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Sample records for weld metal structure

  1. Micro Structure and Hardness Analysis of Brass Metal Welded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukman Faris, N.; Muljadi; Djuhana

    2018-01-01

    Brass metals are widely used for plumbing fittings. High tensile brasses are more highly alloyed and find uses in marine engineering. The welding of brass metal has been done by using electrical weld machine (SMAW). The microstructure of brass metal welded was observed by optical microscope. The result can see that the microstructure has been changed due to heat from welding. The microstructure of original brass metal is seen a fine laminar stucture, but the microstructure at HAZ appears bigger grains and some area at HAZ is seen coarser microstructure. The microstructure at weld zone can be seen that it was found some of agglomeration of materials from reaction between brass metal and electrode coating wire. According the hardness measurement, it is found highest hardness value about 301.92 HV at weld zone, and hardness value at base metal is 177.84 HV

  2. The influence of electric ARC activation on the speed of heating and the structure of metal in welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savytsky Oleksandr M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research related to the impact of electric arc activation onto drive welding energy and metal weld heating speed. It is confirmed that ATIG and AMIG methods, depending on metal thickness, single pass weldability and chemical composition of activating flux, enable the reduction of welding energy by 2-6 times when compared to conventional welding methods. Additionally, these procedures create conditions to increase metal weld heating speed up to 1,500-5,500°C/s-1. Steel which can be rapidly heated, allows for a hardened structure to form (with carbon content up to 0.4%, together with a released martensitic structure or a mixture of bainitic-martensitic structures. Results of the research of effectiveness of ATIG and AMIG welding showed that increase in the penetration capability of electric arc, which increases welding productivity, is the visible side of ATIG and AMIG welding capabilities.

  3. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  4. Effect of weld metal chemistry and heat input on the structure and properties of duplex stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthupandi, V.; Bala Srinivasan, P.; Seshadri, S.K.; Sundaresan, S

    2003-10-15

    The excellent combination of strength and corrosion resistance in duplex stainless steels (DSS) is due to their strict composition control and microstructural balance. The ferrite-austenite ratio is often upset in DSS weld metals owing to the rapid cooling rates associated with welding. To achieve the desired ferrite-austenite balance and hence properties, either the weld metal composition and/or the heat input is controlled. In the current work, a low heat input process viz., EBW and another commonly employed process, gas tungsten-arc welding have been employed for welding of DSS with and without nickel enhancement. Results show that (i) chemical composition has got a greater influence on the ferrite-austenite ratio than the cooling rate, (ii) and even EBW which is considered an immature process in welding of DSS, can be employed provided means of filler addition could be devised.

  5. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Structural Integrity of Dissimilar Metal Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, R.; Das, G.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2018-06-01

    The structural integrity of dissimilar metal welded (DMW) joint consisting of low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel was examined by evaluating mechanical properties and metallurgical characteristics. INCONEL 82 and 182 were used as buttering and filler materials, respectively. Experimental findings were substantiated through thermomechanical simulation of the weld. During simulation, the effect of thermal state and stress distribution was pondered based on the real-time nuclear power plant environment. The simulation results were co-related with mechanical and microstructural characteristics. Material properties were varied significantly at different fusion boundaries across the weld line and associated with complex microstructure. During in-situ deformation testing in a scanning electron microscope, failure occurred through the buttering material. This indicated that microstructure and material properties synergistically contributed to altering the strength of DMW joints. Simulation results also depicted that the stress was maximum within the buttering material and made its weakest zone across the welded joint during service exposure. Various factors for the failure of dissimilar metal weld were analyzed. It was found that the use of IN 82 alloy as the buttering material provided a significant improvement in the joint strength and became a promising material for the fabrication of DMW joint.

  6. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Structural Integrity of Dissimilar Metal Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, R.; Das, G.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2018-03-01

    The structural integrity of dissimilar metal welded (DMW) joint consisting of low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel was examined by evaluating mechanical properties and metallurgical characteristics. INCONEL 82 and 182 were used as buttering and filler materials, respectively. Experimental findings were substantiated through thermomechanical simulation of the weld. During simulation, the effect of thermal state and stress distribution was pondered based on the real-time nuclear power plant environment. The simulation results were co-related with mechanical and microstructural characteristics. Material properties were varied significantly at different fusion boundaries across the weld line and associated with complex microstructure. During in-situ deformation testing in a scanning electron microscope, failure occurred through the buttering material. This indicated that microstructure and material properties synergistically contributed to altering the strength of DMW joints. Simulation results also depicted that the stress was maximum within the buttering material and made its weakest zone across the welded joint during service exposure. Various factors for the failure of dissimilar metal weld were analyzed. It was found that the use of IN 82 alloy as the buttering material provided a significant improvement in the joint strength and became a promising material for the fabrication of DMW joint.

  7. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  8. Welding abilities of UFG metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiński, Łukasz; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Olejnik, Lech; Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Fratini, Livan

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafine Grained (UFG) metals are characterized by an average grain size of welded joints with similar properties to the base of UFG material are crucial for the production of finished engineering components. Conventional welding methods based on local melting of the joined edges cannot be used due to the UFG microstructure degradation caused by the heat occurrence in the heat affected zone. Therefore, the possibility of obtaining UFG materials joints with different shearing plane (SP) positions by means of friction welded processes, which do not exceed the melting temperature during the process, should be investigated. The article focuses on the Linear Friction Welding (LFW) method, which belongs to innovative welding processes based on mixing of the friction-heated material in the solid state. LFW is a welding process used to joint bulk components. In the process, the friction forces work due to the high frequency oscillation and the pressure between the specimens is converted in thermal energy. Character and range of recrystallization can be controlled by changing LFW parameters. Experimental study on the welded UFG 1070 aluminum alloy by means of FLW method, indicates the possibility of reducing the UFG structure degradation in the obtained joint. A laboratory designed LFW machine has been used to weld the specimens with different contact pressure and oscillation frequency.

  9. New process for weld metal reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The industry-wide nature of weld cracking alerts one to the possibility that there is a fundamental law being overlooked. And in overlooking this law, industry is unable to counteract it. That law mandates that restraint during welding causes internal stress; internal stress causes weld metal to crack. Component restraint during welding, according to the welding standard, is the major cause of weld metal failures. When the metal working industry accepts this fact and begins to counter the effects of restraint, the number of weld failures experienced fall dramatically. Bonal Technologies, inc., of Detroit, has developed the first consistently effective non-thermal process to relieve stress caused by restraint during welding. Bonal's patented Mets-Lax sub-resonant stress relief acts as a restraint neutralizer when used during welding. Meta-Lax weld conditioning produces a finer more uniform weld grain structure. A finer, more uniform grain structure is a clear metallurgical indication of improved mechanical weld properties. Other benefits like less internal stress, and less warpage are also achieved

  10. Structural stability of super duplex stainless weld metals and its dependence on tungsten and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, J.O.; Wilson, A.; Huhtala, T.; Karlsson, L.; Jonsson, P.

    1996-01-01

    Three different superduplex stainless weld metals have been produced using manual metal arc welding under identical welding conditions. The concentration of the alloying elements tungsten and copper corresponded to the concentrations in commercial superduplex stainless steels (SDSS). Aging experiments in the temperature range 700 C to 1,110 C showed that the formation of intermetallic phase was enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal and also dissolved at higher temperatures compared with tungsten-poor and tungsten-free weld metals. It could be inferred from time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams produced in the present investigation that the critical cooling rate to avoid 1 wt pct of intermetallic phase was 2 times faster for tungsten-rich weld metal. Microanalysis in combination with thermodynamic calculations showed that tungsten was accommodated in χ phase, thereby decreasing the free energy. Experimental evidence supports the view that the formation of intermetallic phase is enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal, owing to easier nucleation of nonequilibrium χ phase compared with σ phase. The formation of secondary austenite (γ 2 ) during welding was modeled using the thermodynamic computer program Thermo-Calc. Satisfactory agreement between theory and practice was obtained. Thermo-Calc was capable of predicting observed lower concentrations of chromium and nitrogen in γ 2 compared with primary austenite. The volume fraction of γ 2 was found to be significantly higher in tungsten-rich and tungsten + copper containing weld metal. The results could be explained by a higher driving force for precipitation of γ 2 in these

  11. Structural stability of super duplex stainless weld metals and its dependence on tungsten and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J.-O.; Huhtala, T.; Jonsson, P.; Karlsson, L.; Wilson, A.

    1996-08-01

    Three different superduplex stainless weld metals have been produced using manual metal arc welding under identical welding conditions. The concentration of the alloying elements tungsten and copper corresponded to the concentrations in commercial superduplex stainless steels (SDSS). Aging experiments in the temperature range 700 °C to 1110 °C showed that the formation of intermetallic phase was enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal and also dissolved at higher temperatures compared with tungsten-poor and tungsten-free weld metals. It could be inferred from time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams produced in the present investigation that the critical cooling rate to avoid 1 wt pct of intermetallic phase was 2 times faster for tungsten-rich weld metal. Microanalysis in combination with thermodynamic calculations showed that tungsten was accommodated in χ phase, thereby decreasing the free energy. Experimental evidence supports the view that the formation of intermetallic phase is enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal, owing to easier nucleation of nonequilibrium χ phase compared with σ phase. The formation of secondary austenite (γ2) during welding was modeled using the thermodynamic computer program Thermo-Calc. Satisfactory agreement between theory and practice was obtained. Thermo-Calc was capable of predicting observed lower concentrations of chromium and nitrogen in γ2 compared with primary austenite. The volume fraction of γ2 was found to be significantly higher in tungsten-rich and tungsten + copper containing weld metal. The results could be explained by a higher driving force for precipitation of γ2 in these.

  12. Welding of a metal-polymer laminate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gower, H.L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the weldability of a metal polymer sandwich structure. The welding of the sandwich material proceeds first by welding of the skin layer. The material selected for this research is Steelite, a sandwich structure developed by Corus, with 0.12 mm thick mild

  13. Advanced fusion welding processes, solid state joining and a successful marriage. [production of aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    Joining processes for aerospace systems combine fusion welding and solid state joining during production of metal structures. Detailed characteristics of electron beam welding, plasma arc welding, diffusion welding, inertia welding and weldbond processes are discussed.

  14. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  15. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  16. Project of integrity assessment of flawed components with structural discontinuity (IAF). Data book for residual stress analysis in weld joint. Analysis model of dissimilar metal weld joint applied post weld heat treatment (PWHT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    The project of Integrity Assessment of Flawed Components with Structural Discontinuity (IAF) was entrusted to Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and started from FY 2001. And then, it was taken over to Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) which was established in October 2003 and carried out until FY 2007. In the IAF project, weld joints between nickel based alloys and low alloy steels around penetrations in reactor vessel, safe-end of nozzles and shroud supports were selected from among components and pipe arrangements in nuclear power plants, where high residual stresses were generated due to welding and complex structure. Residual stresses around of the weld joints were estimated by finite element analysis method (FEM) with a general modeling method, then the reasonability and the conservativeness was evaluated. In addition, for postulated surface crack of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), a simple calculation method of stress intensity factor (K) required to estimate the crack growth was proposed and the effectiveness was confirmed. JNES compiled results of the IAF project into Data Books of Residual Stress Analysis of Weld Joint, and Data Book of Simplified Stress Intensity Factor Calculation for Penetration of Reactor as typical Structure Discontinuity, respectively. Data Books of Residual Stress Analysis in Weld Joint. 1. Butt Weld Joint of Small Diameter Cylinder (4B Sch40) (JNES-RE-2012-0005), 2. Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint in Safe End (One-Side Groove Joint (JNES-RE-2012-0006), 3. Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint in Safe End (Large Diameter Both-Side Groove Joint) (JNES-RE-2012-0007), 4. Weld Joint around Penetrations in Reactor Vessel (Insert Joint) (JNES-RE-2012-0008), 5. Weld Joint in Shroud Support (H8, H9, H10 and H11 Welds) (JNES-RE-2012-0009), 6. Analysis Model of Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint Applied Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) (JNES-RE-2012-0010). Data Book of

  17. Metals welding by using laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qaisy, R.A.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work, same welding ''conduction limited type'' under atmospheric conditions was performed using pulsed Ng:YAG laser to weld; low carbon steel (LCS), stainless steel (304) (SUS304), stainless steel (303) (SUS303), and brass. Microstructure of welded zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and the laser energy on penetration depth and effective diameter were studied. Tensile test, micro-hardness, and surface roughness of welded and parent metals were also dealt with. Melting efficiency was worked out and an under vacuum seam welding of low carbon steel has been accomplished. Finally spot welding of aluminium tungsten, and platinium wires were employed using different layer energies. 34 tabs.; 82 figs.; 51 refs.; 1 app

  18. Micro-structure of Joints made of Dissimilar Metals using Explosion Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ramón Castillo-Matos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation is to establish the behaviour of the micro-structure of dissimilar joints made of titanium with AISI 1020, 1066 and 1008 steels through explosion welding. A detonation velocity of 2 800 m/s, a charge radius of 0,345 kg and a collision velocity of 1196, 16 m/s with an explosive volume of 600 cm3 and a density of 1,15 g/cm3 were considered. The microstructures obtained were composed of equiaxed ferrite grains, very fine grains of troostitic type and coarse grains with ferrite grid. Fine and aligned grains of ferrite type are observed in the casted area of both base materials. The metal hardness experienced an increase in samples from 120 HV AISI 1008 steel up to 250 HV for AISI 1066 steel. The AISI 1020 steel joint with titanium has an line shaped interface unlike the AISI 1008 steels with 4063 forms waves with uniform width, which provides a higher mechanical resistance associated with the ductility of the AISI 1008 steel.

  19. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  20. Examination of structure and mechanical properties of hard-to-weld metal joints obtained with the laser method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czujko, T.; Przetakiewicz, W.; Jozwiak, S.; Hoffman, J.; Kalita, W.

    1995-01-01

    Metal joints of stainless of type X6CrNiMoTi1722 (according to DIN) and high conductivity (HC) copper, and joints of transformer steel containing about 3.5% of silicon were obtained using metal sheets 2 mm in thickness. The microstructure and the distribution of microhardness in the area of the joint, and the changes of the strength and elongation caused by the process of laser welding were examined with reference to the properties of the native metal; and, in the case of transformer steel-joints, the effects of welding by means of the TIG method were also analyzed. A probable mechanism of the formation of the steel-copper joint was presented, the strength of which is comparable with that of copper. The superiority of laser welding over TIG welding was also demonstrated. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  1. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    Yurtisik,Koray; Tirkes,Suha; Dykhno,Igor; Gur,C. Hakan; Gurbuz,Riza

    2013-01-01

    Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex mi...

  2. Developments in welding and joining methods of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilarczyk, J.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of the welding technology on the economy development. The welding and joining methods review. The particular role of the laser welding and its interesting applications: with filler metal, twin spot laser welding, hybrid welding process, remote welding. The fiber lasers. The high intensity electron beams applications for surface modification. The TIG welding with the use of the active flux. Friction welding, friction stir welding and friction linear welding. (author)

  3. Mechanical and Microstructural Evaluation of DMAG Welding of Structural Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Mert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Double channel torch, which allows concentric flow of two different shielding gases, was designed and manufactured in order to pursue double channel torch gas metal arc welding of unalloyed structural steel S235JR (EN 10025-2 with fourteen passes. Tensile and Charpy V-notch tests were realized and the results were compared with those of conventional gas metal arc welding. In order to evaluate mechanical testing results, microstructural analyses were conducted. It was found that the increase with double channel gas metal arc welding process in yield and tensile strengths as well as in toughness tests, especially in subzero temperatures, compared with conventional gas metal arc welding was due to longer columnar grains and finer tempered zone grain structure between passes and due to solidification and less dendritic structure formation in all-weld metal in double channel gas metal arc welding.

  4. Finite element simulation of the welding process and structural behaviour of welded components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locci, J.M.; Rouvray, A. de; Barbe, B.; Poirier, J.

    1977-01-01

    In the field of inelastic analysis of nuclear metal structures, the computation of residual stresses in welds, and their effects on the strength of welded components is of major importance. This paper presents an experimentally checked finite element simulation with the general nonlinear program PAM NEP-D, of the electron beam welding of two thick hemispherical shells, and the behaviour of the welded sphere under various additional thermomechanical sollicitations. (Auth.)

  5. Two metals welded joints analysis. Specific problems and solution proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodson, F.; Launay, J.P.; Thomas, A.

    1983-03-01

    This paper summarizes the non destructive quality control of bimetallic welded joints on pipes and metallic structures of PWR type reactors (1300 MWe): radiographic and metrasonic failure detection, standardization and in service control processes [fr

  6. Fusion welding of thin metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aspects of fusion welding of thin metal foils are reviewed and the current techniques employed at LASL to join foils are described. Techniques for fusion welding approximately 0.025-mm-thick foils of copper, aluminum, and stainless steels have been developed using both electron beam and laser welding equipment. These techniques, together with the related aspects of joint design, tooling and fixturing, joint preparation, and modifications to the commercially available welding equipment, are included in the review. (auth)

  7. Structural, mechanical and corrosion studies of Cr-rich inclusions in 152 cladding of dissimilar metal weld joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Yang, Chengdong

    2018-01-01

    Cr-rich inclusions were discovered in 152 cladding at the inner wall of domestic dissimilar metal weld joint, and their morphologies, microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors were systematically characterized by SEM, TEM, nanoindentation and FIB. The results indicate that the Cr-rich inclusions originate from large-size Cr particles in 152 welding electrode flux, and they are 50-150 μm in size in most cases, and there is a continuous transition zone of 2-5 μm in width between the Cr inclusion core and 152 cladding matrix, and the transition zone consists of Ni & Fe-rich dendritic austenite and Cr23C6 and Cr matrix. The transition zone has the highest nanoindentation hardness (7.66 GPa), which is much harder than the inclusion core (5.14 GPa) and 152 cladding (3.71 GPa). In-situ microscopic tensile tests show that cracks initialize preferentially in transition zone, and then propagate into the inclusion core, and creep further into 152 cladding after penetrating the core area. The inclusion core and its transition zone both share similar oxide film structure with nickel-base 152 cladding matrix in simulated primary water, while those two parts present better general corrosion resistance than 152 cladding matrix due to higher Cr concentration.

  8. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken on...

  9. Weld metal grain refinement of aluminium alloy 5083 through controlled additions of Ti and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempp, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing BAM, Berlin (Germany). Div. ' ' Safety of Joined Components' ' ; Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany). Dept. ' ' Joining and Coating Technology' ' ; Schwenk, Christopher; Cross, Carl Edward [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The refinement of the weld metal grain structure may lead to a significant change in its mechanical properties and in the weldability of the base metal. One possibility to achieve weld metal grain refinement is the inoculation of the weld pool. In this study, it is shown how additions of titanium and boron influence the weld metal grain structure of GTA welds of the aluminium alloy 5083 (Al Mg4.5Mn0.7). For this purpose, inserts consisting of base metal and additions of the master alloy Al Ti5B1 have been cast, deposited in the base metal and fused in a GTA welding process. The increase of the Ti and B content led to a significant decrease of the weld metal mean grain size and to a change in grain shape. The results provide a basis for a more precise definition of the chemical composition of commercial filler wires and rods for aluminium arc welding. (orig.)

  10. Weld metal microstructures of hardfacing deposits produced by self-shielded flux-cored arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumovic, M.; Monaghan, B.J.; Li, H.; Norrish, J.; Dunne, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    The molten pool weld produced during self-shielded flux-cored arc welding (SSFCAW) is protected from gas porosity arising from oxygen and nitrogen by reaction ('killing') of these gases by aluminium. However, residual Al can result in mixed micro-structures of δ-ferrite, martensite and bainite in hardfacing weld metals produced by SSFCAW and therefore, microstructural control can be an issue for hardfacing weld repair. The effect of the residual Al content on weld metal micro-structure has been examined using thermodynamic modeling and dilatometric analysis. It is concluded that the typical Al content of about 1 wt% promotes δ-ferrite formation at the expense of austenite and its martensitic/bainitic product phase(s), thereby compromising the wear resistance of the hardfacing deposit. This paper also demonstrates how the development of a Schaeffler-type diagram for predicting the weld metal micro-structure can provide guidance on weld filler metal design to produce the optimum microstructure for industrial hardfacing applications.

  11. Mechanical behaviour of dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaravage, C.

    1990-01-01

    This report addresses the problems of dissimilar metal welds connecting an austenitic stainless steel component to a ferritic steel component. In LMFBRs such welds appear at the junction of the austenitic stainless steel vessel with the ferritic steel roof and in sodium and water or steam pipes. The latter are exposed to high temperatures in the creep range. A wide range of austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels (carbon steels, low allow steels and alloy steels) are covered; the study encompasses more than 20 different weld metals (austenitic stainless steels and nickel base alloys). The report begins with a presentation of the materials, geometries and welding procedures treated in the study, followed by a review of service experience from examinations of dissimilar metal welds after elevated temperature service, in particular failed welds. Results of laboratory tests performed for reproducing service failures are then discussed. A further section is devoted to a review of test results on fatigue behaviour and impact toughness for dissimilar metal welded joints when creep is not significant. Finally, the problem of residual life assessment is addressed. A set of recommendations concludes the report. They concern the material selection, welding procedure, life prediction and testing of dissimilar metal welds. 84 refs

  12. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  13. Structure/property relationships in multipass GMA welding of beryllium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, P. W. (Patrick W.); Hults, W. L. (William L.); Thoma, D. J. (Dan J.); Dave, V. R. (Vivek R.); Kelly, A. M. (Anna Marie); Pappin, P. A. (Pallas A.); Cola, M. J. (Mark J.); Burgardt, P. (Paul)

    2001-01-01

    Beryllium is an interesting metal that has a strength to weight ratio six times that of steel. Because of its unique mechanical properties, beryllium is used in aerospace applications such as satellites. In addition, beryllium is also used in x-ray windows because it is nearly transparent to x-rays. Joining of beryllium has been studied for decades (Ref.l). Typically joining processes include braze-welding (either with gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc), soldering, brazing, and electron beam welding. Cracking which resulted from electron beam welding was recently studied to provide structure/property relationships in autogenous welds (Ref. 2). Braze-welding utilizes a welding arc to melt filler, and only a small amount of base metal is melted and incorporated into the weld pool. Very little has been done to characterize the braze-weld in terms of the structure/property relationships, especially with reference to multipass welding. Thus, this investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effects of multiple passes on microstructure, weld metal composition, and resulting material properties for beryllium welded with aluminum-silicon filler metal.

  14. Discontinuity Detection in the Shield Metal Arc Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocota, José Alberto Naves; Garcia, Gabriel Carvalho; da Costa, Adilson Rodrigues; de Lima, Milton Sérgio Fernandes; Rocha, Filipe Augusto Santos; Freitas, Gustavo Medeiros

    2017-05-10

    This work proposes a new methodology for the detection of discontinuities in the weld bead applied in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processes. The detection system is based on two sensors-a microphone and piezoelectric-that acquire acoustic emissions generated during the welding. The feature vectors extracted from the sensor dataset are used to construct classifier models. The approaches based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers are able to identify with a high accuracy the three proposed weld bead classes: desirable weld bead, shrinkage cavity and burn through discontinuities. Experimental results illustrate the system's high accuracy, greater than 90% for each class. A novel Hierarchical Support Vector Machine (HSVM) structure is proposed to make feasible the use of this system in industrial environments. This approach presented 96.6% overall accuracy. Given the simplicity of the equipment involved, this system can be applied in the metal transformation industries.

  15. Structural integrity and fatigue crack propagation life assessment of welded and weld-repaired structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah

    2005-11-01

    Structural integrity is the science and technology of the margin between safety and disaster. Proper evaluation of the structural integrity and fatigue life of any structure (aircraft, ship, railways, bridges, gas and oil transmission pipelines, etc.) is important to ensure the public safety, environmental protection, and economical consideration. Catastrophic failure of any structure can be avoided if structural integrity is assessed and necessary precaution is taken appropriately. Structural integrity includes tasks in many areas, such as structural analysis, failure analysis, nondestructive testing, corrosion, fatigue and creep analysis, metallurgy and materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue life assessment, welding metallurgy, development of repairing technologies, structural monitoring and instrumentation etc. In this research fatigue life assessment of welded and weld-repaired joints is studied both in numerically and experimentally. A new approach for the simulation of fatigue crack growth in two elastic materials has been developed and specifically, the concept has been applied to butt-welded joint in a straight plate and in tubular joints. In the proposed method, the formation of new surface is represented by an interface element based on the interface potential energy. This method overcomes the limitation of crack growth at an artificial rate of one element length per cycle. In this method the crack propagates only when the applied load reaches the critical bonding strength. The predicted results compares well with experimental results. The Gas Metal Arc welding processes has been simulated to predict post-weld distortion, residual stresses and development of restraining forces in a butt-welded joint. The effect of welding defects and bi-axial interaction of a circular porosity and a solidification crack on fatigue crack propagation life of butt-welded joints has also been investigated. After a weld has been repaired, the specimen was tested in a universal

  16. Laser spot welding of cobalt-based amorphous metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runchev, Dobre; Dorn, Lutc; Jaferi, Seifolah; Purbst, Detler

    1997-01-01

    The results concerning weldability of amorphous alloy (VAC 6025F) in shape of foils and the quality of laser-spot welded joints are presented in this paper. The aim of the research was the production of a high quality welding joint, by preserving the amorphous structure. The quality of the joint was tested by shear strength analysis and microhardness measuring. The metallographic studies were made by using optical microscope and SEM. The results show that (1) overlapped Co based amorphous metals foils can be welded with high-quality by a pulsed Nd: YAG-Laser, but only within a very narrow laser parameter window; (2) the laser welded spots show comparably high strength as the basic material; (3) the structure of the welded spot remains amorphous, so that the same characteristics as the base material can be achieved. (author)

  17. Weld metal design data for 316L(N)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atoique, CEA, Saclay (France)

    2007-07-01

    This paper extends the ITER materials properties documentations to weld metal types 316L, 19-12-2 and 16-8-2, used for welding of Type 316L(N), i.e. the structural material retained for manufacturing of ITER main components such as the vacuum vessel. The data presented include those of the low temperature (316L) and high temperature (19-12-2) grades, as well as, the more readily available grade (16-8-2). Weld metal properties data for all three grades are collected, sorted and analyzed according to the French design and construction rules for nuclear components (RCC-MR). Particular attention is paid to the type of weld metal (e.g. wire for TIG, covered electrode for manual arc, flux wire for automatic welding), and the type and the position of welding. Design allowables are derived for each category of weld and compared with those of the base metal. The data sheets established for each physical and mechanical properties follow the presentation established for the ITER Materials Properties Handbook (MPH). They are part of the documentation that when combined with codification and inspection documents should satisfy ITER licensing needs. In most cases, the analyses performed, go beyond conventional analyses required in present international codes and pay attention to specific needs of ITER. These include, possible effects of exposures to high temperatures during various manufacturing stages e.g. HIPing, and effects of irradiation at low and medium temperatures. In general, it is noticed that all three weld metals satisfy the RCC-MR requirements, provided compositions and types of welds used correspond to those specified in RCC-MR. (orig.)

  18. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  19. Investigation on mechanical properties of welded material under different types of welding filler (shielded metal arc welding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Abdullah Mohd; Lair, Noor Ajian Mohd; Wei, Foo Jun

    2018-05-01

    The Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) is (or the Stick welding) defined as a welding process, which melts and joins metals with an arc between a welding filler (electrode rod) and the workpieces. The main objective was to study the mechanical properties of welded metal under different types of welding fillers and current for SMAW. This project utilized the Design of Experiment (DOE) by adopting the Full Factorial Design. The independent variables were the types of welding filler and welding current, whereas the other welding parameters were fixed at the optimum value. The levels for types of welding filler were by the models of welding filler (E6013, E7016 and E7018) used and the levels for welding current were 80A and 90A. The responses were the mechanical properties of welded material, which include tensile strength and hardness. The experiment was analyzed using the two way ANOVA. The results prove that there are significant effects of welding filler types and current levels on the tensile strength and hardness of the welded metal. At the same time, the ANOVA results and interaction plot indicate that there are significant interactions between the welding filler types and the welding current on both the hardness and tensile strength of the welded metals, which has never been reported before. This project found that when the amount of heat input with increase, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and hardness decrease. The optimum tensile strength for welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7016 and the optimum of hardness of welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7018 at welding current of 80A.

  20. Welding of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, many bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials with high specific strength, hardness and superior corrosion resistance have been developed and the maximum thickness of some Zr-based BMGs have reached several tenths of millimeters. Nevertheless, homogeneous glassy BMGs are not thick enough to be used for structural applications. In order to extend the engineering applications of BMG materials, BMG welding technologies needed to be developed. Specifically, the welding technologies of dissimilar materials such as BMG materials to crystalline alloys are to be developed. The functional use of the specific properties of each material in dissimilar material combination provides flexible design possibilities for products. In this project electron beam welding is employed to join BMG with BMG of different composition as well as with different crystalline materials (i.e. Hastealoy C-276, Inconel-625 and pure Ti metal). Defects free weld joint was achieved in BMG-BMG welding. Some cracks were produced in melt zone of BMG-Ti and BMG-Hastealoy C-276 welding while at joint they fuse properly with BMG. Inconel-625 could not properly weld with BMG. In all cases, hardness of melt zone was found to be higher than the base metals and the heat affected zone (HAZ). (author)

  1. Electron beam welding of dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, G.; Lison, R.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-three two-memeber combinations of dissimilar metals were electron beam welded as square-groove butt joints in 0.08 and 0.12 in. sheet material. Many joints were ''braze welded'' by offsetting the electron beam about 0.02 in. from the butt joint to achieve fusion of the lower melting point metal, but no significant fusion of the other member of the pair. The welds were evaluated by visual and metallographic examination, transverse tensile tests, and bend tests. The welds Ag/Al, Ag/Ni15Cr7Fe, Cu/Ni15Cr7Fe, Cu/V, Cu20Ni/Ni15Cr7Fe, Fe18Cr8Ni/Ni, Fe18Cr8Ni/Ni15Cr7Fe, Nb/Ti, Nb/V, Ni/Ni15Cr7Fe, and Cb/V10Ti were readily welded and weld properties were excellent. Others which had only minor defects included the Ag/Cu20Ni, Ag/Ti, Ag/V, Cu/Fe18Cr8Ni, Cu/V10Ti, Cu20Ni/Fe18Cr8Ni, and Ti/Zr2Sn welds. The Cu/Ni weld had deep undercut, but was in other respects excellent. The mechanical properties of the Ag/Fe18Cr8Ni weld were poor, but the defect could probably be corrected. Difficulty with cracking was experienced with the Al/Ni and Fe18Cr8Ni/V welds, but sound welds had excellent mechanical properties. The remaining welds Al-Cu, Al/Cu20Ni, Al/Fe18Cr8Ni, Al/Ni15Cr7Fe, Cu20Ni/V, Cu20Ni/V10Ti, Cb/Zr2Sn, Ni/Ti, Ni15Cr7Fe/V, Ni15Cr7Fe/V10Ti, and Ti/V were unsuccessful, due to brittle phases, primarily at the weld metal-base metal interface. In addition to the two-member specimens, several joints were made by buttering. Longitudinal weld specimens of the three-member combination Al/Ni/Fe18Cr8Ni and the five member combination Fe18Cr8Ni/V/Cb/Ti/Zr2Sn showed good tensile strength and satisfactory elongation. 6 tables, 16 figures

  2. Crack initiation and growth in welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assire, A.

    2000-01-01

    This work concerns the remaining life assessment of a structure containing initial defects of manufacturing. High temperature crack initiation and growth are studied for austenitic stainless steels, and defect assessment methods are improved in order to take into account welded structures. For these one, the probability to have a defect is significant. Two kinds of approaches are commonly used for defect assessment analysis. Fracture mechanics global approach with an energetic criterion, and local approach with a model taking into account the physical damage mechanism. For both approaches mechanical fields (stress and strain) have to be computed everywhere within the structure. Then, Finite Element computation is needed. The first part of the thesis concerns the identification of non linear kinematic and isotropic constitutive models. A pseudo-analytical method is proposed for a 'Two Inelastic Strain' model. This method provides a strategy of identification with a mechanical meaning, and this enables to associate each parameter to a physical phenomenon. Existing identifications are improved for cyclic plasticity and creep on a large range of stress levels. The second part concerns high temperature crack initiation and growth in welded structures. Finite Element analysis on plate and tube experimental configuration enable to understand the phenomenons of interaction between base metal and weld metal under mechanical and thermal loading. Concerning global approach, criteria based on C* parameter (Rice integral for visco-plasticity) are used. Finite Element computations underline the fact that for a defect located in the weld metal, C* values strongly depend on the base metal creep strain rate, because widespread visco-plasticity is located in both metals. A simplified method, based on the reference stress approach, is proposed and validated with Finite Element results. Creep crack growth simplified assessment is a quite good validation of the experimental results

  3. The tensile properties of austenitic steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Elevated temperature tensile data on Mo containing and Mo free austenitic weld metals have been collected from French, German and UK sources and the results analysed. In the as welded condition the proof strength is significantly higher than that of wrought material and Mo containing weld metal is stronger than Mo free weld metal. The differences in UTS values are not so marked, and on average at temperatures above 400 0 the weld metal UTS is slightly lower than that of wrought material. The ductility of weld metal is significantly lower than that for wrought material. 7 refs, 2 tables, 20 figs

  4. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z; Lucas, M

    2012-01-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  5. Nanoconstruction by welding individual metallic nanowires together using nanoscale solder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y; Inkson, B J; Cullis, A G

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a new bottom-up nanowelding technique enabling building blocks to be assembled and welded together into complex 3D nanostructures using nanovolumes of metal solder. The building blocks of gold nanowires, (Co 72 Pt 28 /Pt) n multilayer nanowires, and nanosolder Sn 99 Au 1 alloy nanowires were successfully fabricated by a template technique. Individual metallic nanowires were picked up and assembled together. Conductive nanocircuits were then welded together using similar or dissimilar nanosolder material. At the weld sites, nanoscale volumes of a chosen metal are deposited using nanosolder of a sacrificial nanowire, which ensures that the nanoobjects to be bonded retain their structural integrity. The whole nanowelding process is clean, controllable and reliable, and ensures both mechanically strong and electrically conductive contacts.

  6. Welding of dissimilar metals by CO2 lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garciandia, F.; Zubiri, F.; Etayo, J.L.; Cervantes, R.; Iriberri, I.

    1998-01-01

    The work carried out in CETENASA (laser department) in order to weld dissimilar metals is summarized. The involved metallic pair is M-35 and F-143, a high speed steel and a spring steel, respectively. Looking at the chemical composition of the involved alloys that will appear later, it can be easily understood the difficulty to obtain welded parts with structures metallurgically acceptable because of the high cracking degree that these materials show, specially M-35. The principles of a study which is being developed in the authors laboratory and which shows some interesting CO 2 laser possibilities are presented. (Author) 2 refs

  7. Effect of welding structure and δ-ferrite on fatigue properties for TIG welded austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio; Saito, Masahiro; Hirayama, Yoshiaki

    2000-04-01

    High-cycle and low-cycle fatigue properties of base and weld metals for SUS304L and SUS316L and the effects of welding structure and δ-ferrite on fatigue properties were investigated at cryogenic temperatures in order to evaluate the long-life reliability of the structural materials to be used in liquid hydrogen supertankers and storage tanks and to develop a welding process for these applications. The S-N curves of the base and weld metals shifted towards higher levels, i.e., the longer life side, with decreasing test temperatures. High-cycle fatigue tests demonstrated the ratios of fatigue strength at 10 6 cycles to tensile strength of the weld metals to be 0.35-0.7, falling below those of base metals with decreasing test temperatures. Fatigue crack initiation sites in SUS304L weld metals were mostly at blowholes with diameters of 200-700 μm, and those of SUS316L weld metals were at weld pass interface boundaries. Low-cycle fatigue tests revealed the fatigue lives of the weld metals to be somewhat lower than those of the base metals. Although δ-ferrite reduces the toughness of austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures, the effects of δ-ferrite on high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue properties are not clear or significant.

  8. Influence of weld discontinuities on strain controlled fatigue behavior of 308 stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Valsan, M.; Sandhya, R.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed investigations have been performed for assessing the importance of weld discontinuities in strain controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 308 stainless steel (SS) welds. The LCF behavior of 308 SS welds containing defects was compared with that of type 304 SS base material and 308 SS sound weld metal. Weld pads were prepared by shielded metal arc welding process. Porosity and slag inclusions were introduced deliberately into the weld metal by grossly exaggerating the conditions normally causing such defects. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests have been conducted in air at 823 K on type 304 SS base and 308 SS sound weld metal employing strain amplitudes in the range from ±0.25 to ±0.8 percent. A single strain amplitude of ±0.25 percent was used for all the tests conducted on weld samples containing defects. The results indicated that the base material undergoes cyclic hardening whereas sound and defective welds experience cyclic softening. Base metal showed higher fatigue life than sound weld metal at all strain amplitudes. The presence of porosity and slag inclusions in the weld metal led to significant reduction in life. Porosity on the specimen surface has been found to be particularly harmful and caused a reduction in life by a factor of seven relative to sound weld metal

  9. Assessing mechanical properties of the dissimilar metal welding between P92 steels and alloy 617 at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, J. H.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, T. M.; Bae, D. H. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, W. B. [Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Han, J. W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hoseo University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, a new welding technology of dissimilar materials, Cr-based P92 steels and Ni-based Alloy 617 is introduced and demonstrated to investigate its reliability. Firstly, multi-pass dissimilar metal welding between P92 steel and Alloy 617 was performed using DCEN TIG welding technology, buttering welding technique and a narrow gap groove. After welding, in order to understand characteristics of the dissimilar metal welds, metallurgical micro-structures analysis by optical observation and static tensile strength assessment of the dissimilar welded joints were conducted at 700°C.

  10. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  11. Investigation of fracture in pressurized gas metal arc welded beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiple, C.R.; Merlini, R.J.; Adams, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    Premature failures during proof testing of pressurized-gas-metal-arc (PGMA) welded beryllium assemblies were investigated. The failures were almost entirely within the beryllium (a forming grade, similar to HP-10 or S-240), close to and parallel to the weld interface. The aluminum-silicon weld filler metal deposit was not centered in the weld groove in the failed assemblies, and failure occurred on the side of the weld opposite the bias in the weld deposit. Tensile tests of welded samples demonstrated that the failures were unrelated to residual machining damage from cutting the weld groove, and indicated small lack-of-fusion areas near the weld start to be the most likely origin of the failures. Acoustic emission was monitored during tensile tests of the welds. The majority of acoustic emission was probably from crack propagation through the weld filler metal. Tensile bars cut from the region of the weld start behaved differently; they failed at lower loads and exhibited an acoustic emission behavior believed to be from cracking in the weld metal-beryllium interface. Improvement in the quality of these and similar beryllium welds can therefore most likely be made by centering the weld deposit and reducing the size of the weld start defect. 21 fig

  12. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  13. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2 0 K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2 0 K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness

  14. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  15. A numerical model for cold welding of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    1996-01-01

    at the weld interface. Accordingly, the general model for bond strength in cold welding earlier developed by Bay has been extended and modified. The new model presented in this paper simulates the whole cold welding process including the deformation of base metals and the establishment of welds bonding......Based on experimental investigations of cold welding of different metal combinations applying various surface preparation methods, the understanding of the mechanisms of bond formation in cold welding has been improved by introducing two parameters representing the properties of surface layers...... similar as well as dissimilar metals The calculated bond strengths are verified by comparing with experimental measurements....

  16. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: camilarezende.cr@gmail.com, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: vladimirsoler@hotmail.com, E-mail: ahfv02@outlook.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  17. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G.

    2017-01-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  18. Mechanical behaviour of cracked welded structures including mismatch effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornet, P.

    2002-01-01

    The most important parameters for predicting more precisely the fracture behaviour of welded structures have been identified. In particular, the plasticity development at the crack tip in the ligament appeared as a major parameter to evaluate the yield load of such a complex structure. In this way defect assessments procedures have been developed or modified to take into account the mismatch effect that is to say the mechanical properties of the different material constituting the weld joint. This paper is a synthesis of the work done in the past at Electricite de France on this topic in regards with other work done in France or around the World. The most important parameters which control the plasticity development at the crack tip and so mainly influence the fracture behaviour of welded structures are underlined: the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the ligament size and the weld width. Moreover, commonly used fracture toughness testing procedures developed in case of homogeneous specimens cannot be used in a straight forward manner and so has to be modified to take into account the mismatch effect. Number or defect assessment procedures taking into account the mismatch effect by considering the yield load of the welded structure are shortly described. Then, the 'Equivalent Material Method' developed at EDF which allows a good prediction of the applied J-Integral at the crack tip is more detailed. This procedure includes not only both weld and base metal yield strength, the structure geometry, the crack size and the weld dimension using the yield load of the real structures but also includes the effect of both weld and base metal strain hardening exponents. Some validations of this method are proposed. Finally, the ability of finite element modelling to predict the behaviour of such welded structures is demonstrated by modelling real experiments: crack located in the middle of

  19. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  20. Endplug Welding Techniques developed for SFR Metallic Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Soo Sung; Woo, Yoon Myeng; Kim, Hyung Tae; Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2013-01-01

    In Korea, the R and D on SFR has been begun since 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R and D programs. The international collaborative research is under way on fuel developments within Advanced Fuel Project for Gen-IV SFR with the closed fuel cycle of full actinide recycling, while TRU bearing metallic fuel, U-TRU-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel elements, the endplug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of endplug to cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the welding technique, welding equipment, welding conditions and parameters were developed to make SFR metallic fuel elements. The TIG welding technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed. And the optimal welding conditions and parameters were also established. In order to make SFR metallic fuel elements, the welding technique, welding equipment, welding conditions and parameters were developed. The TIG welding technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed. And the optimal welding conditions and parameters were also established

  1. Endplug Welding Techniques developed for SFR Metallic Fuel Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Soo Sung; Woo, Yoon Myeng; Kim, Hyung Tae; Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Ki Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In Korea, the R and D on SFR has been begun since 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R and D programs. The international collaborative research is under way on fuel developments within Advanced Fuel Project for Gen-IV SFR with the closed fuel cycle of full actinide recycling, while TRU bearing metallic fuel, U-TRU-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel elements, the endplug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of endplug to cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the welding technique, welding equipment, welding conditions and parameters were developed to make SFR metallic fuel elements. The TIG welding technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed. And the optimal welding conditions and parameters were also established. In order to make SFR metallic fuel elements, the welding technique, welding equipment, welding conditions and parameters were developed. The TIG welding technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed. And the optimal welding conditions and parameters were also established.

  2. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  3. Influence of nickel and nitrogen on the structure workability and mechanical properties of weld-deposited high-chromium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasavchikov, V.A.; Solov'eva, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of investigation into the effect of austenite-forming elements (nitrogen and nickel) on the structure, mechanical properties and workability durina weld deposition and on the hardness after heat treatment of the Kh32N8M2 alloy forming the sigma-phase. Nitrogen is stated to produce a stronger effect on the improvement of the workability at a minimum decrease in the hardness of the alloy being investigated. Changes in the mechanical properties and workability of the alloy are shown to take place at the expense of changes in the structural components, the austenite quantity in the structure as well as its arrangement and form being the determining factors. The effect of nickel- and nitrogen content on the sigma-phase formation is less noticeable as compared with their effect on austenization. It should be taken into account that in case of nickel and nitrogen alloying an essential part of nitrogen is bound in chromium nitrides, that is why a decrease in the alloy hardness under heat treatment is less noticeable with growing nitrogen concentration

  4. Hybrid Laser Welding of Large Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhi, Farhang

    Manufacturing of large steel structures requires the processing of thick-section steels. Welding is one of the main processes during the manufacturing of such structures and includes a significant part of the production costs. One of the ways to reduce the production costs is to use the hybrid...... laser welding technology instead of the conventional arc welding methods. However, hybrid laser welding is a complicated process that involves several complex physical phenomena that are highly coupled. Understanding of the process is very important for obtaining quality welds in an efficient way....... This thesis investigates two different challenges related to the hybrid laser welding of thick-section steel plates. Employing empirical and analytical approaches, this thesis attempts to provide further knowledge towards obtaining quality welds in the manufacturing of large steel structures....

  5. The stress rupture properties of austenitic steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    Elevated temperature stress rupture data on Mo containing and Mo free austenitic weld metals have been collected from French, Dutch, German and UK sources and the results analysed. The stress rupture strength of Mo containing weld metal is significantly higher than that of Mo free weld metal. At 10,000h the rupture strength of Mo containing weld metal is higher than that of Type 316 steel whereas the Mo free weld metal is about 20% lower than that of Type 304 steel. Austenitic weld metal can give low stress rupture ductility values. It is concluded that there are insufficient data to permit reliable extrapolations to long times and it is recommended that long term tests are performed to overcome this situation

  6. Assessment of cracking in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, Anders; Norrgaard, K.; Lagerstroem, J.; Embring, G.; Tice, D.R.

