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Sample records for weld metal

  1. Manganese Content Control in Weld Metal During MAG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the welding current and method of gas shielding in MAG welding on the content of manganese is considered in the paper. Results of study of the welded specimens of steels 45 when applying welding wire of different formulas and different types of gas shielding (traditional shielding and double-jet shielding) are given. It is found that in MAG welding the value of the welding current and the speed of the gas flow from the welding nozzle have a considerable impact on the chemical composition of the weld metal. The consumable electrode welding under double-jet gas shielding provides the directed gas-dynamics in the welding area and enables controlling the electrode metal transfer and the chemical composition of a weld.

  2. A Review: Welding Of Dissimilar Metal Alloys by Laser Beam Welding & Friction Stir Welding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Deepika Harwani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar metals has attracted attention of the researchers worldwide, owing to its many advantages and challenges. There is no denial in the fact that dissimilar welded joints offer more flexibility in the design and production of the commercial and industrial components. Many welding techniques have been analyzed to join dissimilar metal combinations. The objective of this paper is to review two such techniques – Laser welding and Friction stir welding. Laser beam welding, a high power density and low energy-input process, employs a laser beam to produce welds of dissimilar materials. Friction stir welding, a solid-state joining process, is also successfully used in dissimilar welding applications like aerospace and ship building industries. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of these two welding processes in the field of dissimilar welding. Future aspects of the study are also discussed.

  3. Microstructure modeling in weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Since microstructure development in the weld metal region is controlled by various physical processes, there is a need for integrated predictive models based on fundamental principles to describe and predict the effect of these physical processes. These integrated models should be based on various tools available for modeling microstructure development in a wide variety of alloy systems and welding processes. In this paper, the principles, methodology, and future directions of modeling thermochemical reactions in liquid, solidification, and solid state transformations are discussed with some examples for low-alloy steel, stainless steel, and Ni-base superalloy. Thermochemical deoxidation reactions in liquid low-alloy steel lead to oxide inclusion formation. This inclusion formation has been modeled by combining principles of ladle metallurgy and overall transformation kinetics. The model`s comparison with the experimental data and the ongoing work on coupling this inclusion model with the numerical models of heat transfer and fluid flow are discussed. Also, recent advances in theoretical and physical modeling of the solidification process are reviewed with regard to predicting the solidification modes, grain structure development, segregation effects, and nonequilibrium solidification in welds. The effects of solid state phase transformations on microstructure development and various methods of modeling these transformations are reviewed. Successful models, based on diffusion-controlled growth and plate growth theories, on microstructure development in low-alloy steel and stainless steel weld metals are outlined. This paper also addresses the importance of advanced analytical techniques to understand the solid state transformation mechanisms in welds.

  4. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  5. Evaluation of similar metal weld effects on residual stress of nozzle dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Cheon; Jeong, Jae Uk; Chang, Yoon Suk; Kim, Young Jin [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Determination of weld-induced residual stress has been an important issue in nuclear power industry because several failures were reported in dissimilar metal weld parts due to primary water stress corrosion cracking. In this context, a couple of remarkable round robin analyses were conducted to quantify the welding simulation variables and to establish optimized numerical analysis process. The purpose of the present research is to introduce welding simulation results for a safety and relief nozzle, which has a dissimilar metal weld part as well as a similar metal weld part. First, finite element analyses are carried out to calculate residual stresses at the inside of nozzle considering only dissimilar metal welding. Subsequently, residual stresses taking into account both the dissimilar and similar metal welding are computed. The similar metal weld effect is evaluated by comparing these analysis results and technical findings derived from the evaluation are fully discussed.

  6. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  7. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  8. Effects of welding wire composition and welding process on the weld metal toughness of submerged arc welded pipeline steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-liang Ren; Fu-ren Xiao; Peng Tian; Xu Wang; Bo Liao

    2009-01-01

    The effects of alloying elements in welding wires and submerged arc welding process on the microstructures and low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals have been investigated.The results indicate that the optimal contents of alloying elements in welding wires can improve the low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals because the proentectoid ferrite and bainite formations can be suppressed,and the fraction of acicular ferrite increases.However,the contents of alloying elements need to vary along with the welding heat input.With the increase in welding heat input,the contents of alloying elements in welding wires need to be increased accordingly.The microstructures mainly consisting of acicular ferrite can be obtained in weld metals after four-wire submerged arc welding using the wires with a low carbon content and appropriate contents of Mn,Mo,Ti-B,Cu,Ni,and RE,resulting in the high low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals.

  9. MECHANISM OF EXPLOSIVE WELDING OF METALS

    OpenAIRE

    Sek, W.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanism of explosive welding is discussed. The experimental date indicate that the explosive bonding interface forms behind the collision point and the physical properties of metals affect considerably this process. The usefulness of hydrodynamic model for describing the explosive welding process is called in question.

  10. Development of Welding Procedures for NPP Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Wook; Cho, Hong Seok; Lee, Dong Min; Park, Yu Deog; Choi, Sang Hoon [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Nuclear primary system consists of various materials according to the function. Recently, concern about the integrity on Dissimilar Metal Weld (DMW) which was made of inconel material such as alloy 600/82/182 has arisen from industry. Leak from hot leg nozzle weld at V.C Summer and axial cracks in hot leg nozzle welds at Ringhals 3 and 4 were took placed at the DMW zone, which is major degradation mechanism known as Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). In order to ensure operational ability of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to obtain measures against unexpected risks. KPS has developed the DMW technology, Narrow Groove Welding (NGW) system and field implementation procedures for alloy 600 since March 2005.

  11. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries.

  12. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  13. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  14. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarraf, Z.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  15. Intraoral metal laser welding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Mahler, Patrick; Bertrand, Caroline; Nammour, Samir

    2010-03-01

    The possibility of laser welding of dental prostheses offers great advantages: first, the operator has the possibility of welding on the master model, which decreases the number of passages and thus the possibility of errors and damage, and secondly, the patient attends only a few sessions, and, due to the possibility of fixing the damaged prostheses, there is no need to resort to the technician's laboratory. In a previous study we described the experimental phases of intraoral welding, from the in vitro model on animal jaws with evaluations of the temperature variations during welding through thermal chamber and type K thermocouples. In this study we describe the intraoral welding in vivo on human subjects by using, as in the previous study, a fibre-delivered neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. The in vivo phase allowed a restored prosthesis to be positioned and intraorally welded in the upper central sector with optimal results both in patient's comfort and in aesthetic effects. This first in vivo test confirmed that the use of a laser technique for the intraoral welding of metal prostheses is possible, with no particular problems and risks for the biological structures close to the welding zone.

  16. Influence of Filler Metals in Welding Wires on the Phase and Chemical Composition of Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Osetkovskiy, I. V.; Kozyreva, O. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of filler metals used in welding wires on the phase and chemical composition of the metal, which is surfaced to mining equipment exposed to abrasive wear, has been investigated. Under a laboratory environment, samples of Mo-V-B and Cr-Mn-Mo-V wires were made. The performed experiments have revealed that fillers of the Cr-Mn-Mo-V system used in powder wire show better wear resistance of the weld metal than that of the Mn-Mo-V-B system; the absence of boron, which promotes grain refinement in the Mn-Mo-V-B system, significantly reduces wear resistance; the Mn-Mo-V-B weld metal has a finer structure than the Cr-Mn-Mo-V weld metal.

  17. Residual stress analysis of an overlay weld on a dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Soo; Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, Bong Sang (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea)); Jung, I.C.; Byeon, J.G.; Park, K.S. (Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea)), e-mail: kskim5@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, a dissimilar metal, Alloy 82/182 welds used to connect stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components in nuclear reactor piping system have experienced a cracking due to a primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC). It is well known that one reason for the cracking is the residual stress by the weld. But, it is difficult to estimate the weld residual stress exactly due to many parameters of a welding. In this paper, the analysis of 3 FEM models is performed to estimate the weld residual stress on a dissimilar metal weld exactly

  18. [Clinical analysis of laser welding on porcelain bonded metal surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jia-wei; Dai, Wen-an; Wu, Xue-ying

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of laser-welded crowns and bridges. Two hundred defective crowns and bridges were welded by using Heraplus laser welding machine, and then restored by porcelain. After being welded ,those defective crowns and bridges of different materials fit well and their marginal areas were also satisfactory. During the follow up period of one year, no fractured porcelain and crack were found at welding spots. The technology of laser welding has no direct effect on welding spots between metal and porcelain and could be used to deal with the usual problems of the crowns and bridges.

  19. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  20. A numerical model for cold welding of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Based on experimental investigations of cold welding of different metal combinations applying various surface preparation methods, the understanding of the mechanisms of bond formation in cold welding has been improved by introducing two parameters representing the properties of surface layers...... at the weld interface. Accordingly, the general model for bond strength in cold welding earlier developed by Bay has been extended and modified. The new model presented in this paper simulates the whole cold welding process including the deformation of base metals and the establishment of welds bonding...

  1. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  2. Study the Factors Effecting on Welding Joint of Dissimilar Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam J. Ebraheam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the factors that affect the welding joint of dissimilar metals. Austenitic stainless steel-type AISI (316L with a thickness of (2mm was welded to carbon steel (1mm using an MIG spot welding. The filler metal is a welding wire of the type E80S-G (according to AWS is used with (1.2mm diameter and CO2 is used as shielding gas with flow rate (7L/min for all times was used in this work. The results indicate that the increase of the welding current tends to increase the size of spot weld, and also increases the sheer force. Whereas the sheer force increased inversely with the time of welding. Furthermore, the results indicate that increasing the current and time of welding increases the diameter of weld zone, and decreases the sheer force.

  3. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  4. Reduction of Deformations during Welding Metal Wire Mesh with Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an issue referring to a reduction of deformation during welding metal wire mesh into the frames. A problem of a possible reduction of deformations was described taking into account characteristics of a construction of a welded element. Technological tests and their results are provided. Technological recommendations relating to the reduction of deformations of the welded element are given.

  5. Kinetics of Acicular Ferrite Transformation in Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acicular Ferrite (AF) is beneficial in welds because it providesa tough and strong microstructure. Therefore, much works have been done in the study of the effect of alloying elements and welding conditions aimed at obtaining more AF in the weld metal. However, the knowledge about the nature of AF is limited due to the lack of kinetics researches. In this paper, the kinetic curves of AF transformation in an X65 weld metal were established by means of welding thermal simulation test. The results showed that AF transformation is a typical diffusion process of nucleation and growth with incubation period. AF transformation in weld metal obeys the relationship described by JMA Equation. The effect of welding heat input was also studied.

  6. Effect of Pulse Parameters on Weld Quality in Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kamal; Pal, Surjya K.

    2011-08-01

    The weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. The coarse-grained weld microstructure, higher heat-affected zone, and lower penetration together with higher reinforcement reduce the weld service life in continuous mode gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Pulsed GMAW (P-GMAW) is an alternative method providing a better way for overcoming these afore mentioned problems. It uses a higher peak current to allow one molten droplet per pulse, and a lower background current to maintain the arc stability. Current pulsing refines the grains in weld fusion zone with increasing depth of penetration due to arc oscillations. Optimum weld joint characteristics can be achieved by controlling the pulse parameters. The process is versatile and easily automated. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality.

  7. Distribution Characteristics of Weld Residual Stress on Butt Welded Dissimilar Metal Plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Maan Won [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    In this study, the weld residual stress distribution at a dissimilar-metal welded plate of low alloy carbon steel and stainless steel, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, was characterized. A plate mock-up with butt welding was fabricated using SA 508 low alloy steel and Type 304 stainless steel plates and the residual stresses were measured by the X-ray diffraction method after electrolytic polishing of the plate specimen. Finite element analysis was carried out in order to simulate the butt welding of dissimilar metal plate, and the calculated weld residual stress distribution was compared with that obtained from the measured data. The characteristics of the three-dimensional residual stress distribution in a butt weld of dissimilar metal plates were investigated by comparing the measured and calculated residual stress data.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Metal Active Gas (MAG) Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model for MAG (metal active gas) arc welding of thin plate has been developed. In MAG arc welding, the electrode wire is melted and supplied into the molten pool intermittently. Accordingly, it is assumed on the modeling that the thermal energy enters the base-plates through two following mechanisms, i.e., direct heating from arc plasma and “indirect” heating from the deposited metal. In the second part of the paper, MAG arc welding process is numerically analyzed by using the model, and the calculated weld bead dimension and surface profile have been compared with the experimental MAG welds on steel plate. As the result, it is made clear that the model is capable of predicting the bead profile of thin-plate MAG arc welding , including weld bead with undercutting.

  9. Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flow of metal during Friction Stir Welding is clarified using a faying surface tracer and a nib frozen in place during welding. It is shown that material is transported by two processes. The first is a wiping of material from the advancing front side of the nib onto a plug of material that rotates and advances with the nib. The material undergoes a helical motion within the plug that both rotates and advances with the plug and descends in the wash of the threads on the nib and rises on the outer part of the plug. After one or more rotations, this material is sloughed off the plug in its wake, primarily on the advancing side. The second process is an entrainment of material from the front retreating side of the nib that fills in between the sloughed off pieces from the advancing side. These two processes produce material with different mechanical properties and the strength of a weld should depend on the relative importance of the processes.

  10. Numerical modeling of electron-beam welding of dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krektuleva, R. A.; Cherepanov, O. I.; Cherepanov, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to numerical modeling of heat transfer processes and estimation of thermal stresses in weld seams created by electron beam welding of heterogeneous metals. The mathematical model is based on a system of equations that includes the Lagrange's variational equation of theory of plasticity and variational equation of M. Biot's principle to simulate the heat transfer processes. The two-dimensional problems (plane strain and plane stress) are considered for estimation of thermal stresses in welds considering differences of mechanical properties of welded materials. The model is developed for simulation of temperature fields and stresses during electron beam welding.

  11. Computer-based sensing and visualizing of metal transfer mode in gas metal arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Maoai; Wu Chuansong; Lü Yunfei

    2008-01-01

    Using Xenon lamp lights to overcome the strong interference from the welding arc, a computer-based system is developed to sense and visualize the metal transfer in GMAW. This system combines through-the-arc sensing of the welding current and arc voltage with high speed imaging of the metal transfer. It can simultaneously display the metal transfer processes and waveforms of electrical welding parameters in real-time The metal transfer videos and waveforms of electrical welding parameters can be recorded. Metal transfers under various welding conditions have been investigated with the system developed.

  12. Effect of welding parameters of Gas Metal Arc welding on weld bead geometry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushp Kumar Baghel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality. The responsefactors, namely bead penetration, weld width, reinforcement height, weld penetration shape factor and weld reinforcement form factor as affected by arc voltage, wire feed rate, welding speed, gas flow rate and nozzle-toplate distance has also been analysed

  13. The optimization of welding regime parameters at shielded metal arc welding (SMAW by mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Petrescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The realized researches followed the determining of mathematical models that allow the optimization of the welding process in order to obtain welded joints with certain values of the mechanical characteristics. Thus, there were established mathematical models of dependence of mechanical characteristics of welded joints (Rm, Rp02, Z, A, KCV 20°C of each parameter of welding regime (Iw, Uw, and also, mathematical models that offer cumulative dependence of mechanical characteristics of both parameters of welding regime.The researches have been carried out using steel E 36-4 as base material and as filler material basic electrodes, type E7018 and the applied welding procedure was the process: shielded metal arc welding (SMAW.

  14. Prediction of welding residual stress of dissimilar metal weld of nozzle using finite element analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Nam Su; Kim, Jong Wook; Choi, Suhn; Kim, Tae Wan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    The Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of dissimilar metal weld based on Alloy 82/182 is one of major issues in material degradation of nuclear components. It is well known that the crack initiation and growth due to PWSCC is influenced by material's susceptibility to PWSCC and distribution of welding residual stress. Therefore, modeling the welding residual stress is of interest in understanding crack formation and growth in dissimilar metal weld. Currently in Korea, a numerical round robin study is undertaken to provide guidance on the welding residual stress analysis of dissimilar metal weld. As a part of this effort, the present paper investigates distribution of welding resisual stress of a ferritic low alloy steel nozzle with dissimilar metal weld using Alloy 82/182. Two-dimensional thermo-mechanical finite element analyses are carried out to simulate multi-pass welding process on the basis of the detailed design and fabrication data. The present results are compared with those from other participants, and more works incorporating physical measurements are going to be performed to quantify the uncertainties relating to modelling assumptions.

  15. Analysis of overlay weld effect on preventing PWSCC in dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Gun; Oh, Chang Kyun; Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Co., Inc., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Ltd., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Sung Soo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    PWSCC(Primary Stress Corrosion Cracking) in Alloy 82/182 butt welds is the problem affecting safety and integrity of nuclear power plant. PWSCC can be occurred in high magnitude of tensile residual stress, such as Alloy 82/182 dissimilar metal welds in Pressurizer(PZR) nozzles. There have been related incidents recently at the dissimilar metal welds in overseas nuclear power plants. Overlay weld is the one of the effective methods to decrease tensile residual stress of inside surface, which will result in preventing PWSCC. In this paper, overlay weld conditions on the purpose of preventing PWSCC was explained and the benefit of the overlay weld was confirmed performing finite element analysis.

  16. Analysis of Overlay Weld Effect on Preventing PWSCC in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Gun; Oh, Chang Kyun; Park, Heung Bae; Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    PWSCC(Primary Stress Corrosion Cracking) in Alloy 82/182 butt welds is the problem affecting safety and integrity of nuclear power plant. PWSCC can be occurred in the area that is at high magnitude of tensile residual stress, such as Alloy 82/182 dissimilar metal welds in PZR(pressurizer) nozzles. There have been a number of incidents recently at the dissimilar metal welds in overseas nuclear power plants. Overlay weld is the one of the effective methods to decrease tensile residual stress of inside surface, which will result in preventing PWSCC. In this paper, overlay weld conditions on the purpose of preventing PWSCC was explained and the benefit of the overlay weld was confirmed performing finite element analysis.

  17. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR.

  18. Precipitating Mechanism of Carbide in Cold-Welding Surfacing Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin ZHANG; Dengyi REN

    2004-01-01

    Carbides in a series of cold-welding weld metals were studied by means of SEM, TEM and EPMA, and the forming mechanism of carbide was proposed according to their distribution and morphology. Due to their different carbide-forming tendency, Nb and Ti could combine with C to form particulate carbide in liquid weld metal and depleted the carbon content in matrix, while V induced the carbide precipitated along grain boundary. But too much Nb or Ti alone resulted in coarse carbide and poor strengthened matrix. When suitable amount of Nb, Ti and V coexisted in weld metal, both uniformly distributed particulate carbide and well strengthened matrix could be achieved. It was proposed that the carbide nucleated on the oxide which dispersed in liquid weld metal, and then grew into multi-layer complex carbide particles by epitaxial growth. At different sites, carbide particles may present as different morphologies.

  19. Weld Metal Cooling Rate Indicator System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    rate of change of weld temperature at the predetermined weld temperature. A range of...provided so that the rate of change of weld temperatures at the predetermined weld temperature can be compared with this range. A device is then provided...which is responsive to the comparing information for indicating whether the rate of change of weld temperature is within, above, or below the range

  20. Energetic peculiarities of metal heating under laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oparin, M.I.; Nikiforov, G.D.; Fedorov, S.A. (Moskovskij Aviatsionnyj Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1981-07-01

    A connection between the energy and thermal parameters of the welding process of laser welding is studied. It is established that the connection between energy and thermal parameters of laser welding regime is carried out through the coefficient of metal absorption. Experimental determination of absorption coefficients of various metals (aluminium alloys, copper, 12Kh18N10T steel, St 3 steel, 0T4 titanium alloy, VN2 niobium alloy) has permitted to develope the methodics of approximated thermal calculations and to built up a nomogram for determining parameters of lazer welding regime. Limits of the thickness of welded sheets of the above materials in dependence on the welding speed are determined according to the nomogram.

  1. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavdar, U.; Gulsahin, I.

    2014-10-01

    The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM) compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW) were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined. (Author)

  2. Behavior of a crack within a Dissimilar Metal Weld Part by using an Overlay Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Soo; Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    In recent years, the dissimilar metal welds, Alloy 82/182 welds, used to connect the stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components in a nuclear reactor piping system have experienced a cracking due to a primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC).It is well known that one reason for the cracking is the residual stress by the weld. But, it is difficult to estimate the weld residual stress exactly due to the many parameters for the welding process. In this paper, a Butt model weld specimen was manufactured and the residual stresses of the weld specimen were measured by the X-Ray method and a Hole Drilling Technique. These results were compared with the results of the Butt FEM Model to confirm the confidence of the FEM input. Also, an analysis of the Crack FEM models made by the ABAQUS Code was performed to estimate the behavior of a crack within a Dissimilar Metal Weld Part (DMWP) when an overlay weld on the DMWP was done.

  3. Vision-based weld seam tracking in gas metal arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jinqiang; WU Chuansong; LIU Xizhang; XIA Dianxiu

    2007-01-01

    A low-cost visual sensmg system is developed to realize weld seam tracking in gas metal arc welding(GMAW).The system consists of a commercial CCD camera,narrow-band composite filter lens,an image capturing card,an industrial computer,a welding control unit,a GMAW power source,and a worktable.Images of root gap and its vicinity are captured in the GMAW welding process by the system.The captured images arc processed by an algorithm on the basis of the analysis of gray characteristics of the root gap to get the offsetting information between torch and root gap centerline.The offsetting information is then used to realize weld seam tracking in the GMAW process.Welding seam tracking experiment is conducted by a simple proportional(P)controller.The results show that tracking error is basically less than ±0.5 mm.

  4. Development of Weld Metal Microstructures in Pulsed Laser Welding of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, F.; Malek Ghaini, F.; Torkamany, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The microstructure of the weld metal of a duplex stainless steel made with Nd:YAG pulsed laser is investigated at different travel speeds and pulse frequencies. In terms of the solidification pattern, the weld microstructure is shown to be composed of two distinct zones. The presence of two competing heat transfer channels to the relatively cooler base metal and the relatively hotter previous weld spot is proposed to develop two zones. At high overlapping factors, an array of continuous axial grains at the weld centerline is formed. At low overlapping factors, in the zone of higher cooling rate, a higher percentage of ferrite is transformed to austenite. This is shown to be because with extreme cooling rates involved in pulsed laser welding with low overlapping, the ferrite-to-austenite transformation can be limited only to the grain boundaries.

  5. Liquid Metal Oscillation and Arc Behaviour during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudodibroto, B.Y.B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to obtain insight into the oscillation behaviour of the liquid metal and the arc behaviour during GMA welding. Observations of the weld pool and the arc were undertaken by visual means using a high-speed video and by analysis of the voltage. To deal with the complex p

  6. Effect of width of repair welding on stress distribution of dissimilar metal butt weld of nuclear piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Won Shik; Lee, Hwee Seung; Huh, Nam Su [Seoul National Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In the present work, the welding residual stress due to repair welding and the stress redistribution behavior due to primary pressure are investigated via 2-dimensional non-linear finite element analyses. In particular, the effect of repair welding width on stress distribution is emphasized. Although, large tensile residual stresses are produced at the PWSCC sensitive region due to repair welding, these stresses are highly reduced due to stress redistribution caused by primary load. Based on the present finite element results, it has been revealed that the effect of width of repair welding on stress distribution is not significant. In the past few years, many numerical and experimental works have been made to assess a structural integrity of cracked components subjected to primary water stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal weld (DMW) using Alloys 82/182 in nuclear industries worldwide. These works include a prediction of weld residual stresses in dissimilar metal weld by either numerical or experimental works since an accurate estimation of residual stress distribution in dissimilar metal weld is the most important element for integrity assessment of components subjected to primary water stress corrosion cracking. During an actual welding process, in general, a repair welding is often performed when a defect indication is detected during post-welding inspection. It has been revealed that such a repair welding could lead to higher tensile residual stress in dissimilar metal weld, which is detrimental to the crack growth due to primary water stress corrosion cracking. Thus, the prediction of residual stress considering a repair welding is needed, and then many efforts were made on this issue. In the present work, the effect of width of repair welding on stress distribution of dissimilar metal butt weld of nuclear piping is evaluated based on the detailed 2-dimensional non-linear finite element analyses. For this purpose, the welding residual stress due to

  7. Microstructures and Toughness of Weld Metal of Ultrafine Grained Ferritic Steel by Laser Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xudong ZHANG; Wuzhu CHEN; Cheng WANG; Lin ZHAO; Yun PENG; Zhiling TIAN

    2004-01-01

    3 mm thick 400 MPa grade ultrafine grained ferritic steel plates were bead-on-plate welded by CO2 laser with heat input of 120~480 J/mm. The microstructures of the weld metal mainly consist of bainite, which form is lower bainite plates or polygonal ferrite containing quantities of dispersed cementite particles, mixed with a few of low carbon martensite laths or ferrite, depending on the heat input. The hardness and the tensile strength of the weld metal are higher than those of the base metal, and monotonously increase as the heat input decreases. No softened zone exists inheat affected zone (HAZ). Compared with the base metal, although the grains of laser weld are much larger, the toughness of the weld metal is higher within a large range of heat input. Furthermore, as the heat input increases, the toughness of the weld metal rises to a maximum value, at which point the percentage of lower bainite is the highest, and then drops.

  8. Application of welding science to welding engineering: A lumped parameter gas metal arc welding dynamic process model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, P.E.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-12-31

    We develop a model of the depth of penetration of the weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which demonstrates interaction between the arc, filler wire and weld pool. This model is motivated by the observations of Essers and Walter which suggest a relationship between droplet momentum and penetration depth. A model of gas metal arc welding was augmented to include an improved model of mass transfer and a simple model of accelerating droplets in a plasma jet to obtain the mass and momentum of impinging droplets. The force of the droplets and depth of penetration is correlated by a dimensionless linear relation used to predict weld pool depth for a range of values of arc power and contact tip to workpiece distance. Model accuracy is examined by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the pool depth obtained from bead on plate welds of carbon steel in an argon rich shielding gas. Moreover, theoretical predictions of pool depth are compared to the results obtained from the heat conduction model due to Christensen et al. which suggest that in some cases the momentum of impinging droplets is a better indicator of the depth of the weld pool and the presence of a deep, narrow penetration.

  9. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There are indications that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) increases the risk of cataract, but there is only circumstantial evidence that metal welding, an important occupational source of UVR exposure, is a risk factor. The objective of this study is to unravel if metal welding......, information on welding was collected from questionnaires and, for both cohorts, information about cataract diagnosis and operation was gathered from Danish national registers. Using Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio (HR) for cataract diagnosis and/or operation was calculated in the follow-up period...

  10. Weld Joint Design for SFR Metallic Fuel Element Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Soo Sung; Woo, Yoon Myeng; Kim, Hyung Tae; Kim, Ki Hwan; Yoon, Kyung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) system is among the six systems selected for Gen-IV promising systems and expected to become available for commercial introduction around 2030. In Korea, the R and D on SFR has been begun since 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R and D programs. The international collaborative research is under way on fuel developments within Advanced Fuel Project for Gen-IV SFR with the closed fuel cycle of full actinide recycling, while TRU bearing metallic fuel, U-TRU-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel elements, the endplug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of endplug to cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the joint designs for endplug welding were investigated. For the irradiation test of SFR metallic fuel element, the TIG welding technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed based on the welding conditions and parameters established. In order to make SFR metallic fuel elements, the weld joint design was developed based on the TIG welding technique.

  11. GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) process development for girth welding of high strength pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Vaidyanath; Daniel, Joe; Quintana, Marie [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yaoshan [Center for Reliable Energy Systems (CRES), Dublin, OH (United States); Souza, Antonio [Lincoln Electric do Brasil, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and findings from the first phase of a consolidated program co-funded by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and Pipeline Research Council Inc (PRCI) to develop pipe weld assessment and qualification methods and optimize X 100 pipe welding technologies. One objective of the program is to establish the range of viable welding options for X 100 line pipe, and define the essential variables to provide welding process control for reliable and consistent mechanical performance of the weldments. In this first phase, a series of narrow gap girth welds were made with pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW), instrumented with thermocouples in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal to obtain the associated thermal profiles, and instrumented to measure true energy input as opposed to conventional heat input. Results reveal that true heat input is 16%-22% higher than conventional heat input. The thermal profile measurements correlate very well with thermal model predictions using true energy input data, which indicates the viability of treating the latter as an essential variable. Ongoing microstructural and mechanical testing work will enable validation of an integrated thermal-microstructural model being developed for these applications. Outputs from this model will be used to correlate essential welding process variables with weld microstructure and hardness. This will ultimately enable development of a list of essential variables and the ranges needed to ensure mechanical properties are achieved in practice, recommendations for controlling and monitoring these essential variables and test methods suitable for classification of welding consumables. (author)

  12. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent.

  13. Stress Distribution in the Dissimilar Metal Butt Weld of Nuclear Reactor Piping due to the Simulation Technique for the Repair Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hweeseung; Huh, Namsu [Seoul Nat' l Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinsu; Lee, Jinho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    During welding, the dissimilar metal butt welds of nuclear piping are typically subjected to repair welding in order to eliminate defects that are found during post-weld inspection. It has been found that the repair weld can significantly increase the tensile residual stress in the weldment, and therefore, accurate estimation of the weld residual stress due to repair weld, especially for dissimilar metal welds using Ni-based alloy 82/182 in nuclear components, is of great importance in order to assess susceptibility to primary water stress corrosion cracking. In the present study, the stress distributions of dissimilar metal butt welds in nuclear reactor piping subjected to repair weld were investigated based on detailed nonlinear finite element analyses. Particular emphasis was placed on the variation of the stress distribution in the dissimilar metal butt weld according to the finite element welding analysis sequence for the repair welding process.

  14. Precipitation of Niobium Boride Phases at the Base Metal/Weld Metal Interface in Dissimilar Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Výrostková, Anna; Kepič, Ján; Homolová, Viera; Falat, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the analysis of failure mechanism in the heat affected zone is described in dissimilar weld joints between advanced martensitic steel T92 and Ni-base weld metal. The joints were treated with two different post-weld heat treatments and tested. For the creep, tensile, and Charpy impact tests, the samples with interfacially located notch were used. Moreover long term aging at 625 °C was applied before the tensile and notch toughness tests. Decohesion fractures ran along carbides at the T92 BM/WM interfaces in case of the modified PWHT, whereas type IV cracking was the prevailing failure mechanism after the classical PWHT in the creep test. In the notch tensile and Charpy impact tests, with the notch at T92 base metal/weld metal interface, fractures ran along the interface with a hard phase on the fracture surface along with the ductile dimple and brittle quasi-cleavage fracture. The phase identified as niobium boride (either NbB and/or Nb3B2) was produced during welding at the end of the solidification process. It was found in the welds regardless of the post-weld heat treatment and long-term aging.

  15. Thermal Recovery of Plastic Deformation in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Dongxiao [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Yu, Xinghua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhang, Wei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Crooker, Paul [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); David, Stan A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-05-23

    Stainless steel has been widely used in challenging environments typical to nuclear power plant structures, due its excellent corrosion resistance. Nickel filler metals containing high chromium concentration, including Alloy 82/182, are used for joining stainless steel to carbon steel components to achieve similar high resistance to stress corrosion cracking. However, the joint usually experience weld metal stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which affects the safety and structural integrity of light water nuclear reactor systems. A primary driving force for SCC is the high tensile residual stress in these welds. Due to large dimension of pressure vessel and limitations in the field, non-destructive residual stress measurement is difficult. As a result, finite element modeling has been the de facto method to evaluate the weld residual stresses. Recent studies on this subject from researchers worldwide report different residual stress value in the weldments [5]. The discrepancy is due to the fact that most of investigations ignore or underestimate the thermal recovery in the heat-affect zone or reheated region in the weld. In this paper, the effect of heat treatment on thermal recovery and microhardness is investigated for materials used in dissimilar metal joint. It is found that high equivalent plastic strains are predominately accumulated in the buttering layer, the root pass, and the heat affected zone, which experience multiple welding thermal cycles. The final cap passes, experiencing only one or two welding thermal cycles, exhibit less plastic strain accumulation. Moreover, the experimental residual plastic strains are compared with those predicted using an existing weld thermo-mechanical model with two different strain hardening rules. The importance of considering the dynamic strain hardening recovery due to high temperature exposure in welding is discussed for the accurate simulation of weld residual stresses and plastic strains. In conclsuion, the

  16. EFFECT OF CARBON MIGRATION ON CREEP PROPERTIES OF Cr5Mo DISSIMILAR WELDED JOINTS WITH Ni-BASED AND AUSTENITIC WELD METAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.M. Gong; Y. Jiang; S.T. Tu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of carbon migration on creep properties of Cr5Mo dissimilar welded joints with Ni-based (Inconel 182) and Cr23Ni13 (A302) austenitic weld metal was investigated. Carbon migration near the weld metal/ferritic steel interface of Cr5Mo dissimilar welded joints was analyzed by aging method. Local creep deformations of the dissimilar welded joints were measured by a long-term local creep deformation measuring technique. The creep rupture testing was performed for Cr5Mo dissimilar welded joints with Inconel 182 and A302 weld metal. The research results show that the maximum creep strain rate occurs in the decarburized zone located on heat affect zone (HAZ) of Cr5Mo ferritic steel. The creep rupture life of Cr5Mo dissimilar welded joints with A302 weld metal decreases due to carbon migration and is about 50% of that welded with Inconel 182 weld metal.

  17. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Khurana, M. K.; Yadav, Pradeep K.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the application of Taguchi method combined with grey relational analysis to optimize the process parameters of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 1020 carbon steels for multiple quality characteristics (bead width, bead height, weld penetration and heat affected zone). An orthogonal array of L9 has been implemented to fabrication of joints. The experiments have been conducted according to the combination of voltage (V), current (A) and welding speed (Ws). The results revealed that the welding speed is most significant process parameter. By analyzing the grey relational grades, optimal parameters are obtained and significant factors are known using ANOVA analysis. The welding parameters such as speed, welding current and voltage have been optimized for material AISI 1020 using GMAW process. To fortify the robustness of experimental design, a confirmation test was performed at selected optimal process parameter setting. Observations from this method may be useful for automotive sub-assemblies, shipbuilding and vessel fabricators and operators to obtain optimal welding conditions.

  18. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  19. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This... content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the guide to remove references to outdated standards...

  20. Probing Pulsed Current Gas Metal Arc Welding for Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, S.; Kulkarni, D. V.; De, A.

    2015-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steels are commonly welded using gas tungsten arc welding process for its superior control over the rate of heat input and vaporization loss of the key alloying elements although the rate electrode deposition remains restricted. Recent developments in pulsed current gas metal arc welding have significantly improved its ability to enhance the rate of electrode deposition with a controlled heat input rate while its application for welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels is scarce. The present work reports a detailed experimental study on the pulsed current gas metal arc welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. The effect of the shielding gas, welding current, and speed on the weld bead profile, microstructure and mechanical properties are examined. The results show that the pulsed current gas metal arc welding with appropriate welding conditions can provide acceptable bead profile and mechanical properties in welds of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels.

  1. Structural integrity analyses for preemptive weld overlay on the dissimilar metal weld of a pressurizer nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chin-Cheng, E-mail: cchuang@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Liu, Ru-Feng [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-15

    This paper presents structural integrity analyses for preemptive weld overlay on the dissimilar metal weld (DMW) of a pressurizer nozzle in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on MRP-169 and ASME Code Case N-504-2, weld overlay sizing calculation, residual stress improvement, shrinkage evaluation, fatigue crack growth and fatigue usage analysis are performed. The weld overlay procedure has to be confirmed to improve the residual stresses around the inside surface of DMW. The residual compressive stress distribution is thus addressed to be resistant to subsequent primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) initiation and further crack growth. To ensure the structural integrity of the original attached piping system, the measured displacement is transformed to temperature gradient to simulate the shrinkage after overlay and is used to determine the post weld distortion and stress situation. Further, the conservative postulated surface cracks are assumed in the DMW for fatigue crack growth analysis with system design cycles. The stress limits and cumulative fatigue usages of the pressurizer nozzle with overlay are also evaluated to meet ASME Code, Section III. Based on the present results, the structural integrity of the pressurizer nozzle with preemptive weld overlay is shown.

  2. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  3. Development of Dissimilar Metal Weld Performance Demonstration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Sik; Yoon, Byung Sik; Yang, Seung Han; Guon, Kee Il [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    In the early 1980s, many leaks in the piping systems of boiling water reactors in the USA were discovered in piping weld area which had been examined ultrasonically and found to be defect free. To enhance the reliability of ultrasonic testing system, ASME B and PV code section XI adopted the performance demonstration requirements (Appendix VIII) for the ultrasonic examination of nuclear power plant piping weld in the 1989 winter addenda for the first time. MOST Bulletin 2004-13 was published at 2004.6. Following the MEST Bulletin 2009-37 which was published at 2009.9(formerly MOST Bulletin 2004-13), all nuclear power plants in Korea shall implement performance demonstration of dissimilar metal weld. The object of this study is to develop the performance demonstration system for dissimilar metal weld ultrasonic testing of nuclear power plant in order to meet ASME Sec. XI Appendix VIII requirements and MEST Bulletin 2009-37. This paper describes the status of the development of dissimilar metal weld performance demonstration system in Korea

  4. Bonds between metals and nanocomposites created by explosion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar', M. P.; Karpov, E. V.; Lukyanov, Ya. L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the study of the influence of a microstructure characterized by directed or chaotic distribution of nanoinclusions and strain rate on the deformability of nanocomposites. It is revealed that, under identical loading conditions, cracks are formed in nanocomposites whose structural elements are mostly directed in the same way at lower strain rates than in nanocomposites with chaotic distribution of the reinforcer. It is shown that, as the strain rate increases, the influence of the structural order on the limiting deformation reduces due to transition from shear strain to rotational strain. No cracks are formed in the creation of bonds between metals and nanocomposites by explosion welding. The experimental results obtained in the study of transverse bending of two-layer welded beams and the structure in the vicinity of the weld reveal that the obtained metal-nanocomposite bond has a uniform structure retained in deformation, with fracture occurring in the nanocomposite.

  5. Numerical simulation of gas metal arc welding temperature field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhentai; Shan Ping; Hu Shengsun; Wei Xinwei; Yang Jinglei

    2006-01-01

    The infrared camera is used to investigate the temperature field of gas metal arc welding. The results show that the temperature distribution of weld pool and adjacent area appears cone shape. A new heat source model combined by Gaussian distribution heat source of the arc and conical distribution heat source of the droplet is set up based on the experimental results,and with the combined boundary conditions, the temperature field of gas metal arc welding is simulated using finite element method. According to the comparison between the results of experiment and simulation in temperature field shows that the new combined heat source model is more accurate and effective than the Gauss heat source model.

  6. Metallic glass coating on metals plate by adjusted explosive welding technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.D. [LTCS and Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, K.X., E-mail: kliu@pku.edu.cn [LTCS and Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Chen, Q.Y.; Wang, J.T. [LTCS and Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yan, H.H.; Li, X.J. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Using an adjusted explosive welding technique, an aluminum plate has been coated by a Fe-based metallic glass foil in this work. Scanning electronic micrographs reveal a defect-free metallurgical bonding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate. Experimental evidence indicates that the Fe-based metallic glass foil almost retains its amorphous state and mechanical properties after the explosive welding process. Additionally, the detailed explosive welding process has been simulated by a self-developed hydro-code and the bonding mechanism has been investigated by numerical analysis. The successful welding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate provides a new way to obtain amorphous coating on general metal substrates.

  7. Metallic glass coating on metals plate by adjusted explosive welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. D.; Liu, K. X.; Chen, Q. Y.; Wang, J. T.; Yan, H. H.; Li, X. J.

    2009-09-01

    Using an adjusted explosive welding technique, an aluminum plate has been coated by a Fe-based metallic glass foil in this work. Scanning electronic micrographs reveal a defect-free metallurgical bonding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate. Experimental evidence indicates that the Fe-based metallic glass foil almost retains its amorphous state and mechanical properties after the explosive welding process. Additionally, the detailed explosive welding process has been simulated by a self-developed hydro-code and the bonding mechanism has been investigated by numerical analysis. The successful welding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate provides a new way to obtain amorphous coating on general metal substrates.

  8. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of aluminium 5083-H111 welded using gas metal arc welding method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available . Alloy Al Mg Mn Fe Si Cr Cu Zn Ti 5083 Balance 4.0-4.9 0.4-1.0 0.4 0.4 0.25 0.1 0.25 0.15 Table 1. Typical chemical compositions of aluminium alloy 5083 (percentage by mass). Corrosion Fatigue Behaviour of Aluminium 5083-H111 Welded Using Gas Metal... to 120 per second. As a result, spray transfer can take place at lower average current levels than would normally be the case. Due to the lower average heat input, thinner plates can be welded, distortion is minimized and spatter is greatly reduced...

  9. Gas metal arc welding in refurbishment of cobalt base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriary, M. S.; Miladi Gorji, Y.; Kolagar, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Refurbishments of superalloys which are used in manufacturing gas turbine hot components usually consists of removing cracks and other defects by blending and then repair welding in order to reconstruct damaged area. In this study, the effects of welding parameters on repair of FSX-414 superalloy, as the most applicable cobalt base superalloy in order to manufacture gas turbine nozzles, by use of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) technic were investigated. Results then were compared by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). Metallographic and SEM studies of the microstructure of the weld and HAZ showed that there are no noticeable defects in the microstructure by use of GMAW. Also, chemical analysis and morphologies of carbide in both methods are similar. Hardness profile of the GM AW structure then also compared with GTAW and no noticeable difference was observed between the profiles. Also, proper tensile properties, compared with GTAW, can be achieved by use of optimum parameters that can be obtained by examining the current and welding speed. Tensile properties of optimized condition of the GMAW then were compared with GTAW. It was seen that the room and high temperature tensile properties of the GMAW structure is very similar and results confirmed that changing the technic did not have any significant influence on the properties.

  10. Effects of Active Fluxes in Gas Metal Arc Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balázs Varbai; Rita Kormos; Kornél Májlinger

    2017-01-01

      In this paper the effects of active fluxes during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) were investigated. Eight different types of active fluxes, with different oxygen content, and MnO - SiO2 flux mixtures were applied to the surface in 20 vol...

  11. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  12. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment.

  13. Investigating chemical and microstructural evolution at dissimilar metal welds

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, John William Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are widely used in steam vessels in thermal power stations to join low-temperature alloys, such as steels, to high temperature alloys, such as nickel-based alloys. This provides a cost-effective manufacturing solution. However, there is a history of DMWs failing due to creep in service environments. Many investigations have been performed on weld systems and failures in the traditional 2.25Cr-1Mo (P22) steels, but fewer have been performed on newer 9Cr-1Mo steels...

  14. PARENT Program for DMW(Dissimilar Metal Weld) Reliability Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Kyung Jo; Jung, Hae Dong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Some cracks were found in dissimilar metal welds (DMW), which are connected with major components of nuclear power plants. Usually, the dissimilar metal welds are consisted of Alloy 600, carbon steel and stainless steel. Since 2000s, most of the cracks are found in welds, especially dissimilar metal welds such as pressurizer safety relief nozzle, reactor head penetration, reactor bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI), and reactor nozzles. Since the cracks are revealed as a primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), the reliability of non destructive evaluation (NDE) technique becomes more important. To cope with the NDE reliability, PINC (program for inspection of nickel alloy components) international cooperation was organized. The aim of the project was 1) to fabricate representative NDE mock-ups with flaws to simulate PWSCCs, 2) to identify and quantitatively assess NDE methods for accurately detecting, sizing and characterizing PWSCCs, 3) to document the range of locations and morphologies of PWSCCs and 4) to incorporate results with other results of ongoing PWSCC research programs, as appropriate. Since the last KNS autumn meeting, the PINC program was finalized and the next program PARENT (Program to Assess Reliability for Emerging NDE Technique) is started on June this year. In this study, as part of the PINC project, international RRT (round robin test) results for DMW will be introduced and the status of new PARENT program will be introduced

  15. Multiple exposure to metals in eight types of welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoli, P; Porru, S; Brunelli, E; Alessio, L

    1997-01-01

    This article evaluates multiple exposures to metals in different types of metal welding such as manual metal arc for mild and stainless steel, continuous wire, submerged arc, laser and brazing. Environmental monitoring was carried out in eight different occupational situations and the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique was adopted in order to characterize exposure to several elements simultaneously and with high accuracy. The results showed that up to 23 elements could be measured. The highest concentrations were found for Al, Mn, Fr, Ni, Cr, Cu and Zn. For some elements such as In, Nd, I, Rb the concentrations were very low. A qualitative and quantitative variation in fume composition was observed at a certain distance from the welding point, which should be to taken into account when evaluating indirect exposures. It would also be possible, with this technique, to identify specific elements in the mixture which could also be measured in biological fluids.

  16. Quantitative metal magnetic memory reliability modeling for welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Haiyan; Dang, Yongbin; Wang, Ben; Leng, Jiancheng

    2016-03-01

    Metal magnetic memory(MMM) testing has been widely used to detect welded joints. However, load levels, environmental magnetic field, and measurement noises make the MMM data dispersive and bring difficulty to quantitative evaluation. In order to promote the development of quantitative MMM reliability assessment, a new MMM model is presented for welded joints. Steel Q235 welded specimens are tested along the longitudinal and horizontal lines by TSC-2M-8 instrument in the tensile fatigue experiments. The X-ray testing is carried out synchronously to verify the MMM results. It is found that MMM testing can detect the hidden crack earlier than X-ray testing. Moreover, the MMM gradient vector sum K vs is sensitive to the damage degree, especially at early and hidden damage stages. Considering the dispersion of MMM data, the K vs statistical law is investigated, which shows that K vs obeys Gaussian distribution. So K vs is the suitable MMM parameter to establish reliability model of welded joints. At last, the original quantitative MMM reliability model is first presented based on the improved stress strength interference theory. It is shown that the reliability degree R gradually decreases with the decreasing of the residual life ratio T, and the maximal error between prediction reliability degree R 1 and verification reliability degree R 2 is 9.15%. This presented method provides a novel tool of reliability testing and evaluating in practical engineering for welded joints.

  17. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çavdar, Uǧur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined.Soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia de polvos de metal compactados. Se ha realizado un estudio de la aplicación de polvos de metal (PM de base hierro compactados por soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia (UHFIW. Estos polvos de metal compactados se utilizan para producir engranajes. Este estudio investiga los métodos de uni.n de los materiales de PM con UHFIW en su aplicación en la industria. La máxima tensión y la máxima deformación de los polvos de metal compactados soldados fueron determinadas por flexión en tres puntos y prueba de resistencia. Se determinó la microdureza y la microestructura de los polvos compactados por soldadura por inducción.

