.; Gao, H.; Amirthalingam, M.; Hermans, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In situ strain evolution during laser welding has been measured by means of digital image correlation to assess the susceptibility of an advanced high strength automotive steel to solidification cracking. A novel method realised using auxiliary illumination and optical narrow bandpass filter

  7. Numerical Analysis of Crack Progress in Different Areas of a Friction Stir Welded Bead for an 5251 H14 Aluminum Alloy Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kambouz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The assemblies welded by Friction Stir Welding have a major advantage which is the absence of a metal filler. This process contributes to the welding of materials that are known to be difficult to weld using the conventional techniques often employed in the field of transport, for example in the automobile body by applying a spot welding. The numerical modeling of this type of process is complex, not only in terms of the variety of physical phenomena which must be considered, but also because of the experimental procedure that must be followed in order to verify and validate numerical predictions. In this work, a finite element model is proposed in order to simulate the crack propagation under monotonic loading in different areas of the weld seam of a strain hardening CT-50 aluminum alloy 5251H14 specimen.

  8. Comparison of creep crack growth rates on the base and welded metals of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Yun, Song Nam; Kim, Yong Wan; Kim, Sung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Young; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    This paper is to compare Creep Crack Growth Rates (CCGR) on the Base Metal (BM) and Welded Metal (WM) of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for Gen-IV reactors. Welded specimens were prepared by Shielded Metal Arc Weld (SMAW) method. To obtain material properties for the BM and welded metal, a series of creep and tensile tests was conducted at 600 .deg. C, and CCG tests was also performed using 1/2'' compact tension specimens under different applied loads at 600 .deg. C. Their CCGR behaviors were analyzed by using the empirical equation of the da/dt vs. C{sup *} parameter and compared, respectively. It appeared that, for a given value of C{sup *}, the rate of creep propagation was about 2.0 times faster than in the WM than the BM. This reason is that a creep rate in the WM was largely attributed when compared with that in the BM. From this result, it can be utilized for assessing the rate of creep propagation on the BM and WM of the G91 steel.

  9. The environmentally-assisted cracking behaviour in the transition region of nickel-base alloy/low-alloy steel dissimilar weld joints under simulated BWR conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.; Leber, H.J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Lab for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour perpendicular to the fusion line in the transition region between the Alloy 182 nickel-base weld metal and the adjacent low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of simulated dissimilar metal weld joints was investigated under boiling water reactor normal water chemistry conditions at different stress intensities and chloride concentrations. A special emphasis was placed to the question whether a fast growing inter-dendritic SCC crack in the highly susceptible Alloy 182 weld metal can easily cross the fusion line and significantly propagate into the adjacent low-alloy RPV steel. Cessation of inter-dendritic stress corrosion crack growth was observed in high-purity or sulphate-containing oxygenated water under periodical partial unloading or constant loading conditions with stress intensity factors below 60 MPa-m{sup 1/2} for those parts of the crack front, which reached the fusion line. In chloride containing water, on the other hand, the inter-dendritic stress corrosion crack in the Alloy 182 weld metal very easily crossed the fusion line and further propagated with a very high growth rate as a transgranular crack into the heat-affected zone and base material of the adjacent low-alloy steel. (authors)

  10. Experimental Evaluation and Characterization of Electron Beam Welding of 2219 AL-Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sobih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to reduce the weight of components, thus allowing a profit in terms of energy saving, automotive industry as well as aircraft industry extensively uses aluminum alloys. The most widely used joining technology in aircraft industry is riveting, while welding seems to be used in the car industry in the case of aluminum alloys. However, welding technology is characterized by many defects, such as gas porosity; oxide inclusions; solidification cracking (hot tearing; and reduced strength in both the weld and the heat affected zones which could limit its development. Many techniques are used for aluminum alloys welding, among them is electron beam welding (EBW, which has unique advantages over other traditional fusion welding methods due to high-energy density, deep penetration, large depth-to-width ratio, and small heat affected zone. The welding parameters that yield to optimal weld joint have been previously obtained. These optimal parameters were validated by welding a specimen using these parameters. To evaluate this optimal weld joint, complete, microstructural observations and characterization have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. This evaluation leads to description and quantification of the solidification process within this weld joint.

  11. Effect of proof testing on the flaw growth characteristics of 304 stainless steel. [crack propagation in welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of proof overload frequency and magnitude on the cyclic crack growth rates of 304 stainless steel weldments were investigated. The welding procedure employed was typical of those used on over-the-road cryogenic vessels. Tests were conducted at room temperature with an overload ratio of 1.50 to determine the effect of overload frequency. Effect of overload magnitude was determined from tests where a room temperature overload was applied between blocks of 1000 cycles applied at 78 K (-320 F). The cyclic stress level used in all tests was typical of the nominal membrane stress generally encountered in full scale vessels. Test results indicate that judicious selection of proof overload frequency and magnitude can reduce crack growth rates for cyclic stress levels.

  12. On the development of a new pre-weld thermal treatment procedure for preventing heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking in nickel-base IN 738 superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, O. T.; Ojo, O. A.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2014-10-01

    Hot cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloys, such as IN 738, during fusion welding remains a major factor limiting reparability of nickel-base gas turbine components. The problem of HAZ intergranular cracking can be addressed by modifying the microstructure of the pre-weld material through thermal treatment, which requires significant understanding of the critical factors controlling cracking behaviour. The decomposition of Mo-Cr-W-and Cr-rich borides in the alloy, among other factors, has been observed to contribute significantly to non-equilibrium intergranular liquation and, hence, intergranular liquation cracking during welding. Gleeble physical simulation of HAZ microstructure has also shown that non-equilibrium liquation is more severe in the vicinity of decomposed borides in the alloy and can occur at temperatures as low as 1,150 °C. Although currently existing pre-weld heat treatments for IN 738 superalloy minimize the contributions of dissolution of second phases, including borides, to HAZ intergranular liquation, these heat treatments are not industrially feasible due to process-related difficulties. Therefore, a new industrially feasible and effective pre-weld thermal treatment process, designated as FUMT, was developed during the present research by controlling both the formation of borides and the segregation of boron at the grain boundaries in the pre-weld heat-treated material. This thermal treatment was observed to very significantly reduce intergranular HAZ cracking in welded IN 738 superalloy. The details of the development process and developed procedure are presented in this paper.

  13. Hot cracking of welded joints of the 7CrMoVTiB 10-10 (T/P24) steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiec, J.

    2011-05-01

    Bainitic steel 7CrMoVTiB10-10 is one the newest steels for waterwalls of modern industrial boilers [1]. In Europe, attempts have been made to make butt welded joints of pipes made of this steel of the diameter up to 51 mm and thickness up to 8 mm. Many cracks have been observed in the welded joint, both during welding and transport and storage [2-4]. The reasons of cracking and the prevention methods have not been investigated. No comprehensive research is carried out in Europe in order to automate the welding process of the industrial boiler elements made of modern bainitic steel, such as 7CrMoVTiB10-10. There is no information about its overall, operative and local weldability, influence of heat treatment, as well as about resistance of the joints to cracking during welding and use. The paper presents experience of Energoinstal SA from development of technology and production of waterwalls of boilers made of the 7CrMoVTiB 10-10 steel on a multi-head automatic welder for submerged arc welding.

  14. Influences of Cr/Ni equivalent ratios of filler wires on pitting corrosion and ductility-dip cracking of AISI 316L weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kim, D. G.; Sung, J. H.; Kim, I. S.; Ko, D. E.; Kang, N. H.; Hong, H. U.; Park, J. H.; Lee, H. W.

    2011-02-01

    To study the pitting corrosion of AISI 316L weld metals according to the chromium/nickel equivalent ratio (Creq/Nieq ratio), three filler wires were newly designed for the flux-cored arc welding process. The weld metal with delta-ferrite at less than 3 vol.%, was observed for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) in the reheated region after multi-pass welding. The tensile strength and yield strength increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratio. The result of anodic polarization tests in a 0.1 M NaCl solution at the room temperature (25) for 45 min, revealed that the base metal and weld metals have a similar corrosion potential of -0.34 VSCE. The weld metal with the highest content of Cr had the highest pitting potential (0.39 VSCE) and the passivation range (0.64 VSCE) was higher than the base metal (0.21 VSCE and 0.46 VSCE, respectively). Adding 0.001 M Na2S to the 0.1M NaCl solution, the corrosion occurred more severely by H2S. The corrosion potentials of the base metal and three weld metals decreased to -1.0 VSCE. DDC caused the decrease of the pitting potential by inducing a locally intense corrosion attack around the crack openings.

  15. Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of 304L Substrate and 308L Weld Metal Exposed to a Salt Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Hsu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available 304 stainless steels (SS were considered as the materials for a dry storage canister. In this study, ER (Electrode Rod 308L was utilized as the filler metal for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD map was used to identify the inherent microstructures in distinct specimens. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the 304L substrates and welds in a salt spray containing 5 wt % NaCl at 80 °C to evaluate their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC. Generally, the weight loss of the ER 308L deposit was higher than that of the 304L substrate in a salt spray in the same sample-prepared condition. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ was responsible for a greater weight loss of the 308L deposit, especially for the cold-rolled and sensitized specimen. Cold rolling was detrimental and sensitization after cold rolling was very harmful to the SCC resistance of the 304L substrate and 308L deposit. Overall, the SCC susceptibility of each specimen was correlated with its weight loss in each group.

  16. Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-03-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

  17. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make people edgy and irritable. They may have panic attacks and full-blown psychosis where they hear ... die. It's extremely hard to kick a crack addiction. Even after people have been off the drug ...

  18. Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking at the Welded Region of High Strength Steel using Acoustic Emission Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Eui Gyun [Kunsan University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoon [Yosu National University, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    This study is to evaluate the characteristics of SCC at the welded region of high strength steel using acoustic emission(AE) method. Specimens were loaded by a slow strain rate method in synthetic seawater and the damage process was monitored simultaneously by AE method. Corrosive environment was controlled using the potentiostat, in which -0.8V and -1.1V were applied to the specimens. In the case of one-pass weldment subjected to -0.8V, much more AE counts were detected compared with the PWHT specimen. It was verified through the cumulative counts that coalescence of micro cracks and cracks for the one pass weldment with -0.8V were mostly detected. In case of the one pass weldment subjected to -1.1V, time to failure became shorter and AE counts were produced considerably as compared with that of the two pass weldment. It was shown that AE counts and range of AE amplitude have close relations with the number and size as well as width of the cracks which were formed during the SCC

  19. Fatigue strength of repaired cracks in welded connections made of very high strength steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyel, A.

    2017-01-01

    For cyclically loaded structures, fatigue design becomes one of the important design criteria. The state of art shows that with modification of the conventional structural design methodology, the use of very high strength steels may have a positive effect on fatigue strength of welded connections.

  20. On the effect of β phase on the microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded commercial brass alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Akbar; Saeid, Tohid

    2015-12-01

    Conventional fusion welding of brass (Cu-Zn) alloys has some difficulties such as evaporation of Zn, toxic behavior of Zn vapor, solidification cracking, distortion, and oxidation [1], [2], [3]. Fortunately, friction stir welding (FSW) has been proved to be a good candidate for joining the brass alloys, which can overcome the fusion welding short comes [4], [5], [6], [7]. The data presented here relates to FSW of the single and double phase brass alloys. The data is the microstructure and mechanical properties of the base metals and joints.

  1. Optimization of process parameters of the activated tungsten inert gas welding for aspect ratio of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The activated TIG (ATIG welding process mainly focuses on increasing the depth of penetration and the reduction in the width of weld bead has not been paid much attention. The shape of a weld in terms of its width-to-depth ratio known as aspect ratio has a marked influence on its solidification cracking tendency. The major influencing ATIG welding parameters, such as electrode gap, travel speed, current and voltage, that aid in controlling the aspect ratio of DSS joints, must be optimized to obtain desirable aspect ratio for DSS joints. Hence in this study, the above parameters of ATIG welding for aspect ratio of ASTM/UNS S32205 DSS welds are optimized by using Taguchi orthogonal array (OA experimental design and other statistical tools such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Pooled ANOVA techniques. The optimum process parameters are found to be 1 mm electrode gap, 130 mm/min travel speed, 140 A current and 12 V voltage. The aspect ratio and the ferrite content for the DSS joints fabricated using the optimized ATIG parameters are found to be well within the acceptable range and there is no macroscopically evident solidification cracking.

  2. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poor mechanical properties. The above problems can be overcome by proper selection and procedure of joining process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural changes with mechanical properties of fusion and solid state welds of high nitrogen steel. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW, electron beam welding (EBW and friction stir welding (FSW processes were used in the present work. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to characterize microstructural changes. Hardness, tensile and bend tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of welds. The results of the present investigation established that fully austenitic dendritic structure was found in welds of SMAW. Reverted austenite pools in the martensite matrix in weld zone and unmixed zones near the fusion boundary were observed in GTA welds. Discontinuous ferrite network in austenite matrix was observed in electron beam welds. Fine recrystallized austenite grain structure was observed in the nugget zone of friction stir welds. Improved mechanical properties are obtained in friction stir welds when compared to fusion welds. This is attributed to the refined microstructure consisting of equiaxed and homogenous austenite grains.

  3. Modification of solidification conditions through the application of pulsed Nd:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jean Pierre; Holtz, Ronald; Wilden, Johannes

    2007-05-01

    Welding and joining of different metallic materials such as steel, aluminum and titanium represents an increasing challenge for welding specialists, as intermetallic brittle phases form in the molten bath and grow to a connected chain during solidification. The brittleness of these phases leads to cracking and reduces the quality of the weld. One solution to avoid the negative effects of extended intermetallic phases is to directly and actively modify the motion behavior of the melt pool, in order to have intermetallics be broken up by the strong convection and attain a homogeneous and fine distribution in the solidified pool. Recent developments in laser technology allow for time dependent modulation of the laser power, so that Marangoni convection can be influenced as well. The basic effects of pulse shaping are presented in this paper for different material combinations.

  4. Crack growth of explosive welding zirconium-steel bimetal subjected to cyclic bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rozumek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the fatigue test results including the cracks growth in the composite zirconium-steel subjected to oscillatory bending. Specimens of square cross-section without melted layer and with a melted layer were tested. In the specimens the net ratio of thickness of steel to zirconium layers was h1 : h2 = 2.5 : 1. It was observed that a higher fraction of the intermetallic inclusions near the interface increase the fatigue life. Two different interaction mechanisms between a crack and interface were observed

  5. Characterization of stress corrosion cracks in Ni-based weld alloys 52, 52M and 152 grown in high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yi [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wu, Yaqiao; Burns, Jatuporn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Zhang, Jinsuo, E-mail: zhang.3558@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Ni-based weld alloys 52, 52M and 152 are extensively used in repair and mitigation of primary water stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power plants. In the present study, a series of microstructure and microchemistry at the SCC tips of these alloys were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). The specimens have similar chemical compositions and testing conditions. Intergranular (IG) and transgranular (TG) SCC was observed in all of them. The cracks were filled with nickel-oxides and partial precipitations of chrome carbides (CrCs), niobium carbides (NbCs), titanium nitrides (TiNs) and silicon carbides (SiCs), while iron (Fe) was largely dissolved into the solution. However, the crack densities, lengths and distributions were different for all three specimens. - Highlights: • Microstructure and microchemistry at the SCC tips of Ni-based weld alloys 52, 52M and 152 were examined. • The crack densities, lengths and distributions were found to be different for different alloys. • IGSCC and TGSCC were observed on alloy 52, only TGSCC was observed on alloy 52M and 152. • The cracks were filled by Ni-oxides and precipitated CrCs, NbCs, TiNs and SiCs.

  6. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  7. Evaluation of the resistance of API 5L-X80 girth welds to sulphide stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forero, Adriana [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ponciano, Jose A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia; Bott, Ivani de S. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia

    2009-07-01

    The susceptibility of pipeline steels to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) depends on a series of factors ranging from the manufacture of the steel, the pipe fabrication and the assembly of the pipeline to the type of substances to be transported. The welding procedures adopted during the production and construction of the pipelines (field welding), can modify the properties of the base metal in the heat affected zone (HAZ), potentially rendering this region susceptible to SCC. This study evaluates the resistance of girth welds, in API 5L X80 pipes, to hydrogen embrittlement and to stress corrosion cracking in the presence of sulphides. The evaluation was performed according to NACE TM0177/96, Method A, applying the criterion of fracture/no fracture, and Slow Strain Rate Tensile tests (SSRT) were undertaken using a sodium thiosulphate solution according to the ASTM G129-00 Standard. According NACE requirements, the base metal was approved. The weld metal exhibited susceptibility to SCC in the presence of sulphides, failing in a period of less than 720h. This was confirmed by SSR tensile tests, where a significant decrease in the ultimate tensile strength, the elongation and the time to fracture were observed. The mechanism of fracture was transgranular. (author)

  8. Theoretical Model of the Effect of Crack Tip Blunting on the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Welds in 2219-T87 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model representing blunting of a crack tip radius through diffusion of vacancies is presented. The model serves as the basis for a computer program which calculates changes, due to successive weld heat passes, in the ultimate tensile strength of 2219-T81 aluminum. In order for the model to yield changes of the same order in the ultimate tensile strength as that observed experimentally, a crack tip radius of the order of .001 microns is required. Such sharp cracks could arise in the fusion zone of a weld from shrinkage cavities or decohered phase boundaries between dendrites and the eutectic phase, or, possibly, from plastic deformation due to thermal stresses encountered during the welding process. Microstructural observations up to X2000 (resolution of about .1 micron) did not, in the fusion zone, show structural details which changed significantly under the influence of a heat pass, with the exception of possible small changes in the configuration of the interdendritic eutectic and in porosity build-up in the remelt zone.

  9. Comparison of Equations for Predicting Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rates in a Surge Nozzle Weld on the Hot Leg Side

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Kyung Hwan; Yun, Eun Sub; Park, Young Sheop [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Nickel-based austenitic alloys such as Alloy 600 and the weld metals Alloy 82, and 182 have been employed extensively in nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Korea. During the construction of NPPs, it was widely believed that these alloys have high corrosion resistance as well as good mechanical properties. However, since the 2000s, the occurrence of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been reported in conjunction with these alloys in oversea NPPs and this has received international attention due to its potential effect on the structural integrity of piping in reactor coolant system. Under these circumstances, PWSCC growth rate studies of Alloy 600/82/182 have become important issues, and many studies have been carried out as a result. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the United States proposed two crack growth rate (CGR) equations for PWSCC in its MRP-21, and MRP-115 reports. On the other hand, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recommended one equation for this purpose. In the present work, one instance of the initiation of an imaginary crack was assumed to exist at the inner surface of a surge nozzle weld on the hot leg side first. Subsequently, the CGRs were estimated for this initiated crack according to the MRP-21, MRP-115, and NRC equations. Finally, a comparison of the equations was made through their CGR results mainly in terms of their degree of conservatisms.

  10. Fatigue crack growth behaviors of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.2 base and weld material in 290 .deg. C water environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Pyungyeon; Kim, Jeong Hyeon; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyunchul [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    The fatigue crack growth behaviors of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.2 low alloy steel in high temperature water environment were investigated. Overall, weld metal showed similar crack growth rate as that of base metal. At 0.01 Hz, fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) was higher than that in air while the difference was smaller at 0.1 Hz. Also, FCGR showed ΔK dependency at 0.1 Hz only, indicating that the environmental effect was much greater at slower loading frequency of 0.01 Hz. FCGR of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.2 low alloy steel was compatible to or smaller than the ASME Sec. XI fatigue reference curves in high temperature water environment.

  11. The welding metallurgy of HASTELLOY alloys C-4, C-22, and C-276

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, M. J.; Headley, T. J.; Romig, A. D.

    1986-11-01

    The welding metallurgy (solidification and solid state transformations) of HASTELLOY* Alloys C-4, C-22, and C-276 has been determined. Varestraint hot-cracking tests performed on commercial alloys revealed a weldability ranking as follows: C-4 > C-22 > C-276. All alloys would be expected to have good weldability, with Alloy C-4 having a very low hot-cracking tendency, comparable to 304L stainless steel. Microstructures of gas-tungsten-arc welds of these alloys have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and analytical electron microscopy. Intermetallic secondary solidification constituents have been found associated with weld metal hot cracks in Alloys C-276 and C-22. In Alloy C-276, this constituent is a combination of P and ώ phases, and in Alloy C-22, this constituent is composed of σ, P, and ώ phases. With phase composition data obtained by AEM techniques and available ternary (Ni-Cr-Mo) phase diagrams, an equivalent chemistry model is proposed to account for the microstructures observed in each alloy's weld metal.

  12. Microstructure, local mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of an SA508-52M-316LN safe-end dissimilar metal weld joint by GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Hongliang; Zhu, Ruolin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Zhiming [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Jianqiu, E-mail: wangjianqiu@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Han, En.-Hou.; Ke, Wei [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Su, Mingxing [Shanghai Research Center for Weld and Detection Engineering Technique of Nuclear Equipment, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2016-07-04

    The microstructure, local mechanical properties and local stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of an SA508-52M-316LN domestic dissimilar metal welded safe-end joint used for AP1000 nuclear power plant prepared by automatic gas tungsten arc welding was studied in this work by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (with electron back scattering diffraction and an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy system), micro-hardness testing, local mechanical tensile testing and local slow strain rate tests. The micro-hardness, local mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility across this dissimilar metal weld joint vary because of the complex microstructure across the fusion area and the dramatic chemical composition change across the fusion lines. Briefly, Type I boundaries and Type II boundaries exist in 52Mb near the SA508-52Mb interface, a microstructure transition was found in SA508 heat affected zone, the residual strain and grain boundary character distribution changes as a function of the distance from the fusion boundary in 316LN heat affected zone, micro-hardness distribution and local mechanical properties along the DMWJ are heterogeneous, and 52Mw-316LN interface has the highest SCC susceptibility in this DMWJ while 316LN base metal has the lowest one.

  13. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Form Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Damage tolerance testing development was required to help qualify a new spin forming dome fabrication process for the Ares 1 program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One challenge of the testing was due to the compound curvature of the dome. The testing was developed on a sub-scale dome with a diameter of approximately 40 inches. The simulated service testing performed was based on the EQTP1102 Rev L 2195 Aluminum Lot Acceptance Simulated Service Test and Analysis Procedure generated by Lockheed Martin for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. This testing is performed on a specimen with an induced flaw of elliptical shape generated by Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) and subsequent fatigue cycling for crack propagation to a predetermined length and depth. The specimen is then loaded in tension at a constant rate of displacement at room temperature until fracture occurs while recording load and strain. An identical specimen with a similar flaw is then proof tested at room temperature to imminent failure based on the critical offset strain achieved by the previous fracture test. If the specimen survives the proof, it is then subjected to cryogenic cycling with loads that are a percentage of the proof load performed at room temperature. If all cryogenic cycles are successful, the specimen is loaded in tension to failure at the end of the test. This standard was generated for flat plate, so a method of translating this to a specimen of compound curvature was required. This was accomplished by fabricating a fixture that maintained the curvature of the specimen rigidly with the exception of approximately one-half inch in the center of the specimen containing the induced flaw. This in conjunction with placing the center of the specimen in the center of the load train allowed for successful testing with a minimal amount of bending introduced into the system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed using the typical double beam assembly and with 4

  14. Characterization the microstructure of pulsed Nd:YAG welding method in low frequencies; correlation with tensile and fracture behavior in laser-welded nitinol joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei Zoeram, Ali; Rahmani, Aida; Asghar Akbari Mousavi, Seyed Ali

    2017-05-01

    The precise controllability of heat input in pulsed Nd:YAG welding method provided by two additional parameters, frequency and pulse duration, has made this method very promising for welding of alloys sensitive to heat input. The poor weldability of Ti-rich nitinol as a result of the formation of Ti2Ni IMC has deprived us of the unique properties of this alloy. In this study, to intensify solidification rate during welding of Ti-rich nitinol, pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam in low frequency was employed in addition to the employment of a copper substrate. Specific microstructure produced in this condition was characterized and the effects of this microstructure on tensile and fracture behavior of samples welded by two different procedures, full penetration and double-sided method with halved penetration depth for each side were investigated. The investigations revealed although the combination of low frequencies, the use of a high thermal conductor substrate and double-sided method eliminated intergranular fracture and increased tensile strength, the particular microstructure, built in the pulsed welding method in low frequencies, results to the formation of the longitudinal cracks during the first stages of tensile test at weld centerline. This degrades tensile strength of welded samples compared to base metal. The results showed samples welded in double-sided method performed much better than samples welded in full penetration mode.

  15. New measurement technique of ductility curve for ductility-dip cracking susceptibility in Alloy 690 welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Uegaki, Takanori; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2016-08-30

    The coupling of a hot tensile test with a novel in situ observation technique using a high-speed camera was investigated as a high-accuracy quantitative evaluation method for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Several types of Alloy 690 filler wire were tested in this study owing to its susceptibility to DDC. The developed test method was used to directly measure the critical strain for DDC and high temperature ductility curves with a gauge length of 0.5 mm. Minimum critical strains of 1.3%, 4.0%, and 3.9% were obtained for ERNiCrFe-7, ERNiCrFe-13, and ERNiCrFe-15, respectively. The DDC susceptibilities of ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 were nearly the same and quite low compared with that of ERNiCrFe-7. This was likely caused by the tortuosity of the grain boundaries arising from the niobium content of around 2.5% in the former samples. Besides, ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 indicated higher minimum critical strains even though these specimens include higher content of sulfur and phosphorus than ERNiCrFe-7. Thus, containing niobium must be more effective to improve the susceptibility compared to sulfur and phosphorous in the alloy system.

  16. FOURCRACK advanced coal-fired power plant steels - avoidance of early weld failure by 'Type IV' cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.J.; Harvey, B.; Brett, S.J. [E.ON UK plc., Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    Project 'FOURCRACK' was undertaken to improve understanding of the problem, assist materials selection, and clarify the effective limits on plant design conditions and temperatures. The main project was based on cross-weld creep rupture testing. Tests were carried out to assess the high temperature performance of welds in seven different casts of leading advanced high alloy ferritic steels, E911, P92 and P122, supplied as forging, casting, plate, and pipe components, and in a weak cast of Grade 91 steel which was welded following different heat treatments to compare the performance of as received, renormalised and tempered and preaged parent material conditions. A novel form of test matrix was devised to investigate variations in both stress and temperature and compare the performance of a large number of different weldment over a range of different test conditions. To generate better long term data on Type IV cracking in the heat-affected zone, the main test programme was followed by additional testing using a special waited specimen geometry. The test data included many short term failures in the weld metal. However, there was a clear trend toward HAZ failure at lower temperature and stresses, and it could be concluded that HAZ Type IV failure is the main long term risk under plant operating conditions. 15 refs., 29 figs., 26 abs., 5 apps.

  17. Evidence of cracks in austenitic pipe weldings with a radiometric inspection system; Nachweis von Rissen in austenitischen Rohrleitungsnaehten mit einem radiometrischen Pruefsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, H.J.; Wuensch, W. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1999-08-01

    The paper reports the development of a radiometric prototype device and its application to inspection of austenitic weldings with intercrystalline crack defects. The device initially was intended to be used for supplemental inspection for clarification of contradictory or unclear testing results, but the results obtained justify to consider the possibility of using it as an independent, full-scope testing instrument. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Berichtet wird ueber die Entwicklung eines Prototypes eines Radiometrie-Geraetes zur Pruefung von austenitischen Schweissnaehten mit interkristalliner Rissbildung, zunaechst als Entscheidungshilfe bei unklaren bzw. sich widersprechenden Pruefresultaten. Zwischenzeitlich wird auch daran gedacht, ein solches Geraet fuer eine vollstaendige Pruefung weiter zu entwickeln. (orig./DGE)

  18. Assessment of Weld Overlays for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking at Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Edward J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-08-01

    This TLR provides an assessment of weld overlays as a mitigation strategy for PWSCC, and includes an assessment of the WOL-related inspection requirements of Code Case N-770-1, as conditioned in §50.55a.

  19. Modern fiber laser beam welding of the newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naffakh Moosavy, Homam; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein; Goodarzi, Massoud; Khodabakhshi, Meisam; Mapelli, Carlo; Barella, Silvia

    2014-04-01

    In the present research, the modern fiber laser beam welding of newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys using various welding parameters in constant heat input has been investigated. Five nickel-base superalloys with various Ti and Nb contents were designed and produced by Vacuum Induction Melting furnace. The fiber laser beam welding operations were performed in constant heat input (100 J mm-2) and different welding powers (400 and 1000 W) and velocities (40 and 100 mm s-1) using 6-axis anthropomorphic robot. The macro- and micro-structural features, weld defects, chemical composition and mechanical property of 3.2 mm weldments were assessed utilizing optical and scanning electron microscopes equipped with EDS analysis and microhardness tester. The results showed that welding with higher powers can create higher penetration-to-width ratios. The porosity formation was increased when the welding powers and velocities were increased. None of the welds displayed hot solidification and liquation cracks in 400 and 1000 W welding powers, but liquation phenomenon was observed in all the heat-affected zones. With increasing the Nb content of the superalloys the liquation length was increased. The changing of the welding power and velocity did not alter the hardness property of the welds. The hardness of welds decreased when the Ti content declined in the composition of superalloys. Finally, the 400 and 1000 W fiber laser powers with velocity of 40 and 100 m ms-1 have been offered for hot crack-free welding of the thin sheet of newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys.

  20. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  1. Thermomechanical modelling of dissimilar Friction Melt Bonding of AA6061 to Dual-phase steel: Prediction of solidification cracking and residual stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez Mena, Norberto; Drezet, Jean-Marie; Jacques, Pascal; Simar, Aude; Thermec

    2016-01-01

    Friction Melt Bonding (FMB) is a novel technique that has been successfully applied to weld aluminium to steel in lap-joint configuration. To carry out the weld, a rotating cylindrical tool showing no pin is pressed against the surface of the steel sheet which is placed over the aluminium one. Heat will is generated from the friction and plastic dissipation induced by the tool in the steel plate. This heat does not melt the steel, but locally melts the aluminium in contact underneath owing to...

  2. Thick-section Laser and Hybrid Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujanpää, Veli

    Austenitic stainless steels are generally known to have very good laser weldability, when ordinary grades of sheets are concerned. But it is not necessarily the case, if special grades of fully austenitic structures with e.g. high molybdenum, or thick-section are used. It is also known that hot cracking susceptibility is strictly controlled by composition and welding parameters. If solidification is primary ferritic, hot cracking resistance is dramatically increased. It is also well known that laser welding needs a careful control of weld edge preparation and air gap between the edges. The dependence on edge quality can be decreased by using filler metal, either cold wire, hot wire or hybrid laser-arc welding. An additional role is high molybdenum contents where micro segregation can cause low local contents in weld which can decrease the corrosion properties, if filler metal is not used. Another feature in laser welding is its incomplete mixing, especially in thick section applications. It causes inhomogeneity, which can make uneven microstructure, as well as uneven mechanical and corrosion properties In this presentation the features of laser welding of thick section austenitic stainless steels are highlighted. Thick section (up to 60 mm) can be made by multi-pass laser or laser hybrid welding. In addition to using filler metal, it requires careful joint figure planning, laser head planning, weld parameter planning, weld filler metal selection, non-destructive and destructive testing and metallography to guarantee high-quality welds in practice. In addition some tests with micro segregation is presented. Also some examples of incomplete mixing is presented.