    2001-08-01

    During the refueling in 2000, indications were observed by non-destructive testing at four locations in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzle to safe end weld in Ringhals 4. All indications were confined to the outlet nozzle (hotleg) oriented at 25 deg, a nozzle with documented repair welding. Six boat samples were removed from the four locations, and the samples were subsequently subjected to a metallographic examination. The objectives were to establish the fracture morphology, and if possible the root cause for cracking. The examination revealed that cracks were present at all four boat sample locations and that they all were confined to the weld metal, alloy 182. Cracking extended in the axial direction of the safe-end. There was no evidence of any cracks extending into the RPV-steel, or the stainless steel safe-end. All cracking was interdendritic and significantly branched. Among others, these observations strongly suggested crack propagation mainly was caused by interdendritic stress corrosion cracking. In addition, crack type defects and isolated areas on the fracture surfaces suggested the presence of hot cracking, which would have been formed during fabrication. The reason for crack initiation could not be established based on the boat samples examined. However, increased stress levels due to repair welding, cold work from grinding, and defects produced during fabrication, e. g. hot cracks, may alone or in combination have contributed to crack initiation

  7. Structure of Ti-6Al-4V nanostructured titanium alloy joint obtained by resistance spot welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenov, V. A., E-mail: klimenov@tpu.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Kurgan, K. A., E-mail: kirill-k2.777@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Chumaevskii, A. V., E-mail: tch7av@gmail.com [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/4 Akademicheskii pr., Tomsk, 634021 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, A. A., E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Gnyusov, S. F., E-mail: gnusov@rambler.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The structure of weld joints of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V in the initial ultrafine-grained state, obtained by resistance spot welding, is studied using the optical and scanning electron microscopy method and the X-ray structure analysis. The carried out studies show the relationship of the metal structure in the weld zone with main joint zones. The structure in the core zone and the heat affected zone is represented by finely dispersed grains of needle-shaped martensite, differently oriented in these zones. The change in the microhardness in the longitudinal section of the weld joint clearly correlates with structural changes during welding.

  8. 16-8-2 weld metal design data for 316L(N) steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.-A.F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: tavassoli@cea.fr

    2008-12-15

    ITER materials properties documentation is extended to weld metals used for welding Type 316L(N) steel, i.e. the structural material retained for manufacturing ITER major components, such as the vacuum vessel. The data presented here are mainly for the Type 16-8-2 and complete those already reported for the low temperature (Type 316L) and the high temperature (Type 19-12-2) filler metals. The weld metal properties data for Type 16-8-2 filler metal and its joints are collected, sorted and analysed according to the French design and construction rules for nuclear components (RCC-MR). Particular attention is paid to the type of weld metal (e.g. wire for TIG, covered electrode for manual arc, flux wire for automatic welding), as well as, to the weld geometry and welding position. Design allowables are derived from validated data for each category of weld and compared with those of the base metal. In most cases, the analyses performed are extended beyond the conventional analyses required for codes to cover specific needs of ITER. These include effects of exposures to high temperature cycles during component fabrication, e.g. HIPing and low dose neutron irradiation at low and medium temperatures. The ITER Materials Properties Handbook (MPH) is, here, enriched with files for physical and mechanical properties of Type 16-8-2 weld metal. These files, combined with the codification and inspection files, are part of the documentation required for ITER licensing needs. They show that all three weld-metals satisfy the code requirements, provided compositions and types of welds used correspond to those specified in RCC-MR.

  9. Structure of Fe-Ni-Cr steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratukhin, A.G.; Maslenkov, S.B.; Logunov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Properties of a welded joint depend on the structure of metal of the joint and near the joint areas subjected to thermal effect in the process of welding. The well-known phenomena, accompanying the welding (grain growth in near the joint area, intergrain slip, stressed state related to crystallization and rapid cooling), as well as certain other processes, which have been insufficiently studied either due to their poor pronouncement or owing to imperfection of the equipment and methods employed, were analyzed, as applied to stainless hihg-strength Fe-Ni-Cr steels

  10. Phased array ultrasonic testing of dissimilar metal pipe weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajeev, J.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Sharma, Govind K; Joseph, A.; Purnachandra Rao, B.

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joints made of stainless steel and ferritic steel is used in nuclear industries as well as oil and gas industries. These joints are prone to frequent failures which makes the non-destructive testing of dissimilar metal weld joints utmost important for reliable and safe operation of nuclear power plants and oil and gas industries. Ultrasonic inspection of dissimilar metal weld joints is still challenging due to the inherent anisotropic and highly scattering nature. Phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) is an advanced technique and its capability has not been fully explored for the inspection of dissimilar metal welds

  11. The fracture toughness of Type 316 steel and weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picker, C.

    This paper describes the results of fracture toughness tests on Type 316 steel and Manual Metal Arc (MMA) weld metal over a range of temperatures from 20 deg. C to 550 deg. C, and includes the effects on toughness of specimen size, post weld heat treatment and thermal ageing. The conclusions reached are that Type 316 steel possesses a superior toughness to the weld metal in the as-welded or stress relieved conditions but the toughness of the steel is degraded to a level similar to that of the weld metal following thermal ageing at temperatures over 600 deg. C. Relatively short term thermal ageing in the temperature range 370 deg. C to 450 deg. C does not appear to affect the toughness of either Type 316 steel or weld metal. (author)

  12. Welding of CuZr-based metallic glasses on air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batalha, W.; Gargarella, P.; Kiminami, C.S.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass alloys have been studied aiming at its exceptional mechanical properties. This alloys processing's requires high cooling rates, which diminishes the sample's size. There by welding these samples without the loss of amorphous structure is a good alternative. The DEMa group has developed a technique based on Joule effect heating. By applying pressure and electric current, reaching temperatures of super cold liquids (the temperature between crystallizing and vitric transition), the vitric metal has it’s viscosity reduced and sample binding occur. The objective of this paper was to weld samples of cylindrical geometry of 2 and 3 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length of the compositions Cu46Zr42Al7Y5 and (Cu47Zr45Al8)98Y2. The process was done using 2 copper electrodes under(over) argon flux. The samples were later analysed by microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X ray diffraction. The results showed that this kind of welding process is possible since crystal formation on the welding region did not occur and there were no faults like cracks or porosity. (author)

  13. Microstructure and toughness of ferritic weld metal of hyperbaric welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, L.

    1988-01-01

    In the present work ferritic weld metals of hyperbaric MIG/MAG welds with pressures up to 100 bar were examined. As a result of the pressure, interactions with the shielding gas, the filler metal as well as with the welding parameters had to be expected and were consequently included in the analysis. Investigation was focused on the influence of these parameters on the chemical composition of the weld metals, the microstructure and toughness behaviour, including fracture mechanics test. Using quantitative microstructural analysis as well as fractography a correlation between microstructure and toughness has been shown. (orig.) [de

  14. Metal Droplet Formation in Gas Metal Arc Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidar, J.

    2000-01-01

    A two-dimensional dynamic treatment has been developed for description of arc and electrode properties in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The theory is a unified treatment of the arc the welding wire anode and the cathode, and includes a detailed account of sheath effects near the anode. The wire anode is included as a dynamic entity and the volume of fluid method is used to handle the movement of the free surface of the molten metal at the tip of the wire, accounting for effects of surface tension, inertia, gravity, arc pressure, viscous drag force of the plasma, magnetic forces and Marangoni effect, and also for the effects of wire feed rate in GMAW. Results of calculations made for a mild steel wire of diameter 0.16 cm are in good agreement with experimental measurements of droplet diameter and droplet detachment frequency at currents between 150 and 330 A, which includes the transition between ''globular'' and ''spray'' transfer. Quantitative predictions are also made of the amount of metal vapour that is generated from the welding droplets at the tip of the welding wire. (author)

  15. Nano-structureal and nano-chemical analysis of Ni-based alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2012-01-01

    The dissimilar metal joints welded between Ni-based alloy, Alloy 690 and low alloy steel, A533 Gr. B with Alloy 152 filler metal were characterized by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, secondary ion mass spectrometry and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. It was found that in the weld root region, the weld was divided into several regions including unmixed zone in Ni-base alloy, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. The result of nanostructural and nanochemical analyses in this study showed the non-homogeneous distribution of elements with higher Fe but lower Mn, Ni and Cr in A533 Gr. B compared with Alloy 152, and the precipitation of carbides near the fusion boundary.

  16. Nano-structureal and nano-chemical analysis of Ni-based alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The dissimilar metal joints welded between Ni-based alloy, Alloy 690 and low alloy steel, A533 Gr. B with Alloy 152 filler metal were characterized by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, secondary ion mass spectrometry and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. It was found that in the weld root region, the weld was divided into several regions including unmixed zone in Ni-base alloy, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. The result of nanostructural and nanochemical analyses in this study showed the non-homogeneous distribution of elements with higher Fe but lower Mn, Ni and Cr in A533 Gr. B compared with Alloy 152, and the precipitation of carbides near the fusion boundary.

  17. Welding of structural components and vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    'Welding of structural components and vessels' was chosen as the guiding topic for the 17th special conference in Munich so that current problems of this important area of application for welding engineering could be discussed in detail. The following topics were in the focus of the discussions: developments in steel, steel production and steel processing, reports on the practical application of welding in the manufacture of containers and pipes, quality assurance, product liability, safety considerations regarding creep-stressed components, problems of welding in large structures. 7 of the total number of 12 contributions were recorded separately for the data base ENERGY. (orig./MM) [de

  18. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  19. The effect of flux on properties of weld in submerged arc welding with filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattahpour, Iran.

    1984-01-01

    In the submerged-arc welding, the electrode wire is shielded by a blanket of granular fusible material called a flux. This granular material, flux, must ensure the deposition of weld metal of given chemical composition and specified mechanical properties. The flux must also ensure stable burning of the welding arc and contribute to the formation of a dense weld of required shape and size, and free from pores, cracks and slag inclusions. As the deposited molten metal solidifies, the flux must form a slag crust, easily separable from the surface of the weld. This material must be of a certain chemical composition and possess definite physical properties, such as melting point, viscosity, bulk weight. The chemical composition of the flux is chosen, depending on the composition of the welded metal and electrode wire used. (Author)

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Metal Active Gas (MAG) Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model for MAG (metal active gas) arc welding of thin plate has been developed. In MAG arc welding, the electrode wire is melted and supplied into the molten pool intermittently. Accordingly, it is assumed on the modeling that the thermal energy enters the base-plates through two following mechanisms, i.e., direct heating from arc plasma and “indirect” heating from the deposited metal. In the second part of the paper, MAG arc welding process is numerically analyzed by using the model, and the calculated weld bead dimension and surface profile have been compared with the experimental MAG welds on steel plate. As the result, it is made clear that the model is capable of predicting the bead profile of thin-plate MAG arc welding , including weld bead with undercutting.

  1. The Investigation of Structure Heterogeneous Joint Welds in Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubimova Lyudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding joints of dissimilar steels don’t withstand design life. One of the important causes of premature destructions can be the acceleration of steel structural degradation due to cyclic mechanical and thermal gradients. Two zones of tube from steel 12H18N9T, exhibiting the structural instability at early stages of the decomposition of a supersaturated solid austenite solution, were subjected to investigation. Methods of x-ray spectral and structure analysis, micro hardnessmetry were applied for the research. Made the following conclusions, inside and outside tube wall surfaces of hazardous zones in welding joint have different technological and resource characteristics. The microhardness very sensitive to changes of metal structure and can be regarded as integral characteristic of strength and ductility. The welding processes are responsible for the further fibering of tube wall structure, they impact to the characteristics of hot-resistance and long-term strength due to development of ring cracks in the welding joint of pipeline. The monitoring of microhardness and structural phase conversions can be used for control by changes of mechanical properties in result of post welding and reductive heat treatment of welding joints.

  2. Production of Manual Metal Arc Welding Electrodes with Local Raw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manual arc welding using flux coated electrodes is carried out by producing an electric arc between the base metal and a flux covered metal electrode with electric current that depends on the type of electrode, material, welding position and the desired strength. The composition of flux coated electrodes is complex and a ...

  3. Fatigue properties of dissimilar metal laser welded lap joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsley, Christopher Paul

    This work involves laser welding austenitic and duplex stainless steel to zinc-coated mild steel, more specifically 1.2mm V1437, which is a Volvo Truck Coiporation rephosphorised mild steel. The work investigates both tensile and lap shear properties of similar and dissimilar metal laser welded butt and lap joints, with the majority of the investigation concentrating on the fatigue properties of dissimilar metal laser welded lap joints. The problems encountered when laser welding zinc-coated steel are addressed and overcome with regard to dissimilar metal lap joints with stainless steel. The result being the production of a set of guidelines for laser welding stainless steel to zinc-coated mild steel. The stages of laser welded lap joint fatigue life are defined and the factors affecting dissimilar metal laser welded lap joint fatigue properties are analysed and determined; the findings suggesting that dissimilar metal lap joint fatigue properties are primarily controlled by the local stress at the internal lap face and the early crack growth rate of the material at the internal lap face. The lap joint rotation, in turn, is controlled by sheet thickness, weld width and interfacial gap. Laser welded lap joint fatigue properties are found to be independent of base material properties, allowing dissimilar metal lap joints to be produced without fatigue failure occurring preferentially in the weaker parent material, irrespective of large base material property differences. The effects of Marangoni flow on the compositions of the laser weld beads are experimentally characterised. The results providing definite proof of the stirring mechanism within the weld pool through the use of speeds maps for chromium and nickel. Keywords: Laser welding, dissimilar metal, Zinc-coated mild steel, Austenitic stainless steel, Duplex stainless steel, Fatigue, Lap joint rotation, Automotive.

  4. Filler metal selection for welding a high nitrogen stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, Madeleine

    2002-06-01

    Cromanite is a high-strength austenitic stainless steel that contains approximately 19% chromium, 10% manganese, and 0.5% nitrogen. It can be welded successfully, but due to the high nitrogen content of the base metal, precautions have to be taken to ensure sound welds with the desired combination of properties. Although no matching filler metals are currently available, Cromanite can be welded using a range of commercially available stainless steel welding consumables. E307 stainless steel, the filler metal currently recommended for joining Cromanite, produces welds with mechanical properties that are generally inferior to those of the base metal. In wear applications, these lower strength welds would probably be acceptable, but in applications where full use is made of the high strength of Cromanite, welds with matching strength levels would be required. In this investigation, two welding consumables, ER2209 (a duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel) and 15CrMn (an austenitic-manganese hardfacing wire), were evaluated as substitutes for E307. When used to join Cromanite, 15CrMn produced welds displaying severe nitrogen-induced porosity, and this consumable is therefore not recommended. ER2209, however, outperformed E307, producing sound porosity-free welds with excellent mechanical properties, including high ductility and strength levels exceeding the minimum limits specified for Cromanite.

  5. Determination of Focal Laws for Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing of Dissimilar Metal Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Ye; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Song, Myung Ho; Kang, Suk Chull; Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Kyung Cho

    2008-01-01

    Inspection of dissimilar metal welds using phased array ultrasound is not easy at all, because crystalline structure of dissimilar metal welds cause deviation and splitting of the ultrasonic beams. Thus, in order to have focusing and/or steering phased array beams in dissimilar metal welds, proper time delays should be determined by ray tracing. In this paper, we proposed an effective approach to solve this difficult problem. Specifically, we modify the Oglivy's model parameters to describe the crystalline structure of real dissimilar metal welds in a fabricated specimen. And then, we calculate the proper time delay and incident angle of linear phased array transducer in the anisotropic and inhomogeneous material for focusing and/or steering phased array ultrasonic beams on the desired position

  6. Creep deformation behavior of weld metal and heat affected zone on 316FR steel thick plate welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Yamazaki, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Kinugawa, Junichi; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Monma, Yoshio; Nakazawa, Takanori

    1999-01-01

    Using hot-rolled 316FR stainless plate (50 mm thick) and 16Cr-8Ni-2Mo filler wire, a narrow-gap welded joint was prepared by GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) process. In addition to conventional round bar specimens of base metals and weld metal, full-thickness joint specimens were prepared for creep test. Creep tests were conducted at 550degC in order to examine creep deformation and rupture behavior in the weld metal of the welded joint. Creep strain distribution on the surface of the joint specimen was measured by moire interferometry. In the welded joint, creep strength of the weld metal zone apart from the surface was larger than that in the vicinity of the surface due to repeating heat cycles during welding. Creep strain and creep rate within the HAZ adjacent to the weld metal zone were smaller than those within the base metal zone. Creep rate of the weld metal zone in the welded joint was smaller than that of the weld metal specimen due to the restraint of the hardened HAZ adjacent to the zone. The full-thickness welded joint specimens showed longer lives than weld metal specimens, though the lives of the latter was shorter than those of the base metal (undermatching). In the full-thickness welded joint specimen, crack started from the last pass layer of the weld metal zone and fracture occurred at the zone. From the results mentioned above, in order to evaluate the creep properties of the welded joint correctly, it is necessary to conduct the creep test using the full-thickness welded joint specimen which includes the weakest zones of the weld metal, the front and back sides of the plate. (author)

  7. Narrow groove gas metal-arc welding of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The Gas Metal-Arc (GMA) welding process is explained and the equipment used described with an analysis of power supply function and the action of the arc, followed by discussion of general applications and problems. GMA braze welding of beryllium is then described, as is the development of a special high purity filler wire and a narrow deep groove joint design for improved weld strength in beryllium. This joint design and the special wire are applied in making high strength welds in high strength aluminum for special applications. High speed motion pictures of the welding operation are shown to illustrate the talk. (auth)

  8. Influence of weld structure on cross-weld creep behavior in P23 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.J.; Degnan, C.C. [E.ON Engineering (United Kingdom); Brett, S.J. [RWE npower (United Kingdom); Buchanan, L.W. [Doosan Babcock (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    A thick section pipe weld in low alloy steel P23 has been characterised by cross-weld creep rupture testing at a range of stresses, together with all-weld-metal and parent material testing, under the auspices of the UK High Temperature Power Plant Forum. The results generally show that the weld metal can be weak when tested in the transverse (cross-weld) orientation, and can fail with limited overall ductility by cracking in the zone of refined weld metal beneath the fusion boundary of the superposed weld bead. However, one specimen showed a much superior performance, which could be understood in terms of its locally more creep resistant weld macrostructure. The implications for P23 performance and weld manufacture are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Welding and joining of single crystals of BCC refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Yutaka; Fujii, Tadayuki

    1989-01-01

    Welding and joining is one of key technologies for the wider utilizations of a material. In the present work, the applicability of welding and joining for a single crystal of BCC refractory metal was investigated. Electron-beam welding and tungsten-inert-gas welding by a melt-run technique, and high-temperature brazing by using brazing metals such as Mo-40%Ru alloy, vanadium or platinum were conducted for molybdenum single crystal which had been prepared by means of secondary recrystallization. 12 refs.,12 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  10. Investigations on the structure – Property relationships of electron beam welded Inconel 625 and UNS 32205

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Sridhar, R.; Periwal, Saurabh; Oza, Smitkumar; Saxena, Vimal; Hidad, Preyas; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Joining of dissimilar metals of Inconel 625 and UNS S32205 using electron beam welding. • Detailed structure – property relationship of dissimilar welds. • Improved metallurgical and tensile properties from the EB welding. - Abstract: The metallurgical and mechanical properties of electron beam welded Ni based superalloy Inconel 625 and UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel plates have been investigated in the present study. Interface microstructure studies divulged the absence of any grain coarsening effects or the formation of any secondary phases at the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the electron beam (EB) weldments. Tensile studies showed that the fracture occurred at the weld zone in all the trials and the average weld strength was reported to be 850 MPa. Segregation of Mo rich phases was witnessed at the inter-dendritic arms of the fusion zone. The study recommended the use of EB welding for joining these dissimilar metals by providing detailed structure – property relationships

  11. Assessment of the Biological Effects of Welding Fumes Emitted From Metal Active Gas and Manual Metal Arc Welding in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Eva; Gube, Monika; Baumann, Ralf; Bertram, Jens; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Emissions from a particular welding process, metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated steel, induce an increase in C-reactive protein. In this study, it was investigated whether inflammatory effects could also be observed for other welding procedures. Twelve male subjects were separately exposed to (1) manual metal arc welding fumes, (2) filtered air, and (3) metal active gas welding fumes for 6 hours. Inflammatory markers were measured in serum before, and directly, 1 and 7 days after exposure. Although C-reactive protein concentrations remained unchanged, neutrophil concentrations increased directly after exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes, and endothelin-1 concentrations increased directly and 24 hours after exposure. After exposure to metal active gas and filtered air, endothelin-1 concentrations decreased. The increase in the concentrations of neutrophils and endothelin-1 may characterize a subclinical inflammatory reaction, whereas the decrease of endothelin-1 may indicate stress reduction.

  12. Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr–Mo ferritic stainless steel filler wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaret, V.; Deschaux-Beaume, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.; Chovet, C.; Petit, B.; Faivre, L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New metal cored filler wires for welding 444 grade stainless steel are manufactured. • The effect of Nb and Ti minor elements on the fusion zone properties is investigated. • The relation between composition of fusion zone and grain structure is investigated. • Oxidation rates of fusion zones and base metal are compared. • High temperature behavior of the welded samples are studied. - Abstract: Several compositions of metal cored filler wire were manufactured to define the best welding conditions for homogeneous welding, by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process, of a modified AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel dedicated to automotive exhaust manifold applications. The patented grade is know under APERAM trade name K44X and has been developed to present improved high temperature fatigue properties. All filler wires investigated contained 19% Cr and 1.8% Mo, equivalent to the base metal K44X chemistry, but various titanium and niobium contents. Chemical analyses and microstructural observations of fusion zones revealed the need of a minimum Ti content of 0.15% to obtain a completely equiaxed grain structure. This structure conferred on the fusion zone a good ductility even in the as-welded state at room temperature. Unfortunately, titanium additions decreased the oxidation resistance at 950 °C if no significant Nb complementary alloying was made. The combined high Ti and Nb additions made it possible to obtain for the welded structure, after optimized heat treatment, high temperature tensile strengths and ductility for the fusion zones and assemblies, rather close to those of the base metal. 950 °C aging heat treatment was necessary to restore significantly the ductility of the as welded structure. Both fusion zone and base metal presented rather homogenized properties. Finally, with the optimized composition of the cored filler wire – 0.3 Ti minimum (i.e. 0.15% in the fusion zone) and high Nb complementary additions, the properties

  13. Electron beam welding of the dissimilar Zr-based bulk metallic glass and Ti metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonghyun [Department of Material Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: joindoc@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Kawamura, Y. [Department of Material Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    We successfully welded 3 mm thick Zr{sub 41}Be{sub 23}Ti{sub 14}Cu{sub 12}Ni{sub 10} bulk metallic glass plate to Ti metal by electron beam welding with a beam irradiated 0.4 mm on the BMG side of the interface. There was no crystallization or defects in the weld because changes in the chemical composition of the weld metal were prevented. Bending showed that the welded sample had a higher strength than the Ti base metal. The interface had a 10 {mu}m thick interdiffusion layer of Zr and Ti.

  14. Effect of constraint condition and internal medium on residual stress under overlay welding for dissimilar metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Jin Weon

    2007-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, residual stress of dissimilar metal weld propagates cracks in the weld metal which is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Overlay welding is a process widely used to mitigate residual stress replacing inside tensile stress by compression stress. However, according to the result of this study the effect of overlay welding on residual stress depends on both internal medium and constraint condition. The purpose of this study is to maximize the positive effect of overlay welding by finite element analyses

  15. Peculiarities of metal welding process modelling for the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunov, Alexey; Fofanov, Andrey; Losunov, Anton

    2017-09-01

    M etal being rather tough has been used in the Arctic for a long time. In severe weather conditions metal construction is subject to strong corrosion and erosion. These processes affect the welds particular strongly. Violation of weld integrity leads to the different industrial accidents. Therefore, the welding quality is given such a strong focus. M ost high-quality welding is obtained if welding zone is provided with gas what eliminates the influence of oxygen on the process. But in this case it is very difficult to find the right concentration, gas pressure, direction of the jet. Study of the welding process using video and photography is expensive, in terms of money and time. Mathematical modelling of welding process using the program FlowVision enables to solve this issue at less cost. It's essential that obtained results qualitatively conform to the experimental ones and can be used in real application.

  16. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Haghshenas, M., E-mail: mhaghshe@uwaterloo.ca [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nguyen, T. [Mechanical Systems Engineering, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Galloway, J. [Welding Engineering Technology, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  17. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavdar, U.; Gulsahin, I.

    2014-10-01

    The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM) compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW) were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined. (Author)

  18. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavdar, U.; Gulsahin, I.

    2014-01-01

    The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM) compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW) were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined. (Author)

  19. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR.

  20. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR

  1. Low Alloy Steel Structures After Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Węgrzyn T.; Piwnik J.; Hadryś D.; Wszołek Ł.

    2017-01-01

    The paper focuses on low alloy steel after innovate welding method with micro-jet cooling. Weld metal deposit (WMD) was carried out for welding and for MIG and MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. This method is very promising mainly due to the high amount of AF (acicular ferrite) and low amount of MAC (self-tempered martensite, retained austenite, carbide) phases in WMD. That structure corresponds with very good mechanical properties, ie. high impact toughness of welds at low temperature. Mic...

  2. Liquid Metal Oscillation and Arc Behaviour during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudodibroto, B.Y.B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to obtain insight into the oscillation behaviour of the liquid metal and the arc behaviour during GMA welding. Observations of the weld pool and the arc were undertaken by visual means using a high-speed video and by analysis of the voltage. To deal with the complex

  3. Metallurgy and mechanical properties variation with heat input,during dissimilar metal welding between stainless and carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdan, RD; Koswara, AL; Surasno; Wirawan, R.; Faturohman, F.; Widyanto, B.; Suratman, R.

    2018-02-01

    The present research focus on the metallurgy and mechanical aspect of dissimilar metal welding.One of the common parameters that significantly contribute to the metallurgical aspect on the metal during welding is heat input. Regarding this point, in the present research, voltage, current and the welding speed has been varied in order to observe the effect of heat input on the metallurgical and mechanical aspect of both welded metals. Welding was conducted by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) on stainless and carbon steel with filler metal of ER 309. After welding, hardness test (micro-Vickers), tensile test, macro and micro-structure characterization and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) characterization were performed. It was observed no brittle martensite observed at HAZ of carbon steel, whereas sensitization was observed at the HAZ of stainless steel for all heat input variation at the present research. Generally, both HAZ at carbon steel and stainless steel did not affect tensile test result, however the formation of chromium carbide at the grain boundary of HAZ structure (sensitization) of stainless steel, indicate that better process and control of welding is required for dissimilar metal welding, especially to overcome this issue.

  4. Experimental study on hollow structural component by explosive welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Mianjun, E-mail: dmjwl@163.com [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Wei, Ling, E-mail: 386006087@qq.com [Tongda College, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunication, Nanjing 210007 (China); Hong, Jin [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Ran, Hong [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Ma, Rui; Wang, Yaohua [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • This paper relates to a study on a thin double-layers hollow structural component by using an explosive welding technology. • This thin double-layer hollow structural component is an indispensable component required for certain core equipment of thermonuclear experimental reactor. • An adjusted explosive welding technology for manufacturing an inconel625 hollow structural component was developed which cannot be made by common technology. • The result shows that a metallurgical bonding was realized by the ribs and slabs of the hollow sheet. • The shearing strength of bonding interface exceeds that of the parent metal. - Abstract: A large thin-walled hollow structural component with sealed channels is required for the vacuum chamber of a thermonuclear experimental reactor, with inconel625 as its fabrication material. This hollow structural component is rarely manufactured by normal machining method, and its manufacture is also problematic in the field of explosive welding. With this in mind, we developed an adjusted explosive welding technology which involves a two-step design, setting and annealing technology. The joints were evaluated using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope, and a mechanical experiment was conducted, involving micro-hardness test, cold helium leak test and hydraulic pressure test. The results showed that a metallurgical bonding was realized by the ribs and slabs, and the shearing strength of the bonding interface exceeded that of the parent metal. Hence, the hollow structural component has a good comprehensive mechanical performance and sealing property.

  5. Experimental study on hollow structural component by explosive welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Mianjun; Wei, Ling; Hong, Jin; Ran, Hong; Ma, Rui; Wang, Yaohua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper relates to a study on a thin double-layers hollow structural component by using an explosive welding technology. • This thin double-layer hollow structural component is an indispensable component required for certain core equipment of thermonuclear experimental reactor. • An adjusted explosive welding technology for manufacturing an inconel625 hollow structural component was developed which cannot be made by common technology. • The result shows that a metallurgical bonding was realized by the ribs and slabs of the hollow sheet. • The shearing strength of bonding interface exceeds that of the parent metal. - Abstract: A large thin-walled hollow structural component with sealed channels is required for the vacuum chamber of a thermonuclear experimental reactor, with inconel625 as its fabrication material. This hollow structural component is rarely manufactured by normal machining method, and its manufacture is also problematic in the field of explosive welding. With this in mind, we developed an adjusted explosive welding technology which involves a two-step design, setting and annealing technology. The joints were evaluated using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope, and a mechanical experiment was conducted, involving micro-hardness test, cold helium leak test and hydraulic pressure test. The results showed that a metallurgical bonding was realized by the ribs and slabs, and the shearing strength of the bonding interface exceeded that of the parent metal. Hence, the hollow structural component has a good comprehensive mechanical performance and sealing property

  6. Development of Weld Metal Microstructures in Pulsed Laser Welding of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, F.; Malek Ghaini, F.; Torkamany, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The microstructure of the weld metal of a duplex stainless steel made with Nd:YAG pulsed laser is investigated at different travel speeds and pulse frequencies. In terms of the solidification pattern, the weld microstructure is shown to be composed of two distinct zones. The presence of two competing heat transfer channels to the relatively cooler base metal and the relatively hotter previous weld spot is proposed to develop two zones. At high overlapping factors, an array of continuous axial grains at the weld centerline is formed. At low overlapping factors, in the zone of higher cooling rate, a higher percentage of ferrite is transformed to austenite. This is shown to be because with extreme cooling rates involved in pulsed laser welding with low overlapping, the ferrite-to-austenite transformation can be limited only to the grain boundaries.

  7. Movement of liquid metal in welding bath during welding in longitudinal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalev, I.M.; Rybakov, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    The specific features are considered of liquid metal flow in a bath during welding of steel 12Kh18N10T plates with a non-consumable electrode in argon under interaction of the arc and bath with a longitudinal constant magnetic field. In controlling the velocity field of metal flow, the longitudinal magnetic field permits to form a seam at automatic welding of horizontal joints on a vertical plane

  8. effects of metal inert gas welding parameters on some mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECTS OF METAL INERT GAS WELDING PARAMETERS ON SOME MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN ACIDIC ... Design Expert Software, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Rockwell Hardness Test, Monsanto Tensometer and Izod Impact Test were used to determine the ...

  9. Identification of Damaged Spot Welds in a Complicated Joined Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunus, M A; Rani, M N Abdul; Ouyang, H; Deng, H; James, S, E-mail: h.ouyang@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, Harrison Hughes Building, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-19

    In automotive engineering, spot welds on assembled structures such as Body in White (BiW) have a significant effect on the vehicles' dynamic characteristics. Understandably, imperfections in the spot welds will cause variations in the dynamic properties such as natural frequencies and mode shapes of the structure. In this paper, a complicated welded structure which is a simplified Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) platform is investigated. The structure fabricated from thin metal sheets consists of ten components. They are jointed together by a number of scattered spot welds. NASTRAN Solution 200 based on sensitivity analysis is used to identify the most sensitive parameters to natural frequencies. The numerical model of the undamaged structure is initially updated in order to minimise the discrepancies between the measured and numerical data using NASTRAN optimisation code. The initial updated model serves as a benchmark for the subsequent structural damage identification. The numerical data of the benchmark model is then compared with the measured data obtained from the damaged structure. The same updating procedure is applied to the benchmark model in order to bring the numerical data as close as possible to the measured data of the damaged structure. The disparity in certain parameter values from the parameter values used in the benchmark model shows a fault or damage in the location of a particular joint, depending on the severity of this disparity. The challenge in this work is to localise damaged area and quantify the damage of the complicated structure with multiple spot welds in the presence of uncertainty in the location and material properties of the welds.

  10. Identification of Damaged Spot Welds in a Complicated Joined Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, M A; Rani, M N Abdul; Ouyang, H; Deng, H; James, S

    2011-01-01

    In automotive engineering, spot welds on assembled structures such as Body in White (BiW) have a significant effect on the vehicles' dynamic characteristics. Understandably, imperfections in the spot welds will cause variations in the dynamic properties such as natural frequencies and mode shapes of the structure. In this paper, a complicated welded structure which is a simplified Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) platform is investigated. The structure fabricated from thin metal sheets consists of ten components. They are jointed together by a number of scattered spot welds. NASTRAN Solution 200 based on sensitivity analysis is used to identify the most sensitive parameters to natural frequencies. The numerical model of the undamaged structure is initially updated in order to minimise the discrepancies between the measured and numerical data using NASTRAN optimisation code. The initial updated model serves as a benchmark for the subsequent structural damage identification. The numerical data of the benchmark model is then compared with the measured data obtained from the damaged structure. The same updating procedure is applied to the benchmark model in order to bring the numerical data as close as possible to the measured data of the damaged structure. The disparity in certain parameter values from the parameter values used in the benchmark model shows a fault or damage in the location of a particular joint, depending on the severity of this disparity. The challenge in this work is to localise damaged area and quantify the damage of the complicated structure with multiple spot welds in the presence of uncertainty in the location and material properties of the welds.

  11. Mechanical properties of 5083 aluminium welds after manual and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding using E5356 filler

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-automatic and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminium alloy 5083 with ER5356 filler wire causes considerable softening in the weld. The tensile strength of dressed automatic welds approaches that of the base metal...

  12. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  13. Effect of the delta ferrite solidification morphology of austenitic steels weld metal on the joint properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilmes, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Llorente, C.; Solari, M.

    1996-01-01

    The properties of austenitic stainless steel weld metals are largely influenced by the appearance in the microstructure of delta ferrite of a given morphology. The susceptibility to hot cracks and low temperature toughness are deeply conditioned by the mixed complex austenitic-ferritic structures which depending on the steel chemical composition and on the cooling rate may be developed. The latest research on this issue points out the importance of the sodification mode as regards to the influence in the appearance of delta ferrite of a certain morphology. In fact, it is very important to understand the solidification sequences, the primary solidification modes which are possible and the subsequent solid state transformations to correlate the structural elements of the weld metal with the parameters of the welding process on the one had, and the weld joint properties on the other. (Author) 19 refs

  14. Welding overlay analysis of dissimilar metal weld cracking of feedwater nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.L.; Wang, Li. H.; Fan, T.W.; Ranganath, Sam; Wang, C.K.; Chou, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Inspection of the weld between the feedwater nozzle and the safe end at one Taiwan BWR showed axial indications in the Alloy 182 weld. The indication was sufficiently deep that continued operation could not be justified considering the crack growth for one cycle. A weld overlay was decided to implement for restoring the structural margin. This study reviews the cracking cases of feedwater nozzle welds in other nuclear plants, and reports the lesson learned in the engineering project of this weld overlay repair. The overlay design, the FCG calculation and the stress analysis by FEM are presented to confirm that the Code Case structural margins are met. The evaluations of the effect of weld shrinkage on the attached feedwater piping are also included. A number of challenges encountered in the engineering and analysis period are proposed for future study.

  15. Innovative electron-beam welding of high-melting metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, W.; Reisgen, U.

    2007-01-01

    Since its establishment as nuclear research plant Juelich in the year 1956, the research centre Juelich (FZJ) is concerned with the material processing of special metals. Among those are, above all, the high-melting refractory metals niobium, molybdenum and tungsten. Electron beam welding has always been considered to be an innovative special welding method; in the FZJ, electron beam welding has, moreover, always been adapted to the increasing demands made by research partners and involved manufacturing and design sectors. From the manual equipment technology right up to highly modern multi-beam technique, the technically feasible for fundamental research has, this way, always been realised. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  16. Weld Joint Design for SFR Metallic Fuel Element Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Soo Sung; Woo, Yoon Myeng; Kim, Hyung Tae; Kim, Ki Hwan; Yoon, Kyung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) system is among the six systems selected for Gen-IV promising systems and expected to become available for commercial introduction around 2030. In Korea, the R and D on SFR has been begun since 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R and D programs. The international collaborative research is under way on fuel developments within Advanced Fuel Project for Gen-IV SFR with the closed fuel cycle of full actinide recycling, while TRU bearing metallic fuel, U-TRU-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel elements, the endplug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of endplug to cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the joint designs for endplug welding were investigated. For the irradiation test of SFR metallic fuel element, the TIG welding technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed based on the welding conditions and parameters established. In order to make SFR metallic fuel elements, the weld joint design was developed based on the TIG welding technique.

  17. Twin-Wire Pulsed Tandem Gas Metal Arc Welding of API X80 Steel Linepipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhao Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Twin-Wire Pulsed Tandem Gas Metal Arc Welding process with high welding production efficiency was used to join the girth weld seam of API X80 steel linepipe of 18.4 mm wall thickness and 1422 mm diameter. The macrostructure, microstructure, hardness, and electrochemical corrosion behavior of welded joints were studied. Effects of temperature and Cl− concentration on the corrosion behavior of base metal and weld metal were investigated. Results show that the welded joint has good morphology, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of both the base metal and the weld metal decreases with increasing temperature or Cl− concentration. In the solution with high Cl− concentration, the base metal and weld metal are more susceptible to pitting. The corrosion resistance of the weld metal is slightly lower than that of the base metal.

  18. Properties of Friction Welding of Dissimilar Metals WCu-Cu Weld for Electrical Contact Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y. H.; Yoon, G. G. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (Korea); Min, T. K. [Chungnam National University (Korea); Han, B. S. [Chonbuk National University (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    A copper-tungsten sintered alloy(WCu) has been friction-welded to a tough pitch copper (Cu) in order to investigate friction weldability. The maximum tensile strength of the WCu-Cu friction welded joints had up to 96% of those of the Cu base metal under the condition of friction time 0.6sec, friction pressure 45MPa, upset pressure 125MPa and upset time 5.0sec. And it is confirmed that the tensile strength of friction welded joints are influenced highly by upset pressure rather than friction time. And it is considered that mixed layer was formed in the Cu adjacent side to the weld interface, W particles included in mixed layer induced fracture in the Cu adjacent side to the weld interface and also, thickness of mixed layer was reduced as upset pressure increase. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  19. Low Alloy Steel Structures After Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on low alloy steel after innovate welding method with micro-jet cooling. Weld metal deposit (WMD was carried out for welding and for MIG and MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. This method is very promising mainly due to the high amount of AF (acicular ferrite and low amount of MAC (self-tempered martensite, retained austenite, carbide phases in WMD. That structure corresponds with very good mechanical properties, ie. high impact toughness of welds at low temperature. Micro-jet cooling after welding can find serious application in automotive industry very soon. Until that moment only argon, helium and nitrogen were tested as micro-jet gases. In that paper first time various gas mixtures (gas mixtures Ar-CO2 were tested for micro-jet cooling after welding.

  20. GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) process development for girth welding of high strength pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Vaidyanath; Daniel, Joe; Quintana, Marie [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yaoshan [Center for Reliable Energy Systems (CRES), Dublin, OH (United States); Souza, Antonio [Lincoln Electric do Brasil, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and findings from the first phase of a consolidated program co-funded by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and Pipeline Research Council Inc (PRCI) to develop pipe weld assessment and qualification methods and optimize X 100 pipe welding technologies. One objective of the program is to establish the range of viable welding options for X 100 line pipe, and define the essential variables to provide welding process control for reliable and consistent mechanical performance of the weldments. In this first phase, a series of narrow gap girth welds were made with pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW), instrumented with thermocouples in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal to obtain the associated thermal profiles, and instrumented to measure true energy input as opposed to conventional heat input. Results reveal that true heat input is 16%-22% higher than conventional heat input. The thermal profile measurements correlate very well with thermal model predictions using true energy input data, which indicates the viability of treating the latter as an essential variable. Ongoing microstructural and mechanical testing work will enable validation of an integrated thermal-microstructural model being developed for these applications. Outputs from this model will be used to correlate essential welding process variables with weld microstructure and hardness. This will ultimately enable development of a list of essential variables and the ranges needed to ensure mechanical properties are achieved in practice, recommendations for controlling and monitoring these essential variables and test methods suitable for classification of welding consumables. (author)

  1. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent.

  2. Toughness of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acarer, Mustafa; Arici, Gökhan; Acar, Filiz Kumdali; Keskinkilic, Selcuk; Kabakci, Fikret

    2017-09-01

    2,25Cr-1Mo steel is extensively used at elevated temperature structural applications in fossil fire power plants for steam pipes, nozzle chambers and petrochemical industry for hydrocracking unit due to its excellent creep resistance and good redundant to oxidation. Also they should have acceptable weldability and toughness. The steels are supplied in quenched and tempered condition and their welded components are subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Tempering process is carried out at 690-710°C to improve toughness properties. However they are sensitive to reheat cracking and temper embrittlement. To measure temper embrittlement of the steels and their weld metal, temper embrittlement factor and formula (J factor - Watanabe and X formula- Bruscato) are used. Step cooling heat treatment is also applied to determine temper embrittlement. In this study, toughness properties of Cr Mo (W) steels were reviewed. Also transition temperature curves of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and its weld metal were constructed before and after step cool heat treatment as experimental study. While 2,25Cr-1Mo steel as base metal was supplied, all weld metal samples were produced in Gedik Welding Company. Hardness measurements and microstructure evaluation were also carried out.

  3. Low ductility creep failure in austenitic weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    Creep tests have been carried out for times of up to approx. 22,000 hrs on three austenitic weld metals of nominal composition 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo, 19Cr-12Ni-3Mo+Nb and 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo. The two former deposits were designed to produce delta-ferrite contents in the range 3-9% while the latter was designed to be fully austenitic. The common feature of all three weld metals was that they all gave very low strains at failure, typically approx. 1%. The microstructures of the failed creep specimens have been studied using optical and electron microscopy and the precipitate structures related to the occurrence of low creep strains. Creep deformation and fracture mechanisms in austenitic materials in general have been reviewed and this has been used as a basis for discussion of the observations of the present work. Finally, some of the factors that can be controlled to improve long-term creep ductility have been appraised

  4. Prevention of microcracking by REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal in laser clad welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okauchi, Hironori; Saida, Kazuyoshi; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Effect of REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal on microcracking prevention was verified in laser clad welding. Laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal or type 316L stainless steel was conducted using the five different filler metals of alloy 690 varying the La content. Ductility-dip crack occurred in laser clad welding when La-free alloy 690 filler metal was applied. Solidification and liquation cracks occurred contrarily in the laser cladding weld metal when the 0.07mass%La containing filler metal was applied. In case of laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal and type 316L stainless steel, the ductility-dip cracking susceptibility decreased, and solidification/liquation cracking susceptibilities increased with increasing the La content in the weld metal. The relation among the microcracking susceptibility, the (P+S) and La contents in every weld pass of the laser clad welding was investigated. Ductility-dip cracks occurred in the compositional range (atomic ratio) of La/(P+S) 0.99(on alloy 132 weld metal), >0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel), while any cracks did not occur at La/(P+S) being between 0.21-0.99 (on alloy 132 weld metal) 0.10-0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel). Laser clad welding test on type 316L stainless steel using alloy 690 filler metal containing the optimum La content verified that any microcracks did not occurred in the laser clad welding metal. (author)

  5. A study on influence of heat input variation on microstructure of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weld metal produced by GTAW process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Srinivasan, G.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel is a major structural material for test blanket module (TBM) to be incorporated in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme to study the breeding of tritium in fusion reactors. This material has been mainly developed to achieve significant reduction in the induced radioactivity from the structural material used. Fabrication of TBM involves extensive welding, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process is one of the welding processes being considered for this purpose. In the present work, the effect of heat input on microstructure of indigenously developed RAFM steel weld metal produced by GTAW process has been studied. Autogenous bead-on-plate welding, autogenous butt-welding, butt-welding with filler wire addition, and pulsed welding on RAFMS have been carried out using GTAW process respectively. The weld metal is found to contain δ-ferrite and its volume fraction increased with increase in heat input. This fact suggests that δ-ferrite content in the weld metal is influenced by the cooling rate during welding. It was also observed that the hardness of the weld metal decreased with increase in δ-ferrite content. This paper highlights the effect of heat input and PWHT duration on microstructure and hardness of welds.

  6. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  7. PRODUCTION OF METAL CHEMICAL WELDING ADDITIVE WITH NANODISPERSED PARTICLES OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLDYREV Alexander Mikhaylovich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When welding bridge structures automatic welding under a gumboil layer with metal chemical additive (MCA is widely applied in the modern bridge building. MCA consists of a chopped welding wire (granulated material, which is powdered by modifying chemical additive of titanium dioxide (TiO₂ in the cylindrical mixer «drunk cask». Chemical composition of all welding materials including welding wire, gumboil, electrodes, are strictly normalized and controlled. However, the existing technology of producing MCA doesn’t allow precise controlling of its structure under working conditions and that causes an impact on the stability of welded connections properties. Therefore the aim of this work is to develop a technology to produce stable MCA structure. The paper compares the existing and proposed manufacturing techniques of the metal chemical additive (MCA which is applied in automatic welding of butt connections for bridge structures. It is shown that production of MCA in a high-energy planetary mill provides more stable structure of the additive introduced into a welded joint. The granulometric analysis of the powder TiO₂ showed that when processing MCA in a planetary mill TiO₂ particles are crashed to nanodimensional order. This process is accompanied by crushing of granulated material too. The proposed method for production of MCA in a planetary mill provides stronger cohesion of dioxide with the granulate surface and, as a consequence, more stable MCA chemical structure. Application of MCA which has been mechanical intensified in a planetary mill, increases stability of mechanical properties, if compare with applied technology, in single-order by breaking point and almost twice by impact viscosity.

  8. 46 CFR 154.180 - Contiguous hull structure: Welding procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Welding procedure. 154.180... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.180 Contiguous hull structure: Welding procedure. Welding procedure tests for contiguous hull structure designed for a temperature colder than −18 °C (0 °F) must meet § 54.05-15 and...