  18. Predicting of bead undercut defects in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jing XU; Chuan-song WU; De-gang ZOU

    2008-01-01

    In the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, when the welding speed reaches a certain threshold, there will be an onset of weld bead undercut defects which limit the further increase of the welding speed. Establishing a mathematical model for high-speed GMAW to predict the tendency of bead undercuts is of great significance to pre-vent such defects. Under the action of various forces, the transferred metal from filler wire to the weld pool, and the geometry and dimension of the pool itself decide if the bead undercut occurs or not. The previous model simpli-fied the pool shape too much. In this paper, based on the actual weld pool geometry and dimension calculated from a numerical model, a hydrostatic model for liquid metal surface is used to study the onset of bead undercut defects in the high-speed welding process and the effects of dif-ferent welding parameters on the bead undercut tendency.

  19. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  20. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  1. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  2. TEM Observation of Martensite Layer at the Weld Interface of an A508III to Inconel 82 Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. R.; Lu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    A lenticular martensite layer at the weld interface in an A508III/Inconel 82 dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint was studied by TEM. The martensite/weld metal boundary was observed as the fusion boundary. There was a K-S orientation relationship between martensite and weld metal. The formation of the martensite was mainly determined by the distribution of alloy elements. The martensite was responsible for the hardness peak in the DMW.

  3. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  4. Control of Structure in Conventional Friction Stir Welds through a Kinematic Theory of Metal Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubisoff, H.A.; Schneider, J.A.; Nunes, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating pin is translated along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. Metal is prevented from flowing up the pin, which would result in plowing/cutting instead of welding, by a shoulder on the pin. In conventional FSW, the weld metal rests on an "anvil", which supports the heavy "plunge" load on the tool. In this study, both embedded tungsten wires along and copper plating on the faying surfaces were used to trace the flow of AA2219 weld metal around the C-FSW tool. The effect of tool rotational speed, travel speed, plunge load, and pin thread pitch on the resulting weld metal flow was evaluated. Plan, longitudinal, and transverse section x-ray radiographs were examined to trace the metal flow paths. The results are interpreted in terms of a kinematic theory of metal flow in FSW.

  5. Mechanism of laser welding on dissimilar metals between stainless steel and W-Cu alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Chen; Zhiyong Wang; Rongshi Xiao; Tiechuan Zuo

    2006-01-01

    @@ CO2 laser is employed to join a piece of powder metallurgical material (PMM) to a stainless steel in butt joint welding mode. The powder Ni35, as a filler powder, is used. The weld metal comes from three parts of stainless steel, powder Ni35, and Cu in W-Cu PMM. It is indicated that some parts of the W-Cu base metal are heated by laser and the metal Cu at the width of 0.06-0.12 mm from the edge is melted into the melting pool in the laser welding process. The formation of firm weld joint is just because that the melting liquid metal could fill the position occupied by metal Cu and surround the metal W granules fully. The analysis results indicate that the mechanism of the laser welding for stainless steel and W-Cu alloy is a special mode of fusion-brazing welding.

  6. Monitoring and Control of the Hybrid Laser-Gas Metal-Arc Welding Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.; Nichol, C. I.; Clark, D.; Todorov, E.; Couch, R. D.; Yu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  7. The temporal nature of forces acting on metal drops in gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L.A.; Eagar, T.W.; Lang, J.H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    At moderate and high welding currents, the most important forces in gas metal arc welding acting on the molten electrode are magnetic forces arising from the interaction between the welding current and its own magnetic field. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown, and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of these forces from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces as a drop detaches from the electrode.

  8. Spot Welding Parameter Optimization to Improve Weld Characteristics for Dissimilar Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Aravinthan Arumugam; MohdAmizi Nor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Resistance spot welding is a process which is widely used in the automotive industry to join steel parts of various thicknesses and types. The current practice in the automotive industry in determining the welding schedule which will be used in the welding process is based on welding table or experiences. This however may not be the optimum welding schedule that will give the best spot weld quality. This work concentrates on the parameter optimization when spot welding steels with di...

  9. Gas metal arc welding of butt joint with varying gap width based on neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Hardam; Sørensen, Torben

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the neural network technology for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) control. A system has been developed for modeling and online adjustment of welding parameters, appropriate to guarantee a certain degree of quality in the field of butt joint welding with full p......-learning PSD control algorithm has been proposed....

  10. ELECTRIC ARC WELDING DEPOSITION OF METALLIC SURFACES BY VIBRATING ELECTRODE IN PROTECTIVE GAS MEDIUM

    OpenAIRE

    N. Spiridonov; A. Кudina; V. Кurash

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents methods for obtaining qualitative metallic surfaces by electric arc welding deposition while using consumable electrode in a protective gas medium and executing regularized drop transfer of electrode metal. The drop transfer efficiency of electrode metal and productivity of welding deposition are significantly increased due to excitation of lateral vibrations in the consumable electrode with preset amplitude. The paper describes a method and a device for welding deposition ...

  11. Ultrasonic metal welding with a vibration source using longitudinal and torsional vibration transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Takuya; Tamada, Yosuke; Higuchi, Yusuke; Miura, Hikaru

    2017-07-01

    Conventional ultrasonic metal welding for joining dissimilar metals uses a linear vibration locus, although this method suffers from problems such as low overall weld strength. Our previous studies have shown that ultrasonic welding with a planar vibration locus improves the weld strength. However, the vibration source in our previous studies had problems in longitudinal-torsional vibration controllability and small welding tip. Therefore, the study of the optimal shape of the vibration locus was difficult. Furthermore, improvement of weld strength cannot be expected. We have developed a new ultrasonic vibration source that can control the longitudinal-torsional vibration and can connect to a large welding tip. In this study, we clarified the longitudinal-torsional vibration controllability of the developed ultrasonic vibration source. Moreover, we clarified that using the planar locus of the developed vibration source produced a higher weld strength than our previous studies, and clarified the optimal shape of the vibration locus.

  12. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  13. Digital control of pulsed gas metal arc welding inverter using TMS320LF2407A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Kaiyuan; Huang Shisheng; Li Xinglin; Wu Shuifeng

    2008-01-01

    A digital control of pulsed gas metal arc welding inverter was proposed. A control system consisting of analogue parts was replaced with a new digital control implemented in a TMS320LF2407A DSP chip. The design and constructional features of the whole digital control were presented. The resources of the DSP chip were efficiently utilized and the circuits are very concise, which can enhance the stability and reliability of welding inverter. Experimental results demonstrate that the developed digital control has the ability to accomplish the excellent pulsed gas metal arc welding process and the merits of the developed digital control are stable welding process, little spatter and perfect weld appearance.

  14. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  15. Laser guided and stabilized gas metal arc welding processes (LGS-GMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsdorf, Jörg; Barroi, Alexander; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2013-05-01

    The demands of the industry are cheap and fast production of highly sophisticated parts without compromises in product quality. To realize this requirement, we have developed a laser guided and stabilized gas metal arc process (LGS-GMA welding). The new welding process is based on a gas metal arc process using low power laser radiation for stabilization. The laser stabilization of gas metal arcs welding is applied to joint welding and cladding. With only 400 W laser power and a focal spot of 1.6 mm the laser radiation is mainly interacting with the arc plasma in order to guide and stabilize it. In joint welding up to 100% increase in welding speed is possible, at equal penetration depth. The guidance effect also enables the process to weld in challenging situations like different sheet thicknesses. Used for cladding, the enhanced process stability allows low penetration depth with dilutions of only 3%. Coatings with up to 63 HRC were achieved.

  16. Analysis Microstructure of Weld Metal for HQ130+QJ63 High Strength Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The microstructure in the weld metals for HQ130+QJ63 high strength steels, which are welded by Ar-CO2 gas shielded metal arc welding, was analyzed by means of microscope and scan electron microscope (SEM). The relative content of different microstructure was evaluated with XQF-2000 micro-image analyzer. The effect of acicular ferrite content on the impact toughness was also studied. The test results indicated that the main microstructure in the weld metals of HQ130+QJ63 high strength steels is acicular ferrite and a few pro-eutectic ferrite on the boundary of original austenite grain. Near the fusion zone there are columnar grains whose direction coefficient (X) is 3.22, but the microstructure in the center of the weld metal is isometric grain, whose direction coefficient X=1. In order to avoid welding crack and improve welding technology the weld heat input should be strictly controlled in 10-16 kJ/cm. Thus, the main microstructure in the weld metals is fine acicular ferrite and the content of pro-eutectic ferrite is limited. The impact toughness in the weld metals of HQ130+QJ63 steels can be ensured and can meet the requirements for application in engineering and machinery.

  17. Spot Welding Parameter Optimization to Improve Weld Characteristics for Dissimilar Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravinthan Arumugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance spot welding is a process which is widely used in the automotive industry to join steel parts of various thicknesses and types. The current practice in the automotive industry in determining the welding schedule which will be used in the welding process is based on welding table or experiences. This however may not be the optimum welding schedule that will give the best spot weld quality. This work concentrates on the parameter optimization when spot welding steels with dissimilar thickness and type using Grey Based Taguchi Method. The experimentation in this work used a L9 orthogonal array with three factors with each factor having three levels. The three factors used are welding current weld time and electrode force. The three weld characteristics that were optimized are weld strength weld nugget diameter and weld indentation. The analysis of variance ANOVA that was carried out showed that welding current gave the most significant contribution in the optimum welding schedule. The comparison test that was carried out to compare the current welding schedule and the optimum welding schedule showed distinct improvement in the increase of weld diameter and weld strengthas well as decrease in electrode indentation.

  18. Fatigue Properties of Welded Butt Joint and Base Metal of MB8 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-xia YU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue properties of welded butt joint and base metal of MB8 magnesium alloy were investigated. The comparative fatigue tests were carried out using EHF-EM200K2-070-1A fatigue testing machine for both welded butt joint and base metal specimens with the same size and shape. The fatigue fractures were observed and analyzed by a scanning electron microscope of 6360 LA type. The experimental results show that the fatigue performance of the welded butt joint of MB8 magnesium alloy is sharply decreased. The conditional fatigue limit (1×107 of base metal and welded butt joint is about 69.41 and 32.76 MPa, respectively. The conditional fatigue limit (1×107 of the welded butt joint is 47.2 % of that of base metal. The main reasons are that the welding can lead to stress concentration in the weld toe area, tensile welding residual stress in the welded joint, as well as grain coarsening in the welding seam. The cleavage steps or quasi-cleavage patterns present on the fatigue fracture surface, indicating the fracture type of the welded butt joint belongs to a brittle fracture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.9132

  19. The effect of welding process and shielding atmosphere on the AlMg4.5Mn weld metal properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokic Cvetkovic, Radica; Popovic, Olivera [Belgrade Univ. (Serbia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Burzic, Meri; Jovicic, Radomir [Belgrade Univ. (Serbia). Innovation Center; Kastelec Macura, Sandra [Technikum Taurunum, Zemun (Serbia); Buyukyildirim, Galip [IWE, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, the AlMg4.5Mn alloy has been welded using tungsten inert gas (TIG) and metal inert gas (MIG) processes with different gas shielding atmospheres. Tensile strength, hardness, impact and fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth parameters ({Delta}K{sub th}, da/dN), as well as microstructure were determined. By comparing results for different gas mixtures, the main conclusion for TIG welding was that increased helium content has an important effect on toughness and fatigue crack growth parameters, whereas its effect on other mechanical properties is not significant. On the other hand, in the case of MIG welding, adding helium does not affect mechanical properties, except the fatigue crack growth rate. It was also established that adding nitrogen (TIG welding) and oxygen (MIG welding) reduces toughness and increases crack growth rate, so their use in shielding mixtures is not recommended. (orig.)

  20. Regulatory Status of Dissimilar Metal Weld (DMW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. C.; Hong, J. K.; Shin, H. S.; Kang, S. S.; Song, M. H.; Chung, H. D. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    In this technical article, the regulatory status for Dissimilar Metal Water (DMW) was discussed. In order to decide the regulatory direction of DMW, the USA's accidents of PWSCC and their regulatory directions were reviewed. By reviewing their experiences, the Korean DMW regulation approach was decided.

  1. Corrosion resistance of ERW (Electric Resistance Welded) seam welds as compared to metal base in API 5L steel pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Velasquez, Jorge L.; Godinez Salcedo, Jesus G.; Lopez Fajardo, Pedro [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN), Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas (ESIQIE). Dept. de Ingenieria Metalurgica

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of ERW seam welds and the base metal in API 5L X70 steel pipes was evaluated by Tafel tests. The procedure was according to ASTM G3 standard. The study was completed with metallographic and chemical characterization of the tested zones, that is, the welded zone and the base metal away of the weld. All tests were made on the internal surface of the pipe in order to assess the internal corrosion of an in-service pipeline made of the API 5L X70 steel. The test solution was acid brine prepared according to NACE Publications 1D182 and 1D196. The results showed that the ERW seam weld corrodes as much as three times faster than the base material. This behavior is attributed to a more heterogeneous microstructure with higher internal energy in the ERW seam weld zone, as compared to the base metal, which is basically a ferrite pearlite microstructure in a normalized condition. This result also indicates that pipeline segments made of ERW steel pipe where the seam weld is located near or at the bottom of the pipe are prone to a highly localized attack that may form channels of metal loss if there is water accumulation at the bottom of the pipeline. (author)

  2. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Ultrasonic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Roberts, Scott N. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using ultrasonic welding. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: ultrasonically welding at least one ribbon to a surface; where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface has a thickness of less than approximately 150.mu.m; and where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface includes a metallic glass-based material.

  3. Automatic Submerged ARC Welding With Metal Power Additions to Increase Productivity and Maintain Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Manager of Welding Engineering PROPOSAL WELDING OF CARBON STEEL AND HY80 UTILIZING THE BULK WELDING PROCESS May 9, 1983 PREPARED BY: NEWPORT NEwS...12 joints with carbon steel and 12 with HY80 , utilizing three The joints will requirements of Benefits 1. Deposition times that different size double...of Joint Variations and Deposition Rates Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses; Carbon Steel /HIS Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses

  4. Flexible solution of the fixturing problem in sheet metal laser butt welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Flemming O.

    1994-09-01

    In 20 years laser welding of sheet metal has been demonstrated as a possible high-tech metal joining process. However, the major obstacle to the introduction of laser welding in for example car body manufacturing has been and is the fixturing problem. In case of laser butt welding of 0.5 - 1 mm thick steel sheets, the maximum acceptable gab between the sheets to be welded is in the range of 40 - 50 micrometer. Out of this demand two major problems arise: (1) the high precision required in weld preparation in terms of precise shape of the two sheets to be welded. (2) the problem of maintaining a narrow gab under welding, where thermal distortions, even though they are relatively small in this process, still will open the gap as the welding beam proceeds along the seam. In this paper a unique technique to overcome these problems will be described. The results of the experimental work described in this paper demonstrates the technique in 2D welding, where high quality butt welds has been demonstrated with virtually no clamping forces applied by utilizing a special seam preparation technique. Possibilities in car body manufacturing and other 3D sheet metal assembly by means of the flexible laser welding technique will be discussed.

  5. Sheet metal welding using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi; Kullberg, Gunnar; Skoog, Hans

    This paper presents a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot system for spot and seam welding of mild steel sheets. The study evaluates the laser beams behaviour for welding, and then investigates pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot and seam welding processes. High pulse power intensity is needed to initiate the key-hole welding process and a threshold pulse energy to reach full penetration. In seam welding, a weld consists of successive overlapping spots. Both high pulse energy and high average power are needed to keep the key-hole welding going. A 70% overlap is used to define overlapping spot welding as seam welding and to optimize process parameters because a high tensile strength joint compatible with the strength of the base material can be obtained when the overlap is ≥ 70%; at the same time a smooth seam with full penetration is obtained. In these cases, the joints in pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding are comparable in strength to those obtained with CO 2 laser welding. Robot positioning and motion accuracies can meet the demands of Nd: YAG laser sheet metal welding, but its cornering accuracy affects the welding processes. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the YAG laser-robot system for production in the automotive industry.

  6. Occupational asthma due to gas metal arc welding on mild steel.

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenplas, O.; Dargent, F; Auverdin, J. J.; Boulanger, J.; Bossiroy, J. M.; Roosels, D.; Vande Weyer, R.

    1995-01-01

    Occupational asthma has been documented in electric arc welders exposed to manual metal arc welding on stainless steel. A subject is described who developed late and dual asthmatic reactions after occupational-type challenge exposure to gas metal arc welding on uncoated mild steel.

  7. Field Testing Pulsed Power Inverters in Welding Operations to Control Heavy Metal Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    FINAL REPORT Field Testing Pulsed Power Inverters in Welding Operations to Control Heavy Metal Emissions ESTCP Project WP-200212...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER Field Testing Pulsed Power Inverters in Welding Operations to Control Heavy Metal Emissions 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  8. A study of laser-beam welding conducted at the Centre for Laser Technologies of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszewski, Bogdan; Gradoń, Ryszard; Trela, Paweł; Cendrowicz, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here is part of a larger research project on laser-beam welding conducted at the Centre for Laser Technologies of Metals. The primary objectives were to compare laser-beam welding with a conventional process when used for longitudinal seams in street lamp posts, to select the process parameters for girth welds in cylindrical high-strength steel machine elements, and to assess whether laser-beam welding can be used for magnesium alloys. The paper includes recommendations for the selection of welding parameters.

  9. Influence of welding parameters on nitrogen content in welding metal of 32Mn-7Cr-1Mo-0.3N austenitic steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Rui-dong; QIU Liang; WANG Cun-yu; WANG Qing-feng; ZHENG Yang-zeng

    2005-01-01

    The transfer behavior of nitrogen into the welding metal during gas tungsten arc welding process of 32Mn-7Cr-1Mo-0.3N steel was investigated. The effects of gas tungsten arc welding process variables, such as the volume fraction of nitrogen in shielding gas, arc holding time and arc current on the nitrogen content in the welding metal were also evaluated. The results show that the volume fraction of nitrogen in gas mixture plays a major role in controlling the nitrogen content in the welding metal. It seems that there exhibits a maximum nitrogen content depending on the arc current and arc holding time. The optimum volume fraction of nitrogen in shielding gas is 4% or so. The role of gas tungsten arc welding processing parameters in controlling the transfer of nitrogen is further confirmed by the experimental results of gas tungsten arc welding process with feeding metal.

  10. Metal cutting analogy for establishing Friction Stir Welding process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Sylvester Allen

    A friction stir weld (FSW) is a solid state joining operation whose processing parameters are currently determined by lengthy trial and error methods. To implement FSWing rapidly in various applications will require an approach for predicting process parameters based on the physics of the process. Based on hot working conditions for metals, a kinematic model has been proposed for calculating the shear strain and shear strain rates during the FSW process, validation of the proposed model with direct measuring is difficult however. Since the shear strain and shear strain rates predicted for the FSW process, are similar to those predicted in metal cutting, validation of the FSW algorithms with microstructural studies of metal chips may be possible leading to the ability to predict FSW processing parameters.

  11. Improving resistance welding of aluminum sheets by addition of metal powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Naimi, Ihsan K.; Al-Saadi, Moneer H.; Daws, Kasim M.

    2015-01-01

    . The improvement obtained is shown to be due to the development of a secondary bond in the joint beside the weld nugget increasing the total weld area. The application of powder additive is especially feasible, when using welding machines with insufficient current capacity for producing the required nugget size......In order to ensure good quality joints between aluminum sheets by resistance spot welding, a new approach involving the addition of metal powder to the faying surfaces before resistance heating is proposed. Three different metal powders (pure aluminum and two powders corresponding to the alloys AA......2024 and AA7075) are investigated for the resistance spot welding of AA1050 aluminum sheets of three different thicknesses. Microstructural and mechanical analysis demonstrates that significant improvement in weld bead morphology and strength are obtained with the addition of metal powder...

  12. Promising HE for explosive welding of thin metallic foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deribas, A. A.; Mikhaylov, A. L.; Titova, N. N.; Zocher, Marvin A.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results are presented on the development of a high explosive (HE) suitable for the welding of thin metallic foils. The explosive is formed from a mixture of brisant HE (RDX or PETN) and an inert material, namely sodium bicarbonate. Sodium bicarbonate releases a rather large quantity of gas during decomposition, the effects of which are discussed. Measurements of detonation velocity and critical thickness for specific mixture combinations are presented. It is shown that particle size (of the RDX or PETN component) has a significant effect upon detonation velocity and critical thickness. Compositions were developed which have a stable detonation velocity ~2 km/s with a layer thickness ~ 2 mm.

  13. Effect of Some Overlay Welding Regime With Longitudinal Magnetic Field on Hardness, Phase Composition And Welded Layer Wear By Arc Method With Flux Metal Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosov, D. G.; Peremitko, V. V.; Barashkin, M. H.

    2016-08-01

    The paper defines the range of overlay welding current, frequencies and induction of a longitudinal magnetic field that enhance the wear resistance of welded layer additing the flux. The conditions of their mutual influence on the process of structure formation are stated as well as the mathematical models linking the overlay welding current, frequency and induction of a longitudinal magnetic field with hardness, wear resistance and phase composition of the welded layer, the use of which will allow to determine the welding modes to provide the necessary properties of the weld metal.

  14. Friction Stir.Welding is an advance metal joining process: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Das,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The friction stir welding is recently developed solid state welding process which overcome the problem associated with fusion welding technology. The properties achieved by friction stir welding is better than that achieve by fusion welding technique It has been invented as a solid-state joining technique and initially applied to aluminum alloys. FSW is used to replace rivets joints in the aeronautical industry. Recently the aircraft and military industries widely have been using aluminum alloys particularly because of their fine strength to weight ratio. However in compare with steels they represent welding difficulties and also lower ductility. In last years it has been observed that Friction Stir Welding (FSW method represents better microstructure and mechanical properties than conventional methods in welding aluminum alloys. It has been widely investigated for mostly low melting materials, such as Al, Mg and Cu alloys. Aluminum is the most usable material in engineering application and a lot of improvement is needed in the area of its welding. The latest works on friction stir welding of aluminum have been directed towards improving the quality of weld, reducing defects and applying the process of FSW to aluminum for specific applications. This joining technique is energy efficient, environment friendly, and versatile. In particular, it can be used to join high-strength aerospace aluminum alloys and other metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. FSW is considered to be the most significant development in metal joining in a last decade. The FSW of Aluminums and its alloys has been commercialized; and recent interest is focused on joining dissimilar materials. However, in order to commercialize the process, research studies are required to characterize and establish proper process parameters for FSW. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of this welding processes in the field of welding. Future aspects of

  15. Effect of Boric Acid Concentration on Viscosity of Slag and Property of Weld Metal Obtained from Underwater Wet Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Guo, Wei; Xu, Changsheng; Du, Yongpeng; Feng, Jicai

    2015-06-01

    Underwater wet welding is a crucial repair and maintenance technology for nuclear plant. A boric acid environment raises a new challenge for the underwater welding maintenance of nuclear plant. This paper places emphasis on studying the influence of a boric acid environment in nuclear plant on the underwater welding process. Several groups of underwater wet welding experiments have been conducted in boric acid aqueous solution with different concentration (0-35000 ppm). The viscosity of the welding slag and the mechanical properties of welds, such as the hardness, strength, and elongation, have been studied. The results show that with increasing boric acid concentration, the viscosity of the slag decreases first and then increases at a lower temperature (less than 1441 °C). However, when the temperature is above 1480 °C, the differences between the viscosity measurements become less pronounced, and the viscosity tends to a constant value. The hardness and ductility of the joints can be enhanced significantly, and the maximum strength of the weld metal can be reached at 2300 ppm.

  16. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  17. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  18. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10-20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%.

  19. ELECTRIC ARC WELDING DEPOSITION OF METALLIC SURFACES BY VIBRATING ELECTRODE IN PROTECTIVE GAS MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Spiridonov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods for obtaining qualitative metallic surfaces by electric arc welding deposition while using consumable electrode in a protective gas medium and executing regularized drop transfer of electrode metal. The drop transfer efficiency of electrode metal and productivity of welding deposition are significantly increased due to excitation of lateral vibrations in the consumable electrode with preset amplitude. The paper describes a method and a device for welding deposition of metallic surfaces by vibrating  electrode where vibrations are excited by ultrasound.

  20. Influence of metal vapour on arc temperatures in gas-metal arc welding: convection versus radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2013-06-01

    The presence of metal vapour in gas-metal arc welding has been shown to have two strong effects on the arc plasma: a decrease in temperature throughout the arc, and the formation of a local temperature minimum near the arc axis. These effects have been attributed, on the basis of different computational models, to either the increased radiative emission associated with the presence of metal vapour in the arc plasma, or the influence of the metal vapour influx on convective flow in the arc. This question is investigated using a three-dimensional computational model in which the production and the transport of metal vapour are taken into account self-consistently. Parameters relevant to welding of thin sheets of aluminum are examined. For these conditions, it is found that the first effect (the decrease in temperature throughout the arc) is due to both the increased radiative emission and the influence of the metal vapour influx on flow. The second effect (the local temperature minimum, which in this case occurs just below the wire electrode) is a consequence of the influence of aluminum vapour produced from the wire electrode on flow in the arc. By examining published results and the energy balance in the plasma, it is shown that for welding of steel with higher arc currents, the increased radiative emission can lead to a local temperature minimum at a greater distance from the wire electrode.

  1. Mechanical property variation within Inconel 82/182 dissimilar metal weld between low alloy steel and 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Changheui [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Jounghoon [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung Kim, Jong; Eun Jin, Tae [Korea Power Engineering Company, 360-9 Mabuk-ri, Guseong-eup, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 449-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    In several locations of pressurized water reactors, dissimilar metal welds using Inconel welding wires are used to join the low alloy steel components to stainless-steel pipes. Because of the existence of different materials and chemistry variation within welds, mechanical properties, such as tensile and fracture properties, are expected to show spatial variation. For design and integrity assessment of the dissimilar welds, these variations should be evaluated. In this study, dissimilar metal welds composed of low alloy steel, Inconel 82/182 weld, and stainless steel were prepared by gas tungsten arc welding and shielded metal arc welding techniques. Microstructures were observed using optical and electron microscopes. Typical dendrite structures were observed in Inconel 82/182 welds. Tensile tests using standard and mini-sized specimens and micro-hardness tests were conducted to measure the variation in strength along the thickness of the weld as well as across the weld. In addition, fracture toughness specimens were taken at the bottom, middle, and top of the welds and tested to evaluate the spatial variation along the thickness. It was found that while the strength is about 50-70 MPa greater at the bottom of the weld than at the top of the weld, fracture toughness values at the top of the weld are about 70% greater than those at the bottom of the weld.

  2. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Weld Metal and Heat-Affected Zone of Electron Beam-Welded Joints of HG785D Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Han, Jianmin; Tan, Caiwang; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Junqiang

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum electron beam welding (EBW) process was employed to butt weld 10-mm-thick HG785D high-strength steels. The penetration into the steel was adjusted by beam current. Microstructures at weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) regions were comparatively observed. Mechanical properties of the EBWed joints including Vickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact tests were evaluated. The results indicated that microstructures at the weld metal consisted of coarse lath martensite and a small amount of acicular martensite, while that in the HAZ was tempered sorbite and martensite. The grain size in the weld metal was found to be larger than that in the HAZ, and its proportion in weld metal was higher. The hardness in the weld metal was higher than the HAZ and base metal. The tensile strength and impact toughness in the HAZ was higher than that in the weld metal. All the behaviors were related to microstructure evolution caused by higher cooling rates and state of base metal. The fracture surfaces of tensile and impact tests on the optimized joint were characterized by uniform and ductile dimples. The results differed significantly from that obtained using arc welding process.

  3. The effects of initial welding temperature and welding parameters on the crystallization behaviors of laser spot welded Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huei-Sen, E-mail: huei@mail.isu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung County 84001, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Mau-Sheng; Chen, Hou-Guang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung County 84001, Taiwan (China); Jang, Jason Shian-Ching [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan County 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-15

    This study investigated the effects of the initial welding temperature (IWT) and welding parameters on the crystallization behaviors of laser spot welded (Zr{sub 53}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 9}Al{sub 8})Si{sub 0.5} bulk metallic glass (BMG). After the welding process, the microstructure evolution, glass-forming ability (GFA) and mechanical properties of the welded samples were determined by a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the Vicker's micro-hardness test. The results showed that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) crystallization seemed avoidable under the room temperature welding process. However, with a combination of a lower energy input (welding Condition C) and a lower IWT (at 0 deg. C), a crystallization-free HAZ was finally obtained. Using the above welding condition into the refined heat flow equation, a critical retention time of 79 ms for the crystallization temperature interval was estimated. Moreover, as the laser welded samples came to crystallization in the HAZ, it was observed that a higher content of spherical-type crystalline precipitates tended to result in a higher value of glass transition temperature, T{sub g}. Therefore, the GFA indices, {Delta}T{sub x}, {gamma} and {gamma}{sub m}, were reduced. Furthermore, it was found that the micro-hardness value in the HAZ crystallization area was decreased due to the massive cracks formed in most parts of the crystalline precipitates. For a crystallization-free HAZ, the hardness seemed unaffected.

  4. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Haghshenas, M., E-mail: mhaghshe@uwaterloo.ca [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nguyen, T. [Mechanical Systems Engineering, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Galloway, J. [Welding Engineering Technology, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  5. Life time assessment and repair of dissimilar metal welds. Part 1; Livslaengdsbedoemning och reparation av blandsvetsskarvar. Etapp 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld

    2005-04-01

    Research on the performance of dissimilar metal welds in high temperature plant has been performed for many years. Nevertheless damages are frequent in such welds. In order to decrease the damage problems and make it possible to estimate residual lifetimes of dissimilar metal welds in our Nordic countries it is first essential to i) collect the knowledge in the literature and ii) map current dissimilar metal welds and their condition in Swedish and Danish plants. The present report describes this first part of the work. There is a comprehensive literature of she subject. Most work has been performed on ferritic/austenitic dissimilar welds. In Swedish and Danish plants the dominating type is ferritic/martensitic dissimilar welds. The damage mechanisms are about the same in the two types, creep is the dominating mechanism, but plant experience indicates that the ferritic/austenitic combination is more prone to damage than the ferritic/martensitic one. An important difference between the two types is that Ni-base weld metal generally prolongs the lifetime for ferritic/austenitic dissimilar welds whereas it shows an opposite effect in ferritic/martensitic ones. In the latter case use of a 5 % Cr weld metal seems to be the best choice but the experiences of such welds are limited. The mapping of dissimilar welds indicates that there are predominantly special kinds of welds which fail whereas ordinary butt welds and branch welds are relatively free from damage.

  6. The optimization of welding regime parameters at shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) by mathematical modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    V. Petrescu; G. Paraschiv; D. Dobrotă

    2016-01-01

    The realized researches followed the determining of mathematical models that allow the optimization of the welding process in order to obtain welded joints with certain values of the mechanical characteristics...

  7. An investigation of the microstructures and properties of metal inert gas and friction stir welds in aluminum alloy 5083

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R Yazdipour; A Shafiei M; H Jamshidi Aval

    2011-08-01

    Two different types of welds, Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Friction Stir Welding (FSW), have been used to weld aluminum alloy 5083. The microstructure of the welds, including the nugget zone and heat affected zone, has been compared in these two methods using optical microscopy. The mechanical properties of the weld have been also investigated using the hardness and tensile tests. The results show that both the methods could successfully be used to weld such alloy. The strength of the joints is comparable to the strength of the base metal in both cases. However, FSWed samples have shown higher strength in comparison to the MIG samples. The results also show that the extension of the heat affected zone is higher in the MIG method in comparison to the FSW method. The weld metal microstructure of MIG welded specimen contains equiaxed dendrites as a result of solidification process during MIG welding while FSWed samples have wrought microstructures.

  8. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. U. Anaele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated, E 308-16(lime-titania coated electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range of 1.5≤Creq./Nieq.≤1.9 and solidified with a duplex mode and were found to be resistant to solidification cracking. The E 308-16 weld metal had the greatest resistance to solidification cracking. Joints produced from E 310-16 had Creq./Nieq. ratio 1.9 and solidified with ferrite mode. It had a low resistance to solidification cracking.

  9. Weld pool temperatures of steel S235 while applying a controlled short-circuit gas metal arc welding process and various shielding gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakov, R.; Schöpp, H.; Gött, G.; Sperl, A.; Wilhelm, G.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2013-11-01

    The temperature determination of liquid metals is difficult and depends strongly on the emissivity. However, the surface temperature distribution of the weld pool is an important characteristic of an arc weld process. As an example, short-arc welding of steel with a cold metal transfer (CMT) process is considered. With optical emission spectroscopy in the spectral region between 660 and 840 nm and absolute calibrated high-speed camera images the relation between temperature and emissivity of the weld pool is determined. This method is used to obtain two-dimensional temperature profiles in the pictures. Results are presented for welding materials (wire G3Si1 on base material S235) using different welding CMT processes with CO2 (100%), Corgon 18 (18% CO2 + 82% Ar), VarigonH6 (93.5% Ar + 6.5% H2) and He (100%) as shielding gases. The different gases are used to study their influence on the weld pool temperature.

  10. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-06-30

    Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

  11. Optimization of Filler Metals Consumption in the Production of Welded Steel Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pańcikiewicz K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the some aspects of the optimization of filler metals consumption in the production of welded steel structures. Correct choice of beveling method can allow to decrease cost of production and increase quality. The review of calculation methods of filler metal consumption at the design stage was carried out. Moreover, the practical examples of amount of filler metals calculation were presented and analyzed. The article also contain examples of mobile apps which are makes it easy to see welding costs in just a few seconds. Apps as well as simple excel spreadsheets with correct mathematic equations allows to optimize welding process.

  12. Microstructure characterization in the weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 high strength steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wang Juan; Li Yajiang

    2003-04-01

    Microstructural characterization of the weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 high strength steels, welded under 80% Ar + 20% CO2 gas shielded metal arc welding and different weld heat inputs, was carried out by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The relative contents of acicular ferrite (AF) and pro-eutectic ferrites (PF) in the weld metals were evaluated by means of XQF-2000 micro-image analyser. The experimental results indicate that there is acicular ferrite in the grain and some pro-eutectic ferrite on the boundary of original austenite grains when the weld heat input is small ( = 9.6 kJ/cm), but the main microstructure is ferrite side plate (FSP) when the heat input is larger ( = 22.3 kJ/cm). So the weld heat input should be strictly controlled in the range 10 ∼ 20 kJ/cm and then the content of pro-eutectic ferrite is limited to $\\lt$ 25%. Thus weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 high strength steels with high toughness and excellent resistance to cracking can be ensured.

  13. Metal ion release from silver soldering and laser welding caused by different types of mouthwash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Ayse Tuygun; Nalbantgil, Didem; Ulkur, Feyza; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2015-07-01

    To compare metal ion release from samples welded with silver soldering and laser welding when immersed into mouthwashes with different ingredients. A total of 72 samples were prepared: 36 laser welded and 36 silver soldered. Four samples were chosen from each subgroup to study the morphologic changes on their surfaces via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Each group was further divided into four groups where the samples were submerged into mouthwash containing sodium fluoride (NaF), mouthwash containing sodium fluoride + alcohol (NaF + alcohol), mouthwash containing chlorhexidine (CHX), or artificial saliva (AS) for 24 hours and removed thereafter. Subsequently, the metal ion release from the samples was measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The metal ion release among the solutions and the welding methods were compared. The Kruskal-Wallis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were used for the group comparisons, and post hoc Dunn multiple comparison test was utilized for the two group comparisons. The level of metal ion release from samples of silver soldering was higher than from samples of laser welding. Furthermore, greater amounts of nickel, chrome, and iron were released from silver soldering. With regard to the mouthwash solutions, the lowest amounts of metal ions were released in CHX, and the highest amounts of metal ions were released in NaF + alcohol. SEM images were in accord with these findings. The laser welding should be preferred over silver soldering. CHX can be recommended for patients who have welded appliances for orthodontic reasons.

  14. Influence of Heat Input on Martensite Formation and Impact Property of Ferritic-Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Metals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Mukherjee T.K. Pal

    2012-01-01

    .... The welded joints were evaluated by microstructure and charpy impact toughness. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on heat input and filler wires were determined by dilution calculation, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE...

  15. Comparison of joint designs for laser welding of cast metal plates and wrought wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare joint designs for the laser welding of cast metal plates and wrought wire, and to evaluate the welded area internally using X-ray micro-focus computerized tomography (micro-CT). Cast metal plates (Ti, Co-Cr) and wrought wires (Ti, Co-Cr) were welded using similar metals. The specimens were welded using four joint designs in which the wrought wires and the parent metals were welded directly (two designs) or the wrought wires were welded to the groove of the parent metal from one or both sides (n = 5). The porosity and gap in the welded area were evaluated by micro-CT, and the maximum tensile load of the welded specimens was measured with a universal testing machine. An element analysis was conducted using an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. The statistical analysis of the results was performed using Bonferroni's multiple comparisons (α = 0.05). The results included that all the specimens fractured at the wrought wire when subjected to tensile testing, although there were specimens that exhibited gaps due to the joint design. The wrought wires were affected by laser irradiation and observed to melt together and onto the filler metal. Both Mo and Sn elements found in the wrought wire were detected in the filler metal of the Ti specimens, and Ni was detected in the filler metal of the Co-Cr specimens. The four joint designs simulating the designs used clinically were confirmed to have adequate joint strength provided by laser welding.

  16. Micro Structural Comparison of Friction Stir Weldment and Shielded Metal Arc Welding in API-X65 Pipe Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Shahinfar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and microhardness properties of the friction stir welded zones and shielded metal arc welded. Microstructural analysis of the weld was carried out using optical microscopy. Under FSW process base metal microstructure fully changed. Different heat inputs were obtained using a fix travel (welding speed in combination with several spindle speeds. Heat input during welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical proprieties in the various weld regions.it can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone hardness increase.

  17. Simulation on friction taper plug welding of AA6063-20Gr metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nithin, Abeyram M.

    2016-05-01

    Friction taper plug welding a variant of friction welding is useful in welding of similar and dissimilar materials. It could be used for joining of composites to metals in sophisticated aerospace applications. In the present work numerical simulation of friction taper plug welding process is carried out using finite element based software. Graphite reinforced AA6063 is modelled using the software ANSYS 15.0 and temperature distribution is predicted. Effect of friction time on temperature distribution is numerically investigated. When the friction time is increased to 30 seconds, the tapered part of plug gets detached and fills the hole in the AA6063 plate perfectly.

  18. High-cycle Fatigue Properties of Alloy718 Base Metal and Electron Beam Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Nagashima, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Hideshi; Ogata, Toshio; Nagao, Naoki

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Alloy 718 plate and its electron beam (EB) welded joint were investigated at 293 K and 77 K under uniaxial loading. At 293 K, the high-cycle fatigue strength of the EB welded joint with the post heat treatment exhibited somewhat lower values than that of the base metal. The fatigue strengths of both samples basically increased at 77 K. However, in longer life region, the EB welded joint fractured from a blow hole formed in the welded zone, resulting in almost the same fatigue strength at 107 cycles as that at 293 K.

  19. Alloying Elements Transition Into the Weld Metal When Using an Inventor Power Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamadaliev, R. A.; Kuskov, V. N.; Popova, A. A.; Valuev, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    The temperature distribution over the surface of the welded 12Kh18N10T steel plates using the inventor power source ARC-200 has been calculated. In order to imitate multipass welding when conducting the thermal analysis the initial temperature was changed from 298K up to 798K in 100K increments. It has been determined that alloying elements transition into the weld metal depends on temperature. Using an inventor power source facilitates a uniform distribution of alloying elements along the length and height of the weld seam.

  20. Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

  1. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  2. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  3. Numerical simulation of dissimilar metal welding and its verification for determination of residual stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sz. Szávai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the results of the through-thickness residual stress distributions on dissimilar metal weld (DMW mock-up. DMWs, as welded joints between ferritic steels and either austenitic stainless steels or nickel-based alloys, are commonly found in piping systems of NPPs as well as in other industrial plants. The welding of the mock-up is simulated by the 3D finite element model using temperature and phase dependent material properties. The commercial finite element code MSC.Marc is used to obtain the numerical results by implementing the Goldak’s double ellipsoidal shaped weld heat source and combined convection radiation boundary conditions. Residual stress measurements are performed on welded joints to validate the simulation results. The validated residual stress distributions can be used for the life time assessment and failure mode predictions of the welded joints.

  4. Penetration control in laser welding of sheet metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Meijer, Johan; Jonker, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    For economical reasons it is desirable to apply the highest possible speed during laser welding. Increasing the welding speed at a certain laser power might result in insufficient penetration of the weld. This work describes the design of a feedback controller, which is able to maintain full penetra

  5. A Computer Aided System for Simulating Weld Metal Solidification Crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A computer-aided system for simulating weld solidification crack has been developed by which a welding engineer can carry out the welding solidification crack simulation on the basis of a commercial finite element analysis software package. Its main functions include calculating the heat generations of the moving arc, mesh generation, calculating stress-strain distributions with element rebirth technique.

  6. Effect of Shoulder Size on Weld Properties of Dissimilar Metal Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlabi, E. T.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports a research study that shows the effect of shoulder diameter size on the resulting weld properties of dissimilar friction stir welds between 5754 aluminum alloy (AA) and C11000 copper (Cu). Welds were produced using three different shoulder diameter tools: 15, 18, and 25 mm by varying the rotational speed between 600 and 1200 rpm and the traverse speed between 50 and 300 mm/min to achieve the best result. Each parameter combination was chosen to represent different heat input conditions (low, intermediates and high). The welds were characterized through microstructural evaluation, tensile testing, microhardness measurements, x-ray diffraction analysis, and electrical resistivity. Microstructural evaluation of the welds revealed that the welds produced consisted of all the friction stir welding (FSW) microstructure zones with organized flow lines comprising mixture layers of aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) at the Stir Zones. The average Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the welds considered ranged from 178 to 208 MPa. Higher Vickers microhardness values were measured at the joint interfaces of all the welds because of the presence of intermetallic compounds in these regions. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed the presence of Al4Cu9 and Al2Cu intermetallics at the interfacial regions, and low electrical resistivities were obtained at the joint interfaces. An optimized parameter setting for FSW of Al and Cu was obtained at the weld produced at 950 rpm and 50 mm/min with the 18-mm shoulder diameter tool.

  7. Pulsed Current Gas Metal Arc Welding under Different Shielding and Pulse Parameters; Part 2: Behaviour of Metal Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghosh, P. K; Dorn, Lutz; Devakumaran, K; Hofmann, F

    2009-01-01

    ...) of pulsed current gas metal arc welding (P-GMAW) using mild steel filler wire have been studied with respect to change in pulse parameters under different gas shieldings of Ar+2%CO2 and Ar+18%CO2...

  8. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The safety issue has been raised with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal could detach and come in contact with astronauts and burn through the fabric of the astronauts' Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding in space. Molten metal detachments from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut if the detachment was to burn through the fabric of the EMU. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The primary molten metal detachment concerns were those cases of molten metal separation from the metal surface due to metal cutting, weld pool splashing, entrainment and release of molten metal due to filler wire snap-out from the weld puddle, and molten metal accumulation and release from the end of the weld wire. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were developed for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. The surface tension represents the force opposing the liquid metal drop from detaching whereas the weight of the liquid metal droplet represents a force that is tending to detach the molten metal drop. Theoretical calculations have indicated that only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop; however, much of the energy of an impact is absorbed in the sample or weld plate before it reaches the metal drop on the cut edge or surface. The tendency for detachment is directly proportional to the weld pool radius and metal density and inversely proportional to the surface

  9. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  10. Welding Stainless Steels and Refractory Metals Using Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Nd:YAG Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Pong, R; Gauthier, M D

    2004-09-27

    This report provides an overview of a series of developmental welding studies performed on a 2.2 kW Rofin Sinar DY-022 Diode Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG welder at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Several materials systems, ranging from refractory metals, such as commercially pure tantalum and vanadium, to austenitic stainless steels, including both 304L and 21-6-9 grades, are examined. Power input and travel speed are systematically varied during the welding of each materials system, and the width, depth, and cross sectional area of the resulting weld fusion zones are measured. These individual studies are undertaken in order to characterize the response of the welder to changes in these welding parameters for a range of materials and to determine the maximum depth of penetration of which this welder is capable in each materials system. The maximum weld depths, which are on the order of 5.4 mm, are observed in the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel at the maximum laser power setting (2200 W) and a slow travel speed (6.4 mm/sec). The next highest weld depth is observed in the 304L stainless steel, followed by that observed in the vanadium and, finally, in the tantalum. Porosity, which is attributed to the collapse of the keyhole during welding, is also observed in the welds produced in tantalum, vanadium, and 304L stainless steel. Only the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel welds displayed little or no porosity over the range of welding parameters. Comparisons with similar laser welding systems are also made for several of these same materials systems. When compared with the welds produced by these other systems, the LLNL system typically produces welds of an equivalent or slightly higher depth.

  11. Influence of longitudinal magnetic field on metal transfer in MIG arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Yunlong; Che Xiaoping; He Youyou; Hu Guangxu

    2008-01-01

    Metal transfer is an important phenomenon in metal inert gas (MIG) arc welding with longitudinal alternating magnetic field. It is of great significance to observe the metal transfer modes under different excitatory currents and frequencies. However, it is very difficult to view the metal transfer process directly during welding, due to the strong interference from the arc light. To obtain the relationship between the metal transfer modes and the different magnetic fields, a high-speed video camera was used to acquire the images of globules. Different metal transfer modes under the conditions of different magnetic fields and welding parameters were studied. The experiment shows clear images of droplet transfer as well as influence of longitudinal magnetic field on both metal transfer and globule shape.

  12. The influence of electric ARC activation on the speed of heating and the structure of metal in welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savytsky Oleksandr M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research related to the impact of electric arc activation onto drive welding energy and metal weld heating speed. It is confirmed that ATIG and AMIG methods, depending on metal thickness, single pass weldability and chemical composition of activating flux, enable the reduction of welding energy by 2-6 times when compared to conventional welding methods. Additionally, these procedures create conditions to increase metal weld heating speed up to 1,500-5,500°C/s-1. Steel which can be rapidly heated, allows for a hardened structure to form (with carbon content up to 0.4%, together with a released martensitic structure or a mixture of bainitic-martensitic structures. Results of the research of effectiveness of ATIG and AMIG welding showed that increase in the penetration capability of electric arc, which increases welding productivity, is the visible side of ATIG and AMIG welding capabilities.