  3. Effect of residual stress relaxation by means of local rapid induction heating on stress corrosion cracking behavior and electrochemical characterization of welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy under slow strain rate test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Tang, Shawei; Liu, Guangyi; Sun, Yue; Hu, Jin

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy was treated by means of local rapid induction heating in order to relax the residual stress existed in the weldment. The welded samples were heat treated at the different temperatures. The stress corrosion cracking behavior and electrochemical characterization of the as-welded samples before and after the post weld heat treatment as a function of residual stress were investigated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of the samples under slow strain rate test were performed in a LiCl-methanol solution. The results demonstrated that the residual stress in the as-welded sample was dramatically reduced after the post weld heat treatment, and the residual stress decreased with the increase in the heat treatment temperature. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility and electrochemical activity of the as-welded sample were significantly reduced after the heat treatment due to the relaxation of the residual stress, which gradually decreased with the decreasing value of the residual stress distributed in the heat treated samples.

  4. Temporal pulse shaping: a key parameter for the laser welding of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Caroline; Poulon-Quintin, Angeline

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to describe the effect of pulse shaping on the prevention of internal defects during laser welding for two dental alloys mainly used in prosthetic dentistry. Single spot, weld beads, and welds with 80 % overlapping were performed on Co-Cr-Mo and Pd-Ag-Sn cast plates with a pulsed neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. A specific welding procedure using adapted parameters to each alloy was completed. All the possibilities for pulse shaping were tested: (1) the square pulse shape as a default setting, (2) a rising edge slope for gradual heating, (3) a falling edge slope to slow the cooling process, and (4) a combination of rising and falling edges. The optimization of the pulse shape is supposed to produce defect-free welds (crack, pores, voids). Cross-section SEM observations and Vickers microhardness measurements were made. Pd-Ag-Sn was highly sensitive to hot cracking, and Co-Cr-Mo was more sensitive to voids and small porosities (sometimes combined with cracks). Using a slow cooling ramp allowed a better control on the solidification process for those two alloys always preventing internal defects. A rapid slope should be preferred for Co-Cr-Mo alloys due to its low-laser beam reflectivity. On the opposite, for Pd-Ag-Sn alloy, a slow rising slope should be preferred because this alloy has a high-laser beam reflectivity.

  5. Influence of Laser Welding Speed on the Morphology and Phases Occurring in Spray-Compacted Hypereutectic Al-Si-Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gietzelt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Normally, the weldability of aluminum alloys is ruled by the temperature range of solidification of an alloy according to its composition by the formation of hot cracks due to thermal shrinkage. However, for materials at nonequilibrium conditions, advantage can be taken by multiple phase formation, leading to an annihilation of temperature stress at the microscopic scale, preventing hot cracks even for alloys with extreme melting range. In this paper, several spray-compacted hypereutectic aluminum alloys were laser welded. Besides different silicon contents, additional alloying elements like copper, iron and nickel were present in some alloys, affecting the microstructure. The microstructure was investigated at the delivery state of spray-compacted material as well as for a wide range of welding speeds ranging from 0.5 to 10 m/min, respectively. The impact of speed on phase composition and morphology was studied at different disequilibrium solidification conditions. At high welding velocity, a close-meshed network of eutectic Al-Si-composition was observed, whereas the matrix is filled with nearly pure aluminum, helping to diminish the thermal stress during accelerated solidification. Primary solidified silicon was found, however, containing considerable amounts of aluminum, which was not expected from phase diagrams obtained at the thermodynamic equilibrium.

  6. Effect of solidification conditions on the solidification mode in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suutala, N.

    1983-02-01

    The effect of the solidification conditions on the solidification mode in the composition range in which the primary austenitic and ferritic modes compete is studied by varying the welding parameters in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding and by comparing the results with those obtained from other laboratory experiments. A good agreement holds if the effect of the composition is described by the ratio Creq/Nieq (Creq = pct Cr + 1.37 × pct Mo + 1.5 × pct Si + 2 × pct Nb + 3 × pct Ti and Nieq = pct Ni + 0.31 × pct Mn + 22 × pct C + 14.2 × pct N + pct Cu) and the effect of the solidification conditions by the growth rate. The critical value of the ratio Creq/Nieq corresponding to the transition from primary austenitic to ferritic solidification increases from 1.43 to 1.55 with increasing growth rate. The upper limit is valid in GTA welding at high welding speeds, while the lower limit corresponds to the practical conditions which exist in ingot and shaped casting. The validity and applicability of this solidification model are discussed.

  7. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 K to 1173 K (700 °C to 900 °C), was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/and above 1073 K (800 °C). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 °C). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine-grained heat-affected zone region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard "normalization and tempering" processes. The steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room temperature toughness. The above data are also analyzed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.

  8. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. R.; Kor, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Control of porosity in weld beads was major objective in development of aluminum welding program. Porosity, most difficult defect to control, is caused by hydrogen gas unable to escape during solidification. Hard tooling allows hotter bead than free-fall tooling so hydrogen bubbles can boil out instead of forming pores. Welding position, moisture, and cleanliness are other important factors in control of porosity.

  9. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendrana C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE, analysis of variance (ANOVA, response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  10. CO2 laser welding of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahri, Mohammed; Masse, Jean Eric; Mathieu, J. F.; Barreau, Gerard; Autric, Michel L.

    2000-02-01

    Metallic alloys with a low mass density can be considered to be basic materials in aeronautic and automotive industry. Magnesium alloys have better properties than aluminum alloys in respect of their low density and high resistance to traction. The main problems of magnesium alloy welding are the inflammability, the crack formation and the appearance of porosity during the solidification. The laser tool is efficient to overcome the difficulties of manufacturing by conventional processing. Besides, the laser processing mainly using shielding gases allows an effective protection of the metal against the action of oxygen and a small heat affected zone. In this paper, we present experimental results about 5 kW CO2 laser welding of 4 mm-thick magnesium alloy plates provided by Eurocopter France. The focused laser beam has about 0.15 mm of diameter. We have investigated the following sample: WE43, alloy recommended in aeronautic and space applications, is constituted with Mg, Y, Zr, rare earth. More ductile, it can be used at high temperatures until 250 degrees Celsius for times longer than 5000 hours without effects on its mechanical properties. A sample of RZ5 (French Norm: GZ4TR, United States Norm ZE41) is composed of Mg, Zn, Zr, La, rare earth. This alloy has excellent properties of foundry and it allows to the realization of components with complex form. Also, it has a good resistance and important properties of tightness. The parameters of the process were optimized in the following fields: laser power: 2 to 5 kW, welding speed: 1 to 4.5 m/min, focal position: -3 mm to +3 mm below or on the top of the metal surface, shielding gas: helium with a flow of 10 to 60 l/min at 4 bars. Metallurgical analyses and mechanical control are made (macroscopic structure, microscopic structure, interpretations of the structures and localization of possible defects, analyse phases, chemical composition, hardness, tensile test etc.) to understand the parameters influence of welding

  11. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  12. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  13. Crack repair welding by CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire for long-term used steam turbine cases of Cr-Mo-V cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Murakami, Aoi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Matsumura, Hideo [Chugoku Electric Power Co., 3-9-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    Surface melting by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding and overlaying by cold metal transfer (CMT) brazing using low melting point filler wire were investigated to develop a repair process for cracks in worn cast steel of steam turbine cases. Cr-Mo-V cast steel, operated for 188,500 h at 566 °C, was used as the base material. Silver and gold brazing filler wires were used as overlaying materials to decrease the heat input into the base metal and the peak temperature during the welding thermal cycle. Microstructural analysis revealed that the worn cast steel test samples contained ferrite phases with intragranular precipitates of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, Mo{sub 2}C, and CrSi{sub 2} and grain boundary precipitates of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Mo{sub 2}C. CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire was found to decrease the heat input and peak temperature during the thermal cycle of the process compared with those during GTA surface melting. Thus, the process helped to inhibit the formation of hardened phases such as intermetallics and martensite in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Additionally, in the case of CMT brazing using BAg-8, the change in the hardness of the HAZ was negligible even though other processes such as GTA surface melting cause significant changes. The creep-fatigue properties of weldments produced by CMT brazing with BAg-8 were the highest, and nearly the same as those of the base metal owing to the prevention of hardened phase formation. The number of fracture cycles using GTA surface melting and CMT brazing with BAu-4 was also quite small. Therefore, CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire such as BAg-8 is a promising candidate method for repairing steam turbine cases. However, it is necessary to take alloy segregation during turbine operation into account to design a suitable filler wire for practical use.

  14. Prediction of non-brittle fracture in the welded joint of C-Mn steel in the brittle-ductile transition domain; Prediction de la non-rupture fragile dans un joint soude en acier C-Mn dans le domaine de la transition fragile/ductile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thai Ha

    2009-11-15

    This work concerns the nuclear safety, specifically the secondary circuit integrity of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The problem is that of the fracture of a thin tubular structure in ferritic steel with many welded joints. The ferritic steel and weld present a brittle/ductile tenacity transition. Moreover, the welds present geometry propitious to the appearance of fatigue cracks, due to vibrations and expansions. These cracks may cause the complete fracture of the structure. The objectives of this work are to establish a criterion of non-fracture by cleavage of thin welded structures in ferritic steel, applicable to actual structures. Therefore, the present study focuses on the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in brittle/ductile transition. It aims at developing the threshold stress model initially proposed by Chapuliot, to predict the non-brittle-fracture of this welded structure. The model is identified for the welded joint in C-Mn steel for nuclear construction, specifically in the upper part of the transition. A threshold stress, below which the cleavage cannot take place, is identified using tensile tests at low temperature on axis-symmetrical notched specimens taken in welded joint. This threshold stress is used to define the threshold volume where the maximum principal stress exceeds the threshold stress during the test. The analysis by SEM of specimen fracture surfaces shows that the gross solidification molten zone in the weld is the most likely to cleave. The relation between the brittle fracture probability and the threshold volume in the gross solidification molten zone is established via a sensitivity function, using multi-materials simulations. The model thus identified is tested for the prediction of non-brittle-fracture of SENT specimens taken in the welded joint and tested in tension. The results obtained are encouraging with regards to the transferability of the model to the actual structure. (author)

  15. Morphology, microstructure, and mechanical properties of laser-welded joints in GH909 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chunming; Cai, Yuanzheng; Hu, Chongjing; Zhang, Xiong; Yan, Fei; Hu, Xiyuan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2017-05-15

    The experimental laser welding of GH909 alloy was conducted in this study. The morphology, microstructure, and mechanical properties of laser-welded joints were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, energy diffraction spectroscopy, and other techniques. Results revealed that the microstructure of the welded joints mainly consisted of tiny cellular structures, dendritic structures, and equiaxed crystals. Pores appeared in the interdendritic regions because of the insufficient local feeding of molten metal during solidification. Nb segregation in the heat-affected zone caused liquation cracking, whereas C segregation further induced the formation of carbide precipitates along the grain boundaries during the welding thermal cycle. The instability of the keyhole significantly promoted the escape of the metal vapor/plasma from the hole; as a result, porosity defects formed in the weld. The average tensile strength of the test joints was 756 MPa, which is 93.1 % of that of the base metal. The average microhardness of the weld zone (250 HV) was higher than that of the GH909 alloy substrate (208 HV), peaking at 267 HV. Microcracks appeared along the grain boundaries, proving that the grain boundaries were the weakest areas in the joint.

  16. Recent Advances in Study of Solid-Liquid Interfaces and Solidification of Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Asle Zaeem

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Solidification occurs in several material processing methods, such as in casting, welding, and laser additive manufacturing of metals, and it controls the nano- and microstructures, as well as the overall properties of the products[...

  17. Fracture assessment of laser welde joints using numerical crack propagation simulation with a cohesive zone model; Bruchmechanische Bewertung von Laserschweissverbindungen durch numerische Rissfortschrittsimulation mit dem Kohaesivzonenmodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheider, I.

    2001-07-01

    This thesis introduces a concept for fracture mechanical assessment of structures with heterogenuous material properties like weldments. It is based on the cohesive zone model for numerical crack propagation analysis. With that model the failure of examined structures due to fracture can be determined. One part of the thesis contains the extension of the capabilities of the cohesive zone model regarding modelling threedimensional problems, shear fracture and unloading. In a second part new methods are developed for determination of elastic-plastic and fracture mechanical material properties, resp., which are based on optical determination of the specimen deformation. The whole concept has been used successfully for the numerical simulation of small laser welded specimens. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein Konzept vorgestellt, mit dem es moeglich ist, Bauteile mit heterogenen Materialeigenschaften, wie z.B. Schweissverbindungen, bruchmechanisch zu bewerten. Es basiert auf einem Modell zur numerischen Rissfortschrittsimulation, dem Kohaesivzonenmodell, um das Versagen des zu untersuchenden Bauteils infolge von Bruch zu bestimmen. Ein Teil der Arbeit umfasst die Weiterentwicklung des Kohaesivzonenmodells zur Vorhersage des Bauteilversagens in Bezug auf die Behandlung dreidimensionaler Probleme, Scherbuch und Entlastung. In einem zweiten Teil werden Methoden zur Bestimmung sowohl der elastischplastischen als auch der bruchmechanischen Materialparameter entwickelt, die zum grossen Teil auf optischen Auswertungsmethoden der Deformationen beruhen. Das geschlossene Konzept wird erfolgreich auf lasergeschweisste Kleinproben angewendet. (orig.)

  18. Slag-metal reactions during welding: Part II. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, U.; Eagar, T. W.

    1991-02-01

    A kinetic model is developed to describe the transfer of alloying elements between the slag and the metal during flux-shielded welding. The model accounts for changes in alloy recovery based on the geometry of the resulting weld bead. It also distinguishes compositional differences between single-pass and multiple-pass weld beads. It is further shown that the final weld metal oxygen content is directly related to the weld solidification time as well as the type of flux used.

  19. Comparison of critical circumferential through-wall-crack-lengths in welds between pieces of straight pipes to welds between straigth pipes and bends with and without internal pressure at force- and displacement-controlled bending load; Vergleich kritischer Umfangsdurchrisslaengen in Schweissnaehten zwischen Geradrohrstuecken mit Schweissnaehten an Rohrbogen-Geradrohrverbindungen mit und ohne Innendruck bei kraft- und wegkontrollierter Biegebelastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbuch, R. [Fachhochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft Reutlingen (Germany). Fachbereich Maschinenbau

    1998-11-01

    Methods for calculation of critical, circumferential through-wall crack lengths in pipes have been developed and verified by several research projects. In applications during the last few years it has been found that the force or displacement-controlled loads have to be considered separately, and this approach was integrated into the recent methods. Methods so far assumed cracks to be located in welds joining straight pipes. But this approach starts from an incomplete picture of reality, as with today`s technology, circumferential welds are less frequent in straight pipes and much more frequent in pipework of other geometry, as for instance in welds joining straight pipes and bends, or bends with longer legs, nozzles, or T-pieces. The non-linear FEM parameter study presented in the paper, covering cases with internal pressure of pipes and one-dimensional bending loads, is based on current geometries of pipework in the primary and secondary loops of industrial plants and compares the conditions induced by circumferential through-wall cracks in welds joining only straight pipes and in those joining bended and straight pipes. At the relevant, displacement-controlled bending loads due to hampered thermal expansion of the pipe system, the critical through-wall cracks lengths occurring in pipe-to-bend welds are of about the same size and importance as those in pipe-to-pipe welds. As for the case of force-controlled loads, the technical codes calculate more serious effects and require lower bending load limits. Within the range of admissible loads given in the codes, the critical through-wall crack lengths occurring in pipe-to-bend welds are similar in size to those in straight pipe welds. It is therefore a conservative or realistic approach to apply the values determined for critical through-wall crack lengths in pipe-to-pipe joints also to pipe-to-bend welds. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Verfahren zur Berechnung kritischer Umfangdurchrisslaengen in Rohrleitungen wurden in

  20. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen; Guerrero-Mata, Martha Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature fail...

  1. Research on stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y.; Bai, Q.; Dong, S.; Yang, Z. L.; Gao, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater was studied. Microstructure, mechanical property and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the underwater wet welding joint were analyzed by metallographic observation, tensile and bending tests, slow strain rate test (SSRT) and SEM. The results indicated that the weld zone (WZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ) were all sensitive to the stress corrosion, and the WZ was more sensitive than the HAZ.

  2. Modelling of convection during solidification of metal and alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Solidification is the heart of many important manufacturing processes such as casting, welding, laser processing, crystal growth etc. It is governed by a number of interacting governing phenomena like transport of energy and solute, convection, nucleation, growth etc. and properties of solidified components like segregation, ...

  3. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  4. Soldagem em operação de dutos de alta resistência e baixa espessura com ênfase nas trincas a frio In-service welding of pipelines in high strength low thickness with emphasis on cold cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Santos Pereira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a ocorrência de trincas a frio quando da soldagem de dutos em operação. Foram executados dois conjuntos de experimentos: o primeiro denominado de experimento "F", em que foi variada a folga entre a calha e o tubo, e utilizados metal de base e de adição de alto carbono equivalente; o segundo denominado de experimento "R", em que foi imposta alta restrição à junta soldada e, promovido o resfriamento rápido mediante fluxo de água no interior do tubo. Foram feitas as soldagens com os seguintes processos e materiais: processo eletrodo revestido (SMAW, tubo e calha em aço ASTM A 335 P5, metal de adição AWS E 8018-B8 (experimento "F". Processos MIG/MAG pulsado (GMAW-P e arame tubular auto-protegido (FCAW-S, tubo e calha em aço API 5L X70, metais de adição AWS ER 80S-G e AWS E 71T-11, respectivamente (experimento "R". Para detectar as trincas a frio foram realizados exame visual e a inspeção com líquidos penetrantes. Adicionalmente as soldas foram avaliadas por macrografia e medição de dureza. Não foram detectadas trincas, apesar da utilização de metais de base e de adição com alto carbono equivalente e da junta com alta restrição, com o objetivo de aumentar as tensões. Admite-se que não houve fissuração devido ao uso de processos e/consumíveis com baixo teor de hidrogênio.The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of cold cracks associated with in-service welding of pipelines. Two sets of experiments were performed : the first of them was called experiment "F", where the gap between sleeve and pipe was varied and base and weld metal of high carbon equivalent were used, the second set of experiment was denominated "R", when higher restriction was imposed to the welded joint, which was simultaneously more rapid cooled by water flow within the pipe. The welds were made ​​with the following procedures and materials: shielded metal arc welding (SMAW of tube and pipeline

  5. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  6. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  7. Advances in Solidification Processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Advances in Solidification Processing. FOREWORD. Solidification phenomena are the heart of most of ... Besides these, the new advances in the understanding of the process have led to the ... steel chemistry on the thermo-mechanical state of solidifying strands is discussed. Finally, control of continuous casting of stainless ...

  8. 49 CFR 195.230 - Welds: Repair or removal of defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... offshore pipeline being installed from a pipelay vessel, a weld must be removed if it has a crack that is... must be inspected to ensure its acceptability. (c) Repair of a crack, or of any defect in a previously... welding procedure used to make the original weld are met upon completion of the final weld repair. [Amdt...

  9. Yield load solutions of heterogeneous welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, D., E-mail: dkozak@sfsb.h [Mechanical Engineering Faculty in Slavonski Brod, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Trg Ivane Brlic-Mazuranic 2, Hr-35000 Slavonski Brod (Croatia); Gubeljak, N. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Konjatic, P.; Sertic, J. [Mechanical Engineering Faculty in Slavonski Brod, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Trg Ivane Brlic-Mazuranic 2, Hr-35000 Slavonski Brod (Croatia)

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this paper is to establish yield load solutions when the materials inhomogeneity within the weld is present, which is usually the case in repair welding. The effect of yield strength mismatch of welded joints performed with different geometry on the yield load value has been investigated in the context of single edge notched fracture toughness specimen subjected to bending SE(B) using the finite element method. The crack was located in the center of the weld and the two most important geometrical parameters were identified as: crack length ratio a/W as well as slenderness of the welded joint, which were systematically varied. One practical and four additional combinations of filler materials, with the same portion of overmatched part and undermatched part of the weld, were analyzed, and plane strain FE solutions for the case when the crack is located in the overmatched half of the heterogeneous weld were obtained.

  10. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of aluminium 5083-H111 welded using gas metal arc welding method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available susceptible to hydrogen-induced porosity. The weld pool may dissolve large amount of hydrogen from the arc atmosphere. On solidification, the solubility of hydrogen decreases and the entrapped hydrogen forms gas porosity. Typical sources of hydrogen... Behaviour of Aluminium 5083-H111 Welded Using Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Kalenda Mutombo1 and Madeleine du Toit2 1CSIR/ 2University of Pretoria South Africa 1. Introduction Aluminium and its alloys are widely used as engineering materials...

  11. Cracks in high-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The reasons which account for the formation of in service cracks in castings made from Hadfield steel were discussed. To explain the source of existence of the nuclei of brittle fractures, the properties of cast steel were examined within the range of solidification temperatures, remembering that feeding of this material is specially difficult, causing microporosity in hot spots. This creates conditions promoting the formation of microcracks which tend to propagate during service conditions involving high dynamic stresses, and explains why the cracks are mainly characterized by a brittle nature. The reason for crack formation in service are micro-porosities formed during casting solidification.

  12. Advances in Solidification Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. Lopez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Melt solidification is the shortest and most viable route to obtain components, starting from the design to the finished products. Hence, a sound knowledge of the solidification of metallic materials is essential for the development of advanced structural metallic components that drive modern technological societies. As a result, there have been innumerable efforts and full conferences dedicated to this important subject [1–6]. In addition, there are various scientific journals fully devoted to investigating the various aspects which give rise to various solidification microstructures [7–9]. [...

  13. Material-analytical investigations on crack initiation and progression in notched laser beam welds. Final report; Makro- und mikrostrukturelle Eigenschaften laserstrahlgeschweisster Verbindungen. Teilprojekt: Werkstoffanalytische Untersuchungen zu Risseinleitung und -verlauf an gekerbten Laserstrahlschweissnaehten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goede, M.; Schmid, C.; Bormann, A.; Haferkamp, H.

    2000-07-28

    Laser technology is a fast-growing market segment in particular for the German industry. While lasers with their economical and technical advantages are already widely used in the automotive industry, there are still quite some barriers in other fields of application for the use of lasers as a joining tool. The elaborated project results provide a possibility to prove the strength of laser-welded joints. The results of this innovative technology thus contribute, in conjunction with their description in the laser manual 'Laser Beam Welding', to an advanced use in a multitude of fields of application in industrial manufacturing. Especially within the legally defined area, the modified tensile and bend test specimen offer geometries which are easy and consistently to produce and which do not only stress the weld but also the heat-affected zone up to an initiation of cracks. This allows for a an evaluation of the laser beam weld. (orig.) [German] Die Lasertechnik stellt insbesondere fuer die deutsche Industrie ein Marktsegment mit grossem Wachstumspotential dar. Waehrend die wirtschaftlichen und technischen Vorteile des Lasereinsatzes im Automobilbau bereits stark genutzt werden, bestehen in anderen Anwendungsbereichen eine Reihe von Barrieren, den Laser als Fuegewerkzeug zu verwenden. Die erarbeiteten Projektergebnisse zeigen eine Moeglichkeit zum Nachweis der Festigkeit lasergeschweisster Verbindungen auf und leisten in Verbindung mit der Darstellung im Handbuch 'Laserstrahlschweissen' einen wichtigen Schritt zum Einsatz dieser innovativen Technologie in weiten Anwendungsbereichen der industriellen Fertigung. Insbesondere fuer den gesetzlich geregelten Bereich bieten die modifizierten Zug- und Biegeproben einfach und reproduzierbar zu fertigende Geometrien, die sowohl die Schweissnaht als auch die Waermeeinflusszone bis zur Risseinleitung belasten und damit eine Bewertung der Laserstrahlschweissnaht ermoeglichen. (orig.)

  14. Creep-fatigue propagation of semi-elliptical crack at 650 deg. C in 316L(N) stainless steel plates with or without welded joints; Propagation de fissures semi-elliptiques en fatigue-fluage a 650 deg. C dans des plaques d'acier 316L(N) avec ou sans joints soudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtit, F

    2000-07-01

    This study realised in LISN Laboratory of CEA Saclay, deals with the creep fatigue propagation of semi elliptical crack at the temperature of 650 deg C in 316L(N) stainless steel plates with or without welded joints. A vast majority of the studies on creep fatigue propagation models are based on specimen (CT) especially designed for crack propagation study. The PLAQFLU program performed in LISN laboratory deals with the application and adaptation of these models to complex crack shape, which are more representative of the cracks observed in industrial components. In this scope, we use propagation tests realised at the temperature of 650 deg C with wide plates containing semi elliptical defects. For some of them, the initial defect is machined in the middle of a welded joint, which constitute a privileged site for the crack initiation. The approach used in this study is based on global parameters of fracture mechanics. At first, tests on CT specimen are used in order to determine the propagation laws correlating the crack growth rate to the global parameters K or C{sup *}. These laws are then supposed to be intrinsic to our materials and are used to analysed the semi elliptical crack propagation. The analysis of the comportment of the crack during the hold time demonstrates the possibility to establish a correlation between the crack propagation both in the deepest and the surface point and the local value of C{sup *}. These correlations are coherent in the different points of the crack front for the different applied hold times, and they present a reasonably good agreement with the creep propagation law identified on CT specimen. The simulation of test performed on based metal specimen with a model of summation of both creep and pure fatigue crack growth gives acceptable results when the calculus of the simplified expression of C{sup *}{sub s} considers a continuous evolution of creep deformations rate during the all test. (author)

  15. Detailed Microstructural Characterization and Restoration Mechanisms of Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel Friction-Stir-Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T. F. A.; Torres, E. A.; Lippold, J. C.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Duplex stainless steels are successfully used in a wide variety of applications in areas such as the food industry, petrochemical installations, and sea water desalination plants, where high corrosion resistance and high mechanical strength are required. However, during fusion welding operations, there can be changes to the favorable microstructure of these materials that compromise their performance. Friction stir welding with a non-consumable pin enables welded joints to be obtained in the solid state, which avoids typical problems associated with solidification of the molten pool, such as segregation of alloying elements and the formation of solidification and liquefaction cracks. In the case of superduplex stainless steels, use of the technique can avoid unbalanced proportions of ferrite and austenite, formation of deleterious second phases, or growth of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone. Consolidated joints with full penetration were obtained for 6-mm-thick plates of UNS S32101 and S32205 duplex stainless steels, and S32750 and S32760 superduplex steels. The welding heat cycles employed avoided the conditions required for formation of deleterious phases, except in the case of the welded joint of the S32760 steel, where SEM images indicated the formation of secondary phases, as corroborated by decreased mechanical performance. Analysis using EBSD and transmission electron microscopy revealed continuous dynamic recrystallization by the formation of cellular arrays of dislocations in the ferrite and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in the austenite. Microtexture evaluation indicated the presence of fibers typical of shear in the thermomechanically affected zone. These fibers were not obviously present in the stir zone, probably due to the intensity of microstructural reformulation to which this region was subjected.

  16. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  17. Research on Fracture Failure of the Underwater Welding Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Feng; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yan; Chu, Dongzhi

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, by testing welding joints of their metallography and hardness, we analyze the metal structure. And then, the microstructure characteristics, macro and micro fracture morphology of underwater welding joint were investigated by means of metallographical examination and SEM. The fracture failure of the underwater welding joint is discussed here. The cracks are the major factors to fracture failure. The cracks spread along with the crack of the welding line, and this expand process generates dimple. The crack continues to expand under the action of tensile and the fracture fails eventually.

  18. Solidification microstructures and solid-state parallels: Recent developments, future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asta, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Beckermann, C. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Karma, A. [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kurz, W. [Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: wilfried.kurz@epfl.ch; Napolitano, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, and Ames Laboratory USDOE, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Plapp, M. [Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Purdy, G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4L7 (Canada); Rappaz, M. [Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Trivedi, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, and Ames Laboratory USDOE, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Rapid advances in atomistic and phase-field modeling techniques as well as new experiments have led to major progress in solidification science during the first years of this century. Here we review the most important findings in this technologically important area that impact our quantitative understanding of: (i) key anisotropic properties of the solid-liquid interface that govern solidification pattern evolution, including the solid-liquid interface free energy and the kinetic coefficient; (ii) dendritic solidification at small and large growth rates, with particular emphasis on orientation selection; (iii) regular and irregular eutectic and peritectic microstructures; (iv) effects of convection on microstructure formation; (v) solidification at a high volume fraction of solid and the related formation of pores and hot cracks; and (vi) solid-state transformations as far as they relate to solidification models and techniques. In light of this progress, critical issues that point to directions for future research in both solidification and solid-state transformations are identified.

  19. Microstructural development during solidification of stainless steel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, J. W.; Allen, S. M.; Eagar, T. W.