  9. Stress Distribution in the Dissimilar Metal Butt Weld of Nuclear Reactor Piping due to the Simulation Technique for the Repair Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hweeseung; Huh, Namsu; Kim, Jinsu; Lee, Jinho

    2013-01-01

    During welding, the dissimilar metal butt welds of nuclear piping are typically subjected to repair welding in order to eliminate defects that are found during post-weld inspection. It has been found that the repair weld can significantly increase the tensile residual stress in the weldment, and therefore, accurate estimation of the weld residual stress due to repair weld, especially for dissimilar metal welds using Ni-based alloy 82/182 in nuclear components, is of great importance in order to assess susceptibility to primary water stress corrosion cracking. In the present study, the stress distributions of dissimilar metal butt welds in nuclear reactor piping subjected to repair weld were investigated based on detailed nonlinear finite element analyses. Particular emphasis was placed on the variation of the stress distribution in the dissimilar metal butt weld according to the finite element welding analysis sequence for the repair welding process

  10. Reheat cracking susceptibility of P23 (7CrWVMoNb9-6) steel welds made using matching and mis-matching filler metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevasmaa, Pekka; Salonen, Jorma; Auerkari, Pertti; Rantala, Juhani; Holmstroem, Stefan [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Reheat cracking sensitivity of 7CrWVMoNb9-6 (P23) thick-section multipass welds has been investigated by Gleeble simulation, mechanical testing, fractography and metallography. The results demonstrate that the experimental weld metal made using a high-Nb-W-Ti-B type filler metal was sensitive to reheat cracking, with a reduction of area no more than 2-3% in the BWI reheat cracking (RC) test. Welds made using a high-W -low-Ti type filler metal with Nb content similar to the parent steel, as well as welds make using a Ni-Nb-Ti-free-(W-free) type filler metal with the chemical composition closer to P24 grade material, were more ductile and crack-resistant, though with reduced cross-weld creep strength. Fractography of RC test specimens showed evidence of pronounced localisation of damage at the prior austenite grain boundaries of the thermally reheated, experimental P23 weld metal. The reheat cracking susceptibility of the less ductile weld metal was apparently related both to the chemical composition (higher B, Nb and Ti content) and sub-structural features of the coarse-grained reheated weld metal microstructure. Appropriate single- and multi-cycle thermal Gleeble simulations to produce representative HAY and reheated weld metal microstructures (as function of peak temperature), in conjunction with the BWI RC test were successfully applied to characterise the reheat cracking sensitivity of the candidate weld metals and parent steel HAZ. (orig.)

  11. Contribution to a research on electron beam welding of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.

    1964-03-01

    The electron beam welding of metals is performed by the travelling of the focusing point along the junction of two pieces to be connected. Welding parameters are the electron gun power W, the value of the electron impact surface S, the welding speed s. From the beginning of our research in 1954, the preponderant part played by specific power W/s on the shape of the welded zone and the penetrating depth, became evident. A more methodical research has been undertaken in the laboratories of C.E.N. under the patronage of Professor CHAUDRON, in order to define in a better way the importance of the different welding parameters and to determine their influence on the metallurgical qualities of welded assemblies. This research induced us to define an electron gun adapted as well as possible to the performance of weldings, not only from the point of view of behaviour, especially during the passage from the atmospheric to a low pressure at 10 -5 Torr, necessary for the carrying out of a welding, but also from the point of view of adjustment conveniences of the different welding parameters, indispensable to the intended research work. The variations of welding parameters show that the shape of the molten zone turns from a circle segment to that of a very high triangle, which implies a continual change of the mode of heat transmission. Tests have been made, in order to confirm this way of looking, especially in order to achieve isotherms in dynamic operating and also the comparison of these isotherms with that recorded while using a method of argon arc welding. The thermal balance of energy supplied to the part, the necessary welding energy, and the energy loss (through conduction, radiation and evaporation) has also been established. These results proved that almost the whole of energy has been used for melting, that the different losses are negligible and that heat transmission can not occur by thermal conduction through the part during 'welding' time, when operating under

  12. Evolution of weld metal microstructure in shielded metal arc welding of X70 HSLA steel with cellulosic electrodes: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghomashchi, Reza; Costin, Walter; Kurji, Rahim

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of weld joint in X70 line pipe steel resulted from shielded metal arc welding with E6010 cellulosic electrodes is characterized using optical and electron microscopy. A range of ferritic morphologies have been identified ranging from polygonal inter- and intra-prior austenite grains allotriomorphic, idiomorphic ferrites to Widmanstätten, acicular and bainitic ferrites. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis using Image Quality (IQ) and Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps through superimposition of IQ and IPF maps and measurement of percentages of high and low angle grain boundaries was identified to assist in differentiation of acicular ferrite from Widmanstätten and bainitic ferrite morphologies. In addition two types of pearlitic structures were identified. There was no martensite detected in this weld structure. The morphology, size and chemistry of non-metallic inclusions are also discussed briefly. - Highlights: • Application of EBSD reveals orientation relationships in a range of phases for shielded metal arc welding of HSLA steel. • Nucleation sites of various ferrite morphologies identified • Formation of upper and lower bainite and their morphologies

  13. Evolution of weld metal microstructure in shielded metal arc welding of X70 HSLA steel with cellulosic electrodes: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghomashchi, Reza, E-mail: reza.ghomashchi@adelaide.edu.au; Costin, Walter; Kurji, Rahim

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure of weld joint in X70 line pipe steel resulted from shielded metal arc welding with E6010 cellulosic electrodes is characterized using optical and electron microscopy. A range of ferritic morphologies have been identified ranging from polygonal inter- and intra-prior austenite grains allotriomorphic, idiomorphic ferrites to Widmanstätten, acicular and bainitic ferrites. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis using Image Quality (IQ) and Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps through superimposition of IQ and IPF maps and measurement of percentages of high and low angle grain boundaries was identified to assist in differentiation of acicular ferrite from Widmanstätten and bainitic ferrite morphologies. In addition two types of pearlitic structures were identified. There was no martensite detected in this weld structure. The morphology, size and chemistry of non-metallic inclusions are also discussed briefly. - Highlights: • Application of EBSD reveals orientation relationships in a range of phases for shielded metal arc welding of HSLA steel. • Nucleation sites of various ferrite morphologies identified • Formation of upper and lower bainite and their morphologies.

  14. Application of Hard Metal Weld Deposit in the Area of Mixing Organic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Any machine part is subject to degradation processes. Intensive wear occurs either when two bearing surfaces come into contact or when loose particles rub the function surface of a machine part. Soil processing machines are a good example. A similar process of abrasive wear occurs also in mixing machines or lines for material transport, such as worm-conveyors. The experiment part of this paper analyses hard metal weld deposit dedicated for renovation of abrasive stressed surfaces. In order to prolong the service life of a blade disc in a mixing machine Kreis-Biogas-Dissolver, the technology of hard surfacing by an electric arc was used. Tested hard metal electrodes were applied on a steel tape class 11 373. To eliminate mixing with the base material, weld beads were applied in two layers. Firstly, the weld bead was visually analyzed on a binocular microscope. Further, weld bead as well as the base material was analyzed from the metallographic point of view, whose aim was to identify the structure of weld metal and the origin of microcracks in weld bead. Moreover, there was also measured microhardness of weld metal. Abrasive resistance was tested according to the norm ČSN 01 5084, which is an abrasive cloth test. As in the mixing process also erosion wear occurs, there was also processed a test on a Bond device simulating stress of test samples by loose abrasive particles. The abrading agents were formed by broken stones of 8–16 mm in size. Based on the results of the individual tests, the recommendation of usage hard metal electrodes for prolonging service life of machine parts will be made.

  15. Estimation of residual stress in welding of dissimilar metals at nuclear power plants using cascaded support vetor regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Young Do; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Residual stress is a critical element in determining the integrity of parts and the lifetime of welded structures. It is necessary to estimate the residual stress of a welding zone because residual stress is a major reason for the generation of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plants. That is, it is necessary to estimate the distribution of the residual stress in welding of dissimilar metals under manifold welding conditions. In this study, a cascaded support vector regression (CSVR) model was presented to estimate the residual stress of a welding zone. The CSVR model was serially and consecutively structured in terms of SVR modules. Using numerical data obtained from finite element analysis by a subtractive clustering method, learning data that explained the characteristic behavior of the residual stress of a welding zone were selected to optimize the proposed model. The results suggest that the CSVR model yielded a better estimation performance when compared with a classic SVR model.

  16. Occupational exposure to solvents, metals and welding fumes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C G; Mulleners, Wim M; Sas, Antonetta M G; van Laar, Teus; Huss, Anke; Kromhout, Hans

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between occupational exposure to solvents, metals and/or welding fumes and risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Data of a hospital based case-control study including 444 PD patients and 876 age and sex matched controls was used. Occupational histories and lifestyle information of cases and controls were collected in a structured telephone interview. Exposures to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents and metals were estimated by linking the ALOHA+ job-exposure matrix to the occupational histories. Exposure to welding fumes was estimated using self-reported information on welding activities. No statistically significant associations with any of the studied metal and solvent exposures were found. However, for self-reported welding activities we observed non-statistically significant reduced risk estimates (third tertile cumulative exposure: OR = 0.51 (95% CI: 0.21-1.24)). The results of our study did not provide support for an increased chance on developing PD after occupational exposure to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents or exposure to metals. The results showed reduced risk estimates for welding, which is in line with previous research, but no clear explanation for these findings is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dislocation structure evolution in 304L stainless steel and weld joint during cyclic plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Jing, Hongyang; Zhao, Lei; Han, Yongdian; Lv, Xiaoqing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xu, Lianyong, E-mail: xulianyong@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-04-06

    Dislocation structures and their evolution of 304L stainless steel and weld metal made with ER308L stainless steel welding wire subjected to uniaxial symmetric strain-controlled loading and stress-controlled ratcheting loading were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The correlation between the cyclic response and the dislocation structure has been studied. The experiment results show that the cyclic behaviour of base metal and weld metal are different. The cyclic behaviour of the base metal consists of primary hardening, slight softening and secondary hardening, while the weld metal shows a short hardening within several cycles followed by the cyclic softening behaviour. The microscopic observations indicate that in base metal, the dislocation structures evolve from low density patterns to those with higher dislocation density during both strain cycling and ratcheting deformation. However, the dislocation structures of weld metal change oppositely form initial complicated structures to simple patterns and the dislocation density gradually decrease. The dislocation evolution presented during the strain cycling and ratcheting deformation is summarized, which can qualitatively explain the cyclic behaviour and the uniaxial ratcheting behaviour of two materials. Moreover, the dislocation evolution in the two types of tests is compared, which shows that the mean stress has an effect on the rate of dislocation evolution during the cyclic loading.

  18. Dependence of the mechanical properties of joints welded according to the parameters of the metal active gas (MAG welding regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dobrotă

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective followed in the realization of welded structures is to obtain superior mechanical characteristics for these structures. The research aimed at setting ranges of values for the welding voltage (Uw, respectively for the welding current (Iw so as to obtain superior mechanical features for welded constructions. The research was carried out using E 36-4 steel as base material and SG2 wire as filler material, whereas the applied welding process was MAG. The optimization was done with the help of a number of 31 test bars considering various welding procedures for each test bar, and the experimental data were processed using the STATISTCA program.

  19. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  20. Metallic glass coating on metals plate by adjusted explosive welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.D.; Liu, K.X.; Chen, Q.Y.; Wang, J.T.; Yan, H.H.; Li, X.J.

    2009-01-01

    Using an adjusted explosive welding technique, an aluminum plate has been coated by a Fe-based metallic glass foil in this work. Scanning electronic micrographs reveal a defect-free metallurgical bonding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate. Experimental evidence indicates that the Fe-based metallic glass foil almost retains its amorphous state and mechanical properties after the explosive welding process. Additionally, the detailed explosive welding process has been simulated by a self-developed hydro-code and the bonding mechanism has been investigated by numerical analysis. The successful welding between the Fe-based metallic glass foil and the aluminum plate provides a new way to obtain amorphous coating on general metal substrates.

  1. Fatigue behaviour of 304L steel welded structures: influence of residual stresses and surface mechanical finishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnier-Monin, L.

    2007-12-01

    This study focuses on the influence of residual stresses and surface mechanical finishing on lifetime of stainless steel 304L welded structures. Residual stresses are determined on specific specimens of three types: base-metal, as-welded and ground-welded specimens. Each type is submitted to fatigue tests in order to assess the influence of these parameters on the lifetime, and to determine their evolution. The experiments show that an important surface stress concentration is located in the weld root of as-welded structures, which has a negative effect on the fatigue life. The grinding operation generates high-level surface residual stresses but the lifetime is higher thanks to the reduction of the notch effect. The fatigue test results are compared to the nuclear industry best-fit S-N curves. This enables the determination of correction factors related to fatigue test results of polished specimens, and to assess the lifetime of structures. (author)

  2. Ultrasonic creeping wave test technique for dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianzhong; Shang Junmin; Yan Zhi; Yuan Guanghua; Zhang Guofeng

    2009-01-01

    To solve the problem encountered in the defect inspection of the surface and near-surface of dissimilar metal weld effectively, a new ultrasonic creeping wave test technique is developed. In this paper, the test technique and its experimental verification are mainly described. The verification results show that linear defect, which is similar to the defect found in liquid penetrant test, on the surface and near-surface of dissimilar metal weld can be detected effectively, by using ultrasonic creeping wave test technique. And the depth, length and height of the defect can be determined easily. The effective covering depth of ultrasonic creeping wave test technique will reach 0-9 mm. Meanwhile, the planar defect, with equivalent area more than 3 mm 2 , existed in welds can be detected efficiently. So, accurate measurement, which self height dimension of planar defect is above 2 mm, will be realized. (authors)

  3. Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 Base Metal and Welded Joints at Room Temperature and 850 .deg. C for VHTR Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Jin; Dew, Rando T. [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Min Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Low cycle fatigue (LCF) is an important design consideration for high temperature IHX components. Moreover, some of the components are joined by welding techniques and therefore the welded joints are unavoidable in the construction of mechanical structures. Since Alloy 617 was introduced in early 1970s, many attempts have been made in the past two decades to evaluate the LCF and creep-fatigue behavior in Alloy 617 base metal at room temperature and high temperature. However, little research has focused on the evaluation and characterization of the Alloy 617 welded joints. butt-welded joint specimens was performed at room temperature and 850 .deg. C. Fatigue lives of GTAW welded joint specimens were lower than those of base metal specimens. LCF cracking and failure in welded specimens initiated in the weld metal zone and followed transgranluar dendritic paths for both at RT and 850 .deg. C.

  4. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  5. Techniques for intergranular crack formation and assessment in alloy 600 base and alloy 182 weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hyun; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Hong Deok; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A technique developed to produce artificial intergranular stress corrosion cracks in structural components was applied to thick, forged alloy 600 base and alloy 182 weld metals for use in the qualification of nondestructive examination techniques for welded components in nuclear power plants. An externally controlled procedure was demonstrated to produce intergranular stress corrosion cracks that are comparable to service-induced cracks in both the base and weld metals. During the process of crack generation, an online direct current potential drop method using array probes was used to measure and monitor the sizes and shapes of the cracks. A microstructural characterization of the produced cracks revealed realistic conformation of the crack faces unlike those in machined notches produced by an electrodischarge machine or simple fatigue loading using a universal testing machine. A comparison with a destructive metallographic examination showed that the characteristics, orientations, and sizes of the intergranular cracks produced in this study are highly reproducible.

  6. Nondestructive testing of austenitic casting and dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahdenperae, K.

    1995-01-01

    The publication is a literature study of nondestructive testing of dissimilar metal welds and cast austenitic components in PWR and BWR plants. A major key to the successful testing is a realistic mockup made of the materials to be tested. The inspectors must also be trained and validated using suitable mockups. (42 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.)

  7. Anti-Thixotropic Analysis of Pipeline Metal Losses in Welded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-Thixotropic Analysis of Pipeline Metal Losses in Welded Locations due to ... by the presence of large slurry of aggregates of sand stones in the pipelines. ... This investigation showed that the sand trap built insitu to sieve the sand and ...

  8. Friction welding of bulk metallic glasses to different ones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Takuo; Kawamura, Yoshihito; Ohno, Yasuhide

    2004-01-01

    For application of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) as industrial materials, it is necessary to establish the metallurgical bonding technology. The BMGs exhibit high-strain-rate superplasticity in the supercooled liquid state. It has been reported that bulk metallic glasses were successfully welded together by friction, pulse-current, explosion and electron-beam methods. In this study, friction welding of the BMGs to different ones were tried for Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 , Pd 40 Cu 30 P 20 Ni 10 , Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 and Zr 41 Be 23 Ti 14 Cu 12 Ni 10 BMGs. Successful welding was obtained in the combinations of the Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 and Pd 40 Cu 30 P 20 Ni 10 BMGs, and the Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 and Zr 41 Be 23 Ti 14 Cu 12 Ni 10 ones. No crystallization was observed and no visible defect was recognized in the interface. The joining strength of the welded BMGs was the same as that of the parent BMG or more. BMGs seem to be successfully welded to the different ones with a difference below about 50 K in glass transition temperature

  9. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  10. Influence of deformation on structural-phase state of weld material in St3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Alexander, E-mail: galvas.kem@gmail.ru; Ababkov, Nicolay, E-mail: n.ababkov@rambler.ru; Ozhiganov, Yevgeniy, E-mail: zhigan84@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); LLC “Kuzbass Center of Welding and Control”, 33/2, Lenin Str., 650055, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Kozlov, Eduard, E-mail: kozlov@tsuab.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Zboykova, Nadezhda, E-mail: tezaurusn@gmail.com; Koneva, Nina, E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The structural-phase condition of the weld material subjected to the plastic deformation was investigated using the translucent diffraction electron microscopy method. The investigations were carried out near the joint of the weld and the base metal. The seam was done by the method of manual arc welding without artificial defects. The St3 steel was taken as the welded material. Influence of the plastic deformation on morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters of weld metal was revealed. All investigations were done at the distance of 0.5 mm from the joint of the weld and the base metal at the deformation degrees from 0 to 5% and after destruction of a sample. It was established that deformation of the sample did not lead to qualitative changes in the structure (the structure is still presented by ferrite-pearlite mixture) but changed the quantitative parameters of the structure, namely, with the increase of plastic deformation a part of the pearlite component becomes more and more imperfect. In the beginning it turns into the destroyed pearlite then into ferrite, the volume fraction of pearlite is decreased. The polarization of dislocation structure takes place but it doesn’t lead to the internal stresses that can destroy the sample.

  11. Testing of dissimilar metal welds according KTA 3201.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giersbeck, Kai; Huenies, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    The amended German standard KTA 3201.4 from 2010 has triggered intensified requirements of the mechanized ultrasonic testing methodology. The report discusses the most important changes of KTA 3201.4 concerning the issues reference block, qualification of the testing methodology, testing of cladded surfaces, dissimilar metal joints, thermal conduits. The demonstration of dissimilar metal weld testing using intelligent NDT is demonstrated for the nozzles in German nuclear power plants.

  12. Key quality aspects for a new metallic composite pipe: corrosion testing, welding, weld inspection and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conder, Robert J.; Felton, Peter [Xodus Group Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Smith, Richard [Shell Global Solutions Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Burke, Raymond [Pipestream Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Dikstra, Frits; Deleye, Xavier [Applus RTD Ltd., Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    XPipeTM is a new metallic composite pipe. This paper discusses three aspects of this new technology. The first subject is determination of the probability of hydrogen embrittlement by the XPipeTM manufacturing method. Two materials were analyzed in three tests: slow strain rate test, constant load test and notched tensile test. The results showed that the high strength steels used do not appear to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. The second subject of this article is weld inspection. A non-destructive testing method of girth welds is developed to allow inspection of the thin-walled austenitic liner pipe. The results demonstrated that the welds can be inspected using the creeping wave technique. The third subject is quality control systems using the SCADA system, which maintains traceability of the materials and monitors and records all parameters during the production process. This system appears to be efficient in ensuring that the product pipe meets recognized quality standards.

  13. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0231] Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide (Revision 4) describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the...

  14. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  15. Research of state of metal welded joint by deformation and corrosion surface projection parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demchenko Maria Vyacheslavovna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available At industrial enterprises in building structures and equipment one can see corrosion damage, as well as damage accumulated during operation period. The areas of stress concentration are welded joints as their structure is heterogeneous. From the point of view of the scale hierarchy, the welded joint represents the welded and base metal zones at the meso-macrolevel, the weld zone, the thermal zone, the base metal at the micro-mesolevel, the grain constituents at the nano-microlevel. Borders are the stress concentrators at different scale levels, thus they becomes the most dangerous places of metal structure. Modeling by the molecular dynamics method at the atomic level has shown nanocracks initiation in triple junctions of grain boundaries and on the ledges of the grain boundaries. Due to active development of nanotechnology, it became possible to evaluate the state of the weld metal at the nanoscale, where irreversible changes take place from the very beginning. Existing methods of nondestructive testing can detect damage only at the meso- and macrolevel. Modern equipment makes it possible to use other methods of control and approaches. For example, according to GOST R55046-2012 and R57223-2016, the analysis of the parameters of the surface projection deformation performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy should be taken into account when the evaluation of state of metal pipelines is carried out. However, there is a problem to monitore it due to various factors affecting the surface during operation. The paper proposes an additional method to estimate the state of weld metal at any stage of deformation that uses 3D analysis of the parameters of the «artificial» corrosion relief of surface. During the operation period changes in the stress-strain state and structure of the metal take place, as the result the character and depth of etching of the grains of the structural components and their boundaries change too. Evaluation of the

  16. The improvement of ultrasonic characteristics in weld metal of austenitic stainless steel using magnetic stirring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, T.; Tomisawa, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic stirring welding process was tested to save the difficulty of ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel overlayed welds, due to grain refinement of weld solidification structure. The testing involved stirring the molten pool with Lorenz force induced by the interaction of welding current and alternative magnetic field applied from the outside magnetic coil. This report summarizes improvement of ultrasonic characteristic in austenitic stainless steel overlayed welds caused by magnetic stirring welding process

  17. Ultrasonic examination for safe end to nozzle dissimilar metal welds of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuowei; Yu Jingsheng; Wang Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The safe-end weld of steam generator is narrow seam weld with dissimilar metal, the filling material is nickel alloy 152/182 (material 690). The interior structure is of great anisotropic, and fake signal may occur during the defect detection by ultrasonic wave and the error for defect location may be increased. Stratified inspection by ultrasonic transducers with different angle and focus is a practical method which is verified by the real inspection while the linear indication in the inside surface besides the interior flaws are detected. (authors)

  18. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment

  19. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment.

  20. Numerical Simulation on the Origin of Solidification Cracking in Laser Welded Thick-Walled Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Bakir

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the main factors affecting the use of lasers in the industry for welding thick structures is the process accompanying solidification cracks. These cracks mostly occurring along the welding direction in the welding center, and strongly affect the safety of the welded components. In the present study, to obtain a better understanding of the relation between the weld pool geometry, the stress distribution and the solidification cracking, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD model was combined with a thermo-mechanical model. The CFD model was employed to analyze the flow of the molten metal in the weld pool during the laser beam welding process. The weld pool geometry estimated from the CFD model was used as a heat source in the thermal model to calculate the temperature field and the stress development and distributions. The CFD results showed a bulging region in the middle depth of the weld and two narrowing areas separating the bulging region from the top and bottom surface. The thermo-mechanical simulations showed a concentration of tension stresses, transversally and vertically, directly after the solidification during cooling in the region of the solidification cracking.

  1. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  2. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  3. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çavdar, Uǧur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined.Soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia de polvos de metal compactados. Se ha realizado un estudio de la aplicación de polvos de metal (PM de base hierro compactados por soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia (UHFIW. Estos polvos de metal compactados se utilizan para producir engranajes. Este estudio investiga los métodos de uni.n de los materiales de PM con UHFIW en su aplicación en la industria. La máxima tensión y la máxima deformación de los polvos de metal compactados soldados fueron determinadas por flexión en tres puntos y prueba de resistencia. Se determinó la microdureza y la microestructura de los polvos compactados por soldadura por inducción.

  4. IMPROVEMENT OF WELDED CONNECTIONS WITH SIDE LAP WELDS BY REDISTRIBUTION OF ALL-WELD METAL ALONG LENGTHS AND CROSS-SECTIONS THEREOF USING MECHANIZED AND ROBOTIC WELDING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov Evgeniy Igorevich

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of bearing capacity of samples of two series performed by semiautomatic welding in CO2 on the axis, and by robotic welding machine in mixture (CO2 + Ar, is presented. Welds of constant cross section, welds with extended leg on end sections, and welds in the form of two dowels on end sections were performed. Efficiency of pilot samples of the first series (with extended leg on end sections by way of a smooth transition defined by the ratio of weld metal volume to a crushing load reaches 28 % relative to samples with a leg constant as per length. Samples of the first series with an extended leg on end sections also showed efficiency increased to 17 %. According to the second series samples test results, the exceeding of bearing capacity of the samples performed with an extended leg on end sections by 24 % in comparison with the samples with a leg of constant cross section was determined. Samples of the second series performed in the form of two dowels on end sections demonstrated the exceeding of the relative bearing capacity by 42 % in comparison with the samples with a continuous leg of constant cross-section.

  5. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Meibian; Jian, Le; Bin, Pingfan; Xing, Mingluan; Lou, Jianlin; Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  6. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Meibian [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Jian, Le [Curtin University of Technology, School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (Australia); Bin, Pingfan [Wujin District Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Xing, Mingluan [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Lou, Jianlin [Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences (China); Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua, E-mail: hzou@cdc.zj.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China)

    2013-11-15

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  7. Correlation Between Microstructure and Low-Temperature Impact Toughness of Simulated Reheated Zones in the Multi-pass Weld Metal of High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Park, Gitae; Jeong, Seonghoon; Lee, Changhee

    2018-01-01

    A large fraction of reheated weld metal is formed during multi-pass welding, which significantly affects the mechanical properties (especially toughness) of welded structures. In this study, the low-temperature toughness of the simulated reheated zone in multi-pass weld metal was evaluated and compared to that of the as-deposited zone using microstructural analyses. Two kinds of high-strength steel welds with different hardenabilities were produced by single-pass, bead-in-groove welding, and both welds were thermally cycled to peak temperatures above Ac3 using a Gleeble simulator. When the weld metals were reheated, their toughness deteriorated in response to the increase in the fraction of detrimental microstructural components, i.e., grain boundary ferrite and coalesced bainite in the weld metals with low and high hardenabilities, respectively. In addition, toughness deterioration occurred in conjunction with an increase in the effective grain size, which was attributed to the decrease in nucleation probability of acicular ferrite; the main cause for this decrease changed depending on the hardenability of the weld metal.

  8. Quantitative metal magnetic memory reliability modeling for welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Haiyan; Dang, Yongbin; Wang, Ben; Leng, Jiancheng

    2016-03-01

    Metal magnetic memory(MMM) testing has been widely used to detect welded joints. However, load levels, environmental magnetic field, and measurement noises make the MMM data dispersive and bring difficulty to quantitative evaluation. In order to promote the development of quantitative MMM reliability assessment, a new MMM model is presented for welded joints. Steel Q235 welded specimens are tested along the longitudinal and horizontal lines by TSC-2M-8 instrument in the tensile fatigue experiments. The X-ray testing is carried out synchronously to verify the MMM results. It is found that MMM testing can detect the hidden crack earlier than X-ray testing. Moreover, the MMM gradient vector sum K vs is sensitive to the damage degree, especially at early and hidden damage stages. Considering the dispersion of MMM data, the K vs statistical law is investigated, which shows that K vs obeys Gaussian distribution. So K vs is the suitable MMM parameter to establish reliability model of welded joints. At last, the original quantitative MMM reliability model is first presented based on the improved stress strength interference theory. It is shown that the reliability degree R gradually decreases with the decreasing of the residual life ratio T, and the maximal error between prediction reliability degree R 1 and verification reliability degree R 2 is 9.15%. This presented method provides a novel tool of reliability testing and evaluating in practical engineering for welded joints.

  9. Sustainability assessment of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahla, Ibrahim; Pervaiz, Salman

    2017-09-01

    Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process is one of the most commonly employed material joining processes utilized in the various industrial sectors such as marine, ship-building, automotive, aerospace, construction and petrochemicals etc. The increasing pressure on manufacturing sector wants the welding process to be sustainable in nature. The SMAW process incorporates several types of inputs and output streams. The sustainability concerns associated with SMAW process are linked with the various input and output streams such as electrical energy requirement, input material consumptions, slag formation, fumes emission and hazardous working conditions associated with the human health and occupational safety. To enhance the environmental performance of the SMAW welding process, there is a need to characterize the sustainability for the SMAW process under the broad framework of sustainability. Most of the available literature focuses on the technical and economic aspects of the welding process, however the environmental and social aspects are rarely addressed. The study reviews SMAW process with respect to the triple bottom line (economic, environmental and social) sustainability approach. Finally, the study concluded recommendations towards achieving economical and sustainable SMAW welding process.

  10. Fluid Flow Behaviour under Different Gases and Flow Rate during Gas Metal Arc Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Jaison Peter

    2013-01-01

    Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is a highly efficient and fast process for fabricating high quality weld. High quality welds are fabricated by proper selection of consumable includes gas and filler metals. The optimum flow rate of gas will ensure the proper quality of weld. In this project, a fluid flow behavior of different flow rate is modeled and the change quality will be studied.

  11. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  12. Toughness of submerged arc weld metals of controlled rolled NB bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Shiga, A.; Kamada, A.; Tsuboi, J.

    1982-01-01

    The toughness and the hardness of reheated weld metals depend on the maximum reheating temperature. When the maximum reheating temperature is 500 to 700 0 C, the hardness of single pass weld metal increases and the toughness decreases because of fine Nb- and V-carbonitride precipitation. When the maximum reheating temperature is over 800 0 C, the hardness and the toughness remain almost unchanged. The stress relieving treatment of single pass weld metal at 600 0 C for 1 up to about 100 hours causes the increase in hardness and then decreases the hardness gradually. It needs over 500 hours to obtain the same hardness value as that of as-welded metal. The addition of Ti to weld metal is very effective to improve the toughness, however excess Ti increases the hardness of stress relieved weld metal by precipitating as fine Ti-carbonitride. Therefore Ti addition should be restricted within the lowest limit required to improve as-welded metal toughness. The optimum Ti content is about 0.020% in the case of weld metal of which oxygen content is 350 ppM or so. In multipass welding, the hardness of weld metal affected by subsequent weld heat cycle varies from pass to pass, because Nb and V content change with the passes as the result of the change in dilution from base metal. The most hardened zone is observed in the reheated first pass weld metal, in which Nb and V content are the highest. Good weld metal toughness would be obtained by lowering dilution from base metal and taking advantage of grain refinement by subsequent passes

  13. A reliability analysis framework with Monte Carlo simulation for weld structure of crane's beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kefei; Xu, Hongwei; Qu, Fuzheng; Wang, Xin; Shi, Yanjun

    2018-04-01

    The reliability of the crane product in engineering is the core competitiveness of the product. This paper used Monte Carlo method analyzed the reliability of the weld metal structure of the bridge crane whose limit state function is mathematical expression. Then we obtained the minimum reliable welding feet height value for the welds between cover plate and web plate on main beam in different coefficients of variation. This paper provides a new idea and reference for the growth of the inherent reliability of crane.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Optical Radiation Emission as a Function of Welding Power during Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Janßen, Marco; Schmitz, Martin; Ott, Günter

    2017-11-01

    Arc welding is accompanied by intense optical radiation emission that can be detrimental not only for the welder himself but also for people working nearby or for passersby. Technological progress advances continuously in the field of joining, so an up-to-date radiation database is necessary. Additionally, many literature irradiance data have been measured for a few welding currents or for parts of the optical spectral region only. Within this paper, a comprehensive study of contemporary metal active gas, metal inert gas, and cold metal transfer welding is presented covering optical radiation emission from 200 up to 2,700 nm by means of (spectro-) radiometric measurements. The investigated welding currents range from 70 to 350 A, reflecting values usually applied in industry. Based upon these new irradiance data, three mathematical models were derived in order to describe optical radiation emission as a function of welding power. The linear, exponential, and sigmoidal emission models depend on the process variant (standard or pulsed) as well as on the welding material (mild and stainless steel, aluminum). In conjunction with the corresponding exposure limit values for incoherent optical radiation maximum permissible exposure durations were calculated as a function of welding power. Typical times are shorter than 1 s for the ultraviolet spectral region and range from 1 to 10 s for visible radiation. For the infrared regime, exposure durations are of the order of minutes to hours. Finally, a validation of the metal active gas emission models was carried out with manual arc welding.

  15. Fracture assessment for a dissimilar metal weld of low alloy steel and Ni-base alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Takuya, E-mail: takuya4.ogawa@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, Power and Industrial Systems Research and Development Center, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Itatani, Masao; Saito, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Takahiro; Narazaki, Chihiro; Tsuchihashi, Kentaro [Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, Power and Industrial Systems Research and Development Center, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    Recently, instances of SCC in Ni-base alloy weld metal of light water reactor components have been reported. Despite the possibility of propagation of SCC crack to the fusion line between low alloy steel (LAS) of pressure vessel and Ni-base alloy of internal structure, a fracture assessment method of dissimilar metal welded joint has not been established. The objective of this study is to investigate a fracture mode of dissimilar metal weld of LAS and Ni-base alloy for development of a fracture assessment method for dissimilar metal weld. Fracture tests were conducted using two types of dissimilar metal weld test plates with semi-elliptical surface crack. In one of the test plates, the fusion line lies around the surface points of the surface crack and the crack tips at the surface points have intruded into LAS. Material ahead of the crack tip at the deepest point is Ni-base alloy. In the other, the fusion line lies around the deepest point of the surface crack and the crack tip at the deepest point has intruded into LAS. Material ahead of the crack tip at the deepest point is LAS. The results of fracture tests using the former type of test plate reveal that the collapse load considering the proportion of ligament area of each material gives a good estimation for fracture load. That is, fracture assessment based on plastic collapse mode is applicable to the former type of test plate. It is also understood that a fracture assessment method based on the elastic-plastic fracture mode is suitable for the latter type of test plate.

  16. Some observations on the physical metallurgy of nickel alloy weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillern, C.G.; Lingenfelter, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous nickel alloys play critical roles in various energy-related applications. Successful use of these alloys is almost always dependent on the availability of acceptable welding methods and welding products. An understanding of the physical metallurgy of these alloys and their weld metals and the interaction of weld metal and base metal is essential to take full advantage of the useful properties of the alloys. To illustrate this point, this paper presents data for two materials: INCONEL alloy 718 and INCONEL Welding Electrode 132. 8 figures, 9 tables

  17. Predicting of bead undercut defects in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jing XU; Chuan-song WU; De-gang ZOU

    2008-01-01

    In the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, when the welding speed reaches a certain threshold, there will be an onset of weld bead undercut defects which limit the further increase of the welding speed. Establishing a mathematical model for high-speed GMAW to predict the tendency of bead undercuts is of great significance to pre-vent such defects. Under the action of various forces, the transferred metal from filler wire to the weld pool, and the geometry and dimension of the pool itself decide if the bead undercut occurs or not. The previous model simpli-fied the pool shape too much. In this paper, based on the actual weld pool geometry and dimension calculated from a numerical model, a hydrostatic model for liquid metal surface is used to study the onset of bead undercut defects in the high-speed welding process and the effects of dif-ferent welding parameters on the bead undercut tendency.

  18. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  19. Metal arc welding and the risk of skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltoft, K N; Slagor, R M; Agner, T

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Arc welding produces the full spectrum of ultraviolet radiation and may be a contributory cause of skin cancer; however, there has been little research into this occupational hazard. The aim of this study is to explore if metal arc welding increases the risk of malignant melanoma and....../or basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on skin areas which may possibly be exposed (neck, head, and upper extremities). METHOD: A Danish national company-based historic cohort of 4333 male metal arc welders was followed from 1987 through 2012 to identify the risk of skin cancer....... An external reference group was established including all Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. Occupational histories were gathered by questionnaires in 1986 and information about skin cancer diagnoses [BCC, SCC, cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), and precancerous...

  20. The Concept of Electrically Assisted Friction Stir Welding (EAFSW) and Application to the Processing of Various Metals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferrando, William A

    2008-01-01

    This report introduces a novel variant of conventional friction stir welding (FSW). Since 1991, friction stir welding provides an alternative to arc welding as a metal joining method in numerous applications...

  1. Numerical simulation of gas metal arc welding parametrical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szanto, M.; Gilad, I.; Shai, I.; Quinn, T.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) is a widely used welding process in the industry. The process variables are usually determined through extensive experiments. Numerical simulation, reduce the cost and extends the understanding of the process. In the present work, a versatile model for numerical simulation of GMAW is presented. The model provides the basis for fundamental understanding of the process. The model solves the magneto-hydrodynamic equations for the flow and temperature fields of the molten electrode and the plasma simultaneously, to form a fully coupled model. A commercial CFD code was extended to include the effects of radiation, Lorentz forces, Joule heating and thermoelectric effects. The geometry of the numerical model assembled to fit an experimental apparatus. To demonstrate the method, an aluminum electrode was modeled in a pure argon arc. Material properties and welding parameters are the input variables in the numerical model. In a typical process, the temperature distribution of the plasma is over 15000 K, resulting high non-linearity of the material properties. Moreover, there is high uncertainty in the available property data, at that range of temperatures. Therefore, correction factors were derived for the material properties to adjust between the numerical and the experimental results. Using the compensated properties, parametric study was performed. The effects of the welding parameters on the process, such the working voltage, electrode feed rate and shielding gas flow, were derived. The principal result of the present work is the ability to predict, by numerical simulation, the mode, size and frequency of the metal transferred from the electrode, which is the main material and energy source for the welding pool in GMAW

  2. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  3. A non-destructive evaluation of transverse hydrogen cracking in high strength flux-cored weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterjovski, Z.; Carr, D. G.; Holdstock, R.; Nolan, D.; Norrish, J.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse hydrogen cracking in high strength weld metal (WM) is a potentially serious problem in thick-sections, especially in highly restrained structures. This paper presents preliminary re suits for which transverse weld metal hydrogen cracking was purposefully generated in 40 mm thick high strength WM to study the effectiveness of various non-destructive testing methods in locating and sizing transverse cracks. Transverse WM hydrogen cracking was intentionally produced by: increasing diffusible hydrogen levels through the introduction of 2% hydrogen in CO 2 shielding gas and minimizing interpass temperature and time; increasing the cracking susceptibility of the micro structure by increasing cooling rate with a large-scale test plate and maintaining an interpass temperature below 70 deg C; increasing stress levels with the use of stiffeners and end welds; and rapid postweld cooling to a temperature lower than 100 deg C. The extent of transverse weld metal hydrogen cracking was evaluated by non-destructive testing (NDT), which included conventional ultrasonic testing, radiography, acoustic emission monitoring and magnetic particle inspection. It was established that conventional ultrasonic testing was the most effective of the NDT techniques used. Acoustic emission monitoring revealed that two different types of emissions emanated from the weld metal and that the majority of emissions occurred within the first 48 hours of welding, although there was some evidence of cracking well after this initial 48 hour period. Larger sized cracks were observed near the transverse stiffeners (and weld ends) where tensile residual stresses (both longitudinal and transverse) were thought to be highest and the micro structure was therefore more susceptible to cracking. Additionally, numerous finer cracks were located in the top third of the plate (in the thickness direction) and on both sides of the weld centre line

  4. Modification of the grain structure of austenitic welds for improved ultrasonic inspectability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra; Stubenrauch, Steffen; Jacobs, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Welding is an essential part of the fabrication of austenitic stainless steel components used in industrial plants, such as those designed for nuclear power generation, chemical processing, conventional power generation and, increasingly, for production of renewable energy. The welded austenitic material presents major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure of the weld metal. The typically coarse grain structure, in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material, leads to increased scattering and affects sound wave propagation in the weld. These effects result in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicate the interpretation of signals and the localisation of defects by ultrasonic inspection. This paper presents the results of a research project dealing with efforts to influence grain growth in the weld during the welding process, in particular during the solidification process, in order to produce smaller grains. The objective was to achieve improved sound propagation through the weld, so that inspectability can be improved. The welding process was modified by the application of alternating magnetic fields at different frequencies, as well as different temperature cycles and pulsed arc technology. Metallographic sections of the test welds show that modification of the grain structure can be achieved by the use of these techniques. For further optimisation, test blocks for ultrasonic testing were manufactured with testflaws to study sound propagation through the modified weld and to assess the detectability of test flaws. The results of this investigation are of importance in assessing the integrity of highly stressed components in industrial installations, particularly for those components with stringent requirements on safety and quality.

  5. Tensile flow behaviour of 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steel base metal an simulated heat affected zone structures of 2.25 Cr-1Mo weld joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S. L.; Sastry, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Tensile tests in the temperature range 298 to 873 K have been performed on 2.25Cr-1Mo base metal and simulated heat affected zone (HAZ) structures of its weld joint, namely coarse grain bainite, fine grain bainite and intercritical structure. Tensile flow behaviour of all the microstructural conditions could be adequately described by the Hollomon equation (σ = K 1 ε n1 ) at higher (>623 K) temperatures. Deviation from the Hollomon equation was observed at low strains and lower ( 1 ε n1 + exp (K 2 + n 2 ε), was found to describe the flow curve. In general, the flow parameters n 1 , K 1 , n 2 and K 2 were found to decrease with increase in temperature except in the intermediate temperature range (423 to 623 K). Peaks/plateaus were observed in their variation with temperature in the intermediate temperature range coinciding with the occurrence of serrated flow in the load-elongation curve. The n 1 value increased and the K 1 value decreased with the type of microstructure in the order: coarse grain bainite, fine grain bainite, base metal and intercritical structure. The variation of n 1 with microstructure has been rationalized on the basis of mean free path (MFP) of dislocations which is directly related to the inter-particle spacing. Larger MFP of dislocations lead to higher strain hardening exponents n 1 . (orig.)

  6. Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Ray, Siba P.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

  7. Comparative study on the welded structure fatigue strength assessment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao

    2018-04-01

    Due to the welding structure is widely applied in various industries, especially the pressure container, motorcycle, automobile, aviation, ship industry, such as large crane steel structure, so for welded structure fatigue strength evaluation is particularly important. For welded structure fatigue strength evaluation method mainly has four kinds of, the more from the use of two kinds of welded structure fatigue strength evaluation method, namely the nominal stress method and the hot spot stress evaluation method, comparing from its principle, calculation method for the process analysis and research, compare the similarities and the advantages and disadvantages, the analysis of practical engineering problems to provide the reference for every profession and trade, as well as the future welded structure fatigue strength and life evaluation method put forward outlook.

  8. Gas metal arc welding of butt joint with varying gap width based on neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Hardam; Sørensen, Torben

    2005-01-01

    penetration, when the gap width is varying during the welding process. The process modeling to facilitate the mapping from joint geometry and reference weld quality to significant welding parameters, has been based on a multi-layer feed-forward network. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear least......This paper describes the application of the neural network technology for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) control. A system has been developed for modeling and online adjustment of welding parameters, appropriate to guarantee a certain degree of quality in the field of butt joint welding with full...

  9. Monitoring and Control of the Hybrid Laser-Gas Metal-Arc Welding Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.; Nichol, C. I.; Clark, D.; Todorov, E.; Couch, R. D.; Yu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  10. Development of a process model for intelligent control of gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.; Carlson, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses work in progress on the development of an intelligent control scheme for arc welding. A set of four sensors is used to detect weld bead cooling rate, droplet transfer mode, weld pool and joint location and configuration, and weld defects during welding. A neural network is being developed as the bridge between the multiple sensor set a conventional proportional-integral controller that provides independent control of process variables. This approach is being developed for the gas metal arc welding process. 20 refs., 8 figs

  11. Approximate entropy—a new statistic to quantify arc and welding process stability in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Biao; Xiang Yuanpeng; Lü Xiaoqing; Zeng Min; Huang Shisheng

    2008-01-01

    Based on the phase state reconstruction of welding current in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding using carbon dioxide as shielding gas, the approximate entropy of welding current as well as its standard deviation has been calculated and analysed to investigate their relation with the stability of electric arc and welding process. The extensive experimental and calculated results show that the approximate entropy of welding current is significantly and positively correlated with arc and welding process stability, whereas its standard deviation is correlated with them negatively. A larger approximate entropy and a smaller standard deviation imply a more stable arc and welding process, and vice versa. As a result, the approximate entropy of welding current promises well in assessing and quantifying the stability of electric arc and welding process in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding

  12. Fracture mechanics evaluation of heavy welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, I.; Ericksson, C.W.; Zilberstein, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes some applications of nondestructive examination (NDE) and engineering fracture mechanics to evaluation of flaws in heavy welded structures. The paper discusses not only widely recognized linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis, but also methods of the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM), such as COD, J-integral, and Failure Assessment Diagram. Examples are given to highlight the importance of interaction between specialists providing input and the specialists performing the analysis. The paper points out that the critical parameters for as-welded structures when calculated by these methods are conservative since they are based on two pessimistic assumptions: that the magnitude of residual stress is always at the yield strength level, and that the residual stress always acts in the same direction as the applied (mechanical) stress. The suggestion is made that it would be prudent to use the COD or the FAD design curves for a conservative design. The appendix examines a J-design curve modified to include residual stresses

  13. Liquid phase and supercooled liquid phase welding of bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress on welding in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) has been reviewed. BMGs have been successfully welded to BMGs or crystalline metals by liquid phase welding using explosion, pulse-current and electron-beam methods, and by supercooled liquid phase welding using friction method. Successful welding of the liquid phase methods was due to the high glass-forming ability of the BMGs and the high concentration of welding energy in these methods. In contrast, the supercooled liquid phase welding was successful due to the thermally stable supercooled liquid state of the BMGs and the superplasticity and viscous flow of the supercooled liquid. The successful welding of BMGs to BMGs and crystalline materials is promising for the future development of BMGs as engineering materials

  14. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-01-01

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  15. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  16. Vacuum welding of metals; Soudage des metaux sous vide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J A; Briola, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    This new welding process has been developed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) in France. The edges of the work-pieces are melted by the impact of an electron beam produced by an electron gun. Welding is carried out in a vacuum of 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -8} mm of mercury. The welding machine consists, diagrammatically, of: a) a metal enclosure in which a vacuum is produced; b) a cathode for electron emission, a high-voltage generator for accelerating these electrons, a focusing device; c) a mechanical device for moving (rotating) the work-piece. Advantages of the process: 1) possible welding of highly oxidizable metals (e.g. zirconium); 2) fabrication of high-vacuum-sealed metal containers; 3) production of very deeply penetrated welds. Therefore, this new process is particularly advantageous for atomic power applications, the fabrication of electron tubes and, more generally, for all industries in which very special metals are used. (author) [French] Ce procede de soudage a ete recemment mis au point au Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique en France (CEA). Il consiste a utiliser, pour fondre les levres des pieces a souder, l'impact d'un faisceau d'electrons produit par un canon a electrons. Le soudage s'effectue sous un vide de 10{sup -4} a 10{sup -8} mm de mercure. La machine a souder se compose schematiquement: a) d'une enceinte metallique ou l'on fait le vide; b) d'une cathode emettant des electrons, d'un generateur H.T. permettant d'accelerer ces electrons d'un dispositif de focalisation; c) d'un dispositif mecanique permettant le deplacement (rotation) de la piece a souder. Avantages de ce procede: 1) possibilite de souder les metaux tres oxydables (exemple: zirconium); 2) realisation de 'containers' metalliques fermes sous vide pousse; 3) obtention de profondeurs de soudures considerables. Ce nouveau procede est donc particulierement interessant pour l ' energie atomique, la fabrication des tubes electroniques et, en general, toutes les industries

  17. The Influence of Friction Stir Weld Tool Form and Welding Parameters on Weld Structure and Properties: Nugget Bulge in Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Brendel, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) was patented in 1991, process development has been based upon trial and error and the literature still exhibits little understanding of the mechanisms determining weld structure and properties. New concepts emerging from a better understanding of these mechanisms enhance the ability of FSW engineers to think about the FSW process in new ways, inevitably leading to advances in the technology. A kinematic approach in which the FSW flow process is decomposed into several simple flow components has been found to explain the basic structural features of FSW welds and to relate them to tool geometry and process parameters. Using this modelling approach, this study reports on a correlation between the features of the weld nugget, process parameters, weld tool geometry, and weld strength. This correlation presents a way to select process parameters for a given tool geometry so as to optimize weld strength. It also provides clues that may ultimately explain why the weld strength varies within the sample population.