  13. Laser welding of stainless steel weld filler metals at high cooling rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Several stainless steels were laser welded under conditions resulting in high cooling rates of the welds. Significant changes in the microstructures, compared to those produced by conventional welding techniques, were found. For alloys 304, 308, 309, 316 and 347, a general decrease in ferrite content with increasing cooling rate was found. For three alloys (304, 308, 347), a fully austenitic structure was obtained at the highest cooling rates. For alloys 312 and 446, the high cooling rates retarded the formation of austenite, resulting in higher ferrite contents and fully ferritic structures at the highest cooling rates. Only for alloy 310 was the microstructure after laser welding comparable to that found after conventional welding. The results are discussed in terms of their impact on the Schaeffler diagram and its applicability to laser welding. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Welding overlay analysis of dissimilar metal weld cracking of feedwater nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Y.L., E-mail: YLTsai@itri.org.t [National Chiao Tung University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 1001 TaHsueh Road, HsinChu, Taiwan 30010 (China); Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), 195 Chung Hsing Rd., Sec.4 Chu Tung, HsinChu, Taiwan 310 (China); Wang, Li. H. [Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), 195 Chung Hsing Rd., Sec.4 Chu Tung, HsinChu, Taiwan 310 (China); Fan, T.W. [Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), 195 Chung Hsing Rd., Sec.4 Chu Tung, HsinChu, Taiwan 310 (China); Chung Hua University, Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Informatics, 707, Sec.2, WuFu Rd., HsinChu, Taiwan 300 (China); Ranganath, Sam [Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), 195 Chung Hsing Rd., Sec.4 Chu Tung, HsinChu, Taiwan 310 (China); Wang, C.K. [Taiwan Power Company (TPC), No.242, Sec. 3, Roosevelt Rd., Zhongzheng District, Taipei City 100, Taiwan (China); Chou, C.P. [National Chiao Tung University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 1001 TaHsueh Road, HsinChu, Taiwan 30010 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Inspection of the weld between the feedwater nozzle and the safe end at one Taiwan BWR showed axial indications in the Alloy 182 weld. The indication was sufficiently deep that continued operation could not be justified considering the crack growth for one cycle. A weld overlay was decided to implement for restoring the structural margin. This study reviews the cracking cases of feedwater nozzle welds in other nuclear plants, and reports the lesson learned in the engineering project of this weld overlay repair. The overlay design, the FCG calculation and the stress analysis by FEM are presented to confirm that the Code Case structural margins are met. The evaluations of the effect of weld shrinkage on the attached feedwater piping are also included. A number of challenges encountered in the engineering and analysis period are proposed for future study.

  15. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Raffi Mohammed; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Srinivasa Rao

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD) method was used to determine t...

  16. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M.; Pardal, Goncalo R.; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al–steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption. PMID:27504075

  17. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, Anton S; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M; Pardal, Goncalo R; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W Bruce

    2016-08-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al-steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption.

  18. Prediction of solidification and phase transformation in weld metals for welding of high performance stainless steels; Kotaishoku kotainetsu stainless koyo yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko hentai no yosoku gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, T.; Inoue, H.; Morimoto, H.; Okita, S. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    Prediction technology is introduced on the solidification and transformation of weld metals used for high performance stainless steel. A model has been developed which uses Thermo Calc, a multiple balanced calculation program, as a means to analyze the solidification of multi-component alloys including the polyphase solidification such as eutectic and peritectic. Verification has been in progress concerning the adequacy of this model and the adaptability as a practical steel. The following are the prediction technologies for solidification and transformation which have been derived from experiments and applied to welding techniques: the effects of nitrogen on the solidification mode and residual {gamma}quantity of a welding metal that is required for controlling the welding/solidification of high nitrogen content {gamma}system stainless steel; the structural control of weld metal for high corrosion resistance high Mo stainless steel, in which high Ni and high Mo contents are indispensable for attaining the optimum structure; the structural control of weld metal for two-phase stainless steel containing Mo and N, in which it is essential to secure a high nitrogen content and a {delta}/{gamma}phase balance in a weld metal; and the precipitation prediction of intermetallic compound in a high alloy weld metal for a high alloy stainless steel, for which an explanation is there by Cieslak et al. based on the phase stability theory. 22 refs., 16 figs.

  19. Microstructure evaluation in low alloy steel weld metal from convective heat transfer calculations in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundra, K.; DebRoy, T.; Babu, S.S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heat transfer and fluid flow during manual metal arc welding of low alloy steels were investigated by solving the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in three dimensions. Cooling rates were calculated at various locations in the weldment. Calculated cooling rates were coupled with an existing phase transformation model to predict percentages of acicular, allotriomorphic, and Widmanstaetten ferrites in various low alloy steel welds containing different concentration of V and Mn. Computed microstructures were in good agreement with experiment, indicating promise for predicting weld metal microstructure from the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  20. EFFECT OF Fe2O3 ON WELDING TECHNOLOGY AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WELD METAL DEPOSITED BY SELF-SHIELDED FLUX CORED WIRE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Ping; Pan Chuan; Xue Jin; Li Zhengbang

    2005-01-01

    Five experimental self-shielded flux cored wires are fabricated with different amount of Fe2O3 in the flux. The effect of Fe2O3 on welding technology and mechanical properties of weld metals deposited by these wires are studied. The results show that with the increase of Fe2O3 in the mix, the melting point of the pretreated mix is increased. LiBaF3 and BaFe12O19, which are very low in inherent moisture, are formed after the pretreatment. The mechanical properties are evaluated to the weld metals. The low temperature notch toughness of the weld metals is increased linearly with the Fe2O3 content in the flux due to the balance between Fe2O3 and residual Al in the weld metal. The optimum Fe2O3 content in flux is 2.5%~3.5 %.

  1. MODEL PEMBELAJARAN PRAKTIK PENGELASAN SHIELED METAL ARC WELDING(SMAW POSISI 1G JURUSAN TEKNIK PENGELASAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masri Bin Ardin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk: (1 mendeskripsikan model pembelajaran praktik yang berlangsung atau disebut model pembelajaran regular praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G di SMK Negeri 2 Pengasih; (2 mengetahui efektifitas dan mendeskripsikan bahan yang digunakan dalam praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G, misalnya: besi plat, mata gerinda, elektroda, dan waktu yang digunakan selama praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian deskriptif dengan teknik pengumpulan data menggunakan wawancara, dokumentasi, angket dan penilaian skill pengelasan. Asessment skill pengelasan mengacu pada Acean Skill Welding Competition. Hasil penelitian yaitu: (1 model pembelajaran praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G terdiri dari 4 pertemuan teori dan 13 pertemuan praktik; (2 model pembelajaran praktik pengelasan di SMKN 2 Pengasih sudah efektif tetapi untuk rutinitas pengelasan belum efektif untuk membentuk skill pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G dengan sistem assesment Asean Skill Welding Competition. Fasilitas utama dalam praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G adalah mesin las. Sementara itu SMKN 2 pengasih memiliki 6 buah mesin las dengan rasio 1 mesin las untuk 5 orang siswa. Bahan habis pakai untuk 30 orang siswa per semester yang menggunakan model pembelajaran praktek pengelasan adalah besi plat ± 100-150 kg, mata gerinda total ± 5-6 keping, elektroda ± 9-10 box dan total waktunya aktif 77 jam selama satu semester. Kata kunci: pembelajaran Praktik Pengelasan SMAW, Skill Siswa untuk Posisi 1G LEARNING MODEL OF SHIELD METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW PRACTICE OF 1G POSITION AT THE WELDING ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Abstract This research aimed to: (1 describe the learning model of shield metal arc welding (SMAW practice of 1G position at the Welding Engineering Department of State Vocational High School (SMKN 2 Pengasih; (2 find the effectiveness and describe materials needed in the learning model of shield metal arc welding (SMAW practice of 1G position, for examples

  2. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  3. Fine micro-welding of thin metal sheet by high speed laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Gillner, Arnold; Olowinsky, Alexander; Gedicke, Jens; Uno, Yoshiyuki

    2007-05-01

    Recently, since the size of component becomes smaller, then the welding of thin metal sheet has been required. Besides, the flexibility of process is important according to the accessibility especially for small components. Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology had developed the SHADOW ® welding technology, in which the high speed joining with small distortion is possible using pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The possibility of high speed and high quality welding had been reported by using single-mode fiber laser. The combination of micro beam and high speed laser scanning has the advantages for thin metal sheet welding. Therefore, the characteristics of micro-welding for thin metal sheet were investigated by high speed laser scanning, in which the welding was carried out by high speed scanner system with single-mode fiber laser and pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The proper welding region was narrow by the laser beam with a large focus diameter of 160 μm without pulse control, while a small focus diameter of 22 μm can control the welding state widely. A small focus diameter can perform the excellent welding seam from the extreme beginning without pulse control. The penetration depth can be controlled by the energy density with a small focus diameter of 22 μm at the energy densities less than 1 J/mm2. Besides, the unique periodic structure appeared at the high velocity of beam scanning with a small focus diameter. Moreover, the overlap welding of 25 μm thickness sheet can be performed regardless of small gap distance between two sheets by the laser beam with a small focus diameter of 22 μm.

  4. Investigation of welding crack in micro laser welded NiTiNb shape memory alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy dissimilar metals joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhua, Chen; Yuqing, Mao; Weiwei, Lu; Peng, He

    2017-06-01

    Dissimilar metals of NiTiNb shape memory alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy with a same thickness of 0.2 mm were joined by micro laser welding. The effect of laser power on crack sensitivity of the weld was investigated. The results show that full penetrated welds are obtained when the laser power of 7.2 W is used, many cracks are observed in the weld. With increasing the laser power to 12 W, the number of all cracks and cracking width first increase and then decrease. By XRD analysis, three different kinds of Ti2Ni, NbNi3 and AlNbTi2 intermetallic compounds are found in the weld. According to the formation enthalpy and binary phase diagram, brittle Ti2Ni phase with more contents is existed in the weld due to final solidification, and which is the main reason of crack formation along with large stress concentration. Moreover, the welding cracks like the weld center longitudinal solidification cracks, weld metal toe transversal liquid cracks, heat-affected-zone hot cracks and crater cracks are classified in the laser welded joints. A brittle cleavage fracture with cleavage planes and river patterns in the joints is presented from the fracture surface.

  5. The ways of reliability enhancement of welded metal structures for critical applications in the conditions of low climatic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraev, Yu. N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Gladkovsky, S. V.; Golikov, N. I.

    2016-11-01

    The paper studies how the energy parameters of an effective welding technology based on adaptive pulse-arc welding method influence the microstructure, mechanical characteristics and fatigue strength of low carbon steel 09G2S welded joint. It is established that the application of the adaptive pulse-arc welding method with modulated current (CMW) as compared to the welding method with direct current (DCW) allows one to obtain a welded joint of this steel with high reserve impact strength, dynamic fracture toughness and fatigue strength of metallic structures at operation temperatures up to -60°C.

  6. Picosecond laser welding of optical to metal components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jinanyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on practical, industrially relevant, welding of optical components to themselves and aluminum alloy components. Weld formation is achieved through the tight focusing of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. By selecting suitable surface preparation, clamping and laser parameters, the plasma can be confined, even with comparatively rough surfaces, by exploiting the melt properties of the glass. The short interaction time allows for a permanent weld to form between the two materials with heating limited to a region ~300 µm across. Practical application of these weld structures is typically limited due to the induced stress within the glass and, critically, the issues surrounding post-weld thermal expansion. We report on the measured strength of the weld, with a particular emphasis on laser parameters and surface preparation.

  7. Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Novel CaO-Added Mg Alloy Filler Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Kang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel “ECO Mg” alloys, i.e., CaO-added Mg alloys, which exhibit oxidation resistance during melting and casting processes, even without the use of beryllium or toxic protection gases such as SF6, have recently been introduced. Research on ECO Mg alloys is still continuing, and their application as welding filler metals was investigated in this study. Mechanical and metallurgical aspects of the weldments were analysed after welding, and welding behaviours such as fume generation and droplet transfer were observed during welding. The tensile strength of welds was slightly increased by adding CaO to the filler metal, which resulted from the decreased grain size in the weld metal. When welding Mg alloys, fumes have been unavoidable so far because of the low boiling temperature of Mg. Fume reduction was successfully demonstrated with a wire composed of the novel ECO Mg filler. In addition, stable droplet transfer was observed and spatter suppression could be expected by using CaO-added Mg filler wire.

  8. Possibility of Underwater Explosive Welding for Making Large-Sized Thin Metal Plate Clad by Overlapping Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokamoto, Kazuyuki; Mori, Akihisa; Fujita, Masahiro

    The authors have developed a new method of explosive welding using underwater shock wave for the welding of thin plate on a substrate. Considering the size limitation of the welding area in using the technique, the possibility of overlapping thin plates to make large-sized welding area is investigated. In general, the results for the welding of Inconel 600 on 304 stainless steel show a macroscopically successful weld, but the microstructure shows some melting spots caused due to the trapping of metal jet during the welding process when the welding condition is changed. The welding process is discussed based on the experimental results in comparison with some numerically simulated results obtained by AUTODYN-2D code.

  9. Pulse current gas metal arc welding characteristics, control and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Prakriti Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is a first-of-its-kind compilation on high deposition pulse current GMAW process. The nine chapters of this monograph may serve as a comprehensive knowledge tool to use advanced welding engineering in prospective applications. The contents of this book will prove useful to the shop floor welding engineer in handling this otherwise critical welding process with confidence. It will also serve to inspire researchers to think critically on more versatile applications of the unique nature of pulse current in GMAW process to develop cutting edge welding technology.

  10. A Comparison of Weld-Repaired and Base Metal for Inconel 718 and CRES 321 at Cryogenic and Room Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Willard, Scott A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted to characterize the performance of Inconel 718 and CRES 321 welds, weld heat-affect-zone and parent metal at room temperature laboratory air and liquid nitrogen (-196oC) environments. The results of this study were required to predict the damage tolerance behavior of proposed orbiter main engine hydrogen fuel liner weld repairs. Experimental results show that the room and cryogenic temperature fatigue crack growth characteristics of both alloys are not significantly degraded by the weld repair process. However, both Inconel 718 and CRES 321 exhibited lower apparent toughness within the weld repair region compared to the parent metal.

  11. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  12. Development of Weld Overlay System for Dissimilar Metal Alloy 82/182 Butt Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. S.; Byeon, J. G.; Kim, Y. J. [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    As a result of the alloy 600 PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking), leak in the dissimilar welds in pressurizer nozzle was discovered recently in several US plants and the advanced companies had developed repair techniques. 2 or 3 years from now, more than half of the nuclear power plants in the country will be operated more than 20 years. Therefore, we need to develop repair techniques of dissimilar welds in pressurizer nozzle. With above backgrounds, we have developed a Prototype of Repair System for dissimilar welds in pressurizer nozzle.

  13. Chemical composition effect on VVER-1000 RPV weld metal thermal aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, B. A.; Chernobaeva, A. A.; Erak, D. Yu; Kuleshova, E. A.; Zhurko, D. A.; Papina, V. B.; Skundin, M. A.; Maltsev, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Temperature and fast neutron flux simultaneously affect the material of welded joints of reactor pressure vessels under irradiation. Understanding thermal aging effects on the weld metal allows for an explanation of the mechanisms that govern an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the reactor pressure vessel materials under long term irradiation at operation temperature. This paper reports on new results and reassessment of the VVER-1000 weld metal surveillance specimen database performed at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute". The current database of VVER-1000 weld metal thermal aging at 310-320 °C includes 50 transition temperature values with the maximum holding time of 208,896 h. The updated database completed with the information on intergranular fracture shear and phosphorous content in the grain boundaries has allowed us to propose a new mechanism of VVER-1000 weld materials thermal aging at 310-320 °C and develop models of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift for VVER-1000 weld metal during a long-term exposure at 310-320 °C.

  14. Residual stress measurements in the dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Mansur, Tanius R.; Scaldaferri, Denis H.B.; Paula, Raphael G., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br, E-mail: dhbs@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br, E-mail: raphaelmecanica@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Souto, Joao P.R.S.; Carvalho Junior, Ideir T., E-mail: joprocha@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ideir_engenharia@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica

    2013-07-01

    Weld residual stresses have a large influence on the behavior of cracking that could possibly occur under normal operation of components. In case of an unfavorable environment, both stainless steel and nickel-based weld materials can be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion cracks were found in dissimilar metal welds of some pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear plants. In the nuclear reactor primary circuit the presence of tensile residual stress and corrosive environment leads to so-called Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The PWSCC is a major safety concern in the nuclear power industry worldwide. PWSCC usually occurs on the inner surface of weld regions which come into contact with pressurized high temperature water coolant. However, it is very difficult to measure the residual stress on the inner surfaces of pipes or nozzles because of inaccessibility. A mock-up of weld parts of a pressurizer safety nozzle was fabricated. The mock-up was composed of three parts: an ASTM A508 C13 nozzle, an ASTM A276 F316L stainless steel safe-end, an AISI 316L stainless steel pipe and different filler metals of nickel alloy 82/182 and AISI 316L. This work presents the results of measurements of residual strain from the outer surface of the mock-up welded in base metals and filler metals by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. (author)

  15. Tensile Behaviour of Welded Wire Mesh and Hexagonal Metal Mesh for Ferrocement Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanawade, A. G.; Modhera, C. D.

    2017-08-01

    Tension tests were conducted on welded mesh and hexagonal Metal mesh. Welded Mesh is available in the market in different sizes. The two types are analysed viz. Ø 2.3 mm and Ø 2.7 mm welded mesh, having opening size 31.75 mm × 31.75 mm and 25.4 mm × 25.4 mm respectively. Tensile strength test was performed on samples of welded mesh in three different orientations namely 0°, 30° and 45° degrees with the loading axis and hexagonal Metal mesh of Ø 0.7 mm, having opening 19.05 × 19.05 mm. Experimental tests were conducted on samples of these meshes. The objective of this study was to investigate the behaviour of the welded mesh and hexagonal Metal mesh. The result shows that the tension load carrying capacity of welded mesh of Ø 2.7 mm of 0° orientation is good as compared to Ø2.3 mm mesh and ductility of hexagonal Metal mesh is good in behaviour.

  16. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  17. Direct welding of glass and metal by 1  kHz femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua

    2015-10-20

    In the welding process between similar or dissimilar materials, inserting an intermediate layer and pressure assistance are usually thought to be necessary. In this paper, the direct welding between alumina-silicate glass and metal (aluminum, copper, and steel), under exposure from 1 kHz femtosecond laser pulses without any auxiliary processes, is demonstrated. The micron/nanometer-sized metal particles induced by laser ablation were considered to act as the adhesive in the welding process. The welding parameters were optimized by varying the pulse energy and the translation velocity of the sample. The shear joining strength characterized by a shear force testing equipment was as high as 2.34 MPa. This direct bonding technology has potential for applications in medical devices, sensors, and photovoltaic devices.

  18. METAL INERT GAS WELDING OF 2519-T87 HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lianghong; TIAN Zhiling; ZHANG Xiaomu; PENG Yun

    2007-01-01

    20 mm thick plates of 2519-T87 high strength aluminum alloy have been welded. The effects of the compositions of filier wires, the heat input and the compositions of shielding gas on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the welded joint have been investigated. The results indicate that finer microstructure, better mechanical properties and higher value of hardness of HAZ can be obtained by using lower heat input. The use of Ar/He mixed shielding gas has several advantages over pure Ar shielding gas. With the increase of the proportion of He in the mixed shielding gas, the grain size of the weld metal as well as porosity susceptibility decreases. When the volume ratio of He to Ar reaches 7:3, the porosity and the grain size of weld metal reach the minimum, and the porosity can be further reduced by filling some CO2.

  19. Weld-metal property optimization from flux ingredients through mixture experiments and mathematical programming approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola David Adeyeye

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new methodology for weld-metal properties optimization from welding flux ingredients. The methodology integrates statistical design of mixture experiment with mathematical programming optimization technique. The mixture experiment is responsible for the modeling of the weld-metal properties as a function of welding flux levels while mathematical programming optimizes the model. Data and confirmed models from the literature were used to perform optimization on the responses. The maximum values possible with the prevailing conditions for acicular ferrite, charpy impact toughness and silicon transfer are 51.2%, 29 J and 0.231% respectively while the minimum oxygen content possible is 249 ppm. The new methodology is able to eliminate the limitations associated with the traditional experimental optimization methodology for flux formulation.

  20. Predicting welding residual stresses in a dissimilar metal girth welded pipe using 3D finite element model with a simplified heat source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Dean, E-mail: deandeng@cqu.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Shazheng Street 174, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Kiyoshima, Shoichi [Research Center of Computational Mechanics, Inc., Togoshi NI-Bldg., 1-7-1 Togoshi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-0041 (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuo [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, TOKYU REIT Toranomon Bldg, 3-17-1, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan); Yanagida, Nobuyoshi [Hitachi Ltd. 1-1, Saiwa-cho 3-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 317-8511 (Japan); Saito, Koichi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. 2-2, Omika-cho, 5-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Welding residual stresses have asymmetrical distributions in the dissimilar metal pipe. Variable length heat source model can largely save computing time. Besides welding, other thermal processes also affect residual stresses. - Abstract: Dissimilar metal welds are commonly used in nuclear power plants to connect low alloy steel components and austenitic stainless steel piping systems. The integrity assessment and life estimation for such welded structures require consideration of residual stresses induced by manufacturing processes. Because the fabrication process of dissimilar metal weld joints is considerably complex, it is very difficult to accurately predict residual stresses. In this study, both numerical simulation technology and experimental method were used to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a dissimilar metal pipe joint with a medium diameter, which were performed by a multi-pass welding process. Firstly, an experimental mock-up was fabricated to measure the residual stress distributions on the inside and the outside surfaces. Then, a time-effective 3-D finite element model was developed to simulate welding residual stresses through using a simplified moving heat source. The simplified heat source method could complete the thermo-mechanical analysis in an acceptable time, and the simulation results generally matched the measured data near the weld zone. Through comparing the simulation results and the experimental measurements, we can infer that besides the multi-pass welding process other key manufacturing processes such as cladding, buttering and heat treatment should also be taken into account to accurately predict residual stresses in the whole range of the dissimilar metal pipe.

  1. Application of a second-gradient model of ductile fracture on a Dissimilar Metal Weld

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Jun; Lacroix Rémi; Bergheau Jean-Michel; Leblond Jean-Baptiste; Perrin Gilles

    2016-01-01

    A “micromorphic”, second-gradient model applicable to ductile porous materials has been proposed, as an improvement from the fundamental work of Gurson that take into account the physical mechanisms responsible for ductile damage. The model has been applied to the study of fracture of the decarburized layer of a Dissimilar Metal Weld. The model successfully reproduces the crack path experimentally observed in a notched tensile sample extracted from this weld, different from the one predicted ...

  2. Development of an Ultralight Pulse Gas Metal ARC Welding System for Shipyard Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-27

    standard 200A OXO, Model AP20. Instrumentation included a calibrated analog ammeter (shunt, mV meter) and VOM (Simpson 260). Initial testing used...strength predicted based on the same correlation. In both cases, weld metal Charpy V-notch impact test results far exceeded minimum specification...Technology (CNST), work was conducted to specify, build, test , and production prove a light-weight, man-portable welding system as described above. The

  3. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  4. Mechanical properties of 5083 aluminium welds after manual and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding using E5356 filler

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available .T. 2010, "Strengthening mechanisms in an Al–Mg alloy", Materials Science and Engineering: A, vol. 527, no. 6, pp. 1292-1298. Dutta, I. & Allen, S.M. 1990, "A calorimetric study of precipitation in commercial aluminium alloy 6061", Journal of Materials...-magnesium alloyed ER5356 filler wire appeared similar to those of the base metal. This joint failed in the weld metal as a result of a slight reduction in hardness in the vicinity of the fusion line. However, the joints of Al6061-T651 similar and the dissimilar...

  5. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  6. Experimental analysis of dissimilar metal weld joint: Ferritic to austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathod, Dinesh W., E-mail: dineshvrathod@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Pandey, Sunil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Singh, P.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Prasad, Rajesh [Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-07-15

    The dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint between SA508Gr.3Cl.1 ferritic steel and SS304LN using Inconel 82/182 consumables was required in the nuclear power plants. The joint integrity assessment of these welds requires mechanical and metallurgical properties evaluation in weldment regions. The joint was subjected to 100% radiography test and bend test and transverse tensile test. Welding and testing were carried out as per the requirements of ASME Sec-IX and acceptance criteria as per ASME Sec-III. The transverse tensile test results indicated the failure from the weld metal although it satisfies the minimum strength requirement of the ASME requirements; therefore, the DMW joint was analyzed in detail. Straight bead deposition technique, fine slag inclusion, less reliable radiograph technique, plastic instability stress, yield strength ratio and metallurgical deteriorations have been contributed to failure of the DMW joint from the weld region. In the present work, the factors contributing to the fracture from weld metal have been discussed and analyzed.

  7. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  8. Evolution of weld metal microstructure in shielded metal arc welding of X70 HSLA steel with cellulosic electrodes: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghomashchi, Reza, E-mail: reza.ghomashchi@adelaide.edu.au; Costin, Walter; Kurji, Rahim

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure of weld joint in X70 line pipe steel resulted from shielded metal arc welding with E6010 cellulosic electrodes is characterized using optical and electron microscopy. A range of ferritic morphologies have been identified ranging from polygonal inter- and intra-prior austenite grains allotriomorphic, idiomorphic ferrites to Widmanstätten, acicular and bainitic ferrites. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis using Image Quality (IQ) and Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps through superimposition of IQ and IPF maps and measurement of percentages of high and low angle grain boundaries was identified to assist in differentiation of acicular ferrite from Widmanstätten and bainitic ferrite morphologies. In addition two types of pearlitic structures were identified. There was no martensite detected in this weld structure. The morphology, size and chemistry of non-metallic inclusions are also discussed briefly. - Highlights: • Application of EBSD reveals orientation relationships in a range of phases for shielded metal arc welding of HSLA steel. • Nucleation sites of various ferrite morphologies identified • Formation of upper and lower bainite and their morphologies.

  9. Fuel cell life improved by metallic sinter activation after electrode assembly welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Technique improves the service life of fuel cell electrodes. The welding is done before the metallic sinter is activated by depositing finely divided metal within the sinter structure from a solution with corrosion inhibiting ions. The activator solution flows through the porous sinter while attached to the backup plate.

  10. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  11. The Impact of Weld Metal Creep Strength on the Overall Creep Strength of 9% Cr Steel Weldments

    OpenAIRE

    Mayr, Peter; Mitsche, Stefan; Cerjak, Horst; Allen, Samuel Miller

    2010-01-01

    In this work, three joints of a X11CrMoWVNb9-1-1 (P911) pipe were welded with three filler metals by conventional arc welding. The filler metals varied in creep strength level, so that one overmatched, one undermatched, and one matched the creep strength of the P911 grade pipe base material. The long-term objective of this work was to study the influence of weld metal creep strength on the overall creep behavior of the welded joints and their failure mechanism. Uniaxial creep tests at 600°C a...

  12. Effects of the laser beam superficial heat treatment on the gas Tungsten arc Ti-6al-4v welded metal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, I.; Dontu, Octavian; Geanta, V.; Ganatsios, S.

    2008-03-01

    The microstructure of the weld and the extent to which it is different from the thermo-mechanically processed base material is strongly influenced by the thermal cycle of welding. The mechanical properties of composite weld structures in titanium alloys depend on structural characteristics of each region (weld, base material and heat affected area), influenced by the specific thermal cycle imposed during welding and the subsequent post-weld heat treatment. In order to improve the as-welded metal toughness and ductility, the welded metal was subjected to various post weld laser heat treatments, above and below beta transus temperature in a shielding atmosphere of pure argon. Standard micro-hardness measurements and tensile strength techniques showed higher mechanical properties of the heat treated samples in different conditions with respect to the base metal. Metallographic investigations attribute this to the formation of α'phases in heat treated material, especially in the weld metal.

  13. Application of Hard Metal Weld Deposit in the Area of Mixing Organic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Any machine part is subject to degradation processes. Intensive wear occurs either when two bearing surfaces come into contact or when loose particles rub the function surface of a machine part. Soil processing machines are a good example. A similar process of abrasive wear occurs also in mixing machines or lines for material transport, such as worm-conveyors. The experiment part of this paper analyses hard metal weld deposit dedicated for renovation of abrasive stressed surfaces. In order to prolong the service life of a blade disc in a mixing machine Kreis-Biogas-Dissolver, the technology of hard surfacing by an electric arc was used. Tested hard metal electrodes were applied on a steel tape class 11 373. To eliminate mixing with the base material, weld beads were applied in two layers. Firstly, the weld bead was visually analyzed on a binocular microscope. Further, weld bead as well as the base material was analyzed from the metallographic point of view, whose aim was to identify the structure of weld metal and the origin of microcracks in weld bead. Moreover, there was also measured microhardness of weld metal. Abrasive resistance was tested according to the norm ČSN 01 5084, which is an abrasive cloth test. As in the mixing process also erosion wear occurs, there was also processed a test on a Bond device simulating stress of test samples by loose abrasive particles. The abrading agents were formed by broken stones of 8–16 mm in size. Based on the results of the individual tests, the recommendation of usage hard metal electrodes for prolonging service life of machine parts will be made.

  14. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, A.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Montgomery, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    A conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) butt-joining process has been modeled using a two-way fully coupled, transient, thermal-mechanical finite-element procedure. To achieve two-way thermal-mechanical coupling, the work of plastic deformation resulting from potentially high thermal stresses is allowed to be dissipated in the form of heat, and the mechanical material model of the workpiece and the weld is made temperature dependent. Heat losses from the deposited filler-metal are accounted for by considering conduction to the adjoining workpieces as well as natural convection and radiation to the surroundings. The newly constructed GMAW process model is then applied, in conjunction with the basic material physical-metallurgy, to a prototypical high-hardness armor martensitic steel (MIL A46100). The main outcome of this procedure is the prediction of the spatial distribution of various crystalline phases within the weld and the heat-affected zone regions, as a function of the GMAW process parameters. The newly developed GMAW process model is validated by comparing its predictions with available open-literature experimental and computational data.

  15. Effects of soldering and laser welding on bond strength of ceramic to metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladağ, Akin; Cömlekoğlu, M Erhan; Dündar, Mine; Güngör, M Ali; Artunç, Celal

    2011-01-01

    Welding or soldering of metal frameworks negatively affects the overall bond strength between the veneering ceramic and metal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of soldering and laser-welding procedures on the bond strength between ceramic and metal. Thirty Ni-based metal specimens (Wiron 99) (8 × 4 × 4 mm) were fabricated and divided into 3 groups; soldered (S), laser welded (L), and control (untreated cast alloy) (n=10). In S and L specimens, a notch (1 × 1.5 mm) was prepared longitudinally on the surface of each specimen and filled with compatible alloy (Wiron soldering rods and Wiroweld NC, respectively). Vickers hardness measurements were made after polishing the surfaces with a metallographic polishing kit. A veneering ceramic (VITA VMK 95) was vibrated, condensed in a mold, and fired on the metal frameworks. The specimens were sectioned in 2 axes to obtain nontrimmed bar specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm². Forty bars per block were obtained. Each bar was subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The μTBS data (MPa) were recorded, and SEM was used for failure analysis of the tested bars. The measurements were statistically analyzed using a 1-way ANOVA and Tamhane tests (α=.05). The mean differences in μTBS of veneering ceramic to soldered (10.4 ±2.4 MPa) and laser-welded (11.7 ±1.3 MPa) metal surfaces were not significantly different and were significantly lower than that of the cast alloy (25.4 ±3.6 MPa) (Plaser-welded groups (129 ±11 HV) (Plaser welding significantly decreased the μTBS of a veneering ceramic to a base metal alloy. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nano-structural and Nano-chemical analysis of dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Shang Hoon; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weld is generally applied to nuclear power plant for manufacturing and machining in structural components such as RPV and Pressurizer nozzles. Alloy 152 is used frequently as filler metal in the manufacture of dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) in light water reactors (LWR) to join the low alloy steel (LAS) pressure vessel nozzles and steam generator nozzles to nickel-based wrought alloy or austenitic stainless steel components. The thermal expansion coefficient of the alloy lies between those of ferrite steel and austenitic stainless steel, and it also significantly retards the carbon diffusion from the ferrite base metal to the weld metal. However, in recent years cracking phenomena have been observed in the welded joints. A concern has been raised about the integrity and reliability in the joint transition zone due to the high susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The dissimilar metal joints which were welded between Inconel 690, Ni-based alloy and A533B, low alloy steel with Inconel 152, filler metal were investigated. This study shows microstructural and chemical analysis between Inconel 152 and A533B by using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and 3 dimension atom probe (3D AP). In the root region, OM and SEM analysis show the microstructure which contains the interface of Inconel 152 and A533B near the rooter region. And it shows unidentified band structure which is formed along weld interface. AP and TEM/EDS analyses show the chemical gradient containing higher Fe but lower Mn, Ni and Cr than Inconel 152 and the unidentified band

  17. Laser Shock Processing of Metal Sheet and Welded Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Shi-kun; TAN Yong-sheng; ZHANG Xiao-bin; LIU Fang-jun

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the application of laser shock processing(LSP) as a post weld treatment technology and a strengthening technology, a series experiments and analysis were taken in this paper. The hardness of the laser shock processed zone of Al-Li alloy was measured, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints of the Ni-based superalloy GH30 and the Austenitic stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti were compared with those without LSP in this paper. The results showed that the size of strengthened zone was similar to that of laser spot and strengthened layer was about 1mm deep, and the high intense dislocations and twins produced in the shocked zone. Plastic strain also gained surface residual compress stress, which is benefit for the fatigue properties of welded zones. In this test, the surface hardness of welding zone of the superalloy GH30 improved obviously and tensile strength increased by 12%, but the improvement of fatigue life was not obvious; Martensite phase is formed in plasma welding 1Cr18Ni9Ti, which reduced the effect of strain deformation martensite induced by laser shock processing, but the surface residual compress stress gained by laser shock processing can obviously improve the fatigue life of 1Cr1 8Ni9Ti welded joints.

  18. Laser Shock Processing of Metal Sheet and Welded Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOUShi-kun; TANYong-sheng; ZHANGXiao-bin; LIUFang-jun

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the application of laser shock processing(LSP) as a post weld treatment technology and a strengthening technology, a series experiments and analysis were taken in this paper. The hardness of the laser shock processed zone of A1-Li alloy was measured, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints of the Ni-based superalloy GH30 and the Austenitic stainless steel 1Crl8Ni9Ti were compared with those without LSP in this paper. The results showed that the size of strengthened zone was similar to that of laser spot and strengthened layer was about lmm deep, and the high intense dislocations and twins produced in the shocked zone. Plastic strain also gained surface residual compress stress, which is benefit for the fatigue properties of welded zones. In this test, the surface hardness of welding zone of the superalloy GH30 improved obviously and tensile strength increased by 12%, but the improvement of fatigue life was not obvious; Martensite phase is formed in plasma welding 1Crl8Ni9Ti, which reduced the effect of strain deformation martensite induced by laser shock processing, but the surface residual compress stress gained by laser shock processing can obviously improve the fatigue life of 1Crl 8Ni9Ti welded joints.

  19. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  20. Toenail metal concentration as a biomarker of occupational welding fume exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grashow, Rachel; Zhang, Jinming; Fang, Shona C; Weisskopf, Marc G; Christiani, David C; Cavallari, Jennifer M

    2014-01-01

    In populations exposed to heavy metals, there are few biomarkers that capture intermediate exposure windows. We sought to determine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations and prior 12-month work activity in welders with variable, metal-rich, welding fume exposures. Forty-eight participants, recruited through a local union, provided 69 sets of toenail clippings. Union-supplied and worker-verified personal work histories were used to quantify hours welded and respirator use. Toenail samples were digested and analyzed for lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), and arsenic (As) using ICP-MS. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to examine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations. Using mixed models to account for multiple participation times, we divided hours welded into three-month intervals and examined how weld hours correlated with log-transformed toenail Pb, Mn, Cd, Ni, and As concentrations. Highest concentrations were found for Ni, followed by Mn, Pb and As, and Cd. All the metals were significantly correlated with one another (rho range = 0.28-0.51), with the exception of Ni and As (rho = 0.20, p = 0.17). Using mixed models adjusted for age, respirator use, smoking status, and BMI, we found that Mn was associated with weld hours 7-9 months prior to clipping (p = 0.003), Pb was associated with weld hours 10-12 months prior to clipping (p = 0.03) and over the entire year (p = 0.04). Cd was associated with weld hours 10-12 months prior to clipping (p = 0.05), and also with the previous year's total hours welded (p = 0.02). The association between Ni and weld hours 7-9 months prior to clipping approached significance (p = 0.06). Toenail metal concentrations were not associated with the long-term exposure metric, years as a welder. Results suggest Mn, Pb, and Cd may have particular windows of relevant exposure that reflect work activity. In a population with variable exposure, toenails may serve as useful biomarkers

  1. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusit Ampaiboon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%.

  2. Welding TiB2 Ceramics and Metal Mo with Combustion Reaction Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daihua HE; Zhengyi FU; Qingjie ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    Combustion reaction welding, one promising method to weld ceramics and metals, was used to weld TiB2 and Mo. The results showed that the reacted products through combustion reaction were TiB2 and MoB when the Mo contents in reactants were 20 wt pct and 40 wt pct while there was Mo besides MoB and TiB2 when there were 60 wt pct and 80 wt pct Mo in reactants. Diffusion of elements occurred at the interfaces of the two substrates. The interfaces between the reacted and the two substrates were indistinct after being welded. The welding temperature strongly affected properties of the samples. The value of bending strength of the sample with 80 wt pct Mo in reactant welded at 1500℃ was the highest, 368.52 MPa. The highest value of shear strength among all the samples was that of the one with 40 wt pct Mo in reactant welded at 1500℃, 50.97 MPa.

  3. New technologies for Management of PWSCC in Dissimilar Metal Weld in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    One of big issues to increase structural integrity and operating efficiency of nuclear power plants(NPPs) is now primary water stress corrosion cracking(PWSCC) occurring in dissimilar metal weld(DMW) regions, such as, inlet and outlet nozzles, and J-welds of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetration and bottom-mounted instrumentation(BMI) nozzles in a reactor pressure vessel, and other nozzles in a primary system. In order to manage the PWSCC occurring in DMW, many technologies, for example, an induction heating stress improvement(IHSI) process, a mechanical stress improvement process(MSIP), overlay and inlay welding processes using conventional welding methods, water jet or laser peening processes, etc., have been developed in nuclear-advanced counties. Many of them have been being applied to some operating NPPs in the world. The most reliable, relatively new, and effective technologies are, however, thought to be a laser peening and an inlay welding process using a under-water laser welding(UWLW) method. In this talk, the laser peening process and inlay welding process using UWLW method will be introduced and their advantages will be discussed

  4. Friction Stir Welding of Zr_(55)Al_(10)Ni_5Cu_(30) Bulk Metallic Glass to Crystalline Aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuoxiang Qin; Cuihong Li; Haifeng Zhang; Zhongguang Wang; Zhuangqi Hu; Zhiqiang Liu

    2009-01-01

    The Zr_(55)Al_(10)Ni_5Cu_(30) bulk metallic glass plate were successfully welded to crystalline aluminum plates by using a friction stir welding (FSW) method. The welded zone was examined. No defects, cracks or pores were observed and no other crystalline phases except for aluminum were found in the welded joint. The strength of the joint is higher than that of aluminum. The glassy phase in the stir zone keeps the amorphous state, showing a successful welding. The storage modulus softens over the glass transition. And the weldability was discussed according to this phenomena.

  5. Explosive Welding of Aluminum, Titanium and Zirconium to Copper Sheet Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, A. A.; Mote, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The main material properties affecting the explosive weldability of a certain metal combination are the yield strength, the ductility, the density and the sonic velocity of the two metals. Successful welding of the metal combination depends mainly on the correct choice of the explosive welding parameters; i.e., the stand off distance, the weight of the explosive charge relative to the weight of the flyer plate and the detonation velocity of the explosive. Based on the measured and the handbook values of the properties of interest, the explosive welding parameters were calculated and the arrangements for the explosive welding of the Al alloy 6061-T6, titanium and zirconium to OFHC copper were determined. The relatively small sheet metal thickness (1/8") and the fact that the thickness of the explosive layer must exceed a certain minimum value were considered during the determination of the explosive welding conditions. The results of the metallographic investigations and the measurements of the shear strength at the interface demonstrate the usefulness of these calculations to minimize the number of experimental trials.

  6. Fatigue cracking of hybrid plasma gas metal arc welded 2205 duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurtisik, Koray; Tirkes, Suha [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Welding Technology and Nondestructive Testing Research/Application Center

    2014-10-01

    Contrary to other keyhole welding applications on duplex stainless steels, a proper cooling time and a dilution were achieved during hybrid plasma gas metal arc welding that provided sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite without sacrificing its high efficiency and productivity. Simultaneous utilization of keyhole and metal deposition in the hybrid welding procedure enabled us to get an as-welded 11 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plate in a single pass. Metallographic examination on hybrid plasma-gas metal arc weldments revealed only primary austenite in ferrite matrix, whereas in addition to reconstructive transformation of primary austenite during solidification, secondary austenite was also transformed in a displacive manner due to successive thermal cycles during multi-pass gas metal arc welding. On the one hand, secondary austenite provided barriers and retarded the crack propagation during the tests in laboratory air. On the other hand, chromium and molybdenum depletion in the neighborhood of secondary austenite precipitates yielded relatively high crack propagation rates in multi-pass weldments under chloride attack.

  7. A comparative study of the microstructure and properties of 800 MPa microalloyed C-Mn steel welded joints by laser and gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qian [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation of Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Di, Hong-Shuang, E-mail: hongshuangdi_ral@126.com [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation of Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Li, Jun-Chen [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation of Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wu, Bao-Qiang [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Material and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    The differences in microstructure and mechanical properties of laser beam welded (LBW) and gas metal arc welded (GMAW) joints of 800 MPa grade Nb-Ti-Mo microalloyed C-Mn steel of 5 mm thickness were studied. The study suggested that the microstructure in welded seam (WS) of GMAW was acicular ferrite and fine grained ferrite, whereas lath martensite (LM) was obtained in WS of LBW, where inclusions were finer and did not act as nucleation sites for acicular ferrite. The microstructure of coarse-grained HAZ (CGHAZ) obtained using the two welding methods was LM and granular bainite (GB), respectively. The original austenite grain size in CGHAZ of LBW was 1/3 of GMAW. The microstructure of fine-grained HAZ and mixed-grained HAZ using the two welding methods was ferrite and M-A constituents, while that of LBW was significantly fine. The hardness of LBW welded joints was higher than the base metal (BM), which was the initiation site for tensile fracture. The tensile fracture location of GMAW welded joints was in WS. The impact toughness of LBW welded joints was excellent and the impact absorption energy was similar to BM.

  8. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  9. Corrosion Characteristics of Welding Zones Welded with 1.25Cr-0.5 Mo Filler Metal to Forged Steel for Piston Crown Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Yul; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man [Korea Maritime University, Dong Sam-Dong,Yong Do-ku, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Tae-Sil [Pohang College, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A heavy oil of low quality has been mainly used in the diesel engine of the merchant ship as the oil price has been significantly jumped for several years. Thus, a combustion chamber of the engine has been often exposed to severely corrosive environment more and more because temperature of the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber has been getting higher and higher with increasing of using the heavy oil of low quality. As a result, wear and corrosion of the engine parts such as exhaust valve, piston crown and cylinder head surrounded with combustion chamber are more serious compared to the other parts of the engine. Therefore, an optimum repair welding for these engine parts is very important to prolong their lifetime in a economical point of view. In this study, 1.25Cr-0.5Mo filler metal was welded with SMAW method in the forged steel which would be generally used with piston crown material. And the corrosion properties of weld metal, heat affected and base metal zones were investigated using electrochemical methods such as measurement of corrosion potential, anodic polarization curves, cyclic voltammogram and impedance etc. in 35% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. The weld metal and base metal zones exhibited the highest and lowest values of hardness respectively. And, the corrosion resistance of the heat affected and weld metal zones was also increased than that of the base metal zone. Furthermore, it appeared that the corrosive products with red color and local corrosion like as a pitting corrosion were more frequently observed on the surface of the base metal zone compared to the heat affected and weld metal zones. Consequently, it is suggested that the mechanical and corrosion characteristics of the piston crown can be predominantly improved by repair welding method using the 1.25Cr-0.5Mo electrode.

  10. Stability evaluation of short-circuiting gas metal arc welding based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Zhilan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Jimi

    2017-03-01

    The arc of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) contains abundant information about its stability and droplet transition, which can be effectively characterized by extracting the arc electrical signals. In this study, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to evaluate the stability of electrical current signals. The welding electrical signals were first decomposed by EEMD, and then transformed to a Hilbert–Huang spectrum and a marginal spectrum. The marginal spectrum is an approximate distribution of amplitude with frequency of signals, and can be described by a marginal index. Analysis of various welding process parameters showed that the marginal index of current signals increased when the welding process was more stable, and vice versa. Thus EEMD combined with the marginal index can effectively uncover the stability and droplet transition of GMAW.

  11. Metal nanoparticles and IR laser applications in medicine for biotissue ablation and welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalayan, A. A.; Israelyan, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biotissue by using metal and hybrid metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. A nanosecond YAG:Nd laser of wavelength 1064 nm has been used for synthesis of metal NPs. The Ag, Au, Cu, Ti and Ni, as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal colloidal NPs were formed in a liquid medium. The diagnostic technique of second harmonic generation (SHG) has been applied to determine the biotissue ablation area after IR laser irradiation. The effectiveness of biotissue ablation was 4-5 times larger in the case of a tissue sample colored with metal NPs than for an uncolored sample. IR laser welding has been demonstrated for deep-located biotissue layers colored by metal NPs.