    1989-10-01

    The microstructures that develop during the solidification of stainless steel alloys are related to the solidification conditions and the specific alloy composition. The solidification conditions are determined by the processing method, i.e., casting, welding, or rapid solidification, and by parametric variations within each of these techniques. One variable that has been used to characterize the effects of different processing conditions is the cooling rate. This factor and the chemical composition of the alloy both influence (1) the primary mode of solidification, (2) solute redistribution and second-phase formation during solidification, and (3) the nucleation and growth behavior of the ferrite-to-austenite phase transformation during cooling. Consequently, the residual ferrite content and the microstructural morphology depend on the cooling rate and are governed by the solidification process. This paper investigates the influence of cooling rate on the microstructure of stainless steel alloys and describes the conditions that lead to the many microstructural morphologies that develop during solidification. Experiments were performed on a series of seven high-purity Fe-Ni-Cr alloys that spanned the line of twofold saturation along the 59 wt pct Fe isopleth of the ternary alloy system. High-speed electron-beam surface-glazing was used to melt and resolidify these alloys at scan speeds up to 5 m/s. The resulting cooling rates were shown to vary from 7°C/s to 7.5×106°C/s, and the resolidified melts were analyzed by optical metallographic methods. Five primary modes of solidification and 12 microstructural morphologies were characterized in the resolidified alloys, and these features appear to be a complete “set” of the possible microstructures for 300-series stainless steel alloys. The results of this study were used to create electron-beam scan speed vs composition diagrams, which can be used to predict the primary mode of solidification and the

  20. Application of a criterion for cold cracking to casting high strength aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D.G.; Fjaer, H.G.; Ten Cate, A.; Ontijt, N.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Direct chill (DC) casting of high strength 7xxx series aluminium alloys is difficult mainly due to solidification cracking (hot cracks) and solid state cracking (cold cracks). Poor thermal properties along with extreme brittleness in the as-cast condition make DC-casting of such alloys a challenging

  1. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  2. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED 7 UNCLASSIFIED 2.1. Fusion welding methods 2.1.1. Gas metal arc (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) welding techniques...UNCLASSIFIED 8 UNCLASSIFIED Fig.3. (a) Schematic of the butt TIG welding for joining the aluminum to steel and (b) formation of the cracks at the...dissimilar metals TIG welding -brazing of aluminum alloy to stainless steel, Materials Science and Engineering A 509 (2009) 31-40. [28] S.B. Lin, J.L. Song

  3. Analysis of factors affecting fractures of rails welded by alumino-thermic welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergejs MIKHAYLOVS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On Latvian Railway the use of the alumino-thermic welding is widespread using the Elektro-Thermit Company technology. Today it is a basic method for rail joints on railway switches. The analysis of the metal structure in the thermic welding and in the thermic welded zone of rails showed that the weld metal had inclusions small pores and nonmetallics. Pores and nonmetallics are not reduce hardness but it is concentrators of stresses and sources of cracks development.

  4. Analysis of factors affecting fractures of rails welded by alumino-thermic welding

    OpenAIRE

    Sergejs MIKHAYLOVS; Dijs SERGEJEVS

    2008-01-01

    On Latvian Railway, the use of the thermic welding is widespread using the ELECTRO-THERMIT Company technology. Today it is a basic method for rail joints. Experience of the operation of rails welded by the thermic welding showed that every year occur from 2 to 3 fractures of thermic joints on the main tracks between stations of Latvian Railway.Such emergence of cracks in the weld joint alongside the scores indicates of great residual stresses in the weld joints made by the thermic welding.

  5. Residual stress characterization of welds and post-weld processes using x-ray diffraction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauss, Michael E.; Pineault, James A.; Eckersley, John S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of residual stress characterization in welds and post weld processes. The failure to characterize residual stresses created during welding and/or post weld processes can lead to unexpected occurrences of stress corrosion cracking, distortion, fatigue cracking as well as instances of over design or over processing. The development of automated residual stress mapping and the availability of portable and fast equipment have now made the characterization of residual stresses using x-ray diffraction practical for process control and optimization. The paper presents examples where x-ray diffraction residual stress characterization techniques were applied on various kinds of welds including arc welds, TIG welds, resistance welds, laser welds and electron beam welds. The nondestructive nature of the x-ray diffraction technique has made the residual stress characterization of welds a useful tool for process optimization and failure analysis, particularly since components can be measured before and after welding and post welding processes. Some examples presented show the residual stresses before and after the application of post weld processes such as shot peening, grinding and heat treatment.

  6. Depressurization of a spread of Brazil-Bolivia gas pipeline and the emergency repair of a weld crack in a instrument derivation at Campo Grande compression station; Despressurizacao de trecho do gasoduto Bolivia-Brazil para reparo emergencial de trinca em uma derivacao de instrumento de temperatura na Estacao de Compressao de Campo Grande - MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Carlos Ribeiro; Leite Junior, Ismael Casano [TBG - Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia Brasil S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the actions taken to repair a gas leak, at an original pressure of 100 kgf/cm{sup 2}, occurred due to a 1 1/2'' branch pipe weld crack, located on the 24'' Campo Grande - Mato Grosso do Sul Compression Station discharge pipe. This branch pipe was used to a thermo well installation and was submitted to an additional strength caused by thermo well vibration. The weld repair actions required an urgent depressurization of a 33 km spread of Bolivia-Brazil Pipeline in a timely manner, to avoid any negative impact in the operational schedule. (author)

  7. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    CERN Document Server

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, He; Chen, Daolun; Jiang, Xianquan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique–ultrasonic spot welding (USW)–at different energy levels. An ultra-fine necklace-like equiaxed grain structure is observed along the weld line due to the occurrence of dynamic crystallization, with smaller grain sizes at lower levels of welding energy. The tensile lap shear strength, failure energy, and critical stress intensity of the welded joints first increase, reach their maximum values, and then decrease with increasing welding energy. The tensile lap shear failure mode changes from interfacial fracture at lower energy levels, to nugget pull-out at intermediate optimal energy levels, and to transverse through-thickness (TTT) crack growth at higher energy levels. The fatigue life is longer for the joints welded at an energy of 1400 J than 2000 J at higher cyclic loading levels. The fatigue failure mode changes from nugget pull-out to TTT crack growth with decreasing cyclic loading for the joints welded at 1400 J, while TTT crack growth mode remains at all cyclic loading levels for the joints welded at 2000 J. Fatigue crack basically initiates from the nugget edge, and propagates with “river-flow” patterns and characteristic fatigue striations. PMID:28772809

  9. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment.

  10. Electron Beam Welding of Gear Wheels by Splitted Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dřímal, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    This contribution deals with the issue of electron beam welding of high-accurate gear wheels composed of a spur gearing and fluted shaft joined with a face weld for automotive industry. Both parts made of the high-strength low-alloy steel are welded in the condition after final machining and heat treatment, performed by case hardening, whereas it is required that the run-out in the critical point of weldment after welding, i. e. after the final operation, would be 0.04 mm max.. In case of common welding procedure, cracks were formed in the weld, initiated by spiking in the weld root. Crack formation was prevented by the use of an interlocking joint with a rounded recess and suitable welding parameters, eliminating crack initiation by spiking in the weld root. Minimisation of the welding distortions was achieved by the application of tack welding with simultaneous splitting of one beam into two parts in the opposite sections of circumferential face weld attained on the principle of a new system of controlled deflection with digital scanning of the beam. This welding procedure assured that the weldment temperature after welding would not be higher than 400 °C. Thus, this procedure allowed achieving the final run-outs in the critical point of gearwheels within the maximum range up to 0.04 mm, which is acceptable for the given application. Accurate optical measurements did not reveal any changes in the teeth dimensions.

  11. Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Parametric Envelopes for Stable Keyhole Plasma Arc Welding of a Titanium Alloy,” Journal of Strain Analysis for Engineering Design, 47(5), pp. 266- 275, 2012...welding, is simulation of the coupling of the heat source, which involves melting, fluid flow in the weld meltpool and heat transfer from the...generation of the solidification boundary, the surface from which heat is transferred into the HAZ, which is the region of most probable weld

  12. Determination of Elements and Carbon Content of Stainless Steel Welded Pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Hudeček; Petr Dostál

    2016-01-01

    Find out defects or problems of welds are not so simple from time to time. Specially, if weld has been made in rough environmental conditions like high temperature, dusty wind and humidity. It is important to assure have good conditions to realize basic step of welding. For welding, have been used welding procedures specification and procedure qualification record. However, difficult conditions, documentations rightness or human errors are always here. Common weld defects like cracks, porosit...

  13. Determination of Grain Size and Resistance to Corrosion of Stainless Steel Welded Pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Hudeček; Petr Dostál

    2017-01-01

    Discover problems of welds is not so easy from time to time. Specially, If welding was made in rough environmental conditions such as high temperature, humidity and dusty wind. It is necessary to provide good conditions to realize basic step of welding. For welding, have been used welding procedures specification and procedure qualification record. However, difficult conditions, documentations rightness or human errors are always here. Common weld defects like cracks, porosity, lack of penetr...

  14. Laser Peening Effects on Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a welding technique that uses frictional heating combined with forging pressure to produce high strength bonds. It is attractive for aerospace applications. Although residual stresses in FSW are generally lower when compared to conventional fusion welds, recent work has shown that significant tensile residual stresses can be present in the weld after fabrication. Therefore, laser shock peening was investigated as a means of moderating the tensile residual stresses produced during welding. This slide presentation reviews the effect of Laser Peening on the weld, in tensile strength, strain, surface roughness, microhardness, surface wear/friction, and fatigue crack growth rates. The study concluded that the laser peening process can result in considerable improvement to crack initiaion, propagation and mechanical properties in FSW.

  15. Modified 9% Cr steel (grade P9. 1): Low cycle fatigue and crack propagation rate of base material and welds at room and high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderschaeghe, A.; Gabrel-Cousaert, C.; Lecoq, J.

    1992-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue properties of weldment have been studied at 550deg C. The base material behaves the best, the main difference between in three zones of the weldment lies in the behaviour in the plastic range. The authors have studied the threshold values and crack growth rates for weldment at 20deg C and 550deg C for R = 0,1. The results show an increase of the crack growth rate of a factor 3 between room temperature and 550deg C. Moreover at 550deg C the influence of the ratio R has been studied only for base material in the range of 0,05 to 0,7. For values of R up to 0,4 the threshold values are related to oxide induced closure theory. (orig.).

  16. Nuclear waste solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  17. Prediction of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel welds by modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilpas, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1999-07-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of several computer models to accurately predict the solidification, microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Emphasis was given to modelling the effect of welding speed on solute redistribution and ultimately to the prediction of weld pitting corrosion resistance. Calculations were experimentally verified by applying autogenous GTA- and laser processes over the welding speed range of 0.1 to 5 m/min for several austenitic stainless steel grades. Analytical and computer aided models were applied and linked together for modelling the solidification behaviour of welds. The combined use of macroscopic and microscopic modelling is a unique feature of this work. This procedure made it possible to demonstrate the effect of weld pool shape and the resulting solidification parameters on microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. Microscopic models were also used separately to study the role of welding speed and solidification mode in the development of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. These investigations demonstrate that the macroscopic model can be implemented to predict solidification parameters that agree well with experimentally measured values. The linked macro-micro modelling was also able to accurately predict segregation profiles and CPT-temperatures obtained from experiments. The macro-micro simulations clearly showed the major roles of weld composition and welding speed in determining segregation and pitting corrosion resistance while the effect of weld shape variations remained negligible. The microscopic dendrite tip and interdendritic models were applied to welds with good agreement with measured segregation profiles. Simulations predicted that weld inhomogeneity can be substantially decreased with increasing welding speed resulting in a corresponding improvement in the weld pitting corrosion resistance. In the case of primary austenitic

  18. Ductility of stabilized ferritic stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. B.; Eagar, T. W.

    1980-02-01

    An investigation was made into the mechanism of ductility loss in low interstitial 18 Cr-2Mo ferritic stainless steel welds stabilized with Ti and Nb. It was found that stabilizing TiN or Nb(C,N) precipitates are dissolved during the welding process, resulting in a finer distribution of precipitates in the weld metal than in the base metal. Furthermore, the FATT was found to increase by more than 200°C, leading to decreased room temperature ductility. Such an increase in FATT may not be explained solely in terms of grain growth. Internal friction measurements indicate that no free nitrogen is present in the weld metal, yet wet chemical analysis reveals that the nitrogen is present in a soluble form. Kinetic arguments suggest that the stabilized nitrogen dissolved during welding tends to reprecipitate during solidification in the form of a chromium rich nitride phase.

  19. Effects of Flux Precoating and Process Parameter on Welding Performance of Inconel 718 Alloy TIG Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsuan-Liang; Wu, Tong-Min; Cheng, Ching-Min

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth-to-width ratio (DWR) and hot cracking susceptibility of Inconel 718 alloy tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds. The Taguchi method is employed to investigate the welding parameters that affect the DWR of weld bead and to achieve optimal conditions in the TIG welds that are coated with activating flux in TIG (A-TIG) process. There are eight single-component fluxes used in the initial experiment to evaluate the penetration capability of A-TIG welds. The experimental results show that the Inconel 718 alloy welds precoated with 50% SiO2 and 50% MoO3 flux were provided with better welding performance such as DWR and hot cracking susceptibility. The experimental procedure of TIG welding process using mixed-component flux and optimal conditions not only produces a significant increase in DWR of weld bead, but also decreases the hot cracking susceptibility of Inconel 718 alloy welds.

  20. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  1. The Effect of Weld Penetration on Blast Performance of Welded Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    from virtually unaffected through to catastrophic deformation and cracking. UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-TR-3017 UNCLASSIFIED 29 Figure 30...documentation in relation the EBT test procedure, welding, instrumentation, radiography , trial preparation, documentation and approvals

  2. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  3. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  4. Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available @ 2 bar pressure Fig. 6: Crack sealing and overlay of 6.0mm plate 4 Typical hardness of the 316L crack seal layers is 160 HV1kg. Crack sealing can be performed with more noble Ni-base alloys to improved... of surface compressive stresses will avoid initiation of SCC. Due to primary austenitic solidification of laser cladded 316L, no delta ferrite is present in the microstructure. Although the susceptibility...

  5. Analysis of steady-state ductile crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian

    1999-01-01

    The fracture strength under quasi-static steady-state crack growth in an elastic-plastic material joined by a laser weld is analyzed. Laser welding gives high mismatch between the yield stress within the weld and the yield stress in the base material. This is due to the fast termic cycle, which....... Both models predict that in general a thinner laser weld gives higher interface strength. Furthermore, both fracture criteria show, that the preferred path of the crack is close outside the weld material; a phenomenon also observed in experiments....... the material undergoes in welding. The elastic properties, on the other hand, are insensitive to the termic cycle, and are therefore essentially the same in the weld and in the base material. The material is described by $J_2$-flow theory, and the analysis is performed by using a numerical algorithm, in which...

  6. Langevin formalism for solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A. (Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States))

    1993-05-31

    The question of how thermal noise should be incorporated in the continuum equations of solidification in a way which is consistent with both bulk and interfacial equilibrium fluctuations is investigated. The proper Langevin formalism which accomplishes this task is found to consist of the usual bulk forces, which remain unaffected by the presence of a two-phase boundary, and an extra stochastic force on the interface associated with its kinetics. The relevance of this force in the context of pattern formation is examined.

  7. Study on weld pool behaviors and ripple formation in dissimilar welding under pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rong; Luo, Yu

    2017-08-01

    A three-transient numerical model is developed to study the dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser. The melting, resolidification and vaporization inducing recoil pressure are considered in this model. Their effects on molten pool dynamic and the weld bead formation are studied. The similar metal welding and dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser are respectively simulated by using this model. It is found that surface ripples are caused mainly by the periodical laser and molten pool solidification. In the first, this model is validated by the weld bead geometry comparison between the simulated and experimental results in similar metal welding. Then, this model is applied to simulate the dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser. The results show that the distributions of the temperature, melt-flow velocity and surface ripples are asymmetric due to the differences in physical properties of the materials. The higher pulse overlapping factor decreases the solidification rate, leading to the more uniform penetration depths and the finer ripples. Good agreements between the experimental observations and simulation results are obtained by the proposed model.

  8. Friction Stir Welding of Magnesium Die Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skar, Jan Ivar; Gjestland, Haavard; Oosterkamp, Ljiljana Djapic; Albright, Darryl L.

    Friction stir welding (FSW), being a solid-state process, is an attractive method for joining magnesium die castings. In this study, FSW of AZ91D and AM50A plates was performed both on the individual alloys and to join them together. The welds were sound and free from defects, except for small surface cracks in AM50A; a fine microstructure characterized the weld zones. The tensile properties of specimens transverse to the weld zone were measured, as were the corrosion properties. The tensile properties were somewhat lower than the base metal, with the largest percentage decrease found in the elongation of AM50A, perhaps due to the surface cracking. The corrosion resistance of the weld zone was relatively poor, most likely due to iron contamination from wearing of the tool. Further optimization of the FSW tool design and process parameters must take place to improve the reliability of FSW for magnesium die castings.

  9. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  10. Effect of high energy shot peening pressure on the stress corrosion cracking of the weld joint of 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiming, Lu, E-mail: lzm@zjut.edu.cn; Laimin, Shi, E-mail: 810050107@qq.com; Shenjin, Zhu, E-mail: 523469865@qq.com; Zhidong, Tang, E-mail: 466054569@qq.com; Yazhou, Jiang, E-mail: 191268219@qq.com

    2015-06-18

    The weld joint of 304 stainless steel is treated using high energy shot peening(HESP) with various shot peening pressures. The grain size and metallographic microstructure of the specimen surface layer are analyzed using the X-ray diffraction method, and the surface hardness is measured. Slow strain rate tension tests are then performed to investigate the effect of shot peening pressure on the stress corrosion sensitivity. The results show that in the surface layer of the specimen, the grain refinement, hardness and the strain-induced plastic deformation all increase with the increasing shot peening pressure. Martensitic transformation is observed in the surface layer after being treated with HESP. The martensite phase ratio is found to increase with increasing shot peening pressure. The result also shows that the effects of the shot peening treatment on the stress corrosion sensitivity index depend on the shot peening pressure. When the shot peening pressure is less than 0.4 MPa, the grain refinement effect plays the main role, and the stress corrosion sensitivity index decreases with the increasing shot peening pressure. In contrast, when the shot peening pressure is higher than 0.4 MPa, the martensite transformation effect plays the main role, the stress corrosion sensitivity index increases with increasing shot peening pressure.

  11. Fluctuations in solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A. (Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States))

    1993-11-01

    We present an analytical treatment of (i) the incorporation of thermal noise in the basic continuum models of solidification, (ii) fluctuations about nonequilibrium steady states, and (iii) the amplification of noise near the onset of morphological instability. In (i), we find that the proper Langevin formalism, consistent with both bulk and interfacial equilibrium fluctuations, consists of the usual bulk forces and an extra stochastic force on the interface associated with its local kinetics. At sufficiently large solidification rate, this force affects interfacial fluctuations on scales where they are macroscopically amplified and, thus, becomes relevant. An estimate of this rate is given. In (ii), we extend the Langevin formalism outside of equilibrium to characterize the fluctuations of a stationary and a directionally solidified planar interface in a temperature gradient. Finally, in (iii), we derive an analytic expression for the linear growth of the mean-square amplitude of fluctuations slightly above the onset of morphological instability. The amplitude of the noise is found to be determined by the small parameter [ital k][sub [ital B]T[ital E]d0][sup [ital c]l][sub [ital T

  12. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  13. Determination of Grain Size and Resistance to Corrosion of Stainless Steel Welded Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Hudeček

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Discover problems of welds is not so easy from time to time. Specially, If welding was made in rough environmental conditions such as high temperature, humidity and dusty wind. It is necessary to provide good conditions to realize basic step of welding. For welding, have been used welding procedures specification and procedure qualification record. However, difficult conditions, documentations rightness or human errors are always here. Common weld defects like cracks, porosity, lack of penetration and distortion can compromise the strength of the base metal, as well as the integrity of the weld. According of site inspection, there were suspicion of intercrystalline corrosion, inclusions, leaker or segregation in root of weld, root weld stretches to the pipe inside, the welded pipes are not in axially level, the not proper surface treatment after welding and keep the intervals between single welds to not overheat the pipes.

  14. The influence of manual metal arc multiple repair welding of long operated waterwall on the structure and hardness of the heat affected zone of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikuła J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Welded installations failures of power plants, which are often result from a high degree of wear, requires suitable repairs. In the case of cracks formed in the weld bead of waterwall, weld bead is removed and new welded joint is prepared. However, it is associated with consecutive thermal cycles, which affect properties of heat affected zone of welded joint. This study presents the influence of multiple manual metal arc welding associated with repair activities of long operated waterwall of boiler steel on properties of repair welded joints. The work contains the results of macro and microscopic metallographic examination as well as the results of hardness measurements.

  15. In-situ crack repair by laser cladding

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available . Successful sealing of simulated cracks was achieved under extreme conditions. Not only was water squirting out occasionally, but water was continually running down the peened crack to the weld pool. Laser cladding was shown to be a robust process under... to the simulated crack prior to the cladding of the first layer to avoid excessive water squirting out. Adequate laser power is required to ensure proper fusion into the base material due to water squirting out of the crack adjacent to the weld pool. As a...

  16. Knuckle Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people realize that cracking knuckles produces a funny noise and may repeat cracking just to produce the ... main areas of exercise are aerobic exercise and resistance News Categories Ankylosing Spondylitis News Fibromyalgia News Gout ...

  17. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  18. Structural degradation of heterogeneous welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analyses of heterogeneous weld interfaces experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the weld interface and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  19. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  20. Microstructural evaluation of a low carbon steel submitted to boriding treatment pre and post GTAW welding; Avaliacao microestrutural de um aco de baixo carbono submetido ao tratamento de boretacao pre e pos-soldagem GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollnow, Edilson Nunes; Osorio, Alice Goncalves, E-mail: edilson.pollnow@hotmail.com, E-mail: osorio.alice@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (CDTec/UFPel), Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico; Araujo, Douglas Bezerra de, E-mail: dbaraujo@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (FEMEC/UFU), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Passos, Thais Andrezza dos; Souza, Daniel, E-mail: thais.andrezza.passos@gmail.com, E-mail: danielsouza@furg.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (EE/FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2017-04-15

    Studies on surface engineering area are given great importance due to the improvement that surface modifications provide to materials. With a global market that has the need to provide parts and equipment with extended service life and low cost, to support stringent requests and thus maintain its high performance, surface treatments may bring what was impossible into reality. Among the surface treatments that have received attention recently, we have the thermochemical process of boriding. The boriding process consists of saturate the surface of steels and metal alloys with boron. This saturation provides an increase in the surface properties not inherent to the base metal, such as hardness, resistance to abrasion and corrosion. Although the properties of boriding steels have already been studied, the effects that the boriding process perform on the steel during or after the welding processes are not known. Hence, it is the purpose of this study to evaluate the microstructure of a low carbon steel treated with boriding before and after GTAW welding. The results indicated poor metallurgical weldability of low carbon steel with boride layer, with the presence of solidification cracks. Nonetheless, the steel welded previous to boring treatment presented a more ductile nucleus, with harder surface. Although the values of hardness within the nucleus of the steel had dropped drastically at the welded zone after the boring, the surface of this steel showed higher values of hardness due to the boriding layer. This fact should be considered when applications where wear resistance is needed. (author)

  1. Mechanical and Microstructural Evaluation of DMAG Welding of Structural Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Mert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Double channel torch, which allows concentric flow of two different shielding gases, was designed and manufactured in order to pursue double channel torch gas metal arc welding of unalloyed structural steel S235JR (EN 10025-2 with fourteen passes. Tensile and Charpy V-notch tests were realized and the results were compared with those of conventional gas metal arc welding. In order to evaluate mechanical testing results, microstructural analyses were conducted. It was found that the increase with double channel gas metal arc welding process in yield and tensile strengths as well as in toughness tests, especially in subzero temperatures, compared with conventional gas metal arc welding was due to longer columnar grains and finer tempered zone grain structure between passes and due to solidification and less dendritic structure formation in all-weld metal in double channel gas metal arc welding.

  2. Microstructure Formation in Dissimilar Metal Welds: Electron Beam Welding of Ti/Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Subhradeep; Abinandanan, T. A.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio

    2016-02-01

    We present results for electron beam welding of a binary Ti/Ni dissimilar metal couple. The difference in physical properties of the base metals and metallurgical features (thermodynamics and kinetics) of the system influence both macroscopic transport and microstructure development in the weld. Microstructures near the fusion interfaces are markedly different from those inside the weld region. At the Ti side, Ti2Ni dendrites are observed to grow toward the fusion interface, while in the Ni side, layered growth of γ-Ni, Ni3Ti, and Ni3Ti + NiTi eutectic is observed. Different morphologies of the latter eutectic constitute the predominant microstructure inside the weld metal region. These results are compared and contrasted with those from laser welding of the same binary couple, and a scheme of solidification is proposed to explain the observations. This highlights notable departures from welding of similar and other dissimilar metals such as a significant asymmetry in heat transport that governs progress of solidification from each side of the couple, and a lack of unique liquidus isotherm characterizing the liquid-solid front.

  3. Effect of electrode and weld current on the physical and mechanical properties of cast iron welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamim, M.; Triyono, Diharjo, Kuncoro

    2017-01-01

    Metal casting industry will repair the products are defective. The repair process is often done using a Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Preheat and post-weld heat treatment method can overcome the problem of welding cast iron. However, many of the local foundry industry does not use this method. The main problem of the method relates to the problem of cost and process. The results of testing Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), gray cast iron welding seen to have an important problem in the PMZ and HAZ. Hard and brittle phase formations during solidification process and after solidification formation eutectoid is carbide and martensite. The formation of martensite and carbides is caused by the high carbon content of cast iron. Consumable electrode with a nickel base material used for the welding process without preheating and PWHT methods. Nickel as an austenite stabilizer can pick up the carbon, so that the hard phase PMZ area can be reduced. Variations electric current used to get good heat input in the welding area so that nickel can diffuse well.

  4. Cracking of Composite Modified Alloy 825 Primary Air Port Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kish, Joseph R. [Paprican; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Singbeil, Douglas [Paprican; Willoughby, Adam W [ORNL; Longmire, Hu Foster [ORNL

    2007-04-01

    Twenty primary air ports fabricated from modified Alloy 825-based composite tubes underwent a metallurgical examination to document the mode and extent of cracking on the external fireside surface of a kraft recovery boiler. Collectively, the crack features found are most consistent with thermal fatigue, but corrosion fatigue cannot be ruled out. Regardless of the true cracking mechanism, temperature cycling is implicated as a critical factor for crack propagation. on the basis of the relative crack lengths observed, membrane welds and tube weld repairs, and their adjacent heat-affected zones, appear to be more susceptible to cracking than the cladding itself. This work suggests that mills should avoid boiler operating conditions that promote large temperature fluctuations, which can cause Alloy 825-based composite tubes to crack.

  5. Laser welding of selected aerospace alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadan, Gracie E.

    The study was aimed at developing an understanding of the microstructural effects of the laser welding process on the alloys, and assessing the structural integrity of the resultant welds. The effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, laser beam traverse speed, lens focal length, and the manipulation of these parameters on the welding efficiency and weld area integrity was also investigated. Other tasks within the project included a study on the possibility of using an anodic film to enhance the laser weld ability of Al 6061. Finally, attempts were made to identify phases observed in the weld area of the composite materials. Nimonics C263 and PE11 exhibited laser welds free of cracks and porosity. The difference in composition between the two alloys did not result in any significant dissimilarities in their response to the laser welding process. The welds in both alloys exhibited a fine columnar dendritic microstructure, and while carbides were observed in the interdendritic regions of the welds, electron optical analysis did not reveal any gamma' precipitates in this region. It was concluded that for the welding of thin gage materials above a threshold laser power the resultant welding efficiency shows a greater dependence on laser beam mode, and laser spot size, than on laser power, and beam traverse speed. Aluminum 6061 was not easily welded with a laser in its as received form, and the welds showed some degree of porosity. Anodizing was found to improve the welding efficiency in this material. While the presence of an anodic film on the metal surface increased the welding efficiency of the alloy, no relationship was found between the thickness of the anodic film and welding efficiency in the range of film thicknesses investigated. Weld regions were observed to be cellular dendritic in structure, with narrow heat affected zones. No precipitates or low melting point phases could be identified in the weld region. Melt zones were successfully

  6. Fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidawi, Jihad A.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on an Fe 510 E C-Mn steel and a submerged arc welded joint from the same material under constant, variable, and random loading amplitudes. Paris-Erdogan's crack growth rate law was tested for the evaluation of m and C using the stress intensity factor K, the J-integral, the effective stress intensity factor K(sub eff), and the root mean square stress intensity factor K(sub rms) fracture mechanics concepts. The effect of retardation and residual stresses resulting from welding was also considered. It was found that all concepts gave good life predictions in all cases.

  7. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  8. Determination of Elements and Carbon Content of Stainless Steel Welded Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Hudeček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Find out defects or problems of welds are not so simple from time to time. Specially, if weld has been made in rough environmental conditions like high temperature, dusty wind and humidity. It is important to assure have good conditions to realize basic step of welding. For welding, have been used welding procedures specification and procedure qualification record. However, difficult conditions, documentations rightness or human errors are always here. Common weld defects like cracks, porosity, lack of penetration and distortion can compromise the strength of the base metal, as well as the integrity of the weld. According of site inspection, there were suspicion of inclusions, leaker or segregation in root of weld. Surface treatment after welding and keep the intervals between single welds to not overheat the pipes. To recognize those suspicions, mechanical testing around weld joint, determination of carbon content and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy will be done.

  9. Assisting Gas Optimization in CO2 Laser Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1996-01-01

    High quality laser welding is achieved under the condition of optimizing all process parameters. Assisting gas plays an important role for sound welds. In the conventional welding process assisting gas is used as a shielding gas to prevent that the weld seam oxidates. In the laser welding process...... assisting gas is also needed to control the laser induced plasma.Assisting gas is one of the most important parameters in the laser welding process. It is responsible for obtaining a quality weld which is characterized by deep penetration, no interior imperfections, i.e. porosity, no crack, homogeneous seam...... surface, etc. In this work a specially designed flexible off-axis nozzle capable of adjusting the angle of the nozzle, the diameter of the nozzle, and the distance between the nozzle end and the welding zone is tested. In addition to the nozzle parameters three gases, Nitrogen, Argon, and Helium...

  10. FITNESS-FOR-SERVICE ASSESSMENT FOR A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK THAT CONTAINS STRESS CORROSION CRACKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B; James Elder, J; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Charles Mckeel, C

    2009-04-23

    Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The tanks are examined by ultrasonic (UT) methods for thinning, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking in order to assess fitness-for-service. During an inspection in 2002, ten cracks were identified on one of the tanks. Given the location of the cracks (i.e., adjacent to welds, weld attachments, and weld repairs), fabrication details (e.g., this tank was not stress-relieved), and the service history the degradation mechanism was stress corrosion cracking. Crack instability calculations utilizing API-579 guidance were performed to show that the combination of expected future service condition hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive any of the identified cracks to instability. The cracks were re-inspected in 2007 to determine if crack growth had occurred. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack <25% through wall' in 2002, was clearly shown not to be a crack. Additionally, examination of a new area immediately adjacent to other cracks along a vertical weld revealed three new cracks. It is not known when these new cracks formed as they could very well have been present in 2002 as well. Therefore, a total of twelve cracks were evaluated during the re-examination. Comparison of the crack lengths measured in 2002 and 2007 revealed that crack growth had occurred in four of the nine previously measured cracks. The crack length extension ranged from 0.25 to 1.8 inches. However, in all cases the cracks still remained within the residual stress zone (i.e., within two to three inches of the weld). The impact of the cracks that grew on the future service of Tank 15 was re-assessed. API-579 crack instability calculations were again performed, based on expected future service conditions and trended crack growth rates for the future tank service cycle. The analysis showed that the combined hydrostatic

  11. The influence of plate thickness on the welding residual stresses from submerged arc welding in offshore steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    to an improved design, which consequently may be included in future norms and standards. Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) was used to make a fully penetrated butt weld in 10 mm and 40 mm thick steel plates with the same welding parameters as used in the production procedures. The base material is thermomechanical hot......Welding-induced residual tensile stresses and distortion have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of welded structures within the offshore wind industry. The stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint, as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue...... life, and attribute to the corrosion cracking and brittle fracture in the weld components. This study investigates the influence of plate thickness on the welding-induced residual stresses. The residual stresses are investigated through experiments and in accordance with existing production procedures...