  18. [INVITED] Evaluation of process observation features for laser metal welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, Felix; Klämpfl, Florian; Nagulin, Konstantin Yu.; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we show how fast the fluid dynamics change when changing the laser power for different feed rates during laser metal welding. By the use of two high-speed cameras and a data acquisition system we conclude how fast we have to image the process to measure the fluid dynamics with a very high certainty. Our experiments show that not all process features which can be measured during laser welding do represent the process behavior similarly well. Despite the good visibility of the vapor plume the monitoring of its movement is less suitable as an input signal for a closed-loop control. The features measured inside the keyhole show a good correlation with changes of process parameters. Due to its low noise, the area of the keyhole opening is well suited as an input signal for a closed-loop control of the process.

  19. Effect of nickel content on mechanical properties and fracture toughness of weld metal of WWER-1000 reactor vessel welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Vasilchenko, G.S.; Starchenko, E.G.; Nosov, S.I

    2004-08-01

    Welding of WWER-1000 reactor vessel of steel 15X2HMPHIA is performed using the C{sub B}-12X2H2MAA wire and PHI-16 or PHI-16A flux. Nickel content in the weld metal usually lays within the limits 1.2-1.9%. The experimental data is shown on the weld metal with the nickel contents 1.28-2.45% after irradiation with fluence up to 260.10{sup 22}n/m{sup 2} at energy more than 0.5 MEV. The embrittlement was measured by shift of critical brittleness temperature. Has appeared, that the weld metal with the low nickel content is the least responsive to irradiation embrittlement. The mechanical properties and fracture toughness of the weld metal with the contents of a nickel less than 1.3% are studied. Specimens CT-1T are tested, the 'master-curve', and its confidence bounds with probability of destruction 5 and 95% is built. 'Master-curve' in the specified confidence interval is affirmed by CT-4T specimens test data. Is shown, that the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of the weld metal with the contents of nickel less than 1.3% satisfy the normative requirements.

  20. Effect of nickel content on mechanical properties and fracture toughness of weld metal of WWER-1000 reactor vessel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Vasilchenko, G.S.; Starchenko, E.G.; Nosov, S.I.

    2004-01-01

    Welding of WWER-1000 reactor vessel of steel 15X2HMPHIA is performed using the C B -12X2H2MAA wire and PHI-16 or PHI-16A flux. Nickel content in the weld metal usually lays within the limits 1.2-1.9%. The experimental data is shown on the weld metal with the nickel contents 1.28-2.45% after irradiation with fluence up to 260.10 22 n/m 2 at energy more than 0.5 MEV. The embrittlement was measured by shift of critical brittleness temperature. Has appeared, that the weld metal with the low nickel content is the least responsive to irradiation embrittlement. The mechanical properties and fracture toughness of the weld metal with the contents of a nickel less than 1.3% are studied. Specimens CT-1T are tested, the 'master-curve', and its confidence bounds with probability of destruction 5 and 95% is built. 'Master-curve' in the specified confidence interval is affirmed by CT-4T specimens test data. Is shown, that the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of the weld metal with the contents of nickel less than 1.3% satisfy the normative requirements

  1. Metal flow of a tailor-welded blank in deep drawing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Guo, Ruiquan

    2005-01-01

    Tailor welded blanks were used in the automotive industry to consolidate parts, reduce weight, and increase safety. In recent years, this technology was developing rapidly in China. In Chinese car models, tailor welded blanks had been applied in a lot of automobile parts such as rail, door inner, bumper, floor panel, etc. Concerns on the properties of tailor welded blanks had become more and more important for automobile industry. A lot of research had shown that the strength of the welded seam was higher than that of the base metal, such that the weld failure in the aspect of strength was not a critical issue. However, formability of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process was complex. Among them, the metal flow of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process must be investigated thoroughly in order to reduce the scrap rate during the stamping process in automobile factories. In this paper, the behavior of metal flow for tailor welded blanks made by the laser welding process with two types of different thickness combinations were studied in the deep drawing process. Simulations and experiment verification of the movement of weld line for tailor welded blanks were discussed in detail. Results showed that the control on the movement of welded seam during stamping process by taking some measures in the aspect of blank holder was effective.

  2. An Experimental Investigation on APR1400 Penetration Weld Failure by Metallic Melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Sang Mo; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2014-01-01

    The penetrations are considered as the most vulnerable parts with respect to the reactor vessel failure when a core melt severe accident occurs and the corium reaches the lower head. Penetration tube failure modes can be divided into two categories; tube ejection out of the vessel lower head and rupture of the penetration tube outside the vessel. Tube ejection begins with degrading the penetration tube weld strength to zero as the weld is exposed to temperatures as high as the weld melting temperature, which is called weld failure, and then overcoming any binding force in the hole in the vessel wall that results from differential thermal expansion of the tube and vessel wall. Tube rupture assumes that the debris bed has melted the instrument tube inside the reactor and melt migrates down into the tube to a location outside the vessel wall where a pressure rupture can occur, thus breaching the pressure boundary. In the present paper, we have a focus on the tube ejection failure mode, specifically on the APR1400 weld failure by direct contact with a metallic melt. The objective is to investigate experimentally the ablation kinetics of an APR1400 penetration weld during the interactions with a metallic melt and to suggest the modification of the existing weld failure model. This paper involves the interaction experiments of two different metallic melts (metallic corium and stainless steel melts) with a weld specimen, and rough estimation of weld failure time. The interaction experiments between the metallic melts and an APR1400 penetration weld were performed to investigate the ablation kinetics of the penetration weld. Metallic corium and stainless steel melts were generated using an induction heating technique and interacted with a penetration weld specimen. The ablation rate of the weld specimen showed a range from 0.109 to 0..244 mm/s and thus the APR1400 penetration weld was estimated to be failed at hundreds of times after the interaction with the melt

  3. SCC crack propagation behavior in 316L weld metal under high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakade, Katsuyuki; Hirasaki, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Shunichi; Takamori, Kenro; Kumagai, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Umeoka, Kuniyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 316L weld metal is of concern to the BWR plants. PLR pipes in commercial BWR plants have shown SCC in almost HAZ area in high temperature water, whereas, SCC has been arrested around fusion boundary for long time in the actual PLR pipe. The SCC behavior could be characterized in terms of dendrite direction, which was defined as the angle between dendrite growth direction and macro-SCC direction. In this study, the relationship between dendrite growth direction and macro-SCC direction was clearly showed on the fracture surface. The relative large difference of SCC susceptibility of 316L HAZ and weld metal was observed on the fracture surface. In the case of 0 degree, SCC has rapidly propagated into the weld metal parallel to the dendrite structure. In the case of more than 30 degree SCC direction, SCC was arrested around fusion area, and 60 degree SCC was drastically arrested around the fusion area. The large inclined dendrite structure for SCC is highly resistant to SCC. (author)

  4. Welding of metallic fuel elements for the irradiation test in JOYO. Preliminary tests and welding execution tests (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Hironobu; Nakamura, Kinya; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo

    2009-10-01

    Irradiation tests of metallic fuels elements in fast test reactor JOYO are planned under the joint research of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI). Six U-Pu-Zr fuel elements clad with ferritic martensitic steel are fabricated in Plutonium Fuel Research Facility (PFRF) of JAEA-Oarai for the first time in Japan. In PFRF, the procedures of fabrication of the fuel elements were determined and the test runs of the equipments were carried out before the welding execution tests for the fuel elements. Test samples for confirming the welding condition between the cladding tube and top and bottom endplugs were prepared, and various test runs were carried out before the welding execution tests. As a result, the welding conditions were finalized by passing the welding execution tests. (author)

  5. The effect of welding process and shielding atmosphere on the AlMg4.5Mn weld metal properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokic Cvetkovic, Radica; Popovic, Olivera [Belgrade Univ. (Serbia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Burzic, Meri; Jovicic, Radomir [Belgrade Univ. (Serbia). Innovation Center; Kastelec Macura, Sandra [Technikum Taurunum, Zemun (Serbia); Buyukyildirim, Galip [IWE, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, the AlMg4.5Mn alloy has been welded using tungsten inert gas (TIG) and metal inert gas (MIG) processes with different gas shielding atmospheres. Tensile strength, hardness, impact and fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth parameters ({Delta}K{sub th}, da/dN), as well as microstructure were determined. By comparing results for different gas mixtures, the main conclusion for TIG welding was that increased helium content has an important effect on toughness and fatigue crack growth parameters, whereas its effect on other mechanical properties is not significant. On the other hand, in the case of MIG welding, adding helium does not affect mechanical properties, except the fatigue crack growth rate. It was also established that adding nitrogen (TIG welding) and oxygen (MIG welding) reduces toughness and increases crack growth rate, so their use in shielding mixtures is not recommended. (orig.)

  6. Diffusion welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Vasudevan, Asuri K.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor diffusion welded to a portion of a ceramic electrode body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  7. Corrosion resistance of ERW (Electric Resistance Welded) seam welds as compared to metal base in API 5L steel pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Velasquez, Jorge L.; Godinez Salcedo, Jesus G.; Lopez Fajardo, Pedro [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN), Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas (ESIQIE). Dept. de Ingenieria Metalurgica

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of ERW seam welds and the base metal in API 5L X70 steel pipes was evaluated by Tafel tests. The procedure was according to ASTM G3 standard. The study was completed with metallographic and chemical characterization of the tested zones, that is, the welded zone and the base metal away of the weld. All tests were made on the internal surface of the pipe in order to assess the internal corrosion of an in-service pipeline made of the API 5L X70 steel. The test solution was acid brine prepared according to NACE Publications 1D182 and 1D196. The results showed that the ERW seam weld corrodes as much as three times faster than the base material. This behavior is attributed to a more heterogeneous microstructure with higher internal energy in the ERW seam weld zone, as compared to the base metal, which is basically a ferrite pearlite microstructure in a normalized condition. This result also indicates that pipeline segments made of ERW steel pipe where the seam weld is located near or at the bottom of the pipe are prone to a highly localized attack that may form channels of metal loss if there is water accumulation at the bottom of the pipeline. (author)

  8. Study on Intelligent Control of Metal Filling System by Welding Robots in the Open Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available robot model of three-arm and five-degree freedom plus large scope of traversing welding was established, and decoupling of models of “large scope of traversing”, “triangle movement of two arms” and “spherical movement of one arm” was realized. The model of “triangle movement of two arms ”is able to use geometrical calculation to solve the kinematics inverse problem , avoid the multiplicity, improve the calculation speed, eliminate the blind spots of the motions of welding gun of welding robot, and simplify the kinematic pair of kinematic mechanism for the arc filling strategy during welding travelling of robot. Binocular stereo vision camera was used to detect the edges of welds, and laser array sensor was used to detect the amount of metal filling of welds. In completely open conditions, feedback was fused based on sensor data to realize the welding tracking control by welding robot.

  9. Microstructural and mechanical properties on friction welding of dissimilar metals used in motor vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesudoss Hynes, N. Rajesh; Shenbaga Velu, P.

    2018-02-01

    In the last two decades, major car manufacturing companies are exploring the possibilities of joining magnesium with aluminium, via friction welding technique for many crucial automotive applications. Our primary objective, is to carry out an experimental investigation in order to study the behaviour of dissimilar joints. The microscopic structure at the welded joint interface was analysed using an optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope. It was found that, by increasing the value of friction time, the value of the tensile strength increases and the result of tensile strength is found to be 120 MPa at a friction time of 10 s. Micro hardness was found to be higher at the interface of the weldment due to the development of a brittle intermetallic compound. Micro structural studies using SEM reveals, distinct zones such as an unaffected parent metal zone, the heat affected zone, a thermo-mechanically affected zone and a fully deformed plasticised zone.

  10. Manual gas tungsten arc (dc) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. Welding procedure specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW)

  11. Structure evolution of multilayer materials of heat-resistant intermetallic compounds under the influence of temperature in the process of diffusion welding under pressure and their mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhov, Valeriy P.; Karpov, Michael I.; Prokhorov, Dmitriy V. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Multilayer materials of high-resistant intermetallic compounds of some transition metals with aluminum and silicon were obtained by diffusion welding of packages, collected from a large number of the respective foils, such as niobium and aluminum. Materials of intermetallics with silicon were obtained by the welding of packages built from metal foils with Si-coating. The change in the structure according to the temperature of the welding was studied, and the high-temperature bending strength was determined. Key words: multilayer composite, high-resistant material, intermetallic compound, diffusion welding, package rolling, layered structure, bending strength.

  12. Weld characterization of RAFM steel. EBP structural materials milestone 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, A. [Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees, CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay (France); Fontes, A. [Service de Techniques Avancees, CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay (France); Schaefer, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Gauthier, A.; Tavassoli, A.A. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay (France); Van Osch, E.V.; Van der Schaaf [ed.] [ECN Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    In the long term part of the European Fusion technology programme welding of reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM)steels takes a prominent place. The blanket structures are complex and welding is an important element in manufacturing procedures. In the 95-98 program several Structural Materials tasks of the European Blanket Project are devoted to welding of RAFM steels. In the milestone 3 defined for the program a review of the weld characterization was foreseen in 1998. The present report gives the status of tasks and the major conclusions and recommendations of the welding milestone meeting. The major conclusion is that defect free GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), EBW (Electron Beam Welding) and diffusion welds can be accomplished, but further work is needed to assure quantitatively the service boundary conditions. Also for irradiated steel additional work is recommended for the 99-02 period. Development of filler wire material for the European reference RAFM: EUROFER97 is necessary. Establishment of weldability tests must be settled in the next period also. 14 refs.

  13. An investigation on high temperature fatigue properties of tempered nuclear-grade deposited weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X. Y.; Zhu, P.; Yong, Q.; Liu, T. G.; Lu, Y. H.; Zhao, J. C.; Jiang, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2018-02-01

    Effect of tempering on low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviors of nuclear-grade deposited weld metal was investigated, and The LCF tests were performed at 350 °C with strain amplitudes ranging from 0.2% to 0.6%. The results showed that at a low strain amplitude, deposited weld metal tempered for 1 h had a high fatigue resistance due to high yield strength, while at a high strain amplitude, the one tempered for 24 h had a superior fatigue resistance due to high ductility. Deposited weld metal tempered for 1 h exhibited cyclic hardening at the tested strain amplitudes. Deposited weld metal tempered for 24 h exhibited cyclic hardening at a low strain amplitude but cyclic softening at a high strain amplitude. Existence and decomposition of martensite-austenite (M-A) islands as well as dislocations activities contributed to fatigue property discrepancy among the two tempered deposited weld metal.

  14. Residual stress measurement inside a dissimilar metal weld mock-up of the pressurizer safety and relief nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Silva, Luiz L.; Mansur, Tanius R., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvall@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Servico de Integridade Estrutural; Martins, Ketsia S., E-mail: ketshinoda@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Nelo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica

    2015-07-01

    Residual stresses are present in materials or structural component in the absence of external loads or changes in temperatures. The most common causes of residual stresses being present are the manufacturing or assembling processes. All manufacturing processes, such as casting, welding, machining, molding, heat treatment, among others, introduces residual stresses into the manufactured object. The residual stresses effects could be beneficial or detrimental, depending on its distribution related to the component or structure, its load service and if it is compressive or tensile. In this work, the residual strains and stresses inside a mock-up that simulates the safety and relief nozzle of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant pressurizer were studied. The current paper presents a blind hole-drilling method residual stress measurements both at the inner surface of dissimilar metal welds of dissimilar metal weld nozzle mock-up. (author)

  15. Residual stress measurement inside a dissimilar metal weld mock-up of the pressurizer safety and relief nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Silva, Luiz L.; Mansur, Tanius R.; Martins, Ketsia S.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stresses are present in materials or structural component in the absence of external loads or changes in temperatures. The most common causes of residual stresses being present are the manufacturing or assembling processes. All manufacturing processes, such as casting, welding, machining, molding, heat treatment, among others, introduces residual stresses into the manufactured object. The residual stresses effects could be beneficial or detrimental, depending on its distribution related to the component or structure, its load service and if it is compressive or tensile. In this work, the residual strains and stresses inside a mock-up that simulates the safety and relief nozzle of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant pressurizer were studied. The current paper presents a blind hole-drilling method residual stress measurements both at the inner surface of dissimilar metal welds of dissimilar metal weld nozzle mock-up. (author)

  16. Characterization of the dissimilar welding - austenitic stainless steel with filler metal of the nickel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Bruno Amorim; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca; Campos, Wagner Reis da Costa

    2007-01-01

    In elevated temperature environments, austenitic stainless steel and nickel alloy has a superior corrosion resistance due to its high Cr content. Consequently, this alloys is widely used in nuclear reactors components and others plants of energy generation that burn fossil fuel or gas, chemical and petrochemical industries. The object of the present work was to research the welding of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel using the nickel alloy filler metals, Inconel 625. Gas tungsten arc welding, mechanical and metallographic tests, and compositional analysis of the joint were used. A fundamental investigation was undertaken to characterize fusion boundary microstructure and to better understand the nature and character of boundaries that are associated with cracking in dissimilar welds. The results indicate that the microstructure of the fusion zone has a dendritic structure, inclusions, and precipitated phases containing Ti and Nb are present in the inter-dendritic region. In some parts near to the fusion line it can be seen a band in the weld, probably a eutectic phase with lower melting point than the AISI 304, were the cracking may be beginning by stress corrosion. (author)

  17. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    .95–1.21] and the adjusted HR was 1.08 (95% CI 0.95–1.22). Age and diabetes were as expected strong risk factors. Conclusion: We found no increased risk of developing cataract among Danish metal welders who worked with arc welding from 1950–1985. This may be attributed to the effectiveness of personal safety equipment....... increases the risk of cataract. Method: We compared the risk of being diagnosed with cataract from 1987–2012 in a historic cohort of 4288 male metal arc welders against a reference group comprised of Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. For the welders’ cohort...... adjusted for baseline data regarding age, diabetes, and social group. Results: There were 266 welders and 29 007 referents with a diagnosis and/or operation for cataract. The unadjusted HR for cataract comparing ever-welders with referents was 1.07 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0...

  18. Fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel weld metal at 4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1984-08-01

    Selection of the welding processess and weld filler metals for fabrication of a large toroidal superconducting magnet is described. Data available in the literature are collected and compared with data generated in this study for three welding processes, shielded metal arc (SMA), gas tungsten arc (GTA), and flux cored arc (FCA) welds had the highest fracture toughness as measured by K/sub Ic/ estimated from J/sub Ic/. The SMA and FCA welds had about the same toughness, below the GTA values but above the average from the literature. The fracture mode for all three processes was typified by ductile dimples. The fracture morphology of the FCA weld specimens was influenced by the solidification substructure, and small particles were found to be nucleation sites for void formation, especially for the GTA welds. All three welding processes were deemed adequate for the intended service and were used to fabricate the large magnet. A trunnion-type turning fixture eliminated the need for welding in the vertical and overhead positions. The GTA process was used for all root passes, and the horizontal welds were filled by the SMA process. Over 80% of the welds were done in the flat position with the FCA process, and its high deposition rate and ease of operation are credited with contributing greatly to the success of the effort

  19. Improving resistance welding of aluminum sheets by addition of metal powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Naimi, Ihsan K.; Al-Saadi, Moneer H.; Daws, Kasim M.

    2015-01-01

    . The improvement obtained is shown to be due to the development of a secondary bond in the joint beside the weld nugget increasing the total weld area. The application of powder additive is especially feasible, when using welding machines with insufficient current capacity for producing the required nugget size......In order to ensure good quality joints between aluminum sheets by resistance spot welding, a new approach involving the addition of metal powder to the faying surfaces before resistance heating is proposed. Three different metal powders (pure aluminum and two powders corresponding to the alloys AA....... In such cases the best results are obtained with pure aluminum powder....

  20. TIG AISI-316 welds using an inert gas welding chamber and different filler metals: Changes in mechanical properties and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual, M.; Salas, F.; Carcel, F.J.; Perales, M.; Sanchez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This report analyses the influence of the use of an inert gas welding chamber with a totally inert atmosphere on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic AISI 316L stainless steel TIG welds, using AISI ER316L, AISI 308L and Inconel 625 as filler metals. When compared with the typical TIG process, the use of the inert gas chamber induced changes in the microstructure, mainly an increase in the presence of vermicular ferrite and ferrite stringers, what resulted in higher yield strengths and lower values of hardness. Its effect on other characteristics of the joins, such as tensile strength, depended on the filler metal. The best combination of mechanical characteristics was obtained when welding in the inert gas chamber using Inconel 625 as filler metal. (Author). 12 refs.

  1. Effect of Dynamic Reheating Induced by Weaving on the Microstructure of GTAW Weld Metal of 25% Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Joon Sung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the additional growth and/or transformation of the austenite phase that occurs in weld metals of super duplex stainless steel upon reheating is known. However, the effects have not been fully investigated, especially with respect to reheating induced by weaving during single-pass welding. In this work, bead-on-pipe gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW was conducted on super duplex stainless steel to understand the effect of weaving on the microstructure of weld metal. Microstructural analysis, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD, and focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM were carried out to investigate the relationship between weaving and microstructural change. The weaving of GTAW produced a dynamic reheated area just before the weld bead during welding. It was revealed that extensive reheated weld existed even after one welding pass, and that the content of the austenite phase in the reheated area was higher than that in the non-reheated area, indicating the existence of a large quantity of intragranular austenite phase. In addition, the Cr2N content in the reheated area was lower than that in the non-reheated area. This reduction of Cr2N was closely related to the reheating resulting from weaving. TEM analysis revealed that Cr2N in the non-reheated area was dispersed following heating and transformed to secondary austenite.

  2. Development of various welding techniques for refractory and reactive metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonpe, Sunil; Saibaba, N.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), Hyderabad, India with its excellent manufacturing facilities, produces nuclear fuel and structural components for nuclear reactors. NFC has taken up the challenging job of production of various critical components made out of refractory and reactive metals and alloys for nuclear and aerospace applications as an indigenization import substitute program. Refractory metals are prime candidates for many high temperature aerospace components because of refractory metal's high melting points and inherent creep resistance. The use of refractory metals is often limited because of their poor room temperature properties, inadequate oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, difficulties associated with joining or welding etc. These advanced materials demand stringent requirement with respect to chemistry, dimensional tolerances, mechanical and metallurgical properties. This paper discusses in detail various welding techniques adopted in NFC for refractory and reactive metals and alloys such as Nb, Zr, Ti, Ta, Zircaloy, Titanium-half alloy etc. to manufacture various components and assemblies required for nuclear and aerospace applications

  3. Reflection of illumination laser from gas metal arc weld pool surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Xiaoji; Zhang, YuMing

    2009-01-01

    The weld pool is the core of the welding process where complex welding phenomena originate. Skilled welders acquire their process feedback primarily from the weld pool. Observation and measurement of the three-dimensional weld pool surface thus play a fundamental role in understanding and future control of complex welding processes. To this end, a laser line is projected onto the weld pool surface in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and an imaging plane is used to intercept its reflection from the weld pool surface. Resultant images of the reflected laser are analyzed and it is found that the weld pool surface in GMAW does specularly reflect the projected laser as in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Hence, the weld pool surface in GMAW is also specular and it is in principle possible that it may be observed and measured by projecting a laser pattern and then intercepting and imaging the reflection from it. Due to high frequencies of surface fluctuations, GMAW requires a relatively short time to image the reflected laser

  4. Structure formation of 5083 alloy during friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikina, A. A.; Kolubaev, A. V.; Sizova, O. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Filippov, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of structures obtained by friction stir welding and sliding friction of 5083 Al alloy. Optical and electron microscopy reveals identical fine-grained structures with a grain size of ˜5 µm both in the weld nugget zone and subsurface layer in friction independently of the initial grain size of the alloy. It has been suggested that the grain boundary sliding is responsible for the specific material flow pattern in both techniques considered.

  5. Structural behaviour of a welded superalloy cylinder with internal pressure in a high temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udoguchi, T.; Nakanishi, T.

    1981-01-01

    Steady and cyclic creep tests with internal pressure were performed at temperatures of 800 to 1000 0 C on Hastelloy X cylinders with and without a circumferential Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding technique. The creep rupture strength of the TIG welded cylinders was much lower than that of the non-welded cylinders whilst creep rupture strength reduction by the TIG technique was not observed in uniaxial creep tests. The reason for the low creep strength of welded cylinders is discussed and it is noted that the creep ductility of weld metal plays an essentially important role. In order to improve the creep strength of the TIG welded cylinder, various welding procedures with assorted weld metals were investigated. Some improvements were obtained by using welding techniques which had either Incoloy 800 or a modified Hastelloy X material as the filler metal. (U.K.)

  6. Creep properties of EB welded joint on Hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arata, Yoshiaki; Susei, Shuzo; Shimizu, Shigeki; Satoh, Keisuke; Nagai, Hiroyoshi.

    1980-01-01

    In order to clarify the creep properties of EB welds on Hastelloy X which is one of the candidate alloys for components of VHTR, creep tests on EB weld metal and welded joint were carried out. The results were discussed in comparison with those of base metal and TIG welds. Further, EB welds were evaluated from the standpoint of high temperature structural design. The results obtained are summarized as follows. 1) Both creep rupture strengths of EB weld metal and EB welded joint are almost equal to that of base metal, but those of TIG welds are lower than base metal. As for the secondary creep rate, EB weld metal is higher and TIG weld metal is lower than base metal. As for the time to onset of tertiary creep, no remarkable difference among base metal, EB weld metal and TIG weld metal is observed. 2) In case of EB weld metal, although anisotropy is slightly observed, the ductility is same or more as compared with base metal. In case of TIG weld metal, on the contrary, anisotropy is not observed and the ductility is essentially low. 3) Such rupture morphology of EB weld metal as appears to have resulted from interconnection of voids which occurred at grain boundary is similar to base metal. In case of TIG weld metal, however, many cracks with sharp tips are observed at grain boundary, and the rupture appears to have occurred in brittle by propagation and connection of the cracks. 4) It can be said from the standpoint of high temperature structural design that EB welding is very suitable to welding for structure where creep effects are significant, because both of the creep ductility and the rupture strength are almost equal to those of base metal. (author)

  7. Methods of acicular ferrite forming in the weld bead metal (Brief analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Володимир Олександрович Лебедєв

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A brief analysis of the methods of acicular ferrite formation as the most preferable structural component in the weld metal has been presented. The term «acicular ferrite» is meant as a structure that forms during pearlite and martensite transformation and austenite decomposition. Acicular ferrite is a packet structure consisting of battens of bainitic ferrite, there being no cementite particles inside these battens at all. The chemical elements most effectively influencing on the formation of acicular ferrite have been considered and their combined effect as well. It has been shown in particular, that the most effective chemical element in terms of impact toughness and cost relation is manganese. Besides, the results of multipass surfacing with impulse and constant feed of low-alloy steel wire electrode have been considered. According to these results acicular ferrite forms in both cases. However, at impulse feed of the electrode wire high mechanical properties of surfacing layer were got in the first passes, the form of the acicular ferrite crystallite has been improved and volume shares of polygonal and lamellar ferrite have been reduced. An assumption has been made, according to which acicular ferrite in the surfacing layer may be obtained through superposition of mechanical low-frequency oscillation on the welding torch or on the welding pool instead of periodic thermal effect due to electrode wire periodic feed

  8. Influence of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Microstructure, Microhardness, and Toughness of a Weld Metal for Hot Bend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Lin Han

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a weld metal in K65 pipeline steel pipe has been processed through self-designed post-weld heat treatments including reheating and tempering associated with hot bending. The microstructures and the corresponding toughness and microhardness of the weld metal subjected to the post-weld heat treatments have been investigated. Results show that with the increase in reheating temperature, austenite grain size increases and the main microstructures transition from fine polygonal ferrite (PF to granular bainitic ferrite (GB. The density of the high angle boundary decreases at higher reheating temperature, leading to a loss of impact toughness. Lots of martensite/austenite (M/A constituents are observed after reheating, and to a large extent transform into cementite after further tempering. At high reheating temperatures, the increased hardenability promotes the formation of large quantities of M/A constituents. After tempering, the cementite particles become denser and coarser, which considerably deteriorates the impact toughness. Additionally, microhardness has a good linear relation with the mean equivalent diameter of ferrite grain with a low boundary tolerance angle (2°−8°, which shows that the hardness is controlled by low misorientation grain boundaries for the weld metal.

  9. Role of the micro/macro structure of welds in crack nucleation and propagation in aerospace aluminum-lithium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.

    1996-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer the benefits of increased strength, elastic modulus and lower densities as compared to conventional aluminum alloys. Martin Marietta Laboratories has developed an Al-Li alloy designated 2195 which is designated for use in the cryogenic tanks of the space shuttle. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process is currently being used to produce these welds [1]. VPPA welding utilizes high temperature ionized gas (plasma) to transfer heat to the workpiece. An inert gas, such as Helium, is used to shield the active welding zone to prevent contamination of the molten base metal with surrounding reactive atmospheric gases. [1] In the Space Shuttle application, two passes of the arc are used to complete a butt-type weld. The pressure of the plasma stream is increased during the first pass to force the arc entirely through the material, a practice commonly referred to as keyholing. Molten metal forms on either side of the arc and surface tension draws this liquid together as the arc passes. 2319 Al alloy filler material may also be fed into the weld zone during this pass. During the second pass, the plasma stream pressure is reduced such that only partial penetration of the base material is obtained. Al 2319 filler material is added during this pass to yield a uniform, fully filled welded joint. This additional pass also acts to alter the grain structure of the weld zone to yield a higher strength joint.

  10. Reheat cracking susceptibility of new generation 2%CrMo(W)V P23 steel multipass welds made using matching and mis-matching filler metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevasmaa, P.; Salonen, J.; Holmstroem, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2007-06-15

    In comparison with conventional creep resisting grade T/P22, the modified 2%Cr steels T/P23 and T/P24 show nearly twice the creep strength at typical service temperatures of about 520-570 deg C. The possibility of welding thin-wall boiler tubes without preheating or PWHT has promoted the use of T23 and T24 in practical boiler service. For thick-wall applications and multipass welds, welding consumables still require further development to improve creep strength and ductility. Susceptibility to reheat cracking and hydrogen cracking increase with the wall-thickness and structural rigidity of the component. Consequently, thick-wall sections generally require the use of PWHT and sometimes preheating as well. This paper is concerned with weldability of P23 pipe steel, with particular emphasis on reheat cracking sensitivity of simulated HAZ microstructures and thick-section multipass welds made using closely matching and mis-matching filler metals. The results demonstrate that the weld metal is far more critical than the parent steel HAZ, both in terms of reheat cracking sensitivity and ductility and toughness. In the as-welded condition, the weld metal exhibited excessive hardness of {approx}380 HV and only diminutive Charpy toughness at room temperature. Adoption of the PWHT (760 deg C/2h) enhanced the weldment toughness; however, it also inevitably raises risk to reheat cracking in the weld metal that showed values of reduction of area (RA) no more than 2-3% in the BWI cracking test. The results imply that thick-section multipass welds made using filler metal with the chemical composition closer to P24 grade material are much less susceptible to reheat cracking than 'matching' P23 grade welds. (orig.)

  11. Intelligent sensing and control of gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Intelligent sensing and control is a multidisciplinary approach that attempts to build adequate sensing capability, knowledge of process physics, control capability, and welding engineering into the welding system such that the welding machine is aware of the state of the weld and knows how to make a good weld. The sensing and control technology should reduce the burden on the welder and welding engineer while providing the great adaptability needed to accommodate the variability found in the production world. This approach, accomplished with application of AI techniques, breaks the tradition of separate development of procedure and control technology

  12. The influence of plate thickness on the welding residual stresses from submerged arc welding in offshore steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Welding-induced residual tensile stresses and distortion have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of welded structures within the offshore wind industry. The stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint, as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue...... leading to a better understanding of the distribution and development of the welding residual stresses. This can later be used to optimize the fatigue design, providing a more efficient and improved design. In this context, the current research is expected to benefit the offshore industry by leading...... to an improved design, which consequently may be included in future norms and standards. Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) was used to make a fully penetrated butt weld in 10 mm and 40 mm thick steel plates with the same welding parameters as used in the production procedures. The base material is thermomechanical hot...

  13. Boundary element analysis of stress singularity in dissimilar metals by friction welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, N. Y.; Park, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Friction welded dissimilar metals are widely applied in automobiles, rolling stocks, machine tools, and various engineering fields. Dissimilar metals have several advantages over homogeneous metals, including high strength, material property, fatigue endurance, impact absorption, high reliability, and vibration reduction. Due to the increased use of these metals, understanding their behavior under stress conditions is necessary, especially the analysis of stress singularity on the interface of friction-welded dissimilar metals. To establish a strength evaluation method and a fracture criterion, it is necessary to analyze stress singularity on the interface of dissimilar metals with welded flashes by friction welding under various loads and temperature conditions. In this paper, a method analyzing stress singularity for the specimens with and without flashes set in friction welded dissimilar metals is introduced using the boundary element method. The stress singularity index (λ) and the stress singularity factor (Γ) at the interface edge are computed from the stress analysis results. The shape and flash thickness, interface length, residual stress, and load are considered in the computation. Based on these results, the variations of interface length (c) and the ratio of flash thickness (t2 t1) greatly influence the stress singularity factors at the interface edge of friction welded dissimilar metals. The stress singularity factors will be a useful fracture parameter that considers stress singularity on the interface of dissimilar metals

  14. Hybrid laser-gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of high strength steel gas transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Ian D.; Norfolk, Mark I. [Edison Welding Institute (EWI), Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid Laser/arc welding process (HLAW) can complete 5G welds, assure weld soundness, material properties, and an acceptable geometric profile. Combining new lasers and pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P) has led to important innovations in the HLAW process, increasing travel speed for successful root pass welding. High power Yb fiber lasers allow a 10 kW laser to be built the size of a refrigerator, allowing portability for use on the pipeline right-of-way. The objective was to develop and apply an innovative HLAW system for mechanized welding of high strength, high integrity, pipelines and develop 5G welding procedures for X80 and X100 pipe, including mechanical testing to API 1104. A cost-matched JIP developed a prototype HLAW head based on a commercially available bug and band system (CRC-Evans P450). Under the US Department of Transportation (DOT) project, the subject of this paper, the system was used to advance pipeline girth welding productivity. External hybrid root pass welding achieved full penetration welds with a 4-mm root at a travel speed of 2.3-m/min. Welds were made 'double down' using laser powers up to 10 kW and travel speeds up to 3-m/min. The final objective of the project was to demonstrate the hybrid LBW/GMAW system under simulated field conditions. (author)

  15. Fracture Mechanics Approach to X-Ray Diffraction Method for Spot Welded Lap Joint Structure of Rolled Steel Considered Residual Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Yeb; Bae, Dong Ho

    2011-01-01

    Cold and hot-rolled carbon steel sheets are commonly used in railroad cars or commercial vehicles such as the automobile. The sheets used in these applications are mainly fabricated by spot welding, which is a type of electric resistance welding. However, the fatigue strength of a spot-welded joint is lower than that of the base metal because of high stress concentration at the nugget edge of the spot-welded part. In particular, the fatigue strength of the joint is influenced by not only geometrical and mechanical factors but also the welding conditions for the spot-welded joint. Therefore, there is a need for establishing a reasonable criterion for a long-life design for spot-welded structures. In this thesis, ΔP-N f relation curves have been used to determine a long-life fatigue-design criterion for thin-sheet structures. However, as these curves vary under the influence of welding conditions, mechanical conditions, geometrical factors, etc. It is very difficult to systematically determine a fatigue-design criterion on the basis of these curves. Therefore, in order to eliminate such problems, the welding residual stresses generated during welding and the stress distributions around the weld generated by external forces were numerically and experimentally analyzed on the basis of the results, reassessed fatigue strength of gas welded joints

  16. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  17. Correlation of Flux Composition and Inclusion Characteristics With Submerged Arc Weld Metal Properties in HY-100 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    chemistries are complex, the welding engineer needs to obtain the correct CCT diagram for the alloy system in question. Once the CCT diagram is estimated...the CCT diagram must be pertinent to the particular chemistry of the weld metal, especially when the weld metal composition varies with flux

  18. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of 13CrNiMo weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilmes, P.D.; Llorente, C.L.; Saire Huaman, L.; Gassa, L.M.; Gervasi, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic potentiodynamic measurements and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyze susceptibility to pitting corrosion of 13CrNiMo weld metals. In order to carry out a critical assessment of the influence of microstructural factors on localized corrosion, different heat treatments were applied to the alloys under investigation. Volume fractions of austenite in tempered conditions as well as the amount and size of precipitated carbides strongly affect pitting resistance. Characteristic potentials (pitting potential and repassivation potential) increase according to the retained austenite content. Results can be discussed in terms of a model that describes the structural refinement resulting from a double-tempering procedure

  19. The Effect of Heat Input and Composition on Weld Metal Microstructures in Thin Section HY-130 GMAW(Gas Metal Are Welding) Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    weldments, Glover et al. [Ref. Ej show, via a schematic CCT diagram , that austenite should transform to coarse polygonal ferrite with regions of pearlite...are essentially subjected to continuous cooling during solidification, so the resultant microstructures should be predictable from CCT diagrams . Unfortunately...cooling rate variaticn just within a single weld pass. Although individual CCT diagrams for weld metals are generally not available, the influence of

  20. High power X-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1997-12-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10{sup 4} watts/cm{sup 2} and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  1. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [[NRC-2012-0231] Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld... draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1279, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in...

  2. The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on thermal history of an arch - welded steel plate by numerical methods. SM Adedayo. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology Vol. 1(1) 2001: 1-16. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  3. The possibility of using laser and micro-jet technology in the welding of structural elements of vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech MAJEWSKI

    2015-01-01

    A paper presents the possibility of laser welding using micro-jet cooling. The effect of micro-jet cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld metal deposit was carried out. New welding process was analyzed for use in the automotive industry. Studies have confirmed the positive effect of cooling micro-jet cooling both for the MIG welding and laser welding.

  4. Characterization on the Microstructure Evolution and Toughness of TIG Weld Metal of 25Cr2Ni2MoV Steel after Post Weld Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and toughness of tungsten inert gas (TIG backing weld parts in low-pressure steam turbine welded rotors contribute significantly to the total toughness of the weld metal. In this study, the microstructure evolution and toughness of TIG weld metal of 25Cr2Ni2MoV steel low-pressure steam turbine welded rotor under different post-weld heat treatment (PWHT conditions are investigated. The fractography and microstructure of weld metal after PWHT are characterized by optical microscope, SEM, and TEM, respectively. The Charpy impact test is carried out to evaluate the toughness of the weld. The optical microscope and SEM results indicate that the as-welded sample is composed of granular bainite, acicular ferrite and blocky martensite/austenite (M-A constituent. After PWHT at 580 °C, the blocky M-A decomposes into ferrite and carbides. Both the number and size of precipitated carbides increase with holding time. The impact test results show that the toughness decreases dramatically after PWHT and further decreases with holding time at 580 °C. The precipitated carbides are identified as M23C6 carbides by TEM, which leads to the dramatic decrease in the toughness of TIG weld metal of 25Cr2Ni2MoV steel.

  5. Pulsed TIG welding in the fabrication of nuclear components and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, W.; Males, B.O.

    1979-01-01

    TIG welding is an important welding technique in nuclear plant fabrication for the welding of critical components and structures where a high level of weld integrity is demanded. Whilst the process is ideally suited to precision welding, since the arc is a small intense heat source, it has proved to be somewhat intolerant to production variations in 'difficult' applications, such as tube to tube plate welding and orbital tube welding with tube in the fixed position. Whilst the problems directly associated with this intolerance (of the welding process) are less frequently observed when used manually, difficulties are experienced in fully mechanised welding operations particularly when welding to a relatively rigid approved procedure. Pulsing of the welding current was developed as a technique to achieve greater control of the behaviour of the weld pool. Instead of moving the weld pool in a continuous motion around the joint, welding was conducted intermittently in the form of overlapping spots. This technique, which offers significant advantages over continuous current welding has been exploited in nuclear fabrication for welding those components which demand a high level of weld quality. In this paper, the essential features of this technique are described and, in indicating its advantages, examples have been drawn from recent experiences on the welding of two types of joint for the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor, a tube sheet and a butt joint in the G Position. (author)

  6. Process Stability of Ultrasonic-Wave-Assisted Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chenglei; Xie, Weifeng; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao; Fan, Yangyang

    2017-10-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, ultrasonic-wave-assisted arc welding successfully introduced power ultrasound into the arc and weld pool, during which the ultrasonic acts on the top of the arc in the coaxial alignment direction. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by using an additional ultrasonic field. Compared with the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW), the welding arc is compressed, the droplet size is decreased, and the droplet transfer frequency is increased significantly in ultrasonic-wave-assisted GMAW (U-GMAW). However, the stability of the metal transfer has deep influence on the welding quality equally, and the ultrasonic wave effect on the stability of the metal transfer is a phenomenon that is not completely understood. In this article, the stabilities of the short-circuiting transfer process and globular transfer process are studied systematically, and the effect of ultrasonic wave on the metal transfer is analyzed further. The transfer frequency and process stability of the U-GMAW process are much higher than those of the conventional GMAW. Analytical results show that the additional ultrasonic wave is helpful for improving welding stability.

  7. Microstructural Effects on Hydrogen Delayed Fracture of 600 MPa and 800 MPa grade Deposited Weld Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Jae; Lee, Tae Woo; Cho, Kyung Mox; Kang, Namhyun; Yoon, Byung Hyun; Park, Seo Jeong; Chang, Woong Seong

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-delayed fracture (HDF) was analyzed from the deposited weld metals of 600-MPa and 800-MPa flux-cored arc (FCA) welding wires, and then from the diffusible hydrogen behavior of the weld zone. Two types of deposited weld metal, that is, rutile weld metal and alkali weld metal, were used for each strength level. Constant loading test (CLT) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) analysis were conducted on the hydrogen pre-charged specimens electrochemically for 72 h. The effects of microstructures such as acicular ferrite, grain-boundary ferrite, and low-temperature-transformation phase on the time-to failure and amount of diffusible hydrogen were analyzed. The fracture time for hydrogen-purged specimens in the constant loading tests decreased as the grain size of acicular ferrite decreased. The major trapping site for diffusible hydrogen was the grain boundary, as determined by calculating the activation energies for hydrogen detrapping. As the strength was increased and alkali weld metal was used, the resistance to HDF decreased.

  8. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinle Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process.

  9. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinle; Chang, Baohua; Du, Dong; Wang, Li; Chang, Shuhe; Peng, Guodong; Wang, Wenzhu

    2018-01-05

    Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW) technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process.

  10. Microstructural and hardness investigations on a dissimilar metal weld between low alloy steel and Alloy 82 weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.R.; Lu, Y.H.; Ding, X.F.; Shoji, T.

    2016-01-01

    The investigation on microstructure and hardness at the fusion boundary (FB) region of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) between low alloy steel (LAS) A508-III and Alloy 82 weld metal (WM) was carried out. The results indicated that there were two kinds of FBs, martensite FB and sharp FB, with obvious different microstructures, alternately distributed in the same FB. The martensite FB region had a gradual change of elemental concentration across FB, columnar WM grains with high length/width ratios, a thick martensite layer and a wide heat affected zone (HAZ) with large prior austenite grains. By comparison, the sharp FB region had a relatively sharp change of elemental concentration across the FB, WM grains with low length/width ratios and a narrow HAZ with smaller prior austenite grains. The martensite possessed a K-S orientation relationship with WM grains, while no orientation relationship was found between the HAZ grains and WM grains at the sharp FB. Compared with sharp FB there were much more Σ3 boundaries in the HAZ beside martensite FB. The hardness maximum of the martensite FB was much higher than that of the sharp FB, which was attributed to the martensite layer at the martensite FB. - Highlights: •Martensite and sharp FBs with different microstructures were found in the same FB. •There were high length/width-ratio WM grains and a wide HAZ beside martensite FB. •There were low length/width-ratio WM grains and a narrow HAZ beside sharp FB. •Compared with sharp FB, there were much more Σ3 boundaries in HAZ of martensite FB. •Hardness maximium of martensite FB was much higher than that of sharp FB.