  12. Characterization of the structural details of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Liu; Hui-jun Ji; Peng Liu; Peng Wang; Feng-gui Lu; Yu-lai Gao

    2014-01-01

    The existence of residual austenite in weld metal plays an important role in determining the properties and dimensional accuracy of welded rotors. An effective corrosive agent and the metallographic etching process were developed to clearly reveal the characteristics of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor. Moreover, the details of the distribution, shape, length, length-to-width ratio, and the content of residual austenite were systematically characterized using the Image-Pro Plus image analysis software. The results revealed that the area fraction of residual austenite was approximately 6.3% in the observed weld seam; the average area, length, and length-to-width ratio of dispersed residual austenite were quantitatively evaluated to be (5.5 ± 0.1)μm2, (5.0 ± 0.1)μm, and (2.2 ± 0.1), re-spectively. The newly developed corrosive agent and etching method offer an appropriate approach to characterize residual austenite in the weld metal of welded rotors in detail.

  13. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  14. Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    5087 and 5556A filler metal alloys have more titanium (Ti) than typically used and necessary in ingot casting of structural alloys. The Ti serves...nucleation of solid from liquid weld metal , to refine the grain size, and modify grain structure to a more equiaxed shape. Table 2 reveals the plate...5 Table 4 details the certified mechanical properties measured in tension of the base metal 7020-T651 25.04- and 39.94-mm-thick plates. The strength

  15. The Impact of Teaching Oxy-Fuel Welding on Gas Metal Arc Welding Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgro, Sergio D.; Field, Dennis W.; Freeman, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Industrial technology programs around the country must be sensitive to the demands of manufacturing and industry as they continue to replace "vocational" curriculum with high-tech alternatives. This article examines whether or not teaching oxyacetylene welding in the industrial technology classroom is required to learn arc welding…

  16. International Round-Robin Test Results for Dissimilar Metal Weld (DMW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Kyung Jo; Jung, Hae Dong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    In nuclear power plant, there are many joints to connect pipes, nozzles and structural components. Most of them are welding joint, and it may be a weak point for leakage and cracks. Some cracks were found in dissimilar metal welds (DMW), which are connected with major components of nuclear power plants. Usually, the dissimilar metal welds are consisted of Alloy 600, carbon steel and stainless steel. Since 2000s, most of the cracks are found in welds, especially dissimilar metal welds such as pressurizer safety relief nozzle, reactor head penetration, reactor bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI), and reactor nozzles. Since the cracks are revealed as a primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), the reliability of non destructive evaluation (NDE) technique becomes more important. To cope with the NDE reliability, PINC (program for inspection of nickel alloy components) international cooperation was organized. The aim of the project was 1) to fabricate representative NDE mock-ups with flaws to simulate PWSCCs, 2) to identify and quantitatively assess NDE methods for accurately detecting, sizing and characterizing PWSCCs, 3) to document the range of locations and morphologies of PWSCCs and 4) to incorporate results with other results of ongoing PWSCC research programs, as appropriate. In this study, as part of the PINC project, international RRT (round robin test) results for DMW will be introduced.

  17. TIG AISI-316 welds using an inert gas welding chamber and different filler metals: Changes in mechanical properties and microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This report analyses the influence of the use of an inert gas welding chamber with a totally inert atmosphere on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic AISI 316L stainless steel TIG welds, using AISI ER316L, AISI 308L and Inconel 625 as filler metals. When compared with the typical TIG process, the use of the inert gas chamber induced changes in the microstructure, mainly an increase in the presence of vermicular ferrite and ferrite stringers, what resulted in higher yield strengths and lower values of hardness. Its effect on other characteristics of the joins, such as tensile strength, depended on the filler metal. The best combination of mechanical characteristics was obtained when welding in the inert gas chamber using Inconel 625 as filler metal.

    En este estudio se analiza la influencia que el uso de una cámara de soldadura de gas inerte tiene sobre la microestructura y las propiedades mecánicas de las soldaduras TIG en el acero inoxidable austenítico AISI-316L cuando se emplean AISI ER316L, AISI 308L e Inconel 625 como materiales de aporte. Cuando se compara con el típico proceso de TIG, el uso de una cámara de gas inerte induce cambios en la microestructura, incrementando la presencia de ferrita vermicular y de laminillas de ferrita, resultando en un aumento del límite elástico y una pérdida de dureza. Su influencia sobre otras características de las soldaduras como la carga de rotura depende de la composición del material de aporte. La mejor combinación de propiedades mecánicas se obtuvo usando el Inconel 625 como material de aporte y soldando en la cámara de gas inerte.

  18. The Measurement of Hardness and Elastic Modulus of non-Metallic Inclusions in Steely Welding Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova Anna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Trunk pipelines work under a cyclic dynamical mechanical load because when oil or gas is pumped, the pressure constantly changes - pulsates. Therefore, the fatigue phenomenon is a common reason of accidents. The fatigue phenomenon more often happens in the zone of non-metallic inclusions concentration. To know how the characteristics of nonmetallic inclusions influence the probability of an accident the most modern research methods should be used. It is determined with the help of the modern research methods that the accident rate of welded joints of pipelines is mostly influenced by their morphological type, composition and size of nonmetallic inclusions, this effect is more important than the common level of pollution by non-metallic inclusions. The article presents the results of the investigations of welded joints, obtained after the use of different common welding materials. We used the methods, described in the state standards: scanning electronic microscopy, spectral microprobe analysis and nano-indentation. We found out that non-metallic inclusions act like stress concentrators because they shrink, forming a blank space between metal and nonmetallic inclusions; it strengthens the differential properties on this boundary. Nonmetallic inclusion is not fixed, it can move. The data that we have received mean that during welded joints’ contamination (with non-metallic inclusions monitoring process, more attention should be paid to the content of definite inclusions, but not to total contamination.

  19. Influence of Heat Input on Martensite Formation and Impact Property of Ferritic-Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mukherjee; T.K. Pal

    2012-01-01

    The effect of heat input on martensite formation and impact properties of gas metal arc welded modified ferritic stainless steel (409M) sheets (as received) with thickness of 4 mm was described in detail in this work. The welded joints were prepared under three heat input conditions, i.e. 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 kJ/mm using two different austenitic filler wires (308L and 316L) and shielding gas composition of Ar + 5% CO2. The welded joints were evaluated by microstructure and charpy impact toughness. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on heat input and filler wires were determined by dilution calculation, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE), optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the microstructure as well as impact property of weld metal was significantly affected by the heat input and filler wire. Weld metals prepared by high heat input exhibited higher amount of martensite laths and toughness compared with those prepared by medium and low heat inputs, which was true for both the filler wires. Furthermore, 308L weld metals in general provided higher amount of martensite laths and toughness than 316L weld metals.

  20. IR-Laser Welding and Ablation of Biotissue Stained with Metal Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lalayan, A A

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biological tissue by the using of spherical metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation which spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. YAG:Nd laser with 1064 nm wavelength, 8 ns pulse duration, and operating in transverse electromagnetic modes TEM$_{00}$ was used for the synthesis of metal NPs. The Au,Ti Ni and Cu as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal NPs were formed in the liquid medium. Effectiveness of laser ablation in the case of the biotissue sample that stained with the metal NPs was approximately on 4-5 times larger than for the native sample. Also the scheme of a laser point welding for the deep-located biotissue layer selectively stained by the metal NPs has been demonstrated.

  1. Initial Testing for the Recommendation of Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Procedures for HY-80 Steel Plate Butt Joints at Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    FOR THE RECOMMENDATION OF IMPROVED GAS METAL ARC WELDING PROCEDURES FOR HY-80 STEEL PLATE BUTT JOINTS AT NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD by Veronika J...FOR THE RECOMMENDATION OF IMPROVED GAS METAL ARC WELDING PROCEDURES FOR HY-80 STEEL PLATE BUTT JOINTS AT NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...gas metal arc welding, submarine, hull cut, butt joint, weld, shielding gas, HY-80 steel , plate 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 53 16. PRICE CODE 17

  2. Crack growth analysis due to PWSCC in dissimilar metal butt weld for reactor piping considering hydrostatic and normal operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwee Sueng; Huh, Nam Su [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Gun; Park, Heung Bae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Ho [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    This study investigates the crack growth behavior due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in the dissimilar metal butt weld of a reactor piping using Alloy 82/182. First, detailed finite element stress analyses were performed to predict the stress distribution of the dissimilar metal butt weld in which the hydrostatic and the normal operating loads as well as the weld residual stresses were considered to evaluate the stress redistribution due to mechanical loadings. Based on the stress distributions along the wall thickness of the dissimilar metal butt weld, the crack growth behavior of the postulated axial and circumferential cracks were predicted, from which the crack growth diagram due to PWSCC was proposed. The present results can be applied to predict the crack growth rate in the dissimilar metal butt weld of reactor piping due to PWSCC.

  3. Experimental Investigation and Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BOZKURT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a relatively contemporary solid state welding process and has been employed in aerospace, railway, automotive and marine industries for joining of aluminum, magnesium, zinc, titanium, copper alloys, dissimilar metals and thermoplastics. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed and tilt angle play an important role in deciding the joining quality. The present study defines the effect of FSW process on the tensile properties of the AA2124/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC plates. Obtained results showed that the joint efficiency decreases by increasing the tool traverse speed while tool rotation speed was kept constant. Second contribution of this study is the application of decision tree technique to predict the tensile properties of friction stir welded MMC plates. It is seen that methodology can be applied with great accuracy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3092

  4. Experimental Investigation and Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BOZKURT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is a relatively contemporary solid state welding process and has been employed in aerospace, railway, automotive and marine industries for joining of aluminum, magnesium, zinc, titanium, copper alloys, dissimilar metals and thermoplastics. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed and tilt angle play an important role in deciding the joining quality. The present study defines the effect of FSW process on the tensile properties of the AA2124/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC plates. Obtained results showed that the joint efficiency decreases by increasing the tool traverse speed while tool rotation speed was kept constant. Second contribution of this study is the application of decision tree technique to predict the tensile properties of friction stir welded MMC plates. It is seen that methodology can be applied with great accuracy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3092

  5. Sudy of the conditions of the formation of a strong bond during the explosive welding of powders with metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaunov, A.M.

    1987-08-01

    The energy conditions for the formation of a strong bond between the coating and the substrate during the explosive welding of powders with metals are examined with reference to experimental results obtained for Cu, Ni, Mo, and Ti powders and iron substrates. A generalized energy criterion is proposed. Recommendations are given concerning welding process control and prediction of the properties of explosively welded coatings. 14 references.

  6. Microstructure in the Weld Metal of Austenitic-Pearlitic Dissimilar Steels and Diffusion of Element in the Fusion Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Microstructure and alloy element distribution in the welded joint between austenitic stainless steel(1Cr18Ni9Ti)and pearlitic heat-resistant steel (1Cr5Mo)were researched by means of light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy(SEM)and electron probe microanalysis(EPMA).Microstructure, divisions of the fusion zone and elemental diffusion distributions in the welded joints were investigated. Furthermore, solidification microstructure and δ-ferrite distribution in the weld metal of these steels are also discussed.

  7. The Influence of Weld Metal Alloying Additions to Extend the Heat Input Range for the Submerged Arc Welding of High Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-16

    in the weld metal is planned to be two fold. First, the for- mation of niobium carbide precipitates is expected to reduce the amount of free carbon...and niobium carbide ) in the matrix and more uniform mechanical proper- ties are anticipated. Second, The combination of two kinds of precipitates...produced by a consumables manufacturer) will be used to generate welds for mechanical and impact toughness data. Additionally, the e-copper and niobium

  8. Nondestructive testing of austenitic casting and dissimilar metal welds; Kaksimetalliliitosten ja austeniittisten valujen testaustekniikoiden vertailu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahdenperae, K. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1995-01-01

    The publication is a literature study of nondestructive testing of dissimilar metal welds and cast austenitic components in PWR and BWR plants. A major key to the successful testing is a realistic mockup made of the materials to be tested. The inspectors must also be trained and validated using suitable mockups. (42 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.).

  9. Feedback Linearization Based Arc Length Control for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Sandberg

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feedback linearization based arc length controller for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is described. A nonlinear model describing the dynamic arc length is transformed into a system where nonlinearities can be cancelled by a nonlinear state feedback control part, and thus, leaving only...

  10. Stress corrosion cracking in canistered waste package containers: Welds and base metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.S.

    1998-03-01

    The current design of waste package containers include outer barrier using corrosion allowable material (CAM) such as A516 carbon steel and inner barrier of corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as alloy 625 and C22. There is concern whether stress corrosion cracking would occur at welds or base metals. The current memo documents the results of our analysis on this topic.

  11. The Evolution of Microstructures and the Properties of Bulk Metallic Glass with Consubstantial Composition Laser Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingjun Tao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 plate-like bulk metallic glass (BMG was prepared using copper mold suction casting. Additionally, alloy powders with the same nominal composition were synthesized. The alloy powders were welded or melted to the cleaned surface of the BMG with a laser beam acceleration voltage of 60 kV, a beam current range from 60 to 100 mA, a welding speed of 60 mm/s, as well as an impulse width of 3.0 ms. The effect of consubstantial composition welding on the microstructures and properties was investigated. The molten and subsequently solidified metallic mixtures remain an amorphous structure, but the enthalpy of the welded or melted position varies due to the combination of the micro-structural relaxation and nano-crystals precipitated during the energy inputs. The surface layers of the BMG can be significantly intensified after welding processes; however, the heat-affected zones (HAZs exhibit a slight degradation in mechanical properties with respect to the BMG matrix. This study has important reference value for specialists working on the promotion of applications of BMGs.

  12. A round-robin analysis of temperature and residual stresses in dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Min Sup; Kang, Sun Ye; Park, June Soo; Sohn, Gap Heon [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    DMWs are common feature of the PWR in the welded connections between carbon steel and stainless steel piping. The nickel-based weld metal, Alloy 82/182, is used for welding the dissimilar metals and is known to be susceptible to PWSCC. A round-robin program has been implemented to benchmark the numerical simulation of the transient temperature and weld residual stresses in the DMWs. To solve the round-robin problem related to pressurizer safety and relief nozzle, the thermal elasto-plastic analysis is performed in the DMW by using the FEM. The welding includes both the DMW of the nozzle to safe-end and the SMW of the safe-end and piping. Major results of the analyses are discussed: The axial and circumferential residual stresses are found to be -88MPa(225MPa) and -38MPa(293MPa) on the inner surface of the DMW; where the values in parenthesis are the residual stresses after the DMW. Thermo-mechanical interaction by the SMW has a significant effect on the residual stress fields in the DMW.

  13. Initial testing for the recommendation of improved gas metal arc welding procedures for HY-80 steel plate butt joints at Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Veronika J.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Hull cut welding proficiency is an essential skill maintained by personnel at naval shipyards. This thesis explores arc weld theory to develop ideal submarine hull butt joint designs and recommends preliminary testing to be used to develop improved butt joint welding procedures at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. Pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P) is the ideal process for shipboard hull welding applications, theoretically. Butt joint samples...

  14. Life time assessment and repair of dissimilar metal welds. Part 2; Livslaengdsbedoemning och reparation av blandsvetsskarvar. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Weilin Zang; Vinter Dahl, Kristian; Borggreen, Kjeld; Hald, John

    2007-12-15

    Phase 1 of the project showed that the research on dissimilar metal welds mainly has focussed on those including austenitic stainless steels. In addition, it was found that damage in dissimilar metal welds in Swedish and Danish power plants were frequent. In the present project the common type of dissimilar welds in the Nordic countries were studied; those between heat resistant low alloy steels and martensitic 9-12 % Cr steels. Three trial welds with three different filler materials were fabricated. The parent metals were 2,25Cr1Mo and 12Cr1MoV (X20) steels. The filler materials were 5Cr1Mo, 12Cr1MoV and a Ni-base alloy. One half of each weld was post weld heat treated (PWHT) at 650 deg C and the other half at 750 deg C. Then, a number of heat treatments at 600-660 deg C/1000 h to simulate service exposure for 50,000 to 200,000 h at 540 deg were carried out on test samples from the welds. The samples were studied metallographically, including measurements of hardness profiles and carbon content profiles. Thermodynamical simulations and creep damage simulations of butt welds were performed with data of the trial weld as a starting point. The purpose of the study was to get a throughout understanding of the creep behaviour of dissimilar metal welds, how their groove and fabrication can be improved, how their life time can be prolonged and how dissimilar weld should be non-destructively tested with respect to creep damage. From the results the following results may be drawn: - Carburised and decarburised zones develop during the PWHT. The zones are small with a PWHT at 650 deg C and relatively large at 750 deg C. They appear as measurable zones in the microstructure. 5Cr weld metal gives smaller zones than 12Cr weld metal. With the Ni-base weld metal intermittent decarburised zones could be observed across the wall after PWHT at 750 deg C. - The thermodynamical simulations predicted carburised and decarburised zones with sizes in agreement with corresponding heat

  15. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. [6061 and 6063

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1015 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2.0 inch; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gas is argon.

  16. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. [6061 and 6063

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2,0 inch; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW).

  17. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  18. Creep properties and simulation of weld repaired low alloy heat resistant CrMo and Mo steels at 540 deg C. Sub project 1 - Ex-serviced parent metal and virgin weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld; Weilin Zang

    2006-10-15

    Many existing power generating and process plants, where low alloy heat resistant CrMo(V) steels are extensively used for critical components, have exceeded their design lifetime of usually 100,000 hours. Assessment of residual lifetime and extension of economic life by weld repair have become increasingly important and attractive. This project aims at i) performing weld repair and determining the degree of mismatching, ii) evaluating the creep properties of weld repairs, iii) analysing creep behaviour of weld repair and providing necessary data for further reliable simulations of weld repair creep behaviour in long term service, and iv), simulating and assessing lifetime and creep damage evolution of weld repair. Weld repair using 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 consumables has been carried out in a service-exposed 10 CrMo 9 10 pipe. Creep specimens have been extracted from the service-exposed 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal (PM), from the virgin 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal (WM), from the virgin 13 CrMo 4 4 WM as well as from the virgin 15 Mo 3 WM. Iso-thermal uniaxial creep tests have been performed at 540 deg C in air. Pre- and post-metallography are carried out on the selected samples. FEM simulations using obtained creep data are executed. Pre-test metallography shows normal and acceptable weld repairs at given welding conditions. Creep tests demonstrate that the virgin 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 WMs have apparently longer creep lifetime than the service-exposed CrMo 9 10 PM at higher stresses than 110 MPa. Among the weld metals, the longest creep lifetime is found in 10 CrMo 9 10. Higher creep strength and lower creep strain rate in the weld metals indicate an overmatch weld. At 95 MPa, however, lifetime of 13 CrMo 4 4 WM is surprisingly short (factors which may shorten lifetime are discussed and one more test will start to verify creep strength at low stress) and tests are still running for other two weld metals. More results regarding low stress

  19. Fracture assessment for a dissimilar metal weld of low alloy steel and Ni-base alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Takuya, E-mail: takuya4.ogawa@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, Power and Industrial Systems Research and Development Center, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Itatani, Masao; Saito, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Takahiro; Narazaki, Chihiro; Tsuchihashi, Kentaro [Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, Power and Industrial Systems Research and Development Center, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    Recently, instances of SCC in Ni-base alloy weld metal of light water reactor components have been reported. Despite the possibility of propagation of SCC crack to the fusion line between low alloy steel (LAS) of pressure vessel and Ni-base alloy of internal structure, a fracture assessment method of dissimilar metal welded joint has not been established. The objective of this study is to investigate a fracture mode of dissimilar metal weld of LAS and Ni-base alloy for development of a fracture assessment method for dissimilar metal weld. Fracture tests were conducted using two types of dissimilar metal weld test plates with semi-elliptical surface crack. In one of the test plates, the fusion line lies around the surface points of the surface crack and the crack tips at the surface points have intruded into LAS. Material ahead of the crack tip at the deepest point is Ni-base alloy. In the other, the fusion line lies around the deepest point of the surface crack and the crack tip at the deepest point has intruded into LAS. Material ahead of the crack tip at the deepest point is LAS. The results of fracture tests using the former type of test plate reveal that the collapse load considering the proportion of ligament area of each material gives a good estimation for fracture load. That is, fracture assessment based on plastic collapse mode is applicable to the former type of test plate. It is also understood that a fracture assessment method based on the elastic-plastic fracture mode is suitable for the latter type of test plate.

  20. Application of a second-gradient model of ductile fracture on a Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YangJun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A “micromorphic”, second-gradient model applicable to ductile porous materials has been proposed, as an improvement from the fundamental work of Gurson that take into account the physical mechanisms responsible for ductile damage. The model has been applied to the study of fracture of the decarburized layer of a Dissimilar Metal Weld. The model successfully reproduces the crack path experimentally observed in a notched tensile sample extracted from this weld, different from the one predicted by the first gradient model.

  1. Fracture toughness master curve characterization of Linde 1092 weld metal for Beaver valley 1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bong Sang; Yang, Won Jon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the test results obtained from the Korean contribution to the integrity assessment of low toughness Beaver Valley reactor vessel by characterizing the fracture toughness of Linde 1092 (No. 305414) weld metal. 10 PCVN specimens and 10 1T-CT specimens were tested in accordance with the ASTM E 1921-97 standard, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T{sub o}, for ferritic steels in the transition range'. This results can also be useful for assessment of Linde 80 low toughness welds of Kori-1.

  2. Computer simulation in the design of local exhaust hoods for shielded metal arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tum Suden, K D; Flynn, M R; Goodman, R

    1990-03-01

    Computer simulations were used to examine competing exhaust hood configurations for shielded metal arc welding. The welder's breathing zone concentration appears to be an inverse linear function of the computer-predicted hood capture efficiency. Hood aspect ratio, hood flow, and the welder's position relative to the hood all have a significant effect on the breathing zone concentration. The height of the hood above the welding surface showed no significant effect in reducing breathing zone concentration. Further examination of breathing zone concentration as a function of capture efficiency is needed before reliable design methods can be developed using this parameter.

  3. Study on an Explosion Treated Steel Weld Metal withPrepared Crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A softening zone with recrystallized grain around the prepared crack tip in the shock waves treated C-Mn steel weld metal was observed. It is suggested that a dynamic recovery occurred around the prepared crack tip even at a low explosion pressure (5 GPa) because of the stress and strain concentration at the crack tip when shock waves pass through. This result supports the previous work on the improved mechanical properties of a shock treated welded joint with residual crack from the viewpoint of microstructure.

  4. Friction-Stir Welding - Heavy Inclusions in Bi-metallic welds of Al 2219/2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Ward W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy Inclusions (HI) were detected for the first time by radiographic examination in aluminum alloy 2219forging/2195plate (advancing/retreating side) Friction Sir Welds (FSW) for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Program. Radiographic HI indications appear as either small (approx.0.005"-0.025") individual particles or clusters of small particles. Initial work was performed to verify that the HI was not foreign material or caused by FSW pin tool debris. That and subsequent elemental analysis determined that the HI were large agglomerations of Al2Cu (theta phase), which is the strengthening precipitate in Al2219. A literature search on that subject determined that the agglomeration of phase has also been found in Al2219 bead on plate FSW [Ref. 1]. Since this was detected in ET space flight hardware, an investigative study of the effect of agglomerated theta phase particles in FSW Al2219f/2195p was performed. Numerous panels of various lengths were welded per ET weld procedures and radiographically inspected to determine if any HI was detected. Areas that had HI were sampled for room temperature and cyclic cryogenic (-423F) tensile testing and determined no significant adverse affect on mechanical properties when compared to test specimens without HI and historical data. Fracture surface examination using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) revealed smaller phase agglomerations undetectable by radiographic inspection dispersed throughout the Al2219f/2195p FSW. This indicates that phase agglomeration is inherent to the Al2219f/2195p FSW process and only rarely creates agglomerations large enough to be detected by radiography. HI has not been observed in FSW of plate to plate material for either Al2219 or AL2195.

  5. Effect of Welding Processes on Tensile and Impact Properties, Hardness and Microstructure of AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Joints Fabricated by Duplex Stainless Steel Filler Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A K Lakshminarayanan; K Shanmugam; V Balasubramanian

    2009-01-01

    The effect of welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding and gas tungsten arc welding on tensile and impact properties of the ferritic stainless steel conforming to AISI 409M grade is studied. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single pass butt welded joints. Tensile and impact properties, microhardness, microstructure and fracture surface morphology of the welded joints have been evaluated and the results are compared. From this investigatio.n, it is found that gas tungsten arc welded joints of ferritic stainless steel have superior tensile and impact properties compared with shielded metal are and gas metal arc welded joints and this is mainly due to the presence of finer grains in fusion zone and heat affected zone.

  6. Oxidation behavior of base metal, weld metal and HAZ regions of SMAW weldment in ASTM SA210 GrA1 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ravindra [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: ravirs_2002@rediffmail.com; Tewari, V.K.; Prakash, Satya [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2009-06-24

    Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) was used to weld together ASTM SA210 GrA1 steel. The oxidation studies were conducted on different regions of shielded metal arc weldment i.e., base metal, weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) specimens after exposure to air at 900 deg. C under cyclic conditions. The thermo-gravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of oxidation. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (SEM/EDAX) techniques were used to analyze the oxidation products. Base metal showed more weight gain than that of weld metal and HAZ. The HAZ specimen showed the least weight gain due to the formation of densely inner oxide scale.

  7. Dissimilar metals TIG welding-brazing of aluminum alloy to galvanized steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    San-bao LIN; Jian-ling SONG; Guang-chao MA; Chun-li YANG

    2009-01-01

    Dissimilar metals TIG welding-brazing of aluminum alloy to galvanized steel was investigated, and the wettability and spreadability of aluminum filler metal on the steel surface were analyzed. The resultant joint was characterized in order to determine the brittle intermetallic compound (IMC) in the interfacial layer, and the mechan-ical property of the joint was tested. The results show that the zinc coated layer can improve the wettability and spreadability of liquid aluminum filler metal on the surface of the steel, and the wetting angle can reach less than 20°. The lap joint has a dual characteristic and can be divided into a welding part on the aluminum side and a brazing part on the steel side. The interfacial IMC layer in the steel side is about 9.0 μm in thickness, which transfers from (α-Al + FeAl3) in the welded seam side to (Fe2Al5+ FeAl2) and (FeAl2+ FeAl) in the steel side. The crystal grain of the welded seam is obviously larger in size in the aluminum side. The local incomplete brazing is found at the root of the lap joint, which weakens the property of the joint. The fracture of the joint occurs at the root and the average tensile strength reaches 90 MPa.

  8. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayana, B [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Mills, Michael J. [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Ohio State University, The, Columbus

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  9. Premature failure of dissimilar metal weld joint at intermediate temperature superheater tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Hajri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal weld (DMW joint between alloyed steel (AS and stainless steel (SS failed at one of intermediate temperature superheater (ITSH tube in steam/power generation plant boiler. The premature failure was detected after a relatively short time of operation (8 years where the crack propagated circumferentially from AS side through the ITSH tube. Apart from physical examination, microstructural studies based on optical microscopy, SEM and EDX analysis were performed. The results of the investigation point out the limitation of Carbides precipitation at the alloyed steel/welding interface. This is synonym of creep stage I involvement in the failure of ITSH. Improper post-welding operation and bending moment are considered as root causes of the premature failure.

  10. Effect of Magnetic Fields on Explosive Welding of Metals and Explosive Compaction of Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, G. A.; Mali, V. I.; Bashkatov, Yu. L.; Anisimov, A. G.; Matrosov, A. D.; Teslenko, T. S.

    2005-07-01

    Explosive welding and explosive compaction of powders are new technologies for producing composite materials, which have been actively studied in recent decades. Considerable experience has been accumulated in producing composite materials with new physical properties, and these materials have been widely used in industry. At the same time, these technologies have certain limitations for high-temperature materials. The present research into the influence of magnetic fields on the explosive welding of metals and the explosive compaction of powders seeks to extend the possibilities of the indicated technologies. The results of the first experiments have shown that the use of magnetic fields holds promise for extending the possibilities of material welding and powder compaction.

  11. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  12. Al-Si-Mn Alloy Coating on Aluminum Substrate Using Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) Welding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, G. P.; Kamaraj, M.; Bakshi, S. R.

    2014-06-01

    The cold metal transfer (CMT) process was explored as a weld overlay technique for synthesizing Al-Si-Mn alloy coating on a commercially pure Al plate. The effect of welding speed on the bead geometry, deposition rate, and the dilution were studied and the best parameter was used to synthesize the coatings. The CMT process can be used to produce thick coatings (>2.5 mm) without porosity and with low dilution levels. The Vickers hardness number of the Al substrate increased from 28 in the bulk to 57 in the coating. It is suggested that the CMT process can be an effective and energy-efficient technique for depositing thick coatings and is useful in weld repair of aluminum alloy components.

  13. Study on fundamental processes of laser welded metals observed with intense x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, T.; Daido, H.; Shobu, T.; Takase, K.; Tsukimori, K.; Kureta, M.; Segawa, M.; Nishimura, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    With use of photon techniques including visible light, soft and hard x-rays, precise fundamental laser welding processes in the repair and maintenance of nuclear plant engineering were reviewed mechanistically. We make discussions centered on the usefulness of an intense soft x-ray beams for evaluations of spatial residual strain distribution and welded metal convection behavior including the surface morphology. Numerical results obtained with a general purpose three-dimensional code SPLICE for the simulation of the welding and solidifying phenomena. Then it is concluded that the x-ray beam would be useful as one of the powerful tools for understanding the mechanisms of various complex phenomena with higher accuracy and higher resolution.

  14. Estimation of residual stress in welding of dissimilar metals at nuclear power plants using cascaded support vetor regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Young Do; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Residual stress is a critical element in determining the integrity of parts and the lifetime of welded structures. It is necessary to estimate the residual stress of a welding zone because residual stress is a major reason for the generation of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plants. That is, it is necessary to estimate the distribution of the residual stress in welding of dissimilar metals under manifold welding conditions. In this study, a cascaded support vector regression (CSVR) model was presented to estimate the residual stress of a welding zone. The CSVR model was serially and consecutively structured in terms of SVR modules. Using numerical data obtained from finite element analysis by a subtractive clustering method, learning data that explained the characteristic behavior of the residual stress of a welding zone were selected to optimize the proposed model. The results suggest that the CSVR model yielded a better estimation performance when compared with a classic SVR model.

  15. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  16. Modeling of Thermo-Electro-Mechanical Manufacturing Processes Applications in Metal Forming and Resistance Welding

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, C V; Alves, L M; Bay, N; Martins, P A F

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of Thermo-Electro-Mechanical Manufacturing Processes with Applications in Metal Forming and Resistance Welding provides readers with a basic understanding of the fundamental ingredients in plasticity, heat transfer and electricity that are necessary to develop and proper utilize computer programs based on the finite element flow formulation.   Computer implementation of a wide range of theoretical and numerical subjects related to mesh generation, contact algorithms, elasticity, anisotropic constitutive equations, solution procedures and parallelization of equation solvers is comprehensively described.   Illustrated and enriched with selected examples obtained from industrial applications, Modeling of Thermo-Electro-Mechanical Manufacturing Processes with Applications in Metal Forming and Resistance Welding works to diminish the gap between the developers of finite element computer programs and the professional engineers with expertise in industrial joining technologies by metal forming and resista...

  17. Complex Behavior of Forces Influencing Molten Weld Metal Flow based on Static Force Balance Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achebo, Joseph I.

    This study is aimed at investigating the forces responsible for the detachment of molten metal droplets formed at an electrode tip, which imminently and eventually drop into the weld pool during the welding process. The Equations used by Kim and Eagar in 1993 were applied to this study. It was found that the different detaching forces which are the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the drag force, were determined to be 7.154 x 10-6N, 0.05N and 1.736N respectively. Whereas, the primary retaining force, which is the surface tension force, was calculated to be 0.0195N. From the findings, since the combination of the detaching forces taken together is greater than the retaining force, detachment of the molten metal droplet must inevitably occur. The combined effect of these forces on the behaviour of molten metal during the droplet detachment process was adequately investigated in this study.

  18. Dependence of the mechanical properties of joints welded according to the parameters of the metal active gas (MAG welding regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dobrotă

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective followed in the realization of welded structures is to obtain superior mechanical characteristics for these structures. The research aimed at setting ranges of values for the welding voltage (Uw, respectively for the welding current (Iw so as to obtain superior mechanical features for welded constructions. The research was carried out using E 36-4 steel as base material and SG2 wire as filler material, whereas the applied welding process was MAG. The optimization was done with the help of a number of 31 test bars considering various welding procedures for each test bar, and the experimental data were processed using the STATISTCA program.

  19. Influence of Mode of Metal Transfer on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded Modified Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-06-01

    This article describes in detail the effect of the modes of metal transfer on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas metal arc-welded modified ferritic stainless steel (SSP 409M) sheets (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared under three modes of metal transfer, i.e., short-circuit (SC), spray (S), transfer, and mix (M) mode transfer using two different austenitic filler wires (308L and 316L) and shielding gas composition of Ar + 5 pct CO2. The welded joints were evaluated by means of microstructural, hardness, notched tensile strength, Charpy impact toughness, and high cycle fatigue. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on modes of metal transfer and filler wires has been determined by dilution calculation, WRC-1992 diagram, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE), optical microscopy (OM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the microstructure as well as the tensile, Charpy impact, and high cycle fatigue of weld metal is significantly affected by the mode of metal transfer and filler wire used. However, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is affected only by the modes of metal transfer. The results have been correlated with the microstructures of weld and HAZ developed under different modes of metal transfer.

  20. Effects of shielding gas composition on arc profile and molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. L.; Lu, F. G.; Wang, H. P.; Murphy, A. B.; Tang, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    In gas metal arc welding, gases of different compositions are used to produce an arc plasma, which heats and melts the workpiece. They also protect the workpiece from the influence of the air during the welding process. This paper models gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes using an in-house simulation code. It investigates the effects of the gas composition on the temperature distribution in the arc and on the molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels. Pure argon, pure CO2 and different mixtures of argon and CO2 are considered in the study. The model is validated by comparing the calculated weld profiles with physical weld measurements. The numerical calculations reveal that gas composition greatly affects the arc temperature profile, heat transfer to the workpiece, and consequently the weld dimension. As the CO2 content in the shielding gas increases, a more constricted arc plasma with higher energy density is generated as a result of the increased current density in the arc centre and increased Lorentz force. The calculation also shows that the heat transferred from the arc to the workpiece increases with increasing CO2 content, resulting in a wider and deeper weld pool and decreased reinforcement height.

  1. The influence of electric ARC activation on the speed of heating and the structure of metal in welds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Savytsky Oleksandr M; Savytsky Mychailo M; Bajić Darko R; Shkrabalyuk Yuriy M; Vuherer Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    .... It is confirmed that ATIG and AMIG methods, depending on metal thickness, single pass weldability and chemical composition of activating flux, enable the reduction of welding energy by 2-6 times when...

  2. Analysis of porosity characteristics in weld metal of high strength aluminum alloy and the effect of mixed shielding gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaomu Zhang; Zhiyong Zhang; Yun Peng; Zhiling Tian; Changhong He; Hongjun Xiao; Chengyong Ma [Central Iron and Steel Research Inst., Beijing, BJ (China)

    2005-07-01

    Aluminum alloy has being widely used in modern automobile and aeronautic industry. However, the welding of aluminum alloy, especially high strength aluminum alloy is difficult. Porosities are usually brought in the weld metal. In this paper, MIG welding using mixed gas shielding is carried out. The characteristic shapes of porosity in weld metal are described, the mechanism of porosity formation is analyzed, and the factors that influence the tendency of porosity formation are studied. Experiment results indicate that by the use of mixed shielding gas of 38%He+62%Ar, the number of porosity is reduced, the width of HAZ and softened zone is decreased, and the mechanical properties of welded joint is increased. (orig.)

  3. Microstructures and properties analysis of dissimilar metal joint in the friction stir welded copper to aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xijing; Zhang Zhongke; Da Chaobing; Li Jing

    2007-01-01

    This paper mainly concentrated on the feasibility of friction stir welding of dissimilar metal of aluminum alloy to copper (T2) and a preliminary analysis of welding parameters influencing on the microstructures and properties of joint was carried out. The results indicated that the thickness of workpiece played an important role in the welding parameters which could succeed in the friction stir welding of dissimilar metal of copper to aluminum alloy, and the parameters were proved to be a narrow choice. The interfacial region between copper and aluminum in the dissimilar joint was not uniformly mixed, constituted with part of incomplete mixing zone, complete mixing zone, dispersion zone and the most region's boundary was obvious. Meantime a kind banded structure with inhomogeneous width was formed. The intermetallic compounds generated during friction stir welding in the interfacial region were mainly Cu9Al4 , Al2Cu etc, and their hardness was higher than others.

  4. Variation of chemical composition of high strength low alloy steels with different groove sizes in multi-pass conventional and pulsed current gas metal arc weld depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Devakumaran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 25 mm thick micro-alloyed HSLA steel plate is welded by multi-pass GMAW and P-GMAW processes using conventional V-groove and suitably designed narrow gap with 20 mm (NG-20 and 13 mm (NG-13 groove openings. The variation of weld metal chemistry in the multi pass GMA and P-GMA weld depositions are studied by spark emission spectroscopy. It is observed that the narrow groove GMA weld joint shows significant variation of weld metal chemistry compared to the conventional V-groove GMA weld joint since the dilution of base metal extends from the deposit adjacent to groove wall to weld center through dissolution by fusion and solid state diffusion. Further, it is noticed that a high rate of metal deposition along with high velocity of droplet transfer in P-GMAW process enhances the dilution of weld deposit and accordingly varies the chemical composition in multi-pass P-GMA weld deposit. Lower angle of attack to the groove wall surface along with low heat input in NG-13 weld groove minimizes the effect of dissolution by fusion and solid state diffusion from the deposit adjacent to groove wall to weld center. This results in more uniform properties of NG-13 P-GMA weld in comparison to those of NG-20 and CG welds.

  5. The Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment in Alloy 82/182 Dissimilar Metal Weld between Low Alloy Steel and 316L Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Hong, Jong-Dae; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) using an Alloy 82/182 are widely used to join low alloy steel components and stainless steel pipes in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It has been reported that tensile residual stress would be generated within DMWs during the welding processes. It is thought as main reason for primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) resulting in deterioration of long-term integrity. The application of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) has been considered to reduce the tensile residual stress after welding process. Meanwhile, the PWHT could affect the changes in microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. Therefore, in this study, the effects of PWHT on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors of base metals of low alloy steel and stainless steel and welding materials of Alloy 82/182 are evaluated. The influence of PWHT in DMW has been investigated. SA 508 and 316L SS exhibited tempered bainite and austenitic grains with a few residual stringer type ferrite. Grain boundary carbides are not precipitated owing to low carbon and insufficient exposure time in 316L SS. The change of mechanicals properties in base metals is not observed. In case of Alloy 182, after PWHT, grain boundaries are covered with film-like continuous Cr-rich carbides.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF THE LOW-CYCLE FATIGUE AND FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIORS OF P91 BASE METAL AND WELD JOINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.C. Yang; Y. Tu; M.M. Yu; J. Zhao

    2004-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests and crack growth propagations tests on P91 pipe base metal and its weld joints were conducted at three different temperatures: room temperature,550℃ and 575℃. The strain-life was analyzed, and the changes in fatigue life behavior and fatigue growth rates with increasing temperature were discussed. The different properties of the base metal and its weld joint have been analyzed.

  7. IR-Laser Welding and Ablation of Biotissue Stained with Metal Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Lalayan, A. A.; Israelyan, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biological tissue by the using of spherical metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation which spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. YAG:Nd laser with 1064 nm wavelength, 8 ns pulse duration, and operating in transverse electromagnetic modes TEM$_{00}$ was used for the synthesis of metal NPs. The Au,Ti Ni and Cu as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal NPs were formed in the liquid medium...

  8. Effect of Thermal and Diffusion Processes on Formation of the Structure of Weld Metal in Laser Welding of Dissimilar Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Babkin, K. D.; Pevzner, Ya. B.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and diffusion processes in laser welding of dissimilar materials are simulated. The active LaserCAD model for welding of dissimilar materials is amended. The developed model is verified for the Fe - Cu system. The microstructure of a weld of tin bronze and low-carbon steel is studied and the elements in the diffusion zone are analyzed. The computed and experimental data for laser and electron-beam welding are shown to agree well.

  9. Reheat cracking susceptibility of P23 (7CrWVMoNb9-6) steel welds made using matching and mis-matching filler metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevasmaa, Pekka; Salonen, Jorma; Auerkari, Pertti; Rantala, Juhani; Holmstroem, Stefan [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Reheat cracking sensitivity of 7CrWVMoNb9-6 (P23) thick-section multipass welds has been investigated by Gleeble simulation, mechanical testing, fractography and metallography. The results demonstrate that the experimental weld metal made using a high-Nb-W-Ti-B type filler metal was sensitive to reheat cracking, with a reduction of area no more than 2-3% in the BWI reheat cracking (RC) test. Welds made using a high-W -low-Ti type filler metal with Nb content similar to the parent steel, as well as welds make using a Ni-Nb-Ti-free-(W-free) type filler metal with the chemical composition closer to P24 grade material, were more ductile and crack-resistant, though with reduced cross-weld creep strength. Fractography of RC test specimens showed evidence of pronounced localisation of damage at the prior austenite grain boundaries of the thermally reheated, experimental P23 weld metal. The reheat cracking susceptibility of the less ductile weld metal was apparently related both to the chemical composition (higher B, Nb and Ti content) and sub-structural features of the coarse-grained reheated weld metal microstructure. Appropriate single- and multi-cycle thermal Gleeble simulations to produce representative HAY and reheated weld metal microstructures (as function of peak temperature), in conjunction with the BWI RC test were successfully applied to characterise the reheat cracking sensitivity of the candidate weld metals and parent steel HAZ. (orig.)

  10. Effect of the Metal Transport on the Mechanical Properties of Al-2Si Alloys Processed through Friction Stir Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailesh Rao, A.; Naik, Yuvaraja

    2017-03-01

    In this study, Al-2Si alloys were joined using friction stir welding with various process parameters. The process parameters considered here were rotational speeds from 600 to 1200 rpm, feed rate from 50 to 150 mm/min with three equal increments. In this study, the mushy state metal movements during the processes are discussed. The experimental observation and results indicate that the flaw formations, surface roughness of the weld, and hardness value depend on the metal movement and are explained in this study. The microstructure of the weld zone was studied finally.

  11. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong Ho [National Center for Nanomaterials Technology (NCNT), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheongam-ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  12. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel-Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin; Lee, Bong Ho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  13. Dry hyperbaric gas metal arc welding of subsea pipelines: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Amin S.

    2012-07-01

    Ambitions in exploration of oil and gas fields at deeper water depth require continuous investigation and maintenance. The transportation pipelines laid in deep waters are both subjected to corrosion and buckling due to environmental phenomena. They may also often undergo branching (namely hot tapping) to redirect (or add to) the transportation paths. Mechanical joints and welding are both considered as available alternatives when sectioning and replacement of the pipes at shallow waters is necessary, yet, welding is more promising for deep waters where remote operation is central. Fusion welding on the other hand comprises several technological detractions for sound operations under high ambient pressures disregarding its low cost and flexibility. The foremost detracting phenomenon in the arc welding is called 'arc root constriction', which is defined as arc geometry shrinkage under the increased pressure. Consequently, the power delivery to the weld pool at different pressure levels is a major worry. Effects of ionization and dissociation energies of different gases and mixtures, partial pressure of environmental gases including hydrogen and oxygen, gasification and degasification of the weld metal, inclusions that affect the phase transformation, absorption and desorption kinetics, oxidation and deoxidation reactions and many more are the phenomena that can possibly be altered by the gas type and ambient pressure level. Spattering and fume generation is a problematic issue since the arc is rather unstable under high pressure. Thus, seeking the effect of different chamber gas mixtures on welding parameters, final microstructure and mechanical properties is the main objective of this work.Statistical analysis of the collected voltage and current waveforms is carried out to identify the source of arc misbehavior and instability (discussed in Paper I). The stochastic parameters is related to the electrical stability and resolved into a number of varying

  14. Micro–macro-characterisation and modelling of mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded (GMAW) DP600 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazani, A., E-mail: ali.ramazani@iehk.rwth-aachen.de [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Mukherjee, K. [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Abdurakhmanov, A. [Welding and Joining Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Prahl, U. [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Schleser, M.; Reisgen, U. [Welding and Joining Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Bleck, W. [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steels show combined high strength and adequate formability. However, during welding, their microstructural feature of dispersion of hard martensite islands in the soft ferrite matrix is lost and the properties deteriorate. The current research aims to study the mechanical properties of the welded joint, taking into account the effect of features of all regions, such as microstructure, chemical composition and the area fraction, on the macroscopic mechanical properties of the welded joint. Hot rolled DP 600 steel was gas metal arc welded (GMAW) and tensile specimens were made with a welded joint. In the heat-affected zone (HAZ), the microstructure varied from bainite to coarse grained ferrite and tempered martensite. Chemical composition of every quantified region in the welded specimen was also identified using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Macromechanical FE modelling was employed to simulate the mechanical properties of the welded tensile specimen. 2D representative volume elements (RVE) for different parts of the welded region were constructed from real microstructure. 2D simulated flow curves were corrected to 3Ds using a developed correlation factor. Finally, the tensile test of welded material with inhomogeneous morphology was simulated and good agreement between experimental and predicted flow curve was achieved.

  15. Tensile and Impact Properties of Shielded Metal Arc Welded AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Shanmugam; A.K.Lakshminarayanan; V.Balasubramanian

    2009-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel on tensile and impact properties of the ferritic stainless steel conforming to AISI 409M grade. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single pass butt welded joints. Tensile and impact properties, microhardness, microstructure and fracture surface morphology of the joints fabricated by austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel filler metals were evaluated and the results were reported. From this investigation, it is found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed higher tensile strength and hardness compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Joints fabricated by austenitic stainless steel filler metal exhibited higher ductility and impact toughness compared with the joints fabricated by ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel filler metals.