  12. Fatigue of friction stir welded AA2024-T351 plate

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Diccon Philip Paul

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue crack initiation and propagation characteristics of Friction Stir Welds (FSW) and 13mm gauge 2024-T351 A1 alloy have been studied. Two failure locations have been identified: outside the weld nugget region and over the nugget region. The study shows that when failure occurs outside the nugget, fatigue crack growth is essentially conventional (mode I dominated), with initiation from S-phase particles. For failures over the nugget region initiations were linked to coarse intermetall...

  13. Development and actual application of new welding process for weld-type piston crown in LMC diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, H.; Shimizu, H.; Fujiwara, F.; Tokuoka, T.; Nishimoto, T.; Fujita, R.; Matsui, S.; Nakayama, S.

    1985-04-01

    In the improved LMC diesel engines for saving fuel oil, the piston crown becomes more rigid. Unibody casting cannot achieve sufficiently high quality for piston crowns, in the smoothness of the inner surface of the cooling hole, for example. A welded piston crown would solve this problem, in which various pieces could be machined smoothly and then welded together. Joint locations are selected to satisfy welding and design requirements. Welding sequence and welding restraint are analysed using the finite element method. Because pistons can be welded from outside only, narrow gap TIG welding is applied to obtain a smooth bead. Then, narrow gap MAG welding is applied to reduce welding time. TIG-MAG combined welding equipment including welding torchs manipulator, positioner and controller is designed, fabricated, and assembled. Utilizing this equipment, experiments such as welding condition test, restraint crack test, joint property test, operation tests, and mock-up tests are carried out. Then, the products are welded and welds are inspected by an optical fiber for the appearance of the bead and also by ultrasonic and magnetic tests for defects.

  14. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  15. Solidification behaviour of Ni-base superalloy CMSX-6

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, D.; Meyer Ter Vehn, M.; Busse, P.; Sahm, P.

    1993-01-01

    The solidification behaviour of the single crystal superalloy CMSX-6 has been investigated using directional solidification technique. The longitudinal sections of the quenched samples were taken to identify the solidification structure. The experimentally determined solidification diagram gives the relationship between solidification structure and process parameters. The analysis of the transverse sections yields the solidification sequence and the solid fraction against the temperature decr...

  16. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  17. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  18. Sample preparation method for glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses yields higher seam strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvecek, K; Miyamoto, I; Strauss, J; Wolf, M; Frick, T; Schmidt, M

    2011-05-01

    Glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses allows joining without the need of an absorber or a preheating and postheating process. However, cracks generated during the welding process substantially impair the joining strength of the welding seams. In this paper a sample preparation method is described that prevents the formation of cracks. The measured joining strength of samples prepared by this method is substantially higher than previously reported values.

  19. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  20. Improving fatigue performance of rail thermite welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiar L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Rail transport development offers economic and ecological interests. Nevertheless, it requires heavy investments in rolling material and infrastructure. To be competitive, this transportation means must rely on safe and reliable infrastructure, which requires optimization of all implemented techniques and structure. Rail thermite (or aluminothermic welding is widely used within the railway industry for in-track welding during re-rail and defect replacement. The process provides numerous advantages against other welding technology commonly used. Obviously, future demands on train traffic are heavier axle loads, higher train speeds and increased traffic density. Thus, a new enhanced weld should be developed to prevent accidents due to fracture of welds and to lower maintenance costs. In order to improve such assembly process, a detailed metallurgical study coupled to a thermomechanical modelling of the phenomena involved in the thermite welding process is carried out. Obtained data enables us to develop a new improved thermite weld (type A. This joint is made by modifying the routinely specified procedure (type B used in a railway rail by a standard gap alumino-thermic weld. Joints of type A and B are tested and compared. Based on experimental temperature measurements, a finite element analysis is used to calculate the thermal residual stresses induced. In the vicinity of the weld, the residual stress patterns depend on the thermal conditions during welding as it also shown by litterature [1, 2]. In parallel, X-Ray diffraction has been used to map the residual stress field that is generated in welded rail of types A and B. Their effect on fatigue crack growth in rail welds is studied. An experimental study based on fatigue tests of rails welded by conventional and improved processes adjudicates on the new advances and results will be shown.

  1. Rapid Solidification of Magnetic Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonji, G.; Deguire, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    The enhanced control over microstructural evolution inherent in rapid solidification processing techniques are exploited to create novel ceramic magnetic materials. The great sensitivity of magnetic properties to local structure provides a powerful probe both for the study of structure and of microscopic solidification mechanisms. The first system studied is the SrO-Fe2O3 binary, which contains the commercially important hard magnetic compound strontium hexaferrite. The products were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and differential thermal analysis. As-quenched ribbons contain high concentrations of super-paramagnetic particles, 80 to 250 Angstroms in diameter, in a glassy matrix. This suggests the possibility of crystallizing monodomain strontium hexaferrite during subsequent heat treatment, with a resulting increase in coercivity over conventionally processed ferrite magnets. That magnetic properties can be controlled in solidification processing by varying the quench rate is demonstrated.

  2. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  3. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  4. STRUCTURAL DEGRADATION OF HETEROGENEOUS WELDED JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analysis of heterogeneous weld joints experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the fusion line and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  5. Study of a fiber laser assisted friction stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, G.; Campanelli, S.; Ludovico, A. D.; Contuzzi, N.; Angelastro, A.

    2012-03-01

    Friction stir welding is a relatively new joining technique. This technique, which is considered a derivative of the more common friction welding method, was developed mainly for aluminum and its alloys. In recent years, this method has been used to join various other alloys. FSW has many advantages, including the following: the welding procedure is relatively simple with no consumables or filler metal; joint edge preparation is not needed; oxide removal prior to welding is unnecessary; high joint strength has been achieved in aluminum and magnesium alloys; FSW can be used with alloys that cannot be fusion welded due to crack sensitivity. The drawbacks of FSW include the need for powerful fixtures to clamp the workpiece to the welding table, the high force needed to move the welding tool forward, the relatively high wear rate of the welding tool, and weld speeds in FSW are slower, which can lead to longer process times. To overcome these drawbacks, a fiber laser-assisted friction stir welding system was designed (FLAFSW). The system combined a conventional commercial friction machine and a fiber pumped laser system. The scope is to investigate the influence of the laser assistance on the weld quality. A number of different aluminum plates, which are still mentioned to be difficult to be joint as intermetallic phases appear during melting welding techniques, were used. The evaluation of quality was performed through analysis of appearance, mechanical and microstructure characterization of the weld.

  6. Small Bore Piping Socket Weld Evaluation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Min; Cho, Hong Seok; Choi, Sang Hoon; Cho, Ki Hyun; Lee, Jang Wook [Korea Plant Service and Enginccring Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Kori unit 3 had stopped operation due to leakage at Steam Generator drain line socket weld on June 6, 2008. The Cause of socket weld damage was known as a fatigue crack. According to this case, all socket welds located in RCS pressure boundary are carrying out Radiographic Testing. But to inspect socket welds by RT has some problems. The result of EPRI study showed that RT has limitation to find flaws at socket welds.The orientation of flaws has big influence on RT inspection capability and there is not enough space at socket welds for RT, dose problems as well. Although the gap between coupling and pipe at socket welds must follow up code, surface inspection can't inspect the gap. If there is absence of the gap, socket welds are damaged during operation. The gap should be identified by RT but the distance of gap can't be measured. As this paper, the ultrasonic inspection system was introduced to figure out indication and gap in the socket welds.

  7. Hydrogen induced cold cracking studies on armour grade high strength, quenched and tempered steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V. [Centre for Materials Joining Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh (P.O.) Hyderabad 560 058 Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2008-04-15

    Quenched and tempered (Q and T) steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in the heat affected zone after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q and T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic (LHF) steel consumables can be used to weld Q and T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on hydrogen induced cold cracking of armour grade Q and T steel welds by implant testing. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes were used for making welds using ASS and LHF welding consumables. ASS welds made using FCAW process offered a higher resistance to HIC than all other welds considered in this investigation. (author)

  8. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  9. Finite element analysis and simulation of welding - an addendum: a bibliography (1996-2001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackerle, Jaroslav

    2002-05-01

    This paper gives a bibliographical review of the finite element methods applied to the analysis and simulation of welding processes. The bibliography is an addendum to the finite element analysis and simulation of welding: a bibliography (1976-96) published in Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. (1996) 4 501-33. The added bibliography at the end of this paper contains approximately 550 references to papers and conference proceedings on the subject that were published in 1996-2001. These are classified in the following categories: modelling of welding processes in general; modelling of specific welding processes; influence of geometrical parameters; heat transfer and fluid flow in welds; residual stresses and deformations in welds; fracture mechanics and welding; fatigue of welded structures; destructive and non-destructive evaluation of weldments and cracks; welded tubular joints, pipes and pressure vessels/components; welds in plates and other structures/components.

  10. Simulation of the welding of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hua Tay

    1989-07-01

    Helium was uniformly implanted using the ''tritium trick'' technique to levels of 0.18, 2.5, 27, 105 and 256 atomic part per million (appm) for type 316 stainless steel, and 0.3 and 1 appm for Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr-1MoVW). Both full penetration as well as partial penetration welds were then produced on control and helium-containing materials using the autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under full constraint conditions. For full penetration welds, both materials were successfully welded when they contained less than 0.3 appm helium. However, welds of both materials, when containing greater than 1 appm helium, were found to develop cracks during cooling of the weld. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the HAZ cracking was caused by the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. This cracking occurred as a result of the combination of high temperatures and high shrinkage tensile stresses. The cracking in the fusion zone was found to result from the precipitation of helium along dendrite interfaces. A model based on the kinetics of diffusive cavity growth is presented to explain the observed results. The model proposes a helium bubble growth mechanism which leads to final intergranular rupture in the heat-affected zone. Results of the present study demonstrate that the use of conventional fusion welding techniques to repair materials degraded by exposure to irradiation environments may be difficult if the irradiation results in the generation of helium equal to or greater than 1 appm.

  11. Fatigue properties and fracture mechanism of load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Abe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the hydraulic excavator and the crane have numerous one-sided welded joints. However, attachments with box like structures are difficult to weld at both sides. Therefore, high accurate evaluation method is needed. In this study, the fatigue properties and the fracture mechanism of the load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding were investigated experimentally to evaluate its fatigue damage with high accuracy based on the experimental results. As the results, fatigue cracks in the test piece initiated from the tip of the unwelded portion and propagated into the welding materials. Multiple welding defects were observed in the unwelded portion, but did not appear to be crack origins. Although these welding defects affected the direction of crack propagation they exerted minimal influence. The three-dimensional observations revealed that fatigue cracks initiate at an early stage of the fatigue development. We infer that the fatigue lifetime is chiefly governed by the crack propagation lifetime. Cracks were initiated at multiple sites in the test piece. As the number of cycles increased, these cracks propagated and combined. So considering the combination of cracks from multiple crack origins is important for a precise evaluation of fatigue damage.

  12. Fatigue properties and fracture mechanism of load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Abe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the hydraulic excavator and the crane have numerous one-sided welded joints. However, attachments with box like structures are difficult to weld at both sides. Therefore, high accurate evaluation method is needed. In this study, the fatigue properties and the fracture mechanism of the load carrying type fillet joints with one-sided welding were investigated experimentally to evaluate its fatigue damage with high accuracy based on the experimental results. As the results, fatigue cracks in the test piece initiated from the tip of the unwelded portion and propagated into the welding materials. Multiple welding defects were observed in the unwelded portion, but did not appear to be crack origins. Although these welding defects affected the direction of crack propagation they exerted minimal influence. The three-dimensional observations revealed that fatigue cracks initiate at an early stage of the fatigue development. We infer that the fatigue lifetime is chiefly governed by the crack propagation lifetime. Cracks were initiated at multiple sites in the test piece. As the number of cycles increased, these cracks propagated and combined. So considering the combination of cracks from multiple crack origins is important for a precise evaluation of fatigue damage.

  13. Development of Underwater Laser Cladding and Underwater Laser Seal Welding Techniques for Reactor Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Kouno, Wataru; Makino, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Shohei; Matsunaga, Keiji

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been reported at the aged components in many nuclear power plants. Toshiba has been developing the underwater laser welding. This welding technique can be conducted without draining the water in the reactor vessel. It is beneficial for workers not to exposure the radiation. The welding speed can be attaining twice as fast as that of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). The susceptibility of SCC can also be lower than the Alloy 600 base metal.

  14. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, L.A.

    1997-02-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water.

  15. PREFACE: Third International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes (ICASP - 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Gerhard; Ratke, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes was held in the Rolduc Abbey in the Netherlands a few kilometres away from Aachen. Around 200 scientists from 24 countries come in for the four day meeting. They found a stimulating but also relaxing environment and atmosphere, with beautiful weather and the medieval abbey inviting for walks, discussions, sitting outside and drinking a beer or wine. The contributions given at the conference reflected recent advances in various topics of solidification processes, ranging from fundamental aspects to applied casting technologies. In 20 oral sessions and a large poster session innovative results of segregation phenomena, microstructure evolution, nucleation and growth, phase formation, polyphase solidification, rapid solidification and welding, casting technology, thermophysics of molten alloys, solidification with forced melt flow and growth of single crystals and superalloys together with innovative diagnostic techniques were presented. Thereby, findings from experiments as well as from numerical modeling on different lengths scales were jointly discussed and contribute to new insight in solidification behaviour. The papers presented in this open access proceedings cover about half the oral and poster presentations given. They were carefully reviewed as in classical peer reviewed journals by two independent referees and most of them were revised and thus improved according to the reviewers comments. We think that this collection of papers presented at ICASP-3 gives an impression of the excellent contributions made. The papers embrace both the basic and applied aspects of solidification. We especially wish to express our appreciation for the team around Georg Schmitz and Margret Nienhaus organising this event and giving us their valued advice and support at every stage in preparing the conference. We also thank Lokasenna Lektorat for taking the task of checking all language-associated issues and

  16. Simulation of continuous cast steel product solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardelean, E.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary cooling – inside the tundish – has a great impact over the thickness of the solidified steel crust. If on exiting the tundish the crust is too thin, it can punch and break, as a result of the ferrostatic pressure exerted from the inside by the liquid steel as well as because of the weight of the molten steel. The parameters that influence the amount of dissipated heat depend on the cooling water flow of the tundish, on the pressure and temperature of the cooling water but also on the overheating of the continuously cast steel. The secondary cooling takes place at the exit of the semi-finished product from the tundish, when the solidification is supposed to take place all along the cross section of the strand. In order to achieve it, in addition to a correctly managed primary cooling, it is necessary to obtain the proper correlation of the factors that influence the secondary cooling as well: the water flow rate long the three zones of the installation and its pressure in the secondary circuit. All these have in view a proper solidification length; an intense cooling can generate cracks due to the thermal stress, while a too slow cooling can generate a partial solidification of the strand up to the cropping machine area. The paper presents a mathematical simulation of the continuously cast steel solidification.

    El enfriamiento primario del cristalizador tiene una gran importancia sobre el espesor de la costra de acero solidificado. Si al salir del cristalizador, esta costra es demasiado sutil, bajo la acción de la presión ferro estática ejercitada por el acero líquido del interior y gracias el peso propio del hilo, ésta, puede perforar resultando su rompimiento. Los parámetros que influenyen sobre la cantidad de calor cedida dependen del agua de enfriamiento del catalizador, de la presión y de la temperatura de agua de enfriamiento, pero también del sobrecalentamiento del acero fundido continuamente. A la salida del

  17. Two-dimensional time-resolved x-ray diffraction study of dual phase rapid solidification in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemura, Mitsuharu; Osuki, Takahiro; Terasaki, Hidenori; Komizo, Yuichi; Sato, Masugu; Toyokawa, Hidenori; Nozaki, Akiko

    2010-01-01

    The high intensity heat source used for fusion welding creates steep thermal gradients of 100 °C/s from 1800 °C. Further, the influence of preferred orientation is important for the observation of a directional solidification that follows the dendrite growth along the ⟨100⟩ direction toward the moving heat source. In the present study, we observed the rapid solidification of weld metal at a time resolution of 0.01-0.1 s by a two-dimensional time-resolved x-ray diffraction (2DTRXRD) system for real welding. The diffraction rings were dynamically observed by 2DTRXRD with synchrotron energy of 18 keV while the arc passes over the irradiation area of the x-rays. The arc power output was 10 V-150 A, and the scan speed of the arc was 1.0 mm/s. The temperature rise in instruments was suppressed by a water-cooled copper plate under the specimen. Further, the temperature distribution of the weld metal was measured by a thermocouple and correlated with the diffraction patterns. Consequently, solidification and solid phase transformation of low carbon steels and stainless steels were observed during rapid cooling by 2DTRXRD. In the low carbon steel, the microstructure is formed in a two step process, (i) formation of crystallites and (ii) increase of crystallinity. In stainless steel, the irregular interface layer of δ/γ in the quenched metal after solidification is expected to show the easy movement of dendrites at a lower temperature. In carbide precipitation stainless steel, it is easy for NbC to grow on δ phase with a little undercooling. Further, a mistlike pattern, which differs from the halo pattern, in the fusion zone gave some indication of the possibilities to observe the nucleation and the early solidification by 2DTRXRD.

  18. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  19. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  20. A Probabilistic Damage Tolerance Concept for Welded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, T.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2002-01-01

    The present paper presents the necessary crack growth statistics and suggests stochastic models for a reliability analysis of the fatigue fracture of welded steel plate joints. The reliability levels are derived from extensive testing with fillet-welded joints for which the entire crack growth....... The derived statistics and distribution function for these parameters are used as variables in a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS). In addition a Markov model is developed as an alternative stochastic model. It is a Markov chain for which the discrete damage states are related to chosen crack depths...

  1. Development of Alternative Technology to PWHT in Site Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. D.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, K. B.; Sung, K. W

    2007-04-15

    ASME Section IX added requirements for qualification when using temper bead welding in the 2004 edition. The temper bead welding techniques which can satisfy the requirements of the Code are needed to use them in the site repair welding. The optimized welding parameters can be obtained when controlling the process to supercritically-reheat and to subcritically-reheat the coarse grain region sequently. The microstructures of SCFGCG obtained from the Gleegle simulated specimens and those of post weld heat treated coarse grain region are compared. The obtained both microstructures showed almost similar patterns. mid bead deposition technique Suggested in this study has a technical concept that the mid beads are deposited between the deposited initial beads repeatedly in a bead layer, which gives a lot of reheating effects on brittle microstructure in HAZ. This newly suggested technique is considered to have more effective tempering effect than the conventional temper bead technique which has concept to deposit one type of beads in a bead layer. The suggested modeling in this study can simulate well the SMAW process. Hence this modeling was used in analyzing the more complicated welding process of multi-layer welding. The modeling was used to analyze the tempering effect on the microstructures of HAZ by considering the patterns of overlapping of the reheating regions under the consequently deposited beads. When considering the crack path in the ever-matched weld metal condition, the interface may have a resistance against the crack propagation. A182 filler and A625 filler were used to make the weld specimens which have different weld metal conditions. The crack directed toward the under-matched weld metal may propagate across the fusion line easier than that of the even-matched weld metal condition.

  2. Microstructural origin of the skeletal ferrite morphology of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy was conducted on welds exhibiting a variety of skeletal, or vermicular ferrite morphologies in addition to one lathy ferrite morphology. These ferrite morphologies result from primary ferrite solidification followed by a solid state transformation upon cooling. During cooling, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite leaving a variety of ferrite morphologies. Comparison of composition profiles and alloy partitioning showed both the skeletal and lathy ferrite structures result from a diffusion controlled solid state transformation. However, the overall measured composition profiles of the weld structure are a result of partitioning during both solidification and the subsequent solid state transformation.

  3. Weld monitor and failure detector for nuclear reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1987-01-01

    Critical but inaccessible welds in a nuclear reactor system are monitored throughout the life of the reactor by providing small aperture means projecting completely through the reactor vessel wall and also through the weld or welds to be monitored. The aperture means is normally sealed from the atmosphere within the reactor. Any incipient failure or cracking of the weld will cause the environment contained within the reactor to pass into the aperture means and thence to the outer surface of the reactor vessel where its presence is readily detected.

  4. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  5. Research on the microstructure and properties of laser-MIG hybrid welded joint of Invar alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Zhang, Dan; Wei, Yanhong; Wang, Yuhua

    2017-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of large deformation, low production efficiency and high tendency of hot cracking in welding 19.05 mm thick plates of Fe36Ni Invar alloy, laser-MIG hybrid multi-layer welding technique (LMHMW) has been developed. To investigate the influence of different welding parameters on the joint properties, optical microscope observation, SEM, EDS and microhardness measurement were conducted. Experimental results illustrated that different matching of welding parameters significantly affected the depth-to-width ratio, formation of defects and HAZ width. Besides, weld zone were consisted of two regions according to the different grain shape. The region near center of weld seam (region 1) was columnar dendrite induced by laser, while the region far away from weld seam center (region 2) was cellular dendrite which was mainly caused by MIG arc. The peak value of microhardness appeared at the center of weld seam since the grains in region 1 were relatively fine, and the lowest hardness value was obtained in HAZ. In addition, results showed that the sheets can be welded at optimum process parameters, with few defects such as, surface oxidation, porosity, cracks and lack of penetration in the welding seam: laser power of backing weld P = 5500 W, welding current I = 240 A, welding speed v = 1 m/min. laser power of filling weld P = 2000 W, welding current I = 220 A, welding speed v = 0.35 m/min. laser power of cosmetic weld P = 2000 W, welding current I = 300 A, welding speed v = 0.35 m/min.

  6. Weld microstructure and hardness prediction for in-service hot-tap welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wentao Cheng; Yong-Yi Wang [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, OH (United States)]. E-mail: wcheng@emc-sq.com; ywang@emc-sq.com; Amend, William [Southern California Gas Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]. E-mail: bamend@semprautilities.com

    2005-07-01

    Welding onto an in-service pipeline is frequently required to repair damaged areas and for system modifications. There are often significant economic and environmental incentives to perform in-service welding, including the ability to maintain operations during welding and to avoid venting the contents to the atmosphere. Welds made onto in-service pipelines tend to cool at an accelerated rate. These welds are likely to have high heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness which increases their susceptibility to hydrogen cracking. Accurate prediction of HAZ hardness is critical in developing successful welding procedures for in-service hot-tap welds. The present PRCI thermal analysis software for hot-tap welding uses an empirical-formula-based HAZ hardness prediction procedure. This paper describes an effort funded by PRCI to produce a significantly improved HAZ hardness prediction procedure over the procedure in the current PRCI thermal analysis software. A markedly improved hardness prediction procedure was developed and systematically validated using extensive experimental data of actual welds. The underlying hardness calculation algorithms were based on the proven state-of-the-art phase transformation models. Although on the average the procedure under-predicts the measured hardness by a small amount, the new hardness prediction procedure is a significant improvement in overall accuracy over the procedure in the current PRCI thermal analysis software. The procedure developed here lays the foundation for a much more accurate hardness prediction module in the future version of the PRCI thermal analysis software. (author)

  7. Cellular multiplets in directional solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopczynski, P.; Rappel, W.; Karma, A. [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    We report the existence of new branches of steady state cellular structures in directional solidification. These structures consist of repeating cellular subunits, or multiplets, each containing a set of distinct cells separated by unequal grooves. A detailed numerical study of the symmetric model of directional solidification reveals that all multiplets bifurcate off the main singlet solution branch in two sets. Two points on the main branch, one corresponding to the onset of the Eckhaus instability at small cell spacing and the other to a fold of this branch at large spacing, are argued to be separate accumulation points for each set of multiplets. The set of structures bifurcating near the fold are morphologically similar to experimentally observed multiplets. In contrast, those bifurcating near the Eckhaus instability do not resemble experimental shapes. Furthermore, they are argued to be generically unstable. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFECTS IN ALLOY 152, 52 AND 52M WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Seffens, Rob J.; Efsing, Pal G.

    2009-08-27

    Defect distributions have been documented by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction in alloy 152 and 52 mockups welds, alloy 52 and 52M overlay mockups and an alloy 52M inlay. Primary defects were small cracks at grain boundaries except for more extensive cracking in the dilution zone of an alloy 52 overlay on 304SS. Detailed characterizations of the dilution zone cracks were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy identifying grain boundary titanium-nitride precipitation associated with the intergranular separations. I. INTRODUCTION Weldments continue to be a primary location of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in light-water reactor systems. While problems related to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) sensitization and intergranular (IG) SCC of austenitic stainless alloys in boiling-water reactors (BWRs) have been significantly reduced, SCC has now been observed in HAZs of non-sensitized materials and in dissimilar metal welds where Ni-base alloy weld metals are used. IGSCC in weld metals has been observed in both BWRs and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with recent examples for PWR pressure vessel penetrations producing the most concern. This has led to the replacement of alloy 600/182/82 welds with higher Cr, more corrosion-resistant replacement materials (alloy 690/152/52/52M). Complicating this issue has been a known susceptibility to cracking during welding [1-7] of these weld metals. There is a critical need for an improved understanding of the weld metal metallurgy and defect formation in Ni-base alloy welds to effectively assess long-term performance. A series of macroscopic to microscopic examinations were performed on available mockup welds made with alloy 52 or alloy 152 plus selected overlay and inlay mockups. The intent was to expand our understanding of weld metal structures in simulated LWR service components with a focus on as-welded defects. Microstructural features, defect distributions

  9. The feasibility of welding irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. T.; Chin, B. A.

    1991-03-01

    Helium was implanted into solution-annealed (SA) 316 stainless steel, 20% cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel and titanium-modified Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) through tritium decay to levels ranging from 0.18 to 256 appm. Full penetration welds were then made on helium-doped materials using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) under fully constrained conditions. Intergranular heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking was observed in all of the materials containing greater than 1 appm He. Electron microscopy showed that the HAZ cracking originated from the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. Bubble growth kinetics in the HAZ is explained by stress-enhanced diffusive cavity growth. Results suggest that the propensity for HAZ cracking can be reduced by the pre-existing cold-worked structure and by finely-distributed MC precipitates that refine the distribution of helium bubbles and minimize the flow of vacancies in grain boundaries.

  10. Efeito da temperatura interpasse na microestrutura, tenacidade ao impacto e propagação de trinca por fadiga de uniões soldadas por GTAW do aço ASTM A743-CA6NM Interpass temperature influence on the microstructure, impact toughness and fatigue crack propagation in ASTM A743-CA6NM GTAW welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimar Rubens de Gouveia

    2013-06-01

    in welding procedures development that promotes a better toughness, without post welding heat treatment (PWHT. The mainly objective of this paper is analyze the influence of interpass temperature on the microstructure, impact toughness and fatigue crack propagation in CA6NM martensitic stainless steel multipass welded joints, with AWS410NiMo filler metal, with GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding. It was observed the interpass temperature influence on ferrite δ formation, observing intergranular ferrite d formation on the d+g field in 80 ºC interpass temperature, while the sample welded at 150 ºC the formation of ferrite d occurs mainly in the δ monophase field. Ferrite d formation with the lowest temperature interpass promoted an increase in impact toughness and a decrease in the fatigue crack propagation when compared with 150ºC interpass temperature sample. It was observed that GTAW process can be an excellent alternative for CA6NM hydraulic turbine repair, it was also observed a significant interpass temperature influence.

  11. The origin of microstructure and hardness gradients within as-deposited steel weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluken, A.O. (SINTEF Metallurgy, Trondehim (Norway)); Anderson, I.; Grong, O.

    1993-11-01

    In the present investigation, attempts have been made to clarify the origin of microstructure and hardness gradients within as-deposited steel weld metals (i.e., single weld passes). Included are both carbon-manganese and low-alloy weld metals, with broad range in chemical compositions. In addition to hardness measurements, optical metallography was employed to quantify the microstructure and prior austenite grain size of selected welds. It is confirmed that competitive grain growth occurring during solidification gives rise to a general coarsening of the austenite grain structure from the fusion line toward the center of the welds. At low alloy contents, this results in a significant increase in the weld metal hardness due to a shift in the microstructure from predominantly grain boundary ferrite at the fusion line to a mixture of acicular ferrite and ferrite side plates close to the weld centerline. For welds exhibiting a higher alloy content (P[sub cm]: [approximately]0.21 to 0.25) relatively constant hardness values are observed across the weld bead, with a corresponding homogeneous microstructure of acicular ferrite. Because of low hardenability, gradients in microstructure and hardness appear to be an intrinsic feature of C-Mn steel weld metals. The objective of the present investigation is to clarify the origin of the observed differences in hardness distribution among the welds. This is achieved by careful sectioning and metallographic examination of selected welds within Series 1 and Series 2, respectively.

  12. Avaliação da susceptibilidade à fragilização induzida por hidrogênio na soldagem de um aço microligado para blindagens por meio de um ensaio de implante com geometria modificada Evaluation of susceptibility of hydrogen induced cracking in microalloyed armor steel welds using a geometry modified implant test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimy Unfried Silgado

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A susceptibilidade à fragilização induzida pelo Hidrogênio (FIH foi avaliada em soldas de aço para blindagem temperado e revenido (T&R de 4,5mm de espessura. As soldas foram desenvolvidas utilizando o processo SMAW com um baixo aporte de calor e consumível AWS E11018M de 2,4 mm. A susceptibilidade a FIH foi avaliada por médio de um ensaio de implante com geometria modificada em juntas soldadas com e sem aplicação de preaquecimento, utilizando consumíveis em condições de estocagem ideais e expostos à atmosfera. Encontrou-se que a condição de estocagem do consumível foi mais relevante que o preaquecimento na susceptibilidade ao FIH.The Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC susceptibility of 4,5mm thickness quenched and tempered (Q&T armor plate steel welding joints was evaluated. The joints were obtained using low heat input and SMAW process with 2,4 mm AWS E11018M electrode. The HIC susceptibility was evaluated using a geometry modified implant test for thin plates. The joints studied were produced with and without preheating and using welding electrodes with and without exposure to atmospheric conditions. The HIC resistance was severely impaired by improperly storage while preheating conditions did not preclude HIC.