  11. A study on the fatigue strength characteristics of ship structural steel with gusset welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jo Park

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess fatigue property by the static overload and average load in the fillet welded joints which is on the ship structural steel having gusset welds. To this end, a small specimen was made, to which the same welding condition for the actual ship structure was applied, to perform fatigue tests. In this study, a method to simply assess changes in welding residual stress according to different static overload was suggested. By measuring actual strain at the weld toe, the weld stress concentration factor and property which is determined by recrystallization in the process of welding were estimated to investigate the relation between overload and fatigue strength.

  12. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filacchioni, G.; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L.

    2002-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program

  13. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  14. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    H.K.D.H. Bhadeshia, A Model for the Microstruc- ture of Some Advanced Bainitic Steels , Mater. Trans., 1991, 32, p 689–696 19. G.J. Davies and J.G. Garland...REPORT Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding Report Title ABSTRACT A fully coupled (two-way

  15. Deviation of longitudinal and shear waves in austenitic stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the ultrasonic inspection of stainless steel weld metal is the deviation of the ultrasonic beams. This can lead to errors in determining both the location and size of reflectors. The present paper compares experimental and theoretical data related to beam steering for longitudinal and shear waves in a sample of 308 SS weld metal. Agreement between predicted and measured beam deviations is generally good. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed

  16. Joining of metals to structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sistiaga, J M; Salvador, J M

    1988-01-01

    A wide review is made on metal-ceramics joining by brazing, mainly by active metal containing brazing filler alloys and solid state welding that is diffusion welding and hot isostatic pressure (HIP). Both the basic aspects of the processes and the mechanisms involved are considsered. At last, different joint testing ands evaluation procedures are presented. (Author)

  17. Joining of metals to structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sistiaga, J.M.; Salvador, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A wide review is made on metal-ceramics joining by brazing, mainly by active metal containing brazing filler alloys and solid state welding that is diffusion welding and hot isostatic pressure (HIP). Both the basic aspects of the processes and the mechanisms involved are considered. At last, different joint testing and evaluation procedures are presented. (Author)

  18. Collision Welding of Dissimilar Materials by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: A Breakthrough Technology for Dissimilar Metal Joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daehn, Glenn S. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Vivek, Anupam [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, Bert C. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2016-09-30

    This work demonstrated and further developed Vaporizing Foil Actuator Welding (VFAW) as a viable technique for dissimilar-metal joining for automotive lightweighting applications. VFAW is a novel impact welding technology, which uses the pressure developed from electrically-assisted rapid vaporization of a thin aluminum foil (the consumable) to launch and ultimately collide two of more pieces of metal to create a solid-state bond between them. 18 dissimilar combinations of automotive alloys from the steel, aluminum and magnesium alloy classes were screened for weldability and characterized by metallography of weld cross sections, corrosion testing, and mechanical testing. Most combinations, especially a good number of Al/Fe pairs, were welded successfully. VFAW was even able to weld combinations of very high strength materials such as 5000 and 6000 series aluminum alloys to boron and dual phase steels, which is difficult to impossible by other joining techniques such as resistance spot welding, friction stir welding, or riveting. When mechanically tested, the samples routinely failed in a base metal rather than along the weld interface, showing that the weld was stronger than either of the base metals. As for corrosion performance, a polymer-based protective coating was used to successfully combat galvanic corrosion of 5 Al/Fe pairs through a month-long exposure to warm salt fog. In addition to the technical capabilities, VFAW also consumes little energy compared to conventional welding techniques and requires relatively light, flexible tooling. Given the technical and economic advantages, VFAW can be a very competitive joining technology for automotive lightweighting. The success of this project and related activities has resulted in substantial interest not only within the research community but also various levels of automotive supply chain, which are collaborating to bring this technology to commercial use.

  19. Investigation on Explosive Welding of Zr53Cu35Al12 Bulk Metallic Glass with Crystalline Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianrui; Chen, Pengwan; Zhou, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    A Zr53Cu35Al12 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was welded to a crystalline Cu using explosive welding technique. The morphology and the composition of the composite were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The investigation indicated that the BMG and Cu were tightly joined together without visible defects, and a thin diffusion layer appeared at the interface. The captured jet at the end of the welding region mostly comes from the Cu side. Amorphous and partially crystallized structures have been observed within the diffusion layer, but the BMG in close proximity to the interface still retains its amorphous state. Nanoindentation tests reveal that the interface exhibits an increment in hardness compared with the matrix on both sides.

  20. Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

  1. Finite element analysis and measurement for residual stress of dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle mockup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Ryong; Park, Jai Hak

    2009-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis and experiment for weld residual stress (WRS) in the pressurizer safety nozzle mockup is described in various processes and results. Foremost of which is the dissimilar simulation metal welding (DMW) between carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel. Thermal and structural analyses were compared with actual residual stress, and actual measurements of. Magnitude and distribution of WRS in the nozzle mockup were assessed. Two measurement methods were used: hole-drilling method (HDM) with strain gauge for residual stress on the surface of the mockup, and block removal and splitting layer (BRSL) method for through-thickness. FE analysis and measurement data showed good agreement. In conclusion, the characteristics of weld residual stress of DMW could be well understood and the simplified FE analysis was verified as acceptable for estimating WRS

  2. Finite element analysis and measurement for residual stress of dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle mockup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    Finite element (FE) analysis and experiment for weld residual stress (WRS) in the pressurizer safety nozzle mockup is described in various processes and results. Foremost of which is the dissimilar simulation metal welding (DMW) between carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel. Thermal and structural analyses were compared with actual residual stress, and actual measurements of. Magnitude and distribution of WRS in the nozzle mockup were assessed. Two measurement methods were used: hole-drilling method (HDM) with strain gauge for residual stress on the surface of the mockup, and block removal and splitting layer (BRSL) method for through-thickness. FE analysis and measurement data showed good agreement. In conclusion, the characteristics of weld residual stress of DMW could be well understood and the simplified FE analysis was verified as acceptable for estimating WRS

  3. Crystalline structure of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to find the crystalline structure of metals on the basis of the existing theory of metals. The considerations are limited to the case of free crystals, that is, not subjected to any stresses and with T=0. The energy of the crystal lattice has been defined and the dependence of each term on structures and other properties of metals has been described. The energy has been used to find the values of crystalline structure parameters as the values at which the energy has an absolute minimum. The stability of the structure has been considered in cases of volume changes and shearing deformations. A semiqualitative description has been obtained which explains characteristic properties of one-electron metals. (S.B.)

  4. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  5. MODEL PEMBELAJARAN PRAKTIK PENGELASAN SHIELED METAL ARC WELDING(SMAW POSISI 1G JURUSAN TEKNIK PENGELASAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masri Bin Ardin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk: (1 mendeskripsikan model pembelajaran praktik yang berlangsung atau disebut model pembelajaran regular praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G di SMK Negeri 2 Pengasih; (2 mengetahui efektifitas dan mendeskripsikan bahan yang digunakan dalam praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G, misalnya: besi plat, mata gerinda, elektroda, dan waktu yang digunakan selama praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian deskriptif dengan teknik pengumpulan data menggunakan wawancara, dokumentasi, angket dan penilaian skill pengelasan. Asessment skill pengelasan mengacu pada Acean Skill Welding Competition. Hasil penelitian yaitu: (1 model pembelajaran praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G terdiri dari 4 pertemuan teori dan 13 pertemuan praktik; (2 model pembelajaran praktik pengelasan di SMKN 2 Pengasih sudah efektif tetapi untuk rutinitas pengelasan belum efektif untuk membentuk skill pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G dengan sistem assesment Asean Skill Welding Competition. Fasilitas utama dalam praktek pengelasan SMAW posisi 1G adalah mesin las. Sementara itu SMKN 2 pengasih memiliki 6 buah mesin las dengan rasio 1 mesin las untuk 5 orang siswa. Bahan habis pakai untuk 30 orang siswa per semester yang menggunakan model pembelajaran praktek pengelasan adalah besi plat ± 100-150 kg, mata gerinda total ± 5-6 keping, elektroda ± 9-10 box dan total waktunya aktif 77 jam selama satu semester. Kata kunci: pembelajaran Praktik Pengelasan SMAW, Skill Siswa untuk Posisi 1G LEARNING MODEL OF SHIELD METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW PRACTICE OF 1G POSITION AT THE WELDING ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Abstract This research aimed to: (1 describe the learning model of shield metal arc welding (SMAW practice of 1G position at the Welding Engineering Department of State Vocational High School (SMKN 2 Pengasih; (2 find the effectiveness and describe materials needed in the learning model of shield metal arc welding (SMAW practice of 1G position, for examples

  6. Modelling of gas-metal arc welding taking into account metal vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnick, M; Fuessel, U; Hertel, M; Haessler, M [Institute of Surface and Manufacturing Technology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Spille-Kohoff, A [CFX Berlin Software GmbH, Karl-Marx-Allee 90, 10243 Berlin (Germany); Murphy, A B [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2010-11-03

    The most advanced numerical models of gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) neglect vaporization of metal, and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as is also common practice for models of gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW). These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to GTAW arcs. However, spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to measurements of GTAW arcs, they have shown the presence of a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. This paper presents a GMAW model that takes into account metal vapour and that is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial distributions of temperature and electric current density. The influence of different values for the net radiative emission coefficient of iron vapour, which vary by up to a factor of hundred, is examined. It is shown that these net emission coefficients cause differences in the magnitudes, but not in the overall trends, of the radial distribution of temperature and current density. Further, the influence of the metal vaporization rate is investigated. We present evidence that, for higher vaporization rates, the central flow velocity inside the arc is decreased and can even change direction so that it is directed from the workpiece towards the wire, although the outer plasma flow is still directed towards the workpiece. In support of this thesis, we have attempted to reproduce the measurements of Zielinska et al for spray-transfer mode GMAW numerically, and have obtained reasonable agreement.

  7. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Test and Analysis Correlation of a Large-Scale, Orthogrid-Stiffened Metallic Cylinder without Weld Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michelle T.; Hilburger, Mark W.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Lindell, Michael C.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Project (SBKF) was established in 2007 by the NESC with the primary objective to develop analysis-based buckling design factors and guidelines for metallic and composite launch-vehicle structures.1 A secondary objective of the project is to advance technologies that have the potential to increase the structural efficiency of launch-vehicles. The SBKF Project has determined that weld-land stiffness discontinuities can significantly reduce the buckling load of a cylinder. In addition, the welding process can introduce localized geometric imperfections that can further exacerbate the inherent buckling imperfection sensitivity of the cylinder. Therefore, single-piece barrel fabrication technologies can improve structural efficiency by eliminating these weld-land issues. As part of this effort, SBKF partnered with the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch (AMPB) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), the Mechanical and Fabrication Branch at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and ATI Forged Products to design and fabricate an 8-ft-diameter orthogrid-stiffened seamless metallic cylinder. The cylinder was subjected to seven subcritical load sequences (load levels that are not intended to induce test article buckling or material failure) and one load sequence to failure. The purpose of this test effort was to demonstrate the potential benefits of building cylindrical structures with no weld lands using the flow-formed manufacturing process. This seamless barrel is the ninth 8-ft-diameter metallic barrel and the first single-piece metallic structure to be tested under this program.

  9. Stress Analysis of Non-Ferrous Metals Welds by Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravarikova Helena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy welded material unevenly heated and thus supports the creation of tension. During the fusing process welding transient tensions generated in the welded material. Generation of the transient tensions depends on the thermal expansion and fixed permanently welded parts. Tensions are the result of the interaction of material particles. For welded parts and constructions it is necessary to know the size and direction of application of tensions. The emerging tensions can cause local change or a total deformation of welded materials. Deformations and residual stresses impair the performance of a welded construction, reduces the stability of the parts. To reduce or eliminate of action or a screening direction stresses and strains it is necessary to know the mechanism of their emergence. It is now possible to examine the emergence of tensions numerical experiments on any model using numerical simulation using FEM. Results of numerical experiment is the analysis of stress and deformation course. In the plane the tension it divided into normal σ and τ tangential folders. Decomposition stress on components simplifies the stress analysis. The results obtained from numerical analysis are correct to predict the stress distribution and size. The paper presents the results of numerical experiments stress analysis solutions fillet welds using FEM numerical simulation of welding of non-ferrous metals.

  10. Novel manufacturing process of nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas welding by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M., E-mail: fattahi.put@gmail.com [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noei Aghaei, V. [Aerospace Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabiri, A.R. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, S. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, S.; Fattahi, Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-11

    In the present work, accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used as an effective method for manufacturing nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. After welding, the distribution of ceramic nanoparticles and mechanical properties of welds were investigated. By applying ARB, ceramic nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the composite filler metals. Consequently, the welds produced by these filler metals had a uniform dispersion of ceramic nanoparticles in their compositions. The test results showed that the yield strength of welds was greatly increased when using the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals. The improvement in the yield strength was attributed to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and Orowan strengthening mechanisms. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals can serve as a novel filler metal for TIG welding of aluminum and its alloys.

  11. Pulse current gas metal arc welding characteristics, control and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Prakriti Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is a first-of-its-kind compilation on high deposition pulse current GMAW process. The nine chapters of this monograph may serve as a comprehensive knowledge tool to use advanced welding engineering in prospective applications. The contents of this book will prove useful to the shop floor welding engineer in handling this otherwise critical welding process with confidence. It will also serve to inspire researchers to think critically on more versatile applications of the unique nature of pulse current in GMAW process to develop cutting edge welding technology.

  12. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  13. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  14. Occupational asthma due to manual metal-arc welding of special stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannu, T; Piipari, R; Kasurinen, H; Keskinen, H; Tuppurainen, M; Tuomi, T

    2005-10-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) can be induced by fumes of manual metal-arc welding on stainless steel. In recent years, the use of special stainless steels (SSS) with high chromium content has increased. This study presents two cases of OA caused by manual metal-arc welding on SSS. In both cases, the diagnosis of OA was based on respiratory symptoms, occupational exposure and positive findings in the specific challenge tests. In the first case, a 46-yr-old welder had experienced severe dyspnoea while welding SSS (SMO steel), but not in other situations. Challenge tests with both mild steel and stainless steel using a common electrode were negative. Welding SSS with a special electrode caused a delayed 37% drop in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). In the second case, a 34-yr-old male had started to experience dyspnoea during the past few years, while welding especially SSS (Duplex steel). The workplace peak expiratory flow monitoring was suggestive of OA. Challenge tests with both mild steel and stainless steel using a common electrode did not cause bronchial obstruction. Welding SSS with a special electrode caused a delayed 31% drop in FEV1. In conclusion, exposure to manual metal-arc welding fumes of special stainless steel should be considered as a new cause of occupational asthma.

  15. Experimental Development of Dual Phase Steel Laser-arc Hybrid Welding and its Comparison to Laser and Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Duarte Antunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Dual phase DP600 steels have been used in many automobile structures and laser welding has been the standard method for the joining of different sections. This work proposed a comparison between laser welding with arc welding (GMAW and with hybrid laser-arc welding in order to access the microstructures and the mechanical behavior. The laser and hybrid welds are competitive in terms of microstructure and mechanical behavior, presenting both acceptable and tough welds. The maximum ductility of the laser and hybrid welds are very similar, around 14%, and near to the values observed in the base material. The GMAW presents low ductility due to the softening caused by tampering of the martensite, and thus is unacceptable as the welding procedure.

  16. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  17. High-strength structural steels; their properties, and the problems encountered during the welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwer, D.

    1978-01-01

    High-strength structural steels, manufacture, properties. Requirements to be met by the welded joints of high-strength structural steels. Influence of the welding conditions on the mechanical properties in the heat-affected zone. Cold-cracking behaviour of welded joints. Economic efficiency of high-strength structural steels. Applications. (orig.) [de

  18. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  19. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Cu54Ni6Zr22Ti18 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Changhee; Lee, D.M.; Sun, J.H.; Shin, S.Y.; Bae, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to weld Cu 54 Ni 6 Zr 22 Ti 18 (numbers indicate at.%) metallic glass with glass forming ability of 6 mm. Through a single pulse irradiation on the glassy plate, the pulse condition for welding without crystallization was investigated. Under the selected pulse condition, the Cu 54 Ni 6 Zr 22 Ti 18 plate was periodically welded with different welding speeds. For the welding speed of 60 mm/min, no crystallization was observed in both weldment and heat-affected zone. For the 20 mm/min, the crystallized areas with a band shape were observed along the welding direction

  20. Weld metal resistant to neutron-bombardment embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention is the provision of a broad range of weldments for reactor pressure vessels that exhibit resistance to neutron-induced changes sufficient to prevent the weldments from being limiting factors in reactor operation. The weld materials of the present invention are defined by as deposited weight percentages in the following ranges: carbon 0.00-0.l5, manganese 1.00 - 2.20, phosphorus 0.000 - 0.015, sulfur 0.00 - 0.02, silicon 0.00 - 0.40, nickel 0.00 - 1.20, chromium 0.00 - 2.50, molybdenum 0.30 - 1.20, copper 0.00 - 0.10, vanadium 0.00 - 0.15, balance essentially iron. A further constraint is that, in its deposited state, A/B <0.4, where A is the sum of the weight percents of nickel and silicon in the metal and B is the sum of the weight percents of manganese, chromium, and molybdenum. (LL)

  1. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerred, N.; Zirker, L.; Charit, I.; Cole, J.; Frary, M.; Butt, D.; Meyer, M.; Murty, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400 C has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  2. Metallic glasses: structural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassif, E.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give a summary of the attempts made up to the present in order to discribe by structural models the atomic arrangement in metallic glasses, showing also why the structure factors and atomic distribution functions cannot be always experimentally determined with a reasonable accuracy. (M.W.O.) [pt

  3. Four examples of non-ferrous metal electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommeria, J.

    1989-01-01

    The welding of superconducting cavity resonators made of niobium for particle accelerators is described. Then the welding of four plates in zircaloy 2 containing the fuel of the Orphee reactor is presented. The two other examples concern power transistor and motor support for planes. 9 figs [fr

  4. Characterization and modelling techniques for gas metal arc welding of DP 600 sheet steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, K.; Prahl, U.; Bleck, W. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Ferrous Metallurgy (IEHK) (Germany); Reisgen, U.; Schleser, M.; Abdurakhmanov, A. [RWTH Aachen University, Welding and Joining Institute (ISF) (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    The objectives of the present work are to characterize the Gas Metal Arc Welding process of DP 600 sheet steel and to summarize the modelling techniques. The time-temperature evolution during the welding cycle was measured experimentally and modelled with the softwaretool SimWeld. To model the phase transformations during the welding cycle dilatometer tests were done to quantify the parameters for phase field modelling by MICRESS {sup registered}. The important input parameters are interface mobility, nucleation density, etc. A contribution was made to include austenite to bainite transformation in MICRESS {sup registered}. This is useful to predict the microstructure in the fast cooling segments. The phase transformation model is capable to predict the microstructure along the heating and cooling cycles of welding. Tensile tests have shown the evidence of failure at the heat affected zone, which has the ferrite-tempered martensite microstructure. (orig.)

  5. Development of friction welding process of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyung Seop; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2004-01-01

    Bulk Metallic Glasses(BMG) with good mechanical properties have problems that engineering application fields have been limited because of limitation of the alloy size. In order to solving this problem, the friction welding of BMG has been tried using the superplastic-like deformation behavior under the supercooled liquid region. The apparatus for friction welding test was designed and constructed using pneumatic cylinder and gripper based on a conventional lathe. Friction welding have been tried to combination of same BMG alloy and crystalline alloys. The results of welding test were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, measurement of hardness and mechanical properties test. In order to obtain the optimized welding test conditions the temperature of friction interface was measured using Infrared thermal imager

  6. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  7. Main alloy elements in covered electrodes in terms of the amount of oxygen in weld metal deposits (WMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Węgrzyn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There were investigated properties of WMD, especially metallographic structure, toughness and fatigue strength of welds with various oxygen amount. The connection between the properties of welds with the content of oxygen in WMD were carried out. The research results indicate that it should be limited oxygen content in steel welds. Subsequent researchers could find more precisely the most beneficial oxygen amount in the welds in terms of the amount of acicular ferrite in welds.

  8. Residual stress measurements in the dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Mansur, Tanius R.; Scaldaferri, Denis H.B.; Paula, Raphael G.; Souto, Joao P.R.S.; Carvalho Junior, Ideir T.

    2013-01-01

    Weld residual stresses have a large influence on the behavior of cracking that could possibly occur under normal operation of components. In case of an unfavorable environment, both stainless steel and nickel-based weld materials can be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion cracks were found in dissimilar metal welds of some pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear plants. In the nuclear reactor primary circuit the presence of tensile residual stress and corrosive environment leads to so-called Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The PWSCC is a major safety concern in the nuclear power industry worldwide. PWSCC usually occurs on the inner surface of weld regions which come into contact with pressurized high temperature water coolant. However, it is very difficult to measure the residual stress on the inner surfaces of pipes or nozzles because of inaccessibility. A mock-up of weld parts of a pressurizer safety nozzle was fabricated. The mock-up was composed of three parts: an ASTM A508 C13 nozzle, an ASTM A276 F316L stainless steel safe-end, an AISI 316L stainless steel pipe and different filler metals of nickel alloy 82/182 and AISI 316L. This work presents the results of measurements of residual strain from the outer surface of the mock-up welded in base metals and filler metals by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. (author)

  9. Tensile Behaviour of Welded Wire Mesh and Hexagonal Metal Mesh for Ferrocement Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanawade, A. G.; Modhera, C. D.

    2017-08-01

    Tension tests were conducted on welded mesh and hexagonal Metal mesh. Welded Mesh is available in the market in different sizes. The two types are analysed viz. Ø 2.3 mm and Ø 2.7 mm welded mesh, having opening size 31.75 mm × 31.75 mm and 25.4 mm × 25.4 mm respectively. Tensile strength test was performed on samples of welded mesh in three different orientations namely 0°, 30° and 45° degrees with the loading axis and hexagonal Metal mesh of Ø 0.7 mm, having opening 19.05 × 19.05 mm. Experimental tests were conducted on samples of these meshes. The objective of this study was to investigate the behaviour of the welded mesh and hexagonal Metal mesh. The result shows that the tension load carrying capacity of welded mesh of Ø 2.7 mm of 0° orientation is good as compared to Ø2.3 mm mesh and ductility of hexagonal Metal mesh is good in behaviour.

  10. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  11. Characterization of the mechanical properties and structural integrity of T-welded connections repaired by grinding and wet welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terán, G., E-mail: gteran@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Cuamatzi-Meléndez, R., E-mail: rcuamatzi@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Albiter, A., E-mail: aalbiter@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Maldonado, C., E-mail: cmzepeda@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, UMSNH, PO Box 52-B, 58000, México (Mexico); Bracarense, A.Q., E-mail: bracarense@ufmg.br [UFMG Departamento de Engeharia Mecánica Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental methodology to characterize the structural integrity and mechanical properties of repaired T-welded connections using in fixed offshore structures. Grinding is employed to remove localized damage like cracking and corrosion and subsequent wet welding can be used to fill the grinded material. But it is important to define the grinding depth and profile in order to maintain structural integrity during the repair. Therefore, in this work different grinding depths were performed, for damage material removal, at the weld toe of the T-welded connections. The grinding was filled by wet welding in a hyperbaric chamber, simulating three different water depths: 50 m, 70 m and 100 m. The electrodes were coated with vinilic varnish, which is cheap and easy to apply. The characterization of the mechanical properties of the T-welded connections was done with standard tensile, hardness and Charpy tests; microstructure and porosity analysis were also performed. The samples were obtained from the welded connections in regions of the wet weld beads. The test results were compared with the mechanical properties of the T-welded connections welded in air conditions performed by other authors. The results showed that the wet welding technique performed in this work produced good mechanical properties of the repaired T-welded connection. The mechanical properties, measured in wet conditions, for 6 mm grinding depth, were similar for the 3 different water depths measured in air conditions. But for 10 mm grinding depth, the values of the mechanical properties measured in wet conditions were quite lower than that for air conditions for the 3 water depths. However a porosity analysis, performed with a Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), showed that the level of porosity in the resulted wet weld beads is in the range of that published in the literature and some samples revealed lower level of porosity. The main resulting microstructure was polygonal

  12. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  13. Microstructural Evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT Weld Metal for Clad Carbon Steel Linepipe Joints: A Comparator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltin, Charles A.; Galloway, Alexander M.; Mweemba, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Microstructural evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT filler metals, used for the fusion welding of clad carbon steel linepipe, has been investigated and compared. The effects of iron dilution from the linepipe parent material on the elemental segregation potential of the filler metal chemistry have been considered. The results obtained provide significant evidence to support the view that, in Inconel 686CPT weld metal, the segregation of tungsten is a function of the level of iron dilution from the parent material. The data presented indicate that the incoherent phase precipitated in the Inconel 686CPT weld metal has a morphology that is dependent on tungsten enrichment and, therefore, iron dilution. Furthermore, in the same weld metal, a continuous network of finer precipitates was observed. The Charpy impact toughness of each filler metal was evaluated, and the results highlighted the superior impact toughness of the Inconel 625 weld metal over that of Inconel 686CPT.

  14. Microstructure of bonding interface for resistance welding of Zr-based metallic glass sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Toshio; Ikeuchi, Kenji; Shimada, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Akira; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa

    2009-01-01

    Resistance welding of Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 metallic glass sheets was investigated at 723 K in a supercooled liquid region. The welding time was changed from 5 s to 20 s at 723 K. The joint interface of the metallic glass was no defect and no crack. X-ray diffraction technique of the bonding interface of specimens was performed. The specimens showed halo patterns showing existence of only glassy phase, when the welding time was 5 s and 10 s. X-ray diffraction patterns of specimen bonded for 20 s showed crystalline peaks with halo patterns for the welding for 20 s. The crystalline phase at the bonding interface was small. Transmission electron micrograph at the bonding interface showed nanostructures of NiZr 2 and Al 5 Ni 3 Zr 2 . (author)

  15. Direct welding of glass and metal by 1  kHz femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua

    2015-10-20

    In the welding process between similar or dissimilar materials, inserting an intermediate layer and pressure assistance are usually thought to be necessary. In this paper, the direct welding between alumina-silicate glass and metal (aluminum, copper, and steel), under exposure from 1 kHz femtosecond laser pulses without any auxiliary processes, is demonstrated. The micron/nanometer-sized metal particles induced by laser ablation were considered to act as the adhesive in the welding process. The welding parameters were optimized by varying the pulse energy and the translation velocity of the sample. The shear joining strength characterized by a shear force testing equipment was as high as 2.34 MPa. This direct bonding technology has potential for applications in medical devices, sensors, and photovoltaic devices.

  16. Characterization of gas metal arc welded hot rolled DP600 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, K.; Ramazani, A.; Yang, L.; Prahl, U.; Bleck, W. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy (IEHK) (Germany); Reisgen, U.; Schleser, M.; Abdurakhmanov, A. [RWTH Aachen University, Welding and Joining Institute (ISF) (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Dual-phase (DP) steels are suitable candidates for automotive applications due to their high strength and ductility. These advanced mechanical properties result from the special microstructure of the DP steel with 5{proportional_to}20% martensite phase in a soft ferrite matrix. However, during welding, which is an important process in automotive industry, this special microstructure is destroyed. In this research the characterization of Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welded joining zones was performed by optical microscopy and hardness mapping. Tensile tests were also performed keeping the welded portion in the gauge length. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used for the fracture investigation. From the characterization and tensile tests, the soften zones were found, which are caused by the tempered martensite and larger ferrite grain size than that in base metal. Furthermore, GMA welding make a large Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Universal gas metal arc welding - a cost-effective and low dilution surfacing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahi, AS.; Pandey, Sunil

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a new variant of the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, termed u niversal gas metal arc welding (UGMAW), for the weld cladding of low carbon steels with stainless steel. The experimental work included single layer cladding of 12 mm thick low carbon steel with austenitic stainless steel 316L solid filler wire of 1.14 mm diameter. Low dilution conditions were employed using both mechanised GMAW and UGMAW processes. Metallurgical aspects of the as welded overlays were studied to evaluate the suitability of these processes for service conditions. It was found that UGMAW claddings contained higher ferrite content; higher concentrations of chromium, nickel and molybdenum; and lower carbon content compared to GMAW claddings. As a result, the UGMAW overlays exhibited superior mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. The findings of this study establish that the new process is technically superior and results in higher productivity, justifying its use for low cost surfacing applications

  18. Effect of Bainitic Microstructure on Ballistic Performance of Armour Steel Weld Metal Using Developed High Ni-Coated Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanick, A. K.; Das, H.; Reddy, G. M.; Ghosh, M.; Nandy, S.; Pal, T. K.

    2018-05-01

    Welding of armour steel has gained significant importance during the past few years as recent civilian and military requirements demand weld metal properties matching with base metal having good ballistic performance along with high strength and toughness at - 40 °C as per specification. The challenge of armour steel welding therefore lies in controlling the weld metal composition which is strongly dependent on welding electrode/consumables, resulting in desired weld microstructure consisting of lower bainite along with retained austenite. The performance of butt-welded armour steel joints produced by the developed electrodes was evaluated using tensile testing, ballistic testing, impact toughness at room temperature and subzero temperature. Microstructures of weld metals are exclusively characterized by x-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy with selected area diffraction pattern. Experimental results show that weld metal with relatively lower carbon, higher manganese and lower nickel content was attributed to lower bainite with film type of retained austenite may be considered as a most covetable microstructure for armour steel weld metal.

  19. Effect of Bainitic Microstructure on Ballistic Performance of Armour Steel Weld Metal Using Developed High Ni-Coated Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanick, A. K.; Das, H.; Reddy, G. M.; Ghosh, M.; Nandy, S.; Pal, T. K.

    2018-04-01

    Welding of armour steel has gained significant importance during the past few years as recent civilian and military requirements demand weld metal properties matching with base metal having good ballistic performance along with high strength and toughness at - 40 °C as per specification. The challenge of armour steel welding therefore lies in controlling the weld metal composition which is strongly dependent on welding electrode/consumables, resulting in desired weld microstructure consisting of lower bainite along with retained austenite. The performance of butt-welded armour steel joints produced by the developed electrodes was evaluated using tensile testing, ballistic testing, impact toughness at room temperature and subzero temperature. Microstructures of weld metals are exclusively characterized by x-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy with selected area diffraction pattern. Experimental results show that weld metal with relatively lower carbon, higher manganese and lower nickel content was attributed to lower bainite with film type of retained austenite may be considered as a most covetable microstructure for armour steel weld metal.

  20. Residual Stresses in Thick Bi-metallic Fusion Welds : A Neutron Diffraction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohms, C.

    2013-01-01

    Welding is applied in many industrial sectors to join components, and has become an important manufacturing process because it enables the fabrication of structures that could not otherwise be constructed. Weld regions have inhomogeneous microstructures and are more susceptible to crack initiation

  1. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  2. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  3. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  4. Evaluating the Properties of Dissimilar Metal Welding Between Inconel 625 and 316L Stainless Steel by Applying Different Welding Methods and Consumables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourdani, Ahmad; Derakhshandeh-Haghighi, Reza

    2018-04-01

    The current work was carried out to characterize welding of Inconel 625 superalloy and 316L stainless steel. In the present study, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with two types of filler metals (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERSS316L) and an electrode (ENiCrMo-3) were utilized. This paper describes the selection of the proper welding method and welding consumables in dissimilar metal joining. During solidification of ERNiCrMo-3 filler metal, Nb and Mo leave dendritic cores and are rejected to inter-dendritic regions. However, ERSS316L filler metal has small amounts of elements with a high tendency for segregation. So, occurrence of constitutional super-cooling for changing the solidification mode from cellular to dendritic or equiaxed is less probable. Using GTAW with lower heat input results in higher cooling rate and finer microstructure and less Nb segregation. The interface between weld metal and base metal and also unmixed zones was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Microhardness measurements, tensile test, and Charpy impact test were performed to see the effect of these parameters on mechanical properties of the joints.

  5. Nitrogen And Oxygen Amount In Weld After Welding With Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-jet cooling after welding was tested only for MIG welding process with argon, helium and nitrogen as a shielded gases. A paper presents a piece of information about nitrogen and oxygen in weld after micro-jet cooling. There are put down information about gases that could be chosen both for MIG/MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gases on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechanical properties of weld was presented in terms of nitrogen and oxygen amount in WMD (weld metal deposit.

  6. Keyhole shapes during laser welding of thin metal sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalderink, B J; Lange, D F de; Aarts, R G K M; Meijer, J

    2007-01-01

    Camera observations of the full penetration keyhole laser welding process show that the keyhole shape is elongated under certain welding conditions. Under these unfavourable circumstances, the welding process is susceptible to holes in the weld bead. Existing models of the pressure balance at the keyhole wall cannot explain this keyhole elongation. In this paper a new model is presented, accounting for the doubly curved shape of the keyhole wall. In this model, the surface tension pressure has one term that tends to close the keyhole and another term that tries to open it. Model calculations show that when the keyhole diameter is of the same order as the sheet thickness, the latter part can become dominant, causing the keyhole to elongate. Experiments on thin aluminium (AA5182) and mild steel (DC04) sheets verify these model calculations. As the keyhole radius depends on the radius of the focused laser spot, it was found for both materials that the ratio of the spot radius and the sheet thickness must be above a critical value to prevent keyhole elongation. These critical radii are 0.25 for AA5182 and 0.4 for DC04, respectively. Furthermore, differences in appearance of the weld bead between the circular and the elongated keyhole welds could be explained by this model

  7. Materials participation in welded joints manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2016-08-01

    Management of materials dilution to form a joint with higher features asked by complex metallic structures is a problem that took attention and efforts of welding processes researchers and this communication will give a little contribution presenting some scientific and experimental results of dilution processes studied by Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department. Liquid state welding processes have a strong dependence related to dilution of base and filler materials, the most important are for automatic joining using welding. The paper presents a review of some scientific works already published and their contributions, results of dilution coefficient evaluation using weighing, graphics and software applied for shielded metal arc welding process. Paper results could be used for welders’ qualification, welding procedure specification and other welding processes researchers’ activities. The results of Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department, show dilution coefficient values between 20-30 % of base material and 70-80 % of filler material for studied welding process.

  8. Structural Design and Sizing of a Metallic Cryotank Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, David W.; Martin, Robert A.; Johnson, Theodore F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the structural design and sizing details of a 33-foot (10 m) metallic cryotank concept used as the reference design to compare with the composite cryotank concepts developed by industry as part of NASA s Composite Cryotank Technology Development (CCTD) Project. The structural design methodology and analysis results for the metallic cryotank concept are reported in the paper. The paper describes the details of the metallic cryotank sizing assumptions for the baseline and reference tank designs. In particular, the paper discusses the details of the cryotank weld land design and analyses performed to obtain a reduced weight metallic cryotank design using current materials and manufacturing techniques. The paper also discusses advanced manufacturing techniques to spin-form the cryotank domes and compares the potential mass savings to current friction stir-welded technology.

  9. Effect of the welding parameters on all-weld-metal deposited from AWS E10018-M, E11018-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surian, E.

    1996-01-01

    Using each one of the electrodes types AWS A5.5-81-M, from standard batches, three-all-weld metal test pieces were prepared (cold, warm and hot) according to the AWS A5.5-81 standard. In order to have three different values for the heat input, the welding parameters were varied, but always having in mind the mentioned standard requirements. The test pieces were used to determine the mechanical properties and to carry out metallographic studies. the results obtained showed that the alloy deposited by the E10018-M electrode is less sensible to heat input variations than that from both E11018-M and E12018-M electrodes. Therefore, to work with these last mentioned electrodes it is necessary to have a strict control and very exact instructions, even more exacting than those established in the AWS a5.5.-81 standard. 9 refs

  10. Microstructural Characterization and Mechanical Properties Analysis of Weld Metals with Two Ni Contents During Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Da-yong; Han, Xiu-lin; Tian, Hong-tao; Liao, Bo; Xiao, Fu-ren

    2015-05-01

    This study designed post-weld heat treatments, including reheating and tempering, associated with hot bending to investigate the microstructures, toughness, and hardness of two weld metals with different Ni contents (transformation temperature and increased the proportion of acicular ferrite (AF). Furthermore, a high Ni content promoted the martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent formation after reheating. The promotion of the M/A formation increased the number of cementite particles, and accelerated cementite coarsening during tempering. The large-angle grain boundary density from the AF improved the toughness despite the negative effect of cementite. The strengthening contributions were calculated, and the grain refinement was the greatest. The high Ni content decreased the effective grain size with a 2 deg tolerance angle, thus enhancing the grain refinement contribution.

  11. Effect of Pulse Laser Welding Parameters and Filler Metal on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al-4.7Mg-0.32Mn-0.21Sc-0.1Zr Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Loginova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pulse laser welding parameters and filler metal on microstructure and mechanical properties of the new heat-treatable, wieldable, cryogenic Al-4.7Mg-0.32Mn-0.21Sc-0.1Zr alloy were investigated. The optimum parameters of pulsed laser welding were found. They were 330–340 V in voltage, 0.2–0.25 mm in pulse overlap with 12 ms duration, and 2 mm/s speed and ramp-down pulse shape. Pulsed laser welding without and with Al-5Mg filler metal led to the formation of duplex (columnar and fine grains as-cast structures with hot cracks and gas porosity as defects in the weld zone. Using Al-5Ti-1B filler metal for welding led to the formation of the fine grain structure with an average grain size of 4 ± 0.2 µm and without any weld defects. The average concentration of Mg is 2.8%; Mn, 0.2%; Zr, 0.1%; Sc, 0.15%; and Ti, 2.1% were formed in the weld. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the welded alloy with AlTiB was 260 MPa, which was equal to the base metal in the as-cast condition. The UTS was increased by 60 MPa after annealing at 370 °C for 6 h that was 85% of UTS of the base alloy.

  12. Effect of composition on corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.I.; Gooch, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel weld metal in the ranges of 17 to 28% chromium (Cr), 6 to 60% nickel (Ni), 0 to 9% molybdenum (Mo), and 0.0 to 0.37% nitrogen (N) was examined. Critical pitting temperatures were determined in ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ). Passive film breakdown potentials were assessed from potentiodynamic scans in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 50 C. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests were carried out in 30% sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) ar 25 C, which was representative of chloride-free acid media of low redox potential. Metallographic examination and microanalysis were conducted on the test welds. Because of segregation of alloying elements, weld metal pitting resistance always was lower than that of matching composition base steel. The difference increased with higher Cr, Mo, and N contents. Segregation also reduced resistance to general corrosion in H 2 SO 4 , but the effect relative to the base steel was less marked than with chloride pitting. Segregation of Cr, Mo, and N in fully austenitic deposits decreased as the Ni' eq- Cr' eq ratio increased. Over the compositional range studied, weld metal pitting resistance was dependent mainly on Mo content and segregation. N had less effect than in wrought alloys. Both Mo and N enhanced weld metal corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4

  13. The effect of post-weld heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Xixue; Di, Xinjie; Wang, Baosen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-weld heat treatment effects on microstructure of deposited metal are studied. • Coarsening of γ′ phase at different post-weld heat treatment temperature is revealed. • Formation of δ phase in deposited metal is a bainite-like transformation process. - Abstract: The effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal (DM) was examined using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The transformation mechanism of the γ ″ → δ phase and the grain growth kinetics of the γ′ phase during PWHT were revealed. The results indicate that the microstructure of as-welded DM is composed of columnar grains of different sizes, of which the average grain size is approximately 160 μm. Certain precipitates, such as the dispersed γ′ phase, blocky MC-type carbide and irregular shape Laves phase, precipitate in the microstructure of the as-welded DM. Compared with as-welded DM, the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 650 °C for 4 h shows minimal variation. With an increase in PWHT temperature, a large number of body-centered tetragonal γ ″ phases precipitate at interdendrite regions in the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 750 °C for 4 h. When the PWHT temperature increases to 850 °C, the metastable γ ″ phase directly transforms into a stable δ phase in shear mode, which exhibits a similar chemical composition but a different crystal structure than the γ ″ phase. At 950 °C, the γ ″ phase and the δ phase disappear, whereas certain M 6 C-type carbides precipitate at the grain boundaries. Alloying elements such as Nb, Mo, Si, Al and Fe in the microstructure of as-welded DM exhibit segregation behavior. Due to an increasing PWHT temperature, the segregation behavior constantly weakens with minimal evolution to the temperature of 750 °C. Above this temperature, partition coefficients tend toward 1, and

  14. The effect of post-weld heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Xixue [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Di, Xinjie, E-mail: dixinjie@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Baosen [Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Baoshan District, Shanghai 200431 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Post-weld heat treatment effects on microstructure of deposited metal are studied. • Coarsening of γ′ phase at different post-weld heat treatment temperature is revealed. • Formation of δ phase in deposited metal is a bainite-like transformation process. - Abstract: The effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal (DM) was examined using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The transformation mechanism of the γ{sup ″} → δ phase and the grain growth kinetics of the γ′ phase during PWHT were revealed. The results indicate that the microstructure of as-welded DM is composed of columnar grains of different sizes, of which the average grain size is approximately 160 μm. Certain precipitates, such as the dispersed γ′ phase, blocky MC-type carbide and irregular shape Laves phase, precipitate in the microstructure of the as-welded DM. Compared with as-welded DM, the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 650 °C for 4 h shows minimal variation. With an increase in PWHT temperature, a large number of body-centered tetragonal γ{sup ″} phases precipitate at interdendrite regions in the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 750 °C for 4 h. When the PWHT temperature increases to 850 °C, the metastable γ{sup ″} phase directly transforms into a stable δ phase in shear mode, which exhibits a similar chemical composition but a different crystal structure than the γ{sup ″} phase. At 950 °C, the γ{sup ″} phase and the δ phase disappear, whereas certain M{sub 6}C-type carbides precipitate at the grain boundaries. Alloying elements such as Nb, Mo, Si, Al and Fe in the microstructure of as-welded DM exhibit segregation behavior. Due to an increasing PWHT temperature, the segregation behavior constantly weakens with minimal evolution to the temperature of 750 °C. Above this temperature, partition coefficients

  15. Advantages of new micro-jet welding technology on weld microstructure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan PIWNIK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An innovative apparatus to welding process with micro-jet cooling of the weld made it possible to carry out technological tests, which have proved theoretical considerations about this problem. This project gives real opportunities for professional development in the field of welding with controlling the parameters of weld structure. These tests have proved that the new micro-jet technology has the potential for growth. It may be great achievement of welding technology in order to increase weld metal strength. The new technology with micro-jet cooling may have many practical applications in many fields, for example such as in the transport industry or to repair damaged metal elements. The advantages of the new device over the traditional system are the ability to control the structure of the weld, the weld mechanical performance increases and improve the quality of welded joints.

  16. Simulation Based Investigation of Focusing Phased Array Ultrasound in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Hee Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flaws at dissimilar metal welds (DMWs, such as reactor coolant systems components, Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM, Bottom Mounted Instrumentation (BMI etc., in nuclear power plants have been found. Notably, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC in the DMWs could cause significant reliability problems at nuclear power plants. Therefore, phased array ultrasound is widely used for inspecting surface break cracks and stress corrosion cracks in DMWs. However, inspection of DMWs using phased array ultrasound has a relatively low probability of detection of cracks, because the crystalline structure of welds causes distortion and splitting of the ultrasonic beams which propagates anisotropic medium. Therefore, advanced evaluation techniques of phased array ultrasound are needed for improvement in the probability of detection of flaws in DMWs. Thus, in this study, an investigation of focusing and steering phased array ultrasound in DMWs was carried out using a time reversal technique, and an adaptive focusing technique based on finite element method (FEM simulation. Also, evaluation of focusing performance of three different focusing techniques was performed by comparing amplitude of phased array ultrasonic signals scattered from the targeted flaw with three different time delays.

  17. Texture characterisation of hexagonal metals: Magnesium AZ91 alloy, welded by laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouadri, A.; Barrallier, L.

    2006-01-01

    Cooled and cast magnesium AZ91 alloy was welded using a CO 2 laser. The changes in the microstructure were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Modification of the anisotropic properties was evaluated by the characterization of the texture in the base metal, in the core of the welded zone and in the welded zone close to the surface. In the two former zones, we have not observed a texture. Laser welding only leads to a change of the grain size and a disappearance of the eutectic phase. By contrast, in the welded zone close to the surface, the laser process leads both to a finer microstructure, to a loss of the Al-content and to the presence of several texture components. In this zone, our results showed that these textures are on pyramidal {101-bar 1} and prismatic {101-bar 0} planes. Much of the explanation for such texture rests with the fact that during the laser welding, material solidifies in strong non-equilibrium conditions. The kinetics of the nucleation and the growth are partly controlled by the high-rise and high fall of the temperature and the power produced by the laser process. The nature of the texture has been explained by the presence of a columnar to equiaxed transition in the welded zone

  18. Modification of the grain structure of austenitic welds for improved ultrasonic inspectability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.; Dugan, S.; Stubenrauch, S.; Jacobs, O.

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel welds, which are widely used for example in nuclear power plants and chemical installations, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure of the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. The aim of this project is to influence grain growth in the weld during the welding process to produce smaller grains, in order to improve sound propagation through the weld, thus improving inspectability. Metallographic sections of the first test welds have shown that a modification of the grain structure can be achieved by influencing the grain growth with magnetic fields. For further optimization, test blocks for ultrasonic testing were manufactured to study sound propagation through the weld and detectability of test flaws.