  16. Changes in Precipitate Distributions and the Microstructural Evolution of P24/P91 Dissimilar Metal Welds During PWHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Karl E.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Chi, Kuangnan; Barnard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The effect of post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) on the evolution of precipitate phases in dissimilar metal welds made between 9 pct Cr P91 alloy and 2.25 pct Cr T/P24-type weld metal has been investigated. Sections of multi-pass fusion welds were analyzed in their as welded condition and after PWHTs of 2 and 8 hour duration at 1003 K (730 °C). Thin foil specimens and carbon extraction replicas have been examined in transmission electron microscopes in order to identify precipitate phases and substantiate their distributions in close proximity to the fusion line. The findings of these studies confirm that a carbon-depleted region develops in the lower alloyed weld material, adjacent to the weld interface, during thermal processing. A corresponding carbon enriched region is formed, simultaneously, in the coarse grain heat affected zone of the P91 parent alloy. It has been demonstrated that carbon depletion from the weld alloy results in the dissolution of M7C3 and M23C6 chromium carbides. However, micro-alloying additions of vanadium and niobium which are made to both the P24 and P91 alloys facilitate the precipitation of stable, nano-scale, MX carbonitride particles. This work demonstrates that these particles, which are of key importance to the strength of ferritic creep resistant alloys, are retained in carbon-depleted regions. The microstructural stability which is conferred by their retention means that the pernicious effects of recrystallization are largely avoided.

  17. The origin of transformation textures in steel weld metals containing acicular ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluken, A. O.; Grong, Ø.; Hjelen, J.

    1991-03-01

    The present investigation is concerned with basic studies of the development of transformation textures in steel weld metals, using the electron backscattering pattern (EBSP) technique. It is shown that the acicular ferrite (AF) plates exhibit an orientation relationship with both the austenite and the prior delta ferrite columnar grains in which they grow. The observed orientation relationship lies within the Bain orientation region and can be described by three texture components, i.e., a component and two complementary components. Each of these texture components is orientated approximately parallel with the original cell/dendrite growth direction. Measurements of the spatial misorientation between neighboring plates confirm that the morphology of AF in low-alloy steel weld metals bears a close resemblance to upper bainite.

  18. Analytical Investigation of Prior Austenite Grain Size Dependence of Low Temperature Toughness in Steel Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.F. Zhang; P. Hall; H. Terasak; M. Sato; Y. Komizo

    2012-01-01

    Prior austenite grain size dependence of the low temperature impact toughness has been addressed in the bainitic weld metals by in situ observations.Usually,decreasing the grain size is the only approach by which both the strength and the toughness of a steel are increased.However,low carbon bainitic steel with small grain size shows a weakening of the low temperature impact toughness in this study.By direct tracking of the morphological evolution during phase transformation,it is found that large austenite grain size dominates the nucleation of intragranular acicular ferrite,whereas small austenite grain size leads to grain boundary nucleation of bainite.This kinetics information will contribute to meet the increasing low temperature toughness requirement of weld metals for the storage tanks and offshore structures.

  19. Constitutive Model for Multiaxial Ratcheting Predictions of Cyclic Softening Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong; CHEN Xu; JIAO Rong

    2005-01-01

    A series of fully reversed axial, torsional strain-controlled cyclic tests and two multiaxial ratcheting tests were conducted on weld metal specimens using an Instron8521 tension-torsional servo-controlled testing machine. The weld metal showed clear cyclic softening under axial, torsional and multiaxial loading. A modified kinematic hardening rule was proposed in which a multiaxial-loading-dependent parameter incorporated the radial evanescence term of the Burlet-Cailletaud mode with the Ohno-Wang kinematic hardening rule to predict the multiaxial ratcheting effects. The introduction of yield stress evolved with accumulated plasticity strain enables the model to predict cyclic plasticity behavior of cyclic softening or cyclic hardening materials. Thus modified model considers the isotropic hardening as well as kinematic hardening of yield surface, and it can present description of plasticity behavior and ratcheting of cyclic softening and cyclic hardening materials well under multiaxial loading.

  20. Premature failure of dissimilar metal weld joint at intermediate temperature superheater tube

    OpenAIRE

    Al Hajri, Mohammed; Anees U. Malik; MEROUFEL, Abdelkader; Al-Muaili, Fahd

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint between alloyed steel (AS) and stainless steel (SS) failed at one of intermediate temperature superheater (ITSH) tube in steam/power generation plant boiler. The premature failure was detected after a relatively short time of operation (8 years) where the crack propagated circumferentially from AS side through the ITSH tube. Apart from physical examination, microstructural studies based on optical microscopy, SEM and EDX analysis were performed. The results o...

  1. Solidification microstructures and phase transformations in Al-Ti-Si-Mn deoxidized steel weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluken, A. O.; Grong, Ø.; Rørvik, G.

    1990-07-01

    The present investigation is concerned with basic studies of solidification mechanisms in Al-Ti-Si-Mn deoxidized steel weld metals. Assessment of the weld metal solidification micro-structures was done on the basis of optical microscopy in combination with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), while both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for characterization of indigenous oxide inclusions. It is shown that nonmetallic inclusions play a critical role in the development of the weld metal columnar grain structure by acting as inert substrates for nucleation of delta ferrite ahead of the advancing interface. The nucleation potency of the oxides increases in the order SiO2-MnO, Al2O3-Ti2O3-SiO2-MnO, A12O3, reflecting a corresponding increase in the inclusion/liquid interfacial energy. Moreover, a shift in the peritectic reaction (which facilitates growth of the austenite grains across the phosphorus-rich boundaries of the primary delta ferrite phase) has been observed in the presence of A12O3 inclusions. Indications are that the resulting decrease in the local phosphorus concentrations at the austenite grain boundaries will strongly alter the kinetics of the subsequent solid-state transformation reactions by promoting growth of grain boundary ferrite sideplates at the expense of intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrite.

  2. Experimental comparison of the MIG, friction stir welding, cold metal transfer and hybrid laser-MIG processes for AA 6005-T6 aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Serafino; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Rinaldi, Sergio; Gallone, Antonello; Viscido, Lucio; Filice, Luigino; Umbrello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of welded joints of AA 6005-T6 aluminum alloy obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and cold metal transfer (CMT) welding were analyzed. The performance of hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welded joints were identified using tensile, bending, shear and fatigue life tests. Taking into account the process conditions and requirements, hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welding processes were compared with friction stir welding (FSW) and conventional metal inert gas (MIG) welding processes, shown in a previous work, to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the processes for welding applications of studied Al alloy. Better tensile, bending and shear strength and fatigue life behavior were obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and FSW welded joints compared with conventional MIG processes.

  3. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  4. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling......Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  5. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure.

  6. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Arakere, A.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-05-01

    A fully coupled (two-way), transient, thermal-mechanical finite-element procedure is developed to model conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) butt-joining process. Two-way thermal-mechanical coupling is achieved by making the mechanical material model of the workpiece and the weld temperature-dependent and by allowing the potential work of plastic deformation resulting from large thermal gradients to be dissipated in the form of heat. To account for the heat losses from the weld into the surroundings, heat transfer effects associated with natural convection and radiation to the environment and thermal-heat conduction to the adjacent workpiece material are considered. The procedure is next combined with the basic physical-metallurgy concepts and principles and applied to a prototypical (plain) low-carbon steel (AISI 1005) to predict the distribution of various crystalline phases within the as-welded material microstructure in different fusion zone and heat-affected zone locations, under given GMAW-process parameters. The results obtained are compared with available open-literature experimental data to provide validation/verification for the proposed GMAW modeling effort.

  7. Real-time monitoring of abnormal conditions based on Fuzzy Kohonen clustering network in gas metal arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jinqiang; WU Chuansong; HU Jiakun

    2007-01-01

    A real-time monitoring system based on through-the-arc sensing is developed for detecting abnormal conditions in gas metal arc welding. The transient signals of welding voltage and current during the welding process are sampled and processed by statistical analysis methods. It is found that three statistical parameters (the standard deviation,variance, and kurtosis of welding current) show obvious variations during the step disturbance, which is intentionally introduced into the T-joint test pieces by cutting a gap in the vertical plane. A Fuzzy Kohonen clustering network (FKCN) is put forward to monitor the abnormal conditions in real-time. Ten robotic welding experiments are conducted to verify the real-time monitoring system. It is found that the correct identification rate is above 90%.

  8. Thermal Aging Effects on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consists of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, is now being widely used as the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing material for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its mechanical property, thermal expansion coefficient, and corrosion resistance. The heat affected zone (HAZ) on Alloy 600 which is formed by welding process is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al. crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions [3]. And according to Z.P. Lu et al. CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. To predict the life time of components, there is a model which can calculate the effective degradation years (EDYs) of the material as a function of operating temperature. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects the hardness of dissimilar metal weld from the fusion boundary to Alloy 600 base metal and the residual strain at Alloy 600 heat affected zone. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. The hardness, measured by Vickers hardness tester, peaked near the fusion boundary between Alloy 182 and Alloy 600, and it decreases as the picked point goes to Alloy 600 base metal. Even though the formation of precipitate such as Cr carbide, thermal aging doesn't affect the value and the tendency of hardness because of reduced residual stress. According to kernel average misorientation mapping, residual strain decreases when the material thermally aged. And finally, in 30 years simulated specimen, the high residual strain almost disappears. Therefore, the influence of residual strain on primary water stress corrosion cracking can be diminished when the material undergoes thermal aging.

  9. Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MJ Lambert

    2005-11-18

    Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 {micro}m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a

  10. Integrated risk estimation of metal inert gas (MIG and metal active gas (MAG welding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karkoszka

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the technical characteristics of the welding processes, associated with the fulfilling clients’ requirements, the assurance of safe and healthy working places as well as the environment protection the fundamental meaning belongs to the application of the appropriate methods of risk assessment of these processes. The paper presents the results of risk analysis, using an integrated risk indicator implemented into operation of the MIG and MAG welding processes in the practice. In the welding risk management one can decide about reduce the risk by avoiding the risky ventures, or as a result of the proper preventive actions’ application.

  11. Bonding Interface and Bending Deformation of Al/316LSS Clad Metal Prepared by Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xunzhong; Fan, Minyu; Wang, Liuan; Ma, Fuye

    2016-06-01

    The morphology, elemental distribution, and phase analysis of the bonding interface were investigated by means of SEM, EDS, and XRD to evaluate the interface bonding properties of Al/316LSS clad metal prepared by explosive welding method. Furthermore, the micro-hardness and bending properties were also investigated. The results indicated that the linear and wavy bonding interfaces coexisted and intermetallic phases were present in the local interfacial zone. Moreover, the micro-hardness value at the bonding interface with intermetallic phases was higher than that at the interface without any intermetallic phases. In addition, bulk metal compounds could easily lead to the generation of micro-cracks during the bending forming process.

  12. Features of behavior of the contact boundary of metals during explosion welding: Numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanov, V. G.; Shutov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The results of numerical simulation of wave formation under an oblique impact of metal plates during explosion welding are presented. The numerical simulation was carried out on the basis of the elastoplastic approximation. It is shown that the elastoplastic behavior of metals may be a possible source of instabilities. Further evolution of the process of wave formation and the formation of a periodic wave structure of the interface are already determined by the hydrodynamic behavior of materials. The temperature at the contact boundary of plates obtained in the calculation exceeds the melting point. The calculated wavelengths coincide with the experimental data.

  13. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Galgalikar, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process was introduced. The model is of a modular type and comprises five modules, each designed to handle a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e.: (i) electro-dynamics of the welding-gun; (ii) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric-arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler-metal consumable electrode to the weld; (iii) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (iv) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; and (v) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties. In the present work, the GMAW process model has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the spatial distribution of the mechanical properties controlling the ballistic-limit (i.e., penetration-resistance) of the weld. The model is upgraded through the introduction of the sixth module in the present work in recognition of the fact that in thick steel GMAW weldments, the overall ballistic performance of the armor may become controlled by the (often inferior) ballistic limits of its weld (fusion and heat-affected) zones. To demonstrate the utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel, MIL A46100. The model predictions concerning the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic-limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt-weld are found to be consistent with prior observations and general expectations.

  14. Parametric studies on tensile strength in joining AA6061- T6 and AA7075-T6 by gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, M.; Noordin, N. F. M.; Shah, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Proper selection of the welding parameters can result in better joining. In this study, the effects of various welding parameters on tensile strength in joining dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 were investigated. 2 mm thick samples of both base metals were welded by semi-automatic gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using filler wire ER5356. The welding current, arc voltage and welding speed were chosen as variables parameters. The strength of each specimen after the welding operations were tested and the effects of these parameters on tensile strength were identified by using Taguchi method. The range of parameter for welding current were chosen from 100 to 115 A, arc voltage from 17 to 20 V and welding speed from 2 to 5 mm/s. L16 orthogonal array was used to obtained 16 runs of experiments. It was found that the highest tensile strength (194.34 MPa) was obtained with the combination of a welding current of 115 A, welding voltage of 18 V and welding speed of 4 mm/s. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), the welding voltage was the most effected parameter on tensile strength with percentage of contribution at 41.30%.

  15. Dry hyperbaric gas metal arc welding of subsea pipelines: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Amin S.

    2012-07-01

    Ambitions in exploration of oil and gas fields at deeper water depth require continuous investigation and maintenance. The transportation pipelines laid in deep waters are both subjected to corrosion and buckling due to environmental phenomena. They may also often undergo branching (namely hot tapping) to redirect (or add to) the transportation paths. Mechanical joints and welding are both considered as available alternatives when sectioning and replacement of the pipes at shallow waters is necessary, yet, welding is more promising for deep waters where remote operation is central. Fusion welding on the other hand comprises several technological detractions for sound operations under high ambient pressures disregarding its low cost and flexibility. The foremost detracting phenomenon in the arc welding is called 'arc root constriction', which is defined as arc geometry shrinkage under the increased pressure. Consequently, the power delivery to the weld pool at different pressure levels is a major worry. Effects of ionization and dissociation energies of different gases and mixtures, partial pressure of environmental gases including hydrogen and oxygen, gasification and degasification of the weld metal, inclusions that affect the phase transformation, absorption and desorption kinetics, oxidation and deoxidation reactions and many more are the phenomena that can possibly be altered by the gas type and ambient pressure level. Spattering and fume generation is a problematic issue since the arc is rather unstable under high pressure. Thus, seeking the effect of different chamber gas mixtures on welding parameters, final microstructure and mechanical properties is the main objective of this work.Statistical analysis of the collected voltage and current waveforms is carried out to identify the source of arc misbehavior and instability (discussed in Paper I). The stochastic parameters is related to the electrical stability and resolved into a number of varying

  16. Inspection of dissimilar metal welds in reactor pressure vessels in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadea, J.R.; Regidor, J.J.; Pelaez, J.A.; Serrano, P. [Tecnatom, S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    MRP-139 recommendations for inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in PWR vessels were launched in the last years in the USA. Basically, it increases the frequency of the examinations in these type of welds, with major emphasis in the hot loops, adding one intermediate inspection at the ten years interval in outlet nozzles. The spanish nuclear power plants (NPP's) have begun the implementation of this type of inspections on the vessel nozzles DM welds. As this type of inspections could have an impact in the critical path duration of the outage, it is necessary the use of a mechanical equipment able to examine the nozzles DM welds in a short vessel occupation time (VOT) with high quality, qualified techniques and minimum requirements of the refuelling platform. Tecnatom undertook the design and development of a new more advanced equipment, named TENIS-DM, for implementing the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzles examination. This equipment was designed in order to accomplish the stringent requirements and the updated examination techniques; it was used for the inspection of the DM welds of Asco 1 NPP inlet and outlet nozzles in March 2011. Examination techniques and procedures were qualified through the GRUVAL validation program, based on ENIC methodology. Mechanical scanner was equipped with a large number of examination probes, and TV cameras -for visual inspection and also for monitoring the ultrasonic inspections. A remote operated submarine was also used to give support to the operational personnel during the manipulation of the equipment and its movements from one nozzle to the others. During two months before the inspection, tests of the complete inspection system were made on a nozzle mock-up installed in a 4 meters deep well at Tecnatom's facilities; this scenario was also used during the training sessions of the inspection crew. The defined technical and practical objectives were achieved: use of qualified techniques and minimal impact on the

  17. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  19. Cold metal transfer spot plug welding of AA6061-T6-to-galvanized steel for automotive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, R., E-mail: caorui@lut.cn; Huang, Q.; Chen, J.H., E-mail: zchen@lut.cn; Wang, Pei-Chung

    2014-02-05

    Highlights: • Two Al-to-galvanized steel spot plug welding joints were studied by CMT method. • The optimum process variables for the two joints were gotten by orthogonal test. • Connection mechanism of the two joints were discussed. -- Abstract: In this study, cold metal transfer (CMT) spot plug joining of 1 mm thick Al AA6061-T6 to 1 mm thick galvanized steel (i.e., Q235) was studied. Welding variables were optimized for a plug weld in the center of a 25 mm overlap region with aluminum 4043 wire and 100% argon shielding gas. Microstructures and elemental distributions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. Mechanical testing of CMT spot plug welded joints was conducted. It was found that it is feasible to join Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized steel by CMT spot plug welding method. The process variables for two joints with Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized mild steel and galvanized mild steel-to-Al AA6061T6 are optimized. The strength of CMT spot welded Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized mild steel is determined primarily by the strength and area of the brazed interface. While, the strength of the galvanized mild steel-to-Al AA6061T6 joint is mainly dependent upon the area of the weld metal.

  20. Material properties of a dissimilar metal weld Inconel 600/ Inconel 82 weld filler/ Carbon Steel (Gr.106 B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, S. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Duan, X. [CANDU Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Weck, A., E-mail: aweck@uottawa.ca [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Inconel 600 pipes welded to Carbon-Steel are used in CANDU nuclear reactors. Fracture of these welded pipes has important consequences in term of safety, and therefore their mechanical properties need to be better understood. In this study, the weld region was analyzed at various length-scales using optical microscopy, micro hardness testing, small and large scale tensile testing, and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Micro-hardness profiles showed variations across the weld and through thickness and were justified in terms of residual stresses. Local stress-strain curves were built using DIC and showed good agreement with stress-strain curves obtained from miniature tensile samples. (author)

  1. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, F.; Ahmad, A.; Farooq, A.; Haider, W.

    2016-10-01

    In the present research work, corrosion behavior of post-weld heat-treated (PWHT) AISI 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) specimens joined by gas metal arc welding is compared with as-welded samples by using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Welded samples were PWHT at 1323 K for 480 s and quenched. Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of as-welded and PWHT specimens were investigated. Microstructural studies have shown grain size refinement after PWHT. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were found maximum for PWHT samples. Bend test have shown that PWHT imparted ductility in welded sample. Fractographic analysis has evidenced ductile behavior for samples. Potentiodynamic polarization test was carried out in a solution composed of 1 M H2SO4 and 1 N NaCl. Corrosion rate of weld region was 127.6 mpy, but after PWHT, it was decreased to 13.12 mpy.

  2. PENGARUH VARIASI SUHU POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT ANNEALING TERHADAP SIFAT MEKANIS MATERIAL BAJA EMS-45 DENGAN METODE PENGELASAN SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusiyanto Rusiyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan Untuk mengetahui nilai kekerasan Vickers material Baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan dan setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan tanpa post weld heat treatment annealing, Untuk mengetahui berapakah suhu optimal post weld heat treatment annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 dengan variasi suhu yang digunakan 350 o C, 550 o C, dan 750 C. Untuk mengetahui struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 akibat variasi suhu post weld heat treatment annealing pada proses pengelasan dengan menggunakan metode pengelasan shielded metal arc welding. Bahan atau material dasar yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah Baja EMS-45 dengan ketebalan pelat 10 mm, lebar pelat 20 mm dan panjang 100 mm. Berdasarkan hasil pengujian nilai kekerasan tertinggi setelah proses pengelasan terletak pada daerah Logam Las. Pengelasan non PWHT memiliki nilai kekerasan paling tinggi setelah proses pengelasan yaitu sebesar 183,2 VHN. Suhu optimal Post Weld Heat Treatment Annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 adalah pada suhu 750 C. Karena pada PWHT pada suhu tersebut mengalami penurunan kekerasan yang besar yaitu sebesar 127,2 VHN, sehingga material baja EMS-45 dapat memperbaiki sifat mampu mesinnya. Struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan berupa grafit serpih, perlit dan ferit, setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan mempunyai struktur mikro berupa matrik ferit dan grafit pada daerah logam las, matrik perlit kasar dan grafit serpih pada daerah HAZ dan struktur perlit, grafit serpih dan ferit pada daerah logam induk o o

  3. Phased array ultrasonic testing of dissimilar metal welds using geometric based referencing delay law technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Taeyoung; Schubert, Frank; Hillmann, Susanne; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2015-03-01

    Phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) techniques are widely used for the non-destructive testing (NDT) of austenitic welds to find defects like cracks. However, the propagation of ultrasound waves through the austenitic material is intricate due to its inhomogeneous and anisotropic nature. Such a characteristic leads beam path distorted which causes the signal to be misinterpreted. By employing a reference block which is cutout from the mockup of which the structure is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW), a new method of PAUT named as Referencing Delay Law Technique (RDLT) is introduced. With the RDLT, full matrix capture (FMC) was used for data acquisition. To reconstruct the images, total focusing method (TFM) was used. After the focal laws were calculated, PAUT was then performed. As a result, the flaws are more precisely positioned with significantly increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  4. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  5. Effect of thermal aging on SCC and mechanical properties of stainless steel weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hixon, J.R. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States); Kim, J.H.; Ballinger, R.G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels and duplex stainless steel. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well known '475{sup o}C embrittlement that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials, and this process is operative in welds in either cast or wrought stainless steels where delta ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 475{sup o}C, the process is also operative at lower temperatures, including the 300{sup o}C operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours. An experimental program is under way in to understand how the spinodal decomposition may affect material properties changes in BWR pipe weld metals. Testing includes nano and micro-structural analysis as well as fatigue and SCC crack growth. In this study we report on the initial results of this program, including tensile, Charpy impact, fracture toughness and SCC crack growth rates of SS weld metals under simulated BWR conditions. The measurement of tensile, microhardness and Charpy-impact energy show an increase in strength, a decrease in ductility, and a decrease in impact energy after aging for 1000 hours at 430 and 400 {sup o}C. Crack growth rates for material in the as welded and aged for 5000 hours at 400{sup o}C have been measured and are generally within the scatter band for wrought material although the aged material data fall at the high end. Unusual insitu unstable fracture behavior has been experienced at toughness values significantly below (<50%) the room temperature fracture toughness. This behavior, termed 'environmental fracture' requires further investigation. (author)

  6. Nano-structural and Nano-chemical analysis of dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Dissimilar Metal Welds (DMWs) is generally applied to nuclear power plants for manufacturing and machining in structural components such as reactor pressure vessels and pressurizer nozzles. Alloy 152 is used frequently as filler metal in the manufacture of the DMW in light water reactors to join the low alloy steel pressure vessel nozzles and steam generator nozzles to nickel-based wrought alloy or austenitic stainless steel components. However, in recent years cracking phenomena has been observed in the welded joints. Concerns have been raised to the integrity and reliability in the joint transition zone due to the high susceptibility of the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the fusion boundary (FB) to stress corrosion cracking in combination with thermal aging. Since the material microstructure and chemical composition are key parameters affecting the stress corrosion cracking, improving the understanding of stress corrosion cracking at the FB region requires fundamental understanding of the unique microstructure of the FB region in DMW. Despite the potential degradation and consequent risk in the DMW, there is still a lack of the fundamental understanding of microstructure in the FB region, in particular the region containing unidentified band structures near the FB. The scale of the microstructure in modern metallic materials is becoming increasingly smaller. The 3-dimensional atom probe tomography (3D APT) has a truly quantitative analytical capability to characterize nanometer scale particles in metallic materials, thus its application to the microstructural analysis in multi-component metallic materials provides critical information on the mechanism of nanoscale microstructural evolution. The 3D APT is a microscope that allows the reconstruction of 3D 'atom maps'. These reconstructions can be interrogated and interpreted to determine the nanoscale chemistry of the material. Therefore, the current study is aiming at the establishment of detail procedure

  7. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  8. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  9. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, John; Harper, Eddie

    This packet, containing a teacher's edition, a student edition, and a student workbook, introduces students to high deposition welding and processes for "shielding" a weld. In addition to general information, the teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages, as well as unit information that corresponds to the…

  10. High-power fiber laser welding and its application to metallic glass Zr{sub 55}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 5}Cu{sub 30}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahito, Yousuke [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University (JWRI), 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: kawahito@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Terajima, Takeshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University (JWRI), 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kimura, Hisamich [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Kuroda, Toshio; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Katayama, Seiji [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University (JWRI), 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Fiber laser has been receiving attention due to its advantages of high-power and high-beam quality to produce narrow and deep penetration welds at high-welding speeds. Therefore, fiber laser welding is expected to apply to the joining of metallic glass which has unique properties such as high-mechanical strength or small solidification shrinkage, because extremely rapid quenching for the laser weldment or heat-affected zone (HAZ) is possible to remain amorphous. In this research, fiber laser welding was first performed with the objective of obtaining a fundamental knowledge of weld property produced in bead-on-plate welding for common marital such as Type 304 stainless steel with 6 kW fiber laser beams of several peak power densities. Deeply penetrated weld beads with narrow widths were produced with small spots of tightly focused laser beams and full-penetration welds in 8 mm thick plate could be obtained at the high-welding speed of 4.5 m/min. Subsequently, the tightly focused 2.5 kW fiber laser beam was applied to 72 m/min ultra-high-speed welding for metallic glass Zr{sub 55}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 5}Cu{sub 30} in order to keep amorphous metals. Consequently, the weldment and HAZ remained desirably amorphous at ultra-high-welding speed with a tightly focused fiber laser beam.

  11. Persistence of deposited metals in the lungs after stainless steel and mild steel welding fume inhalation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Chapman, Rebecca; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G

    2011-05-01

    Welding generates complex metal fumes that vary in composition. The objectives of this study were to compare the persistence of deposited metals and the inflammatory potential of stainless and mild steel welding fumes, the two most common fumes used in US industry. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 mg/m(3) of stainless or mild steel welding fumes for 3 h/day for 3 days. Controls were exposed to filtered air. Generated fume was collected, and particle size and elemental composition were determined. Bronchoalveolar lavage was done on days 0, 8, 21, and 42 after the last exposure to assess lung injury/inflammation and to recover lung phagocytes. Non-lavaged lung samples were analyzed for total and specific metal content as a measure of metal persistence. Both welding fumes were similar in particle morphology and size. Following was the chemical composition of the fumes-stainless steel: 57% Fe, 20% Cr, 14% Mn, and 9% Ni; mild steel: 83% Fe and 15% Mn. There was no effect of the mild steel fume on lung injury/inflammation at any time point compared to air control. Lung injury and inflammation were significantly elevated at 8 and 21 days after exposure to the stainless steel fume compared to control. Stainless steel fume exposure was associated with greater recovery of welding fume-laden macrophages from the lungs at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. A higher concentration of total metal was observed in the lungs of the stainless steel welding fume at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. The specific metals present in the two fumes were cleared from the lungs at different rates. The potentially more toxic metals (e.g., Mn, Cr) present in the stainless steel fume were cleared from the lungs more quickly than Fe, likely increasing their translocation from the respiratory system to other organs.

  12. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  13. Potential for EMU Fabric Damage by Electron Beam and Molten Metal During Space Welding for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of preparations concerning the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), studies were performed to better understand the effect of molten metal contact and electron beam impingement with various fabrics for space suit applications. The question arose as to what would occur if the electron beam from the Ukrainian Universal Hand Tool (UHT) designed for welding in space were to impinge upon a piece of Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The expectation was that the electron beam would lay down a static charge pattern with no damage to the ceramic fabric. The electron beam is capable of spraying the fabric with enough negative charge to repel further electrons from the fabric before significant heating occurs. The static charge pattern would deflect any further charge accumulation except for a small initial amount of leakage to the grounded surface of the welder. However, when studies were made of the effect of the electron beam on the insulating ceramic fabric it was surprisingly found that the electron beam did indeed burn through the ceramic fabric. It was also found that the shorter electron beam standoff distances had longer burnthrough times than did some greater electron beam standoff distances. A possible explanation for the longer burnthrough times for the small electron beam standoff distance would be outgassing of the fabric which caused the electron beam hand-tool to cycle on and off to provide some protection for the cathodes. The electron beam hand tool was observed to cycle off at the short standoff distance of two inches likely due to vapors being outgassed. During the electron beam welding process there is an electron leakage, or current leakage, flow from the fabric. A static charge pattern is initially laid down by the electron beam current flow. The static charge makes up the current leakage flow which initially slightly heats up the fabric. The initially laid down surface charge leaks a

  14. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  15. Explosive welding: Mixing of metals without mutual solubility (iron-silver)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Rybin, V. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Volkova, A. Yu.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.

    2012-11-01

    The results obtained for joints of dissimilar metals, iron-silver (earlier, copper-tantalum), which form immiscible liquid suspensions, explain why they are mixed in explosive welding. Inhomogeneities of the wavy interface, such as protrusions and zones of localized melting, were observed. The effect of granulating fragmentation, which is responsible for crushing initial materials into particles, was understood as one of the most efficient ways to dissipate the supplied energy. It is shown that, in the case of joints of metals without mutual solubility, zones of localized melting represent colloidal solutions, which form either emulsions or suspensions. At solidification, the emulsion represents a hazard for joint stability due to possible separation; on the contrary, suspension can enable the dispersion strengthening of the joint. The results can be used in the development of new metal joints without mutual solubility.

  16. Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra [Materials Testing Institute University of Stuttgart (MPA), Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Köhler, Bernd [Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing, Dresden Branch (IZFP-D), Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

  17. Solidification crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy weld metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibilities of the three aluminum alloys to solidification crack were studied with trans-varestraint tests and tensile tests at elevated temperature. Their metallurgical characteristics, morphologies of the fractured surface and dynamic cracking behaviors at elevated temperature were analyzed with a series of micro-analysis methods. The results show that dynamic cracking models can be classified into three types. The first model has the healing effect which is called type A. The second is the one with deformation and breaking down of metal bridge, called type B. The last one is with the separation of liquid film along grain boundary, called type C.Moreover, the strain rate has different effects on crack susceptibility of aluminum alloys with different cracking models. ZL101 and 5083 alloys belong to type A and type C cracking model respectively, in which strain rate has greater effect on eutectic healing and plastic deformation of metal bridge. 6082 alloy is type B cracking model in which the strain rate has little effect on the deformation ability of the liquid film.

  18. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of 13CrNiMo weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilmes, P.D. [Laboratorio de Investigaciones de Metalurgia Fisica ' Ing. Gregorio Cusminsky' (LIMF), Departamento Mecanica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, calle 1 y 47, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Llorente, C.L. [Laboratorio de Investigaciones de Metalurgia Fisica ' Ing. Gregorio Cusminsky' (LIMF), Departamento Mecanica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, calle 1 y 47, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Saire Huaman, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones, Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Sucursal 4-C.C. 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Laboratorio de Ingenieria de Corrosion y Tecnologia Electroquimica (LICTE), Departamento Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, 1 y 47, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Gassa, L.M. [Instituto de Investigaciones, Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Sucursal 4-C.C. 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Laboratorio de Ingenieria de Corrosion y Tecnologia Electroquimica (LICTE), Departamento Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, 1 y 47, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Gervasi, C.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones, Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Sucursal 4-C.C. 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina) and Laboratorio de Ingenieria de Corrosion y Tecnologia Electroquimica (LICTE), Departamento Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, 1 y 47, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: gervasi@inifta.unlp.edu.ar

    2006-10-15

    Cyclic potentiodynamic measurements and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyze susceptibility to pitting corrosion of 13CrNiMo weld metals. In order to carry out a critical assessment of the influence of microstructural factors on localized corrosion, different heat treatments were applied to the alloys under investigation. Volume fractions of austenite in tempered conditions as well as the amount and size of precipitated carbides strongly affect pitting resistance. Characteristic potentials (pitting potential and repassivation potential) increase according to the retained austenite content. Results can be discussed in terms of a model that describes the structural refinement resulting from a double-tempering procedure.

  19. Development of matching filler metals for welding CB2 and first experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuser, Herbert; Jochum, Claus; Kreuzer-Zagar, Dorothea [Boehler Schweisstechnik Deutschland GmbH, Hamm (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper gives an overview about the properties of a new martensitic welding consumable which is matching to CB2, FB2, PB2. This material has been developed in the frame of COST 536 research program. Thermanit MTS 5 Co1 shows high strength properties with moderate toughness in the range about 40 J. The mechanical properties have been tested after different PWHT, the influence of Boron was evaluated with respect to weldability, creep strength and toughness. Creep tests are still running, up to now, the filler metal behaves as expected. (orig.)

  20. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON METAL TRANSFER OF CELLULOSE ELECTRODE IN VERTICAL DOWN WELDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Haiyun; Li Zhuoxin; Shi Yaowu

    2005-01-01

    A high-speed photographic method is mainly used to analyze metal transfer of a cellulose covered electrode in the vertical down welding. The experimental results show that fine droplets spraying transfer and globular transfer are the dominant transfer characteristic. The large droplet spatter, especially the upwards spatter, is a particular phenomenon. It is found that the combination action of gas blow force, surface tension, gravitational force and electromagnetic force lead to globular transfer. Gravitational force and electromagnetic force, which hasten big droplet spatter, should not be neglected.

  1. Effects of Different Filler Metals on the Mechanical Behaviors of GTA Welded AA7A52(T6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Fengyuan; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Lin, Jianjun; Sun, Zhe; Xu, Binshi; He, Peng

    2014-06-01

    ER4043, ER5356, and AA7A52 on behalf of the Al-Si, Al-Mg, and Al-Zn-Mg-based welding material, respectively, were chosen as the filler metal to weld AA7A52(T6) plates by GTAW. The variance in mechanical performances of the joints caused by the various filler materials was investigated with reference to the SEM and EDS test results for the weld seam and the fracture surface. Failure was found in the seam for all the welded joints. With regard to the joint obtained with ER4043 welding wire, the total elongation was limited by the brittle intergranular compound Mg2Si of which Mg was introduced by convection mass transfer. As for the other two welds, the content ratio of Zn and Mg was found to play the dominant role in deciding the mechanical properties of the intergranular Mg-Zn compounds which were responsible for the tensile behavior of the joints. The content ratio (wt.%) of beyond 2:1 gave birth to the strengthening phase MgZn2 leading to a ductile fracture. Cr in the seam obtained with AA7A52 filler metal was found to enhance the strength of the joint through isolated particles.

  2. Design for low-cost gas metal arc weld-based aluminum 3-D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhuhn, Amberlee S.

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, has the potential to change the state of manufacturing across the globe. Parts are made, or printed, layer by layer using only the materials required to form the part, resulting in much less waste than traditional manufacturing methods. Additive manufacturing has been implemented in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, medical, consumer products, and fashion, using metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and even organic tissues. However, traditional 3-D printing technologies, particularly those used to print metals, can be prohibitively expensive for small enterprises and the average consumer. A low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer has been developed based upon gas metal arc weld (GMAW) technology. Using this technology, substrate release mechanisms have been developed, allowing the user to remove a printed metal part from a metal substrate by hand. The mechanical and microstructural properties of commercially available weld alloys were characterized and used to guide alloy development in 4000 series aluminum-silicon alloys. Wedge casting experiments were performed to screen magnesium, strontium, and titanium boride alloying additions in hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys for their properties and the ease with which they could be printed. Finally, the top performing alloys, which were approximately 11.6% Si modified with strontium and titanium boride were cast, extruded, and drawn into wire. These wires were printed and the mechanical and microstructural properties were compared with those of commercially available alloys. This work resulted in an easier-to-print aluminum-silicon-strontium alloy that exhibited lower porosity, equivalent yield and tensile strengths, yet nearly twice the ductility compared to commercial alloys.

  3. ANALISIS KEKUATAN SAMBUNGAN LAS SMAW ( SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING PADA MARINE PLATE ST 42 AKIBAT FAKTOR CACAT POROSITAS DAN INCOMPLETE PENETRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Pujo Mulyatno

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available At this moment, weld engineering is applied widely in tacking on joints at construction of steel building, especially at ship building. All important in weld engineering is when process tacking on weld metal with steel metal to be one unities. It mean, the strength of metal result by welded must equal to the original metal. Generally, that thing is inaccessible cause by weld defect formed. Result of survey in JMI indicates that often happened problem at weld joint part of construction of hull causing existence of fraction or crack at the division. Because, hull is main part which received many forces, in water compressive force ( hydrostatic and ship attractive force on top of wave ( sagging and or in trough of wave ( hogging . Even, at the moment of ship in full cargo condition or when at dock, ship must can maintain the selfish strength. In the research, will be checked weld defect influence incomplete penetration and porosity formed at SMAW method, evaluated from tensile and compressive strength as the application of force received by ship.from the result, indicates that tensile strength is optimum happened at the normal joint plate without heat treatment about 464, 50 Mpa, while tensile strength is lowest at joint plate condition of heat treatment 6000 C about 351,23 Mpa. for optimal of compressive strength happened at normal joint of plate without heat treatment about 872, 17 N/mm2, while compressive strength is lowest at joint plate condition of heat treatment 3000 C about 684 N/mm2. In this experiment, weld defect of incomplete penetration and porosity is not too effect a weld joint strength caused all to fracture happen in base metal is not it in weld joint or weld metal, however for all weld defect must be minimizes

  4. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  5. Evolution of weld metals nanostructure and properties under irradiation and recovery annealing of VVER-type reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Zabusov, O.; Prikhodko, K.; Zhurko, D.

    2013-03-01

    The results of VVER-440 steel Sv-10KhMFT and VVER-1000 steel SV-10KhGNMAA investigations by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger-electron spectroscopy and mechanical tests are presented in this paper. The both types of weld metals with different content of impurities and alloying elements were studied after irradiations to fast neutron (E > 0.5 MeV) fluences in the wide range below and beyond the design values, after recovery annealing procedures and after re-irradiation following the annealing. The distinctive features of embrittlement kinetics of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPV weld metals conditioned by their chemical composition differences were investigated. It is shown that the main contribution into radiation strengthening within the design fluence can be attributed to radiation-induced precipitates, on reaching the design or beyond design values of fast neutron fluencies the main contribution into VVER-440 welds strengthening is made by radiation-induced dislocation loops, and in case of VVER-1000 welds - radiation-induced precipitates and grain-boundary phosphorous segregations. Recovery annealing of VVER-440 welds at 475 °C during 100 h causes irradiation-induced defects disappearance, transformation of copper enriched precipitates into bigger copper-rich precipitates with lower number density and leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties followed by comparatively slow re-embrittlement rate. The recovery annealing temperature of VVER-1000 welds was higher - 565 °C during 100 h - to avoid temper brittleness. The annealing of VVER-1000 welds leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties due to irradiation-induced defects disappearance and decrease in precipitates number density and grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus. The re-embrittlement rate of VVER-1000 weld during subsequent re-irradiation is at least not higher than the initial rate.

  6. Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mainã Portella; Mantovani, Gerson Luiz; Vasant Kumar, R.; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of metal active gas-welded joints of a high-strength steel with tensile yield strength of 900 MPa was investigated. The welded joints were obtained using two different heat inputs. The corrosion behavior has been studied in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests. Optical microscopy images, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray revealed different microstructural features in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal (WM). Before and after the corrosion process, the sample was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy to measure the depth difference between HAZ and WM. The results showed that the heat input did not play an important role on corrosion behavior of HSLA steel. The anodic and cathodic areas of the welded joints could be associated with depth differences. The HAZ was found to be the anodic area, while the WM was cathodic with respect to the HAZ. The corrosion behavior was related to the amount and orientation nature of carbides in the HAZ. The microstructure of the HAZ consisted of martensite and bainite, whereas acicular ferrite was observed in the weld metal.

  7. Numerical investigation of ductile crack growth behavior in a dissimilar metal welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.T. [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, G.Z., E-mail: gzwang@ecust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Xuan, F.Z.; Tu, S.T. [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Ductile crack growth behavior in a dissimilar metal welded joint was simulated. > Interface crack growth tends to deviate into material with lower yield stress. > Crack locations and mismatches affect local stress-strain distribution. > Local stress-strain leads to different crack growth resistances and paths. - Abstract: In this paper, the finite element method (FEM) based on GTN model is used to investigate the ductile crack growth behavior in single edge-notched bend (SENB) specimens of a dissimilar metal welded joint (DMWJ) composed of four materials in the primary systems of nuclear power plants. The J-{Delta}a resistance curves, crack growth paths and local stress-strain distributions in front of crack tips are calculated for eight initial cracks with different locations in the DMWJ and four cracks in the four homogenous materials. The results show that the initial cracks with different locations in the DMWJ have different crack growth resistances and growth paths. When the initial crack lies in the centers of the weld Alloy182 and buttering Alloy82, the crack-tip plastic and damage zones are symmetrical, and the crack grow path is nearly straight along the initial crack plane. But for the interface cracks between materials and near interface cracks, the crack-tip plastic and damage zones are asymmetric, and the crack growth path has significant deviation phenomenon. The crack growth tends to deviate into the material whose yield stress is lower between the two materials on both sides of the interface. The different initial crack locations and mismatches in yield stress and work hardening between different materials in the DMWJ affect the local stress triaxiality and plastic strain distributions in front of crack tips, and lead to different ductile crack growth resistances and growth paths. For the accurate integrity assessment for the DMWJ, the fracture toughness data and resistance curves for the initial cracks with different locations in the

  8. Review of Dissimilar Metal Welding for the NGNP Helical-Coil Steam Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. DuPont

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding research and development of a new high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) that is capable of providing high temperature process heat for industry. The steam generator of the HTGR will consist of an evaporator economizer section in the lower portion and a finishing superheater section in the upper portion. Alloy 800H is expected to be used for the superheater section, and 2.25Cr 1Mo steel is expected to be used for the evaporator economizer section. Dissimilar metal welds (DMW) will be needed to join these two materials. It is well known that failure of DMWs can occur well below the expected creep life of either base metal and well below the design life of the plant. The failure time depends on a wide range of factors related to service conditions, welding parameters, and alloys involved in the DMW. The overall objective of this report is to review factors associated with premature failure of DMWs operating at elevated temperatures and identify methods for extending the life of the 2.25Cr 1Mo steel to alloy 800H welds required in the new HTGR. Information is provided on a variety of topics pertinent to DMW failures, including microstructural evolution, failure mechanisms, creep rupture properties, aging behavior, remaining life estimation techniques, effect of environment on creep rupture properties, best practices, and research in progress to improve DMW performance. The microstructure of DMWs in the as welded condition consists of a sharp chemical concentration gradient across the fusion line that separates the ferritic and austenitic alloys. Upon cooling from the weld thermal cycle, a band of martensite forms within this concentration gradient due to high hardenability and the relatively rapid cooling rates associated with welding. Upon aging, during post weld heat treatment (PWHT), and/or during high temperature service, C diffuses down the chemical potential gradient from the ferritic 2.25Cr 1Mo steel

  9. Microstructural characterization of the A-508/82/182/316L dissimilar metal weld with reinforcement of 52 weld; Caracterizacao microestrutural da solda de metais dissimilares A-508/82/182/316L com reforco de solda 52

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Campos, Wagner R.C., E-mail: caf@cdtn.br, E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is the major corrosion concern in the plant life management of ageing plants. The main classes of nuclear power plant materials that are potentially subjected to SCC are austenitic stainless steels and nickel based alloys. The nickel alloys 600, 82 and 182, originally selected due to their high corrosion resistance, show after many years of plant operation, susceptibility to SCC. Those alloys are used in steam generators and as dissimilar metal weld materials for nozzles of components such as the reactor pressure vessel and the pressurizer. Several techniques have been developed to mitigate the consequences of SCC in dissimilar metal welds; e. g. deposition of a compatible structural layer over the nozzle external surface, known as weld overlay, to induce compressive stresses on the nozzle critical region and weld repair. The material used in this work is a mock-up of an Angra 1 pressurizer nozzle weld, manufactured at CDTN according to procedures established for nuclear power plants. The weld links the forged 316 stainless steel to the A-508 carbon steel by Inconel 182 weld metal. On the carbon steel side, a buttering layer is applied (alloy 82). Alloy 52 is employed as weld overlay. The objective of this work is to perform a microstructural and metallographic characterization of the mock up materials, which includes an optical microscope analysis of the general structure of the material, microhardness determinations and a microstructure evaluation of selected regions of the mock up. (author)

  10. Effect of Pin Tool Shape on Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, J. C.; Coronado, E.; Aloor, S.; Nowak, B.; Murr, L. M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that metal moves behind the rotating Friction Stir Pin Tool in two separate currents or streams. One current, mostly on the advancing side, enters a zone of material that rotates with the pin tool for one or more revolutions and eventually is abandoned behind the pin tool in crescent-shaped pieces. The other current, largely on the retreating side of the pin tool is moved by a wiping process to the back of the pin tool and fills in between the pieces of the rotational zone that have been shed by the rotational zone. This process was studied by using a faying surface copper trace to clarify the metal flow. Welds were made with pin tools having various thread pitches. Decreasing the thread pitch causes the large scale top-to-bottorn flow to break up into multiple vortices along the pin and an unthreaded pin tool provides insufficient vertical motion for there to be a stable rotational zone and flow of material via the rotational zone is not possible leading to porosity on the advancing side of the weld.

  11. Three dimensional atom probe study of Ni-base alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Three dimensional atom probe tomography (3D APT) is applied to characterize the dissimilar metal joint which was welded between the Ni-based alloy, Alloy 690 and the low alloy steel, A533 Gr. B, with Alloy 152 filler metal. While there is some difficulty in preparing the specimen for the analysis, the 3D APT has a truly quantitative analytical capability to characterize nanometer scale particles in metallic materials, thus its application to the microstructural analysis in multicomponent metallic materials provides critical information on the mechanism of nanoscale microstructural evolution. In this study, the procedure for 3D APT specimen preparation was established, and those for dissimilar metal weld interface were prepared near the fusion boundary by a focused ion beam. The result of the analysis in this study showed the precipitation of chromium carbides near the fusion boundary between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152.

  12. Plasma diagnostics in gas metal arc welding by optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valensi, F; Pellerin, S; Zielinska, S [GREMI, Universite d' Orleans (Site de Bourges)/CNRS, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges cedex (France); Boutaghane, A [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Alger (Algeria); Dzierzega, K [Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, N [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Briand, F, E-mail: flavien.valensi@laplace.univ-tsle.f, E-mail: stephane.pellerin@univ-orleans.f, E-mail: aboutaghane@yahoo.f, E-mail: krzycho@netmail.if.uj.edu.p, E-mail: sylwia.zielinska@airliquide.co, E-mail: nadia.pellerin@univ-orleans.f, E-mail: francis.briand@airliquide.co [CTAS-Air Liquide Welding, Saint Ouen l' Aumone, 95315 Cergy-Pontoise cedex (France)

    2010-11-03

    The plasma column in a metal inert gas welding process is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy and high-speed imaging. The concentration and repartition of iron vapours are measured and correlated with the plasma and electrode geometric configuration. Plasma temperatures and electron densities are also measured for each studied position in the plasma. The temperatures are calculated using two different methods, allowing validation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium state of the plasma. The results show a maximum temperature of 12 500 K in the upper part of the arc, away from the arc axis. The iron concentration reaches a maximum of 0.3% close to the anode and strongly decreases along both the vertical and radial directions. The plasma thermophysical properties, calculated from this plasma composition, are then discussed regarding the metal transfer mode.