  13. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Fatigue and Fracture Mechanisms of Weld-Repaired Bisplate80 With or Without a Buffer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunguo; Ren, Cuiping; Lei, Beibei; Hu, Xiaozhi; Lu, Pengmin

    2017-04-01

    In this work, weld-repaired Bisplate80 joints without or with a buffer layer (BL) were subjected to a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 930 °C for 1 h followed by air cooling. The mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of the PWHT specimens were compared to those from corresponding as-welded specimens to study the influence of the PWHT and to compare them with as-received Bisplate80 specimens to inspect the welding quality of the joints. Fatigue crack growth curves and micro-hardness profiles across the welded joints for the as-weld or PWHT conditions were measured together with relevant scanning electron microscope observations along the crack growth path. Special attention was paid to the areas at and around the welded interfaces. The results showed that the incorporation of a BL with an appropriate thickness significantly improved the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joint for the PWHT condition, as the da/dN over the entire area of the welded joint was much lower than for both the as-welded and as-received Bisplate80 specimens, showing that the incorporated BL greatly improved the fracture mechanisms of the fatigue specimens.

  14. Bringing Pulsed Laser Welding into Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, some research and develop-ment activities within pulsed laser welding technology at the Tech-nical University of Denmark will be described. The laser group at the Insti-tute for Manufacturing Technology has nearly 20 years of experience in laser materials process-ing. Inter......-nationally the group is mostly known for its contri-butions to the development of the laser cutting process, but further it has been active within laser welding, both in assisting industry in bringing laser welding into production in several cases and in performing fundamental R & D. In this paper some research...... activities concerning the weldability of high alloyed austenitic stainless steels for mass production industry applying industrial lasers for fine welding will be described. Studies on hot cracking sensitivity of high alloyed austenitic stainless steel applying both ND-YAG-lasers and CO2-lasers has been...

  15. In situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of chemical compositions in stainless steels during tungsten inert gas welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparli, Ugur Alp; Jacobsen, Lars; Griesche, Axel; Michalik, Katarzyna; Mory, David; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was combined with a bead-on-plate Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process for the in situ measurement of chemical compositions in austenitic stainless steels during welding. Monitoring the weld pool's chemical composition allows governing the weld pool solidification behavior, and thus enables the reduction of susceptibility to weld defects. Conventional inspection methods for weld seams (e.g. ultrasonic inspection) cannot be performed during the welding process. The analysis system also allows in situ study of the correlation between the occurrence of weld defects and changes in the chemical composition in the weld pool or in the two-phase region where solid and liquid phase coexist. First experiments showed that both the shielding Ar gas and the welding arc plasma have a significant effect on the selected Cr II, Ni II and Mn II characteristic emissions, namely an artificial increase of intensity values via unspecific emission in the spectra. In situ investigations showed that this artificial intensity increase reached a maximum in presence of weld plume. Moreover, an explicit decay has been observed with the termination of the welding plume due to infrared radiation during sample cooling. Furthermore, LIBS can be used after welding to map element distribution. For austenitic stainless steels, Mn accumulations on both sides of the weld could be detected between the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base material.

  16. Interface Phenomena and Bonding Mechanism in Magnetic Pulse Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, A.; Shribman, V.; Ben-Artzy, A.; Aizenshtein, M.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) is a solid-state impact welding technology that provides metallurgical joints while exhibiting a negligible heat-affected zone. The MPW process is a high speed single shot welding technique used mainly for joining tubular components in a lap configuration and characteristic length scales of few millimeters to centimeters. It is similar in operation to explosive welding and shares the same physical principles. The nature of bonding in MPW is not sufficiently understood yet and some controversial explanations are reported in the literature. The two major ideas are based on either solid state bonding or local melting and solidification. The present work summarizes our current understanding of the bonding mechanism and the structure in various similar and dissimilar metal pairs joined by MPW.

  17. Effect of the rotational speed of on the surface quality of 6061 Al-alloy welded joint using friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, T. T.; Zhang, X. H.; Fan, G. J.; Xu, L. F.

    2017-06-01

    The rotational speed of the stir-welding head is an important technological parameter in friction stir welding (FSW) process. For investigating the effect of the rotational speed of the stir-welding head on the surface quality of the welded joint, in this study, the weld tests were conducted under different rotational speeds (in which the welding speed was fixed), and then the effects were analyzed using the heat-fluid analysis model established. The test results revealed that cracks or grooves could be observed on the welded joint at small rotational speeds; with the increase of rotational speed, the weld surface became bright and clean; as the rotational speed further increased, the surface of the welded joint may be over burnt. Through analysis, it can be observed that appropriate increasing the rotational speed of the stir-welding joint increased the heat input in welding; meanwhile, fewer materials participated in the formation of weld, the material’s flowability was improved, and the resistance that impeded the advance of the stir-welding needle was reduced, thereby improving the quality of the welded joint.

  18. Optimal welding technology of high strength steel S690QL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Arsic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented the detailed procedure for defining the optimal technology for welding the structures made of the high strength steel S690QL. That steel belongs into a group of steels with exceptional mechanical properties. The most prominent properties are the high tensile strength and impact toughness, at room and at elevated temperatures, as well. However, this steel has a negative characteristic - proneness to appearance of cold cracks.  That impedes welding and makes as an imperative to study different aspects of this steel's properties as well as those of eventual filler metal. Selection and defining of the optimal welding technology of this high strength steel is done for the purpose of preserving the favorable mechanical properties once the welded joint is realized; properties of the welded metal and the melting zone, as well as in the heat affected zone, which is the most critical zone of the welded joint.

  19. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  20. Predicting the crack response for a pipe with a complex crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, Robert G.

    Traditional flaw evaluation in the nuclear field uses conservative methods to predict maximum load carrying capacity for flaws in a given pipe. There is a need in the nuclear industry for more accurate estimates of the load carrying capacity of nuclear piping such that probabilistic tools can be used to predict the time to failure for various types of cracks. These more accurate estimates will allow the nuclear industry to repair flaws at a more appropriate time considering external factors such as costs and man-rem planning along with the flaw repair. Analysis of the maximum load carrying capacity of a pipe with a complex crack (CC) has gained increased importance due to the recent identification of long CC's that have appeared in dissimilar metal (DM) welds thought to be caused by primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). A coded solution for a single material with a weld was developed that gives an accurate maximum load and crack driving force prediction for a pipe with a through wall crack (TWC), called LBBEng. To support the analysis of a CC, traditionally, an assumption is used that the CC performs similar to that of a TWC of a reduced thickness (TWCr). This modification gives a conservative prediction of the maximum load carrying capacity for a CC in a single material but was never verified for a CC in a DM weld. From the evaluation of the DM weld test data, along with finite element analysis, it can be demonstrated that the crack response of a CC can be predicted by a TWC model when modifications are made to the reduced thickness method.

  1. Laser micro welding of copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mys, Ihor; Schmidt, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Aluminum combines comparably good thermal and electrical properties with a low price and a low material weight. These properties make aluminum a promising alternative to copper for a large number of electronic applications, especially when manufacturing high volume components. However, a main obstacle for a wide use of this material is the lack of a reliable joining process for the interconnection of copper and aluminum. The reasons for this are a large misalignment in the physical properties and even more a poor metallurgical affinity of both materials that cause high crack sensitivity and the formation of brittle intermetallic phases during fusion welding. This paper presents investigations on laser micro welding of copper and aluminum with the objective to eliminate brittle intermetallic phases in the welding structure. For these purposes a combination of spot welding, a proper beam offset and special filler material are applied. The effect of silver, nickel and tin filler materials in the form of thin foils and coatings in a thickness range 3-100 μm has been investigated. Use of silver and tin filler materials yields to a considerable improvement of the static and dynamic mechanical stability of welded joints. The analysis of the weld microstructure shows that an application even of small amounts of suitable filler materials helps to avoid critical, very brittle intermetallic phases on the interface between copper and solidified melt in the welded joints.

  2. Influence of Crack Morphology on Leak Before Break Margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weilin Zang (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the deterministic LBB-margins for different pipe systems in a Swedish PWR-plant and using different crack morphology parameters. Results: - The influence of crack morphology on Leak Before Break (LBB) margins is studied. The subject of the report is a number of LBB-submittals to SKI where deterministic LBB-margins are reported. These submittals typically uses a surface roughness of 0.0762 mm (300 microinch) and number of turns equal to zero and an in-house code for the leak rate evaluations. The present report has shown that these conditions give the largest LBB-margins both in terms of the quotient between the critical crack length and the leakage crack size and for the leak rate margin. - Crack morphology parameters have a strong influence on the leak rate evaluations. Using the SQUIRT code and more recent recommendations for crack morphology parameters, it is shown that in many cases the evaluated margins, using 1 gpm as the reference leak rate detection limit, are below the safety factor of 2 on crack size and 10 on leak rate, which is generally required for LBB approval. - The effect of including weld residual stresses on the LBB margins is also investigated. It is shown that for the two examples studied, weld residual stresses were important for the small diameter thin wall pipe whereas it was negligible for the large diameter thick wall pipe which had a self-balanced weld residual stress distribution

  3. JOINTING PROCESS OF THE SAE 1020 WITH MAG WELD'S REGION HAVE BEEN INVESTIGATED AND FACTOR OF MISMATCH DETERMINED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevdet MERİÇ

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the jointing process of the SAE 1020 low carbon steel, generally used in the industry, has been done by the MAG weld method. The aim of this study is to examine the mismatch between base and weld metal. After the jointing process, mechanical and metalographical properties of the weld region, HAZ, and the weld metal of the samples considered here were searched, and CTOD (Crack Tip Opening Displacement was identified.

  4. JOINTING PROCESS OF THE SAE 1020 WITH MAG WELD'S REGION HAVE BEEN INVESTIGATED AND FACTOR OF MISMATCH DETERMINED

    OpenAIRE

    Cevdet MERİÇ; Mesut TOKDEMİR

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the jointing process of the SAE 1020 low carbon steel, generally used in the industry, has been done by the MAG weld method. The aim of this study is to examine the mismatch between base and weld metal. After the jointing process, mechanical and metalographical properties of the weld region, HAZ, and the weld metal of the samples considered here were searched, and CTOD (Crack Tip Opening Displacement) was identified.

  5. Report Summarizing the Effort Required to Initiate Welding of Irradiated Materials within the Welding Cubicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Greg [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Sutton, Benjamin J. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Tatman, Jonathan K. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Vance, Mark Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Allen W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gibson, Brian T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The advanced welding facility within a hot cell at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which has been jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and the Electric Power Research Institute, Long Term Operations Program and the Welding and Repair Technology Center, is in the final phase of development. Research and development activities in this facility will involve direct testing of advanced welding technologies on irradiated materials in order to address the primary technical challenge of helium induced cracking that can arise when conventional fusion welding techniques are utilized on neutron irradiated stainless steels and nickel-base alloys. This report details the effort that has been required since the beginning of fiscal year 2017 to initiate welding research and development activities on irradiated materials within the hot cell cubicle, which houses welding sub-systems that include laser beam welding (LBW) and friction stir welding (FSW) and provides material containment within the hot cell.

  6. Micro alloyed steel weldability and sensibility testing on the lamellar cracks appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stojadinović

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work are given the testing results of mechanical properties welded joints and microstructure of micro alloyed steel as well as its sensitivity to lamellar cracks appearance. The obtained results show that steel has good resistance to lamellar cracks appearance and with an appropriate wire choice for welding, a good combination of mechanical properties could be obtained at room (ambience temperatures as well as at low temperatures.

  7. Solidification microstructures in single-crystal stainless steel melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipf, J.B.; Boatner, L.A.; David, S.A.

    1994-03-01

    Development of microstructure of stationary melt pools of oriented stainless steel single crystals (70%Fe-15%Ni-15%Cr was analyzed. Stationary melt pools were formed by electron-beam and gas-tungsten-arc heating on (001), (011), and (111) oriented planes of the austenitic, fcc-alloy crystals. Characterization and analysis of resulting microstructure was carried out for each crystallographic plane and welding method. Results showed that crystallography which favors ``easy growth`` along the <100> family of directions is a controlling factor in the microstructural formation along with the melt-pool shape. The microstructure was found to depend on the melting method, since each method forms a unique melt-pool shape. These results are used in making a three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure for each plane and melting method employed. This investigation also suggests avenues for future research into the microstructural properties of electron-beam welds as well as providing an experimental basis for mathematical models for the prediction of solidification microstructures.

  8. Wavelength selection in directional solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A.

    1986-08-18

    Cell-spacing selection in directional solidification is investigated. An integral equation describing steady-state cells in the limit where the solute diffusion length is much larger than the cell spacing is derived and solved numerically by Newton's method. With surface tension and no crystalline anisotropy present the spatial periodicity of a one-dimensional array of cells with cusp singularities is found to be determined uniquely by a solvability condition. The inclusion of crystalline anisotropy has no other effect than to shift the value of the selected spacing.

  9. Finite element modelling of solidification phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process of solidification process is complex in nature and the simulation of such process is required in industry before it is actually undertaken. Finite element method is used to simulate the heat transfer process accompanying the solidification process. The metal and the mould along with the air gap formation is ...

  10. Effect of thermosolutal convection on directional solidification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The impact of thermosolutal convection during directional solidification is explored via results of numerical investigations. Results from fully transient numerical simulations of directional solidification in a differentially heated cavity under terrestrial conditions and Bridgman crystal growth in space are discussed. The pivotal ...

  11. 2014/2219 Tri-Point Crack Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. The objective of this study was to evaluate the deformation response at the tips of cracks located in the heat affected zone of friction plug welds and to study the fracture behavior of welds with defects in the form of fatigue cracks. The study used existing 2014-T6 to 2219-T87 self-reacting friction stir weld panels with 2219-T87 friction plug welds. Electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches were machined into the heat affected zone of the plug at the plug-to-base metal interface. Samples were then cycled to generate a fatigue crack emanating from the notch. After the fatigue crack reached a pre-defined length, a speckle pattern was applied and the ARAMIS system (a three dimensional imaging correlation system) was used to measure the deformations at the crack tip under a sequence of loads. Testing was conducted at ambient laboratory conditions. Fracture data from the testing was analyzed to evaluate residual strength capability of the panel as a function of flaw size. ARAMIS strain data was evaluated to examine strain and deformation patterns that develop around the crack tip and at the plug/weld interfaces. Four samples were used in this study, with three samples in a post-weld heat treated condition. Three samples contained large diameter plugs (M5) and one sample contained a small diameter plug (M3). Two samples were 4 inches in width and two samples were 8.5 inches in width. All samples failed through the precrack with residual strengths ranging from 37 ksi to 42 ksi.

  12. Welding rework data acquisition and automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-Lithium is a modern material that NASA MSFC is evaluating as an option for the aluminum alloys and other aerospace metals presently in use. The importance of aluminum-lithium is in it's superior weight to strength characteristics. However, aluminum-lithium has produced many challenges in regards to manufacturing and maintenance. The solution to these problems are vital to the future uses of the shuttle for delivering larger payloads into earth orbit and are equally important to future commercial applications of aluminum-lithium. The Metals Processes Branch at MSFC is conducting extensive tests on aluminum-lithium which includes the collection of large amounts of data. This report discusses the automation and data acquisition for two processes: the initial weld and the repair. The new approach reduces the time required to collect the data, increases the accuracy of the data, and eliminates several types of human errors during data collection and entry. The same material properties that enhance the weight to strength characteristics of aluminum-lithium contribute to the problems with cracks occurring during welding, especially during the repair/rework process. The repairs are required to remove flaws or defects discovered in the initial weld, either discovered by x-ray, visual inspection, or some other type of nondestructive evaluation. It has been observed that cracks typically appear as a result of or beyond the second repair. MSFC scientists have determined that residual mechanical stress introduced by the welding process is a primary cause of the cracking. Two obvious solutions are to either prevent or minimize the stress introduced during the welding process, or remove or reduce the stress after the welding process and MSFC is investigating both of these.

  13. Characterization of the Microstructures and the Cryogenic Mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Welded Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon Il; Bae, Sang Hyun; Do, Jeong Hyeon; Jo, Chang Yong; Hong, Hyun Uk

    2016-02-01

    The microstructures and the cryogenic mechanical properties of electron beam (EB) welds between cast and forged Inconel 718 superalloys with a thickness of 10 mm were investigated in comparison with gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. EB welding with a heat input lower than 250 J/mm caused the formation of liquation microfissuring in the cast-side heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of the EB welds. HAZ liquation microfissuring appeared to be associated with the constitutional liquation of primary NbC carbides at the grain boundaries. Compared with the GTA welding process, the EB welding produced welds with superior microstructure, exhibiting fine dendritic structure associated with the reduction in size and fraction of the Laves phase due to the rapid cooling rate. This result was responsible for the superior mechanical properties of the EB welds at 77 K (-196 °C). Laves particles in both welds were found to provide the preferential site for the crack initiation and propagation, leading to a significant decrease in the Charpy impact toughness at 77 K (-196 °C). Crack initiation and propagation induced by Charpy impact testing were discussed in terms of the dendrite arm spacing, the Laves size and the dislocation structure ahead of the crack arisen from the fractured Laves phase in the two welds.

  14. Mechanical Characteristics of 9% Ni Steel Welded Joint for Lng Storage Tank at Cryogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Shim, Kyu-Taek; Kim, Young-Kyun

    To confirm the safety performance of LNG storage tank, the change in fatigue crack growth rate and fracture toughness within X-grooved weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of newly developed 9% Ni steel, which was SMAW welded, was investigated. These materials were produced by QT (quenching, tempering) heat treatment. The weld metal specimens were prepared by taking the same weld procedure applied in actual inner shell of LNG storage tank. All tests were performed in the temperature ranging from R.T. and -162°C. The fatigue crack growth behavior was carried out using CT specimen. Investigation has been carried out to study the influence of temperature and weld effect on fatigue crack growth behavior. Also, Fracture surfaces after tests were observe by scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  15. Prevention of Porosities in Insert-type Electron Beam Welding for Nodular Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Fumio, SHIBATA; SEIICHI, ANDO; College of Science and Technology, Nihon University; College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports about investigations in regard to the influences of the welding conditions mainly on porosities in insert-type electron beam welding for 50 Kgf/mm^2 class nodular cast iron (plate thickness: 6, 12, 18mm) with austenitic stainless steel SUS304 (thickness: 0.5 mm) as insert metal. Bead appearances, shape of fusion zone, porosities, state of weld cracks, and tensile test of weld joint have been carefully observed under the influences of welding conditions, that is, pretreatmen...

  16. FY 1998 annual report on the study on solidification process of hot, heat-resistant metal melts; 1998 nendo tainetsu kinzoku koon yueki no gyoko katei no kenkyu chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Described herein are results of the studies on basic aspects of solidification process of hot, heat-resistant metal melts under a microgravity atmosphere, its applicability to industrial purposes, production of new metallic structures by precision casting and supercooling solidification of the heat-resistant, metal alloy parts, and evaluation techniques therefor. In the supercooling solidification of Al, its purity greatly determines the crystal morphology. The single crystal can be produced under a microgravity when it is 99.9% pure. The supercooling solidification under a microgravity can give an Al-Pb alloy structure of uniform dendrite structure both on the surface and inside, free of gravity-caused segregation of Pb. The welding problems caused by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} present in the Al are solved. The study also clarifies the effects of the microgravity atmosphere in the spot welding by a pulsed YAG laser on, e.g., melting characteristics, welding phenomena and formation of welding defects. The basic knowledge obtained is expected to contribute to, e.g., precision casting and welding of heat-resistant alloys, and creation of new alloys. (NEDO)

  17. Elemental segregation during resistance spot welding of boron containing advanced high strength steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirthalingam, M.; Van der Aa, E.M.; Kwakernaak, C.; Hermans, M.J.M.; Richardson, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    The partitioning behaviour of carbon, phosphorous and boron during the solidification of a resistance spot weld pool was studied using experimental simulations and a phase field model. Steels with varying carbon, phosphorous and boron contents were designed and subjected to a range of resistant spot

  18. Multiscale characterization and mechanical modeling of an Al-Zn-Mg electron beam weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puydt, Quentin; Flouriot, Sylvain; Ringeval, Sylvain; Parry, Guillaume; De Geuser, Frédéric; Deschamps, Alexis

    Welding of precipitation hardening alloys results in multi-scale microstructural heterogeneities, from the hardening nano-scale precipitates to the micron-scale solidification structures and to the component geometry. This heterogeneity results in a complex mechanical response, with gradients in strength, stress triaxiality and damage initiation sites.

  19. Relaxation cracking in the process industry, an underestimated problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, J.C. van [TNO Institute of Industrial Technology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    Austenitic components, operating between 500 and 750 deg C, can fail within 1 year service while the ordinary mechanical properties after failure are still within the code requirements. The intergranular brittle failures are situated in the welded or cold deformed areas. This type of cracking has many names, showing the uncertainty concerning the mechanism for the (catastrophical) failures. A just finished investigation showed that it is a relaxation crack problem, introduced by manufacturing processes, especially welding and cold rolling. Cracking/failures can be expected after only 0.1- 0.2 % relaxation strain. These low strain values can already be generated during relaxation of the welding stresses. Especially coarse grained `age hardening` materials are susceptible. Stabilising and Postweld Heat Treatments are very effective to avoid relaxation crack problems during operation. After these heat treatments the components can withstand more than 2 % relaxation strain. At temperatures between 500 and 750 deg C relaxation cracking is the predominant factor for the safety and lifetime of welded austenitic components. (orig.) 12 refs.

  20. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during equiaxed dendritic solidification. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion-dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and co-workers isothermal dendritic growth experiment (IDGE) for steady growth of a single dendrite to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation closer to actual casting conditions. Corresponding Earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  1. Fracture Behaviour of Nickel-Titanium Laser Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletta, C.; Falvo, A.; Furgiuele, F.; Barbieri, G.; Brandizzi, M.

    2009-08-01

    In this study, the effects of Nd:YAG laser welding on the fracture behavior of Ni-rich nickel-titanium sheets are analyzed by experimental investigations. The welding was carried out in open air conditions by using a special shielding/clamping system to avoid the chemical contamination of the molten zone and the formation of hot cracks. Mechanical tests of standard dog bone-shaped and single edge crack specimens were carried out to measure the stress-strain response and the fracture resistance of both the base and the welded materials. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy observations of the fracture surfaces were carried out in order to better understand the failure mechanisms. Finally, systematic comparative studies between base and laser-welded materials were carried out.

  2. Residual Stresses in Thick Bi-metallic Fusion Welds: A Neutron Diffraction Study

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ohms

    2013-01-01

    Welding is applied in many industrial sectors to join components, and has become an important manufacturing process because it enables the fabrication of structures that could not otherwise be constructed. Weld regions have inhomogeneous microstructures and are more susceptible to crack initiation and crack propagation than the surrounding base material regions. Residual stresses are also formed, which superimpose with applied loads, resulting in a reduction of the maximum applied load a comp...

  3. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  4. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  5. [Stress-corrosion test of TIG welded CP-Ti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Wang, Y; Zhou, Z; Meng, X; Liang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, Y

    2000-12-01

    In this study TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welded CP-Ti were subjected to stress-corrosion test under 261 MPa in artificial saliva of 37 degrees C for 3 months. No significant difference was noted on mechanical test (P > 0.05). No color-changed and no micro-crack on the sample's surface yet. These results indicate that TIG welded CP-Ti offers excellent resistance to stress corrosion.

  6. Failure Analysis of X80 Line Pipe’s Circumferential Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hong Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One 530mm X80 pipeline weld failed infrequently in service process. This paper gives a systematic analysis in consideration of both material quality and loading condition. Inspection was performed on chemical composition, mechanical performance, metallograghy and micro-morphology. The result shows that weld joint’s leakage failure accident is fatigue failure. Under the effect of tensile- tensile stress fatigue stress, fatigue crack originated from weld fusion line near the pipe body and developed along the weld. Porosity defect in the weld reduced its bearing capacity, and promoted the formation and development of the fatigue crack. Fatigue strength and fatigue life of the weld has great relationship with the size and distribution of porosity. The greater the porosity, the more close to surface, the decrease of fatigue life is more obvious.

  7. Recent evaluations of crack-opening-area in circumferentially cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Miura, N.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. The leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of the through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section XI. The objectives of this study were to review, evaluate, and refine current predictive models for performing crack-opening-area analyses of circumferentially cracked pipes. The results from twenty-five full-scale pipe fracture experiments, conducted in the Degraded Piping Program, the International Piping Integrity Research Group Program, and the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program, were used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess quantitatively the accuracy of the predictive models. The evaluation also involved finite element analyses for determining the crack-opening profile often needed to perform leak-rate calculations.

  8. The effect of adding boron in solidification microstructure of dilute iron-carbon alloy as assessed by phase-field modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Silva Furtado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alloying element like boron, even in small addition, is well known to improve hardenability of steels. Its application can improve mechanical properties of steels and reduce alloying costs. Despite these benefits is not easy to cast boron steels, mainly in dynamical solidification process like continuous casting, due to their crack susceptibility1,2. The strategy of using Phase-Field simulation of the solidification process is based on its proved capacity of predicting realistic microstructure that emerge during solidification under conditions even far from equilibrium3-5. Base on this, some comparative simulations were performed using a three component dilute alloy in a two dimensional domain under unconstrained (isothermal and constrained (directional solidification. Simulation results suggested two fragile mechanisms: one related to a deep dendritic primary arms space and other due to the remelting of this region at low temperature. Both resulted mainly from the high boron segregation in interdendritic regions.

  9. New technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin

    2017-06-01

    In the aircraft industry, double-sided laser beam welding is an approved method for producing skin-stringer T-joints on aircraft fuselage panels. As for the welding of new generation aluminum-lithium alloys, however, this technique is limited because of high hot cracking susceptibility and strengthening elements' uneven distributions within weld. In the present study, a new technique of skin embedded wire double-sided laser beam welding (LBW) has been developed to fabricate T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys using eutectic alloy AA4047 filler wire. Necessary dimension parameters of the novel groove were reasonably designed for achieving crack-free welds. Comparisons were made between the new technique welded T-joint and conventional T-joint mainly on microstructure, hot crack, elements distribution features and mechanical properties within weld. Excellent crack-free microstructure, uniform distribution of silicon and superior tensile properties within weld were found in the new skin embedded wire double-sided LBW T-joints.

  10. Effects of Laser Peening, and Shot Peening, on Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon; Truong, Chanh; Walter, Matt

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the effects of laser peening and shot peening on friction stir welding is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Friction Stir Welding (FSW); 3) Microstructure; 4) Laser & Shot Peening; 5) Residual Stresses; 6) Tensile Behavior; 7) Fatigue Life & Surface Roughness; 8) Crack Growth; and 9) Benefits.

  11. Residual Stresses in Thick Bi-metallic Fusion Welds : A Neutron Diffraction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohms, C.

    2013-01-01

    Welding is applied in many industrial sectors to join components, and has become an important manufacturing process because it enables the fabrication of structures that could not otherwise be constructed. Weld regions have inhomogeneous microstructures and are more susceptible to crack initiation

  12. Preheating to around 100°C under endcap blocks before welding at KHI.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loveless, D

    2000-01-01

    The 600mm thick sector blocks of the CMS endcaps are made from three layers of 200mm plates welded together. During the manufacture at KHI, the blocks are preheated to around 100°C to prevent cracks in the welds.

  13. Neutron diffraction analysis of residual strain/stress distribution in the vicinity of high strength welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamák I.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses resulting from non homogeneous heat distribution during welding process belong to most significant factor influencing behavior of welded structures. These stresses are responsible for defect occurrence during welding and they are also responsible for crack initiation and propagation at the either static or dynamic load. The significant effect of weld metal chemical composition as well as the effect of fatigue load and local plastic deformation on residual stress distribution and fatigue life have been recognized for high strength steels welds. The changes in residual stress distribution have then positive effect on cold cracking behavior and also on fatigue properties of the welds [1-3]. Several experimental methods, both destructive and non-destructive, such as hole drilling method, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and others, have been used to examine residual stress distribution in all three significant orientations in the vicinity of the welds. The present contribution summarizes the results of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress distribution in the vicinity of single-pass high-strength-steel welds having different chemical composition as well as the influence of fatigue load and local plastic deformation. It has been observed that the chemical composition of the weld metal has a significant influence on the stress distribution around the weld. Similarly, by aplying both cyclic load or pre-stress load on the specimens, stress relaxation was observed even in the region of approximately 40 mm far from the weld toe.

  14. [The effects of different welding wires on the mechanical properties of laser welding joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qing-feng; Zhang, Jian-zhong; Jiang, Wei-dong; Li, Quan; Yu, Jin-xing

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate the mechanical properties and microstructure of laser-welded joints with different welding wires for clinical use of welding wire. The standard tensile test and three-point bending test rods were made from Co-Cr and Ni-Cr alloy, and were laser-welded with different welding wire (commercially welding wire and casting wire). Then the tensile rods were tested for the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and the bending rods for the ultimate bending strength (UBS). The results was analyzed by one-way ANOVA. The tensile fracture surface were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Metallurgical analysis were also performed on polished longitudinal sectioned samples. For Co-Cr alloy, the UTS of casting wire group and commercially welding wire group was respectively (606.40+/-82.53)MPa and (693.61+/-47.68)MPa; the UBS was respectively (997.95+/-88.89)MPa and (1160.76+/-91.59)MPa. ANOVA showed a significant difference of UTS and UBS between the two groups at the 0.05 level (Pwelding wire group was respectively (558.14+/-46.75)MPa and (582.32+/-35.43)MPa; the UBS was respectively (1084.75+/-46.02)MPa and (1078.29+/-36.25)MPa. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05). SEM and metallurgical examination showed the welded zone exhibiting more cracks in the casting wire group than in the commercially welding wire group. It would be advisable to work with commercially welding wire for the joints that need better strength.

  15. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  16. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  17. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  18. Effect of massive transformation on formation of acicular structure in austenitic stainless steel weld metal solidified as ferritic single phase. Report 5. Study on solidification and subsequent transformation of Cr-Ni stainless steel weld metals; Feraito tanso de gyokosuru osutenaito kei sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku ni okeru ashikyura jo soshiki no keisei ni oyobosu masshibu hentai no eikyo.5. Cr-Ni kei sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko/hentai ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Koseki, T.; Okita, S.; Fuji, M. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    The authors clarified that massive transformation occurs at two phase region under To temperature and there is K-S relation between the massive formation phase and base phase using {gamma} stainless steel that solidifies at F mode and forms acicular structure at room temperature structure. There is a possibility of massive transformation in weld metals because the cooling rate below the high temperature To was high even for normal welding process. Thereupon, in this report, whether the massive transformation effects the formation of acicular structure or not was studied as for {gamma} stainless steel weld metal that solidifies at F mode and room temperature structure becomes acicular form of two {delta} and {gamma} phase. As a result, it was clarified that massive transformation occurs at two phase region with temperature below To, and the room temperature structure was acicular form structure irrespective to massive transformation in case of composition with small Cr/Ni ratio even in case of stainless steel that solidifies at F mode. 20 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Causes of the cracks in the pipeline made of the 15HM steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Słania J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Issues referring to cracks in the pipelines made of the 15HM steel are described. Metallographic specimen of welded joints are provided. The results of impact strength tests, hardness tests and static tensile tests are given. Tests results as well as direct and indirect causes of the pipeline cracks are shown.