  19. ADIMEW: Fracture assessment and testing of an aged dissimilar metal weld pipe assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, J.B.; Hayes, B.; Goldthorpe, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    ADIMEW (Assessment of Aged Piping Dissimilar Metal Weld Integrity) was a three-year collaborative research programme carried out under the EC 5th Framework Programme. The objective of the study was to advance the understanding of the behaviour and safety assessment of defects in dissimilar metal welds between pipes representative of those found in nuclear power plant. ADIMEW studied and compared different methods for predicting the behaviour of defects located near the fusion boundaries of dissimilar metal welds typically used to join sections of austenitic and ferritic piping operating at high temperature. Assessment of such defects is complicated by issues that include: severe mis-match of yield strength of the constituent parent and weld metals, strong gradients of material properties, the presence of welding residual stresses and mixed mode loading of the defect. The study includes the measurement of material properties and residual stresses, predictive engineering analysis and validation by means of a large-scale test. The particular component studied was a 453mm diameter pipe that joins a section of type A508 Class 3 ferritic pipe to a section of type 316L austenitic pipe by means of a type 308 austenitic weld with type 308/309L buttering laid on the ferritic pipe. A circumferential, surface-breaking defect was cut using electro discharge machining into the 308L/309L weld buttering layer parallel to the fusion line. The test pipe was subjected to four-point bending to promote ductile tearing of the defect. This paper presents the results of TWI contributions to ADIMEW including: fracture toughness testing, residual stress measurements and assessments of the ADIMEW test using elastic-plastic, cracked body, finite element analysis. (orig.)

  20. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  1. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-01-01

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80–100 μm between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn 2 , Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg–Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: ► Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. ► Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. ► An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  2. Laser, tungsten inert gas, and metal active gas welding of DP780 steel: Comparison of hardness, tensile properties and fatigue resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Sung Hyuk; Kwon, Hyuk Sun; Kim, Gyo Sung; Lee, Chong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the mechanical properties of DP780 steel welded by three methods. • The size of the welded zone increases with heat input (MAG > TIG > laser). • The hardness of the welded zone increases with cooling rate (laser > TIG > MAG). • Tensile and fatigue properties are strongly dependent on welding method. • Crack initiation sites depend on the microstructural features of the welded zone. - Abstract: The microstructural characteristics, tensile properties and low-cycle fatigue properties of a dual-phase steel (DP780) were investigated following its joining by three methods: laser welding, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and metal active gas (MAG) welding. Through this, it was found that the size of the welded zone increases with greater heat input (MAG > TIG > laser), whereas the hardness of the weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) increases with cooling rate (laser > TIG > MAG). Consequently, laser- and TIG-welded steels exhibit higher yield strength than the base metal due to a substantially harder WM. In contrast, the strength of MAG-welded steel is reduced by a broad and soft WM and HAZ. The fatigue life of laser-and TIG-welded steel was similar, with both being greater than that of MAG-welded steel; however, the fatigue resistance of all welds was inferior to that of the non-welded base metal. Finally, crack initiation sites were found to differ depending on the microstructural characteristics of the welded zone, as well as the tensile and cyclic loading

  3. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin is associated with heavy metal exposure in welding workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kai-Jen; Pan, Chih-Hong; Su, Chien-Ling; Lai, Ching-Huang; Lin, Wen-Yi; Ma, Chih-Ming; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-12-17

    Metals cause nephrotoxicity with acute and/or chronic exposure; however, few epidemiological studies have examined impacts of exposure to metal fumes on renal injury in welding workers. In total, 66 welding workers and 12 office workers were recruited from a shipyard located in southern Taiwan. Urine samples from each subject were collected at the beginning (baseline) and end of the work week (1-week exposure). Personal exposure to PM2.5 was measured. The 8-h mean PM2.5 was 50.3 μg/m(3) for welding workers and 27.4 μg/m(3) for office workers. iTRAQs coupled with LC-MS/MS were used to discover the pathways in response to welding PM2.5 in the urine, suggesting that extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interactions are a critical mechanism. ECM-receptor interaction-related biomarkers for renal injury, kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), were significantly elevated in welding workers post-exposure, as well as were urinary Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni levels. NGAL was more significantly associated with Al (r = 0.737, p welding PM2.5 exposure. Nephrotoxicity (e.g., renal tubular injury) may be an emerging concern in occupational health.

  4. Fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel plate and weld metal steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskovic, R.

    1988-01-01

    Compact tension specimens were used to measure the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel steel plates and submerged arc weld metal. Plate test specimens were manufactured from four different casts of steel comprising: aluminium killed C-Mn-Mo-Cu and C-Mn steel and two silicon killed C-Mn steels. Unionmelt No. 2 weld metal test specimens were extracted from welds of double V butt geometry having either the C-Mn-Mo-Cu steel (three weld joints) or one particular silicon killed C-Mn steel (two weld joints) as parent plate. A multiple specimen test technique was used to obtain crack growth data which were analysed by simple linear regression to determine the crack growth resistance lines and to derive the initiation fracture toughness values for each test temperature. These regression lines were highly scattered with respect to temperature and it was very difficult to determine precisely the temperature dependence of the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance. The data were re-analysed, using a multiple linear regression method, to obtain a relationship between the materials' crack growth resistance and toughness, and the principal independent variables (temperature, crack growth, weld joint code and strain ageing). (author)

  5. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  6. Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Sommer, R.G.

    1985-11-29

    This method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. The exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extrucing beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

  7. Corrosion Characteristics of Welding Zones Welded with 1.25Cr-0.5 Mo Filler Metal to Forged Steel for Piston Crown Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Yul; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-01-01

    A heavy oil of low quality has been mainly used in the diesel engine of the merchant ship as the oil price has been significantly jumped for several years. Thus, a combustion chamber of the engine has been often exposed to severely corrosive environment more and more because temperature of the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber has been getting higher and higher with increasing of using the heavy oil of low quality. As a result, wear and corrosion of the engine parts such as exhaust valve, piston crown and cylinder head surrounded with combustion chamber are more serious compared to the other parts of the engine. Therefore, an optimum repair welding for these engine parts is very important to prolong their lifetime in a economical point of view. In this study, 1.25Cr-0.5Mo filler metal was welded with SMAW method in the forged steel which would be generally used with piston crown material. And the corrosion properties of weld metal, heat affected and base metal zones were investigated using electrochemical methods such as measurement of corrosion potential, anodic polarization curves, cyclic voltammogram and impedance etc. in 35% H 2 SO 4 solution. The weld metal and base metal zones exhibited the highest and lowest values of hardness respectively. And, the corrosion resistance of the heat affected and weld metal zones was also increased than that of the base metal zone. Furthermore, it appeared that the corrosive products with red color and local corrosion like as a pitting corrosion were more frequently observed on the surface of the base metal zone compared to the heat affected and weld metal zones. Consequently, it is suggested that the mechanical and corrosion characteristics of the piston crown can be predominantly improved by repair welding method using the 1.25Cr-0.5Mo electrode

  8. Corrosion Characteristics of Welding Zones Welded with 1.25Cr-0.5 Mo Filler Metal to Forged Steel for Piston Crown Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Yul; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man [Korea Maritime University, Dong Sam-Dong,Yong Do-ku, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Tae-Sil [Pohang College, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A heavy oil of low quality has been mainly used in the diesel engine of the merchant ship as the oil price has been significantly jumped for several years. Thus, a combustion chamber of the engine has been often exposed to severely corrosive environment more and more because temperature of the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber has been getting higher and higher with increasing of using the heavy oil of low quality. As a result, wear and corrosion of the engine parts such as exhaust valve, piston crown and cylinder head surrounded with combustion chamber are more serious compared to the other parts of the engine. Therefore, an optimum repair welding for these engine parts is very important to prolong their lifetime in a economical point of view. In this study, 1.25Cr-0.5Mo filler metal was welded with SMAW method in the forged steel which would be generally used with piston crown material. And the corrosion properties of weld metal, heat affected and base metal zones were investigated using electrochemical methods such as measurement of corrosion potential, anodic polarization curves, cyclic voltammogram and impedance etc. in 35% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. The weld metal and base metal zones exhibited the highest and lowest values of hardness respectively. And, the corrosion resistance of the heat affected and weld metal zones was also increased than that of the base metal zone. Furthermore, it appeared that the corrosive products with red color and local corrosion like as a pitting corrosion were more frequently observed on the surface of the base metal zone compared to the heat affected and weld metal zones. Consequently, it is suggested that the mechanical and corrosion characteristics of the piston crown can be predominantly improved by repair welding method using the 1.25Cr-0.5Mo electrode.

  9. Effects of heat input on pitting corrosion in super duplex stainless steel weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong taek; Shin, Hak soo; Lee, Hae woo

    2012-12-01

    Due to the difference in reheating effects depending on the heat input of subsequent weld passes, the microstructure of the weld metal varies between acicular type austenite and a mixture of polygonal type and grain boundary mixed austenite. These microstructural changes may affect the corrosion properties of duplex stainless steel welds. This result indicates that the pitting resistance of the weld can be strongly influenced by the morphology of the secondary austenite phase. In particular, the ferrite phase adjacent to the acicular type austenite phase shows a lower Pitting Resistance Equivalent (PRE) value of 25.3, due to its lower chromium and molybdenum contents, whereas the secondary austenite phase maintains a higher PRE value of more than 38. Therefore, it can be inferred that the pitting corrosion is mainly due to the formation of ferrite phase with a much lower PRE value.

  10. A comparative study of the microstructure and properties of 800 MPa microalloyed C-Mn steel welded joints by laser and gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qian [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation of Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Di, Hong-Shuang, E-mail: hongshuangdi_ral@126.com [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation of Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Li, Jun-Chen [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation of Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wu, Bao-Qiang [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Material and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    The differences in microstructure and mechanical properties of laser beam welded (LBW) and gas metal arc welded (GMAW) joints of 800 MPa grade Nb-Ti-Mo microalloyed C-Mn steel of 5 mm thickness were studied. The study suggested that the microstructure in welded seam (WS) of GMAW was acicular ferrite and fine grained ferrite, whereas lath martensite (LM) was obtained in WS of LBW, where inclusions were finer and did not act as nucleation sites for acicular ferrite. The microstructure of coarse-grained HAZ (CGHAZ) obtained using the two welding methods was LM and granular bainite (GB), respectively. The original austenite grain size in CGHAZ of LBW was 1/3 of GMAW. The microstructure of fine-grained HAZ and mixed-grained HAZ using the two welding methods was ferrite and M-A constituents, while that of LBW was significantly fine. The hardness of LBW welded joints was higher than the base metal (BM), which was the initiation site for tensile fracture. The tensile fracture location of GMAW welded joints was in WS. The impact toughness of LBW welded joints was excellent and the impact absorption energy was similar to BM.

  11. Effects of delta ferrite content on the mechanical properties of E308-16 stainless steel weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, D. P.; Vandergriff, D. M.; Gray, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of ferrite content on the properties of type 308 stainless steel shielded metal-arc (SMA) welds were investigated. Welds were made at four levels of ferrite content ranging from 2 to 15 FN (Ferrite Number). Creep and tensile tests were performed. Specimens were aged at 1100/sup 0/C (593/sup 0/C) for times up to 10,000 h (36 Ms) and Charpy V-notch impact tests were performed. Chemical analysis of the original deposits, Magne-gage evaluations, and metallographic evaluation of tested specimens were made. The E308-16 stainless steel electrodes were formulated to produce SMA welds with 2, 5, 9, and 15 FN. The ferrite number was made to vary by varying the nickel and chromium concentrations. Magne-gage determinations revealed that as-welded structures contained an average of 1.8, 4.2, 9.6, and 14.5 FN, respectively. Chemical anslysis of these deposits revealed no unusually high concentrations of tramp elements that would significantly affect mechanical properties. The extra low-ferrite electrodes were made with a different core wire, which produced deposits with slightly higher molybdenum concentrations. This variation in molybdenum should affect properties only minimally. From these chemical analyses and a constitutional diagram, ferrite concentrations were calculated, and the results correlated with the Magne-gage values

  12. Mechanical properties of CO2/MIG welded structural rolled steel and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jong Young; Yoon, Myong Jin; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Tae Gyu; Shin, Hyeon Seung

    2015-01-01

    To accomplish long-term use of specific parts of steel, welding technology is widely applied. In this study, to compare the efficiency in improving mechanical properties, rolled steel (SS400) was welded with stainless steel (STS304) by both CO 2 welding method and MIG (metal inert gas) welding method, respectively. Multi-tests were conducted on the welded specimen, such as X-ray irradiation, Vickers' Hardness, tensile test, fatigue test and fatigue crack growth test. Based on the fatigue crack growth test performed by two different methods, the relationship of da/dN was analyzed. Although the hardness by the two methods was similar, tensile test and fatigue properties of MIG welded specimen are superior to CO 2 welded one.

  13. Stress corrosion crack growth rate in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M. P.; Lapena, J.; Lancha, A. M.; Perosanz, F. J.; Navas, M.

    2000-01-01

    Dissimilar welds, used to join different sections in light water reactors, are potentially susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous mediums characteristic of nuclear plants. However, the study of these The ma has been limited to evaluating the weld material susceptibility in these mediums. Little scarce data are available on crack growth rates due, fundamentally, to inadequate testing techniques. In order to address this lack of information the crack growth rate at the interface of ferritic SA 533 B-1 alloy and alloy I-82, in a dissimilar weld (SA533B-1/I-82/316L), was studied. Experiments were conducted in water at 288 degree centigrade, 8 ppm of O 2 and 1 μS/cm conductivity. (Author) 33 refs

  14. Thermal Insulation of Wet Shielded Metal Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Cooling Curves Superimposed on a CCT Diagram ......................... 20 Figure 3.3 Schematic of the Local Drying Method Developed by Satoh...with the Continuous Cooling Transformation ( CCT ) diagram for the steel being welded. An example of a CCT diagram with superimposed cooling curves is...2.5mnm from ar wfusionline 0.1 1.0 10 102 10 3 10 4 10 5 TIME ’,SEC) Figure 3.2 Weld Cooling Curves Superimposed on a CCT Diagram [101 20 fIt

  15. TIG AISI-316 welds using an inert gas welding chamber and different filler metals: Changes in mechanical properties and microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This report analyses the influence of the use of an inert gas welding chamber with a totally inert atmosphere on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic AISI 316L stainless steel TIG welds, using AISI ER316L, AISI 308L and Inconel 625 as filler metals. When compared with the typical TIG process, the use of the inert gas chamber induced changes in the microstructure, mainly an increase in the presence of vermicular ferrite and ferrite stringers, what resulted in higher yield strengths and lower values of hardness. Its effect on other characteristics of the joins, such as tensile strength, depended on the filler metal. The best combination of mechanical characteristics was obtained when welding in the inert gas chamber using Inconel 625 as filler metal.

    En este estudio se analiza la influencia que el uso de una cámara de soldadura de gas inerte tiene sobre la microestructura y las propiedades mecánicas de las soldaduras TIG en el acero inoxidable austenítico AISI-316L cuando se emplean AISI ER316L, AISI 308L e Inconel 625 como materiales de aporte. Cuando se compara con el típico proceso de TIG, el uso de una cámara de gas inerte induce cambios en la microestructura, incrementando la presencia de ferrita vermicular y de laminillas de ferrita, resultando en un aumento del límite elástico y una pérdida de dureza. Su influencia sobre otras características de las soldaduras como la carga de rotura depende de la composición del material de aporte. La mejor combinación de propiedades mecánicas se obtuvo usando el Inconel 625 como material de aporte y soldando en la cámara de gas inerte.

  16. The possibility of using laser and micro-jet technology in the welding of structural elements of vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech MAJEWSKI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A paper presents the possibility of laser welding using micro-jet cooling. The effect of micro-jet cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld metal deposit was carried out. New welding process was analyzed for use in the automotive industry. Studies have confirmed the positive effect of cooling micro-jet cooling both for the MIG welding and laser welding.

  17. Effect of Microstructure on Hydrogen Diffusion in Weld and API X52 Pipeline Steel Base Metals under Cathodic Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the influence of microstructure on hydrogen permeation of weld and API X52 base metal under cathodic protection. The microstructures analyzed were of the API X52, as received, quenched, and annealed, and the welded zone. The test was performed in base metal (BM, quenched base metal (QBM, annealed base metal (ABM, and weld metal (WM. Hydrogen permeation flows were evaluated using electrochemical tests in a Devanathan cell. The potentiodynamic polarization curves were carried out to evaluate the corrosion resistance of each microstructure. All tests were carried out in synthetic soil solutions NS4 and NS4 + sodium thiosulfate at 25°C. The sodium thiosulfate was used to simulate sulfate reduction bacteria (SRB. Through polarization, assays established that the microstructure does not influence the corrosion resistance. The permeation tests showed that weld metal had lower hydrogen flow than base metal as received, quenched, and annealed.

  18. The Measurement of Hardness and Elastic Modulus of non-Metallic Inclusions in Steely Welding Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova Anna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Trunk pipelines work under a cyclic dynamical mechanical load because when oil or gas is pumped, the pressure constantly changes - pulsates. Therefore, the fatigue phenomenon is a common reason of accidents. The fatigue phenomenon more often happens in the zone of non-metallic inclusions concentration. To know how the characteristics of nonmetallic inclusions influence the probability of an accident the most modern research methods should be used. It is determined with the help of the modern research methods that the accident rate of welded joints of pipelines is mostly influenced by their morphological type, composition and size of nonmetallic inclusions, this effect is more important than the common level of pollution by non-metallic inclusions. The article presents the results of the investigations of welded joints, obtained after the use of different common welding materials. We used the methods, described in the state standards: scanning electronic microscopy, spectral microprobe analysis and nano-indentation. We found out that non-metallic inclusions act like stress concentrators because they shrink, forming a blank space between metal and nonmetallic inclusions; it strengthens the differential properties on this boundary. Nonmetallic inclusion is not fixed, it can move. The data that we have received mean that during welded joints’ contamination (with non-metallic inclusions monitoring process, more attention should be paid to the content of definite inclusions, but not to total contamination.

  19. Elucidation of Metallic Plume and Spatter Characteristics Based on SVM During High-Power Disk Laser Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiangdong; Liu Guiqian

    2015-01-01

    During deep penetration laser welding, there exist plume (weak plasma) and spatters, which are the results of weld material ejection due to strong laser heating. The characteristics of plume and spatters are related to welding stability and quality. Characteristics of metallic plume and spatters were investigated during high-power disk laser bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel plates at a continuous wave laser power of 10 kW. An ultraviolet and visible sensitive high-speed camera was used to capture the metallic plume and spatter images. Plume area, laser beam path through the plume, swing angle, distance between laser beam focus and plume image centroid, abscissa of plume centroid and spatter numbers are defined as eigenvalues, and the weld bead width was used as a characteristic parameter that reflected welding stability. Welding status was distinguished by SVM (support vector machine) after data normalization and characteristic analysis. Also, PCA (principal components analysis) feature extraction was used to reduce the dimensions of feature space, and PSO (particle swarm optimization) was used to optimize the parameters of SVM. Finally a classification model based on SVM was established to estimate the weld bead width and welding stability. Experimental results show that the established algorithm based on SVM could effectively distinguish the variation of weld bead width, thus providing an experimental example of monitoring high-power disk laser welding quality. (plasma technology)

  20. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  1. Influence of heat treatments for laser welded semi solid metal cast A356 alloy on the fracture mode of tensile specimens

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kunene, G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available were then butt laser welded. It was found that the pre-weld as cast, T4 and post-weld T4 heat treated specimens fractured in the base metal. However, the pre-weld T6 heat treated specimens were found to have fractured in the heat affected zone (HAZ)...

  2. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld metals in high-temperature water. Influence of corrosion potential, weld type, thermal aging, cold-work and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on crack growth rate measurement in oxygenated high-temperature pure water conditions, such as normal water chemistry in boiling water reactors, using compact tension type specimens have shown that weld stainless steels are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. However, to our knowledge, there is no crack growth data of weld stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary water. The principal purpose of this study was to examine the SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld metals in simulated PWR primary water. A second objective was to examine the effect of (1) corrosion potential, (2) thermal-aging, (3) Mo in alloy and (4) cold-working on SCC growth in hydrogenated and oxygenated water environments at 320degC. In addition, the temperature dependence of SCC growth in simulated PWR primary water was also studied. The results were as follows: (1) No significant SCC growth was observed on all types of stainless steel weld metals: as-welded, aged (400degC x 10 kh) 308L and 316L, in 2.7 ppm-hydrogenated (low-potential) water at 320degC. (2) 20% cold-working markedly accelerated the SCC growth of weld metals in high-potential water at 320degC, but no significant SCC growth was observed in the hydrogenated water, even after 20% cold-working. (3) No significant SCC growth was observed on stainless steel weld metals in low-potential water at 250degC and 340degC. Thus, stainless steel weld metals have excellent SCC resistance in PWR primary water. On the other hand, (4) significant SCC growth was observed on all types of stainless steel weld metals: as-weld, aged (400degC x 10 kh) and 20% cold-worked 308L and 316L, in 8 ppm-oxygenated (high-potential) water at 320degC. (5) No large difference in SCC growth was observed between 316L (Mo) and 308L. (6) No large effect on SCC growth was observed between before and after aging up to 400degC for 10 kh. (7) 20% cold-working markedly accelerated the SCC growth of stainless steel weld metals. (author)

  3. Fabrication and characterization of metal-packaged fiber Bragg grating sensor by one-step ultrasonic welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhu, Lianqing; Luo, Fei; Dong, Mingli; Ding, Xiangdong; He, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A metallic packaging technique of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is developed for measurement of strain and temperature, and it can be simply achieved via one-step ultrasonic welding. The average strain transfer rate of the metal-packaged sensor is theoretically evaluated by a proposed model aiming at surface-bonded metallic packaging FBG. According to analytical results, the metallic packaging shows higher average strain transfer rate compared with traditional adhesive packaging under the same packaging conditions. Strain tests are performed on an elaborate uniform strength beam for both tensile and compressive strains; strain sensitivities of approximately 1.16 and 1.30 pm/μɛ are obtained for the tensile and compressive situations, respectively. Temperature rising and cooling tests are also executed from 50°C to 200°C, and the sensitivity of temperature is 36.59 pm/°C. All the measurements of strain and temperature exhibit good linearity and stability. These results demonstrate that the metal-packaged sensors can be successfully fabricated by one-step welding technique and provide great promise for long-term and high-precision structural health monitoring.

  4. Modeling macro-and microstructures of Gas-Metal-Arc Welded HSLA-100 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Debroy, T.

    1999-06-01

    Fluid flow and heat transfer during gas-metal-arc welding (GMAW) of HSLA-100 steel were studied using a transient, three-dimensional, turbulent heat transfer and fluid flow model. The temperature and velocity fields, cooling rates, and shape and size of the fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs) were calculated. A continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram was computed to aid in the understanding of the observed weld metal microstructure. The computed results demonstrate that the dissipation of heat and momentum in the weld pool is significantly aided by turbulence, thus suggesting that previous modeling results based on laminar flow need to be re-examined. A comparison of the calculated fusion and HAZ geometries with their corresponding measured values showed good agreement. Furthermore, “finger” penetration, a unique geometric characteristic of gas-metal-arc weld pools, could be satisfactorily predicted from the model. The ability to predict these geometric variables and the agreement between the calculated and the measured cooling rates indicate the appropriateness of using a turbulence model for accurate calculations. The microstructure of the weld metal consisted mainly of acicular ferrite with small amounts of bainite. At high heat inputs, small amounts of allotriomorphic and Widmanstätten ferrite were also observed. The observed microstructures are consistent with those expected from the computed CCT diagram and the cooling rates. The results presented here demonstrate significant promise for understanding both macro-and microstructures of steel welds from the combination of the fundamental principles from both transport phenomena and phase transformation theory.

  5. Multi-objective Optimization of Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Using Neuro NSGA-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kamal; Pal, Surjya K.

    2018-05-01

    Weld quality is a critical issue in fabrication industries where products are custom-designed. Multi-objective optimization results number of solutions in the pareto-optimal front. Mathematical regression model based optimization methods are often found to be inadequate for highly non-linear arc welding processes. Thus, various global evolutionary approaches like artificial neural network, genetic algorithm (GA) have been developed. The present work attempts with elitist non-dominated sorting GA (NSGA-II) for optimization of pulsed gas metal arc welding process using back propagation neural network (BPNN) based weld quality feature models. The primary objective to maintain butt joint weld quality is the maximization of tensile strength with minimum plate distortion. BPNN has been used to compute the fitness of each solution after adequate training, whereas NSGA-II algorithm generates the optimum solutions for two conflicting objectives. Welding experiments have been conducted on low carbon steel using response surface methodology. The pareto-optimal front with three ranked solutions after 20th generations was considered as the best without further improvement. The joint strength as well as transverse shrinkage was found to be drastically improved over the design of experimental results as per validated pareto-optimal solutions obtained.

  6. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  7. Determination of ASTM 1016 structural welded joints fracture toughness through J integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Villela, Jefferson Jose; Terra, Jose Lucio; Rabello, Emerson Giovani; Martins, Geraldo Antonio Scoralick; Carneiro, Jose Rubens Goncalves

    2009-01-01

    Fracture toughness is an important parameter for studies of materials behavior in nuclear and conventional industry. Crack propagation resistance is, in general, evaluate using one of the fracture mechanics parameters K IC , for the case of the materials that exhibits a linear elastic behavior, the CTOD (crack tip opening displacement) and J IC , the critical value of J Integral, for the case of materials with elastic-plastic behavior. On this work the fracture mechanics parameters of the ASTM 1016 structural steel welded joints were obtained, using the J Integral. Charpy V tests at several temperatures were also obtained, with the purpose to obtain the curves of ductile-brittle of the regions of the welded joints: Base Metal, (MB), and Melted Zone (MZ). The joints were welded by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) with V bevel for evaluation the MZ toughness properties. The tests were accomplished at temperatures varying from -100 deg C to 100 deg C using the technical of compliance variation for J IC determination, the critical value that defines the initial stable crack growth, that applies to brittle and ductile materials. The J Integral alternative specimens has square cross section 10mmX10mm, according ASTM E 1820, with notch localized respectively at the BM and MZ. After the tests, the specimens fractured were analyzed in a scanning microscopic electronic (SME) for verification of the fracture surface. The fractography of the specimens at elevated temperatures presented dimples at the region of stable crack growth, characteristic of ductile fracture. The results of J Integral and Charpy V presented a good correlation between these two parameters. From these correlations it can be concluded that in some applications, the use Charpy V energy to infer fracture toughness can be substitute the Integral J tests. (author)

  8. Nondestructive testing of austenitic casting and dissimilar metal welds; Kaksimetalliliitosten ja austeniittisten valujen testaustekniikoiden vertailu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahdenperae, K [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1995-01-01

    The publication is a literature study of nondestructive testing of dissimilar metal welds and cast austenitic components in PWR and BWR plants. A major key to the successful testing is a realistic mockup made of the materials to be tested. The inspectors must also be trained and validated using suitable mockups. (42 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.).

  9. Occupational exposure to solvents, metals and welding fumes and risk of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C G; Mulleners, Wim M; Sas, Antonetta M G; van Laar, Teus; Huss, Anke; Kromhout, Hans

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between occupational exposure to solvents, metals and/or welding fumes and risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: Data of a hospital based case-control study including 444 PD patients and 876 age and sex

  10. Transformation and Precipitation Reactions by Metal Active Gas Pulsed Welded Joints from X2CrNiMoN22-5-3 Duplex Stainless Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utu, Ion-Dragos; Mitelea, Ion; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-07-21

    The high alloying degree of Duplex stainless steels makes them susceptible to the formation of intermetallic phases during their exposure to high temperatures. Precipitation of these phases can lead to a decreasing of the corrosion resistance and sometimes of the toughness. Starting from the advantages of the synergic Metal Active Gas (MAG) pulsed welding process, this paper analyses the structure formation particularities of homogeneous welded joints from Duplex stainless steel. The effect of linear welding energy on the structure morphology of the welded joints was revealed by macro- and micrographic examinations, X-ray energy dispersion analyses, measurements of ferrite proportion and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results obtained showed that the transformation of ferrite into austenite is associated with the chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen distribution between these two phases and their redistribution degree is closely linked to the overall heat cycle of the welding process. The adequate control of the energy inserted in the welded components provides an optimal balance between the two microstructural constituents (Austenite and Ferrite) and avoids the formation of undesirable intermetallic phases.

  11. Transformation and Precipitation Reactions by Metal Active Gas Pulsed Welded Joints from X2CrNiMoN22-5-3 Duplex Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion-Dragos Utu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The high alloying degree of Duplex stainless steels makes them susceptible to the formation of intermetallic phases during their exposure to high temperatures. Precipitation of these phases can lead to a decreasing of the corrosion resistance and sometimes of the toughness. Starting from the advantages of the synergic Metal Active Gas (MAG pulsed welding process, this paper analyses the structure formation particularities of homogeneous welded joints from Duplex stainless steel. The effect of linear welding energy on the structure morphology of the welded joints was revealed by macro- and micrographic examinations, X-ray energy dispersion analyses, measurements of ferrite proportion and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results obtained showed that the transformation of ferrite into austenite is associated with the chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen distribution between these two phases and their redistribution degree is closely linked to the overall heat cycle of the welding process. The adequate control of the energy inserted in the welded components provides an optimal balance between the two microstructural constituents (Austenite and Ferrite and avoids the formation of undesirable intermetallic phases.

  12. Cardiovascular effects in rats after intratracheal instillation of metal welding particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen; Antonini, James M; Lin, Yen-Chang; Roberts, Jenny R; Kashon, Michael L; Castranova, Vincent; Kan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that pulmonary exposure to welding fumes can induce a series of adverse effects in the respiratory system, including infection, bronchitis, siderosis and decreased pulmonary function. Recent clinical and epidemiological studies have found that pulmonary exposure to welding fumes is also associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular events. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm a direct effect of welding fumes on the cardiovascular system. The present study investigated the effects of pulmonary exposure to welding fumes on the heart and the vascular system in rats. Two chemically distinct welding fumes generated from manual metal arc-hard surfacing (MMA-HS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) welding were tested. Three groups of rats were instilled intratracheally with MMA-HS (2 mg/rat), GMA-MS (2 mg/rat) or saline as control once a week for seven weeks. On days 1 and 7 after the last treatment, basal cardiovascular function and the cardiovascular response to increasing doses of adrenoreceptor agonists were assessed. MMA-HS treatment reduced the basal levels of left ventricle end-systolic pressure and dP/dt(max) at 1 day post-treatment, and decreased dP/dt(min) in response to isoproterenol (ISO) at 7 days post-treatment. Unlike MMA-HS, GMA-MS only affected left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in response to ISO at 7 days post-treatment. Treatment with MMA-HS or GMA-MS did not alter heart rate and blood pressure. Our findings suggest that exposure to different welding fumes can induce different adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, and that cardiac contractility may be a sensitive indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction.

  13. Effect of weld metal properties on fatigue crack growth behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, K.; Lakshminarayanan, A.K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behaviour of the gas tungsten arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single 'V' butt welded joints. Centre cracked tensile (CCT) specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behaviour. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behaviour of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength, hardness and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  14. A fundamental study on the structural integrity of magnesium alloys joined by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harish Mangebettu

    The goal of this research is to study the factors that influence the physical and mechanical properties of lap-shear joints produced using friction stir welding. This study focuses on understanding the effect of tool geometry and weld process parameters including the tool rotation rate, tool plunge depth and dwell time on the mechanical performance of similar magnesium alloy and dissimilar magnesium to aluminum alloy weld joints. A variety of experimental activities were conducted including tensile and fatigue testing, fracture surface and failure analysis, microstructure characterization, hardness measurements and chemical composition analysis. An investigation on the effect of weld process conditions in friction stir spot welding of magnesium to magnesium produced in a manner that had a large effective sheet thickness and smaller interfacial hook height exhibited superior weld strength. Furthermore, in fatigue testing of friction stir spot welded of magnesium to magnesium alloy, lap-shear welds produced using a triangular tool pin profile exhibited better fatigue life properties compared to lap-shear welds produced using a cylindrical tool pin profile. In friction stir spot welding of dissimilar magnesium to aluminum, formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of the weld had a dominant effect on the weld strength. Lap-shear dissimilar welds with good material mixture and discontinues intermetallic compounds in the stir zone exhibited superior weld strength compared to lap-shear dissimilar welds with continuous formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone. The weld structural geometry like the interfacial hook, hook orientation and bond width also played a major role in influencing the weld strength of the dissimilar lap-shear friction stir spot welds. A wide scatter in fatigue test results was observed in friction stir linear welds of aluminum to magnesium alloys. Different modes of failure were observed under fatigue loading including crack

  15. Crack initiation and growth in welded structures; Amorcage et propagation de la fissuration dans les jonctions soudees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assire, A

    2000-10-13

    This work concerns the remaining life assessment of a structure containing initial defects of manufacturing. High temperature crack initiation and growth are studied for austenitic stainless steels, and defect assessment methods are improved in order to take into account welded structures. For these one, the probability to have a defect is significant. Two kinds of approaches are commonly used for defect assessment analysis. Fracture mechanics global approach with an energetic criterion, and local approach with a model taking into account the physical damage mechanism. For both approaches mechanical fields (stress and strain) have to be computed everywhere within the structure. Then, Finite Element computation is needed. The first part of the thesis concerns the identification of non linear kinematic and isotropic constitutive models. A pseudo-analytical method is proposed for a 'Two Inelastic Strain' model. This method provides a strategy of identification with a mechanical meaning, and this enables to associate each parameter to a physical phenomenon. Existing identifications are improved for cyclic plasticity and creep on a large range of stress levels. The second part concerns high temperature crack initiation and growth in welded structures. Finite Element analysis on plate and tube experimental configuration enable to understand the phenomenons of interaction between base metal and weld metal under mechanical and thermal loading. Concerning global approach, criteria based on C* parameter (Rice integral for visco-plasticity) are used. Finite Element computations underline the fact that for a defect located in the weld metal, C* values strongly depend on the base metal creep strain rate, because widespread visco-plasticity is located in both metals. A simplified method, based on the reference stress approach, is proposed and validated with Finite Element results. Creep crack growth simplified assessment is a quite good validation of the experimental

  16. Crack initiation and growth in welded structures; Amorcage et propagation de la fissuration dans les jonctions soudees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assire, A

    2000-10-13

    This work concerns the remaining life assessment of a structure containing initial defects of manufacturing. High temperature crack initiation and growth are studied for austenitic stainless steels, and defect assessment methods are improved in order to take into account welded structures. For these one, the probability to have a defect is significant. Two kinds of approaches are commonly used for defect assessment analysis. Fracture mechanics global approach with an energetic criterion, and local approach with a model taking into account the physical damage mechanism. For both approaches mechanical fields (stress and strain) have to be computed everywhere within the structure. Then, Finite Element computation is needed. The first part of the thesis concerns the identification of non linear kinematic and isotropic constitutive models. A pseudo-analytical method is proposed for a 'Two Inelastic Strain' model. This method provides a strategy of identification with a mechanical meaning, and this enables to associate each parameter to a physical phenomenon. Existing identifications are improved for cyclic plasticity and creep on a large range of stress levels. The second part concerns high temperature crack initiation and growth in welded structures. Finite Element analysis on plate and tube experimental configuration enable to understand the phenomenons of interaction between base metal and weld metal under mechanical and thermal loading. Concerning global approach, criteria based on C* parameter (Rice integral for visco-plasticity) are used. Finite Element computations underline the fact that for a defect located in the weld metal, C* values strongly depend on the base metal creep strain rate, because widespread visco-plasticity is located in both metals. A simplified method, based on the reference stress approach, is proposed and validated with Finite Element results. Creep crack growth simplified assessment is a quite good validation of the experimental results

  17. Fatigue analysis of welding seams in automotive structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halaszi, C.; Gaier, C.; Dannbauer, H.; Hofwimmer, K.

    2006-01-01

    For lightweight automotive structures, the stiffness and the fatigue behavior is greatly influenced by the properties of the joints. The joining technology used and the number and locations of the joints are of high importance for both engineers and cost accountants. An overview of common computational procedures including European and national standards is given for the assessments of the fatigue behavior of thin sheet structures with arc welds. The influence of the quality and size of finite shell elements on the fatigue results are investigated and it is shown how this influence can be minimized. (author)

  18. Field Testing Pulsed Power Inverters in Welding Operations to Control Heavy Metal Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Aluminum, zinc , and barium were also present, but they are believed to be an artifact of the CI substrate filter material.) Other metals that appear in the...OPERATIONS As noted earlier, PPI technology is promoted as producing less metal-bearing particulates because less slag and spatter take place. This is...2) Also, less slag and spatter should result in reduced welding time. In addition, PPI reportedly will generate less ozone, carbon monoxide, and

  19. Control of the electrode metal transfer by means of the welding current pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Knyaz'kov, S.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a generator of welding current pulses to transfer an electrode metal into the molten pool. A homogeneous artificial line is used to produce near rectangular pulses. The homogeneous artificial line provides the minimum heat input with in the pulse to transfer the electrode metal, and it significantly decreases the impact of disturbances affecting this transfer. The pulse frequency does not exceed 300 Hz, and the duration is 0.6 ÷ 0.9 ms.

  20. Life time assessment and repair of dissimilar metal welds. Part 2; Livslaengdsbedoemning och reparation av blandsvetsskarvar. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Weilin Zang; Vinter Dahl, Kristian; Borggreen, Kjeld; Hald, John

    2007-12-15

    Phase 1 of the project showed that the research on dissimilar metal welds mainly has focussed on those including austenitic stainless steels. In addition, it was found that damage in dissimilar metal welds in Swedish and Danish power plants were frequent. In the present project the common type of dissimilar welds in the Nordic countries were studied; those between heat resistant low alloy steels and martensitic 9-12 % Cr steels. Three trial welds with three different filler materials were fabricated. The parent metals were 2,25Cr1Mo and 12Cr1MoV (X20) steels. The filler materials were 5Cr1Mo, 12Cr1MoV and a Ni-base alloy. One half of each weld was post weld heat treated (PWHT) at 650 deg C and the other half at 750 deg C. Then, a number of heat treatments at 600-660 deg C/1000 h to simulate service exposure for 50,000 to 200,000 h at 540 deg were carried out on test samples from the welds. The samples were studied metallographically, including measurements of hardness profiles and carbon content profiles. Thermodynamical simulations and creep damage simulations of butt welds were performed with data of the trial weld as a starting point. The purpose of the study was to get a throughout understanding of the creep behaviour of dissimilar metal welds, how their groove and fabrication can be improved, how their life time can be prolonged and how dissimilar weld should be non-destructively tested with respect to creep damage. From the results the following results may be drawn: - Carburised and decarburised zones develop during the PWHT. The zones are small with a PWHT at 650 deg C and relatively large at 750 deg C. They appear as measurable zones in the microstructure. 5Cr weld metal gives smaller zones than 12Cr weld metal. With the Ni-base weld metal intermittent decarburised zones could be observed across the wall after PWHT at 750 deg C. - The thermodynamical simulations predicted carburised and decarburised zones with sizes in agreement with corresponding heat

  1. Multi-objective Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters using Grey Relational Analysis for Joining Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasan KONGANAPURAM SUNDARARAJAN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium metal matrix composites has gained importance in recent time because of its improved mechanical and metallurgical properties. The welding of aluminium metal matrix composites using conventional welding process has got many demerits so in order to overcome them a solid state welding process is to be employed. To achieve a good strength weld in the aluminium metal matrix composite bars an efficient and most preferred technique is friction welding. In this work the aluminium metal matrix composite AA7075 + 10 % vol SiC-T6 is selected and friction welded. The combination of friction welding process parameters such as spindle speed, friction pressure, upset pressure and burn-off- length for joining the AA7075 + 10 % vol SiCP-T6 metal matrix composite bars are selected by Taguchi’s design of experiment. The optimum friction welding parameters were determined for achieving improved ultimate tensile strength and the hardness using grey relational analysis. A combined grey relational grade is found from the determined grey relational coefficient of the output responses and the optimum friction welding process parameters were obtained as spindle speed – 1200 rpm, friction pressure – 100 MPa, upset pressure – 250 MPa, Burn-off-Length – 2 mm. Analysis of variance (ANOVA performed shows that the friction pressure is the most significant friction welding parameter that influences the both the ultimate tensile strength and hardness of friction welded AA7075 + 10 % volSiCP-T6 joints. The fractured surface under microstructure study also revealed good compliance with the grey relational grade result. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.24.2.17725

  2. Creep properties and simulation of weld repaired low alloy heat resistant CrMo and Mo steels at 540 deg C. Sub project 1 - Ex-serviced parent metal and virgin weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld; Weilin Zang

    2006-10-15

    Many existing power generating and process plants, where low alloy heat resistant CrMo(V) steels are extensively used for critical components, have exceeded their design lifetime of usually 100,000 hours. Assessment of residual lifetime and extension of economic life by weld repair have become increasingly important and attractive. This project aims at i) performing weld repair and determining the degree of mismatching, ii) evaluating the creep properties of weld repairs, iii) analysing creep behaviour of weld repair and providing necessary data for further reliable simulations of weld repair creep behaviour in long term service, and iv), simulating and assessing lifetime and creep damage evolution of weld repair. Weld repair using 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 consumables has been carried out in a service-exposed 10 CrMo 9 10 pipe. Creep specimens have been extracted from the service-exposed 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal (PM), from the virgin 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal (WM), from the virgin 13 CrMo 4 4 WM as well as from the virgin 15 Mo 3 WM. Iso-thermal uniaxial creep tests have been performed at 540 deg C in air. Pre- and post-metallography are carried out on the selected samples. FEM simulations using obtained creep data are executed. Pre-test metallography shows normal and acceptable weld repairs at given welding conditions. Creep tests demonstrate that the virgin 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 WMs have apparently longer creep lifetime than the service-exposed CrMo 9 10 PM at higher stresses than 110 MPa. Among the weld metals, the longest creep lifetime is found in 10 CrMo 9 10. Higher creep strength and lower creep strain rate in the weld metals indicate an overmatch weld. At 95 MPa, however, lifetime of 13 CrMo 4 4 WM is surprisingly short (factors which may shorten lifetime are discussed and one more test will start to verify creep strength at low stress) and tests are still running for other two weld metals. More results regarding low stress

  3. Friction-Stir Welding - Heavy Inclusions in Bi-metallic welds of Al 2219/2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Ward W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy Inclusions (HI) were detected for the first time by radiographic examination in aluminum alloy 2219forging/2195plate (advancing/retreating side) Friction Sir Welds (FSW) for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Program. Radiographic HI indications appear as either small (approx.0.005"-0.025") individual particles or clusters of small particles. Initial work was performed to verify that the HI was not foreign material or caused by FSW pin tool debris. That and subsequent elemental analysis determined that the HI were large agglomerations of Al2Cu (theta phase), which is the strengthening precipitate in Al2219. A literature search on that subject determined that the agglomeration of phase has also been found in Al2219 bead on plate FSW [Ref. 1]. Since this was detected in ET space flight hardware, an investigative study of the effect of agglomerated theta phase particles in FSW Al2219f/2195p was performed. Numerous panels of various lengths were welded per ET weld procedures and radiographically inspected to determine if any HI was detected. Areas that had HI were sampled for room temperature and cyclic cryogenic (-423F) tensile testing and determined no significant adverse affect on mechanical properties when compared to test specimens without HI and historical data. Fracture surface examination using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) revealed smaller phase agglomerations undetectable by radiographic inspection dispersed throughout the Al2219f/2195p FSW. This indicates that phase agglomeration is inherent to the Al2219f/2195p FSW process and only rarely creates agglomerations large enough to be detected by radiography. HI has not been observed in FSW of plate to plate material for either Al2219 or AL2195.

  4. Fracture toughness master curve characterization of Linde 1092 weld metal for Beaver valley 1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Sang; Yang, Won Jon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the test results obtained from the Korean contribution to the integrity assessment of low toughness Beaver Valley reactor vessel by characterizing the fracture toughness of Linde 1092 (No. 305414) weld metal. 10 PCVN specimens and 10 1T-CT specimens were tested in accordance with the ASTM E 1921-97 standard, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T o , for ferritic steels in the transition range'. This results can also be useful for assessment of Linde 80 low toughness welds of Kori-1

  5. Fracture toughness master curve characterization of Linde 1092 weld metal for Beaver valley 1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bong Sang; Yang, Won Jon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the test results obtained from the Korean contribution to the integrity assessment of low toughness Beaver Valley reactor vessel by characterizing the fracture toughness of Linde 1092 (No. 305414) weld metal. 10 PCVN specimens and 10 1T-CT specimens were tested in accordance with the ASTM E 1921-97 standard, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T{sub o}, for ferritic steels in the transition range'. This results can also be useful for assessment of Linde 80 low toughness welds of Kori-1.

  6. Effect of Grain Boundary Character Distribution on the Impact Toughness of 410NiMo Weld Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Chowdhury, Sandip Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundary character distributions in 410NiMo weld metal were studied in the as-welded, first-stage, and second-stage postweld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions, and these were correlated with the Charpy-V impact toughness values of the material. The high impact toughness values in the weld...... metal in the as-welded and first-stage PWHT conditions compared to that in the second-stage condition are attributed to the higher fraction of low-energy I pound boundaries. A higher volume fraction of retained austenite and coarser martensite after second-stage PWHT accompanied by the formation...... in the impact toughness. In addition to this, grain refinement during 4-hour PWHT in the second stage also increased the toughness of the weld metal....

  7. Detection of damage in welded structure using experimental modal data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu Husain, N [Transportation Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Ouyang, H, E-mail: nurul@fkm.utm.my, E-mail: h.ouyang@liv.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, Harrison-Hughes Building, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-19

    A typical automotive structure could contain thousands of spot weld joints that contribute significantly to the vehicle's structural stiffness and dynamic characteristics. However, some of these joints may be imperfect or even absent during the manufacturing process and they are also highly susceptible to damage due to operational and environmental conditions during the vehicle lifetime. Therefore, early detection and estimation of damage are important so necessary actions can be taken to avoid further problems. Changes in physical parameters due to existence of damage in a structure often leads to alteration of vibration modes; thus demonstrating the dependency between the vibration characteristics and the physical properties of structures. A sensitivity-based model updating method, performed using a combination of MATLAB and NASTRAN, has been selected for the purpose of this work. The updating procedure is regarded as parameter identification which aims to bring the numerical prediction to be as closely as possible to the measured natural frequencies and mode shapes data of the damaged structure in order to identify the damage parameters (characterised by the reductions in the Young's modulus of the weld patches to indicate the loss of material/stiffness at the damage region).