  13. Residual stress measurement inside a dissimilar metal weld mock-up of the pressurizer safety and relief nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Silva, Luiz L.; Mansur, Tanius R., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvall@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Servico de Integridade Estrutural; Martins, Ketsia S., E-mail: ketshinoda@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Nelo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica

    2015-07-01

    Residual stresses are present in materials or structural component in the absence of external loads or changes in temperatures. The most common causes of residual stresses being present are the manufacturing or assembling processes. All manufacturing processes, such as casting, welding, machining, molding, heat treatment, among others, introduces residual stresses into the manufactured object. The residual stresses effects could be beneficial or detrimental, depending on its distribution related to the component or structure, its load service and if it is compressive or tensile. In this work, the residual strains and stresses inside a mock-up that simulates the safety and relief nozzle of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant pressurizer were studied. The current paper presents a blind hole-drilling method residual stress measurements both at the inner surface of dissimilar metal welds of dissimilar metal weld nozzle mock-up. (author)

  14. Effect of Hyperbaric Chamber Gas on Transformation Texture of the API-X70 Pipeline Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Amin S.; Østby, Erling; Akselsen, Odd M.

    2012-09-01

    The development of the texture components in the X70 weld metal under several shielding environments was investigated using the electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) techniques. A new method for assigning the reference direction (RD), transverse direction (TD), and normal direction (ND) was introduced based on the morphological orientation of the grains. The analyses showed that different shielding gases affect the weld metal texture and microstructure. The shielding environment with pure argon shows the highest orientational pole density values and dominant acicular ferrite microstructure. It was observed that the distribution of misorientation angle and special coincidence site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries play significant roles in determining the tensile characteristics of the weld samples. Moreover, the bainite lattice orientation was found dependent on the directional heat flow unlike the other detected constituents.

  15. Characterization of mechanical properties in the heat affected zones of alloy 82/182 dissimilar metal weld joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Weon [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Sunchon National Univ., Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents the characteristics of mechanical properties within the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of dissimilar metal weld between SA508 Gr.1a and F316 Stainless Steel (SS) with Alloy 82/182 filler metal. Tensile tests were performed using small-size specimens taken from the HAZ regions close to both fusion lines of weld, and the micro-structures were examined using Optical Microscope (OM) and Transmission Microscope (TEM). The results showed that significant gradients of the Yield Stress (YS), Ultimate Tensile Stress (UTS), and elongations were observed within the HAZ of SA508 Gr.1a. This was attributed to the different microstructures within the HAZ. In the HAZ of F316 SS, however, the welding effect dominated the YS and elongation rather than UTS, and TEM micrographs conformed the strengthening in the HAZ of F316 SS was associated with a dislocation-induced strain hardening.

  16. Influência do molibdênio em propriedades do metal de solda na soldagem molhada com eletrodos óxi-rutílicos Influence of molybdenum in metal weld properties in welding wet with oxy-rutillic electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ferreira Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A técnica de soldagem subaquática molhada com eletrodos revestidos apresenta um crescente potencial de aplicação para reparos submarinos em elementos estruturais de unidades flutuantes de produção de petróleo (profundidade até 20 m. Porém, ela apresenta problemas tais como o maior risco de fissuração a frio e de formação acentuada de porosidade. O presente trabalho tem como objetivo melhorar a resistência mecânica do metal de solda de um eletrodo experimental do tipo oxi-rutílico. Foram estudadas as influências de adições de Mo (até 0,4% no metal de solda na microestrutura e em propriedades mecânicas. As soldas foram realizadas em simulador de soldagem subaquática em profundidade equivalente de 10m utilizando um sistema de soldagem por gravidade. As análises das micrografias mostrou que o aumento do teor de Mo no metal de solda diminui significantemente o tamanho médio de grão da região reaquecida de grãos finos. O aumento do teor de Mo no metal de solda resultou, ainda, em aumento do limite de resistência à tração sem perdas de tenacidade e ductilidade até aproximadamente 0,25%Mo.the underwater wet welding with coated electrodes technique is undergoing an important use growth in underwater repairs of oil production floating unit's structural elements (up to 20 m depth. However, it presents problems such as increased risk of cold cracking and sharp porosity formation. This work aims to improve the weld metal's mechanical strength through the addition of molybdenum to experimental oxy-rutilic type electrodes. Both the microstructure and the mechanical properties of weld metals were studied while electrodes would receive additional Mo (up to 0.4%. The welds were done using a gravity welding system placed in an underwater welding simulator with an equivalent depth of 10 m. Analyses of micrographics shown that the increased level of Mo in weld metal (a decreases significantly the average grain size of fine

  17. Numerical Simulation on Interfacial Creep Failure of Dissimilar Metal Welded Joint between HR3C and T91 Heat-Resistant Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jianqiang; TANG Yi; ZHANG Guodong; ZHAO Xuan; GUO Jialin; LUO Chuanhong

    2016-01-01

    The maximum principal stress, von Mises equivalent stress, equivalent creep strain, stress triaxiality in dissimilar metal welded joints between austenitic (HR3C) and martensitic heat-resistant steel (T91) are simulated by FEM at 873 K and under inner pressure of 42.26 MPa. The results show that the maximum principal stress and von Mises equivalent stress are quite high in the vicinity of weld/T91 interface, creep cavities are easy to form and expand in the weld/T91 interface. There are two peaks of equivalent creep strains in welded joint, and the maximum equivalent creep strain is in the place 27-32 mm away from the weld/T91 interface, and there exists creep constrain region in the vicinity of weld/T91 interface. The high stress triaxiality peak is located exactly at the weld/T91 interface. Accordingly, the weld/T91 interface is the weakest site of welded joint. Therefore, using stress triaxiality to describe creep cavity nucleation and expansion and crack development is reasonable for the dissimilar metal welded joint between austenitic and martensitic steel.

  18. Some Studies of Optimal Process Parameters For Solid Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Neural Network Technique And Simulation Using Ansys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saritprava Sahoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding is an arc welding process which is widely used in industry to join the metals. In this present work we have investigated the effect of varying welding parameters on the weld bead quality of Mild Steel flat having 12mm thickness. The chosen input parameters for the study are Welding Voltage, Welding Current and the travel speed of welding torch. The output parameters chosen are Weld Bead Width, Weld Bead Height, Depth of Penetration and Depth of Heat Affected Zone (HAZ. The four levels of experimental set-ups for each of the input parameters are considered and other process parameters are kept constant for the study. Hence the total numbers of experimental set-ups are 64 and the corresponding values of output parameters are found. As this is a Multi-Response Problem, it is being optimized to Single-Response Problem using Weighted Principal Components (WPC Method. Artificial Neural Networks (sANN, Error Back Propagation Procedure is being used for the prediction of optimal process parameters for GMAW process in this present work. The finite element analysis of residual stresses in butt welding of two similar plates is performed with the ANSYS software.

  19. Influences of post weld heat treatment on fatigue crack growth behavior of TIG welding of 6013 T4 aluminum alloy joint (Part 1. Fatigue crack growth across the weld metal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The present study evaluates the influences of PWHT on FCG behavior and tensile properties of TIG butt welded Al 6013-T4 sheets. Crack propagation tests were carried out on compact tension (CT) specimens. The T82 heat treatment was varied in three artificial aging times (soaking) of 6, 18 and 24 hours. The results of T82 heat treatment with artificial aging variations were tested for their fatigue crack growth rates at the main metal zone, the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the welded metal zone. It has been observed that the various agings in heat treatment T82 are sensitive to the mechanical properties (fatigue crack growth rate test, tensile test). The results show that PWHT-T82 for 18 hours aging is the highest fatigue resistance, while the aging 18 hours provided the highest tensile test result.

  20. Effect of Grain Boundary Character Distribution on the Impact Toughness of 410NiMo Weld Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Chowdhury, Sandip Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    metal in the as-welded and first-stage PWHT conditions compared to that in the second-stage condition are attributed to the higher fraction of low-energy I pound boundaries. A higher volume fraction of retained austenite and coarser martensite after second-stage PWHT accompanied by the formation...

  1. Effect of Ti-containing inclusions on the nucleation of acicular ferrite and mechanical properties of multipass weld metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Hosseini, M; Arabian, N; Rahimi, E

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, the influence of Ti-containing inclusions on the development of acicular ferrite microstructure and mechanical properties in the multipass weld metals has been studied. Shielded metal arc weld deposits were prepared by varying titanium content in the range of 0.003-0.021%. The variation in the titanium content was obtained by the addition of different amounts of titanium oxide nanoparticles to the electrode coating. The dispersion of titanium oxide nanoparticles, composition of inclusions, microstructural analysis, tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were evaluated. As the amount of Ti-containing inclusions in the weld metal was increased, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed from the grain boundary allotriomorphic ferrite structure to acicular ferrite with the intragranular nucleation of ferrite on the Ti-containing inclusions, and the mechanical properties were improved. This improvement is attributable to the increased percentage of acicular ferrite due to the uniform dispersion of Ti-containing inclusions and the pinning force of oxide nanoparticles against the growth of allotriomorphic ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite from the austenite grain boundaries.

  2. Comparison of creep crack growth rates on the base and welded metals of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Yun, Song Nam; Kim, Yong Wan; Kim, Sung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Young; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    This paper is to compare Creep Crack Growth Rates (CCGR) on the Base Metal (BM) and Welded Metal (WM) of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for Gen-IV reactors. Welded specimens were prepared by Shielded Metal Arc Weld (SMAW) method. To obtain material properties for the BM and welded metal, a series of creep and tensile tests was conducted at 600 .deg. C, and CCG tests was also performed using 1/2'' compact tension specimens under different applied loads at 600 .deg. C. Their CCGR behaviors were analyzed by using the empirical equation of the da/dt vs. C{sup *} parameter and compared, respectively. It appeared that, for a given value of C{sup *}, the rate of creep propagation was about 2.0 times faster than in the WM than the BM. This reason is that a creep rate in the WM was largely attributed when compared with that in the BM. From this result, it can be utilized for assessing the rate of creep propagation on the BM and WM of the G91 steel.

  3. Study on Non-Metallic Inclusions in Laser-Welded TRIP-Aided Nb-Microalloyed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The work concerns the studies on non-metallic inclusions occuring in laser-welded Si-Al TRIP steel containing Nb and Ti microadditions. Laser welding tests of 2 mm thick thermomechanically rolled sheets were carried out using keyhole welding and a solid-state laser. The results of laser welding in the air atmosphere for the heat input value of 0.048 kJ/mm are included. The distribution, type and chemical composition of non-metallic inclusions formed in the base metal, heat-affected zone, and fusion zone are analysed in detail. It was found that the base metal contains rare, fine oxysulphides. Their chemical composition was modified by rare earth elements. Numerous oxide inclusions of a various size and a chemical composition occur in the fusion zone. The dependence between a size of particles and their chemical composition was observed. A microstructure of steel was assessed using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques.

  4. Pipeline welding with Flux Cored and Metal Cored Wire; Soldagem de dutos com processos Arame Tubular e de Alma Metalica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Ubirajara Pereira da [ITW Soldagem Brasil Miller-Hobart, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Different welding process like SMAW, Semi-Automatic FCAW Gas-shielded and Self-shielded and Mechanized GMAW-MAG with Solid Wire are suggested to weld Transmission Pipelines. Presently, the largest extensions of Transmission Pipelines under construction, are in China like Lines West-East, Zong-Wu, Shan-Jing Fuxian and some others, totalizing about 8.000 km, and all using Semi-Automatic Self Shielded Flux Cored Arc Welding Process. Also, several papers and magazines that covers Transmission Pipelines Welding, not frequently mention Operational aspects of the process and some other variables like environment and site geography. This presentation intends to cover some of the Operational aspects of the Flux Cored Arc Welding and GMAW-Metal Cored in order to give sufficient information for Construction, Engineering, Projects e Contractors so they can evaluate these Process against the SMAW or even Mechanized Systems, considering the Operation Factor, Efficiency and Deposition Rate. We will not cover operational details of the GMAW Mechanized Systems but only suggest that be evaluated the possibility to replace the GMAW-Solid Wire by the GMAW-Metal Cored Wire. (author)

  5. Improvement of localised corrosion resistance of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel joints made by gas metal arc welding under electromagnetic interaction of low intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Rentería, M.A., E-mail: crazyfim@gmail.com [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); López-Morelos, V.H., E-mail: vhlopez@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); García-Hernández, R., E-mail: rgarcia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Dzib-Pérez, L., E-mail: luirdzib@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); García-Ochoa, E.M., E-mail: emgarcia@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); González-Sánchez, J., E-mail: jagonzal@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Electromagnetic interaction in welding improved localised corrosion resistance. • Electromagnetic interaction in welding enhanced γ/δ phase balance of DuplexSS. • Welding under Electromagnetic interaction repress formation and growth of detrimental phases. • Welds made with gas protection (2% O{sub 2} + 98% Ar) have better microstructural evolution during welding. - Abstract: The resistance to localised corrosion of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel plates joined by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) under the effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) was evaluated with sensitive electrochemical methods. Welds were made using two shielding gas mixtures: 98% Ar + 2% O{sub 2} (M1) and 97% Ar + 3% N{sub 2} (M2). Plates were welded under EMILI using the M1 gas with constant welding parameters. The modified microstructural evolution in the high temperature heat affected zone and at the fusion zone induced by application of EMILI during welding is associated with the increase of resistance to localised corrosion of the welded joints. Joints made by GMAW using the shielding gas M2 without the application of magnetic field presented high resistance to general corrosion but high susceptibility to undergo localised attack.

  6. Application of CMT Cold Metal Transfer Welding Technology in HT250 Repair Welding%CMT冷金属过渡焊接技术在HT250灰铸铁补焊中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨新华; 管志花

    2013-01-01

    阐述了利用CMT冷金属过渡方法补焊HT250灰铸铁的焊接工艺及补焊结果,主要从CMT冷金属过渡方法的特点、HT250灰铸铁焊接工艺和补焊质量3个方面进行了论述和试验研究,总结CMT自动焊技术在补焊铸铁方面的经验,为灰铸铁铸件的补焊提供科学依据和技术参考.%The welding process and the welding result of HT250 gray cast iron using CMT cold metal transfer welding methods were described,that is mainly discussed and researched from three aspects of the characteristics of CMT cold metal transfer method,welding process and welding quality of HT250 gray cast iron.The experience of CMT automatic welding technology in welding of cast iron was summarized,which provide scientific basis and technical references for repair welding of grey iron castings.

  7. Effect of chemical composition and welding parameters on microstructure and hardness of API 5I X60 steel weld metals; Efeito da composicao quimica e dos parametros de soldagem sobre a microestrutura e dureza de metais de solda de acos API 5I X60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Kleber Eduardo Siqueira; Maciel, Theophilo Moura; Albuquerque, Maria Clea Soares de; Almeida, Daisy Martins de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2004-12-15

    In this work the influence of the variation of the welding parameters and chemical composition of weld metal obtained with different filler metals and b different welding process on the microhardness values and on the acicular ferrite (AF) and primary ferrite (PF) percentiles from the columnar grain region were evaluated. Thee welding processes used were Shielded Manual Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and semiautomatic processes, such as Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW), with protection of CO{sub 2} and inner shield, process MGAW with protection of CO{sub 2} and of CO{sub 2} + Argon and process MGAW with protection of argon. The obtained results indicated that the percentile of AF and PF vary from 48 to 61 per cent and from 28 to 44 per cent respectively. The weld metals that obtained the higher values of A F were those welded by process FCAW inner shield and MGAW with higher values of Equivalent Carbon and with lower heat input. (author)

  8. FE analysis of cruciform welded joints considering different mechanical properties for base material, heat affected zone and weld metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino Corigliano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific work was to investigate the behaviour of cruciform welded joints under static loading using a full-field technique: Digital Image Correlation. The material curves, relative to different zones (base material, heat affected zone, weld, were obtained by hardness measurements, which were done by means of a fully automated hardness scanner with high resolution. This innovative technique, based on the UCI method, allowed to identify the different zones and to assess their different mechanical properties, which were considered in the finite element model. Finally the finite element model was validated experimentally, comparing the results with the measurements obtained using the Digital Image Correlation technique.

  9. Microstructure and creep characteristics of dissimilar T91/TP316H martensitic/austenitic welded joint with Ni-based weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falat, Ladislav, E-mail: lfalat@imr.saske.sk [Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Svoboda, Milan [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Vyrostkova, Anna; Petryshynets, Ivan; Sopko, Martin [Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2012-10-15

    This paper deals with characterization of microstructure and creep behavior of dissimilar weldment between the tempered martensitic steel T91 and the non-stabilized austenitic steel TP316H with Ni-based weld metal (Ni WM). Microstructure analyses were performed using light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The martensitic part of the welded joint exhibited a wide heat-affected zone (HAZ) with typical microstructural gradient from its coarse-grained to the fine-grained/intercritical region. In contrast, the HAZ of austenitic steel was limited to only a narrow region with coarsened polygonal grains. The microstructure of Ni WM was found to be very heterogeneous with respect to the size, morphology and distribution of grain boundaries and MC-type precipitates as a result of strong weld metal dilution effects and fast non-equilibrium solidification. Cross-weld creep tests were carried out in a temperature range from 600 to 650 Degree-Sign C at applied stresses from 60 to 140 MPa. The obtained values of apparent stress exponents and creep activation energies indicate thermally activated dislocation glide to be the governing creep deformation mechanism within the range of used testing conditions. The creep samples ruptured in the T91 intercritical HAZ region by the 'type IV cracking' failure mode and the creep fracture mechanism was identified to be the intergranular dimple tearing by microvoid coalescence at grain boundaries. The TEM observations revealed pronounced microstructural differences between the critical HAZ region and the T91 base material before as well as after the creep exposure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase transformations affect the microstructures of T91 and TP316H HAZ regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High weld metal dilution results in heterogeneous microstructure with MC carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Creep behavior of the studied weldment is

  10. The effect of metal transfer modes and shielding gas composition on the emission of ultrafine particles in MAG steel welding

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, J. F.; R. M. Miranda; Carvalho,P.A.; Quintino,M. L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to characterize ultrafine particles emitted during gas metal arc welding of mild steel and stainless steel, using different shielding gas mixtures, and to evaluate the effect of metal transfer modes, controlled by both processing parameters and shielding gas composition, on the quantity and morphology of the ultrafine particles. It was found that the amount of emitted ultrafine particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly depen...

  11. Simulation Based Investigation of Focusing Phased Array Ultrasound in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Hee Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flaws at dissimilar metal welds (DMWs, such as reactor coolant systems components, Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM, Bottom Mounted Instrumentation (BMI etc., in nuclear power plants have been found. Notably, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC in the DMWs could cause significant reliability problems at nuclear power plants. Therefore, phased array ultrasound is widely used for inspecting surface break cracks and stress corrosion cracks in DMWs. However, inspection of DMWs using phased array ultrasound has a relatively low probability of detection of cracks, because the crystalline structure of welds causes distortion and splitting of the ultrasonic beams which propagates anisotropic medium. Therefore, advanced evaluation techniques of phased array ultrasound are needed for improvement in the probability of detection of flaws in DMWs. Thus, in this study, an investigation of focusing and steering phased array ultrasound in DMWs was carried out using a time reversal technique, and an adaptive focusing technique based on finite element method (FEM simulation. Also, evaluation of focusing performance of three different focusing techniques was performed by comparing amplitude of phased array ultrasonic signals scattered from the targeted flaw with three different time delays.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Three Alloy 690 Mockup Components: Base Metal and Welding Induced Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickard R. Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion cracking (SCC resistance of cold deformed thermally treated (TT Alloy 690 has been questioned in recent years. As a step towards understanding its relevancy for weld deformed Alloy 690 in operating plants, Alloy 690 base metal and heat affected zone (HAZ microstructures of three mockup components have been studied. All mockups were manufactured using commercial heats and welding procedures in order to attain results relevant to the materials in the field. Thermodynamic calculations were performed to add confidence in phase identification as well as understanding of the evolution of the microstructure with temperature. Ti(C,N banding was found in all materials. Bands with few large Ti(C,N precipitates had negligible effect on the microstructure, whereas bands consisting of numerous small precipitates were associated with locally finer grains and coarser M23C6 grain boundary carbides. The Ti(C,N remained unaffected in the HAZ while the M23C6 carbides were fully dissolved close to the fusion line. Cold deformed solution annealed Alloy 690 is believed to be a better representation of this region than cold deformed TT Alloy 690.

  13. Measurement of residual stresses in the dissimilar metal weld joint of a safe-end nozzle mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuo (Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organisation, Tokyo (Japan)); Kingston, E.; Chidwick, L. (VEQTER Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom)); Smith, D. (Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom))

    2009-07-01

    Knowledge of the origin, magnitude and distribution of residual stresses generated during the manufacture of nuclear power plants is of vital importance to their structural integrity assessment. The overall aim of this work was to measure welding residual stresses in components prone to primary water stress corrosion cracking in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. This paper describes the on-site application of the Deep-Hole Drilling (DHD) technique to measure the through-thickness residual stress distributions through a safe-end nozzle component containing a dissimilar metal weld joint at different stages of manufacture

  14. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, 63-gil, Geumjeong-Gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  15. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  16. Passive optical sensors for the groove-detection at metal-arc-welding; Passive optische Sensoren zur Fugenvermessung beim Metall-Schutzgas-Schweissen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, J.; Wild, W. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Antriebstechnik und Mechatronik

    2002-04-01

    The paper presents the application of CMOS detectors to measure and to follow butt-joints in metal-arc-welding. Unlike standard operating schemes, the electric arc in this application also serves as the lighting source, projecting the characteristics of the welding groove as a grey scale pattern onto a CMOS detector, vertically mounted in front of the welding torch. Both monocular and binocular set-ups are presented and the evaluation of groove geometry, based on data from profile scans, is demonstrated. The information characterizing joint geometry is used to control the height of the filler in the welding groove. Particular emphasis is given to a robust design, allowing the mobile automatic welding machine to operate in rough environments. (orig.) [German] Der Beitrag beschreibt die Anwendung von optischen CMOS-Detektoren zur Vermessung und Verfolgung von V-Fugen beim Metall-Schutzgas-Schweissen. Die Besonderheit ist der Einsatz beim offenen Lichtbogen. Der in der Fuge brennende Lichtbogen bildet die V-Fuge als charakteristischen Grauwertverlauf auf dem senkrecht vor dem Schweissbrenner montierten CMOS-Detektor ab. Es werden sowohl monokulare als auch binokulare Anordnungen vorgestellt und die Berechnung der Fugengeometrie aus den Profilscans gezeigt. Abschliessend wird der. Einsatz der gewonnenen Geometrieinformationen zur Steuerung einer konstanten Fugenverfuellung dargestellt. (orig.)

  17. Study of the stability of electrode metal melting and transfer in the process of consumable electrode welding powered by supplies with differing dynamic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraev, Y. N.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Il'yashchenko, D. P.; Kiselev, A. S.; Gardiner, A. S.; Raev, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    In the paper we present the results of the study of the power supply characteristics effect upon the stability of electrode metal melting and transfer into the weld pool in the process of consumable electrode welding. It was shown that application of inverter type welding power supplies of the new generation results in changing the characteristics of the heat and mass transfer which has a decisive impact upon the heat content of the weld pool, reduction of residual stresses in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The authors also substantiate the tendency to the reduction of the structural constituents in the area of the permanent joint.

  18. Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

  19. Comparison of laboratory and field experience of PWSCC in Alloy 182 weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.; Meunier, M.-C.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, Paris La Defense (France); Calonne, O.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP, Centre Technique, Le Creusot Cedex (France); Combrade, P. [ACXCOR, Saint Etienne (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    2007-07-01

    Laboratory studies of stress corrosion cracking of the nickel base weld metal, Alloy 182, in simulated PWR primary water suggest similar resistance to crack initiation and somewhat enhanced propagation rates relative to wrought Alloy 600. By contrast, field experience of cracking in the primary circuits of PWRs shows in general much better performance for Alloy 182 relative to Alloy 600 than would be anticipated from laboratory studies. This paper endeavours to resolve this apparent conundrum. It draws on the conclusions of recent research that has focussed on the role of surface finish, particularly cold work and residual stresses resulting from different fabrication processes, on the risk of initiating IGSCC in nickel base alloys in PWR primary water. It also draws on field experience of stress corrosion cracking that highlights the important role of surface finish for crack initiation. (author)

  20. Metallic layered composite materials produced by explosion welding: Structure, properties, and structure of the transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal'tseva, L. A.; Tyushlyaeva, D. S.; Mal'tseva, T. V.; Pastukhov, M. V.; Lozhkin, N. N.; Inyakin, D. V.; Marshuk, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, morphology, and microhardness of the transition zone in multilayer metallic composite joints are studied, and the cohesion strength of the plates to be joined, the mechanical properties of the formed composite materials, and fracture surfaces are analyzed. The materials to be joined are plates (0.1-1 mm thick) made of D16 aluminum alloy, high-strength maraging ZI90-VI (03Kh12N9K4M2YuT) steel, BrB2 beryllium bronze, and OT4-1 titanium alloy. Composite materials made of different materials are shown to be produced by explosion welding. The dependence of the interface shape (smooth or wavelike) on the physicomechanical properties of the materials to be joined is found. The formation of a wavelike interface is shown to result in the formation of intense-mixing regions in transition zones. Possible mechanisms of layer adhesion are discussed.

  1. Ultrasonic Transducer Design for the Axial Flaw Detection of Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Byung Sik; Kim, Yong Sik; Yang, Seung Han [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Dissimilar metal welds in nuclear power plant are known as very susceptible to PWSCC flaws, and periodically inspected by the qualified inspector and qualified procedure during in-service inspection period. According to field survey data, the majority of their DMWs are located on tapered nozzle or adjacent to a tapered component. These types of configurations restrict examination access and also limit examination volume coverage. Additionally, circumferential scan for axially oriented flaw is very difficult to detect located on tapered surface because the transducer can't receive flaw response from reflector for miss-orientation. To overcome this miss-orientation, it is necessary adapt skewed ultrasonic transducer accommodate tapered surface. The skewed refracted longitudinal ultrasonic transducer designed by modeling and manufactured from the modelling result for axial flaw detection. Experimental results showed that the skewed refracted longitudinal ultrasonic transducer get higher flaw response than non-skewed refracted longitudinal ultrasonic transducer.

  2. Finite element analysis and measurement for residual stress of dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle mockup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    Finite element (FE) analysis and experiment for weld residual stress (WRS) in the pressurizer safety nozzle mockup is described in various processes and results. Foremost of which is the dissimilar simulation metal welding (DMW) between carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel. Thermal and structural analyses were compared with actual residual stress, and actual measurements of. Magnitude and distribution of WRS in the nozzle mockup were assessed. Two measurement methods were used: hole-drilling method (HDM) with strain gauge for residual stress on the surface of the mockup, and block removal and splitting layer (BRSL) method for through-thickness. FE analysis and measurement data showed good agreement. In conclusion, the characteristics of weld residual stress of DMW could be well understood and the simplified FE analysis was verified as acceptable for estimating WRS

  3. Control of Cr6+ emissions from gas metal arc welding using a silica precursor as a shielding gas additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Huang, Joyce; Yu, Kuei-Min; Hsu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Chang-Yu; Oh, Sewon; Cho, Kuk; Paulson, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) emitted from welding poses serious health risks to workers exposed to welding fumes. In this study, tetramethylsilane (TMS) was added to shielding gas to control hazardous air pollutants produced during stainless steel welding. The silica precursor acted as an oxidation inhibitor when it decomposed in the high-temperature welding arc, limiting Cr(6+) formation. Additionally, a film of amorphous SiO(2) was deposited on fume particles to insulate them from oxidation. Experiments were conducted following the American Welding Society (AWS) method for fume generation and sampling in an AWS fume hood. The results showed that total shielding gas flow rate impacted the effectiveness of the TMS process. Increasing shielding gas flow rate led to increased reductions in Cr(6+) concentration when TMS was used. When 4.2% of a 30-lpm shielding gas flow was used as TMS carrier gas, Cr(6+) concentration in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes was reduced to below the 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard (5 μg m(-3)) and the efficiency was >90%. The process also increased fume particle size from a mode size of 20 nm under baseline conditions to 180-300 nm when TMS was added in all shielding gas flow rates tested. SiO(2) particles formed in the process scavenged nanosized fume particles through intercoagulation. Transmission electron microscopy imagery provided visual evidence of an amorphous film of SiO(2) on some fume particles along with the presence of amorphous SiO(2) agglomerates. These results demonstrate the ability of vapor phase silica precursors to increase welding fume particle size and minimize chromium oxidation, thereby preventing the formation of hexavalent chromium.

  4. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  5. Improvement of localised corrosion resistance of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel joints made by gas metal arc welding under electromagnetic interaction of low intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; García-Ochoa, E. M.; González-Sánchez, J.

    2014-12-01

    The resistance to localised corrosion of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel plates joined by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) under the effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) was evaluated with sensitive electrochemical methods. Welds were made using two shielding gas mixtures: 98% Ar + 2% O2 (M1) and 97% Ar + 3% N2 (M2). Plates were welded under EMILI using the M1 gas with constant welding parameters. The modified microstructural evolution in the high temperature heat affected zone and at the fusion zone induced by application of EMILI during welding is associated with the increase of resistance to localised corrosion of the welded joints. Joints made by GMAW using the shielding gas M2 without the application of magnetic field presented high resistance to general corrosion but high susceptibility to undergo localised attack.

  6. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  7. Occupational exposure to dioxins by thermal oxygen cutting, welding, and soldering of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, H M; Bolm-Audorff, U; Turcer, E; Bienfait, H G; Albracht, G; Walter, D; Emmel, C; Knecht, U; Päpke, O

    1998-04-01

    This paper focuses on one aspect of occupational dioxin exposure that is novel and unexpected. Exposures in excess of the German threshold limit value of 50 pg international toxicity equivalent (I-TEQ)/m3 are very frequent, unpredictable, and sometimes very high--up to 6612 pg I-TEQ/m3--during thermal oxygen cutting at scrap metal and demolition sites. The same procedure involving virgin steel in steel trade and mass production of steel objects gave no such evidence, even though no final conclusions can be drawn because of the low number of samples analyzed. Low dioxin exposures during inert gas electric arc welding confirm previous literature findings, whereas soldering and thermal oxygen cutting in the presence of polyvinyl chloride give rise to concern. The consequences of occupational dioxin exposure were studied by analysis of the dioxin-blood concentration, the body burden, of men performing thermal oxygen cutting at scrap metal reclamation and demolition sites, in steel trade and producing plants as well as for industrial welders and white-collar workers. The results concerning body burdens are in excellent agreement with the dioxin exposure as characterized by dioxin air concentration in the workplace. The significant positive correlation between duration and frequency of performing thermal oxygen cutting at metal reclamation and demolition sites expressed in job-years and dioxin body burden speaks for the occupational origin of the observed overload after long times. The results reported here lead to consequences for occupational health, which are discussed and require immediate attention.

  8. Influence of Metal Transfer Stability and Shielding Gas Composition on CO and CO2 Emissions during Short-circuiting MIG/MAG Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meneses, Valter Alves de; Leal, Valdemar Silva; Scotti, Américo

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of parameters and shielding gas on metal transfer stability or on the generation of fumes in MIG/MAG welding, but little or nothing has been discussed...

  9. Effects of annealing time on the recovery of Charpy V-notch properties of irradiated high-copper weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1994-12-31

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. An important issue to be resolved is the effect on the toughness properties of reirradiating a vessel that has been annealed. This paper describes the annealing response of irradiated high-copper submerged-arc weld HSSI 73W. For this study, the weld has been annealed at 454 C (850 F) for lengths of time varying between 1 and 14 days. The Charpy V-notch 41-J (30-ft-lb) transition temperature (TT{sub 41J}) almost fully recovered for the longest period studied, but recovered to a lesser degree for the shorter periods. No significant recovery of the TT{sub 41J} was observed for a 7-day anneal at 343 C (650 F). At 454 C for the durations studied, the values of the upper-shelf impact energy of irradiated and annealed weld metal exceeded the values in the unirradiated condition. Similar behavior was observed after aging the unirradiated weld metal at 460 and 490 C for 1 week.

  10. Resistance welding of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone composites using metal mesh and PEI film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫久春; 王晓林; 秦明; 赵新英; 杨士勤

    2004-01-01

    Weldability of polyetheretherketone(PEEK) with polyetherimide(PEI) is tested. And carbon fiber reinforced PEEK laminates are resistance welded using stainless steel mesh heating element. The effects of the welding time and welding pressure on the lap shear strength of joints are investigated. Results show that PEEK can heal with PEI well in welding condition and the lap shear strength of PEEK/CF(carbon fibre) joint increases linearly with welding time, but reaches a maximum value when welding pressure ranging from 0.3MPa to 0.5MPa with constant welding time. The fracture characteristics of surface are analyzed by SEM techniques, and four types of fracture modes of lap shear joints are suggested.

  11. Methodology to evaluate the crack growth rate by stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metals weld in simulated environment of PWR nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Rabelo, Emerson G., E-mail: raphaelmecanica@gmail.com, E-mail: caf@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Inconel alloys weld metal is widely used to join dissimilar metals in nuclear reactors applications. It was recently observed failures of weld components in plants, which have triggered an international effort to determine reliable data on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of this material in reactor environment. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to determine the crack growth rate caused by stress corrosion in Inconel alloy 182, using the specimen (Compact Tensile) in simulated PWR environment. (author)

  12. Influence of Metal Transfer Stability and Shielding Gas Composition on CO and CO2 Emissions during Short-circuiting MIG/MAG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Valter Alves de Meneses; Valdemar Silva Leal; Américo Scotti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated the influence of parameters and shielding gas on metal transfer stability or on the generation of fumes in MIG/MAG welding, but little or nothing has been discussed regarding the emission of toxic and asphyxiating gases, particularly as it pertains to parameterization of the process. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the effect of manufacturing aspects of welding processes (short-circuit metal transfer stability and shielding gas...

  13. Influence of the parameters of a high-frequency acoustic wave on the structure, properties, and plastic flow of metal in the zone of a joint of materials welded by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, E. V.; Dorodnikov, A. N.

    2017-05-01

    The results of an investigation of the influence of the parameters of high-frequency acoustic wave on the structure and properties of the zone of joint of homogeneous metals bonded by explosive welding under the action of ultrasound have been presented. The influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibrations on the structure and properties of the explosively welded joints compared with the samples welded without the application of ultrasound has been established. The action of high-frequency acoustic waves on the metal leads to a reduction in the dynamic yield stress, which changes the properties of the surface layers of the metal and the conditions of the formation of the joint of the colliding plates upon the explosive welding. It has been shown that the changes in the length and amplitude of waves that arise in the weld joint upon the explosive welding with the simultaneous action of ultrasonic vibrations are connected with a decrease in the magnitude of the deforming pulse and time of action of the compressive stresses that exceed the dynamic yield stress beyond the point of contact.

  14. Creep properties and simulation of weld repaired low alloy heat resistant CrMo and Mo steels at 540 deg C. Sub-project 2 - Ex-serviced 2.25Cr1M0 weld metal and cross weld repairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld; Feilitzen, Carl von

    2007-12-15

    Weld repair has been carried out in an ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 pipe by using 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 consumables. Application of current welding procedure and consumables results in an over matched weld repair. This is verified by both creep tests and the creep simulations at even lower stresses than tested. Creep specimens have been extracted from ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal (PM) and weld metal (WM), from virgin 10 CrMo 9 10 WM, from virgin 13 CrMo 4 4 WM, and from virgin 15 Mo 3 WM. In addition, cross weld specimens including weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal have been taken from the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 weld joint, and from three weld repairs. In total, there are nine test series. The sequence of creep lifetime at 540 deg C at given stresses is; virgin 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal > virgin 15 Mo 3 weld metal approx virgin 13 CrMo 4 4 weld metal approx ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal >> ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal > ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 cross weld approx 10 CrMo 9 10 cross weld repair approx 13 CrMo 4 4 cross weld repair approx and 15 Mo 3 cross weld repair. All the series show good creep ductility. The ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal shows a creep lifetime about one order of magnitude shorter than that for both the virgin parent metal and the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal, independent of stresses. Differences in creep lifetime among the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 cross weld and other cross weld repairs are negligible, simply because rupture always occurred in the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal, approximately 10 mm from HAZ, for all the cross welds. Necking is frequently observed in the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal at the opposite side of the fracture. Creep damage to a large and a small extend is found adjacent to the fracture and at the necking area, respectively. Other parts of the weld joint like weld metal and HAZ are damage-free, independent of stress, weld metal and

  15. The effect of post-weld heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Xixue [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Di, Xinjie, E-mail: dixinjie@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Baosen [Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Baoshan District, Shanghai 200431 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Post-weld heat treatment effects on microstructure of deposited metal are studied. • Coarsening of γ′ phase at different post-weld heat treatment temperature is revealed. • Formation of δ phase in deposited metal is a bainite-like transformation process. - Abstract: The effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal (DM) was examined using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The transformation mechanism of the γ{sup ″} → δ phase and the grain growth kinetics of the γ′ phase during PWHT were revealed. The results indicate that the microstructure of as-welded DM is composed of columnar grains of different sizes, of which the average grain size is approximately 160 μm. Certain precipitates, such as the dispersed γ′ phase, blocky MC-type carbide and irregular shape Laves phase, precipitate in the microstructure of the as-welded DM. Compared with as-welded DM, the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 650 °C for 4 h shows minimal variation. With an increase in PWHT temperature, a large number of body-centered tetragonal γ{sup ″} phases precipitate at interdendrite regions in the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 750 °C for 4 h. When the PWHT temperature increases to 850 °C, the metastable γ{sup ″} phase directly transforms into a stable δ phase in shear mode, which exhibits a similar chemical composition but a different crystal structure than the γ{sup ″} phase. At 950 °C, the γ{sup ″} phase and the δ phase disappear, whereas certain M{sub 6}C-type carbides precipitate at the grain boundaries. Alloying elements such as Nb, Mo, Si, Al and Fe in the microstructure of as-welded DM exhibit segregation behavior. Due to an increasing PWHT temperature, the segregation behavior constantly weakens with minimal evolution to the temperature of 750 °C. Above this temperature, partition coefficients

  16. Effects of aging temperature on microstructural evolution at dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Taeho [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), UNIST-gil 50, Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (PNU), Busandaehak-ro 63, Beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), UNIST-gil 50, Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    From the earlier study which characterized the region of a fusion boundary between a low-alloy steel (LAS) and a Ni-based weld metal of as-welded and aged samples at 450 °C for a 30-y-equivalent time, it was observed in the microstructure that the aging treatment induced the formation and growth of Cr precipitates in the fusion boundary region because of the thermodynamic driving force. Now, this research extends the text matrix and continues the previous study by compiling all the test data, with an additional aging heat treatment conducted at 400 °C for 15- and 30-y-equivalent times (6450 and 12,911 h, respectively). The results for the extended test matrix primarily represent the common features of and disparities in the effects of thermal aging on the aged samples at two different heat-treatment temperatures (400 and 450 °C). Although no difference was expected between the samples, because the heat treatment conditions simulate thermal aging effects during the same service time of 30 y, the sample aged at 450 °C exhibited slightly more severe effects of thermal aging than the sample aged at 400 °C. Nevertheless, the trends for these effects are similar and the simulation of thermal aging effects for a light-water reactor appears to be reliable. However, according to a simulation of the same degree of thermal aging effects, it appears that the activation energy for Cr diffusion should be larger than the numerical value used in this study.

  17. Effects of aging temperature on microstructural evolution at dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Taeho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-07-01

    From the earlier study which characterized the region of a fusion boundary between a low-alloy steel (LAS) and a Ni-based weld metal of as-welded and aged samples at 450 °C for a 30-y-equivalent time, it was observed in the microstructure that the aging treatment induced the formation and growth of Cr precipitates in the fusion boundary region because of the thermodynamic driving force. Now, this research extends the text matrix and continues the previous study by compiling all the test data, with an additional aging heat treatment conducted at 400 °C for 15- and 30-y-equivalent times (6450 and 12,911 h, respectively). The results for the extended test matrix primarily represent the common features of and disparities in the effects of thermal aging on the aged samples at two different heat-treatment temperatures (400 and 450 °C). Although no difference was expected between the samples, because the heat treatment conditions simulate thermal aging effects during the same service time of 30 y, the sample aged at 450 °C exhibited slightly more severe effects of thermal aging than the sample aged at 400 °C. Nevertheless, the trends for these effects are similar and the simulation of thermal aging effects for a light-water reactor appears to be reliable. However, according to a simulation of the same degree of thermal aging effects, it appears that the activation energy for Cr diffusion should be larger than the numerical value used in this study.

  18. Study of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valensi, F.; Pellerin, S.; Castillon, Q.; Boutaghane, A.; Dzierzega, K.; Zielinska, S.; Pellerin, N.; Briand, F.

    2013-06-01

    The gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is strongly influenced by the composition of the shielding gas. In particular, addition of CO2 increases the threshold current for the transition from unstable globular to more stable spray transfer mode. We report on the diagnostics—using optical emission spectroscopy—of a GMAW plasma in pure argon and in mixtures of argon, CO2 and N2 while operated in spray and globular transfer modes. The spatially resolved plasma parameters are obtained by applying the Abel transformation to laterally integrated emission data. The Stark widths of some iron lines are used to determine both electron density and temperature, and line intensities yield relative contents of neutral and ionized iron to argon. Our experimental results indicate a temperature drop on the arc axis in the case of spray arc transfer. This drop reduces with addition of N2 and disappears in globular transfer mode when CO2 is added. Despite the temperature increase, the electron density decreases with CO2 concentration. The highest concentration of iron is observed in the plasma column upper part (close to the anode) and for GMAW with CO2. Our results are compared with recently published works where the effect of non-homogeneous metal vapour concentration has been taken into account.

  19. 金属焊接虚拟实验室的开发%Exploitation of metal welding virtual lab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金涛; 雷毅

    2012-01-01

      Based on Web3D technology, a new method of exploring metal welding virtual lab is proposed using 3DSMAX and VR-Platform. The example shows that the method is more convenient to design and explore metal welding virtual lab with standard operation and save assessment time.%  基于Web3D技术,提出了一种利用3DSMAX和VR-Platform开发金属焊接虚拟实验室的实现方法和过程。经实例验证,本方法便于金属焊接虚拟实验室的设计和开发,同时操作流程规范、节约时间。

  20. Effect of Heat Input on Fume Generation and Joint Properties of Gas Metal Arc Welded Austenitic Stainless Steel%Effect of Heat Input on Fume Generation and Joint Properties of Gas Metal Arc Welded Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K Srinivasan; V Balasubramanian

    2011-01-01

    The effect of heat input on fume and their compositions during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 316 stainless steel plates are investigated. Fume generation rate (FGR) and fume percentage were determined by ANSI/AWS F1.2 methods. Particle characterization was performed with SEM-XEDS and XRF analysis to reveal the particle morphology and chemical composition of the fume particles. The SEM analysis reveals the morphology of particles having three distinct shapes namely spherical, irregular, and agglomerated. Spherical particles were the most abundant type of individual particle. All the fume particle size falls in the range of less than 100 nm. Mechanical properties (strength, hardness and toughness) and microstructural analysis of the weld deposits were evaluated. It is found that heat input of 1.15 kJ/mm is beneficial to weld stainless steel by GMAW process due to lower level of welding fume emissions and superior mechanical properties of the joints.

  1. On-line quality monitoring in short-circuit gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolfsson, S. [Univ. of Karlskrono/Ronneby (Sweden). Dept. of Signal Processing]|[Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Production and Materials Engineering; Bahrami, A. [Technology Center of Kronoberg, Vaexjoe (Sweden)]|[Lund Univ. (Sweden); Bolmsjoe, G. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Claesson, I. [Univ. of Karlskrono/Ronneby (Sweden)

    1999-02-01

    This paper addresses the problems involved in the automatic monitoring of the weld quality produced by robotized short-arc welding. A simple statistical change detection algorithm for the weld quality, the repeated Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT), was used. The algorithm may similarly be viewed as a cumulative sum (CUSUM) type test, and is well-suited to detecting sudden minor changes in the monitored test statistic. The test statistic is based on the variance of the weld voltage, wherein it will be shown that the variance decreases when the welding process is not operating under optimal conditions. The performance of the algorithm is assessed through the use of experimental data. The results obtained from the algorithm show that it is possible to detect changes in weld quality automatically and on-line.

  2. The structure and properties of filler metal-free laser beam welded joints in steel S700MC subjected to TMCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górka, Jacek; Stano, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    The research-related tests aimed to determine the effect of filer-metal free laser beam welding on the structure and properties of 10 mm thick steel S700MC subjected to the Thermo-Mechanical Control Process (TMCP). The nondestructive tests revealed that the welded joints represented quality level B according to the requirements of standard 13919-1. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The tests of thin foils performed using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope revealed that filler metal-free welding led to the increased amount of alloying microagents (Ti and Nb) in the weld (particularly near fusion line) in comparison with welding performed using a filler metal. The significant content of hardening phases in the welds during cooling resulted in considerable precipitation hardening through finedispersive (Ti,Nb)(C,N) type precipitates (several nm in size) leading to the deterioration of plastic properties. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The increase in the concentration of microagents responsible for steel hardening (Ti and Nb) also contributed to the decrease in weld toughness being below the allowed value of 25 J/cm2.

  3. A Microsample Tensile Test Application: Local Strength of Impact Welds Between Sheet Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzing, J. T.; He, M.; Vivek, A.; Taber, G. A.; Mills, M. J.; Daehn, G. S.