  20. Influence of alloying on hydrogen-assisted cracking and diffusible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Study of hydrogen-assisted cracking and measurement of diffusible hydrogen content in different Cr–Mo steel welds shows that under identical conditions, susceptibility to cracking increased and diffusible hydrogen content decrease with increase in alloy content. Hydrogen permeation studies show that hydrogen diffusivity ...

  1. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  2. Investigations on avoidance of hot cracks during laser welding of austenitic Cr-Ni steels and nickel-based alloys using temperature field tailoring. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Vermeidung von Heissrissen beim Laserstrahlschweissen von austenitischen Cr-Ni-Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen mittels Temperaturfeld-Tailoring. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-08

    The aim of the project was to transfer the developed method of laser beam welding of heat treated machining steels of temperature field tailoring on hot crack endangered austenitic Cr-Ni steels and nickel-based alloys. With this method, transient thermal stresses adjacent to the weld are produced by an travelling induction heating so that the hot cracking is prevented during welding. As test materials the austenitic Cr-Ni steel with sulfur additive 1.4305, the Cr-Ni steels 1.4404 and 1.4435 and the nickel-based alloy Udimet 720 were selected. As a result of the research it was shown that a hot crack-free laser welding in the investigated materials using at least three different welding and material-technical approaches is possible. [German] Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens bestand darin, das fuer das Laserstrahlschweissen verguetbarer Automatenstaehle entwickelte Verfahren des Temperaturfeld-Tailorings auf heissrissgefaehrdete austenitische Cr-Ni-Staehle und Nickelbasislegierungen zu uebertragen. Mit diesem Verfahren werden waehrend des Schweissens transiente thermische Spannungen neben der Schweissnaht durch eine mitlaufende induktive Erwaermung so erzeugt, dass die Heissrissbildung verhindert wird. Als Versuchswerkstoffe wurden der austenitische Cr-Ni-Stahl mit Schwefelzusatz 1.4305, die Cr-Ni-Staehle 1.4404 und 1.4435 sowie die Nickelbasislegierung Udimet 720 ausgewaehlt. Im Ergebnis des Forschungsvorhabens konnte gezeigt werden, dass ein heissrissfreies Laserstrahlschweissen bei den untersuchten Werkstoffen unter Nutzung von mindestens drei verschiedenen schweiss- und werkstofftechnischen Ansaetzen moeglich ist: Erstens koennen mit einem Temperaturfeld-Tailoring bei im Stumpfstoss zu verschweissenden Blechen aus austenitischen Staehlen bis mindestens 6 mm Dicke senkrecht zur Naht und parallel zur Blechoberflaeche wirkende transiente Druckspannungen erzeugt werden, die der Bildung von Mittelrippenrissen oder dazu parallel liegenden Heissrissen entgegenwirken

  3. Similar and Dissimilar Nd:YAGlaser Welding of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy to AISI 420Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jassim Mohammed Salman Al-Murshdy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Similar NiTi shape memory alloy(SMA plates, 420 Martensitic stainless steelplates and dissimilar NiTi shape memory alloy with Martensiticstainless steel were welded by a pulsed Nd:YAGlaser welding method.The nature microstructure of the base metal (BM, weld zone (WZ, interface and the heat affected zones(HAZ were showedby in a scanning electron microscope (SEM and optical microscope.Vickers hardness tests wasconducted to specifythe properties of the weld. The outcomes showed that the hardness of dissimilar NiTi-Stainless steel (St.St. weld is higher than that in similar NiTi-NiTi and St.St.-St.St. weld.TheMicrostructural examination in both NiTi-St.St. and NiTi-NiTi welds illustrates that the solidification process in the fusion zone changed the kind of plan to the cell type as well as the changes that occur in the cell to dentritic kind of intra- region of the weld through the weld center in the welded sample sides but in the St.St.-St.St. weld showed dendrite microstructure. In this study it is found that the increase of the welding speed leads to a decrease in hardness in all jointsNiTi-NiTi, NiTi-St.St. and St.St.-St.St.

  4. Residual stress, micro-hardness and tensile properties of ANSI 304 stainless steel thick sheet by fiber laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Lu, J.Z., E-mail: blueesky2005@163.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Luo, K.Y., E-mail: luokaiyu2012@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, A.X. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); College of Mechanical Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Dai, F.Z.; Zhong, J.S.; Luo, M. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang, Y.K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)

    2013-01-20

    A fiber laser was chosen to weld the ANSI 304 stainless steel (ANSI 304 SS) sheets with a thickness of 5 mm. The effects of laser power, defocusing distance and welding speed on the weld appearances were investigated by the orthogonal test and the analyses on the appearances and properties of laser welds. Residual stress, micro-hardness and tensile properties of ANSI 304 SS welds were measured, and the cross section and surface morphologies were characterized by optical microscope (OM) compared with the two conventional laser (CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG) welding methods. Results showed that ANSI 304 SS welds with good quality can be obtained if the appropriate fiber laser welding parameters were chosen. Tensile residual stresses of the fiber laser weld with the appropriate welding parameters were the lowest and micro-hardness and tensile properties were the highest among the three laser welding methods. In addition, the crystal solidification process induced by the fiber laser welding was schematically illustrated and systematically revealed.

  5. Segregation behaviour and phase developments during solidification of Inconel 625; effect of iron and carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, Christian; Tiedje, Niels; Hald, John

    2004-01-01

    of the protective layer is observed to occur predominately along either the dendrite cores, D.C. or in the inter-dendric regions, I.D. ¡V which occasionally results in unexpected large (and possibly detrimental) local corrosion rates. In this investigation microstructure characterization was performed......The key to improve the performance of Inconel 625 weld overlays applied for corrosion resistance in waste incinerator plants is to understand the solidification process: At present, enhanced resistance against fireside corrosion in waste incinerator boilers is commonly achieved by overlay welding...... with nickel based alloys i.e. Inconel grades. The final layer has a thickness of at least 2 mm. This layer has a dendritic morphology with a dendrite arm spacing of a few microns. In general, this combination of material and process technology provides an adequate solution. However, corrosive attacks...

  6. Crack growth simulation in heterogeneous material by S-FEM and comparison with experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kikuchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fully automatic fatigue crack growth simulation system is developed using S-version FEM (SFEM. This system is extended to fracture in heterogeneous material. In the heterogeneous material, crack tip stress field becomes mixed mode condition, and crack growth path is affected by inhomogeneous materials and mixed mode conditions. Stress Intensity Factors (SIF in mixed mode condition are evaluated using Virtual Crack Closure Method (VCCM. Criteria for crack growth amount and crack growth path are used based on these SIFs, and growing crack configurations are obtained. Three crack growth problems are simulated. One is crack growth in bi-materila made of CFRP plate and Aluminum alloy. Initial crack is located in CFRP plate, and grows toward Aluminum alloy. Crack growing direction changes and results are compared with experimental one. Second problem is crack growth in bimaterial made of PMMA and Aluminum alloy. Initial crack is located in PMMA plate and parallel to phase boundary. By cahnging loading conditions, several cases are simulated and compared with experimental ones. In the experiment, crack grows into pahse boundary and grow along it. This case is simulated precisely, and the effect of pahse boundary is discussed. Last case is Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC at Hot-Leg Safe-End of Pressurized Water Rreactor. This location is made of many kinds of steels by welding. In some steel, SCC does not occur and in other steel, SCC is accelerated. As a result, small surface crack grows in complicated manner.

  7. Residual stress distributions in a P91 steel-pipe girth weld before and after post weld heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddea, S., E-mail: s.paddea@open.ac.uk [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Francis, J.A. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX, Oxon (United Kingdom); Bouchard, P.J. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Shibli, I.A. [European Technology Development Ltd., Leatherhead KT22 7RD, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stresses in a pipe girth weld in P91 steel have been measured in both the as-welded and PWHT conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest tensile residual stresses coincided with the HAZ boundary and the microstructural region that is prone to type IV cracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compressive residual stresses were measured in the weld metal, in a location corresponding to the final weld pass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The location of the peak compressive stresses can be explained by the effect of solid-state phase transformation. - Abstract: In this study the residual stresses in a pipe girth weld in a ferritic-martensitic power plant steel were measured by neutron diffraction and compared with the corresponding metallurgical zones in the weld region. It was found that, in both the as-welded and post-weld heat treated condition, the highest tensile stresses resided near the outer boundary of the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and towards the weld root region. Substantial tensile direct and hydrostatic stresses existed across the HAZ, including the fine-grained and intercritically annealed regions, where premature type IV creep failures manifest in 9-12 Cr steel welds. Compressive stresses were found in the weld metal coinciding with the last weld bead to be deposited. Constrained cooling tests on test coupons illustrated that these compressive stresses can be explained in terms of the influence that solid-state phase transformations have on the accumulation of stress in welds.

  8. Cold pressure welding - the mechanisms governing bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    1979-01-01

    Investigations of the bonding surface in scanning electron microscope after fracture confirm the mechanisms of bond formation in cold pressure welding to be: fracture of work-hardened surface layer, surface expansion increasing the area of virgin surface, extrusion of virgin material through cracks...... of the original surface layer, and establishment of real contact and bonding between virgin material. This implies that normal pressure as well as surface expansion are basic parameters governing the bond strength. Experimental investigations of pressure welding Al-Al under plane strain compression in a specially...... developed equipment allowing independent variation of normal pressure and surface expansion confirm this. Based upon a slip-line analysis of the extrusion through cracks of the surface layer and upon the establishment of real contact between virgin material, a theory for the bond strength as a function...

  9. The effects of electron beam rotation upon electron beam welded copper-304 couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysk, Kevin Tacy

    The United States Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center, has been using copper to 304 stainless steel couples made using the electron beam welding process during the fabrication of intrusive gas-path diagnostic probes for over five years. Only a limited physical analysis of the resulting welds had been done. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects that varying the rotation frequency of the electron beam had upon the mechanical characteristics of the copper to 304 stainless steel couples. All controllable weld process parameters were held constant with the exception of the electron beam rotation frequency; the rotation frequency was varied from 20 Hz to 180 Hz in steps of 20 Hz. Samples welded without electron beam rotation provided a baseline for comparison. Microhardness distributions showed that weld region homogeneity as evidenced by microhardness maps and optical microscopy was a function of the electron beam rotation frequency. There was no correlation between electron beam rotation frequency and weld tensile strength since each test coupon failed in the Cu base material outside of the weld region. The welds made at all electron beam rotation frequencies used for this study contained cracks within the weld region, heat affected zone (HAZ), or both. The relative number, length, and location of the individual cracks changed with electron beam rotation frequency. Cracking in the HAZ due to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) was not evident in those samples welded with the electron beam rotation frequencies below 100 Hz, Cracking due to LME outside of the weld region in the HAZ was observed to increase with the electron beam rotation frequency above 80 Hz. The relationship between weld region cracking and residual stress within the weld region was shown to be dependent on the electron beam rotation frequency. Cracking in the weld region was not observed in samples welded with the electron beam rotation frequency above 80 Hz

  10. Evaluation of canister weld flaw depth for concrete storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Tae Chul; Cho, Chun Hyung [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sung Hun; Lee, Young Oh; Jung, In Su [Korea Nuclear Engineering and Service Corp, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Domestically developed concrete storage casks include an internal canister to maintain the confinement integrity of radioactive materials. In this study, we analyzed the depth of flaws caused by loads that propagate canister weld cracks under normal, off-normal and accident conditions, and evaluated the maximum allowable weld flaw depth needed to secure the structural integrity of the canister weld and to reduce the welding time of the internal canister lid of the concrete storage cask. Structural analyses for normal, off-normal and accident conditions were performed using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ABAQUS; the allowable flaw depth was assessed according to ASME B and PV Code Section XI. Evaluation results revealed an allowable canister weld flaw depth of 18.75 mm for the concrete storage cask, which satisfies the critical flaw depth recommended in NUREG-1536.

  11. Plasma arc welding repair of space flight hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Repair and refurbishment of flight and test hardware can extend the useful life of very expensive components. A technique to weld repair the main combustion chamber of space shuttle main engines has been developed. The technique uses the plasma arc welding process and active cooling to seal cracks and pinholes in the hot-gas wall of the main combustion chamber liner. The liner hot-gas wall is made of NARloyZ, a copper alloy previously thought to be unweldable using conventional arc welding processes. The process must provide extensive heat input to melt the high conductivity NARloyZ while protecting the delicate structure of the surrounding material. The higher energy density of the plasma arc process provides the necessary heat input while active water cooling protects the surrounding structure. The welding process is precisely controlled using a computerized robotic welding system.

  12. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components. PMID:26553246

  13. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, H L; Mazumder, J; DebRoy, T

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data...

  14. Environmentally assisted cracking in LWR materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Park, J.H.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Zhang, J.; Brust, F.W.; Dong, P. [Battelle Columbus Labs., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2--0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized.

  15. Ultrasound influence on materials structure in parts reconditioned by welding with ultrasonic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dobrotă

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research presented in the paper refers to the structural analysis of materials that are thermally influenced for loading by welding of pieces in the classical variant of manual coated electric arc welding and the version that in which the welding bath is activated by ultrasounds. The structural analysis made refer to: the size of the grains of the structure obtained under certain loading conditions through welding, grain size variation on the submission of a single layer in the ultrasonic field, the mode of solidification and fragmentation of grains when loaded in welding in a ultrasonic field, acceleration of the diffusion process for ultrasonic activation, the appearance of hard carbides between grains.

  16. Use of Friction Buttering for Overcoming HAZ Liquation Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, G. M.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2017-10-01

    Multi-layer friction deposits in nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 were investigated for their heat-affected zone liquation cracking resistance. The friction deposits, owing to their fine-grained microstructure with a large number of subgrain boundaries and fine, uniformly distributed carbide particles, were found to exhibit superior liquation cracking resistance to standard wrought-processed alloy 718. Based on these findings, a new technique involving friction deposition of the base plates prior to fusion welding was proposed for overcoming liquation cracking.

  17. Optimization of welding current waveform for dissimilar material with DP590 and Al5052 by Delta-spot welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Young Gon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The automotive industry has a target goal to improve fuel consumption due to restricted exhaust gas regulation. For this reason, the applicability of lightweight material, Al alloys, Mg alloys is also being expanded. In this concept, high strength steel, DP590 and light alloy, AL5052 are joined in the right place of the car body. However, it is difficult to join to steel and aluminum by conventional fusion welding. Generally, in respect to dissimilar metal joining by fusion welding, intermetallic compound layer is formed at the joint interface, hot cracking is generated. In this study, the effect of the current waveform on the mechanical characteristics and microstructure in Delta spot welding process of dissimilar metal was investigated. As results, Intermetallic compound (IMC) layer was reduced from 2.355 μm to 1.09 μm by using Delta spot welding process; also the welding current range improved by 50% in the delta spot welding, higher than in the inverter resistance welding. To conclude, the delta spot welding process adopting the process tapes contributes to improving the welding quality for dissimilar metals (Al5052 and DP590) due to a decrease in IMC layer.

  18. Quantitative analysis of prediction models for hot cracking in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A RodrМguez-Prieto

    2017-11-16

    Nov 16, 2017 ... Welding Research Council (WRC) introduced the Ferrite. Number (FN) to define the amount of ferrite measured using a calibrated instrument [8]. It has been demonstrated that hot cracking increases when the values of the chromium and nickel equivalents are modified to obtain a purely austenitic structure ...

  19. Control of relaxation cracking in austenitic high temperature components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.C. van

    2007-01-01

    The degradation mechanism "relaxation cracking" is acting in austenitic components operating between 550°C (1020°F) and 750°C (1380°F). The brittle failures are always located in cold formed areas or in welded joints and are mostly addressed within 1 year service. More than 10 different names can be

  20. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  1. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  2. Study of gas tungsten arc welding procedures for tantalum alloy T-111 (Ta-8 W-2Hf) plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Kesterson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Methods of eliminating or reducing underbread cracking in multipass GTA welds in thick T-111 plate were studied. Single V butt welds prepared using experimental filler metal compositions and standard weld procedures resulted in only moderate success in reducing underbread cracking. Subsequent procedural changes incorporating manual welding, slower weld speeds, and three or fewer fill passes resulted in crack-free single V welds only when the filler metal was free of hafnium. The double V joint design with successive fill passes on opposite sides of the joint produced excellent welds. The quality of each weld was determined metallographically since the cracking, when present, was very slight and undetectable using standard NDT techniques. Tensile and bend tests were performed on selected weldments. The inherent filler metal strength and the joint geometry determined the strength of the weldment. Hardness and electron beam microprobe traverses were made on selected specimens with the result that significant filler metal-base metal dilution as well as hafnium segregation was detected. A tentative explanation of T-111 plate underbread cracking is presented based on the intrinsic effects of hafnium in the weldment.

  3. Detection and sizing of stress corrosion cracks in austenitic components using ultrasonic testing and synthetic aperture focusing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Materialpruefungsanstalt; Dillhoefer, Alexander [NDT Global GmbH and Co.KG, Stutensee (Germany); Rieder, Hans; Spies, Martin [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren (IZFP), Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Flaw detection and sizing using NDT techniques is an important factor for reliably assessing the integrity of components. In the case of dissimilar metal welds and austenitic stainless steel welds, the grain structure of the weld in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material will present major challenges for UT. A study on austenitic base metal test blocks with artificially grown IGSCCs has shown that the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) can improve the signal-to-noise ratio, particularly for crack tip signals. In welded test blocks, the influence of the inhomogeneous, anisotropic weld has to be considered.

  4. 49 CFR 213.119 - Continuous welded rail (CWR); plan contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repairs, in-track welding, and in conjunction with adjustments made in the area of tight track, a track... cracks and other indications of potential failures in CWR joints. In formulating the procedures under... otherwise detectable cracks and conduct remedial action pursuant to § 213.121; (3) Specify the conditions of...

  5. Experimental Investigation and Stochastic Modelling of the Fatigue Behaviour of Welded Steel Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Tom

    The present report describes the fatigue behaviour of surface cracks in welded steel joints. Emphasis is laid on fracture mechanics modelling and the stochastic nature of the fatigue process. Various sources which may contribute to the observed scatter in time to crack initiation and time spent...

  6. Effect of notch location on fatigue crack growth behavior of strength-mismatched high-strength low-alloy steel weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Nasser, S. Nemat

    2004-12-01

    Welding of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels involves the use of low-strength, equal-strength, and high-strength filler materials (electrodes) compared with the parent material, depending on the application of the welded structures and the availability of filler material. In the present investigation, the fatigue crack growth behavior of weld metal (WM) and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of undermatched (UM), equally matched (EM), and overmatched (OM) joints has been studied. The base material used in this investigation is HSLA-80 steel of weldable grade. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) has been used to fabricate the butt joints. A center-cracked tension (CCT) specimen has been used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of welded joints, utilizing a servo-hydraulic-controlled fatigue-testing machine at constant amplitude loading (R=0). The effect of notch location on the fatigue crack growth behavior of strength mismatched HSLA steel weldments also has been analyzed.

  7. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  8. Microstructure and fatigue resistance of high strength dual phase steel welded with gas metal arc welding and plasma arc welding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Oh, Yong-Jun; Choi, Won-Doo; Lee, Kwang-Bok; Jung, Jae-Gyu; Nam, Soo Woo

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the microstructure and high cycle fatigue performance of lap shear joints of dual phase steel (DP590) welded using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and plasma arc welding (PAW) processes. High cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single and double lap joints under a load ratio of 0.1 and a frequency of 20 Hz. In order to establish a basis for comparison, both weldments were fabricated to have the same weld depth in the plate thickness. The PAW specimens exhibited a higher fatigue life, a gentle S-N slope, and a higher fatigue limit than the GMAW specimens. The improvement in the fatigue life of the PAW specimens was primarily attributed to the geometry effect that exhibited lower and wider beads resulting in a lower stress concentration at the weld toe where cracks initiate and propagate. Furthermore, the microstructural constituents in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the PAW specimens contributed to the improvement. The higher volume fraction of acicular ferrite in the HAZ beneath the weld toe enhanced the PAW specimen's resistance to fatigue crack growth. The double lap joints displayed a higher fatigue life than the single lap joints without changing the S-N slope.

  9. Characterization of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welded DP600 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ramazani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW as a predominant welding technique used for joining steels in automotive applications needs to be studied carefully in order to improve the mechanical properties of the spot welds. The objectives of the present work are to characterize the resistance spot weldment of DP600 sheet steels. The mechanical properties of the welded joints were evaluated using tensile-shear and cross-tensile tests. The time-temperature evolution during the welding cycle was measured. The microstructures observed in different sites of the welds were correlated to thermal history recorded by thermocouples in the corresponding areas. It was found that cracks initiated in the periphery region of weld nuggets with a martensitic microstructure and a pull-out failure mode was observed. It was also concluded that tempering during RSW was the main reason for hardness decrease in HAZ.

  10. Microstructure and Failure Analysis of Flash Butt Welded HSLA 590CL Steel Joints in Wheel Rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Xu, Zhixin; Shu, Yang; Ma, Feng

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructures, mechanical properties and failure behavior of flash butt welded high strength low alloy 590CL steel joints. Acicular ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite and granular bainite were observed in the weld. The micro-hardness values of the welded joints varied between 250 HV and 310 HV. The tensile strength of the welded joints met the strength standard of the wheel steel. The Charpy V-notch impact absorbing energy of the welded joints was higher than the base metal, and the impact fracture of the welded joints was composed of shearing and equiaxed dimples. The fracture mode of the wheel rim in the flaring and expanding process was brittle fracture and ductile fracture, respectively. A limited deviation was found in the terminal of the crack for the wheel in the flaring process. A transition from the weld to the Heat Affected Zone was observed for the wheel in the expanding process.

  11. Joining characteristics of orthodontic wires with laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kawashima, Isao; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding 0.016 x 0.022 in. beta-Ti, Ni-Ti, and Co-Cr-Ni orthodontic wires was investigated by measuring joint tensile strength, measuring laser penetration depth, determining metallurgical phases using micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD), and examining microstructures with an scanning electron microscope (SEM). Welding was performed from 150 to 230 V. Mean tensile strength for Ni-Ti groups was significantly lower (p Ni was significantly lower than for control specimens joined by silver soldering, it was sufficient for clinical use. The beta-Ti orthodontic wire showed deeper penetration depth from laser welding than the Ni-Ti and Co-Cr-Ni orthodontic wires. Micro-XRD patterns of laser-welded beta-Ti and Ni-Ti obtained 2 mm from the boundary were similar to as-received specimens, indicating that original microstructures were maintained. When output voltages of 190 V and higher were used, most peaks from joint areas disappeared or were much weaker, perhaps because of a directional solidification effect, evidenced by SEM observation of fine striations in welded beta-Ti. Laser welding beta-Ti and Co-Cr-Ni wires may be acceptable clinically, since joints had sufficient strength and metallurgical phases in the original wires were not greatly altered.

  12. Study of the Performance of Stainless Steel A-TIG Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, S. W.; Huang, H. Y.; Tseng, K. H.; Chou, C. P.

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the effect of oxide fluxes on weld morphology, arc voltage, mechanical properties, angular distortion and hot cracking susceptibility obtained with TIG welding, which applied to the welding of 5 mm thick austenitic stainless steel plates. A novel variant of the autogenous TIG welding process, oxide powders (Al2O3, Cr2O3, TiO2, SiO2 and CaO) was applied on a type 304 stainless steel through a thin layer of the flux to produce a bead on plate welds. The experimental results indicated that the increase in the penetration is significant with the use of Cr2O3, TiO2, and SiO2. A-TIG welding can increase the weld depth to bead-width ratio, and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the weldment. It was also found that A-TIG welding can increase the retained delta-ferrite content of stainless steel 304 welds and, in consequence, the hot-cracking susceptibility of as-welded is reduced. Physically constricting the plasma column and reducing the anode spot are the possible mechanism for the effect of certain flux on A-TIG penetration.

  13. Study on hydrogen assisted cracking susceptibility of HSLA steel by implant test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopa Chakraborty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DMR-249A is an indigenously developed high strength low alloy steel for Indian ship building industry for making ship-hull and is extensively used in the construction of war ships and submarines. Welding electrodes conforming to SFA 5.5 AWS E8018 C1 has been indigenously developed for welding of this steel using shielded metal arc welding process. In the present study, susceptibility to hydrogen assisted cracking of DMR-249A steel welds made using this electrode has been assessed using implant test. Implant tests were conducted using this electrode at two different levels of diffusible hydrogen, measured using gas chromatography technique. It is observed that both the steel and the welding consumable are not susceptible to hydrogen assisted cracking even with a high diffusible hydrogen level of 9 mL/100g of weld metal. In implant tests, specimen did not fracture even after loading to stress levels higher than the yield strength of the base metal. The good resistance of this steel and the welding consumable, even with high levels of diffusible hydrogen, is attributed to absence of a susceptible microstructure in both the weld metal and heat affected zone. Hence, this study shows that, in the absence of a susceptible microstructure, hydrogen assisted cracking is unlikely to occur even if hydrogen level is high. It also confirms that in welding of DMR-249A with indigenously developed E8018 C1 electrode, hydrogen assisted cracking is not a concern and no preheating is required to avoid it during welding.

  14. Prevention of halfway cracks in continuous cast A36 steel slabs containing boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-chao Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of halfway cracks in continuous cast A36 steel slabs containing 17 ppm boron was studied by investigating the zero ductility temperature (ZDT, zero strength temperature (ZST, solidification characteristics, and strain distribution in the steels. Results show that the formation of halfway cracks in A36-B slab is attributed to the increase in both the internal crack susceptibility (ZDT and ZST of the steel and the external tensile strain at the solidification front. The ZST of both steels with (A36-B and without (A36 boron addition is nearly the same, but the ZDT of A36-B steel is found 50 篊 lower due to a considerable increase of boron content at the final stage of solidification. The decrease of ZDT enlarges the solidification cracking susceptibility zone and results in the A36-B steel being more prone to cracking. In addition, during the unbending segments, a large tensile strain, resulting from the unbending process and the misalignment deviation of supporting rolls, occurs in the upper part of the solidified shell, which is another reason causing halfway cracks in A36-B slab. By decreasing the P and S content to be less than 50 ppm and 150 ppm, respectively, controlling B content in the range of 10 to 15 ppm, increasing the secondary cooling specific water ratio from 0.76 to 0.85 L穔g-1, and restricting roll alignment deviation to less than plus or minus 0.3 mm, halfway cracks in the boron containing slab are almost eliminated.

  15. Crack propagation and arrest of structural steels and pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Takehiro

    2008-07-01

    Crack arrest of fast running cracks is an important issue for the safety of steel structures. Crack arrest design can prevent fatal damage of large structures by restricting the influence of the incidents. Therefore crack arrest design is important especially for very large structure, where accidents may cause huge economical and social losses. Propagating shear fracture, long running ductile crack propagation in pipelines and brittle crack propagation in heavy thick shipbuilding steels have been investigated. For the propagating shear fracture issue, a new HLP simulation model, applicable to various backfill conditions, including underwater backfill, was developed. The proposed backfill model can be applied to the prediction of the crack arrest of propagating shear fracture under various backfill conditions. The new HLP simulation was successful in estimating full-scale burst tests with various backfill depths. The new HLP simulation for underwater pipelines indicated that propagating shear cracks are easily arrested in offshore pipelines compared to onshore pipeline. The toughness requirement of the line pipe for preventing propagating shear fracture can be significantly smaller in underwater pipelines compared to onshore pipelines. The margin of the underwater pipeline for propagating shear fracture was clarified by the new model developed in this thesis. For brittle crack arrest, an empirical approach for long crack propagation has been conducted. Several large-scale crack arrest tests were carried out in order to investigate the long crack arrestability of heavy-thick shipbuilding steel plates. All plates and their welded joints used in this study satisfied the Charpy toughness requirement for EH-grade shipbuilding steels and welded joints. A brittle crack ran along a welded joint and penetrated through the test plate under a stress exceeding 200MPa, despite the presence of longitudinal stiffeners across the test weld. A brittle crack in a base plate model

  16. Effect of current and atomized grain size distribution on the solidification of Plasma Transferred Arc coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Bond

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA is the only thermal spray process that results in a metallurgical bond, being frequently described as a hardfacing process. The superior properties of coatings have been related to the fine microstructures obtained, which are finer than those processed under similar heat input with welding techniques using wire feedstock. This observation suggests that the atomized feedstock plays a role on the solidification of coatings. In this study a model for the role of the powders grains in the solidification of PTA coatings is put forward and discussed. An experiment was setup to discuss the model which involved the deposition of an atomized Co-based alloy with different grain size distributions and deposition currents. X ray diffraction showed that there were no phase changes due to the processing parameters. Microstructure analysis by Laser Confocal Microscopy, dilution with the substrate steel and Vickers microhardness were used the characterized coatings and enriched the discussion confirming the role of the powdered feedstock on the solidification of coatings.

  17. Hot Corrosion of Inconel 625 Overlay Weld Cladding in Smelting Off-Gas Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Zahrani, E.; Alfantazi, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    Degradation mechanisms and hot corrosion behavior of weld overlay alloy 625 were studied. Phase structure, morphology, thermal behavior, and chemical composition of deposited salt mixture on the weld overlay were characterized utilizing XRD, SEM/EDX, DTA, and ICP/OES, respectively. Dilution level of Fe in the weldment, dendritic structure, and degradation mechanisms of the weld were investigated. A molten phase formed on the weld layer at the operating temperature range of the boiler, which led to the hot corrosion attack in the water wall and the ultimate failure. Open circuit potential and weight-loss measurements and potentiodynamic polarization were carried out to study the hot corrosion behavior of the weld in the simulated molten salt medium at 873 K, 973 K, and 1073 K (600 °C, 700 °C, and 800 °C). Internal oxidation and sulfidation plus pitting corrosion were identified as the main hot corrosion mechanisms in the weld and boiler tubes. The presence of a significant amount of Fe made the dendritic structure of the weld susceptible to preferential corrosion. Preferentially corroded (Mo, Nb)-depleted dendrite cores acted as potential sites for crack initiation from the surface layer. The penetration of the molten phase into the cracks accelerated the cracks' propagation mainly through the dendrite cores and further crack branching/widening.