  8. An analysis of electron beam welds in a dual coolant liquid metal breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizelj, L.; Riesch-Oppermann, H.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH

    1994-10-01

    Numerical simulation of electron beam welding of blanket segments was performed using non-linear finite element code ABAQUS. The thermal and stress fields were assumed uncoupled, while preserving the temperature dependency of all material parameters. The martensite-austenite and austenite-martensite transformations were taken into account through volume shrinking/expansion effects, which is consistent with available data. The distributions of post welding residual stress in a complex geometry of the first wall are obtained. Also, the effects of preheating and post-welding heat treatment were addressed. Time dependent temperature and stress-strain fields obtained provide good insight into the welding process. They may be used directly to support reliability and life-time studies of blanket structures. On the other hand, they provide useful hints about the feasibility of the geometrical configurations as proposed by different design concepts. (orig.) [de

  9. Grain structure, texture and mechanical property evolution of automotive aluminium sheet during high power ultrasonic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddadi, Farid; Tsivoulas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (HPUSW) is a joining technique which is performed within less than a second and provides a more energy-efficient alternative to friction stir spot welding (FSSW), which is considered a longer cycle manufacturing process for joining automotive alloys. To date, only a few reports exist on the deformation mechanisms that take place during high power ultrasonic spot welding. In this work, dynamic recrystallization and grain growth were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). HPUSW causes extensive deformation within the weld zone where the temperature increases to 440 °C. An ultra-fine grain structure was observed in a thin band of flat weld interface within a short welding time of 0.10 s. With increasing welding time the interface was displaced and ‘folds’ or ‘crests’ appeared together with shear bands. The weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal and eventually to a convoluted wave-like pattern when the tool fully penetrated the workpiece, having a wavelength of ~ 1 mm after 0.40 s. Finally, the microstructure and texture varied significantly depending on the location within the weld. Although the texture near the weld interface was relatively weak, a shift was observed with increasing welding time from an initially Cube-dominated texture to one where the typical β-fibre Brass component prevailed. - Highlights: •Lap shear strength of ~2.9 kN was achieved in 0.30 sec welding time. •Temperature approached 440 °C along the weld centreline for the highest welding time. •The texture near the teeth was dominated by Brass, P and S components at optimum condition. •The weld interface showed typical β-fibre deformation texture at optimum condition.

  10. Grain structure, texture and mechanical property evolution of automotive aluminium sheet during high power ultrasonic welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddadi, Farid, E-mail: farid.haddadi@gmail.com [Clemson University–International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR), #347, 4 Research Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 (United States); School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Tsivoulas, Dimitrios, E-mail: dim.tsivoulas@gmail.com [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Clean Energy/Nuclear Services, Amec Foster Wheeler, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (HPUSW) is a joining technique which is performed within less than a second and provides a more energy-efficient alternative to friction stir spot welding (FSSW), which is considered a longer cycle manufacturing process for joining automotive alloys. To date, only a few reports exist on the deformation mechanisms that take place during high power ultrasonic spot welding. In this work, dynamic recrystallization and grain growth were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). HPUSW causes extensive deformation within the weld zone where the temperature increases to 440 °C. An ultra-fine grain structure was observed in a thin band of flat weld interface within a short welding time of 0.10 s. With increasing welding time the interface was displaced and ‘folds’ or ‘crests’ appeared together with shear bands. The weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal and eventually to a convoluted wave-like pattern when the tool fully penetrated the workpiece, having a wavelength of ~ 1 mm after 0.40 s. Finally, the microstructure and texture varied significantly depending on the location within the weld. Although the texture near the weld interface was relatively weak, a shift was observed with increasing welding time from an initially Cube-dominated texture to one where the typical β-fibre Brass component prevailed. - Highlights: •Lap shear strength of ~2.9 kN was achieved in 0.30 sec welding time. •Temperature approached 440 °C along the weld centreline for the highest welding time. •The texture near the teeth was dominated by Brass, P and S components at optimum condition. •The weld interface showed typical β-fibre deformation texture at optimum condition.

  11. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (Δ T) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. Δ T increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of Δ T was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in Δ T and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  12. Effect of filler metals and heat treatment on mechanical properties of welded joints of the VT20L and VT6L titanium cast alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramova, V.N.; Polyakov, D.A.; Vas'kin, Yu.V.; Kulikov, F.R.; Prostov, I.A.; Yasinskij, K.K.

    1979-01-01

    Developed is a technology of welding and heat treatment of the VT20L and VT6L alloys, providing the mechanical properties of welds on the base metal level. It is found, that for residual stress relieving it is quite enough to anneal the alloys at 650 deg C. Welding of the investigated alloys up to 20 mm thick using SPT-2 additional wire provides the welded joint strength on a level of 0.8 σsub(u) of base metal. Usage of additional wire of base metal provides equal strength of welds and base metal

  13. Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Metallurgy , 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003. DOI: 10.1002/0471434027. 2. O. Grong, Metallurgical Modelling of Welding , 2ed., Materials Modelling...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6394--16-9690 Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using...PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges S.G. Lambrakos

  14. Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds Calculated Using Multiple Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Laboratory (Ret.), private communication. 33. S. Kou, Welding Metallurgy , 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003. DOI: 10.1002/0471434027. 34. J. K...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--15-9665 Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds ...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds Calculated Using Multiple

  15. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    REPORT Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading Conditions 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...properties and of the attendant ballistic-impact failure mechanisms in prototypical friction stir welding (FSW) joints found in armor structures made of high...mechanisms, friction stir welding M. Grujicic, B. Pandurangan, A. Arakere, C-F. Yen, B. A. Cheeseman Clemson University Office of Sponsored Programs 300

  16. Thomson scattering diagnostics of steady state and pulsed welding processes without and with metal vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M; Schein, J; Marqués, J-L

    2015-01-01

    Thomson scattering is applied to measure temperature and density of electrons in the arc plasma of the direct current gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. This diagnostic technique allows to determine these plasma parameters independent from the gas composition and heavy particles temperature. The experimental setup is adapted to perform measurements on stationary as well as transient processes. Spatial and temporal electron temperature and density profiles of a pure argon arc in the case of the GTAW process and argon arc with the presence of aluminum metal vapor in the case of the GMAW process were obtained. Additionally the data is used to estimate the concentration of the metal vapor in the GMAW plasma. (fast track communication)

  17. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  18. Premature failure of dissimilar metal weld joint at intermediate temperature superheater tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Hajri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal weld (DMW joint between alloyed steel (AS and stainless steel (SS failed at one of intermediate temperature superheater (ITSH tube in steam/power generation plant boiler. The premature failure was detected after a relatively short time of operation (8 years where the crack propagated circumferentially from AS side through the ITSH tube. Apart from physical examination, microstructural studies based on optical microscopy, SEM and EDX analysis were performed. The results of the investigation point out the limitation of Carbides precipitation at the alloyed steel/welding interface. This is synonym of creep stage I involvement in the failure of ITSH. Improper post-welding operation and bending moment are considered as root causes of the premature failure.

  19. Fluid-structure-interaction analysis for welded pipes with flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.; Ding, Y., E-mail: lan.sun@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) entrance effect results in enhanced wall thinning immediately downstream of a weld if the weld connects an upstream FAC-resistant material with a downstream less resistant material. The weld regions, especially those with local repairs, are susceptible to cracking due to the high residual stresses induced by fabrication. The combined effects of the FAC entrance effect and high stresses at a weld might compromise the structural integrity of the piping and lead to a failure. Weld degradation by FAC entrance effect has been observed at nuclear and fossil power plants. This paper describes an application using fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) modelling to study the combined effects of FAC wall thinning, weld residual stresses, and in-service loads on welded structures. Simplified cases analyzed were based on CANDU outlet feeder conditions. The analysis includes the flow and mass transfer modelling of the FAC entrance effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and nonlinear structural analyses of the welded structures with wall thinning and an assumed weld residual stress and strain distribution. The FSI analyses were performed using ANSYS Workbench, an integrated platform that enables the coupling of CFD and structural analysis solutions. The obtained results show that the combination of FAC, weld residual stresses, in-service loads (including the internal pressure) and (or) extreme loads could cause high stresses and affect the integrity of the welded pipes. The present work demonstrated that the FSI modelling can be used as an effective approach to assess the integrity of welded structures. (author)

  20. Soluble transition metals cause the pro-inflammatory effects of welding fumes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeilly, Jane D.; Heal, Mathew R.; Beverland, Iain J.; Howe, Alan; Gibson, Mark D.; Hibbs, Leon R.; MacNee, William; Donaldson, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently reported a higher incidence of respiratory illnesses such as bronchitis, metal fume fever (MFF), and chronic pneumonitis among welders exposed to high concentrations of metal-enriched welding fumes. Here, we studied the molecular toxicology of three different metal-rich welding fumes: NIMROD 182, NIMROD c276, and COBSTEL 6. Fume toxicity in vitro was determined by exposing human type II alveolar epithelial cell line (A549) to whole welding fume, a soluble extract of fume or the 'washed' particulate. All whole fumes were significantly toxic to A549 cells at doses >63 μg ml -1 (TD 50; 42, 25, and 12 μg ml -1 , respectively). NIMROD c276 and COBSTEL 6 fumes increased levels of IL-8 mRNA and protein at 6 h and protein at 24 h, as did the soluble fraction alone, whereas metal chelation of the soluble fraction using chelex beads attenuated the effect. The soluble fraction of all three fumes caused a rapid depletion in intracellular glutathione following 2-h exposure with a rebound increase by 24 h. In addition, both nickel based fumes, NIMROD 182 and NIMROD c276, induced significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in A549 cells after 2 h as determined by DCFH fluorescence. ICP analysis confirmed that transition metal concentrations were similar in the whole and soluble fractions of each fume (dominated by Cr), but significantly less in both the washed particles and chelated fractions. These results support the hypothesis that the enhanced pro-inflammatory responses of welding fume particulates are mediated by soluble transition metal components via an oxidative stress mechanism

  1. Corrosion behavior of dissimilar weld joint of 316L and alloy 182 filler metal with different post-weld heat treatments in saline environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Joao H.N.; Santos, Neice F.; Esteves, Luiza; Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G., E-mail: joao.garcia@cdtn.br, E-mail: nfs@cdtn.br, E-mail: luiza.esteves@cdtn.br, E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SEIES/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Serviço de Integridade Estrutural

    2017-11-01

    Austenitic stainless steel and nickel alloys are widely used in nuclear reactors components and other plants of energy generation, chemical and petrochemical industries, due to their high corrosion resistance. These metals require post weld heat treatment (PWHT) to relieve stresses from the welding processes, although it can lead to a degradation of the weld microstructure. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of different PWHT on corrosion behavior of a dissimilar weld joint of two AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel plates with nickel alloy as filler material in saline environments. The material was submitted to heat treatments for three hours at 600, 700 and 800 °C. The weld joint was examined by optical microscopy to determine the effects of PWHT in the microstructure. The corrosion behavior of the samples before and after heat treatment was evaluated using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) in sodium chloride solutions (19% v/v) and pH 4.0 at room temperature. Metallographic analyses showed that delta ferrite dissolute with PWHT temperature increase. CPP curves demonstrated an increase of pitting corrosion resistance as the PWHT temperature increases, although the pit size has been increased. The heat treated weld joint at 600 °C showed corrosion resistance close to the as welded material. (author)

  2. Selected Welding Techniques, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1964-01-01

    Partial contents: CONVENTIONAL WELD JOINTS VERSUS BUTT JOINTS IN 1-INCH ALUMINUM PLATE, SPECIAL WELD JOINT PREPARATION, UPSET METAL EDGES FOR INCREASED WELD JOINT STRENGTH, OUT-OF-POSITION WELDING OF HEAVY GAGE...

  3. Microchemical Analysis of Non-Metallic Inclusions in C-Mn Steel Shielded Metal Arc Welds by Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    transformation ( CCT ) diagram Figure 2.2. The microstructures that develop are determined by the cooling rate, alloying element and oxygen content of the weld...TIME Figure 2.2 CCT Diagram for the weld metal of low-carbon, low-alloy steels [From Ref. 2] To assist material scientists in microstructure

  4. Corrosion Behavior of Brazed Zinc-Coated Structured Sheet Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc brazing has, in comparison to arc welding, the advantage of less heat input while joining galvanized sheet metals. The evaporation of zinc is reduced in the areas adjacent to the joint and improved corrosion protection is achieved. In the automotive industry, lightweight design is a key technology against the background of the weight and environment protection. Structured sheet metals have higher stiffness compared to typical automobile sheet metals and therefore they can play an important role in lightweight structures. In the present paper, three arc brazing variants of galvanized structured sheet metals were validated in terms of the corrosion behavior. The standard gas metal arc brazing, the pulsed arc brazing, and the cold metal transfer (CMT® in combination with a pulsed cycle were investigated. In experimental climate change tests, the influence of the brazing processes on the corrosion behavior of galvanized structured sheet metals was investigated. After that, the corrosion behavior of brazed structured and flat sheet metals was compared. Because of the selected lap joint, the valuation of damage between sheet metals was conducted. The pulsed CMT brazing has been derived from the results as the best brazing method for the joining process of galvanized structured sheet metals.

  5. Structural energetics of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujibur Rahman, S.M.

    1982-06-01

    Structural energetics of the noble metals, namely Cu, Ag, and Au are investigated by employing a single-parameter pseudopotential. The calculations show that the lowest energy for all of these metals corresponds to FCC - their observed crystal structure. The one-electron contribution to the free energy is found to dominate the structural prediction for these metals. The present investigation strongly emphasizes that the effects due to band hybridization and core-core exchange play a significant role on the structural stability of the noble metals. (author)

  6. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility

  7. Nature-Inspired Capillary-Driven Welding Process for Boosting Metal-Oxide Nanofiber Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, You; Lou, Kaihua; Qi, Rui; Guo, Zidong; Shin, Byoungchul; Liu, Guoxia; Shan, Fukai

    2018-06-20

    Recently, semiconducting nanofiber networks (NFNs) have been considered as one of the most promising platforms for large-area and low-cost electronics applications. However, the high contact resistance among stacking nanofibers remained to be a major challenge, leading to poor device performance and parasitic energy consumption. In this report, a controllable welding technique for NFNs was successfully demonstrated via a bioinspired capillary-driven process. The interfiber connections were well-achieved via a cooperative concept, combining localized capillary condensation and curvature-induced surface diffusion. With the improvements of the interfiber connections, the welded NFNs exhibited enhanced mechanical property and high electrical performance. The field-effect transistors (FETs) based on the welded Hf-doped In 2 O 3 (InHfO) NFNs were demonstrated for the first time. Meanwhile, the mechanisms involved in the grain-boundary modulation for polycrystalline metal-oxide nanofibers were discussed. When the high-k ZrO x dielectric thin films were integrated into the FETs, the field-effect mobility and operating voltage were further improved to be 25 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and 3 V, respectively. This is one of the best device performances among the reported nanofibers-based FETs. These results demonstrated the potencies of the capillary-driven welding process and grain-boundary modulation mechanism for metal-oxide NFNs, which could be applicable for high-performance, large-scale, and low-power functional electronics.

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of 304L Substrate and 308L Weld Metal Exposed to a Salt Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Hsu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available 304 stainless steels (SS were considered as the materials for a dry storage canister. In this study, ER (Electrode Rod 308L was utilized as the filler metal for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD map was used to identify the inherent microstructures in distinct specimens. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the 304L substrates and welds in a salt spray containing 5 wt % NaCl at 80 °C to evaluate their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC. Generally, the weight loss of the ER 308L deposit was higher than that of the 304L substrate in a salt spray in the same sample-prepared condition. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ was responsible for a greater weight loss of the 308L deposit, especially for the cold-rolled and sensitized specimen. Cold rolling was detrimental and sensitization after cold rolling was very harmful to the SCC resistance of the 304L substrate and 308L deposit. Overall, the SCC susceptibility of each specimen was correlated with its weight loss in each group.

  9. Study of aluminum content in a welding metal by thermoelectric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, H.; Ramirez, S.; Coronado, C.; Salazar, M.

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates the effect caused by the aluminum content in a welding metal and its variation in mechanical properties through the use of a non-destructive thermoelectric technique. It is known that aluminum has positive effects as deoxidizer in low percentages and alloying element together with Niobium and Vanadium. Aluminum has a positive and negative effect, initially improves the mechanical properties of the metal, as it acts as a grain refiner, increasing the yield strength, but in larger quantities, important mechanical properties such as hardness and toughness are seriously affected. For this purpose, HSLA ASTM 572 Gr. 50 steel was used as the base metal, where the weld metal was deposited, after which the specimens were fabricated and the mechanical tests and non-destructive tests were carried out. The sensitivity of the thermoelectric potential technique to microstructural and chemical composition changes was confirmed. The evolution of absolute thermoelectric potential (TEP) values with respect to the percentage of aluminum added to the weld was observed, being also quite sensitive to defects such as micro-cracks.

  10. MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION AND AUTOMATION OF PROCESS ENGINEERING FOR WELDED STRUCTURE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Zankovets

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Models and methods for presentation of database and knowledge base have been developed on the basis of composition and structure of data flow in technological process of welding. The information in data and knowledge base is presented in the form of multilevel hierarchical structure and it is organized according to its functionality in the form of separate files. Each file contains a great number of tables. While using mathematical simulation and information technologies an expert system has been developed with the purpose to take decisions in designing and process engineering for production of welded ructures. The system makes it possible to carry out technically substantiated selection of welded and welding materials, sttypes of welded connections, welding methods, parameters and modes of welding. The developed system allows to improve quality of the accepted design decisions due to reduction of manual labour costs for work with normative-reference documentation, analysis and evaluation of dozens of possible alternatives. The system also permits to reduce labour inputs for testing structures on technological effectiveness, to ensure reduction of materials consumption for welded structures, to guarantee faultless formation of welded connections at this stage.

  11. International conference on design, fabrication and economy of metal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, József

    2013-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the International Conference on Design, Fabrication and Economy of Metal Structures held on 24-26 April 2013 in Miskolc, Hungary which contain 99 papers covering: Structural optimization Thin-walled structures Stability Fatigue Frames Fire Fabrication Welding technology Applications Steel-concrete composite Special problems The authors are from 23 different countries, ensuring that the themes covered are of worldwide interest and importance. The International Institute of Welding (IIW), the International Society of Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization (ISSMO), the TÁMOP 4.2.1.B-10/2/KONV-2010-0001 project entitled “Increasing the quality of higher education through the development of research - development and innovation program at the University of Miskolc supported by the European Union, co-financed by the European Social Fund” and many other sponsors helped organizers to collect these valuable studies, the results of which will provoke discussion, and provide an i...

  12. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin; Lee, Bong Ho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary

  13. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong Ho [National Center for Nanomaterials Technology (NCNT), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheongam-ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  14. Power characteristics of the metal compounds formation process during the friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzaev Radmir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An influence of the power characteristics on the formation process of the uniform metals compound during the welding with friction stirringis being examined in this article.A dependency between the machine-tool engine power input and the instrument tilt during the FSW for the aluminum alloy AD31, copper alloy M1, titanium alloy OT4-1 and steel St-3 low-alloyed has been explored. A question of the stabilization of power consumption process while the establishment of superplastic condition of welded metal during the FSW has also been reviewed. A dependency revealed between the power characteristics, the geometry of the formation, the rotation speeds, the longitudinal displacement of the tool and its dimensions for fixed values of the parameters during the FSW.

  15. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (ΔH) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides

  16. Nanostructure analysis of friction welded Pd-Ni-P/Pd-Cu-Ni-P metallic glass interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, T.; Shoji, S.; Kawamura, Y.; Hono, K.

    2005-01-01

    Friction welded Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 /Pd 40 Cu 30 Ni 10 P 20 metallic glass interface has been characterized by energy filtering transmission electron microscopy. The interface is fully amorphous with a gradual compositional change of Cu and Ni in the range of 30 nm. By annealing above T g , the interdiffusion of Cu and Ni progressed in the supercooled liquid region, and the crystallization occurred from the Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 glass

  17. Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonathan D Buttram

    2005-01-01

    Described is a manual, portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary cooling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification

  18. Premature failure of dissimilar metal weld joint at intermediate temperature superheater tube

    OpenAIRE

    Al Hajri, Mohammed; Malik, Anees U.; Meroufel, Abdelkader; Al-Muaili, Fahd

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint between alloyed steel (AS) and stainless steel (SS) failed at one of intermediate temperature superheater (ITSH) tube in steam/power generation plant boiler. The premature failure was detected after a relatively short time of operation (8 years) where the crack propagated circumferentially from AS side through the ITSH tube. Apart from physical examination, microstructural studies based on optical microscopy, SEM and EDX analysis were performed. The results o...

  19. An analysis of the creep/fatigue behaviour of type 316 weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.; Wynn, J.

    The document presents creep/fatigue results obtained at UKAEA Risley Nuclear Labs. on type 316 weld metal and the associated stress rupture data and analyses them in the same way as that currently favoured for wrought material. The continuous cycling fatigue results are shown; the lower temperature is seen to give a higher endurance. The creep/fatigue results indicate that lower endurances are obtained at 625 deg. C and that with increasing hold time there is a tendency for the endurance to be lowered. The weld metal creep/fatigue endurances are compared with published UK data on wrought material for strain ranges of up to 3%. Under the conditions examined, it can be seen that the weld metal endurance is towards the top of the scatter band, the results at 550 deg. C forming the upper bound. The stress rupture data note that the ductility is reasonable at short times but fall to relatively low values at long times (10,000h)

  20. Analysis of Deformation and Failure Behaviors of TIG Welded Dissimilar Metal Joints Using Miniature Tensile Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji-Hwan; Jahanzeb, Nabeel; Kim, Min-Seong; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Shi-Hoon [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The deformation and failure behaviors of dissimilar metal joints between SS400 steel and STS316L steel were investigated. The dissimilar metal joints were fabricated using the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with STS309 steel as a filler metal. The microstructures of the dissimilar metal joints were investigated using an optical microscope and EBSD technique. The mechanical properties of the base metal (BM), heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM) were measured using a micro-hardness and micro-tension tester combined with the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The HAZ of the STS316L steel exhibited the highest micro-hardness value, and yield/tensile strengths, while the BM of the SS440 steel exhibited the lowest micro-hardness value and yield /tensile strengths. The grain size refinement in the HAZ of SS400 steel induced an enhancement of micro-hardness value and yield/tensile strengths compared to the BM of the SS400 steel. The WM, which consists of primary δ-ferrite and a matrix of austenite phase, exhibited relatively a high micro-hardness value, yield /tensile strengths and elongation compared to the BM and HAZ of the SS400 steel.

  1. Micro–macro-characterisation and modelling of mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded (GMAW) DP600 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazani, A., E-mail: ali.ramazani@iehk.rwth-aachen.de [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Mukherjee, K. [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Abdurakhmanov, A. [Welding and Joining Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Prahl, U. [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Schleser, M.; Reisgen, U. [Welding and Joining Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Bleck, W. [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steels show combined high strength and adequate formability. However, during welding, their microstructural feature of dispersion of hard martensite islands in the soft ferrite matrix is lost and the properties deteriorate. The current research aims to study the mechanical properties of the welded joint, taking into account the effect of features of all regions, such as microstructure, chemical composition and the area fraction, on the macroscopic mechanical properties of the welded joint. Hot rolled DP 600 steel was gas metal arc welded (GMAW) and tensile specimens were made with a welded joint. In the heat-affected zone (HAZ), the microstructure varied from bainite to coarse grained ferrite and tempered martensite. Chemical composition of every quantified region in the welded specimen was also identified using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Macromechanical FE modelling was employed to simulate the mechanical properties of the welded tensile specimen. 2D representative volume elements (RVE) for different parts of the welded region were constructed from real microstructure. 2D simulated flow curves were corrected to 3Ds using a developed correlation factor. Finally, the tensile test of welded material with inhomogeneous morphology was simulated and good agreement between experimental and predicted flow curve was achieved.

  2. Micro–macro-characterisation and modelling of mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded (GMAW) DP600 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramazani, A.; Mukherjee, K.; Abdurakhmanov, A.; Prahl, U.; Schleser, M.; Reisgen, U.; Bleck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steels show combined high strength and adequate formability. However, during welding, their microstructural feature of dispersion of hard martensite islands in the soft ferrite matrix is lost and the properties deteriorate. The current research aims to study the mechanical properties of the welded joint, taking into account the effect of features of all regions, such as microstructure, chemical composition and the area fraction, on the macroscopic mechanical properties of the welded joint. Hot rolled DP 600 steel was gas metal arc welded (GMAW) and tensile specimens were made with a welded joint. In the heat-affected zone (HAZ), the microstructure varied from bainite to coarse grained ferrite and tempered martensite. Chemical composition of every quantified region in the welded specimen was also identified using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Macromechanical FE modelling was employed to simulate the mechanical properties of the welded tensile specimen. 2D representative volume elements (RVE) for different parts of the welded region were constructed from real microstructure. 2D simulated flow curves were corrected to 3Ds using a developed correlation factor. Finally, the tensile test of welded material with inhomogeneous morphology was simulated and good agreement between experimental and predicted flow curve was achieved

  3. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on the Corrosion Behavior of AISI Type 304L SS Weld Metal in Simulated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Girija; Nandakumar, T.; Viswanath, A.

    2018-05-01

    The manuscript presents the investigations carried out on the effect of low-temperature sensitization (LTS) of 304L SS weld metal on its corrosion behavior in simulated groundwater, for its application as a canister material for long-term storage of nuclear vitrified high-level waste in geological repositories. AISI type 304L SS weld pad was fabricated by multipass gas tungsten arc welding process using 308L SS filler wire. The as-welded specimens were subsequently subjected to carbide nucleation and further to LTS at 500 °C for 11 days to simulate a temperature of 300 °C for 100-year life of the canister in geological repositories. Delta ferrite ( δ-ferrite) content of the 304L SS weld metal substantially decreased on carbide nucleation treatment and further only a marginal decrease occurred on LTS treatment. The microstructure of the as-welded consisted of δ-ferrite as a minor phase distributed in austenite matrix. The δ-ferrite appeared fragmented in the carbide-nucleated and LTS-treated weld metal. The degree of sensitization measured by double-loop electrochemical potentokinetic reactivation method indicated an increase in carbide nucleation treatment when compared to the as-welded specimens, and further increase occurred on LTS treatment. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization investigations in simulated groundwater indicated a substantial decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the carbide-nucleated and LTS 304L SS weld metals, when compared to the as-welded specimens. Post-experimental micrographs indicated pitting as the primary mode of attack in the as-welded, while pitting and intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurred in the carbide-nucleated weld metal. LTS-treated weld metal predominantly underwent IGC attack. The decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the weld metal after LTS treatment was found to have a direct correlation with the degree of sensitization and the weld microstructure. The results are detailed in the manuscript.

  4. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on the Corrosion Behavior of AISI Type 304L SS Weld Metal in Simulated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Girija; Nandakumar, T.; Viswanath, A.

    2018-04-01

    The manuscript presents the investigations carried out on the effect of low-temperature sensitization (LTS) of 304L SS weld metal on its corrosion behavior in simulated groundwater, for its application as a canister material for long-term storage of nuclear vitrified high-level waste in geological repositories. AISI type 304L SS weld pad was fabricated by multipass gas tungsten arc welding process using 308L SS filler wire. The as-welded specimens were subsequently subjected to carbide nucleation and further to LTS at 500 °C for 11 days to simulate a temperature of 300 °C for 100-year life of the canister in geological repositories. Delta ferrite (δ-ferrite) content of the 304L SS weld metal substantially decreased on carbide nucleation treatment and further only a marginal decrease occurred on LTS treatment. The microstructure of the as-welded consisted of δ-ferrite as a minor phase distributed in austenite matrix. The δ-ferrite appeared fragmented in the carbide-nucleated and LTS-treated weld metal. The degree of sensitization measured by double-loop electrochemical potentokinetic reactivation method indicated an increase in carbide nucleation treatment when compared to the as-welded specimens, and further increase occurred on LTS treatment. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization investigations in simulated groundwater indicated a substantial decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the carbide-nucleated and LTS 304L SS weld metals, when compared to the as-welded specimens. Post-experimental micrographs indicated pitting as the primary mode of attack in the as-welded, while pitting and intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurred in the carbide-nucleated weld metal. LTS-treated weld metal predominantly underwent IGC attack. The decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the weld metal after LTS treatment was found to have a direct correlation with the degree of sensitization and the weld microstructure. The results are detailed in the manuscript.

  5. To investigate the effect of heat treatment on fracture toughness of welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, A.; Pasha, R.A.; Shah, M.

    2013-01-01

    Annealing as a post weld heat treatment (PWHT), increases toughness in the welding joints of medium carbon steel in the same way as it increases toughness of the non-welded medium carbon steel. Measurement of increase in toughness through PWHT is focus of the present research work. Welded samples of commercially available steel AISI -1035 have been used for the proposed evaluation. The samples welded by two different techniques namely oxyacetylene gas welding and manual metal arc welding, passed through annealing process along with non-welded samples for comparison of increase in toughness. Toughness measured by impact tests revealed the improvement, which in the order of increasing effects is in gas welded, electric welded and non-welded samples. The aim of the present research was to measure the improvement in fracture toughness through post weld heat treatment (annealing). It has been shown that toughness increases as the structural flaws decrease. (author)

  6. The effect of laser welding process parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of V-4CR-4TI structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, C. B.; Natesan, K.; Xu, Z.; Smith, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    V-Cr-Ti alloys are among the leading candidate materials for the frost wall and other structural materials applications in fusion power reactors because of several important advantages including inherently low irradiation-induced activity, good mechanical properties, good compatibility with lithium, high thermal conductivity and good resistance to irradiation-induced swelling and damage [1]. However, weldability of these alloys in general must be demonstrated, and laser welding, specifically, must be developed. Laser welding is considered to be an attractive process for construction of a reactor due to its high penetrating power and potential flexibility. This paper reports on a systematic study which was conducted to examine the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting joints. Deep penetration and defect-free welds were achieved under an optimal combination of laser parameters including focal length of lens, pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, beam travel speed, and shielding gas arrangement. The key for defect-free welds was found to be the stabilization of the keyhole and providing an escape path for the gas trapped in the weld. An innovative method was developed to obtain deep penetration and oxygen contamination free welds. Oxygen and nitrogen uptake were reduced to levels only a few ppm higher than the base metal by design and development of an environmental control box. The effort directed at developing an acceptable postwelding heat treatment showed that five passes of a diffuse laser beam over the welded region softened the weld material, especially in the root region of the weld

  7. Creep properties of base metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR produced for High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor in simulated primary coolant helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Shindo, Masami; Suzuki, Tomio; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Mutoh, Isao; Hiraga, Kenjiro

    1999-01-01

    Creep tests of base metal, weld metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR, which had the same chemical composition as Hastelloy XR produced for an intermediate heat exchanger of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, were conducted in simulated primary coolant helium. The weld metal and welded joint showed almost equal to or longer rupture time than the base metal of Hastelloy XR at 850 and 900degC, although they gave shorter rupture time at 950degC under low stress and at 1,000degC. The welded joint of Hastelloy XR ruptured at the base metal region at 850 and 900degC. On the other hand, it ruptured at the weld metal region at 950 and 1,000degC. The steady-state creep rate of weld metal of Hastelloy XR was lower than that of base metal at 850, 900 and 950degC. The creep rupture strengths of base metal, weld metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR obtained in this study were confirmed to be much higher than the design allowable creep-rupture stress (S R ) of the Design Allowable Limits below 950degC. (author)

  8. Thermal Aging Effects on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consists of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, is now being widely used as the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing material for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its mechanical property, thermal expansion coefficient, and corrosion resistance. The heat affected zone (HAZ) on Alloy 600 which is formed by welding process is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al. crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions [3]. And according to Z.P. Lu et al. CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. To predict the life time of components, there is a model which can calculate the effective degradation years (EDYs) of the material as a function of operating temperature. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects the hardness of dissimilar metal weld from the fusion boundary to Alloy 600 base metal and the residual strain at Alloy 600 heat affected zone. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. The hardness, measured by Vickers hardness tester, peaked near the fusion boundary between Alloy 182 and Alloy 600, and it decreases as the picked point goes to Alloy 600 base metal. Even though the formation of precipitate such as Cr carbide, thermal aging doesn't affect the value and the tendency of hardness because of reduced residual stress. According to kernel average misorientation mapping, residual strain decreases when the material thermally aged. And finally, in 30 years simulated specimen, the high residual strain almost disappears. Therefore, the influence of residual strain on primary water stress corrosion cracking can be diminished when the material undergoes thermal aging.

  9. Creep Rupture Properties for Base and Weld Metals of Alloy 617

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo-Gon; Kim, Min-Hwan; Park, Jae-Young; Ekaputra, I. M. W.

    2015-01-01

    The allowable deformation in the welds is also restricted to half the deformation permitted for the base metal, since the ductility of the welds at elevated temperatures is generally low. For a design use, the data of the tensile and creep properties for Alloy 617 WM should be sufficiently provided, and in particular, to develop a design code of Alloy 617 WM. However, the data for the WM are very rare and limited until now, although the data for the BM are available in the ASME draft code case, which was suspended at the end of the 1980s owing to a lack of support and interes. In this report, the creep data for Alloy 617 WM, which was fabricated by a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) procedure, were obtained by a series of creep tests at 800 .deg. C, and the creep properties of the WM were compared with those of the BM. The high-temperature creep properties for Alloy 617 WM, fabricated by a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) procedure, were investigated by a series of creep tests with different stress levels at 800 .deg. C, and the creep test data for the WM were compared with those of the BM. From the results, it was found that the WM had a slightly longer creep rupture life and lower creep rate than the BM, and a particularly lower rupture elongation. The lower creep rate in the WM was due to the lower rupture elongation than the BM

  10. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure.

  11. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  12. Ultrasound influence on materials structure in parts reconditioned by welding with ultrasonic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dobrotă

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research presented in the paper refers to the structural analysis of materials that are thermally influenced for loading by welding of pieces in the classical variant of manual coated electric arc welding and the version that in which the welding bath is activated by ultrasounds. The structural analysis made refer to: the size of the grains of the structure obtained under certain loading conditions through welding, grain size variation on the submission of a single layer in the ultrasonic field, the mode of solidification and fragmentation of grains when loaded in welding in a ultrasonic field, acceleration of the diffusion process for ultrasonic activation, the appearance of hard carbides between grains.

  13. Fabrication of metal/semiconductor nanocomposites by selective laser nano-welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huiwu; Li, Xiangyou; Hao, Zhongqi; Xiong, Wei; Guo, Lianbo; Lu, Yongfeng; Yi, Rongxing; Li, Jiaming; Yang, Xinyan; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-06-01

    A green and simple method to prepare metal/semiconductor nanocomposites by selective laser nano-welding metal and semiconductor nanoparticles was presented, in which the sizes, phases, and morphologies of the components can be maintained. Many types of nanocomposites (such as Ag/TiO 2 , Ag/SnO 2 , Ag/ZnO 2 , Pt/TiO 2 , Pt/SnO 2 , and Pt/ZnO) can be prepared by this method and their corresponding performances were enhanced.

  14. Structure and properties of Hardox 450 steel with arc welded coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu. F.; Konovalov, S. V.; Kormyshev, V. E.; Gromov, V. E.; Teresov, A. D.; Semina, O. A.

    2017-12-01

    The paper reports on a study of the surface structure, phase composition, and microhardness of Hardox 450 steel with coatings deposited by arc welding of powder wires differing in chemical composition. The study shows that to a depth of 6-8 mm, the microhardness of the thus formed coatings is more than two times the microhardness of the base metal and that their higher mechanical properties are provided by martensite structure containing Nb2C and NbC carbides and Fe2B borides as eutectic lamellae with a transverse size of 30-70 nm; their volume reveals a net-like dislocation substructure with a scalar dislocation density of 1011 cm-2. The highest surface hardness is found for the steel coated with boron-containing wire material. Some ideas are suggested on possible mechanisms and temperature for the formation of Nb and B carbides during the process.

  15. Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MJ Lambert

    2005-11-18

    Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 {micro}m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a

  16. Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MJ Lambert

    2005-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 (micro)m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a

  17. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Weld Joints of Magnesium Alloy AZ31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, T.; Otsuka, M.; Yokota, T.; Ueki, T.

    The applicability of friction stir welding to hot rolled sheet of commercial magnesium alloy AZ31 plates has been investigated. Friction stir weld joint showed mechanical strength comparable to that of base material, though the ductility remained at one half of that of the latter. The results are consistent with the microstructure which is characterized by a fine grained bond layer bounded by-intermediate grained base metals. It is found that both anodizing treatment and insertion of aluminum foil between batting faces do not degrade the joint properties at all. The results suggest that friction stir welding can be potentially applied to magnesium alloy.

  18. Influence of Filler Alloy Composition and Process Parameters on the Intermetallic Layer Thickness in Single-Sided Cold Metal Transfer Welding of Aluminum-Steel Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvayeh, Zahra; Vallant, Rudolf; Sommitsch, Christof; Götzinger, Bruno; Karner, Werner; Hartmann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid components made of aluminum alloys and high-strength steels are typically used in automotive lightweight applications. Dissimilar joining of these materials is quite challenging; however, it is mandatory in order to produce multimaterial car body structures. Since especially welding of tailored blanks is of utmost interest, single-sided Cold Metal Transfer butt welding of thin sheets of aluminum alloy EN AW 6014 T4 and galvanized dual-phase steel HCT 450 X + ZE 75/75 was experimentally investigated in this study. The influence of different filler alloy compositions and welding process parameters on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, which forms between the weld seam and the steel sheet, was studied. The microstructures of the weld seam and of the intermetallic layer were characterized using conventional optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that increasing the heat input and decreasing the cooling intensity tend to increase the layer thickness. The silicon content of the filler alloy has the strongest influence on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, whereas the magnesium and scandium contents of the filler alloy influence the cracking tendency. The layer thickness is not uniform and shows spatial variations along the bonding interface. The thinnest intermetallic layer (mean thickness < 4 µm) is obtained using the silicon-rich filler Al-3Si-1Mn, but the layer is more than twice as thick when different low-silicon fillers are used.

  19. Evaluation of residual stress on pipe welded joints using laser interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ho Seob; Na, Man Gyun; Kim, Koung Suk [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Residual stresses that occur during the welding process, are the main cause of failure and defects in welded structures. This paper, presents the use of an electronic processing laser speckle interferometer to measure the residual stress of a welded pipe for a nuclear power plant. A tensile testing machine was used to evaluate a welded pipe that failed in compression. The inform plane deformation and modulus of elasticity of the base metal and welds were measured using an interferometer. Varying the load on the welded pipe had a larger effect on the deformation of the base metal the other properties of the base metal and welds. The elastic moduli of the base metal and weld of the welded pipe were 202.46 and 212.14 GPa, respectively, the residual stress was measured to be 6.29 MPa.

  20. 46 CFR 154.182 - Contiguous hull structure: Production weld test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Production weld test. 154.182... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.182 Contiguous hull structure: Production weld test. If a portion of the contiguous hull structure is designed for a temperature colder than −34 °C (−30 °F) and is not part of the...

  1. Metal working and dislocation structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Microstructural observations are presented for different metals deformed from low to high strain by both traditional and new metal working processes. It is shown that deformation induced dislocation structures can be interpreted and analyzed within a common framework of grain subdivision on a finer...... and finer scale down to the nanometer dimension, which can be reached at ultrahigh strains. It is demonstrated that classical materials science and engineering principles apply from the largest to the smallest structural scale but also that new and unexpected structures and properties characterize metals...

  2. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  3. Effect of weld metal toughness on fracture behavior under ultra-low cycle fatigue loading (earthquake)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermajani, M. [School of Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaini, F. Malek, E-mail: Fmalek@modares.ac.ir [School of Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Miresmaeili, R. [School of Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghakouchak, A.A. [School of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shadmand, M. [Department of Research and Development, MAPNA Electric and Control (MECO) Company, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-21

    Results from 12 ultra-low cycle fatigue tests performed on the weld metals of both toughness and non-toughness rated grades are presented. Fracture resistance under these loadings seemed to be dependent on materials' toughness, displacement amplitude, and stress state triaxiality, while the toughness effect was more highlighted at high stress levels and concentrations. To study the effect of microstructures on these failures, supporting ancillary tests including all-weld tension coupons, Charpy V-notched impact tests, and optical and scanning electron microscope analyses were performed. The favored microstructures appeared to be those which absorbed energy by plastic deformation and, hence, hindered void formation and/or could avoid crack propagation by deflection. Considering the response of the tested materials to cyclic loadings and the requirements of the materials specified in AISC341 Provisions could question the adequacy of these requirements for weld metals. However, the role of microstructural features like inclusions would be the same in both the Charpy impact tests and ultra-low cycle loadings.

  4. Spinodal Decomposition in Functionally Graded Super Duplex Stainless Steel and Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Vahid A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Wessman, Sten; Karlsson, Leif

    2018-04-01

    Low-temperature phase separations (T duplex stainless steel (SDSS) base and weld metals were investigated for short heat treatment times (0.5 to 600 minutes). A novel heat treatment technique, where a stationary arc produces a steady state temperature gradient for selected times, was employed to fabricate functionally graded materials. Three different initial material conditions including 2507 SDSS, remelted 2507 SDSS, and 2509 SDSS weld metal were investigated. Selective etching of ferrite significantly decreased in regions heat treated at 435 °C to 480 °C already after 3 minutes due to rapid phase separations. Atom probe tomography results revealed spinodal decomposition of ferrite and precipitation of Cu particles. Microhardness mapping showed that as-welded microstructure and/or higher Ni content accelerated decomposition. The arc heat treatment technique combined with microhardness mapping and electrolytical etching was found to be a successful approach to evaluate kinetics of low-temperature phase separations in SDSS, particularly at its earlier stages. A time-temperature transformation diagram was proposed showing the kinetics of 475 °C-embrittlement in 2507 SDSS.

  5. Dry hyperbaric gas metal arc welding of subsea pipelines: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Amin S.

    2012-07-01

    Ambitions in exploration of oil and gas fields at deeper water depth require continuous investigation and maintenance. The transportation pipelines laid in deep waters are both subjected to corrosion and buckling due to environmental phenomena. They may also often undergo branching (namely hot tapping) to redirect (or add to) the transportation paths. Mechanical joints and welding are both considered as available alternatives when sectioning and replacement of the pipes at shallow waters is necessary, yet, welding is more promising for deep waters where remote operation is central. Fusion welding on the other hand comprises several technological detractions for sound operations under high ambient pressures disregarding its low cost and flexibility. The foremost detracting phenomenon in the arc welding is called 'arc root constriction', which is defined as arc geometry shrinkage under the increased pressure. Consequently, the power delivery to the weld pool at different pressure levels is a major worry. Effects of ionization and dissociation energies of different gases and mixtures, partial pressure of environmental gases including hydrogen and oxygen, gasification and degasification of the weld metal, inclusions that affect the phase transformation, absorption and desorption kinetics, oxidation and deoxidation reactions and many more are the phenomena that can possibly be altered by the gas type and ambient pressure level. Spattering and fume generation is a problematic issue since the arc is rather unstable under high pressure. Thus, seeking the effect of different chamber gas mixtures on welding parameters, final microstructure and mechanical properties is the main objective of this work.Statistical analysis of the collected voltage and current waveforms is carried out to identify the source of arc misbehavior and instability (discussed in Paper I). The stochastic parameters is related to the electrical stability and resolved into a number of varying

  6. Inspection of dissimilar metal welds in reactor pressure vessels in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadea, J.R.; Regidor, J.J.; Pelaez, J.A.; Serrano, P. [Tecnatom, S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    MRP-139 recommendations for inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in PWR vessels were launched in the last years in the USA. Basically, it increases the frequency of the examinations in these type of welds, with major emphasis in the hot loops, adding one intermediate inspection at the ten years interval in outlet nozzles. The spanish nuclear power plants (NPP's) have begun the implementation of this type of inspections on the vessel nozzles DM welds. As this type of inspections could have an impact in the critical path duration of the outage, it is necessary the use of a mechanical equipment able to examine the nozzles DM welds in a short vessel occupation time (VOT) with high quality, qualified techniques and minimum requirements of the refuelling platform. Tecnatom undertook the design and development of a new more advanced equipment, named TENIS-DM, for implementing the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzles examination. This equipment was designed in order to accomplish the stringent requirements and the updated examination techniques; it was used for the inspection of the DM welds of Asco 1 NPP inlet and outlet nozzles in March 2011. Examination techniques and procedures were qualified through the GRUVAL validation program, based on ENIC methodology. Mechanical scanner was equipped with a large number of examination probes, and TV cameras -for visual inspection and also for monitoring the ultrasonic inspections. A remote operated submarine was also used to give support to the operational personnel during the manipulation of the equipment and its movements from one nozzle to the others. During two months before the inspection, tests of the complete inspection system were made on a nozzle mock-up installed in a 4 meters deep well at Tecnatom's facilities; this scenario was also used during the training sessions of the inspection crew. The defined technical and practical objectives were achieved: use of qualified techniques and minimal impact on the

  7. Inspection of dissimilar metal welds in reactor pressure vessels in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadea, J.R.; Regidor, J.J.; Pelaez, J.A.; Serrano, P.