    2017-03-01

    Microsample tensile testing was conducted to evaluate the quality of impact welds created by vaporizing foil actuator welding. Tensile test samples with a gauge length of 0.6 mm were electro-discharge machined out of welds created between 1-mm-thick aluminum alloy type 6061 (AA6061) sheets and 6-mm-thick copper (Cu110) plates. Aluminum sheets were used as flyers, while copper plates acted as targets. Flyer sheets in T6 as well as T4 temper conditions were utilized to create welds. Some of the welds made with T4 temper flyers were heat treated to a T6 temper. It was found that the welds made with T4 temper flyers were slightly stronger (max. of 270 MPa) than those produced with T6 temper flyers. Generally, failure propagated in a brittle manner across the weld interface; however, elemental mapping reveals material transfer on either member of the welded system. This work proves the feasibility to apply microsample tensile testing to assess impact welding, even when conducted with flyer sheets of 1 mm or less, and provides insight that is complementary to other test methods.

  4. Assessment of weld quality of aerospace grade metals by using ultrasonic matrix phased array technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-03-01

    Advantages of two dimensional electronic ultrasonic beam focusing, steering and scanning with the matrix phased array (MPA) technology has been used to visualize the conditions of resistance spot welds in auto vehicle grade advanced high strength steel carbon steels nondestructively. Two of the commonly used joining techniques, resistance spot welding and resistance seam welding, for thin aerospace grade plates made of aluminum, titanium, and stainless steels have also been inspected with the same MPA NDE system. In this study, a detailed discussions of the current MPA based ultrasonic real time imaging methodology has been made followed by some of the NDT results obtained with various welded test coupons.

  5. Property Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded Dissimilar Metals : AA6101-T6 and AA1350 Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran ASHOK KUMAR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Next to copper, aluminium alloys are widely used in electrical industries, because of their high electrical conductivity. AA6101-T6 and AA1350 aluminium alloys are widely used in electrical bus bars. As these alloys are joined by mechanical fasteners in electrical bus bars, the conductive area has been reduced. To avoid this problem, they should be joined without removal of metal as well as their properties. Friction stir welding technique is mainly invented for joining similar and dissimilar aluminium alloys. In this investigation, friction stir welding of AA6101-T6 and AA1350 aluminium alloys was done by varying tool traversing speed, rotational speed and tilt angle with hexagonal pin profiled tool. The analysis of variance was employed to study the effect of above parameters on mechanical properties of welded joints. From the experimental results, it is observed that welded joint with the combination of 1070 rpm rotating speed, 78 mm/min traversing speed and 2° tilt angle provides better mechanical properties. Analysis of variance shows that most significant impact on tensile strength is made by variation in tool rotating speed while tool tilt angle makes the most significant impact on elongation and bending strength.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14132

  6. EFFECT OF CHEMISTRY VARIATIONS IN PLATE AND WELD FILLER METAL ON THE CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF NI-CR-MO ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.V. Fix

    2006-02-07

    The ASTM standard B 575 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys such as Alloy 22 (N06022) and Alloy 686 (N06686). The compositions of each element are given in a range. For example, the content of Mo is specified from 12.5 to 14.5 weight percent for Alloy 22 and from 15.0 to 17.0 weight percent for Alloy 686. It was important to determine how the corrosion rate of welded plates of Alloy 22 using Alloy 686 weld filler metal would change if heats of these alloys were prepared using several variations in the composition of the elements even though still in the range specified in B 575. All the material used in this report were especially prepared at Allegheny Ludlum Co. Seven heats of plate were welded with seven heats of wire. Immersion corrosion tests were conducted in a boiling solution of sulfuric acid plus ferric sulfate (ASTM G 28 A) using both as-welded (ASW) coupons and solution heat-treated (SHT) coupons. Results show that the corrosion rate was not affected by the chemistry of the materials in the range of the standards.

  7. Effect of Chemistry Variations in Plate and Weld Filler Metal on the Corrosion Performance of Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, D V; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    The ASTM standard B 575 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys such as Alloy 22 (N06022) and Alloy 686 (N06686). The compositions of each element are given in a range. For example, the content of Mo is specified from 12.5 to 14.5 weight percent for Alloy 22 and from 15.0 to 17.0 weight percent for Alloy 686. It was important to determine how the corrosion rate of welded plates of Alloy 22 using Alloy 686 weld filler metal would change if heats of these alloys were prepared using several variations in the composition of the elements even though still in the range specified in B 575. All the material used in this report were especially prepared at Allegheny Ludlum Co. Seven heats of plate were welded with seven heats of wire. Immersion corrosion tests were conducted in a boiling solution of sulfuric acid plus ferric sulfate (ASTM G 28 A) using both as-welded (ASW) coupons and solution heat-treated (SHT) coupons. Results show that the corrosion rate was not affected by the chemistry of the materials in the range of the standards.

  8. Neurotoxic effects of subchronic intratracheal Mn nanoparticle exposure alone and in combination with other welding fume metals in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máté, Zsuzsanna; Horváth, Edina; Papp, András; Kovács, Krisztina; Tombácz, Etelka; Nesztor, Dániel; Szabó, Tamás; Szabó, Andrea; Paulik, Edit

    2017-04-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a toxic heavy metal exposing workers in various occupational settings and causing, among others, nervous system damage. Metal fumes of welding, a typical source of Mn exposure, contain a complex mixture of metal oxides partly in nanoparticle form. As toxic effects of complex substances cannot be sufficiently understood by examining its components separately, general toxicity and functional neurotoxicity of a main pathogenic welding fume metal, Mn, was examined alone and combined with iron (Fe) and chromium (Cr), also frequently found in fumes. Oxide nanoparticles of Mn, Mn + Fe, Mn + Cr and the triple combination were applied, in aqueous suspension, to the trachea of young adult Wistar rats for 4 weeks. The decrease of body weight gain during treatment, caused by Mn, was counteracted by Fe, but not Cr. At the end of treatment, spontaneous and evoked cortical electrical activity was recorded. Mn caused a shift to higher frequencies, and lengthened evoked potential latency, which were also strongly diminished by co-application of Fe only. The interaction of the metals seen in body weight gain and cortical activity were not related to the measured blood and brain metal levels. Fe might have initiated protective, e.g. antioxidant, mechanisms with a more general effect.

  9. The effect of welding fixtures on welding distortions

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to examine the effect of welding fixture used to prevent the distortions duringcooling process utilizing a robot controlled gas metal arc welding method on cooling rate and distortions ofwelded structures.Design/methodology/approach: Using a specially designed welding fixture for a welded steel structure, sixdifferent types of AISI 1020 steel specimens are tested in three different welding speeds and two differentcooling conditions either at fixture or without using ...

  10. Effect of Heat Input During Disk Laser Bead-On-Plate Welding of Thermomechanically Rolled Steel on Penetration Characteristics and Porosity Formation in the Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed analysis of the influence of heat input during laser bead-on-plate welding of 5.0 mm thick plates of S700MC steel by modern Disk laser on the mechanism of steel penetration, shape and depth of penetration, and also on tendency to weld porosity formation. Based on the investigations performed in a wide range of laser welding parameters the relationship between laser power and welding speed, thus heat input, required for full penetration was determined. Additionally the relationship between the laser welding parameters and weld quality was determined.

  11. Weldability of thin sheet metals by small-scale resistance spot welding using high-frequency inverter and capacitor-discharge power supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Dong, S. J.; Ely, K. J.

    2001-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted of the weldability of 0.2-mm-thick sheet aluminum, brass, and copper in small-scale resistance spot welding using a high-frequency inverter and a capacitor-discharge power supply. The results have been compared to those of previous investigations using a line-frequency alternating current power supply. The effects of electrode materials and process parameters on joint strength, nugget diameter, weld-metal expulsion and electrode-sheet sticking were studied. This work has also provided practical guidelines for selection of power supplies, process parameters (welding current/pulse energy, welding time/pulse width, electrode forces, etc.) and electrode materials for small-scale resistance spot welding of thin sheet aluminum, brass and copper.

  12. In-situ Raman spectroscopic analysis of interfaces of Ni-base alloy/LAS dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Jin; Shin, Sang Hoon; Jung, Ju Ang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Aging of structural materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has been one of the major issues for plant safety and life extension. While a new alloy (Alloy 690) introduced, some concerns remain unresolved especially deterioration of a dissimilar metal weld. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is one of major degradation modes of aging problems that occur in structural materials for steam generators or nozzles in PWRs. The IGSCC of Ni-base alloys in PWR primary water has been extensively studied to establish theoretical and empirical models for predicting the crack initiation in field components. Even though there is no general agreement on the origin of IGSCC, one common assumption of these approaches is that the damage to the alloy substrate can be related to some transport or repair properties of its protective oxide film. Therefore, the oxide film is believed to play a key role in the process of IGSCC on the surface of the Ni-base alloys in the primary water. This study is aimed to characterize the oxide film by in-situ method in order to investigate the effects of aging on the degradation of Ni-base alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld(DMW). Since the SCC of structural alloys is related to the property of native oxide layers, surface oxides on the aged weld specimens need to be characterized. It is essential to overcome the current limitation of typical ex-situ methods. In this study, therefore, a hydrothermal cell for the in-situ surface oxide analysis using Raman spectroscopy were designed and assembled. It is mainly composed of a water loop for simulated PWR primary water condition, in-situ Raman spectroscopy system, and hydrothermal optical cell for oxide analysis. Using the developed experimental system, the interface region of Ni-base alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld will be analyzed by acquiring Raman spectrum from DMW specimens exposed to high temperature and high pressure water condition

  13. A Study of Thermal Aging Effects on Microstructures of Type-II Boundary in Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Fusion boundary region has complex microstructure because of welding heat and latter heat treatment that cause changes of mechanical property and corrosion resistance of material. Due to this reason, this region has very different characteristic with base metal or filler metal. Therefore, it needs to be more studied. Nelson et al. found type-II boundary which is parallel to fusion boundary in the filler metal within 100μm in dilution zone is a potential crack path for SCC. Mechanism of formation of type-II boundary is not clearly turned out. Nelson et al. suggest that the type-II boundary is created by changing process of solidification from body centered cubic structure of ferrite to face centered cubic structure of austenite at welding process. But further research is required on this region. As nuclear power plant operation time increased, concerns occur about decreased integrity of dissimilar metal weld about SCC due to thermal aging. This study purposes to analyze the detailed microstructure of type-II boundary of Alloy 152 . A533 Gr. B weld joint, applying thermal aging effect simulation of nuclear power plant environment to evaluating integrity of this region about SCC. The microstructure of type-II boundary region of Alloy 152 . A533 Gr. B weld joint had been analyzed with optical microscope (OM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscope attached to scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDX), Vickers micro-hardness tester. In order to characterize the thermal aging effect on microstructures in the fusion boundary and type-II boundary, the DMWs consisting of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B were analyzed with several instruments. Hardness was maximized at narrow zone near type-II boundary. Reason for this phenomenon may include residual stress, precipitate and stiff composition gradient. There are studies which report that SCC is easily propagates at the region with higher hardness, so integrity to SCC at this region must be considered. After heat treatment, nickel

  14. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  15. Residual Stresses in Thick Bi-metallic Fusion Welds: a Neutron Diffraction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohms, C.

    2013-01-01

    Welding is applied in many industrial sectors to join components, and has become an important manufacturing process because it enables the fabrication of structures that could not otherwise be constructed. Weld regions have inhomogeneous microstructures and are more susceptible to crack initiation a

  16. Residual Stresses in Thick Bi-metallic Fusion Welds: a Neutron Diffraction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohms, C.

    2013-01-01

    Welding is applied in many industrial sectors to join components, and has become an important manufacturing process because it enables the fabrication of structures that could not otherwise be constructed. Weld regions have inhomogeneous microstructures and are more susceptible to crack initiation a

  17. Residual Stresses in Thick Bi-metallic Fusion Welds: a Neutron Diffraction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohms, C.

    2013-01-01

    Welding is applied in many industrial sectors to join components, and has become an important manufacturing process because it enables the fabrication of structures that could not otherwise be constructed. Weld regions have inhomogeneous microstructures and are more susceptible to crack initiation

  18. Experimental Development of Dual Phase Steel Laser-arc Hybrid Welding and its Comparison to Laser and Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Duarte Antunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Dual phase DP600 steels have been used in many automobile structures and laser welding has been the standard method for the joining of different sections. This work proposed a comparison between laser welding with arc welding (GMAW and with hybrid laser-arc welding in order to access the microstructures and the mechanical behavior. The laser and hybrid welds are competitive in terms of microstructure and mechanical behavior, presenting both acceptable and tough welds. The maximum ductility of the laser and hybrid welds are very similar, around 14%, and near to the values observed in the base material. The GMAW presents low ductility due to the softening caused by tampering of the martensite, and thus is unacceptable as the welding procedure.

  19. Precision machining, sheet-metal work and welding at the heart of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    From the writing of specifications and the production of high-tech components, to technology transfer and call-out work on-site, the MF group in EST Division offers CERN users a wide variety of services. Its full range of activities is presented in a new brochure. In addition to its many physicists and engineers, CERN also has teams of mechanics, welders and sheet-metalworkers whose expertise is a precious asset for the Organization. Within the MF Group (Manufacturing Facilities, EST Division) these teams perform precision machining, sheet-metal work and welding. As an example, the Group has been responsible for producing radiofrequency accelerating cells to a precision of the order of 1/100th mm and with a surface roughness of only 0.1 micron. The Group's workshops also manufactured the stainless steel vacuum chamber for the brand new n-TOF experiment (Bulletin n°47/2000), a 200-m long cylindrical chamber with a diameter of just 800 millimetres! The MF Group is assisted in its task of providing me...

  20. Irradiation-induced structural changes in surveillance material of VVER 440-type weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, M.; Denner, V.; Böhmert, J.; Mathon, M.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The irradiation-induced microstructural changes in surveillance materials of the VVER 440-type weld metal Sv-10KhMFT were investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and anomalous small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Due to the high fluence, a strong effect was found in the SANS experiment. No significant effect of the irradiation is detected by SAXS. The reason for this discrepancy is the different scattering contrast of irradiation-induced defects for neutrons and X-rays. An analysis of the SAXS shows that the scattering intensity is mainly caused by vanadium-containing (VC) precipitates and grain boundaries. Both types of scattering defects are hardly changed by irradiation. Neutron irradiation rather produces additional scattering defects of a few nanometers in size. Assuming these defects are clusters containing copper and other foreign atoms with a composition according to results of atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations, both the high SANS and the low SAXS effect can be explained.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of metal-packaged fiber Bragg grating sensor by one-step ultrasonic welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhu, Lianqing; Luo, Fei; Dong, Mingli; Ding, Xiangdong; He, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A metallic packaging technique of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is developed for measurement of strain and temperature, and it can be simply achieved via one-step ultrasonic welding. The average strain transfer rate of the metal-packaged sensor is theoretically evaluated by a proposed model aiming at surface-bonded metallic packaging FBG. According to analytical results, the metallic packaging shows higher average strain transfer rate compared with traditional adhesive packaging under the same packaging conditions. Strain tests are performed on an elaborate uniform strength beam for both tensile and compressive strains; strain sensitivities of approximately 1.16 and 1.30 pm/μɛ are obtained for the tensile and compressive situations, respectively. Temperature rising and cooling tests are also executed from 50°C to 200°C, and the sensitivity of temperature is 36.59 pm/°C. All the measurements of strain and temperature exhibit good linearity and stability. These results demonstrate that the metal-packaged sensors can be successfully fabricated by one-step welding technique and provide great promise for long-term and high-precision structural health monitoring.

  2. Investigation of microstructure within metal welds by energy resolved neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Kockelmann, W.; Paradowska, A. M.; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Korsunsky, A. M.; Shinohara, T.; Feller, W. B.; Lehmann, E. H.

    2016-09-01

    The recent development of bright pulsed neutron sources and high resolution neutron counting detectors enables simultaneous acquisition of a neutron transmission spectrum for each pixel of the image. These spectra can be used to reconstruct microstructure parameters within welds, such as strain, texture and phase composition through Bragg edge analysis, and in some cases elemental composition through resonance absorption analysis. In this paper we demonstrate the potential of energy-resolved neutron imaging to study the microstructures of two steel welds, where the spatial distribution of residual strain within the welds, as well as some information on the texture, are obtained with sub-mm spatial resolution. A friction stir weld of two steel plates and a conventional weld of two steel pipes were studied at pulsed neutron facilities, where a Δλ/λ resolution as low as 0.2% can be attained over a wide range of neutron wavelengths ranging from 0.5 Å to 8 Å.

  3. Influence of Metal Transfer Stability and Shielding Gas Composition on CO and CO2 Emissions during Short-circuiting MIG/MAG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Alves de Meneses

    Full Text Available Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated the influence of parameters and shielding gas on metal transfer stability or on the generation of fumes in MIG/MAG welding, but little or nothing has been discussed regarding the emission of toxic and asphyxiating gases, particularly as it pertains to parameterization of the process. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the effect of manufacturing aspects of welding processes (short-circuit metal transfer stability and shielding gas composition on the gas emission levels during MIG/MAG welding (occupational health and environmental aspects. Using mixtures of Argon with CO2 and O2 and maintaining the same average current and the same weld bead volume, short-circuit welding was performed with carbon steel welding wire in open (welder’s breathing zone and confined environments. The welding voltage was adjusted to gradually vary the transfer stability. It was found that the richer the composition of the shielding gas is in CO2, the more CO and CO2 are generated by the arc. However, unlike fume emission, voltage and transfer stability had no effect on the generation of these gases. It was also found that despite the large quantity of CO and CO2 emitted by the arc, especially when using pure CO2 shielding gas, there was no high level residual concentration of CO and CO2 in or near the worker’s breathing zone, even in confined work cells.

  4. Friction stir welding of dissimilar joint between semi-solid metal 356 and AA 6061-T651 by computerized numerical control machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Tehyo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanicalproperties of friction stir welded butt joints of dissimilar aluminum alloy sheets between Semi-Solid Metal (SSM 356 and AA6061-T651 by a Computerized Numerical Control (CNC machine. The base materials of SSM 356 and AA 6061-T651 werelocated on the advancing side (AS and on the retreating side (RS, respectively. Friction Stir Welding (FSW parameterssuch as tool pin profile, tool rotation speed, welding speed, and tool axial force influenced the mechanical properties of theFS welded joints significantly. For this experiment, the FS welded materials were joined under two different tool rotationspeeds (1,750 and 2,000 rpm and six welding speeds (20, 50, 80, 120, 160, and 200 mm/min, which are the two prime joiningparameters in FSW. A cylindrical pin was adopted as the welding tip as its geometry had been proven to yield better weldstrengths. From the investigation, the higher tool rotation speed affected the weaker material’s (SSM maximum tensilestrength less than that under the lower rotation speed. As for welding speed associated with various tool rotation speeds, anincrease in the welding speed affected lesser the base material’s tensile strength up to an optimum value; after which its effectincreased. Tensile elongation was generally greater at greater tool rotation speed. An averaged maximum tensile strength of197.1 MPa was derived for a welded specimen produced at the tool rotation speed of 2,000 rpm associated with the weldingspeed of 80 mm/min. In the weld nugget, higher hardness was observed in the stir zone and the thermo-mechanically affectedzone than that in the heat affected zone. Away from the weld nugget, hardness levels increased back to the levels of the basematerials. The microstructures of the welding zone in the FS welded dissimilar joint can be characterized both by the recrystallizationof SSM 356 grains and

  5. In situ droplet surface tension and viscosity measurements in gas metal arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, B.; Siewert, E.; Schein, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptation of a drop oscillation technique that enables in situ measurements of thermophysical properties of an industrial pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. Surface tension, viscosity, density and temperature were derived expanding the portfolio of existing methods and previously published measurements of surface tension in pulsed GMAW. Natural oscillations of pure liquid iron droplets are recorded during the material transfer with a high-speed camera. Frame rates up to 30 000 fps were utilized to visualize iron droplet oscillations which were in the low kHz range. Image processing algorithms were employed for edge contour extraction of the droplets and to derive parameters such as oscillation frequencies and damping rates along different dimensions of the droplet. Accurate surface tension measurements were achieved incorporating the effect of temperature on density. These are compared with a second method that has been developed to accurately determine the mass of droplets produced during the GMAW process which enables precise surface tension measurements with accuracies up to 1% and permits the study of thermophysical properties also for metals whose density highly depends on temperature. Thermophysical properties of pure liquid iron droplets formed by a wire with 1.2 mm diameter were investigated in a pulsed GMAW process with a base current of 100 A and a pulse current of 600 A. Surface tension and viscosity of a sample droplet were 1.83 ± 0.02 N m-1 and 2.9 ± 0.3 mPa s, respectively. The corresponding droplet temperature and density are 2040 ± 50 K and 6830 ± 50 kg m-3, respectively.

  6. Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Multi-Physics Process Model and Its Application to MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel Butt-welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    within the weld. Design/methodology/approach The improved GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt-welding of MIL A46100 (a...improved GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and properties within the MIL A46100 butt-weld are

  7. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vargas-Arista

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughness and critical crack length, and a transgranular brittle final fracture with an area fraction of dimple zones connecting cleavage facets. A fractographic analysis proved that as the normalizing time increased the crack length decreased. The increase in the river patterns on the fatigue crack propagation in zone II was also evidenced and final brittle fracture because of transgranular quasicleavage was observed. Larger grains induced a deterioration of the fatigue resistance of the HAZ.

  8. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  9. MODELING OF THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF METALS DURING WELDING LASER USING BEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lemkeddem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The laser welding provides a very high energy density, this allows the use of welds narrow, deep and at high speeds. Because of its advantages over other joining processes, laser welding is a process of manufacturing the most important. In order to model the thermal behavior, we must study the different phenomena that may be involved in the operation. The temperature distribution in the workpiece can be determined from the heat equation which expresses the energy balance. This is a parabolic differential equation and for resolution we applied the finite difference method using the implicit scheme.

  10. Influence of friction stir welding parameters on metallurgical and mechanical properties of dissimilar joint between semi-solid metal 356-T6 and aluminum alloys 6061-T651

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Tehyo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanicalproperties of friction stir (FS welded butt joints of dissimilar aluminum alloy sheets between Semi-Solid Metal (SSM 356-T6and AA6061-T651 by a computerized numerical control (CNC machine. The base materials of SSM356-T6 and AA6061-T651were located on the advancing side (AS and on the retreating side (RS, respectively. For this experiment, the FS weldedmaterials were joined under two different tool rotation speeds (1,750 and 2,000 rpm and six welding speeds (20, 50, 80, 120, 160,and 200 mm/min, which are the two prime joining parameters in FSW. From the investigation, the higher tool rotation speedaffected the weaker material’s (SSM maximum tensile strength less than that under the lower rotation speed. As for weldingspeed associated with various tool rotation speeds, an increase in the welding speed affected lesser the base material’s tensilestrength up to an optimum value; after which its effect increased. Tensile elongation was generally greater at greater toolrotation speed. An averaged maximum tensile strength of 206.3 MPa was derived from a welded specimen produced at the toolrotation speed of 2,000 rpm associated with the welding speed of 80 mm/min. In the weld nugget, higher hardness was observedin the stir zone than that in the thermo-mechanically affected zone. Away from the weld nugget, hardness levels increased backto the levels of the base materials. The microstructures of the welding zone in the FS welded dissimilar joint can be characterizedboth by the recrystallization of SSM356-T6 grains and AA6061-T651 grain layers.

  11. Mechanism of laser welding of SiC reinforced LD2 aluminum metal matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the mechanism of SiCP/LD2 aluminum matrix composites during laser welding was investigated. The emphasis was laid on the study of the distribution of aluminum carbides in whole welds. The joint can be divided into three regions both in depth and in width. The depth is divided into severe reaction region, partial reaction region, and no reaction region. In these regions, the extent of interfacial reaction varies gradually, the shape of reactants varies from long to fine. In width it can also be divided into severe reaction region, partial reaction region, and initial reaction region from the center of the weld to about the welding junction. In the initial reaction region, nucleation and growth of the reaction products on the surface of SiC particles can be observed by using TEM. The investigation showed that the quantity and size of SiC are relative to the temperature gradient in the molten pool.

  12. Advanced Control Methods for Optimization of Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J. S.

    Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) is a proces used for joining pieces of metal. Probably, the GMAW process is the most successful and widely used welding method in the industry today. A key issue in welding is the quality of the welds produced. The quality of a weld is influenced by several factors...

  13. Study made to establish parameters and limitations of explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polhemus, F. C.

    1967-01-01

    It is theorized that metal jetting must be present for welding to occur, therefore an explosive weld interface may indicate the relation between the metal jet velocity and shock wave velocity in welding. Parameters for effecting explosive welding in patches of 3 or 4 inches in diameter were established, and found applicable to explosive welding of patches of various sizes.

  14. Low-Cost Open-Source Voltage and Current Monitor for Gas Metal Arc Weld 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arduino open-source microcontrollers are well known in sensor applications for scientific equipment and for controlling RepRap 3D printers. Recently low-cost open-source gas metal arc weld (GMAW RepRap 3D printers have been developed. The entry-level welders used have minimal controls and therefore lack any real-time measurement of welder voltage or current. The preliminary work on process optimization of GMAW 3D printers requires a low-cost sensor and data logger system to measure welder current and voltage. This paper reports on the development of a low-cost open-source power measurement sensor system based on Arduino architecture. The sensor system was designed, built, and tested with two entry-level MIG welders. The full bill of materials and open source designs are provided. Voltage and current were measured while making stepwise adjustments to the manual voltage setting on the welder. Three conditions were tested while welding with steel and aluminum wire on steel substrates to assess the role of electrode material, shield gas, and welding velocity. The results showed that the open source sensor circuit performed as designed and could be constructed for <$100 in components representing a significant potential value through lateral scaling and replication in the 3D printing community.

  15. Effects of the use of a flat wire electrode in gas metal arc welding and fuzzy logic model for the prediction of weldment shape profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuthapandi, Sripriyan; Thyla, P. R. [PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Ramu, Murugan [Amrita University, Ettimadai (India)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes the relationships between the macrostructural characteristics of weld beads and the welding parameters in Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using a flat wire electrode. Bead-on-plate welds were produced with a flat wire electrode and different combinations of input parameters (i.e., welding current, welding speed, and flat wire electrode orientation). The macrostructural characteristics of the weld beads, namely, deposition, bead width, total bead width, reinforcement height, penetration depth, and depth of HAZ were investigated. A mapping technique was employed to measure these characteristics in various segments of the weldment zones. Results show that the use of a flat wire electrode improves the depth-to-width (D/W) ratio by 16.5 % on average compared with the D/W ratio when a regular electrode is used in GMAW. Furthermore, a fuzzy logic model was established to predict the effects of the use of a flat electrode on the weldment shape profile with varying input parameters. The predictions of the model were compared with the experimental results.

  16. A Study on the Residual Stress Improvement of PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) in DMW(Dissimilar Metal Weld)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Seung Gun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heung Bae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Since 2000s, most of the cracks are found in welds, especially in (DMW) dissimilar metal welds such as pressurizer safety relief nozzle, reactor head penetration, reactor bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI), and reactor nozzles. Even the cracks are revealed as a primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), it is difficult to find the cracks by current non destructive examination. The PWSCC is occurred by three incident factors, such as susceptible material, environmental corrosive condition, and welding residual stress. If one of the three factors can be erased or decreased, the PWSCC could be prevented. In this study, we performed residual stress analysis for DMW and several residual stress improvement methods. As the preventive methods of PWSCC, we used laser peening(IP) method, inlay weld(IW) method, and induction heating stress improvement(IHSI) method. The effect of residual stress improvement for preventive methods was compared and discussed by finite element modeling and residual stress of repaired DMW

  17. Investigation of C-276 Weld Metal Corrosion Resistance after Cold Metal Transfer(CMT)Welding%C-276合金冷金属过渡焊接焊缝熔敷金属耐蚀性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫宏伟; 谷文; 高殿宝; 莫文林

    2013-01-01

    C-276合金在氧化性和非氧化性酸中都具有很好的耐腐蚀性,所以在精对苯二甲酸(PTA)装置中应用较多。在化工容器设计时,虽然没有明确规定哪些场合使用复合板或堆焊,但是,考虑到堆焊层是铸造枝晶状奥氏体组织,复合板是轧制孪晶奥氏体组织,而且堆焊的热过程比复合的热过程复杂。以C-276钢板为参考,研究了C-276合金冷金属过渡(CMT)焊接焊缝熔敷金属的耐蚀性,供PTA装置制造厂参考。%C-276 alloy has good corrosion resistance in oxidizing and non-oxidizing acids,so it is wide-ly used in purified terephthalic acid(PTA)device.In the chemical vessel design,it does not specify the using of composite board or surfacing.Considering the surfacing layer microstructure is dendritic austen-ite,the composite board microstructure is twinned austenite,and the thermal process of welding is complex than that of composite.We have study C -276 weld metal corrosion resistance after cold metal transfer (CMT)welding,which is useful for PTA device fabrication.

  18. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  19. Explosive Welding with Nitroguanidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadwin, L D

    1964-03-13

    By using the explosive nitroguanidine, continuous welds can be made between similar and dissimilar metals. Since low detonation pressures are attainable, pressure transfer media are not required between the explosive and the metal surface. The need for either a space or an angle between the metals is eliminated, and very low atmospheric pressures are not required. Successful welds have been made between tantalum and 4140 steel, 3003H14 aluminum and 4140 steel, and 304 stainless steel and 3003H14 aluminum.

  20. Evaluation of crack arrest fracture toughness of parent plate, weld metal and heat affected zone of BIS 812 EMA ship plate steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, I. A.

    1993-10-01

    The steel chosen for the pressure hull of the Collins class submarine has undergone evaluation to compare the crack arrest fracture toughness, K(Ia), of the parent plate with that of weld metal and heat affected zone. The tests were conducted over a range of subzero temperatures on specimens slightly outside the ASTM standard test method specimen configuration. Shallow face grooved specimens were used to vary the propagating crack velocity from that of non face grooved specimens and determine if K(Ia), is sensitive to changes in crack velocity. The weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ), and parent plate were assessed to determine if the welding process had a deleterious effect on the crack arrest properties of this particular steel. Tests on each of these regions revealed that, for the combination of parent plate, welding procedure and consumables, no adverse effect on crack arrest properties was encountered. Crack arrest fracture toughness of the weld metal and HAZ was superior to that of the parent plate at comparable temperatures.

  1. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  2. A study on detection of micro-cracks in the dissimilar metal weld through ultrasound infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heesang; Choi, Manyong; Park, Jeounghak; Kim, Wontae

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate a possibility of detecting stress corrosion crack defects in a pipe welded with dissimilar metals (STS304 and SA106 Gr. b) through infrared ultrasound thermography and lock-in phase method. The ultrasound generator was set as 250 W in output and 19.8 kHz in frequency. With experiment results, this study could detect, cracks located inside the dissimilar metal weld pipe through lock-in infrared thermography and compare thermography images obtained from both the inside and the outside when the ultrasound vibration was applied to the outer part of the pipe. Besides, after cutting off the pipe in the axial direction, this study conducted PT inspection. As a result, it was found there existed more than a single crack in a certain range inside the pipe, which made hot spots appear in a wide range on the thermography image. Moreover, through ultrasound infrared thermography and lock-in phase method this study verified the possibility of detecting micro-sized shattered cracks through ultrasound thermography, which were not easy to detect with the existing techniques.

  3. Stress distribution at the dissimilar metal weld of safety injection nozzle according to safe-end length and SMW thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Jin; Jeong, Woo Chul; Huh, Nam Su [Dept. of Mechanical System Design Engineering, Seoul Nat' l Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In the present paper, we evaluate the effects of the safe-end length and thickness of the similar metal weld (SMW) of safety injection nozzles on stress distributions at the dissimilar metal weld (DMW). For this evaluation, we carry out detailed 2-D axisymmetric finite element analyses by considering four different values of the safe-end length and four different values of the thickness of SMW. Based on the results obtained, we found that the SMW thickness affects the axial stresses at the center of the DMW for the shorter safe-end length; on the other hand, it does not affect the hoop stresses. In terms of the safe-end length, the values of the axial and hoop stresses at the inner surface of the DMW center increase as the safe-end length increases. In particular, for the cases considered in the present study, the stress distributions at the DMW center can be categorized according to certain values of safe-end length.

  4. Simulation of Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding Based on the Model of Interactive Force Between Tool and Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. Q.; Shi, Q. Y.; Fujiya, Y.; Horie, T.

    2014-04-01

    In this research, the three-dimensional flow of metal in friction stir welding (FSW) has been simulated based on computational fluid dynamics. Conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy were solved in three dimensions. The interactive force was imposed as boundary conditions on the tool/material boundary in the model. The strain rate- and temperature-dependent non-Newtonian viscosity was adopted for the calculation of metal flow. The distribution of temperature, velocity, and strain rate were simulated based on the above models. The simulated temperature distribution agreed well with the experimental results. The simulation results showed that the velocity on the pin was much higher than that on the shoulder. From the comparison between the simulation results and the experiments results, contours line, corresponding to strain rate = 4 s-1, reflected reasonably well the shape of stir zone, especially at the ground portion.

  5. Effects of Ti-bearing inclusions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of MAG multilayer weld metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin WANG; Wenchao DONG; Shanping LU; Guangzhong HE; Xu ZHAO; Dianmai ZHOU; Yiyi LI

    2012-01-01

    The metal active gas (MAG) multilayer weld metal consists of the columnar grain zone (CGZ) and the fine grain zone (FGZ).Mechanical properties and microstructure of the CGZ and FGZ have been analyzed and evaluated.The inclusion with a size of 0.2-1.0 μm is typical log-normal distribution.The morphology of inclusions has been analyzed using transmission electron microscope (TEM).With the microalloying element Ti addition,much MnTiO3 phase precipitates on the Mn-silicates matrix,which is beneficial for the nucleation of acicular ferrite (AF).The probable mechanism for the nucleation of AF has been discussed.

  6. Nano-structureal and nano-chemical analysis of Ni-based alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The dissimilar metal joints welded between Ni-based alloy, Alloy 690 and low alloy steel, A533 Gr. B with Alloy 152 filler metal were characterized by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, secondary ion mass spectrometry and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. It was found that in the weld root region, the weld was divided into several regions including unmixed zone in Ni-base alloy, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. The result of nanostructural and nanochemical analyses in this study showed the non-homogeneous distribution of elements with higher Fe but lower Mn, Ni and Cr in A533 Gr. B compared with Alloy 152, and the precipitation of carbides near the fusion boundary.

  7. Investigation on Stake Welding Method of T-joints for Metal Sandwich Panel%金属夹芯结构制造中的T型接头Stake焊接方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷侃锋; 魏强; 赵明扬

    2012-01-01

    The Stake welding method of T-joints is a critical technology for making metal sandwich panels. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of making metal sandwich panels with welding method, three welding methods, including laser welding, gas tungsten arc (TIG) welding, and laser-TIG hybrid welding with cold welding wire, were investigated experimentally on Stake welding method of titanium alloy thin sheet T-joints. The weld forming properties of the T-joints and some affecting factors were analyzed under this three welding methods. The results show that the laser-TIG hybrid welding with cold welding wire method is an ideal technical for the Stake welding method of T-joints for making metal sandwich panels, which has more advantages than the laser welding method and the gas tungsten arc(TIG) welding method in the microstructure of welded joint, efficiency of welding, weld shaping and adaptability of weld gap.%T型接头的Stake焊接方法是实现金属夹芯板焊接制造的关键技术之一.为了论证焊接制造金属夹芯板的可行性,本文通过实验对比研究了在单一激光、TIG电弧和激光-TIG电弧复合等三种焊接工艺下,钛合金薄板T型接头Stake焊接焊缝成形特点及影响因素.结果表明,激光-TIG电弧焊是实现钛合金薄板T型接头Stake焊接的理想工艺,在焊缝组织、焊接效率、焊缝成形、间隙适应性等方面比单一激光或TIG焊接工艺有明显的优势,可以应用于金属夹芯板的焊接制造.

  8. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  9. Simulation of welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Song WU; Michael RETHMEIER; Christopher SCHWENK

    2011-01-01

    @@ Welding has become the most important materials processing technology in manufacturing, and has critical effects on the quality, reliability and life of products as well as production cost, efficiency and response speed to market.As various kinds of high performance metallic materials are widely used in engineering, there are more demands in manufacturing industry for advanced welding technology.

  10. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  11. Welding technology for rails. Rail no setsugo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M.; Karimine, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Uchino, K.; Sugino, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Technical Research Inst. of Yawata Works); Ueyama, K. (JR Railway Technical Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    The rail joining technology is indispensable for making long welded rails. Flush butt welding, gas welding, enclosed arc welding, and thermit welding are used properly as the welding methods. A method for improving the joint reliability by controlling the residual stress distribution of welded joint is investigated to prepare high carbon component weld metal similar to the rail. Problems with each of the welding methods and the newly developed technology to solve the problems are outlined. Composition of the coating is improved also, and a high C system welding rod is developed which has satisfactory weldability. High performance and high efficient new enclosed arc welding technology not available by now is developed which utilizes high carbon welding metal as a new EA welding work technology, and put to practical use. As a result of this study, useful guides are obtained for the establishment of satisfactory thermit welding technology. 17 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effects of Welding Processes on Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Weld Metal of Corrosion Resistant Ship Plate Steel DH36%焊接工艺对 DH36耐蚀船板钢焊缝金属组织与耐蚀性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋志强; 齐彦昌; 王军丽; 马成勇

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion resistant ship plate steels DH36 were welded by using submerged-arc welding,flux cored wire CO 2 gas shielded welding and shielded metal arc welding processes,and then corrosion experiments were carried out in the simulated environment around bottom plates of cargo oil tanks,the effects of welding processes on microstructure and corrosion resistance of weld metals were studied.The results show that under three welding processes,microstructure of the weld metals consisted predominantly of acicular ferrite,ferrite side-plate and proeutectoid ferrite.Compared with shielded metal arc welding and gas shielded welding,the weld metal prepared by submerged-arc welding had the best corrosion resistance,this due to the decrease of proeutectoid ferrite caused by higher heat input.Under three welding processes,the size and distribution of inclusion in weld metal were similar,and there was no obvious difference in the effects of inclusion on corrosion property of weld metal.%分别采用埋弧焊、药芯焊丝 CO 2气体保护焊和焊条电弧焊工艺对 DH36耐蚀船板钢进行对接焊,然后在模拟油船货油舱下底板的腐蚀环境中进行腐蚀试验,研究了焊接工艺对焊缝金属组织和耐蚀性能的影响。结果表明:在3种焊接工艺下,焊缝金属的组织均主要由先共析铁素体、侧板条铁素体和针状铁素体组成;与焊条电弧焊和气体保护焊相比,采用埋弧焊得到的焊缝金属的耐蚀性能最优,这源于埋弧焊较高的热输入导致针状体素体数量减少;在三种焊接工艺下,焊缝金属中夹杂物的尺寸、分布均相似,它们对焊缝金属耐蚀性能的影响基本相同。

  13. Transformation and Precipitation Reactions by Metal Active Gas Pulsed Welded Joints from X2CrNiMoN22-5-3 Duplex Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion-Dragos Utu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The high alloying degree of Duplex stainless steels makes them susceptible to the formation of intermetallic phases during their exposure to high temperatures. Precipitation of these phases can lead to a decreasing of the corrosion resistance and sometimes of the toughness. Starting from the advantages of the synergic Metal Active Gas (MAG pulsed welding process, this paper analyses the structure formation particularities of homogeneous welded joints from Duplex stainless steel. The effect of linear welding energy on the structure morphology of the welded joints was revealed by macro- and micrographic examinations, X-ray energy dispersion analyses, measurements of ferrite proportion and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results obtained showed that the transformation of ferrite into austenite is associated with the chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen distribution between these two phases and their redistribution degree is closely linked to the overall heat cycle of the welding process. The adequate control of the energy inserted in the welded components provides an optimal balance between the two microstructural constituents (Austenite and Ferrite and avoids the formation of undesirable intermetallic phases.

  14. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  15. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding of Al Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2003-01-01

    The innovative process of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has generated tremendous interest since its inception about a decade or so ago since the first patent in 1991 by TWI of Cambridge, England. This interest has been seen in many recent international conferences and publications on the subject and relevant published literature. Still the process needs both intensive basic study of deformation mechanisms during this FSW process and analysis and feasibility study to evaluate production methods that will yield high quality strong welds from the stirring action of the appropriate pin tool into the weld plate materials. Development of production processes is a complex task that involves effects of material thickness, materials weldability, pin tool design, pin height, and pin shoulder diameter and related control conditions. The frictional heating with rotational speeds of the pin tool as it plunges into the material and the ensuing plastic flow arising during the traverse of the welding faying surfaces provide the known special advantages of the FSW process in the area of this new advanced joining technology.

  16. Modeling of welded bead profile for rapid prototyping by robotic MAG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong; ZHU Sheng; WANG Tao; WANG Wanglong

    2009-01-01

    As a deposition technology, robotic metal active gas(MAG) welding has shown new promise for rapid prototyping (RP) of metallic parts. During the process of metal forming using robotic MAG welding, sectional profile of single-pass welded bead is critical to formed accuracy and quality of metal pans. In this paper, the experiments of single-pass welded bead for rapid prototyping using robotic MAG welding were carried out. The effect of some edge detectors on the cross-sectional edge of welded bead was discussed and curve fitting was applied using leat square fitting. Consequently, the mathematical model of welded bead profile was developed. The experimental results show that good shape could be obtained under suitable welding parameters. Canny operawr is suitable to edge detection of welded bead profile, and the mathematical model of welded bead profile developed is approximately parabola.

  17. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  18. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  19. VPPA weld model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-07-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  20. Determination of Informal Sector as Urban Pollution Source : Fume Characterization of Small-scale Manual Metal Arc Welding using Factor Analysis in Bandung City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nastiti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, the informal sector, particularly small-scale welding activities, are considered to be an important contributor to urban air pollution although studies in this sector are limited. This study aims to identify the composition of small-scale welding fume in order to further investigate the effects and set control strategies and urban pollution abatement policies. Breathing zone air samples were collected from 30 mild steel manual metal arc welders and 17 non-welders in Bandung City, West Java, Indonesia. The respirable particulates in air samples were analyzed using gravimetric method, and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA was employed to identify characteristic of welding fume. It was found that respirable particulates concentration in welders (range : 315.6 and 3,735.93 µgm-3; average 1,545.436 µgm-3 were significantly higher than in non-welders (range : 41.84 and 1,688.03 µgm-3; average : 375.783 µgm-3. Welders’ breathing zones contain Fe>Na>K>Mn>Al >Cr>Ti>Cl>Br>I>Zn>Sb>V>Co>Sc; while non-welders’ breathing zones contain Cr>F>Al>Ti>Na>Br>I>Mn>Cl>Co>Zn>Sc. Inter-species correlation analysis conducted using Statgraphic Ver. 4.0 shows that Fe (range : n.d. – 775.19 µgm-3; average: 0.1674 µgm-3, Co (range : n.d. – 0.51 µgm-3; average: 0.000082 µgm-3, Mn (range : 0.39 – 148.37 µgm-3; average: 0.0374 µgm-3, Na (range: 0.17 and 623.85 µgm-3; average: 0.0973 µgm-3 and K (range : n.d. – 301.15 µgm-3; average: 0.0535 µgm-3 were emitted from welding activity, and thus are considered as components of welding fume which contribute to urban air pollution. Although welding fume and the identified species in welding fume were still below permissible limit, small-scale welding activities have great potential in emitting higher fume concentration due to due to high variability of welding activities, such as welding frequency, materials being welded, and varied environmental conditions

  1. Assessment of occupational exposure to manganese and other metals in welding fumes by portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Cavallari, Jennifer M; Fang, Shona C; Lin, Xihong; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C; Weisskopf, Marc G

    2010-08-01

    Elemental analysis of welding fume samples can be done using several laboratory-based techniques. However, portable measurement techniques could offer several advantages. In this study, we sought to determine whether the portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) is suitable for analysis of five metals (manganese, iron, zinc, copper, and chromium) on 37-mm polytetrafluoroethylene filters. Using this filter fitted on a cyclone in line with a personal pump, gravimetric samples were collected from a group of boilermakers exposed to welding fumes. We assessed the assumption of uniform deposition of these metals on the filters, and the relationships between measurement results of each metal obtained from traditional laboratory-based XRF and the portable XRF. For all five metals of interest, repeated measurements with the portable XRF at the same filter area showed good consistency (reliability ratios are equal or close to 1.0 for almost all metals). The portable XRF readings taken from three different areas of each filter were not significantly different (p-values = 0.77 to 0.98). This suggested that the metal rich PM(2.5) deposits uniformly on the samples collected using this gravimetric method. For comparison of the two XRFs, the results from the portable XRF were well correlated and highly predictive of those from the laboratory XRF. The Spearman correlation coefficients were from 0.325 for chromium, to 0.995 for manganese and 0.998 for iron. The mean differences as a percent of the mean laboratory XRF readings were also small (<5%) for manganese, iron, and copper. The differences were greater for zinc and chromium, which were present at very low amounts in our samples and below the limits of detection of the portable XRF for many of the samples. These five metals were moderately to strongly correlated with the total fine particle fraction on filters (Spearman rho = 0.41 for zinc to 0.97 for iron). Such strong correlations and comparable results suggested that

  2. Magnetic Pulse Welding Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Jassim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the benefits of using Magnetic Pulse machine which is belong to Non-conventional machine instead of conventional machine. Magnetic Pulse Technology is used for joining dissimilar metals, and for forming and cutting metals. It is a non contact technique. Magnetic field is used to generate impact magnetic pressure for welding and forming the work piece by converted the electrical energy to mechanical energy. It is enable us to design previously not possible by welding dissimilar materials and allowing to welds light and stronger materials together. It can be used to weld metallic with non metallic materials to created mechanical lock on ceramics, polymers, rubbers and composites. It is green process; there is no heat, no radiation, no gas, no smoke and sparks, therefore the emissions are negligible.

  3. The Application of Stress-Relaxation Test to Life Assessment of T911/T22 Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tieshan; Zhao, Jie; Cheng, Congqian; Li, Huifang

    2016-03-01

    A dissimilar weld metal was obtained through submerged arc welding of a T911 steel to a T22 steel, and its creep property was explored by stress-relaxation test assisted by some conventional creep tests. The creep rate information of the stress-relaxation test was compared to the minimum and the average creep rates of the conventional creep test. Log-log graph showed that the creep rate of the stress-relaxation test was in a linear relationship with the minimum creep rate of the conventional creep test. Thus, the creep rate of stress-relaxation test could be used in the Monkman-Grant relation to calculate the rupture life. The creep rate of the stress-relaxation test was similar to the average creep rate, and thereby the rupture life could be evaluated by a method of "time to rupture strain." The results also showed that rupture life which was assessed by the Monkman-Grant relation was more accurate than that obtained through the method of "time to rupture strain."