  18. A Monte Carlo model for 3D grain evolution during welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Mitchell, John A.; Tikare, Veena

    2017-09-01

    Welding is one of the most wide-spread processes used in metal joining. However, there are currently no open-source software implementations for the simulation of microstructural evolution during a weld pass. Here we describe a Potts Monte Carlo based model implemented in the SPPARKS kinetic Monte Carlo computational framework. The model simulates melting, solidification and solid-state microstructural evolution of material in the fusion and heat-affected zones of a weld. The model does not simulate thermal behavior, but rather utilizes user input parameters to specify weld pool and heat-affect zone properties. Weld pool shapes are specified by Bézier curves, which allow for the specification of a wide range of pool shapes. Pool shapes can range from narrow and deep to wide and shallow representing different fluid flow conditions within the pool. Surrounding temperature gradients are calculated with the aide of a closest point projection algorithm. The model also allows simulation of pulsed power welding through time-dependent variation of the weld pool size. Example simulation results and comparisons with laboratory weld observations demonstrate microstructural variation with weld speed, pool shape, and pulsed-power.

  19. Effect of welding processes on mechanical and microstructural characteristics of high strength low alloy naval grade steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ragu Nathan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Naval grade high strength low alloy (HSLA steels can be easily welded by all types of fusion welding processes. However, fusion welding of these steels leads to the problems such as cold cracking, residual stress, distortion and fatigue damage. These problems can be eliminated by solid state welding process such as friction stir welding (FSW. In this investigation, a comparative evaluation of mechanical (tensile, impact, hardness properties and microstructural features of shielded metal arc (SMA, gas metal arc (GMA and friction stir welded (FSW naval grade HSLA steel joints was carried out. It was found that the use of FSW process eliminated the problems related to fusion welding processes and also resulted in the superior mechanical properties compared to GMA and SMA welded joints.

  20. Low Cycle Fatigue behavior of SMAW welded Alloy28 superaustenitic stainless steel at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kchaou, Y., E-mail: yacinekchaou@yahoo.fr [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, UPR 3346 CNRS ISAE-ENSMA Université de Poitiers, Téléport 2, 1, avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, F – 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Génie des Matériaux et Environnement (LGME), ENIS, BPW 1173, Sfax (Tunisia); Pelosin, V.; Hénaff, G. [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, UPR 3346 CNRS ISAE-ENSMA Université de Poitiers, Téléport 2, 1, avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, F – 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Haddar, N.; Elleuch, K. [Laboratoire de Génie des Matériaux et Environnement (LGME), ENIS, BPW 1173, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-01-10

    This paper focused on the study of Low Cycle Fatigue of welded joints of superaustenitic (Alloy28) stainless steels. Chemical composition and microstructure investigation of Base Metal (BM) and Weld Metal (WM) were identified. The results showed that both of composition is fully austenitic with a dendritic microstructure in the WM. Low cycle fatigue tests at different strain levels were performed on Base Metal (BM) and Welded Joint (WJ) specimens with a strain ratio R{sub ε}=−1. The results indicated that the fatigue life of welded joints is lower than the base metal. This is mainly due to the low ductility of the Welded Metal (WM) and the presence of welding defects. Simultaneously, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observations of fractured specimens show that WJ have brittle behavior compared to BM with the presence of several welding defects especially in the crack initiation site. An estimation of the crack growth rate during LCF tests of BM and WJ was performed using distance between striations. The results showed that the crack initiation stage is shorter in the case of WJ compared to BM because of the presence of welding defects in WJ specimens.

  1. More About Brazing Or Welding NiAl Without Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about two processes for joining, brazing, or welding workpieces made of nickel aluminide alloys, without use of filler metal. Joining processes involve uniform heating in vacuum-controlled furnace. Eliminates internal thermal gradients in workpieces joined and greatly reduces tendency toward cracking.

  2. Welding sequence effects on residual stress distribution in offshore wind monopile structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mehmanparast

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses are often inevitably introduced into the material during the fabrication processes, such as welding, and are known to have significant effects on the subsequent fatigue crack growth behavior of welded structures. In this paper, the importance of welding sequence on residual stress distribution in engineering components has been reviewed. In addition, the findings available in the literature have been used to provide an accurate interpretation of the fatigue crack growth data on specimens extracted from the welded plates employed in offshore wind monopile structures. The results have been discussed in terms of the role of welding sequence in damage inspection and structural integrity assessment of offshore renewable energy structures.

  3. High cycle fatigue of weld repaired cast Ti-6AI-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. B.; Hodi, F. S.; Eagar, T. W.

    1982-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of weld repair on fatigue life of titanium-6Al-4V castings, a series of specimens was exposed to variations in heat treatment, weld procedure, HIP cycle, cooling rate, and surface finish. The results indicate that weld repair is not detrimental to HCF properties as fatigue cracks were located primarily in the base metal. Fine surface finish and large colony size are the primary variables improving the fatigue life. The fusion zone resisted fatigue crack initiation due to a basketweave morphology and thin grain boundary alpha. Multipass welds were shown not to affect fatigue life when compared with single pass welds. A secondary HIP treatment was not detrimental to fatigue properties, but was found to be unnecessary.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Laser-Welded and Diode-Laser-Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, S. M.; Chen, D. L.; Bhole, S. D.; Powidajko, E.; Weckman, D. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2011-07-01

    The microstructures, tensile properties, strain hardening, and fatigue strength of fiber-laser-welded (FLW) and diode-laser-welded (DLW) AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloys were studied. Columnar dendrites near the fusion zone (FZ) boundary and equiaxed dendrites at the center of FZ, with divorced eutectic β-Mg17Al12 particles, were observed. The FLW joints had smaller dendrite cell sizes with a narrower FZ than the DLW joints. The heat-affected zone consisted of recrystallized grains. Although the DLW joints fractured at the center of FZ and exhibited lower yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and fatigue strength, the FLW joints failed at the fusion boundary and displayed only moderate reduction in the YS, UTS, and fatigue strength with a joint efficiency of ~91 pct. After welding, the strain rate sensitivity basically vanished, and the DLW joints exhibited higher strain-hardening capacity. Stage III hardening occurred after yielding in both base metal (BM) and welded samples. Dimple-like ductile fracture characteristics appeared in the BM, whereas some cleavage-like flat facets together with dimples and river marking were observed in the welded samples. Fatigue crack initiated from the specimen surface or near-surface defects, and crack propagation was characterized by the formation of fatigue striations along with secondary cracks.

  5. The fatigue life of a cobalt-chromium alloy after laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayaa, Nabil Jalal Ahmad; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fatigue life of laser welded joints in a commercially available cast cobalt-chromium alloy. Twenty rod shaped specimens (40 mm x 1.5 mm) were cast and sand blasted. Ten specimens were used as controls and the remaining ten were sectioned and repaired using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser welder. All specimens were subjected to fatigue testing (30N - 2Hz) in a controlled environment. A statistically significant difference in median fatigue life was found between as-cast and laser welded specimens (p cracks, pores and constriction of the outer surface in the welded specimens despite 70% penetration of the weld.

  6. A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Mannan, S. L.

    1995-05-01

    A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joints was carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 × 10-3 s-1 with strain amplitudes in the range ±0.20 to ±1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. From TEM, the cyclic softening in weld metal was ascribed to the annihilation of dislocations during LCF. Type 316LN base metal exhibits better fatigue resistance than weld metal at 773 K, whereas the reverse holds true at 873 K. The weld joint shows the lowest life at both temperatures. The better fatigue resistance of weld metal is related to the brittle transformed delta ferrite structure and the high density of dislocations at the interface, which inhibits the growth rate of cracks by deflecting the crack path. The lower fatigue endurance of the weld joint was ascribed to the shortening of the crack initiation phase caused by surface intergranular crack initiation and to the poor

  7. Ultra-fast in-situ X-ray studies of evolving columnar dendrites in solidifying steel weld pools

    OpenAIRE

    Mirihanage, W.U.; Di Michiel, M.; Mathiesen, R.H.

    2015-01-01

    High-brilliance polychromatic synchrotron radiation has been used to conduct in-situ studies of the solidification microstructure evolution during simulated welding. The welding simulations were realized by rapidly fusing ~ 5 mm spot in Fe-Cr-Ni steel. During the solid- liquid-solid phase transformations, a section of the weld pool was placed in an incident 50-150 keV polychromatic synchrotron X-ray beam, in a near-horizontal position at a very low inclination angle. Multiple high-resolution ...

  8. Analysis of Internal Cracks in Continuous Casting Slabs with Soft Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Jiongming; Xiao, Chao; Wang, Shunxi; Song, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The formation of internal cracks in continuous casting slabs is mainly attributed to the strain status and microsegregation near the solidifying front of the slabs. By analyzing the internal cracks of medium carbon microalloy steel, the obtained conclusions are that C, P, S, etc. enrich in dendrites and exist in grain boundaries, but these are just the internal causes, and the root cracking causes the tensile stress of solidification front. When the slab passes through the straightening segments, the liquid core thickness is large, and the liquid steel in the space of columnar crystals is not completely frozen. Therefore, the reduction effect of rollers results in the strain of solidification front exceeding the critical value. However, the corresponding strain in the arc and horizontal segments does not exceed this critical value, so the solidification front in the straightening segments would be much easy to crack. The statistics analysis shows that after soft reduction and straightening process are separately carried out, the occurrence rate of intermediate cracks is reduced by 41.3%.

  9. Effects of Friction Stir Welding Speed on AA2195 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ho-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of friction stir welding (FSW to aerospace has grown rapidly due to the high efficiency and environmental friendly nature of the process. FSW is achieved by plastic flow of frictionally heated material in solid state and offers many advantages of avoiding hot cracking and limiting component distortion. Recently low density, high modulus and high strength AA2195 are used as substitute for conventional aluminum alloys since the weight saving is critical in aerospace applications. One of the problems for this alloy is weld metal porosity formation leading to hot cracking. Combination of FSW and AA2195 provides synergy effect to improve mechanical properties and weight saving of aerospace structure such as cryogenic fuel tanks for launch systems. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of friction stir welding speed on mechanical and microstructural properties of AA2195. The friction stir welded materials were joined with four different tool rotation speeds (350~800 rpm and five welding speeds (120~360 mm/min, which are the two prime welding parameters in this process.

  10. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

  11. Effect of welding speed on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of laser welded-brazed Al/brass dissimilar joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Luo, L. Y.; Tan, C. W.; Li, Z. Y.; Song, X. G.; Zhao, H. Y.; Huang, Y. X.; Feng, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    Laser welding-brazing process was developed for joining 5052 aluminum alloy and H62 brass in butt configuration with Zn-15%Al filler. Effect of welding speed on microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of joints were investigated. Acceptable joints without obvious defect were obtained with the welding speed of 0.5-0.6 m/min, while lower and higher welding speed caused excessive back reinforcement and cracking, respectively. Three reaction layers were observed at welding speed of 0.3 m/min, which were Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 (τ‧)/Al4Cu9/CuZn from weld seam side to brass side; while at welding speed of 0.4-0.6 m/min, two layers Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 and CuZn formed. The thickness of interfacial reaction layers increased with the decrease of welding speed, but varied little at different interfacial positions from top to bottom in one joint. Tensile test results indicated that the maximum joint tensile strength of 128 MPa was obtained at 0.5 m/min, which was 55.7% of that of Al base metal. All the joints fractured along the weld seam/brass interface. Some differences were found regarding fracture locations with three and two reaction layers. The joint fractured between Al4Cu9 and τ‧ IMC layer when the interface had three layers, while the crack occurred between CuZn and τ‧ phase in the case of two layers.

  12. Heat sink welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes to control distortion and residual stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Div., Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-07-01

    Construction of India's Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) involves extensive welding of austenitic stainless steels pipes of different dimensions. Due to high thermal expansion coefficient and poor thermal conductivity of this class of steels, welding can result in significant distortion of these pipes. Attempts to arrest this distortion can lead to high levels of residual stresses in the welded parts. Heat sink welding is one of the techniques often employed to minimize distortion and residual stress in austenitic stainless steel pipe welding. This technique has also been employed to repair welding of the piping of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) subjected to radiation induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In the present study, a comparison of the distortion in two pipe welds, one made with heat sink welding and another a normal welds. Pipes of dimensions 350{phi} x 250(L) x 8(t) mm was fabricated from 316LN plates of dimensions 1100 x 250 x 8 mm by bending and long seam (L-seam) welding by SMAW process. Two fit ups with a root gap of 2 mm, land height of 1mm and a groove angle of 70 were prepared using these pipes for circumferential seam (C-seam) welding. Dimensions at predetermined points in the fit up were made before and after welding to check the variation in radius, circumference and and ovality of the pipes. Root pass for both the pipe fit up were carried out using conventional GTAW process with 1.6 mm AWS ER 16-8-2 as consumables. Welding of one of the pipe fit ups were completed using conventions GTAW process while the other was completed using heat sink welding. For second and subsequent layers of welding using this process, water was sprayed at the root side of the joint while welding was in progress. Flow rate of the water was {proportional_to}6 1/minute. Welding parameters employed were same as those used for the other pipe weld. Results of the dimensional measurements showed that there is no circumferential shrinkage in

  13. Effects of the Electron Beam Welding Process on the Microstructure, Tensile, Fatigue and Fracture Properties of Nickel Alloy Nimonic 80A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Huang, Chongxiang; Guan, Zhongwei; Li, Jiukai; Liu, Yongjie; Chen, Ronghua; Wang, Qingyuan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate rotary bending high-cycle fatigue properties and crack growth of Nimonic 80A-based metal and electron beam-welded joints. All the tests were performed at room temperature. Fracture surfaces under high-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack growth were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Microstructure, hardness and tensile properties were also evaluated in order to understand the effects on the fatigue results obtained. It was found that the tensile properties, hardness and high-cycle fatigue properties of the welded joint are lower than the base metal. The fracture surface of the high-cycle fatigue shows that fatigue crack initiated from the surface under the high stress amplitude and from the subsurface under the low stress amplitude. The effect of the welding process on the statistical fatigue data was studied with a special focus on probabilistic life prediction and probabilistic lifetime limits. The fatigue crack growth rate versus stress intensity factor range data were obtained from the fatigue crack growth tests. From the results, it was evident that the fatigue crack growth rates of the welded are higher than the base metal. The mechanisms and fracture modes of fatigue crack growth of welded specimens were found to be related to the stress intensity factor range ΔK. In addition, the effective fatigue crack propagation thresholds and mismatch of welded joints were described and discussed.

  14. Non newtonian annular alloy solidification in mould

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraga, Nelson O.; Garrido, Carlos P. [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, La Serena (Chile); Castillo, Ernesto F. [Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-08-15

    The annular solidification of an aluminium-silicon alloy in a graphite mould with a geometry consisting of horizontal concentric cylinders is studied numerically. The analysis incorporates the behavior of non-Newtonian, pseudoplastic (n=0.2), Newtonian (n=1), and dilatant (n=1.5) fluids. The fluid mechanics and heat transfer coupled with a transient model of convection diffusion are solved using the finite volume method and the SIMPLE algorithm. Solidification is described in terms of a liquid fraction of a phase change that varies linearly with temperature. The final results make it possible to infer that the fluid dynamics and heat transfer of solidification in an annular geometry are affected by the non-Newtonian nature of the fluid, speeding up the process when the fluid is pseudoplastic. (orig.)

  15. Non Newtonian annular alloy solidification in mould

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraga, Nelson O.; Castillo, Ernesto F.; Garrido, Carlos P.

    2012-08-01

    The annular solidification of an aluminium-silicon alloy in a graphite mould with a geometry consisting of horizontal concentric cylinders is studied numerically. The analysis incorporates the behavior of non-Newtonian, pseudoplastic ( n = 0.2), Newtonian ( n = 1), and dilatant ( n = 1.5) fluids. The fluid mechanics and heat transfer coupled with a transient model of convection diffusion are solved using the finite volume method and the SIMPLE algorithm. Solidification is described in terms of a liquid fraction of a phase change that varies linearly with temperature. The final results make it possible to infer that the fluid dynamics and heat transfer of solidification in an annular geometry are affected by the non-Newtonian nature of the fluid, speeding up the process when the fluid is pseudoplastic.

  16. Rapid solidification of Nb-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, A. B.; Javed, K. R.; Abbaschian, G. J.; Lewis, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    New Nb-base alloys are of interest for aerospace structural applications at high temperatures, viz, 800 to 1650 C. Fundamental information regarding the effects of rapid solidification in achieving greatly refined microstructures, extended solid solubility, suppression of embrittling equilibrium phases, and formation of new phases is desired in a number of Nb-X alloys. The microstructures and selected properties of Nb-Si and other Nb-base alloys are presented for materials both rapidly quenched from the equilibrium liquidus and rapidly solidified following deep supercooling. Electromagnetic levitation was used to achieve melting and supercooling in a containerless inert gas environment. A variety of solidification conditions were employed including splatting or drop casting of supercooled samples. The morphology and composition of phases formed are discussed in terms of both solidification history and bulk composition.

  17. Hot cracking of ZRE1 alloy in constant joint stiffness condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Adamiec

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ZRE1 alloy with addition of Zn, Zr and rare earth elements is gravity casted to sand casting moulds, and is used mainly in aerospace and automotive industries. Magnesium alloy castings often have defects, such as misruns and micro-shrinkage. This defects are repaired with welding and overlay welding techniques. Main practical difficulty during welding of magnesium alloys is their susceptibility to hot cracking in the crystallization process.The paper intends to evaluate susceptibility of magnesium alloys to hot cracking and examine influence of heat treatment on cracking of the ZRE1 magnesium alloy with addition of zinc and rare earth elements during welding in conditions of constant stiffness. The results of tests of susceptibility to hot cracking of repair welding joints of ZRE1 alloy castings have been described.The range of research has included the Fisco test and metallographic tests. It has been observed that heat treatment decreases susceptibility of the ZRE1 alloy to hot cracking.

  18. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  19. Effect of Water Depth on the Underwater Wet Welding of Ferritic Steels Using Austenitic Ni-Based Alloy Electrodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheakley, Brian

    2000-01-01

    ...), slag inclusions, oxide inclusions, and porosity. To avoid underbead cracking three weld samples were made using an austenitic nickel weld metal with an Oxylance coating at 10 feet of salt water, 25 feet of salt water, and 33 feet of salt water...

  20. Solidificação da zona de fusão na soldagem do AISI 304 com inconel 600 por laser de Nd: YAG Microstructure development in Nd: YAG laser welding of AISI 304 and Inconel 600

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício David M. das Neves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho estudou-se a morfologia de solidificação da zona de fusão, numa junta formada a partir de materiais dissimilares, composta por aço inoxidável austenítico AISI 304 e por liga de níquel Inconel 600, soldada com laser pulsado de Nd:YAG. Os parâmetros do feixe laser e do sistema óptico foram selecionados, visando obter uma solda com penetração total e bom acabamento superficial. A caracterização microestrutural foi realizada por microscopia ótica, onde se observou uma zona de fusão com penetração total do tipo keyhole, a presença de pequenos poros e a ausência de trincas. As juntas soldadas foram caracterizadas também, por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV. Medidas realizadas por espectrometria de raios X por dispersão de energia na zona de fusão indicaram uma distribuição levemente heterogênea de níquel e ferro. Observou-se que o início de solidificação da zona de fusão ocorreu por meio de crescimento epitaxial. A morfologia de solidificação da ZF foi basicamente dendrítica e celular sendo, influenciada pelo gradiente de temperatura, velocidade de solidificação e composição química. As variações de composição química e da morfologia de solidificação não alteraram significativamente os valores de microdureza Vickers na zona de fusão. Resultados obtidos nos ensaios de tração indicaram valores de eficiência de soldagem adequados.An autogenous laser welding of dissimilar materials involving AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels and Inconel 600 nickel alloy was investigated in this study. Hence, the aim of this investigation was to study the solidification and microstructure of fusion zone when using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The laser and optical beam parameters were chosen to achieve a good weld with total penetration. Optical microscopy pictures showed a typical keyhole weld with total penetration, small pores and free of cracks. The x-ray spectrometry by energy dispersion

  1. Correlation of Stress Concentration Factors for T-Welded Connections – Finite Element Simulations and Fatigue Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Terán Méndez

    Full Text Available Abstract The stress concentration factors (SCFs in welded connections usually occur at zones with high stress levels. Stress concentrations reduce the fatigue behavior of welded connections in offshore structures and cracking can develop. By using the grinding technique, cracking can be eliminated. Stress concentration factors are defined as a ratio of maximum stress at the intersection to nominal stress on the brace. Defining the stress concentration factor is an important stage in the fatigue behavior of welded connections. Several approaches have evolved for designing structures with the classical S-N approach for estimating total life. This work correlates to the stress concentration factors of T-welded connections and the fatigue behavior. Stress concentration factors were computed with the finite element employing 3D T-welded connections with intact and grinding depth conditions. Then, T-welded connections were constructed with A36 plate steel and welded with E6013 electrodes to obtain the stress-life (S-N approach. The methodology from previous works was used to compute the SCF and fabricate the T-welded connections. The results indicated that the grinding process could restore the fatigue life of the T-welded connections for SCFs values in the range of 1.29. This value can be considered to be a low SCF value in T-welded connection. However, for higher SCF values, the fatigue life decreased, compromising and reducing the structural integrity of the T-welded connections.

  2. The mechanism of hot crack formation in Ti-6A1-4V during cold crucible continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng DING

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Hot crack is one of common defects in castings, which often results in failure of castings. This work studies the formation of hot cracks during cold crucible continous casting by means of experiments and thoretical analysis. The results show that the hot crack occurs on the surface and in the circumference of ingots, where the solidified shell and solidification front meet each other. The tendency of hot cracking decreases with the increase of withdrawal velocities in some extent. The hot crack is caused mainly by friction force between the shell and the crucible inner wall, and it takes place when the stress resulting from friction exceeds the tensile strength of the shell. The factors affecting the hot cracks are analyzed and verified. In order to decrease the tendency of hot cracks, technical parameters should be optimized.

  3. A moving boundary solution for solidification of lava lake and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the solidification of a lava lake heat is released convectively from the top surface as well as conductively into the country rock from the base, leading to non-uniform solidification. The upper solidified layer grows at a faster rate than the lower solidified layer. Similarly, solidification of magma intrusion within the crust is ...

  4. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  5. Failure analyses and weld repair of boiler feed water pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulpen, R. van [KemaPower Generation, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    During a regular inspection of the Boiler Auxiliaries at one of the Dutch Electricity Production Companies serious cracks were found in the cover and casings of the feed water circulation pumps in two units after 108.000 and 122.000 hours of boiler operation. Kema Laboratories carried out Failure analyses on boat samples at the cracked areas. Corrosion fatigue cracking was found on the inner side of the GS-24CrNiMo325 casing. Shop Weld repairs were carried out using a newly developed mechanized Plasma Welding Technique. The repaired feed water circulation pumps showed no problems alter several years of operation. The costs of repair were substantially lower than the costs of replacement. (orig.) 3 refs.

  6. Development of field welding technology for rails; Tetsudo rail no genchi yoyu yosetsu gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M.; Karimine, K.; Uchino, K.; Yurioka, N. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    A new element technology is outlined which is for welding regular rails in the field and making a long rail. A new EAW (Enclosed Arc Welding) has been developed for the purpose of improving vibration and noise due to the local abrasion of the existing EAW and improving the deterioration of resistibility against rolling fatigue breakage and the generation of transverse fissure due to the high temperature liquefaction crack. It has been verified that a highly carbonized metal improves the local abrasion and the generation of crack. Problems were brought up, in the case of welding rails by thermit welding (TW) utilizing the reaction of Al powder and brown iron oxide, such that strength was rather small against the bending fatigue of a joint and that the soundness of internal property of a welded part was likely to fluctuate. A test was carried out concerning the latter problem, and it was revealed that the temperature to pour molten steel dropped, whether the Al compound was insufficient or excessive, possibly causing reaction defects. As a technology to replace EAW and TW techniques, an automatic welding was developed which combinedly used narrow groove electro-slag welding and gas sealed arc welding. Further, as an after-treatment of this technology, a method was developed to remove a weld overlay. 19 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  8. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  9. Sensitivity of Liquation Cracking to Deposition Parameters and Residual Stresses in Laser Deposited IN718 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaocheng; Yang, Li; Chen, Tingyi; Pang, Song; Zhang, Weihui

    2017-10-01

    The laser deposited IN718 alloys were fabricated with laser cladding system under different conditions to estimate the sensitivity of weld metal liquation cracking. The microstructure and the crack characterization of the laser deposited IN718 alloy were investigated, and the effect of metallurgical factors and residual stress on the crack sensitivity was analyzed. The results showed that the continuous dendritic Laves was precipitated and formed a Lave-austenite interface with ambiguous nanohardness distribution. The weld metal liquation cracking was propagated along the laser scanning direction and the buildup direction in the laser deposited IN718 alloy simultaneously, and the Nb-/Mo-riched fine granular clusters were formed in the crack surface. The precipitation amount of the coarse eutectic phases, presented as dendrite or network, was increased in the laser deposited alloy fabricated with IN718/C-Fe-Cr composite powder and slow cooling rate. The total crack length and the maximum crack length were decreased by increasing cooling rate, and the transverse residual stress was increased with increasing buildup layer number. The crack sensitivity of the laser deposited IN718 alloy was increased by the crack initiation provided by the metallurgical defects and the eutectic phases with low melting temperatures, and then, crack propagated along the continuous phase under the transverse residual stress.

  10. Sensitivity of Liquation Cracking to Deposition Parameters and Residual Stresses in Laser Deposited IN718 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaocheng; Yang, Li; Chen, Tingyi; Pang, Song; Zhang, Weihui

    2017-11-01

    The laser deposited IN718 alloys were fabricated with laser cladding system under different conditions to estimate the sensitivity of weld metal liquation cracking. The microstructure and the crack characterization of the laser deposited IN718 alloy were investigated, and the effect of metallurgical factors and residual stress on the crack sensitivity was analyzed. The results showed that the continuous dendritic Laves was precipitated and formed a Lave-austenite interface with ambiguous nanohardness distribution. The weld metal liquation cracking was propagated along the laser scanning direction and the buildup direction in the laser deposited IN718 alloy simultaneously, and the Nb-/Mo-riched fine granular clusters were formed in the crack surface. The precipitation amount of the coarse eutectic phases, presented as dendrite or network, was increased in the laser deposited alloy fabricated with IN718/C-Fe-Cr composite powder and slow cooling rate. The total crack length and the maximum crack length were decreased by increasing cooling rate, and the transverse residual stress was increased with increasing buildup layer number. The crack sensitivity of the laser deposited IN718 alloy was increased by the crack initiation provided by the metallurgical defects and the eutectic phases with low melting temperatures, and then, crack propagated along the continuous phase under the transverse residual stress.

  11. Design of Laser Welding Parameters for Joining Ti Grade 2 and AW 5754 Aluminium Alloys Using Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Behúlová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining of dissimilar Al-Ti alloys is very interesting from the point of view of weight reduction of components and structures in automotive or aerospace industries. In the dependence on cooling rate and chemical composition, rapid solidification of Al-Ti alloys during laser welding can lead to the formation of metastable phases and brittle intermetallic compounds that generally reduce the quality of produced weld joints. The paper deals with design and testing of welding parameters for preparation of weld joints of two sheets with different thicknesses from titanium Grade 2 and AW 5754 aluminium alloy. Temperature fields developed during the formation of Al-Ti butt joints were investigated by numerical simulation in ANSYS software. The influence of laser welding parameters including the laser power and laser beam offset on the temperature distribution and weld joint formation was studied. The results of numerical simulation were verified by experimental temperature measurement during laser beam welding applying the TruDisk 4002 disk laser. The microstructure of produced weld joints was assessed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. EDX analysis was applied to determine the change in chemical composition across weld joints. Mechanical properties of weld joints were evaluated using tensile tests and Vickers microhardness measurements.

  12. Failure investigations of failed valve plug SS410 steel due to cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyankar, V. D.; Deshmukh, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    Premature and sudden in service failure of a valve plug due to crack formation, applied in power plant has been investigated. The plug was tempered and heat treated, the crack was originated at centre, developed along the axis and propagates radially towards outer surface of plug. The expected life of the component is 10-15 years while, the component had failed just after the installation that is, within 3 months of its service. No corrosion products were observed on the crack interface and on the failed surface; hence, causes of corrosion failure are neglected. This plug of level separator control valve, is welded to the stem by means of plasma-transferred arc welding and as there is no crack observed at the welding zone, the failure due to welding residual stresses are also neglected. The failed component discloses exposed surface of a crack interface that originated from centre and propagates radially. The micro-structural observation, hardness testing, and visual observation are carried out of the specimen prepared from the failed section and base portion. The microstructure from the cracked interface showed severe carbide formation along the grain boundaries. From the microstructural analysis of the failed sample, it is observed that there is a formation of acicular carbides along the grain boundaries due to improper tempering heat treatment.

  13. Quantification of Residual Stresses in External Attachment Welding Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhajri, R.; Liu, S.; Yu, Z.

    2017-01-01

    It is uncertain whether postweld heat treatment (PWHT) should be required for external attachment welds in petrochemical industry applications where stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a possibility. An industrial criterion established by NACE SP0472 indicates that PWHT is not required if residual...... stresses don’t extend through the entire thickness. To investigate this problem, a finite-element analysis (FEA) software, Sysweld™, was utilized to analyze the extent and level of residual stresses of such welds through the thickness of the pressure vessel shell. The study also used the gas metal arc...... welding (GMAW) process to deposit single beadonplate welds with ER70S6 wire on ASTM516 grade 70 pressure vessel steel plates of 6.3, 12.7, and 19 mm thicknesses. Microstructural analysis, temperature, and distortion measurements of weldments were performed to qualify the FEA modeling results. In addition...

  14. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  15. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  16. Modeling of laser welding of steel and titanium plates with a composite insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, V. I.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Shapeev, V. P.

    2017-10-01

    A 3D model of laser welding proposed before by the authors was extended to the case of welding of metallic plates made of dissimilar materials with a composite multilayer intermediate insert. The model simulates heat transfer in the welded plates and takes into account phase transitions. It was proposed to select the composition of several metals and dimensions of the insert to avoid the formation of brittle intermetallic phases in the weld joint negatively affecting its strength properties. The model accounts for key physical phenomena occurring during the complex process of laser welding. It is capable to calculate temperature regimes at each point of the plates. The model can be used to select the welding parameters reducing the risk of formation of intermetallic plates. It can forecast the dimensions and crystalline structure of the solidified melt. Based on the proposed model a numerical algorithm was constructed. Simulations were carried out for the welding of titanium and steel plates with a composite insert comprising four different metals: copper and niobium (intermediate plates) with steel and titanium (outer plates). The insert is produced by explosion welding. Temperature fields and the processes of melting, evaporation, and solidification were studied.

  17. Simulation of inverse heat conduction problems in fusion welding with extended analytical heat source models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkhin, V. A.; Pittner, A.; Schwenk, C.; Rethmeier, M.

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents bounded volume heat sources and the corresponding functional-analytical expressions for the temperature field. The power density distributions considered here are normal, exponential and parabolic. The sources model real heat sources like the welding arc, laser beam, electron beam, etc., the convection in the weld pool as well as the latent heat due to fusion and solidification. The parameters of the heat source models are unknown a priori and have to be evaluated by solving an inverse heat conduction problem. The functional-analytical technique for calculating 3D temperature fields in butt welding is developed. The proposed technique makes it possible to reduce considerably the total time for data input and solution. It is demonstrated with an example of laser beam welding of steel plates.

  18. Fracture mechanics characterisation of the WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel beltline welding seam of Greifswald unit 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehrig, Hans-Werner; Schuhknecht, Jan [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    WWER-440 second generation (V-213) reactor pressure vessels (RPV) were produced by IZHORA in Russia and by SKODA in the former Czechoslovakia. The surveillance Charpy-V and fracture mechanics SE(B) specimens of both producers have different orientations. The main difference is the crack extension direction which is through the RPV thickness and circumferential for ISHORA and SKODA RPV, respectively. In particular for the investigation of weld metal from multilayer submerged welding seams the crack extension direction is of importance. Depending on the crack extension direction in the specimen there are different welding beads or a uniform structure along the crack front. The specimen orientation becomes more important when the fracture toughness of the weld metal is directly determined on surveillance specimens according to the Master Curve (MC) approach as standardised in the ASTM Standard Test Method E1921. This approach was applied on weld metal of the RPV beltline welding seam of Greifswald Unit 8 RPV. Charpy size SE(B) specimens from 13 locations equally spaced over the thickness of the welding seam were tested. The specimens are in TL and TS orientation. The fracture toughness values measured on the SE(B) specimens with both orientations follow the course of the MC. Nearly all values lie within the fracture toughness curves for 5% and 95% fracture probability. There is a strong variation of the reference temperature T{sub 0} though the thickness of the welding seam, which can be explained with structural differences. The scatter is more pronounced for the TS SE(B) specimens. It can be shown that specimens with TS and TL orientation in the welding seam have a differentiating and integrating behaviour, respectively. The statistical assumptions behind the MC approach are valid for both specimen orientations even if the structure is not uniform along the crack front. By comparison crack extension, JR, curves measured on SE(B) specimens with TL and TS orientation

  19. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  20. Measurement and Analysis of the Diffusible Hydrogen in Underwater Wet Welding Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The diffusible hydrogen in steel weldments is one of the main reasons that led to hydrogen assisted cracking. In this paper, the results of literatures survey and preliminary tests of the diffusible hydrogen in underwater wet welding joint were presented. A fluid-discharge method of for measuring the diffusible hydrogen in weldment was introduced in detail. Two kinds of underwater welding electrode diffusible hydrogen are 26.5 mL/100g and 35.5 mL/100g by fluid-discharge method, which are high levels. The diffusible hydrogen of underwater welding is higher than atmospheric welding, and the result is closely related to welding material. The best way to control the diffusible hydrogen is adjusting welding material and improving fluidity of slag.

  1. Laser beam welding of titanium nitride coated titanium using pulse-shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Sergio Fernandes de Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new welding method which allows the assembly of two titanium nitride coated titanium parts is proposed. The welding procedure utilizes the possibility for pulse-shaping in order to change the energy distribution profile during the laser pulse. The pulse-shaping is composed of three elements: a a short high power pulse for partial ablation at the surface; b a long pulse for thermal penetration; and c a quenching slope for enhanced weldability. The combination of these three elements produces crack-free welds. The weld microstructure is changed in comparison to normal welding, i.e. with a rectangular pulse, as the nitrogen and the microhardness are more homogenously distributed in the weld under pulse-shaping conditions. This laser pulse dissolves the TiN layer and allows nitrogen to diffuse into the melt pool, also contributing to an enhanced weldability by providing suitable thermal conditions.

  2. Dendritic Solidification in a Copper Nickel Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    DÜNDAR, Sacit

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of nickel in dendrite arms and in interdendritic regions of copper-10% nickel alloy solidified under production conditions designed to provide 4 different cooling rates was investigated. The results indicate that at different rates of solidification undercooling, diffusion and convection mechanisms affect the microsegregation of nickel and copper in the cast materials to various extents.

  3. Polymer Solidification Technology - Technical Issues and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Charles [Diversified Technologies Services, Inc., Knoxville (United States); Kim, Juyoul [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Many factors come into play, most of which are discovered and resolved only during full-scale solidification testing of each of the media commonly used in nuclear power plants. Each waste stream is unique, and must be addressed accordingly. This testing process is so difficult that Diversified's Vinyl Ester Styrene and Advanced Polymer Solidification are the only two approved processes in the United States today. This paper summarizes a few of the key obstacles that must be overcome to achieve a reliable, repeatable process for producing an approved Stable Class B and C waste form. Before other solidification and encapsulation technologies can be considered compliant with the requirements of a Stable waste form, the tests, calculations and reporting discussed above must be conducted for both the waste form and solidification process used to produce the waste form. Diversified's VERI{sup TM} and APS{sup TM} processes have gained acceptance in the UK. These processes have also been approved and gained acceptance in the U. S. because we have consistently overcome technical hurdles to produce a complaint product. Diversified Technologies processes are protected intellectual property. In specific instances, we have patents pending on key parts of our process technology.

  4. Microstructure Development during Solidification of Aluminium Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruvalcaba Jimenez, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    This Thesis demonstrates studies on microstructure development during the solidification of aluminium alloys. New insights of structure development are presented here. Experimental techniques such as quenching and in-situ High-brilliance X-ray microscopy were utilized to study the microstructure

  5. Characterization of the mechanical properties and structural integrity of T-welded connections repaired by grinding and wet welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terán, G., E-mail: gteran@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Cuamatzi-Meléndez, R., E-mail: rcuamatzi@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Albiter, A., E-mail: aalbiter@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Maldonado, C., E-mail: cmzepeda@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, UMSNH, PO Box 52-B, 58000, México (Mexico); Bracarense, A.Q., E-mail: bracarense@ufmg.br [UFMG Departamento de Engeharia Mecánica Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental methodology to characterize the structural integrity and mechanical properties of repaired T-welded connections using in fixed offshore structures. Grinding is employed to remove localized damage like cracking and corrosion and subsequent wet welding can be used to fill the grinded material. But it is important to define the grinding depth and profile in order to maintain structural integrity during the repair. Therefore, in this work different grinding depths were performed, for damage material removal, at the weld toe of the T-welded connections. The grinding was filled by wet welding in a hyperbaric chamber, simulating three different water depths: 50 m, 70 m and 100 m. The electrodes were coated with vinilic varnish, which is cheap and easy to apply. The characterization of the mechanical properties of the T-welded connections was done with standard tensile, hardness and Charpy tests; microstructure and porosity analysis were also performed. The samples were obtained from the welded connections in regions of the wet weld beads. The test results were compared with the mechanical properties of the T-welded connections welded in air conditions performed by other authors. The results showed that the wet welding technique performed in this work produced good mechanical properties of the repaired T-welded connection. The mechanical properties, measured in wet conditions, for 6 mm grinding depth, were similar for the 3 different water depths measured in air conditions. But for 10 mm grinding depth, the values of the mechanical properties measured in wet conditions were quite lower than that for air conditions for the 3 water depths. However a porosity analysis, performed with a Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), showed that the level of porosity in the resulted wet weld beads is in the range of that published in the literature and some samples revealed lower level of porosity. The main resulting microstructure was polygonal

  6. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  7. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  8. Crack sealer fill characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory testing was conducted to determine the extent of crack fill for crack sealers composed of methyl methacrylate, : epoxy, urethane, and high molecular weight methacrylate. The test specimens consisted of eight-inch long concrete : cylinders ...

  9. Fatigue life estimation in welded joints under multiaxial loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Vantadori

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Welded joints are frequently locations for cracks initiation and propagation that may cause fatigue failure of engineering structures. Biaxial or triaxial stress-strain states are present in the vicinity of welded joints, due to local geometrical constraints, welding processes and/or multiaxial external loadings. Fatigue life evaluation of welded joints under multiaxial proportional (in-phase cyclic loading can be performed by using conventional hypotheses (e.g. see the von Mises criterion or the Tresca criterion on the basis of local approaches. On the contrary, the fatigue life predictions of welded joints under non-proportional (out-ofphase cyclic loading are generally unsafe if these conventional hypotheses are used. A criterion initially proposed by the authors for smooth and notched structural components has been extended to the fatigue assessment of welded joints. In more detail, fatigue life of welded joints under multiaxial stress states can be evaluated by considering a nonlinear combination of the shear stress amplitude (acting on the critical plane and the amplitude and the mean value of the normal stress (acting on the critical plane. In the present paper, fatigue lifetimes predicted through the proposed criterion are compared with experimental fatigue life data available in the literature, related to fatigue biaxial tests.

  10. Alternative welding reconditioning solutions without post welding heat treatment of pressure vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicic, D. T.; Rontescu, C.; Bogatu, A. M.; Dijmărescu, M. C.

    2017-08-01

    In pressure vessels, working on high temperature and high pressure may appear some defects, cracks for example, which may lead to failure in operation. When these nonconformities are identified, after certain examination, testing and result interpretation, the decision taken is to repair or to replace the deteriorate component. In the current legislation it’s stipulated that any repair, alteration or modification to an item of pressurised equipment that was originally post-weld heat treated after welding (PWHT) should be post-weld heat treated again after repair, requirement that cannot always be respected. For that reason, worldwide, there were developed various welding repair techniques without PWHT, among we find the Half Bead Technique (HBT) and Controlled Deposition Technique (CDT). The paper presents the experimental results obtained by applying the welding reconditioning techniques HBT and CDT in order to restore as quickly as possible the pressure vessels made of 13CrMo4-5. The effects of these techniques upon the heat affected zone are analysed, the graphics of the hardness variation are drawn and the resulted structures are compared in the two cases.

  11. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  12. Effect of temporal pulse shaping on the reduction of laser weld defects in a Pd-Ag-Sn dental alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, C; Poulon-Quintin, A

    2011-03-01

    To describe the influence of pulse shaping on the behavior of a palladium-based dental alloy during laser welding and to show how its choice is effective to promote good weld quality. Single spots, weld beads and welds with 80% overlapping were performed on Pd-Ag-Sn cast plates. A pulsed Nd:Yag laser was used with a specific welding procedure using all the possibilities for pulse-shaping: (1) the square pulse shape as the default setting, (2) a rising edge slope for gradual heating, (3) a falling edge slope to slow the cooling and (4) a combination of a rising and falling edges called bridge shape. The optimization of the pulse shape is supposed to enhance weldability and produce defect-free welds (cracks, pores…) Vickers microhardness measurements were made on cross sections of the welds. A correlation between laser welding parameters and microstructure evolution was found. Hot cracking and internal porosities were systematically detected when using rapid cooling. The presence of these types of defects was significantly reduced with the slow cooling of the molten pool. The best weld quality was obtained with the use of the bridge shape. The use of a slow cooling ramp is the only way to significantly reduce the presence of typical defects within the welds for this Pd-based alloy studied. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. New Method for Mitigating the Tensile Residual Stresses induced on the Inside Wall of Butt Welded Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Kang Soo; Kim, Ki Baik; Kim, Kwang Mo; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Because dissimilar metal welding between ferritic steel and austenitic stainless steel needs not post weld heat treatment (PWHT), the effect of residual stresses induce during the welding should be investigated to assess the reliability of the weld process. It is known that the A82/182 weld metals, which are used for filler metals of the butt welding between the ferritic steel pipe and the stainless steel pipe, are susceptible to PWSCC (Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) in PWR plant. The tensile residual stresses on the inside wall of the pipe, which are induced during the production welding, tend to be the dominant driving force for the PWSCC initiation and crack growth. In order to prevent the PWSCC the tensile residual stresses should be mitigated or removed. Two methods, weld overlay and mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP) have been considered proper tools to reduce the tensile residual stresses and to mitigate the PWSCC susceptibility of the dissimilar metal welded nozzles and pipes. In this research, new method for mitigating the tensile residual stresses induced on the inside wall of pipe during the production welding between the ferritic steel pipe and the stainless steel pipe was suggested. This new method may be able to apply to the SA508 /A182/SS316 nozzles of the pressure vessels in PWR to prevent PWSCC susceptibility as another substitute method.

  14. Hydrogen permeation characteristics of welded 316 stainless steel using nickel welding filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, T.; Ikeshoji, T.T.; Suzumura, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Naito, T. [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Low carbon stainless steel of 316L has been utilized for an ultra high vacuum chamber assembled by welding, and it contains 12-15% nickel. We investigate the work of nickel element with hydrogen atoms as the hydrogen catalysis near heat affected zone. Hydrogen permeation tests for welded specimens using nickel filler were performed to prevent from hydrogen embrittlement cracking in the heat affected zone. In this study, the hydrogen permeation technique using an orifice and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) is utilized to measure the hydrogen gas flux in the stainless steel. A stationary hydrogen flux from the stainless steel surface was measured by using a system with an orifice. The hydrogen pressure difference which applied to the specimen was enabled us to maintain constant by constant gas flow rate from the orifice in low pressure vessel. The value of hydrogen permeability, K, at 620K for welded specimen using the nickel filler is 3.62 times 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}s{sup -1}Pa{sup 1/2}. It is 1.9 times grater than that of normal non-welded 316 stainless steel substrate. The value at 520 K for the welded specimen is 7.31 times 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}s{sup -1}Pa{sup 1/2}. It is as same as that of the non-welded substrate. It is considered that the role of nickel at high temperature near 620K is to release hydrogen atom, and the role of nickel at temperature below 520K is to trap hydrogen atoms, and that the weld metal become hydrogen diffusion path. (orig.)

  15. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  16. Experimental assessment of an RFID-based crack sensor for steel structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Martínez-Castro, R.; Jang, S.; Nicholas, J.; Bansal, R.

    2017-08-01

    The use of welded steel cover plates had been a common design practice to increase beam section capacity in regions of high moment for decades. Many steel girder bridges with cover plates are still in service. Steel girder bridges are subject to cyclic loading, which can initiate crack formation at the toe of the weld and reduce beam capacity. Thus, timely detection of fatigue cracks is of utmost importance in steel girder bridge monitoring. To date, crack monitoring methods using in-house radio frequency identification (RFID)-based sensors have been developed to complement visual inspection and provide quantitative information of damage level. Offering similar properties at a reduced cost, commercial ultra-high frequency (UHF) passive RFID tags have been identified as a more financially viable option for pervasive crack monitoring using a dense array of sensors. This paper presents a study on damage sensitivity of low-cost commercial UHF RFID tags for crack detection and monitoring on metallic structures. Using backscatter power as a parameter for damage identification, a crack sensing system has been developed for single and multiple tag configurations for increased sensing pervasiveness. The effect on backscatter power of the existence and stage of crack propagation has been successfully characterized. For further automation of crack detection, a damage index based on the variation of backscatter power has also been established. The tested commercial RFID-based crack sensor contributes to the usage of this technology on steel girder bridges.

  17. Weldability characteristics of shielded metal arc welded high strength quenched and tempered plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R.; Mukerjee, D.; Jha, S.; Narasimhan, K.; Veeraraghavan, R.

    2002-02-01

    High strength, quench and tempered (Q&T) plates having yield strength of a minimum of 670 MPa and conforming to SA 517 Gr. F specification were successfully developed at Rourkela Steel Plant in plates up to 40 mm thickness. The plates are used extensively for the fabrication of impellers, penstocks, excavators, dumpers, and raw material handling devices, where welding is an important processing step. SA 517 Gr. F plates, characterized by a relatively high carbon equivalent (CE: ˜0.6) and alloyed with Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, and V, are susceptible to a crack-sensitive microstructure and cold cracking during welding. In view of the above, the present study investigated the weldability properties of 20 mm thick plates using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Implant and elastic restraint cracking (ERC) tests were carried out to assess the cold cracking resistance of the weld joint under different welding conditions. Preheat of 100 °C, partial or full rebake, and a heat input of 14.9 to 15.4 KJ/cm resulted in static fatigue limit (SFL) values well in excess of the minimum specified yield strength (MSYS) of 670 MPa and a critical restraint intensity (K cr) value of 34,650 MPa, indicating adequate cold cracking resistance. Lamellar tear tests conducted using full thickness plates at heat input levels ranging from 9.7 to 14.4 KJ/cm and weld restraint loads (WRL) of 510 to 685 MPa showed no incidence of lamellar tear upon visual, ultrasonic, and four-section macroexamination. The weld joint, based on optimized welding parameters, exhibited adequate tensile strength (812.4 MPa) and low temperature impact toughness 88.3 and 63.4 J (9.2 and 6.6 kg-m) at -40 °C for weld metal (WM), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) properties, respectively. The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) values of WM and HAZ (0.40 and 0.36 mm, respectively) were superior to that of the parent metal (0.29 mm), indicating adequate resistance of weld joint to brittle fracture. It was concluded that

  18. Laser Beam Welding with High-Frequency Beam Oscillation: Welding of Dissimilar Materials with Brilliant Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraetzsch, Mathias; Standfuss, Jens; Klotzbach, Annett; Kaspar, Joerg; Brenner, Berndt; Beyer, Eckhard

    Brilliant laser beam sources in connection with a high frequent beam oscillation make it now possible to join metallic material combinations, which have been conventionally non-laser weldable up to now. It concerns especially such combinations like Al- Cu, where brittle intermetallic phases occur. Extreme small weld seam with high aspect ratio leads to very short meld pool life time. These allow an extensive reduction of the heat input. On the other side the melting behavior at metallic mixed joint, seam geometry, meld pool turbulence and solidification behavior can be influenced by a high frequent time-, position- and powercontrolled laser beam oscillation.

  19. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour of gas tungsten arc welds of maraging steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Madhusudhan Reddy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior properties of maraging steels make them suitable for the fabrication of components used for military applications like missile covering, rocket motor casing and ship hulls. Welding is the main process for fabrication of these components, while the maraging steels can be fusion welded using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. All these fabricated components require longer storage life and a major problem in welds is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC. The present study is aimed at studying the SCC behaviour of MDN 250 (18% Ni steel and its welds with respect to microstructural changes. In the present study, 5.2 mm thick sheets made of MDN 250 steel in the solution annealed condition was welded using GTAW process. Post-weld heat treatments of direct ageing (480 °C for 3 h, solutionizing (815 °C for 1 h followed by ageing and homogenizing (1150 °C for 1 h followed by ageing were carried out. A mixture of martensite and austenite was observed in the microstructure of the fusion zone of solutionized and direct aged welds and only martensite in as-welded condition. Homogenization and ageing treatment have eliminated reverted austenite and elemental segregation. Homogenized welds also exhibited a marginal improvement in the corrosion resistance compared to those in the as-welded, solutionized and aged condition. Constant load SCC test data clearly revealed that the failure time of homogenized weld is much longer compared to other post weld treatments, and the homogenization treatment is recommended to improve the SCC life of GTA welds of MDN 250 Maraging steel.

  20. Dendritic microstructure and hot cracking of laser additive manufactured Inconel 718 under improved base cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuan; Lu, Fenggui; Zhang, Ke; Nie, Pulin; Elmi Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Feng, Kai, E-mail: fengkai@sjtu.edu.cn; Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-06-15

    The base cooling effect was improved by imposing the continuous water flow on the back of the substrate during the laser additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 (IN718). The dendritic microstructure, crystal orientation and hot cracking behavior were studied by using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. The results showed that the crystal orientation was increased by increasing the base cooling effect during the deposition. Also, highly ordered columnar dendrites were established, and mono-crystalline texture was constructed in the final clad. It was fund that the effect of solidification cracking on the properties of final clad was negligible since it was only generated at the top region of the deposit, while liquation cracking was produced and remained in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and needed to be carefully controlled. The susceptibility to the liquation cracking showed a high dependence on the grain boundary misorientation, which was considered to be attributed to the stability of interdendritic liquation films, as well as the magnitude of local stress concentration in the last stage of solidification. - Highlights: • The base cooling effect was increased during laser additive manufacturing. • Highly ordered dendrites were established under improved base cooling. • The crystal orientation was increased by improving the base cooling effect. • Liquation cracking tendency was reduced due to the increase of base cooling. • Liquation cracking increased with the increase of grain boundary misorientation.

  1. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  2. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Friction Tapered Stud Overlap Welding for X65 Pipeline Steel Under Wet Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. C.; Jing, H. Y.; Han, Y. D.; Xu, L. Y.

    2017-08-01

    This paper exhibits a novel in situ remediation technique named friction tapered stud overlap welding (FTSOW) to repair a through crack in structures and components in extremely harsh environments. Furthermore, this paper presents variations in process data, including rotational speed, stud displacement, welding force, and torque for a typical FTSOW weld. In the present study, the effects of welding parameters on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the welding joints were investigated. Inapposite welding parameters consisted of low rotational speeds and welding forces, and when utilized, they increased the occurrence of a lack of bonding and unfilled defects within the weld. The microstructures with a welding zone and heat-affected zone mainly consisted of upper bainite. The hardness value was highest in the welding zone and lowest in the base material. During the pull-out tests, all the welds failed in the stud. Moreover, the defect-free welds broke at the interface of the lap plate and substrate during the cruciform uniaxial tensile test. The best tensile test results at different depths and shear tests were 721.6 MPa and 581.9 MPa, respectively. The favorable Charpy impact-absorbed energy was 68.64 J at 0 °C. The Charpy impact tests revealed a brittle fracture characteristic with a large area of cleavage.

  3. Application of infrared imaging for quality inspection in resistance spot welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Wanchuck; Chin, Charles W.; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Hsin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Hanbing; Sklad, Philip S.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared thermal imaging method was applied for the development of a non-destructive inspection technique to determine the quality of resistance spot welds. The current work is an initial feasibility study based on post-mortem inspection. First, resistance spot welds were fabricated on dual phase steel sheets (DP 590 steel) with carefullycontrolled welding parameters. It created welds with desirable and undesirable qualities in terms of nugget size, indentation depth, and voids and cracks. Second, five different heating and cooling methods were evaluated. The heating or cooling source was applied on one side of the weld stack while the surface temperature change on the other side of the weld was recorded using an infrared camera. Correlation between the weld quality and the "thermal signature" of each weld was established. Finally, a simplified thermal finite element analysis was developed to simulate the heat flow during inspection. The thermal model provided insight into the effect of the nugget size and indentation depth on the peak temperature and heating rate. The results reported in this work indicate that the IR thermography technique is feasible for weld quality inspection due to the distinguish temperature profiles for different welds and the repeatability and consistency in measurement.

  4. Effect of Travel Speed and Beam Focus on Porosity in Alloy 690 Laser Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Julie D.; Nolan, Terrance K.; Martin, Anthony J.; Young, George A.

    2012-12-01

    Advances in laser welding technology, including fiber optic delivery and high power density, are increasing the applicability of this joining technique. The inherent benefits of laser welding include small heat-affected zones, minimal distortion, and limited susceptibility to cracking. These advantages are of special interest to next-generation nuclear power systems where welding solute-rich alloys is expected to increase. Alloy 690 (A690) is an advanced corrosion-resistant structural material used in many replacement components and in construction of new commercial power plants. However, the application of A690 is hindered by its difficult weldability using conventional arc welding, and laser welding is a promising alternate. This work studies the effects of travel speed and beam focus on porosity formation in partial penetration, autogenous A690 laser welds. Porosity has been characterized by light optical microscopy and x-ray computed tomography to quantify its percent volume in the welds. This work describes the tradeoff between weld penetration and defect density as a function of beam defocus and travel speed. Additionally, the role of shield gas in porosity formation is discussed to provide a mitigation strategy for A690 laser welding. A process map is provided that shows the optimal combinations of travel speed and beam defocus to minimize porosity and maximize weld penetration at a laser power of 4 kW.

  5. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  6. Modelling of ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT of welded joints and its effect on fatigue strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.L. Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT is a remarkable post-weld technique applying mechanical impacts in combination with ultrasound into the welded joints. In the present work, a 3D simulation method including welding simulation, numerical modelling of UIT-process and an evaluation of fatigue crack growth has been developed. In the FE model, the actual treatment conditions and local mechanical characteristics due to acoustic softening are set as input parameters. The plastic deformation and compressive stress layer are found to be more pronounced when acoustic softening takes place. The predicted internal residual stress distributions of welded joint before and after UIT are compared with experimental results, showing a fairly good agreement with each other. Finally, simulated results of fatigue crack growth in various residual stress fields are well compared with test results, so that the proposed model may provide an effective tool to simulate UIT-process in engineering structures.

  7. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  8. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  9. High-Performance Laser Peening for Effective Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackel, L; Hao-Lin, C; Wong, F; Hill, M

    2002-10-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the Yucca Mountain waste package closure welds is believed to be the greatest threat to long-term containment. Use of stress mitigation to eliminate tensile stresses resulting from welding can prevent SCC. A laser technology with sufficient average power to achieve high throughput has been developed and commercially deployed with high peak power and sufficiently high average power to be an effective laser peening system. An appropriately applied version of this process could be applied to eliminate SCC in the waste package closure welds.

  10. Phase-field modeling of directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echebarria, Blas; Karma, Alain

    2001-06-01

    Phase-field models have become an important tool to simulate interfacial pattern formation in solidification and other systems. Here we investigate the directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy by means of a new phase-field model. The thin interface limit of this model yields a much less stringent restriction on the choice of interface thickness than previous models and permits, in addition, to eliminate non-equilibrium effects at the interface that are typically negligibly small in low growth rate experiments. Simulations of this model are used to investigate the interface evolution far above the onset of morphological instability for realistic values of the physical parameters and to make quantitative comparisons with experiments.

  11. Mold Simulator Study on the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel Near the Corner of Continuous Casting Mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Peisheng; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Haihui

    2017-02-01

    Corner cracks are one of the most widespread surface defects of continuous casting slabs, and they are especially severe for peritectic steels and low-alloy steels. Therefore, a clear understanding of molten steel initial solidification around mold corner would be of great importance for the inhibition of corner cracks. This paper has been conducted with the aim to elucidate this understanding, by using a novel mold simulator equipped with a right-angle copper mold. The responding temperatures and heat fluxes across the mold hot-face and corner were firstly calculated through a 2D-inverse heat conduction program mathematical model, and the results suggested that the cooling ability and the fluctuation of heat fluxes around the mold corner are stronger than those for mold hot-face. With the help of power spectral density analysis and fast Fourier transformation, the four characteristic signals of heat fluxes were discussed in this paper. Next, the relation between the thickness of solidified shell and solidification time was fitted with the solidification square root law; as a result, the average solidification factor bar{K} for the hot-face shell is 2.32 mm/s1/2, and it is 2.77 mm/s1/2 for the shell near-corner. For the same oscillation marks (OMs), it appeared that the OMs positions on the shell corner are lower than those on the shell hot-face along the casting direction, because the stronger shrinkage of shell at the corner allows the overflowing steel to penetrate deeper into the larger gap between the shell corner and mold, which is demonstrated through the heat transfer analysis and metallographic examination. Finally, the interrelation between shell profile, mold oscillation, variation rate of heat flux, high-frequency heat flux and high-frequency temperature was discussed for above two cases, and the results suggested that meniscus conditions (heat transfer and melt flow) around the mold corner are more unsteady.

  12. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  13. The role of transient convection in the melting and solidification in arc weldpools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreper, G. M.; Szekely, J.; Eagar, T. W.

    1986-12-01

    A mathematical formulation has been developed to describe the transient growth and collapse of axisymmetric weldpools in spot welding operations. In the statement of the problem allowance is made for both conductive and convective heat transfer. In describing convection, the driving forces included buoyancy, electromagnetic forces, and surface tension forces. In most cases it was found that convection played a major role in affecting the weldpool shape, and that this convection was often dominated by surface tension forces. The model also allowed us to represent the transient collapse of weldpools upon the cessation of the heat and current supply. It was found that the melt velocity was reduced as the weldpool shrank. Most of the solidification took place from a circulating weldpool. By calculating both the growth rate and the relevant temperature gradients, it was possible to estimate the dendrite arm spacing which was found to be of the order of tens of microns.

  14. Phosphate bonded solidification of radioactive incinerator wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. W.; Langton, C. A.; Singh, D.

    1999-12-03

    The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  16. The Effect of Weld Residual Stress on Life of Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald G. Ballinger; Sara E. Ferry; Bradley P. Black; Sebastien P. Teysseyre

    2013-08-01

    With the elimination of Yucca Mountain as the long-term storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in the United States, a number of other storage options are being explored. Currently, used fuel is stored in dry-storage cask systems constructed of steel and concrete. It is likely that used fuel will continue to be stored at existing open-air storage sites for up to 100 years. This raises the possibility that the storage casks will be exposed to a salt-containing environment for the duration of their time in interim storage. Austenitic stainless steels, which are used to construct the canisters, are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride-containing environments if a continuous aqueous film can be maintained on the surface and the material is under stress. Because steel sensitization in the canister welds is typically avoided by avoiding post-weld heat treatments, high residual stresses are present in the welds. While the environment history will play a key role in establishing the chemical conditions for cracking, weld residual stresses will have a strong influence on both crack initiation and propagation. It is often assumed for modeling purposes that weld residual stresses are tensile, high and constant through the weld. However, due to the strong dependence of crack growth rate on stress, this assumption may be overly conservative. In particular, the residual stresses become negative (compressive) at certain points in the weld. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a probabilistic model with quantified uncertainties for SCC failure in the dry storage casks. In this paper, the results of a study of the residual stresses, and their postulated effects on SCC behavior, in actual canister welds are presented. Progress on the development of the model is reported.

  17. The prediction of risk of welding defects at the procedure stage using computer knowledge based systems.

    OpenAIRE

    da Costa, S. C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a methodology to evaluate the likelihood of defective welds as a procedure proposal is entered into a computerised database system. The approach developed was assessed for hydrogen induced cold cracking (HICC) since this defect is a major problem in welding technology. An expert system was used to implement the methodology. The information for the expert system knowledge base was partly gathered from previous work in this area. The...

  18. The influence of the heat treatment on delta ferrite transformation in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shielded metal arc (SMAW welded specimens using austenitic consumable materials with different amount of delta-ferrite are annealed in range 650-750 °C through 2-10 hours. Factorial plan 33 with influenced factors regression analyze of measured delta-ferrite values is used. The transformation i.e. decomposition of delta ferrite during annealing was analyzed regarding on weld cracking resistance using metallographic examination and WRC-1992 diagram.

  19. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  20. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.