    2011-01-01

    MRP-139 recommendations for inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in PWR vessels were launched in the last years in the USA. Basically, it increases the frequency of the examinations in these type of welds, with major emphasis in the hot loops, adding one intermediate inspection at the ten years interval in outlet nozzles. The spanish nuclear power plants (NPP's) have begun the implementation of this type of inspections on the vessel nozzles DM welds. As this type of inspections could have an impact in the critical path duration of the outage, it is necessary the use of a mechanical equipment able to examine the nozzles DM welds in a short vessel occupation time (VOT) with high quality, qualified techniques and minimum requirements of the refuelling platform. Tecnatom undertook the design and development of a new more advanced equipment, named TENIS-DM, for implementing the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzles examination. This equipment was designed in order to accomplish the stringent requirements and the updated examination techniques; it was used for the inspection of the DM welds of Asco 1 NPP inlet and outlet nozzles in March 2011. Examination techniques and procedures were qualified through the GRUVAL validation program, based on ENIC methodology. Mechanical scanner was equipped with a large number of examination probes, and TV cameras -for visual inspection and also for monitoring the ultrasonic inspections. A remote operated submarine was also used to give support to the operational personnel during the manipulation of the equipment and its movements from one nozzle to the others. During two months before the inspection, tests of the complete inspection system were made on a nozzle mock-up installed in a 4 meters deep well at Tecnatom's facilities; this scenario was also used during the training sessions of the inspection crew. The defined technical and practical objectives were achieved: use of qualified techniques and minimal impact on the critical

  8. A preliminary study on the application of Friction Welding in structural repairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, D.; Santos, J.F. dos [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung; Blakemore, G.R. [Pressure Products Group, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Gibson, D. [National Hyperbaric Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    Friction Welding is characterised by the absence of a fusion zone associated with comparatively low temperatures in the weld. These features allow the application of this welding process in joining and repair of most engineering structures, especially in hazardous environments. This work presents a preliminary study on different friction welding processes, including the recently developed Friction Hydro-Pillar Processing (FHPP) and Friction Stitch Welding, as joining technologies for thick-walled structures. The use of these welding processes in different industrial applications, compared with the commonly used arc welding counterparts, as well as the influence of welding parameters on the weldment integrity are discussed. A brief description of a portable friction welding equipment and its possible implementation for FHPP are presented. Stud welds produced in the commissioning phase of this equipment have been analysed and tested to assess their quality. (orig.) [Deutsch] Da die Schweisszonentemperatur waehrend des Reibschweissvorganges vergleichsweise niedrig ist, bildet sich kein Schmelzbad aus. Anwendbar ist dieses Schweissverfahren zur Verbindung oder Reparatur der meisten Metallkonstruktionen, speziell in risikobehafteter Umgebung. Diese Arbeit enthaelt eine Vorstudie zu verschiedenen Reibschweissprozessen, einschliesslich der neu entwickelten Friction Hydro-Pillar Processing (FHPP)- und Friction Stitch Welding-Verfahren, als Fuegetechniken fuer dickwandige Strukturen. Die Anwendbarkeit dieser Schweissprozesse in verschiedenen Industrien, verglichen mit herkoemmlich verwendeten Lichtbogenschweissverfahren, sowie der Einfluss von Schweissparametern auf die Guete der Verbindung werden diskutiert. Praesentiert wird ausserdem eine tragbare Reibschweissmaschine und ihre moegliche Verwendung zum FHPP-Schweissen. Bolzenschweissungen, die waehrend der Inbetriebnahmephase dieser Maschine hergestellt wurden, sind zur Charakterisierung ihrer Qualitaet analysiert und

  9. Welding of CuZr-based metallic glasses on air; Soldagem ao ar de ligas vitreas baseadas em Cu e Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batalha, W.; Gargarella, P.; Kiminami, C.S., E-mail: wbatalha@dema.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-07-01

    Metallic glass alloys have been studied aiming at its exceptional mechanical properties. This alloys processing's requires high cooling rates, which diminishes the sample's size. There by welding these samples without the loss of amorphous structure is a good alternative. The DEMa group has developed a technique based on Joule effect heating. By applying pressure and electric current, reaching temperatures of super cold liquids (the temperature between crystallizing and vitric transition), the vitric metal has it’s viscosity reduced and sample binding occur. The objective of this paper was to weld samples of cylindrical geometry of 2 and 3 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length of the compositions Cu46Zr42Al7Y5 and (Cu47Zr45Al8)98Y2. The process was done using 2 copper electrodes under(over) argon flux. The samples were later analysed by microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X ray diffraction. The results showed that this kind of welding process is possible since crystal formation on the welding region did not occur and there were no faults like cracks or porosity. (author)

  10. Effect of welding processes on the impression creep resistance of type 316 LN stainless steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Sisira, P.; Divya, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.

    2016-01-01

    Type 316 LN stainless steel is the major structural material used in the construction of fast breeder reactors. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding , a variant of the TIG welding process has been found to enhance the depth of penetration significantly during autogenous welding and also found to enhance the creep rupture life in stainless steels. The present study aims at comparing the effect of TIG and A-TIG welding processes on the impression creep resistance of type 316 LN stainless steel base metal, fusion zone and heat affected zone (HAZ) of weld joints. Optical and TEM have been used to correlate the microstructures with the observed creep rates of various zones of the weld joints. Finer microstructure and higher ferrite content was observed in the TIG weld joint fusion zone. Coarser grain structure was observed in the HAZ of the weld joints. Impression creep rate of A-TIG weld joint fusion zone was almost equal to that of the base metal and lower than that of the TIG weld joint fusion zone. A-TIG weld joint HAZ was found to have lower creep rate compared to that of conventional TIG weld joint HAZ due to higher grain size. HAZ of the both the weld joints exhibited lower creep rate than the base metal. (author)

  11. Molybdenum depletion around P-phases Ni-Cr-Mo-W weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; Miranda, Helio Cordeiro de; Farias, Jesualdo Pereira

    2010-01-01

    This work evaluated the local chemical composition in matrix/precipitate interface in a Ni-Cr-Mo-W alloy weld metals deposited on substrate of C-Mn steel. The microstructural characterization was carried out through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results had shown that the presence of secondary phases precipitates in the interdendritic region. Through SEM analysis were observed indications of depletion of Mo around these phases. These precipitates were identified as P-phase by TEM analysis. The Mo depletion indications were confirmed through EDS. The Mo depletion was a result of a reheating due to several welding heat cycles deposited to promote the coating layer. (author)

  12. The effect of weld chemistry on the likely primary water stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloy 82 dissimilar metal welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persaud, S.Y., E-mail: suraj.persaud@mail.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ramamurthy, S. [Surface Science Western, London, ON (Canada); Newman, R.C. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Alloy 82 dissimilar weld joints between carbon steel and Alloy 600 were exposed to a simulated primary water environment consisting of hydrogenated steam at 480 {sup o}C and 1 bar. Dilution from the carbon steel to the weld was significant, particularly in the root where Fe was enriched to 35 at. % and Cr was depleted to 10 at. %. The heterogeneous composition of the weld from root to crown resulted in differences in internal and external oxidation tendency. An Fe-rich external surface oxide formed on the weld root which may help to prevent embrittlement and SCC by internal intergranular oxidation. (author)

  13. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiqul, M I; Ishak, M; Rahman, M M

    2012-01-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  14. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiqul, M. I.; Ishak, M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  15. Cold metal transfer spot plug welding of AA6061-T6-to-galvanized steel for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, R.; Huang, Q.; Chen, J.H.; Wang, Pei-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Two Al-to-galvanized steel spot plug welding joints were studied by CMT method. • The optimum process variables for the two joints were gotten by orthogonal test. • Connection mechanism of the two joints were discussed. -- Abstract: In this study, cold metal transfer (CMT) spot plug joining of 1 mm thick Al AA6061-T6 to 1 mm thick galvanized steel (i.e., Q235) was studied. Welding variables were optimized for a plug weld in the center of a 25 mm overlap region with aluminum 4043 wire and 100% argon shielding gas. Microstructures and elemental distributions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. Mechanical testing of CMT spot plug welded joints was conducted. It was found that it is feasible to join Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized steel by CMT spot plug welding method. The process variables for two joints with Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized mild steel and galvanized mild steel-to-Al AA6061T6 are optimized. The strength of CMT spot welded Al AA6061T6-to-galvanized mild steel is determined primarily by the strength and area of the brazed interface. While, the strength of the galvanized mild steel-to-Al AA6061T6 joint is mainly dependent upon the area of the weld metal

  16. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimation and control of droplet size and frequency in projected spray mode of a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzehaee, Mohammad Mousavi; Haeri, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    New estimators are designed based on the modified force balance model to estimate the detaching droplet size, detached droplet size, and mean value of droplet detachment frequency in a gas metal arc welding process. The proper droplet size for the process to be in the projected spray transfer mode is determined based on the modified force balance model and the designed estimators. Finally, the droplet size and the melting rate are controlled using two proportional-integral (PI) controllers to achieve high weld quality by retaining the transfer mode and generating appropriate signals as inputs of the weld geometry control loop. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Multiaxial Cycle Deformation and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Mild Carbon Steel and Related Welded-Metal Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilian Qu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-cycle fatigue experiments of mild carbon Q235B steel and its related welded-metal specimens are performed under uniaxial, in-phase, and 90° out-of-phase loading conditions. Significant additional cyclic hardening for 90° out-of-phase loading conditions is observed for both base metal and its related weldment. Besides, welding process produces extra additional hardening under the same loading conditions compared with the base metal. Multiaxial low-cycle fatigue strength under 90° out-of-phase loading conditions is significantly reduced for both base-metal and welded-metal specimens. The weldment has lower fatigue life than the base metal under the given loading conditions, and the fatigue life reduction of weldment increases with the increasing strain amplitude. The KBM, FS, and MKBM critical plane parameters are evaluated for the fatigue data obtained. The FS and MKBM parameters are found to show better correlation with fatigue lives for both base-metal and welded-metal specimens.

  19. PENGARUH VARIASI SUHU POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT ANNEALING TERHADAP SIFAT MEKANIS MATERIAL BAJA EMS-45 DENGAN METODE PENGELASAN SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusiyanto Rusiyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan Untuk mengetahui nilai kekerasan Vickers material Baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan dan setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan tanpa post weld heat treatment annealing, Untuk mengetahui berapakah suhu optimal post weld heat treatment annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 dengan variasi suhu yang digunakan 350 o C, 550 o C, dan 750 C. Untuk mengetahui struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 akibat variasi suhu post weld heat treatment annealing pada proses pengelasan dengan menggunakan metode pengelasan shielded metal arc welding. Bahan atau material dasar yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah Baja EMS-45 dengan ketebalan pelat 10 mm, lebar pelat 20 mm dan panjang 100 mm. Berdasarkan hasil pengujian nilai kekerasan tertinggi setelah proses pengelasan terletak pada daerah Logam Las. Pengelasan non PWHT memiliki nilai kekerasan paling tinggi setelah proses pengelasan yaitu sebesar 183,2 VHN. Suhu optimal Post Weld Heat Treatment Annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 adalah pada suhu 750 C. Karena pada PWHT pada suhu tersebut mengalami penurunan kekerasan yang besar yaitu sebesar 127,2 VHN, sehingga material baja EMS-45 dapat memperbaiki sifat mampu mesinnya. Struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan berupa grafit serpih, perlit dan ferit, setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan mempunyai struktur mikro berupa matrik ferit dan grafit pada daerah logam las, matrik perlit kasar dan grafit serpih pada daerah HAZ dan struktur perlit, grafit serpih dan ferit pada daerah logam induk o o

  20. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  1. Laser welding of Ti-Ni type shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Akio; Araki, Takao; Uchihara, Masato; Honda, Keizoh; Kondoh, Mitsuaki.

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to apply the laser welding to the joining of a shape memory alloy. Butt welding of a Ti-Ni type shape memory alloy was performed using 10 kW CO 2 laser. The laser welded specimens showed successfully the shape memory effect and super elasticity. These properties were approximately identical with those of the base metal. The change in super elasticity of the welded specimen during tension cycling was investigated. Significant changes in stress-strain curves and residual strain were not observed in the laser welded specimen after the 50-time cyclic test. The weld metal exhibited the celler dendrite. It was revealed by electron diffraction analysis that the phase of the weld metal was the TiNi phase of B2 structure which is the same as the parent phase of base metal and oxide inclusions crystallized at the dendrite boundary. However, oxygen contamination in the weld metal by laser welding did not occur because there was almost no difference in oxygen content between the base metal and the weld metal. The transformation temperatures of the weld metal were almost the same as those of the base metal. From these results, laser welding is applicable to the joining of the Ti-Ni type shape memory alloy. As the application of laser welding to new shape memory devices, the multiplex shape memory device of welded Ti-50.5 at % Ni and Ti-51.0 at % Ni was produced. The device showed two-stage shape memory effects due to the difference in transformation temperature between the two shape memory alloys. (author)

  2. Low-cycle fatigue and cyclic deformation behavior of Type 16-8-2 weld metal at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raske, D.T.

    1977-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue behavior of Type 16-8-2 stainless steel ASA weld metal at 593 0 C was investigated, and the results are compared with existing data for Type 316 stainless steel base metal. Tests were conducted under axial strain control and at a constant axial strain rate of 4 x 10 -3 s -1 for continuous cyclic loadings as well as hold times at peak tensile strain. Uniform-gauge specimens were machined longitudinally from the surface and root areas of 25.4-mm-thick welded plate and tested in the as-welded condition. Results indicate that the low-cycle fatigue resistance of this weld metal is somewhat better than that of the base metal for continuous-cycling conditions and significantly better for tension hold-time tests. This is attributed to the fine duplex delta ferrite-austenite microstructure in the weld metal. The initial monotonic tensile properties and the cyclic stress-strain behavior of this material were also determined. Because the cyclic changes in mechanical properties are strain-history dependent, a unique cyclic stress-strain curve does not exist for this material

  3. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  4. Mechanical and structural characteristics in high temperature of stainless steel welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Carvalho Mota, A.F. de

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical behavior at 600 0 C of weldments made of type 304 stainless as base metal and niobium containing type 347 stainless as weld metal has been investigated. This was done through tensile and creep tests. Heat treatments at 600 0 C and up to 6000 hours permited a simultaneous follow up of the mechanical and microstructural changes. It was observed that the exposure at 600 0 C under load contributes, from the begining, to the strengthening of the weld. This is due to the acceleration of the second phase precipitation hardening. (Author) [pt

  5. Electronic structure of metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertheim, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Photoemission spectra of valence electrons in metal clusters, together with threshold ionization potential measurements, provide a coherent picture of the development of the electronic structure from the isolated atom to the large metallic cluster. An insulator-metal transition occurs at an intermediate cluster size, which serves to define the boundary between small and large clusters. Although the outer electrons may be delocalized over the entire cluster, a small cluster remains insulating until the density of states near the Fermi level exceeds 1/kT. In large clusters, with increasing cluster size, the band structure approaches that of the bulk metal. However, the bands remain significantly narrowed even in a 1000-atom cluster, giving an indication of the importance of long-range order. The core-electron binding-energy shifts of supported metal clusters depend on changes in the band structure in the initial state, as well as on various final-state effects, including changes in core hole screening and the coulomb energy of the final-state charge. For cluster supported on amorphous carbon, this macroscopic coulomb shift is often dominant, as evidenced by the parallel shifts of the core-electron binding energy and the Fermi edge. Auger data confirm that final-state effects dominate in cluster of Sn and some other metals. Surface atom core-level shifts provide a valuable guide to the contributions of initial-state changes in band structure to cluster core-electron binding energy shifts, especially for Au and Pt. The available data indicate that the shift observed in supported, metallic clusters arise largely from the charge left on the cluster by photoemission. As the metal-insulator transition is approached from above, metallic screening is suppressed and the shift is determined by the local environment. (orig.)

  6. Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

    2006-05-25

    The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

  7. Initial Testing for the Recommendation of Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Procedures for HY-80 Steel Plate Butt Joints at Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    17  Figure 11.  IRMS versus VRMS Comparison with Different Ar/CO2 Gas Mixtures Using GMAW-P...21  Figure 13.  IRMS versus VRMS Comparison with Miller and Lincoln Welding Machines in the Horizontal and Vertical Positions Using GMAW-P...Gas Metal Arc Welding Pulsed Spray Transfer GMAW-S Gas Metal Arc Welding Spray Transfer HAZ Heat Affected Zone HC#1 Hull Cut #1 IRMS Current Root

  8. High Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Studies in Stainless Steel 316L(N Welds Processed by A-TIG and MP-TIG Welding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Welded stainless steel components used in power plants and chemical industries are subjected to mechanical load cycles at elevated temperatures which result in early fatigue failures. The presence of weld makes the component to be liable to failure in view of residual stresses at the weld region or in the neighboring heat affected zone apart from weld defects. Austenitic stainless steels are often welded using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG process. In case of single pass welding, there is a reduced weld penetration which results in a low depth-to-width ratio of weld bead. If the number of passes is increased (Multi-Pass TIG welding, it results in weld distortion and subsequent residual stress generation. The activated flux TIG welding, a variant of TIG welding developed by E.O. Paton Institute, is found to reduce the limitation of conventional TIG welding, resulting in a higher depth of penetration using a single pass, reduced weld distortion and higher welding speeds. This paper presents the fatigue crack growth rate characteristics at 823 K temperature in type 316LN stainless steel plates joined by conventional multi-pass TIG (MP-TIG and Activated TIG (A-TIG welding process. Fatigue tests were conducted to characterize the crack growth rates of base metal, HAZ and Weld Metal for A-TIG and MP-TIG configurations. Micro structural evaluation of 316LN base metal suggests a primary austenite phase, whereas, A-TIG weld joints show an equiaxed grain distribution along the weld center and complete penetration during welding (Fig. 1. MP-TIG microstructure shows a highly inhomogeneous microstructure, with grain orientation changing along the interface of each pass. This results in tortuous crack growth in case of MP-TIG welded specimens. Scanning electron microscopy studies have helped to better understand the fatigue crack propagation modes during high temperature testing.

  9. Design for low-cost gas metal arc weld-based aluminum 3-D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhuhn, Amberlee S.

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, has the potential to change the state of manufacturing across the globe. Parts are made, or printed, layer by layer using only the materials required to form the part, resulting in much less waste than traditional manufacturing methods. Additive manufacturing has been implemented in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, medical, consumer products, and fashion, using metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and even organic tissues. However, traditional 3-D printing technologies, particularly those used to print metals, can be prohibitively expensive for small enterprises and the average consumer. A low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer has been developed based upon gas metal arc weld (GMAW) technology. Using this technology, substrate release mechanisms have been developed, allowing the user to remove a printed metal part from a metal substrate by hand. The mechanical and microstructural properties of commercially available weld alloys were characterized and used to guide alloy development in 4000 series aluminum-silicon alloys. Wedge casting experiments were performed to screen magnesium, strontium, and titanium boride alloying additions in hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys for their properties and the ease with which they could be printed. Finally, the top performing alloys, which were approximately 11.6% Si modified with strontium and titanium boride were cast, extruded, and drawn into wire. These wires were printed and the mechanical and microstructural properties were compared with those of commercially available alloys. This work resulted in an easier-to-print aluminum-silicon-strontium alloy that exhibited lower porosity, equivalent yield and tensile strengths, yet nearly twice the ductility compared to commercial alloys.

  10. Evaluation of Hydrogen Cracking in Weld Metal Deposited using Cellulosic-Coated Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-16

    Cellulosic-coated electrodes (primarily AWS EXX10-type) are traditionally used for "stovepipe" welding of pipelines because they are well suited for deposition of pipeline girth welds and are capable of high deposition rates when welding downhill. De...

  11. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  12. Improving productivity and quality in plastic and thin metallic plates manufacturing by using ultrasonic welding processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dehelean,D.; Oanca,O.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the research done at the Romanian National R&D Institute for Welding and Material Testing ISIM Timisoara in the field of ultrasonic process development. It starts with a general presentation of the value added by the welding sector in Europe. There are presented figures representing the size of the welding sector in Romania. The need of development of new high efficiency welding processes is mentioned, ultrasonic welding being one of the special welding proce...

  13. Effect of Nickel Contents on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties for Low-Carbon Bainitic Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Gaojun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Shuai; Guo, Xili; Yuan, Junjun; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jianhong

    2017-05-01

    Multi-pass weld metals were deposited on Q345 base steel using metal powder-flux-cored wire with various Ni contents to investigate the effects of the Ni content on the weld microstructure and property. The types of the microstructures were identified by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and micro-hardness tests. As a focusing point, the lath bainite and lath martensite were distinguished by their compositions, morphologies, and hardness. In particular, a number of black plane facets appearing between lath bainite or lath martensite packets were characterized by laser scanning confocal microscope. The results indicated that with the increase in Ni contents in the range of 0, 2, 4, and 6%, the microstructures in the weld-deposited metal were changed from the domination of the granular bainite to the majority of the lath bainite and/or the lath martensite and the micro-hardness of the weld-deposited metal increased. Meanwhile, the average width of columnar grain displays a decreasing trend and prior austenite grain size decreases while increases with higher Ni content above 4%. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength decrease, while the reduction in fracture area increases with the decreasing Ni mass fraction and the increasing test temperature, respectively. And poor yield strength in Ni6 specimen can be attributed to elements segregation caused by weld defect. Finally, micro-hardness distribution in correspondence with specimens presents as a style of cloud-map.

  14. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  15. Data collection on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels and weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picker, C.; Wareing, J.; Tavassoli, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Data on the influence of low dose irradiation on the mechanical properties of structural steels (Types 304, 316, 316L, 316H and 316L(N) and associated weld metals) at temperatures from 20 deg. C to 750 deg. C, have been compiled from published literature and the results of British, Dutch, French and German Laboratories. The preliminary results, which cover the dose range from 0 to 5 displacements per atom (and/or up to 2 appm helium) are presented as comparisons between irradiated and unirradiated control data, covering a range of strength and cyclic properties. The results show that low dose irradiation can have a significant influence on the properties ranging from increases in 0.2% proof stress to decreases in stress rupture strength and ductility. More detailed investigations of the significant factors on the individual properties will be completed in the future. (author). 13 figs, 1 tab

  16. Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    strength Al, with tough, ductile , weld joints may provide improved protection and crash safety by means of a rigid vehicle structure. This...characteristics and ballistic protection, with V50 statistics of 5083 and 7039 aluminum and RHA steel . Aberdeen Proving Ground (MD): Army Research...633. 9. McQueen H, Leo P, Cerri E. Al-Zn-Mg for extrusion– hot workability. In TMS 2009, Al Alloys: Fabrication, Characterization and Applications II

  17. Three-dimensional cellular automaton-finite element modeling of solidification grain structures for arc-welding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shijia; Guillemot, Gildas; Gandin, Charles-André

    2016-01-01

    Solidification grain structure has significant impact on the final properties of welded parts using fusion welding processes. Direct simulation of grain structure at industrial scale is yet rarely reported in the literature and remains a challenge. A three-dimensional (3D) coupled Cellular Automaton (CA) – Finite Element (FE) model is presented that predicts the grain structure formation during multiple passes Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW). The FE model is established in a level set (LS) approach that tracks the evolution of the metal-shielding gas interface due to the addition of metal. The FE method solves the mass, energy and momentum conservation equations for the metal plus shielding gas system based on an adaptive mesh (FE mesh). Fields are projected in a second FE mesh, named CA mesh. A CA grid made of a regular lattice of cubic cells is created to overlay the fixed CA mesh. The CA model based on the CA grid simulates the melting and growth of the grain boundaries in the liquid pool. In order to handle large computational domains while keeping reasonable computational costs, parallel computations and dynamic strategies for the allocation/deallocation of the CA grid are introduced. These strategies correspond to significant optimizations of the computer memories that are demonstrated. The 3D CAFE model is first applied to the simple configuration of single linear passes by GTAW of a duplex stainless steel URANUS 2202. It is then applied to a more persuasive example considering GMAW in spray transfer mode during multiple passes to fill a V-groove chamfer. Simulations reveal the possibility to handle domains with millions of grains in representative domain sizes while following the formation of textures that result from the growth competition among columnar grains. -- Graphical abstract: Simulated 3D grain structure (3D CAFE model) for GTAW multiple linear passes at the surface of a duplex stainless steel (URANUS 22002

  18. Effects of Different Filler Metals on the Mechanical Behaviors of GTA Welded AA7A52(T6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Fengyuan; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Lin, Jianjun; Sun, Zhe; Xu, Binshi; He, Peng

    2014-06-01

    ER4043, ER5356, and AA7A52 on behalf of the Al-Si, Al-Mg, and Al-Zn-Mg-based welding material, respectively, were chosen as the filler metal to weld AA7A52(T6) plates by GTAW. The variance in mechanical performances of the joints caused by the various filler materials was investigated with reference to the SEM and EDS test results for the weld seam and the fracture surface. Failure was found in the seam for all the welded joints. With regard to the joint obtained with ER4043 welding wire, the total elongation was limited by the brittle intergranular compound Mg2Si of which Mg was introduced by convection mass transfer. As for the other two welds, the content ratio of Zn and Mg was found to play the dominant role in deciding the mechanical properties of the intergranular Mg-Zn compounds which were responsible for the tensile behavior of the joints. The content ratio (wt.%) of beyond 2:1 gave birth to the strengthening phase MgZn2 leading to a ductile fracture. Cr in the seam obtained with AA7A52 filler metal was found to enhance the strength of the joint through isolated particles.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yao [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Wenjing [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Xie Jijia [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun Shouguang [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Liang [College of Metallurgy and Material Engineering, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 (China); Qian Ye; Meng Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Yujie, E-mail: yujie_wei@lnm.imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yao; Wang Wenjing; Xie Jijia; Sun Shouguang; Wang Liang; Qian Ye; Meng Yuan; Wei Yujie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. ► GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. ► GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  1. Optimal parameters determination of the orbital weld technique using microstructural and chemical properties of welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, A.; Echevarria, J.F.; Rondon, S.; Leiva, P.; Sendoya, F.A.; Amalfi, J.; Lopez, M.; Dominguez, H.

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of the main parameters of thermal cycle in Orbital Automatic Weld, as a particular process of the GTAW Weld technique. Also is concerned with the investigation of microstructural and mechanical properties of welded joints made with Orbital Technique in SA 210 Steel, a particular alloy widely use during the construction of Economizers of Power Plants. A number of PC software were used in this sense in order to anticipate the main mechanical and structural characteristics of Weld metal and the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). The papers also might be of great value during selection of optimal Weld parameters to produce sound and high quality Welds during the construction / assembling of structural components in high requirements industrial sectors and also to make a reliable prediction of weld properties

  2. Structural Phase Evolution in Ultrasonic-Assisted Friction Stir Welded 2195 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    The authors examined the structural and phase state of fixed joints produced by method of friction stir welding (FSW) and ultrasonic-assisted friction stir welding (UAFSW) from extruded profile of aluminum alloy AA2195. In order to identify the role of ultrasonic application in the course of welding, such characteristics, as volume fraction and average size of secondary particles are compared in the base material and stir zones of FSW and UAFSW joints. By applying the methods of SEM and TEM analysis, researchers established the complex character of phase transitions as a result of ultrasonic application.

  3. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  4. Determination of welding parameters for execution of weld overlayer on PWR nuclear reactor nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Gabriela M.; Lima, Luciana I.; Quinan, Marco A.; Schvartzman, Monica M.

    2009-01-01

    In the PWR reactors, nickel based dissimilar welds have been presented susceptibilities the stress corrosion (S C). For the mitigation the problem a deposition of weld layers on the external surface of the nozzle is an alternative, viewing to provoke the compression of the region subjected to S C. This paper presents a preliminary study on the determination of welding parameters to obtain these welding overlayers. Welding depositions were performed on a test piece welded with nickel 182 alloy, simulating the conditions of a nozzle used in a PWR nuclear power plant. The welding process was the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), and a nickel 52 alloy as addition material. The overlayers were performed on the base metals, carbon steel an stainless steel, changing the welding parameters and verifying the the time of each weld filet. After that, the samples were micro structurally characterized. The macro structures and the microstructures obtained through optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness are presented. The preliminary results make evident the good weld quality. However, a small weld parameters influence used in the base material microstructure (carbon steel and stainless steel). The obtained results in this study will be used as reference in the construction of a mock up which will simulate all the conditions of a pressurizer nozzle of PWR reactor

  5. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  6. Predicting welding distortion in a panel structure with longitudinal stiffeners using inherent deformations obtained by inverse analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM) which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results.

  7. Structure and properties of an aluminium alloy welded by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzimov, Sh.M.; Palvanov, S.R.; Pogrebnjak, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In the given work the experimental results on research of influence of electronic beams on structure of an aluminum alloy are submitted. As a basis of samples the alloy Al-Mg-Zn-Cu by the additives Se-0.5 % and Nb-0.15 % is chosen. Samples from a cast aluminum alloy by thickness of 3 mm such as B-96 were welded with an electronic beam in three different modes at radius circle of a root of a welded seam of 5 mm. The welding was carried out by an alloy Amg 63 and Sv-1571 with application electron team welding joint of parts. The basic influence on the given process makes energy - allocation of an electronic beam. For research of phase structure used of X-ray beams (XRD), DRON-2 in copper K α - Cu measurement. For research of structure and morphology of a surface used optical microscope with increase 800-1500 times and electronic microscope with the microanalysis. On figures of optical microscopy the morphology of a seam sharply differs from morphology of an initial part. The microanalysis carried out with a place of a seam, has shown presence of the whole spectrum of elements, such as, Al; Zn; Na; Mg; Cu; and Mn. All measurements carried out in welding zone and in frontier zones that it was possible to carry out the comparative analysis. The element structure of these zones essentially differs in dependence of a condition of welding

  8. Review of Dissimilar Metal Welding for the NGNP Helical-Coil Steam Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuPont, John N.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding research and development of a new high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) that is capable of providing high temperature process heat for industry. The steam generator of the HTGR will consist of an evaporator economizer section in the lower portion and a finishing superheater section in the upper portion. Alloy 800H is expected to be used for the superheater section, and 2.25Cr 1Mo steel is expected to be used for the evaporator economizer section. Dissimilar metal welds (DMW) will be needed to join these two materials. It is well known that failure of DMWs can occur well below the expected creep life of either base metal and well below the design life of the plant. The failure time depends on a wide range of factors related to service conditions, welding parameters, and alloys involved in the DMW. The overall objective of this report is to review factors associated with premature failure of DMWs operating at elevated temperatures and identify methods for extending the life of the 2.25Cr 1Mo steel to alloy 800H welds required in the new HTGR. Information is provided on a variety of topics pertinent to DMW failures, including microstructural evolution, failure mechanisms, creep rupture properties, aging behavior, remaining life estimation techniques, effect of environment on creep rupture properties, best practices, and research in progress to improve DMW performance. The microstructure of DMWs in the as welded condition consists of a sharp chemical concentration gradient across the fusion line that separates the ferritic and austenitic alloys. Upon cooling from the weld thermal cycle, a band of martensite forms within this concentration gradient due to high hardenability and the relatively rapid cooling rates associated with welding. Upon aging, during post weld heat treatment (PWHT), and/or during high temperature service, C diffuses down the chemical potential gradient from the ferritic 2.25Cr 1Mo steel

  9. Low temperature fatigue crack propagation in neutron irradiated Type 316 steel and weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.; Walls, J.D.; Gravenor, J.

    1981-02-01

    The fast cycling fatigue crack propagation characteristics of Type 316 steel and weld metal have been investigated at 380 0 C after irradiation to 1.72-1.92x10 20 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) and 2.03x10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) at the same temperature. With mill-annealed Type 316 steel, modest decreases in the rates of crack propagation were observed for both dose levels considered, whereas for cold-worked Type 316 steel irradiation to 2.03x10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) caused increases in the rate of crack propagation. For Type 316 weld metal, increases in the rate of crack propagation were observed for both dose levels considered. The diverse influences of irradiation upon fatigue crack propagation in these materials are explained by considering a simple continuum mechanics model of crack propagation together with the results of control tensile experiments made on similarly irradiated materials. (author)

  10. The prediction of creep damage in Type 347 weld metal: part II creep fatigue tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spindler, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Calculations of creep damage under conditions of strain control are often carried out using either a time fraction approach or a ductility exhaustion approach. In part I of this paper the rupture strength and creep ductility data for a Type 347 weld metal were fitted to provide the material properties that are used to calculate creep damage. Part II of this paper examines whether the time fraction approach or the ductility exhaustion approach gives the better predictions of creep damage in creep-fatigue tests on the same Type 347 weld metal. In addition, a new creep damage model, which was developed by removing some of the simplifying assumptions that are made in the ductility exhaustion approach, was used. This new creep damage model is a function of the strain rate, stress and temperature and was derived from creep and constant strain rate test data using a reverse modelling technique (see part I of this paper). It is shown that the new creep damage model gives better predictions of creep damage in the creep-fatigue tests than the time fraction and the ductility exhaustion approaches

  11. Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mainã Portella; Mantovani, Gerson Luiz; Vasant Kumar, R.; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of metal active gas-welded joints of a high-strength steel with tensile yield strength of 900 MPa was investigated. The welded joints were obtained using two different heat inputs. The corrosion behavior has been studied in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests. Optical microscopy images, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray revealed different microstructural features in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal (WM). Before and after the corrosion process, the sample was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy to measure the depth difference between HAZ and WM. The results showed that the heat input did not play an important role on corrosion behavior of HSLA steel. The anodic and cathodic areas of the welded joints could be associated with depth differences. The HAZ was found to be the anodic area, while the WM was cathodic with respect to the HAZ. The corrosion behavior was related to the amount and orientation nature of carbides in the HAZ. The microstructure of the HAZ consisted of martensite and bainite, whereas acicular ferrite was observed in the weld metal.

  12. Sensitization behaviour of modified 316N and 316L stainless steel weld metals after complex annealing and stress relieving cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvathavarthini, N.; Dayal, R.K.; Khatak, H.S.; Shankar, V.; Shanmugam, V.

    2006-01-01

    Sensitization behaviour of austenitic stainless steel weld metals prepared using indigenously developed modified 316N (C = 0.05%; N = 0.12%) and 316L (C = 0.02%; N = 0.07%) electrodes was studied. Detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examination was carried out to understand the microstructural changes occurring in the weld metal during isothermal exposure at various temperatures ranging from 500 deg. C to 850 deg. C (773-1123 K). Based on these studies the mechanism of sensitization in the austenite-ferrite weld metal has been explained. Time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams were established using ASTM A262 Practice E test. From the TTS diagrams, critical cooling rate (CCR) above which there is no risk of sensitization was calculated for both materials. The heating/cooling rates to be followed for avoiding sensitization during heat treatment cycles consisting of solution-annealing and stress-relieving in fabrication of welded components of AISI 316LN stainless steel (SS) were estimated taking into account the soaking time and the number of times the component undergoes thermal excursions in the sensitization regime. The results were validated by performing controlled heating and cooling heat treatment trials on welded specimens

  13. Three dimensional atom probe study of Ni-base alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Three dimensional atom probe tomography (3D APT) is applied to characterize the dissimilar metal joint which was welded between the Ni-based alloy, Alloy 690 and the low alloy steel, A533 Gr. B, with Alloy 152 filler metal. While there is some difficulty in preparing the specimen for the analysis, the 3D APT has a truly quantitative analytical capability to characterize nanometer scale particles in metallic materials, thus its application to the microstructural analysis in multicomponent metallic materials provides critical information on the mechanism of nanoscale microstructural evolution. In this study, the procedure for 3D APT specimen preparation was established, and those for dissimilar metal weld interface were prepared near the fusion boundary by a focused ion beam. The result of the analysis in this study showed the precipitation of chromium carbides near the fusion boundary between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152.

  14. Three dimensional atom probe study of Ni-base alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Three dimensional atom probe tomography (3D APT) is applied to characterize the dissimilar metal joint which was welded between the Ni-based alloy, Alloy 690 and the low alloy steel, A533 Gr. B, with Alloy 152 filler metal. While there is some difficulty in preparing the specimen for the analysis, the 3D APT has a truly quantitative analytical capability to characterize nanometer scale particles in metallic materials, thus its application to the microstructural analysis in multicomponent metallic materials provides critical information on the mechanism of nanoscale microstructural evolution. In this study, the procedure for 3D APT specimen preparation was established, and those for dissimilar metal weld interface were prepared near the fusion boundary by a focused ion beam. The result of the analysis in this study showed the precipitation of chromium carbides near the fusion boundary between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152.

  15. Time resolved Thomson scattering diagnostic of pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M; Schein, J; Marquès, J L

    2014-01-01

    In this work a Thomson scattering diagnostic technique was applied to obtain time resolved electron temperature and density values during a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. The investigated GMAW process was run with aluminum wire (AlMg 4,5 Mn) with 1.2 mm diameter as a wire electrode, argon as a shielding gas and peak currents in the range of 400 A. Time resolved measurements could be achieved by triggering the laser pulse at shifted time positions with respect to the current pulse driving the process. Time evaluation of resulting electron temperatures and densities is used to investigate the state of the plasma in different phases of the current pulse and to determine the influence of the metal vapor and droplets on the plasma properties

  16. STUDY OF ARC IMPULSE FREQUENCY EFFECT ON THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF WELDED CONNECTION ELEMENTS IN ALUMINIUM PIPELINE SYSTEMS, MADE WITH MASTERTIG 3500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Pavel V. Bakhmatov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary . The article focuses on the arc impulse frequency effect on the structure and properties of welded connections in aluminum pipeline systems hand-operated with argon-arc welding nonconsumable rod on MasterTig3500. It was revealed that the frequency of the welding current impulses plays an important role in the forming of the welded connection. The authors determined the optimal value of the welding current frequency significantly accelerating the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the weld. The authors detailed some features of cleaning assembly parts with a wire brush prior to welding process.

  17. Residual and working stresses in pipe joints in heterogeneous metals, due to common action of welding and service loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, S.N.; Voronin, N.N.; Roshchin, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The stresses in the welded joints of cylindrical shells are studied, which are caused by the total effect of the thermal deformation welding cycles, by the preheats connected with the thermal treatment or operation, and by power loads. Studied were the shell joints made of the steels Kh18N10T and St.3, as well as the joints of three shells made of different metals, St.3+18N1aT steel+copper. The schematic diagram showing the residual stresses set up under effect of different factors are presented. The following has been shown by the study: the preheating of the welded joints of the shells made of diverse metals up to the operational temperatures does not result in obviating the residual stresses. If the welded shells are loaded by the internal pressure up to the stresses of (0.8-O.9) sigmasub(T), in certain cases an essential (up to 60-70%) reduction in the residual welding stresses may be obtained. The effectiveness of a variation in the residual stresses is reduced in the joints that have been thermally treated after welding. The working stresses set up in the welded joints of the shells made of different metals under the operational loading may be essentially reduced through initial preheating with the application of a pressure or without it. The preheating temperature and the pressures applied may be chosen so that to create the residual strains and the stresses of inverse sign as compared with the working stresses

  18. Effects of LSP on micro-structures and residual stresses in a 4 mm CLAM steel weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xizhang, E-mail: chenxizhang@wzu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wenzhou University., Wenzhou 325035 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Fang, Yuanyuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Shuyan; Kelleher, Joe F. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Zhou, Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-05-15

    The effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on the distribution of residual stress and micro-structure of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel weldment were investigated via neutron diffraction and optical microscope (OM). A pair of 4 mm CLAM steel plates joined by GTA welding. Special attention is paid to the generation of high level compressive residual stresses introduced by LSP. Residual stress in longitudinal, normal and transversal direction at weldment surface and longitudinal stress through thickness are evaluated via neutron diffraction. Compressive residual stress after LSP occurred at more than 90% areas within the weld joint, it is almost double the areas of compressive stress compare to weldment surface before LSP. The maximum compressive normal residual stress becomes to −183 MPa after LSP from −63 MPa before LSP. The Modification of surface micro-structures including weld zone (WZ), heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal (BM) are also discussed. Results to date demonstrate that laser shock processing has been a great potential method for the improvement of mechanical performance of components.

  19. Leak-before-break analysis of a dissimilar metal welded joint for connecting pipe-nozzle in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, N. [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, G.Z., E-mail: gzwang@ecust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Xuan, F.Z.; Tu, S.T. [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Leak-before-break (LBB) analysis for a dissimilar metal weld joint (DMWJ) is made. ► Pipe-nozzle geometry and inhomogeneous material property of DMWJ are incorporated. ► LBB behavior of a defect can be assessed by LBB assessment diagram and LBB curve. ► Feasibility region of LBB is enlarged with decreasing load and increasing J{sub R}. -- Abstract: This paper presents a leak-before-break (LBB) analysis for a dissimilar metal welded joint (DMWJ) connected the safe end to pipe-nozzle of a reactor pressure vessel of which is relevant to safety of nuclear power plant. Three-dimensional finite element analysis models were built for the DMWJ structure, and the initial inner circumferential surface cracks were postulated at the interface between A508 steel and buttering Alloy82. Based on the elastic–plastic fracture mechanics theory of J-integral, the crack growth stability was analyzed, and the pipe-nozzle geometry effect and inhomogeneous material properties of the DMWJ have been incorporated. Base on the analysis results, the LBB curves and LBB assessment diagrams were constructed for the DMWJ, and effects of applied bending moment loads and J-resistance curves of materials on LBB behavior were analyzed. The results show that the LBB behavior of a defect in the DMWJ under an upmost severe load can be assessed and predicted by plotting the defect size and its propagation path in the LBB assessment diagrams. With decreasing the maximum bending moment load and increasing the crack growth resistance of materials, the ligament instability lines shift upward and the critical crack length lines move to the right in the LBB assessment diagrams, which leads to enlargement of the feasibility region in the LBB behavior.

  20. Fiber Laser Welding of Dissimilar 2205/304 Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an attempt on pulsed-fiber laser welding on an austenitic-duplex stainless steel butt joint configuration was investigated. The influence of various welding parameters, such as beam diameter, peak power, pulse repetition rate, and pulse width on the weld beads geometry was studied by checking the width and depth of the welds after each round of welding parameters combination. The weld bead dimensions and microstructural progression of the weld joints were observed microscopically. Finally, the full penetration specimens were subjected to tensile tests, which were coupled with the analysis of the fracture surfaces. From the results, combination of the selected weld parameters resulted in robust weldments with similar features to those of duplex and austenitic weld metals. The weld depth and width were found to increase proportionally to the laser power. Furthermore, the weld bead geometry was found to be positively affected by the pulse width. Microstructural studies revealed the presence of dendritic and fine grain structures within the weld zone at low peak power, while ferritic microstructures were found on the sides of the weld metal near the SS 304 and austenitic-ferritic microstructure beside the duplex 2205 boundary. Regarding the micro-hardness tests, there was an improvement when compared to the hardness of duplex and austenitic stainless steels base metals. Additionally, the tensile strength of the fiber laser welded joints was found to be higher when compared to the tensile strength of the base metals (duplex and austenitic in all of the joints.

  1. Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean

    2010-05-01

    Fumes from a group of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes used on stainless steel were generated using three different metal transfer modes and four different shield gases. The objective was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) species in the fumes, and identify processes that are minimal generators of Mn species. The robotic welding system was operated in short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO2 and He/Ar), axial spray (AXS) mode (Ar/O2 and Ar/CO2), and pulsed axial-spray (PAXS) mode (Ar/O2). The fumes were analyzed for Mn by a sequential extraction process followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total elemental Mn, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) were separately measured after aqua regia digestion and ICP-AES analysis. Soluble Mn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ni2+ in a simple biological buffer (phosphate-buffered saline) were determined at pH 7.2 and 5.0 after 2 h incubation at 37 C by ion chromatography. Results indicate that Mn was present in soluble form, acid-soluble form, and acid-soluble form after reduction by hydroxylamine, which represents soluble Mn0 and Mn2+ compounds, other Mn2+ compounds, and (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds, respectively. The dominant fraction was the acid-soluble Mn2+ fraction, but results varied with the process and shield gas. Soluble Mn mass percent in the fume ranged from 0.2 to 0.9%, acid-soluble Mn2+ compounds ranged from 2.6 to 9.3%, and acid plus reducing agent-soluble (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds ranged from 0.6 to 5.1%. Total Mn composition ranged from 7 to 15%. XRD results showed fumes had a crystalline content of 90-99% Fe3O4, and showed evidence of multiple Mn oxides, but overlaps and weak signals limited identification. Small amounts of the Mn2+ in the fume (welding process. Mn generation rates for the fractions were tabulated, and the influence of ozone is discussed. The conclusions are that exposures to welding fumes include multiple Mn species, both

  2. Friction stir weld tools having fine grain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Glenn J.; Frye, John G.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-03-15

    Tools for friction stir welding can be made with fewer process steps, lower cost techniques, and/or lower cost ingredients than other state-of-the-art processes by utilizing improved compositions and processes of fabrication. Furthermore, the tools resulting from the improved compositions and processes of fabrication can exhibit better distribution and homogeneity of chemical constituents, greater strength, and/or increased durability. In one example, a friction stir weld tool includes tungsten and rhenium and is characterized by carbide and oxide dispersoids, by carbide particulates, and by grains that comprise a solid solution of the tungsten and rhenium. The grains do not exceed 10 micrometers in diameter.

  3. Fatigue analysis of a structure with welds considering metallurgical discontinuities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillat, M.T.; Lejeail, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Within the frameworks of a creep-fatigue experimental program, called EVASION, thermo-mechanical tests were conducted on two mock-ups, the first one was fully machined and the second one welded and then machined (in order to eliminate geometrical discontinuities, thus only leaving metallurgical discontinuities). These two mock-ups were submitted to exactly the same loading history. Plastic analyses with a correct description of mechanical properties and fatigue strength of materials are conducted and compared with experimental results in order to highlight the influence of the weld. (author). 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Effect of the Grain Size of the Initial Structure of 1565chM Alloy on the Structure and Properties of the Joints Fabricated by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Drits, A. M.; Gureeva, M. A.; Malov, D. V.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of the initial grain size in the structure of the aluminum 1565chM alloy on the mechanical properties of the welded joints forme