  4. Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC's) (Center Director's Discretionary Fund, Project No. 98-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Carter, R. W.; Ding, J.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes an investigation of using friction stir welding (FSW) process for joining a variety of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) reinforced with discontinuous silicon-carbide (SiC) particulate and functional gradient materials. Preliminary results show that FSW is feasible to weld aluminum MMC to MMC or to aluminum-lithium 2195 if the SiC reinforcement is <25 percent by volume fraction. However, a softening in the heat-affected zone was observed and is known to be one of the major limiting factors for joint strength. The pin tool's material is made from a low-cost steel tool H-13 material, and the pin tool's wear was excessive such that the pin tool length has to be manually adjusted for every 5 ft of weldment. Initially, boron-carbide coating was developed for pin tools, but it did not show a significant improvement in wear resistance. Basically, FSW is applicable mainly for butt joining of flat plates. Therefore, FSW of cylindrical articles such as a flange to a duct with practical diameters ranging from 2-5 in. must be fully demonstrated and compared with other proven MMC joining techniques for cylindrical articles.

  5. Two-dimensional time-dependent modelling of fume formation in a pulsed gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselli, M.; Colombo, V.; Ghedini, E.; Gherardi, M.; Sanibondi, P.

    2013-06-01

    Fume formation in a pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is investigated by coupling a time-dependent axi-symmetric two-dimensional model, which takes into account both droplet detachment and production of metal vapour, with a model for fume formation and transport based on the method of moments for the solution of the aerosol general dynamic equation. We report simulative results of a pulsed process (peak current = 350 A, background current 30 A, period = 9 ms) for a 1 mm diameter iron wire, with Ar shielding gas. Results showed that metal vapour production occurs mainly at the wire tip, whereas fume formation is concentrated in the fringes of the arc in the spatial region close to the workpiece, where metal vapours are transported by convection. The proposed modelling approach allows time-dependent tracking of fumes also in plasma processes where temperature-time variations occur faster than nanoparticle transport from the nucleation region to the surrounding atmosphere, as is the case for most pulsed GMAW processes.

  6. Metallic glass formation at the interface of explosively welded Nb and stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, I. A.; Hokamoto, K.; Keno, H.; Bataev, A. A.; Balagansky, I. A.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The interface between explosively welded niobium and stainless steel SUS 304 was studied using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy. The wavy interface along which vortex zones were located was observed. The vortex zones formed due to the mixing of materials typically had amorphous structure. Inoue's criteria of glass formation were used to explain this result. The effect of the composition, cooling rate and pressure on the glass formation are discussed. The conditions of deformation, heating, and cooling as well as shockwaves propagation were numerically simulated. We show that the conditions of vortex zone formation resemble the conditions of rapid solidification processes. In contrast to the "classical" methods of rapid solidification of melt, the conditions of metastable phase formation during explosive welding are significantly complicated by the fluctuations of composition and pressure. Possible metastable structures formation at the interface of some common explosively joined materials is predicted.

  7. Effect of Welding Parameters on Dilution and Weld Bead Geometry in Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) variables on the dilution and weld bead geometry in cladding X65 pipeline steel with 316L stainless steel was studied. Using a full factorial method, a series of experiments were carried out to know the effect of wire feed rate, welding speed, distance between gas nozzle and plate, and the vertical angle of welding on dilution and weld bead geometry. The findings indicate that the dilution of weld metal and its dimension i.e. width, height and depth increase with the feed rate, but the contact angle of the bead decreases first and then increases. Meantime, welding speed has an opposite effect except for dilution. There is an interaction effect between welding parameters at the contact angle. The results also show forehand welding or decreasing electrode extension decrease the angle of contact. Finally,a mathematical model is contrived to highlight the relationship between welding variables with dilution and weld bead geometry.

  8. Efecto del procedimiento de soldadura sobre las propiedades de uniones soldadas de aceros microaleados para cañería Welding procedure effect on the properties of microalloyed steel welded joints for metal fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Zalazar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue, en esta primera etapa, comparar las propiedades mecánicas y la microestructura del acero HIC, aleado al Nb-Ti-Cu-Ni, resistente a la corrosión, con las del acero normal NOR, microaleado con Nb-V-Ti, ambos caracterizados mediante análisis químico, mediciones de dureza, estudios metalográficos y ensayos de tracción e impacto. Con el fin de establecer la temperatura de precalentamiento óptima se realizaron ensayos de soldabilidad Tekken a distintas temperaturas y de acuerdo con la Norma JIS Z 3158. Luego se llevaron a cabo soldaduras circunferenciales de cañerías fabricadas con ambos aceros diseñándose procedimientos para la utilización, por un lado, de electrodos revestidos (SMAW: shielded metal arc welding, electrodos de distintos proveedores para todas las pasadas y por el otro, la primera pasada usando soldadura automática con alambre macizo bajo CO2 (GMAW: gas metal arc welding y el resto de las mismas con alambre tubular autoprotegido (FCAW-S: flux cored arc welding-selfshielded. Las soldaduras fueron calificadas de acuerdo con el Código API 1104. Los resultados de los análisis metalográficos y los ensayos mecánicos de tracción, dureza e impacto de las juntas soldadas revelaron la influencia de los consumibles de soldadura y del metal base en las propiedades de las uniones. Se observaron diferencias en las propiedades de las uniones soldadas con consumibles de igual especificación y distintos proveedores. De las diferentes combinaciones ensayadas se definieron valores óptimos para la soldadura de estos aceros.The objective of this work was, in this first step, to compare mechanical property and microstructure of the steel HIC, alloyed with Nb-Ti-Cu-Ni, corrosion resistant, to those of a normal steel NOR, microlloyed with Nb-V-Ti, characterized through chemical analysis, hardness measurements, metallographic studies and tensile and Charpy-V properties. The preheating temperature was established

  9. Lung tumor production and tissue metal distribution after exposure to manual metal ARC-stainless steel welding fume in A/J and C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Battelli, Lori A; Salmen-Muniz, Rebecca; Li, Zheng; Erdely, Aaron; Kashon, Michael L; Simeonova, Petia P; Antonini, James M

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steel welding produces fumes that contain carcinogenic metals. Therefore, welders may be at risk for the development of lung cancer, but animal data are inadequate in this regard. Our main objective was to examine lung tumor production and histopathological alterations in lung-tumor-susceptible (A/J) and -resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mice exposed to manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fume. Male mice were exposed to vehicle or MMA-SS welding fume (20 mg/kg) by pharyngeal aspiration once per month for 4 mo. At 78 wk postexposure, gross tumor counts and histopathological changes were assessed and metal analysis was done on extrapulmonary tissue (aorta, heart, kidney, and liver). At 78 wk postexposure, gross lung tumor multiplicity and incidence were unremarkable in mice exposed to MMA-SS welding fume. Histopathology revealed that only the exposed A/J mice contained minimal amounts of MMA-SS welding fume in the lung and statistically increased lymphoid infiltrates and alveolar macrophages. A significant increase in tumor multiplicity in the A/J strain was observed at 78 wk. Metal analysis of extrapulmonary tissue showed that only the MMA-SS-exposed A/J mice had elevated levels of Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn in kidney and Cr in liver. In conclusion, this study further supports that MMA-SS welding fume does not produce a significant tumorigenic response in an animal model, but may induce a chronic lung immune response. In addition, long-term extrapulmonary tissue alterations in metals in the susceptible A/J mouse suggest that the adverse effects of this fume might be cumulative.

  10. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  11. Human biomonitoring of aluminium after a single, controlled manual metal arc inert gas welding process of an aluminium-containing worksheet in nonwelders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Hartmann, Laura; Schettgen, Thomas; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Several existing field studies evaluate aluminium welding works but no thoroughly controlled exposure scenario for welding fume has been described yet. This study provides information about the uptake and elimination of aluminium from welding fumes under controlled conditions. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory, we are able to generate welding fumes of a defined particle mass concentration. We exposed 12, until then occupationally unexposed participants with aluminium-containing welding fumes of a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process of a total dust mass concentration of 2.5 mg/m(3) for 6 h. Room air filter samples were collected, and the aluminium concentration in air derived. Urine and plasma samples were collected directly before and after the 6-h lasting exposure, as well as after 1 and 7 days. Human biomonitoring methods were used to determine the aluminium content of the samples with high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary aluminium concentrations showed significant changes after exposure compared to preexposure levels (mean t(1) (0 h) 13.5 µg/L; mean t(2) (6 h) 23.5 µg/L). Plasma results showed the same pattern but pre-post comparison did not reach significance. We were able to detect a significant increase of the internal aluminium burden of a single MIG aluminium welding process in urine, while plasma failed significance. Biphasic elimination kinetic can be observed. The German BAT of 60 µg/g creatinine was not exceeded, and urinary aluminium returned nearly to baseline concentrations after 7 days.

  12. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  13. Effect of thermal aging to microstructure of the interface of low alloy Steel and Ni-based alloy filler metal of dissimilar weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jong Jin; Choi, Sang Il; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Dissimilar Metal Welds (DMWs) is generally applied to nuclear power plants for manufacturing and machining in structural components such as reactor pressure vessels and pressurizer nozzles. Alloy 152 is used frequently as filler metal in the manufacture of the DMW in light water reactors to join the low alloy steel pressure vessel nozzles and steam generator nozzles to nickel-based wrought alloy or austenitic stainless steel components. However, in recent years cracking phenomena has been observed in the welded joints. Additionally, the number of long-term aged nuclear power plants is increasing. Concerns have been raised to the integrity and reliability in the joint transition zone due to the high susceptibility of the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the fusion boundary (FB) to stress corrosion cracking in combination with thermal aging. Since the material microstructure and chemical composition are key parameters affecting the stress corrosion cracking, improving the understanding of stress corrosion cracking at the FB region requires fundamental understanding of the unique microstructure of the FB region in DMW. Despite the potential degradation and consequent risk in the DMW, there is still a lack of the fundamental understanding of microstructure in the FB region, in particular the region containing unidentified band structures near the FB. As the life of nuclear power plants becomes long cycle, concerns have been raised to the integrity and reliability in the region after getting thermal aging effect. The long term exposure of this kind of material could experience the thermal aging which can form the chromium carbides near the FB by promoting the diffusion of C content at the service temperature. Therefore, the current study is aiming at the investigation of the thermal effect on the interface between Alloy 152 filler metal and A533 Gr. B. The used tools are Vickers hardness tester and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  14. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, S. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cinson, A. D. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States); Diaz, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, M. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criterion for detection performance.

  15. Avaliação da microestrutura e propriedades mecânicas de metais de solda obtidos por processos de soldagem manual e automatizado utilizado na soldagem de aço API 5L X80 Evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties of weld metals obtained by manual and automated welding process used in the welding of API 5L X80 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siderley Fernandes Albuquerque

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar as características da zona termicamente afetada (ZTA e a microestrutura e propriedades mecânicas de metais de solda de juntas soldadas do aço API 5L X80, obtidos para quatro diferentes procedimentos de soldagem utilizando processos manuais e automatizados. Para isto, chapas do referido aço foram soldadas por processo manual ao Arco Elétrico com Eletrodo Revestido (SMAW, utilizando 473 e 673 K como temperaturas de interpasses e o eletrodo celulósico AWS E8010-G como consumível; por processo ao Arco Elétrico com Arame Tubular (FCAW robotizado, utilizando o arame AWS E71T- 1C como metal de adição e argônio com 25%CO2 como gás de proteção; por processo a Arco Elétrico com Eletrodo de Tungstênio (GTAW mecanizado na raiz da solda, usando o arame ER70S-3 e argônio como gás de proteção. As análises microestruturais foram relacionadas com os resultados de ensaios de impacto Charpy nos metais de solda e com os perfis de microdureza Vickers ao longo da junta soldada. Os resultados indicaram maiores percentuais de Ferrita Acicular e maiores valores de resistência ao impacto nos metais de solda e uma menor extensão e granulometria da ZTA, associado ao procedimento de soldagem utilizando processo automatizado com maior velocidade de soldagem.The objective of this work was to evaluate the heat affected zone characteristics and weld metals microstructure and mechanical properties of API 5L X80 steel welded joints, obtained for four different welding procedures using manual and automated processes. For this, plates of this steel were welded by manual Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW process with interpasses temperatures of 473 e 673 K, and using AWS E8010-G electrode as filler metals; robotized Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW process, using AWS E71T-1C wire and Ar25%CO2 as consumable and mechanized Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process, for the root pass using AWS ER70S-3 and Ar as consumable .The

  16. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  17. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  18. Environmentally-assisted cracking behaviour in the transition region of an Alloy182/SA 508 Cl.2 dissimilar metal weld joint in simulated boiling water reactor normal water chemistry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, H. P.; Ritter, S.; Shoji, T.; Peng, Q. J.; Takeda, Y.; Lu, Z. P.

    2008-08-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion fatigue behaviour perpendicular and parallel to the fusion line in the transition region between the Alloy 182 Nickel-base weld metal and the adjacent SA 508 Cl.2 low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of a simulated dissimilar metal weld joint was investigated under boiling water reactor normal water chemistry conditions. A special emphasis was placed to the question whether a fast growing interdendritic SCC crack in the highly susceptible Alloy 182 weld metal can easily cross the fusion line and significantly propagate into the adjacent low-alloy RPV steel. Cessation of interdendritic SCC crack growth was observed in high-purity or sulphate-containing oxygenated water under constant or periodical partial unloading conditions for those parts of the crack front, which reached the fusion line. In chloride containing water, on the other hand, the interdendritic SCC crack in the Alloy 182 weld metal very easily crossed the fusion line and further propagated with a very high rate as a transgranular crack into the heat-affected zone and base metal of the adjacent low-alloy steel. The observed SCC cracking behaviour at the interface correlates excellently with the field experience of such dissimilar metal weld joints, where SCC cracking was usually confined to the Alloy 182 weld metal.

  19. Environmentally-assisted cracking behaviour in the transition region of an Alloy182/SA 508 Cl.2 dissimilar metal weld joint in simulated boiling water reactor normal water chemistry environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)], E-mail: hans-peter.seifert@psi.ch; Ritter, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Shoji, T.; Peng, Q.J.; Takeda, Y.; Lu, Z.P. [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute (FRI), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2008-08-31

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion fatigue behaviour perpendicular and parallel to the fusion line in the transition region between the Alloy 182 Nickel-base weld metal and the adjacent SA 508 Cl.2 low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of a simulated dissimilar metal weld joint was investigated under boiling water reactor normal water chemistry conditions. A special emphasis was placed to the question whether a fast growing interdendritic SCC crack in the highly susceptible Alloy 182 weld metal can easily cross the fusion line and significantly propagate into the adjacent low-alloy RPV steel. Cessation of interdendritic SCC crack growth was observed in high-purity or sulphate-containing oxygenated water under constant or periodical partial unloading conditions for those parts of the crack front, which reached the fusion line. In chloride containing water, on the other hand, the interdendritic SCC crack in the Alloy 182 weld metal very easily crossed the fusion line and further propagated with a very high rate as a transgranular crack into the heat-affected zone and base metal of the adjacent low-alloy steel. The observed SCC cracking behaviour at the interface correlates excellently with the field experience of such dissimilar metal weld joints, where SCC cracking was usually confined to the Alloy 182 weld metal.

  20. Effect of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of GMA-welded HY-80 steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmusoglu, Senol [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Tuerker, Mehmet [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). ISF - Welding and Joining Inst.; Tosun, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    In this publication, investigations of HY-80 steels joined by gas metal arc welding by using different welding parameters are described. Different samples obtained from the welded joints were subjected to mechanical testing by means of tensile, hardness and impact toughness tests. The tensile test results showed that the strength of weld metal and heat affected zone were higher than of base metal. Similar Charpy impact toughness test results were obtained for weld metal and heat affected zone. Weld metal hardness was almost similar to the base metal hardness, nevertheless, the heat affected zone indicated higher values. The base metal has ferritic-perlitic structure with fine grains. Martensite needles and bainite are seen in the heat affected zone. Weld metal has martensite needles, partial bainite and residual austenite.

  1. Laser Welding of Ultra-Fine Grained Steel SS400

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yun; TIAN Zhi-ling; CHEN Wu-zhu; WANG Cheng; BAO Gang

    2003-01-01

    The effects of laser welding on microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-fine grained steel SS400 were studied. The plasma arc welding and MAG welding were conducted to make a comparison between these weldings and laser welding. The coarse grain heat-affected zone (HAZ) of laser welding was simulated using thermomechanical simulation machine, and the impact toughness was tested. The deep penetration laser welding produces weld of large depth and narrow width. The weld metal and HAZ of laser welding was heated and then cooled rapidly. The prior austenite grain size of coarse grain HAZ is 1/10 of that for arc welding. For laser welding, the toughness of weld metal is higher than that of base metal, and the toughness of the coarse grain HAZ of laser welding is on a level with that of base metal. Matching lower laser power with lower welding speed, the hardening tendency of the weld metal and the coarse grain HAZ can be decreased. There is no softened zone. The tensile strength of welded joint formed by laser is higher than that of base metal. The joint has good bending ductility.

  2. 高频感应焊接的特点及其在异种金属焊接中的应用%Characteristic and application in dissimilar metals welding of high-frequency induction welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李连杰; 戴乐

    2011-01-01

    回顾了高频感应的定义和发展,介绍了高频感应加热焊接的基本原理和其加热速度快,焊接热影响区小,能量集中,冷却时间短以及环保、节能等特点.针对异种金属焊接存在的难点,综述了常用的焊接方法及其优缺点.高频感应焊的快速加热和表面集肤效应的特点,使其能够实现异种金属钎焊和表面熔覆焊的冶金结合,接头性能优良.指出感应圈的形状及其与工件之间的相互位置对加热的质量和效率起至关重要的作用.研究表明,通过在钢表面预镀一层锌作为钎料并改善铝在钢上的润湿性,控制温度低于钢的熔点而高于铝的熔点,采用高频感应焊可实现钢-铝良好的直接熔焊结合.%The definition and development of high-frequency induction welding are reviewed and the fundamental principle and characteristic are introduced.The characteristic is that heating speed is fast,heat affected zone is small,energy is centralized,cooling time is short and so on.To the difficulties of dissimilar metals welding,advantages and disadvantages of general welding ways are studied. High calefaction speed and surfacing effect of high-frequency induction can realize metallurgy welding of brazing and surface fusion welding of dissimilar metals and the capabilities of the joint are excellent. The shape of inductor and the distance between workpiece and inductor are important to quality and efficiency.The experimental results indicate that high-frequency induction welding can melt aluminum to steel directly by the way of galvanization on steel and control the temperature between the melting point of steel and that of aluminum.

  3. Explosive welding finds uses offshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    This article discusses an explosive welding procedure for pipeline repair. Unlike fusion welding, explosive welding does not leave a brittle area behind and will stop axial or longitudinal cracking of a pipeline. The metals are joined by cold impact pressure, which actually liquifies the metal at the point of impact. In explosive welding, the force of the circular explosion drives the two metals together with such an impact that a bonded wave pattern is set up. All surface defects and oxides are pushed ahead of the collision front, resulting in a metal-to-metal seal. Two techniques are reviewed: the Exploweld method and the Norabel method. Both methods do not reduce or expand the internal diameter of the welded surface.

  4. Effect of post-weld heat treatment and neutron irradiation on a dissimilar-metal joint between F82H steel and 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Haiying, E-mail: haigirl1983@gmail.com [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); Nagasaka, Takuya [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Kometani, Nobuyuki [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Guan, Wenhai; Nogami, Shuhei; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Iwata, Takuya; Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yamazaki, Masanori [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Kano, Sho; Satoh, Yuhki; Abe, Hiroaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Significant hardening after neutron irradiation at 300 °C for 0.1 dpa was found in the fine-grain HAZ of F82H for the dissimilar-metal joint between F82H and 316L. • The possible hardening mechanism was explained from the viewpoint of carbon behavior. • However, the significant hardening did not degrade the impact property significantly. - Abstract: A dissimilar-metal joint between F82H steel and 316L stainless steel was fabricated by using electron beam welding (EBW). By microstructural analysis and hardness test, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of F82H was classified into interlayer area, fine-grain area, and coarse-carbide area. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to control the hardness of HAZ. After PWHT at 680 °C for 1 h, neutron irradiation at 300 °C with a dose of 0.1 dpa was carried out for the joint in Belgian Reactor II (BR-II). Compared to the base metals (BMs) and weld metal (WM), significant irradiation hardening up to 450HV was found in the fine-grain HAZ of F82H. However, the impact property of F82H-HAZ specimens, which was machined with the root of the V-notch at HAZ of F82H, was not deteriorated obviously in spite of the significant irradiation hardening.

  5. Materials participation in welded joints manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2016-08-01

    Management of materials dilution to form a joint with higher features asked by complex metallic structures is a problem that took attention and efforts of welding processes researchers and this communication will give a little contribution presenting some scientific and experimental results of dilution processes studied by Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department. Liquid state welding processes have a strong dependence related to dilution of base and filler materials, the most important are for automatic joining using welding. The paper presents a review of some scientific works already published and their contributions, results of dilution coefficient evaluation using weighing, graphics and software applied for shielded metal arc welding process. Paper results could be used for welders’ qualification, welding procedure specification and other welding processes researchers’ activities. The results of Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department, show dilution coefficient values between 20-30 % of base material and 70-80 % of filler material for studied welding process.

  6. A study on consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Wang Yuxin; Feng Jicai

    2009-01-01

    A consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding method has been studied. This method is different from the traditional TIG welding because it introduces an MIG welding torch into the traditional TIG welding system. An indirect arc is generated between the consumable electrode of the MIG welding torch and the tungsten electrode of the TIG welding torch, but not generated between the tungsten electrode of the welding torch and the base metal. Welding current flows from the consumable electrode to the tungsten electrode in the free-burning indirect arc. The consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding not only rapidly melts the welding wire but also effectively restrains the excessive fusion of the base metal. The welding experiment and the theoretical analysis confirm that this method can obtain a high deposition rate and a low dilution ratio during the welding process.

  7. A Field Study on the Respiratory Deposition of the Nano-Sized Fraction of Mild and Stainless Steel Welding Fume Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, L G; Chisholm, W P; Keane, M J; Chen, B T

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to estimate the amount of Cr, Mn, and Ni deposited in the respiratory system of 44 welders in two facilities. Each worker wore a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild and stainless steel and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) of mild steel. Several welders also wore side-by-side NRD samplers and closed-face filter cassettes for total particulate samples. The NRD sampler estimates the aerosol's nano-fraction deposited in the respiratory system. Mn concentrations for both welding processes ranged 2.8-199 μg/m3; Ni concentrations ranged 10-51 μg/m3; and Cr concentrations ranged 40-105 μg/m3. Cr(VI) concentrations ranged between 0.5-1.3 μg/m3. For the FCAW process the largest concentrations were reported for welders working in pairs. As a consequence this often resulted in workers being exposed to their own welding fumes and to those generated from the welding partner. Overall no correlation was found between air velocity and exposure (R2 = 0.002). The estimated percentage of the nano-fraction of Mn deposited in a mild-steel-welder's respiratory system ranged between 10 and 56%. For stainless steel welding, the NRD samplers collected 59% of the total Mn, 90% of the total Cr, and 64% of the total Ni. These results indicate that most of the Cr and more than half of the Ni and Mn in the fumes were in the fraction smaller than 300 nm.

  8. Assessing the Impact of Sequencing Practicums for Welding in Agricultural Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Malcolm; Pate, Michael L.; Lawver, Rebecca G.; Warnick, Brian K.; Dai, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of sequencing practicums for welding on students' ability to perform a 1F (flat position-fillet lap joint) weld on low-carbon steel. Participants were randomly assigned a specific practice sequence of welding for using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). A total of 71 participants…

  9. Combination of a Nd:YAG laser and a liquid cooling device to (Zr{sub 53}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 9}Al{sub 8})Si{sub 0.5} bulk metallic glass welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.S., E-mail: huei@mail.isu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, No. 1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Rd., Dashu Township, Kaohsiung County 84001, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, No. 1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Rd., Dashu Township, Kaohsiung County 84001, Taiwan (China); Jang, J.S.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan County 32001, Taiwan (China); Chiou, M.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, No. 1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Rd., Dashu Township, Kaohsiung County 84001, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-25

    Research highlights: {yields} A liquid cooling device (LCD) helps to produce a lower initial welding temperature. {yields} A lower initial welding temperature leads to a faster welding thermal cycle (WTC). {yields} A faster WTC produces a crystallization free weld for a laser welded Zr-based BMG. - Abstract: Using pre-selected welding parameters, a crystallization-free weld for (Zr{sub 53}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 9}Al{sub 8})Si{sub 0.5} bulk metallic glass (BMG) was successfully produced by adopting a Nd:YAG pulse laser in combination with a liquid cooling device (LCD). When a LCD was employed, a faster cooling rate and shorter retention time for the crystallization temperature interval were produced, thus, no crystallization was observed in the weld fusion zone (WFZ) or heat affected zone (HAZ). The hardness in those areas did not differ significantly in comparison to the parent material (PM). For the room temperature laser weld (LCD was not employed), HAZ crystallization seemed unavoidable, although no crystallization occurred within the WFZ. The major crystalline phase in the HAZ was identified as Zr{sub 2}Cu. When the precipitates were greater in the crystallized area (i.e., HAZ), cracks were more likely to form, thus, hardness in the area was decreased.

  10. Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of Circumferential Multipass Dissimilar Weld Between 20MND5 and Z2CND18-12NS with Ni-Base Filler Metal 52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Renyao; Duan, Zhaoling; He, Guo

    2013-10-01

    The large circumferential multipass dissimilar weld between 20MND5 steel and Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel welded with FM52 filler material was investigated in terms of the diluted composition, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility of the weld. The diluted composition of the weld is composed of 37 to 47 pct Ni, 21 to 24 pct Cr, and 28 to 40 pct Fe, which are inhomogeneous along the depth and over the width of the deep weld. The carbon content has a distribution in the region of the surface weld from a high level (~0.20 pct) in the zone near 20MND5 steel to a normal level (~0.03 pct) in the zone near Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel. The carbon distribution is corresponding to the grain boundary carbides. The minimum threshold strains for DDC occur in the temperature range of 1223 K to 1323 K (950 °C to 1050 °C), which are 0.5, 0.35, and 0.4 pct for the root weld, middle region, and the surface weld, respectively. The dissimilar weld has the largest susceptibility to the DDC compared to the filler metal 52 and the Inconel 690.

  11. [Change in the composition and structure of the metal in the zone of the welded seam of dental drill blanks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altareva, G I; Bazhukhin, V I; Gerasev, G P; Matukhnov, V M; Shmyreva, T P

    1982-01-01

    Composition and structure of metals in the meld zone connecting a dental burr handpiece made of hard alloy BK-6 with a shank made of steel 20X13 are examined by the X-ary microanalyzer MS-46 and the X-ray diffractometer "dPOH-2". Representative interdiffusion processes of alloy components into steel and, converserly, iron from steel into hard alloy are found. After melding, the transition layer has been shown to represent the cobalt-iron solid solution with variable concentration of the components through the layer, tungsten carbid particles being uniformly spread all over the metallic matrix. The phasic composition change is analysed in the course of material welding. The enrichment of stell melt with carbon of tungsten carbid results in the formation of gamma-Fe phase in the meld zone. The failure of burr blanks is noted to occur at the interface of the second (10-20 micrometer) and the first (130-140 micrometer) zones. The increase in the concentration of both iron and iron-containing phases--alpha-Fe, gamma-Fe, Fe3W3C--at the surface of steel fracture is responsible for the failures.

  12. Influence of weld structure on cross-weld creep behavior in P23 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.J.; Degnan, C.C. [E.ON Engineering (United Kingdom); Brett, S.J. [RWE npower (United Kingdom); Buchanan, L.W. [Doosan Babcock (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    A thick section pipe weld in low alloy steel P23 has been characterised by cross-weld creep rupture testing at a range of stresses, together with all-weld-metal and parent material testing, under the auspices of the UK High Temperature Power Plant Forum. The results generally show that the weld metal can be weak when tested in the transverse (cross-weld) orientation, and can fail with limited overall ductility by cracking in the zone of refined weld metal beneath the fusion boundary of the superposed weld bead. However, one specimen showed a much superior performance, which could be understood in terms of its locally more creep resistant weld macrostructure. The implications for P23 performance and weld manufacture are discussed. (orig.)

  13. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Plug Welds after Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve mechanical properties of plug welds. The main purpose of that paper was analyzing of mechanical properties of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling. The main way for it was comparison of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling and plug welds made by ordinary MIG welding method. It is interesting for steel because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF in weld metal deposit (WMD is obtained in MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling in relation to ordinary MIG welding method. This article presents the influence of the cooling medium and the number of micro-jet streams on mechanical properties of the welded joint. Mechanical properties were described by force which is necessary to destroy weld joint.

  15. Stress/strain distributions for weld metal solidification crack in stainless steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper has simulated the driving force of solidification crack of stainless steels, that is, stress/strain field in the trail of molten pool. Firstly, the effect of the deformation in the molten pool was eliminated after the element rebirth method was adopted. Secondly, the influence of solidification shrinkage was taken into account by increasing thermal expansion coefficients of the steels at elevated temperatures. Finally, the stress/strain distributions of different conditions have been computed and analyzed. Furthermore, the driving force curves of the solidification crack of the steels have been obtained by converting strain-time curves into strain-temperature curves, which founds a basis for predicting welding solidification crack.

  16. Ultrasonic inspectability of austenitic stainless steel and dissimilar metal weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudovikov, S.; Bulavinov, A.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Since their invention in 1912, austenitic stainless steel materials are widely used in a variety of industry sectors. In particular, austenitic stainless steel material is qualified to meet the design criteria of high quality, safety related applications, for example, the primary loop of the most of the nuclear power plants in the world, due to high durability and corrosion resistance. Certain operating conditions may cause a range of changes in the integrity of the component, and therefore require nondestructive testing at reasonable intervals. These in-service inspections are often performed using ultrasonic techniques, in particular when cracking is of specific concern. However, the coarse, dendritic grain structure of the weld material, formed during the welding process, is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of ultrasonic Phased Array techniques becomes desirable. The ''Sampling Phased Array'' technique, invented and developed by Fraunhofer IZFP, allows the acquisition of time signals (A-scans) for each individual transducer element of the array along with image reconstruction techniques using ''SynFoc'' algorithms. The reconstruction considers the sound propagation from each image pixel to the individual sensor element. For anisotropic media, where the sound beam is deflected and the sound path is not known a-priory, we implement a new phase adjustment called ''Reverse Phase Matching'' technique. This algorithm permits the acquisition of phase-corrected A-scans that represent the actual sound propagation in the anisotropic structure; this technique can be utilized for image reconstruction. (orig.)

  17. Fusion Welding Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    RD-AlSO 253 FUSION WELDING RESEARCH(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH L/I CAMBRIDGE DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING T W EAGAR ET AL. 30 RPR 85...NUMBER 12. GOV’ ACCESSION NO. 3. RECICIE-S CATALOG NUMBER 4. T TL V nd Subtitle) S. P OFRPR PERIOD COVERED 5t h A~nnual Technical Report Fusion Welding ...research S on welding processes. Studies include metal vapors in the arc, development of a high speed infrared temperature monitor, digital signal

  18. Sliding wear characteristics of Co-based overlay weld metal with dispersed boride particles; Hokabutsu ryushi bunsan kyoka Co ki nikumori kinzoku no suberi mamosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, M.; Araki, T.; Shigekawa, Y. [Ehime University, Ehime (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Asano, I.; Hayashi, Y. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-05

    Requirements on wear resistant materials in recent years are applied not only to strength and hardness, but also to heat resistance and corrosion resistance. This paper describes fabrication of an overlay weld metal reinforced by dispersed particles, structured by a Co-based alloy (stellite No. 6) added with boride (MoB powder) using a plasma transferred arc welding process. The paper discusses the effect of MoB on wear characteristics at room temperature and elevated temperatures, as well as on seizability. When the MoB addition amount is increased to 3% by mass or more, the structure was found constituted by an eutectic structure with M2B and {beta} phases and an eutectic structure with M23C6 and {beta} phases, in addition to plate-shaped crystallized substance of CoMo2B2 which is a tetragonal system, and a matrix of {beta} Co. When S45C is used as a counterpart material, wear resistance was improved regardless of temperatures by making hardness of the overlay metal higher by HV 300 or more than that of the counterpart material. The overlay weld metal added with MoB showed high friction coefficient at room temperature, but even if the temperature is raised, it had less agglutination of S45C, and decreased at elevated temperatures. 13 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Microstructure, local mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of an SA508-52M-316LN safe-end dissimilar metal weld joint by GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Hongliang; Zhu, Ruolin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Zhiming [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Jianqiu, E-mail: wangjianqiu@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Han, En.-Hou.; Ke, Wei [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Su, Mingxing [Shanghai Research Center for Weld and Detection Engineering Technique of Nuclear Equipment, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2016-07-04

    The microstructure, local mechanical properties and local stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of an SA508-52M-316LN domestic dissimilar metal welded safe-end joint used for AP1000 nuclear power plant prepared by automatic gas tungsten arc welding was studied in this work by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (with electron back scattering diffraction and an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy system), micro-hardness testing, local mechanical tensile testing and local slow strain rate tests. The micro-hardness, local mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility across this dissimilar metal weld joint vary because of the complex microstructure across the fusion area and the dramatic chemical composition change across the fusion lines. Briefly, Type I boundaries and Type II boundaries exist in 52Mb near the SA508-52Mb interface, a microstructure transition was found in SA508 heat affected zone, the residual strain and grain boundary character distribution changes as a function of the distance from the fusion boundary in 316LN heat affected zone, micro-hardness distribution and local mechanical properties along the DMWJ are heterogeneous, and 52Mw-316LN interface has the highest SCC susceptibility in this DMWJ while 316LN base metal has the lowest one.

  20. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  1. Development of Temper Bead Welding Process for Weld Overlay of Dissimilar Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, J. G.; Park, K. S.; Kim, Y. J. [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In recent years, the dissimilar weld metal used to connect stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components have experienced cracking in nuclear reactor piping systems. The cracking has been observed in several Pressurized Water Reactors in overseas. In Several cases, the cracking was repaired using structural weld overlays, a repair technique that has been in use in the U.S. in Boiling Water Reactors for over twenty years. Although weld overlays have been used primarily as a repair for flawed piping, they can also be applied at locations that have not yet exhibited any cracking, but are considered susceptible to cracking. The purpose of this research is to develop the temper bead weld process for the weld overlay of the dissimilar weld pipe. We developed equipment for the overlay system, applied Procedure Qualification(PQ) for the temper bead welding process.

  2. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  3. Study on DC welding parameters of Al-alloy shaping based on arc-welding robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Al-alloy arc-welding shaping system based on arc-welding robot is established, and the Al-alloy shaping manufacture is realized with the DC (direct current) gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The research indicates that the metal transfer type of DC GMAW, heat input and the initial temperature of the workpiece greatly affect the Al-alloy shaping based on arc welding robot. On the penetration, the weld width and the reinforcement, the influence of welding parameters is analyzed by generalized regression neural network (GRNN) fitting.

  4. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  5. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Test Results for Al-Li 2195 Parent Metal, Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welds and Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Wagner, John A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy 2195 plate and weldments was determined at 200-F, ambient temperature and -320-F. The effects of stress ratio (R), welding process, orientation and thickness were studied. Results are compared with plate data from the Space Shuttle Super Lightweight Tank (SLWT) allowables program. Data from the current series of tests, both plate and weldment, falls within the range of data generated during the SLWT allowables program.

  6. Effects of post-weld heat treatment on dissimilar metal joint between aluminum alloy and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Honggang, E-mail: donghg@dlut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116085 (China); Liao Chuanqing; Yang Liqun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116085 (China); Dong Chuang [Key Lab of Materials Modification, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116085 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al alloy was joined to stainless steel with Zn-15Al flux-cored filler wire. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of post-weld heat treatment on joint performance were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of Zn-rich phases in the weld changed with PWHT conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fine Zn-rich phases uniformly distributed in the weld enhanced the joint strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fractured surfaces of the specimens after tensile testing were examined. - Abstract: Lap joining of 5A02 aluminum alloy to 304 stainless steel sheets was conducted by gas tungsten arc welding with Zn-15%Al flux-cored filler wire, and the effects of the temperature and duration time during post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the resultant joints were investigated. The experimental results show that the concentration and size of the Zn-rich phases in the weld, especially along the weld/steel interface, changed with different temperature and duration time, and consequently affected the joint strength. The fine Zn-rich phases uniformly distributed in the weld could enhance the joint strength; however, the coarse Zn-rich phases along the interfacial layer would degrade the bonding strength of the interfacial layer. The fractured surfaces of the specimens after tensile testing were also examined.

  7. Welding of aluminum with linear ribbon explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    A small-scale simplified, parallel plate process of welding aluminum with very small quantities of lead-sheathed linear ribbon RDX explosive is described. The results of the welding of five different alloys, obtained by using this technique, show that the weld strengths are up to 90% of the parent metal tensile strength.

  8. Investigation of Interface Bonding Mechanism of an Explosively Welded Tri-Metal Titanium/Aluminum/Magnesium Plate by Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. T.; Wang, W. X.; Zhou, J.; Cao, X. Q.; Yan, Z. F.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2017-08-01

    A tri-metal titanium/aluminum/magnesium (Ti/Al/Mg) cladding plate, with an aluminum alloy interlayer plate, was fabricated for the first time by explosive welding. Nanoindentation tests and associated microstructure analysis were conducted to investigate the interface bonding mechanisms of the Ti/Al/Mg cladding plate. A periodic wavy bonding interface (with an amplitude of approximately 30 μm and a wavelength of approximately 160 μm) without a molten zone was formed between the Ti and Al plates. The bonding interface between the Al and the Mg demonstrated a similar wavy shape, but the wave at this location was much larger with an amplitude of approximately 390 μm and a wavelength of approximately 1580 μm, and some localized melted zones also existed at this location. The formation of the wavy interface was found to result from a severe deformation at the interface, which was caused by the strong impact or collision. The nanoindentation tests showed that the material hardness decreased with increasing distance from the bonding interface. Material hardness at a location was found to be correlated with the degree of plastic deformation at that site. A larger plastic deformation was correlated with an increase in hardness.

  9. Dynamic Strength Evaluations for Self-Piercing Rivets and Resistance Spot Welds Joining Similar and Dissimilar Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper summarizes the dynamic joint strength evaluation procedures and the measured dynamic strength data for thirteen joint populations of self-piercing rivets (SPR) and resistance spot welds (RSW) joining similar and dissimilar metals. A state-of-the-art review of the current practice for conducting dynamic tensile/compressive strength tests in different strain rate regimes is first presented, and the generic issues associated with dynamic strength test are addressed. Then, the joint strength testing procedures and fixture designs used in the current study are described, and the typical load versus displacement curves under different loading configurations are presented. Uniqueness of the current data compared with data in the open literature is discussed. The experimental results for all the joint populations indicate that joint strength increases with increasing loading rate. However, the strength increase from 4.47m/s (10mph) to 8.94m/s (20mph) is not as significant as the strength increase from static to 4.47m/s. It is also found that with increasing loading velocity, displacement to failure decreases for all the joint samples. Therefore, “brittleness” of the joint sample increases with impact velocity. Detailed static and dynamic strength data and the associated energy absorption levels for all the samples in the thirteen joint populations are also included.

  10. Evaluation of erythemal UV effective irradiance from UV lamp exposure and the application in shield metal arc welding processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Ping; Liu, Hung-Hsin; Peng, Chiung-Yu; Fang, Hsin-Yu; Tsao, Ta-Ho; Lan, Cheng-Hang

    2008-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is known to cause potential effects such as erythema in skin. For UV-induced erythema (sunburn), the action spectrum from the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage, International Commission on Illumination (CIE) was adopted. Erythemal UV effects from UVR lamp exposure were investigated with commercial spectroradiometry devices in this research. Three kinds of portable UV germicidal lamps with broadband UVA (BB UVA, 350-400 nm), broadband UVB (BB UVB, 280-350 nm), and narrowband UVC (NB UVC, 254 nm) wavelengths served as the UVR emission sources. An action spectrum expresses the effectiveness of radiation for assessing the hazard of UVR in the erythemal action spectrum from 250-400 nm. The UV Index (UVI) is an irradiance scale computed by multiplying the CIE erythemal irradiance integral in milliwatts per square meter by 0.04 m mW. A comprehensive approach to detecting erythemal UVR magnitude was developed to monitor the effective exposure from UV lamps. The erythemal UVR measurement was established and the exposure assessment was applied to monitor erythemal UVR magnitude from shield metal arc welding (SMAW) processing. From this study, the erythemal UVR exposures were assessed and evaluated with environmental solar simulation of the UVI exposure.

  11. Size Evolution of the Surface Short Fatigue Cracks of 1Cr18Ni9Ti Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Size evolution of the surface short fatigue cracks of 1Cr18Ni9Ti weld metal was investigated. A local viewpoint is applied to be agreement with a so-called "effectively short fatigue crack criterion". Attention was paid to the dominant effectively short fatigue crack (DESFC) initiation zone and the zones ahead of the DESFC tips. The results revealed that the evolutionary size shows a significant character of microstructural short crack (MSC) and physical short crack (PSC) stages. In the MSC stage, fatigue damage is due to mainly the initiation and irregular growth of the effectively short fatigue cracks (ESFCs). In the PSC stage, the damage is conversely due to mainly the DESFC growth and partially, the growth of the ESFCs and the coalescence of the ESFCs themselves with the DESFC. The process involves from a non-ordered/chaotic state in the initiation of MSC stage, gradually to an independently random state at the transition point between the MSC and PSC stages and then, to an ordered/history-dependent random state. Interactive effect of the collective cracks is stronger and shows an increase in the MSC stage. It reaches a maximum value at the transition point and then, tends to a decrease in the PSC stage. The DESFC acts as a result of the interactive cracks and thus, is deemed suitable to describe the behaviour of collective cracks.

  12. Advantages of new micro-jet welding technology on weld microstructure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan PIWNIK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An innovative apparatus to welding process with micro-jet cooling of the weld made it possible to carry out technological tests, which have proved theoretical considerations about this problem. This project gives real opportunities for professional development in the field of welding with controlling the parameters of weld structure. These tests have proved that the new micro-jet technology has the potential for growth. It may be great achievement of welding technology in order to increase weld metal strength. The new technology with micro-jet cooling may have many practical applications in many fields, for example such as in the transport industry or to repair damaged metal elements. The advantages of the new device over the traditional system are the ability to control the structure of the weld, the weld mechanical performance increases and improve the quality of welded joints.

  13. Predicting effects of diffusion welding parameters on welded joint properties by artificial neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎明; 祝美丽; 牛济泰; 张忠典

    2001-01-01

    The static model for metal matrix composites in diffusion welding was established by means of artificial neural network method. The model presents the relationship between weld joint properties and welding parameters such as welding temperature, welding pressure and welding time. Through simulating the diffusion welding process of SiCw/6061Al composite, the effects of welding parameters on the strength of welded joint was studied and optimal technical parameters was obtained. It is proved that this method has good fault-tolerant ability and versatility and can overcome the shortage of the general experiment. The established static model is in good agreement with the actual welding process, so it becomes a new path for studying the weldability of new material.

  14. Effects of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of inert gas welded 6063 Aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertan, Taner [MAKO Corporation (Turkey); Uguz, Agah [Uludag Univ. (Turkey). Mechnical Engineering Dept.; Ertan, Rukiye

    2012-07-01

    The influence of welding parameters, namely welding current and gas flow rate, on the mechanical properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) welded 6063 Aluminum alloy (AA 6063) has been investigated. In order to study the effect of the welding current and gas flow rate, microstructural examination, hardness measurements and room temperature tensile tests have been carried out. The experimental results show that the mechanical properties of GTAW welded joints have better mechanical properties than those of SMAW welded joints. Increasing the welding current appeared to have a beneficial effect on the mechanical properties. However, either increasing or decreasing the gas flow rate resulted in a decrease of hardness and tensile strength. It was also found that, the highest strength was obtained in GTAW welded samples at 220 A and 15 l/min gas flow rate.

  15. Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing: Weld Optimization for Aluminum 6061, Development of Scarf Joints for Aluminum Sheet Metal, and Joining of High Strength Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcott, Paul J.

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a low temperature, solid-state manufacturing process that enables the creation of layered, solid metal structures with designed anisotropies and embedded materials. As a low temperature process, UAM enables the creation of active composites containing smart materials, components with embedded sensors, thermal management devices, and many others. The focus of this work is on the improvement and characterization of UAM aluminum structures, advancing the capabilities of ultrasonic joining into sheet geometries, and examination of dissimilar material joints using the technology. Optimized process parameters for Al 6061 were identified via a design of experiments study indicating a weld amplitude of 32.8 synum and a weld speed of 200 in/min as optimal. Weld force and temperature were not significant within the levels studied. A methodology of creating large scale builds is proposed, including a prescribed random stacking sequence and overlap of 0.0035 in. (0.0889 mm) for foils to minimize voids and maximize mechanical strength. Utilization of heat treatments is shown to significantly increase mechanical properties of UAM builds, within 90% of bulk material. The applied loads during the UAM process were investigated to determine the stress fields and plastic deformation induced during the process. Modeling of the contact mechanics via Hertzian contact equations shows that significant stress is applied via sonotrode contact in the process. Contact modeling using finite element analysis (FEA), including plasticity, indicates that 5000 N normal loads result in plastic deformation in bulk aluminum foil, while at 3000 N no plastic deformation occurs. FEA studies on the applied loads during the process, specifically a 3000 N normal force and 2000 N shear force, show that high stresses and plastic deformation occur at the edges of a welded foil, and base of the UAM build. Microstructural investigations of heat treated foils confirms

  16. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  17. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looi, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion a

  18. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A204. Aircraft Welding. Instructor Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on aircraft welding on airframes. The module contains four units that cover the following topics: (1) gas welding and cutting; (2) brazing and soldering; (3) shielded metal arc welding; and (4) gas tungsten arc welding. Each unit follows a standardized format…

  19. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looi, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion