WorldWideScience

Sample records for weld integrity assessment

  1. Integrity and quality assessment applied on laser welded titanium components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirdelius Håkan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding of thin titanium components, a critical component of many gas turbine engines, has demonstrated a tendency of generating pores in clusters with a prescribed orientation. These pores, also known as chain porosities, are often of harmless sizes (of 50–100 micrometer as individuals. Though the cluster as such, depending on the distances and orientations in between the pores, may have an impact on the structural integrity. A recently developed algorithm for 3-D positioning of small pore defects in planar geometries using digital X-ray inspection aims at providing 3-D positions of the defects. This could then be used in-line to assess the welding quality in the manufacturing process. This presentation describes the development of a methodology that aims to incorporate non-destructive evaluation with, in this case, structural integrity.

  2. ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

    2008-06-30

    The potential to save trillions of BTU’s in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: • While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. • Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. • For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/π, which has additional implications. . • For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack

  3. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  4. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  5. Early generation pipeline girth welding practices and their implications for integrity management of North American pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amend, Bill [DNV Columbus, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    In response to the interest in ensuring the continued safe operation of vintage pipelines and the integrity management challenges related to those pipelines, PRCI sponsored in 2009 a project called {sup V}intage Girth Weld Defect Assessment - Comprehensive Study{sup .} Its objectives focused on girth welds made with the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process, particularly with regard to: review of approaches for evaluating the integrity of these welds; description of the typical characteristics and properties of SMAW vintage welds; determination of gaps in available information and technology that hinder effective integrity assessment and management of vintage girth welds. A very extensive literature review was performed as part of this project. Key findings include the following. The failure rate of early generation girth welds is low, especially when considering the rate of catastrophic failures. Pipeline girth welds are unlikely to fail unless subjected to axial strains that far exceed the strains related to internal pressure alone.

  6. Welded joints integrity analysis and optimization for fiber laser welding of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuewei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Li, Peigen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Dissimilar materials welded joints provide many advantages in power, automotive, chemical, and spacecraft industries. The weld bead integrity which is determined by process parameters plays a significant role in the welding quality during the fiber laser welding (FLW) of dissimilar materials. In this paper, an optimization method by taking the integrity of the weld bead and weld area into consideration is proposed for FLW of dissimilar materials, the low carbon steel and stainless steel. The relationships between the weld bead integrity and process parameters are developed by the genetic algorithm optimized back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN). The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is taken for optimizing the predicted outputs from GA-BPNN for the objective. Through the optimization process, the desired weld bead with good integrity and minimum weld area are obtained and the corresponding microstructure and microhardness are excellent. The mechanical properties of the optimized joints are greatly improved compared with that of the un-optimized welded joints. Moreover, the effects of significant factors are analyzed based on the statistical approach and the laser power (LP) is identified as the most significant factor on the weld bead integrity and weld area. The results indicate that the proposed method is effective for improving the reliability and stability of welded joints in the practical production.

  7. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  8. Novel Optimization Methodology for Welding Process/Consumable Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, Marie A; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Vitek, John; Babu, Suresh

    2006-01-15

    Advanced materials are being developed to improve the energy efficiency of many industries of future including steel, mining, and chemical, as well as, US infrastructures including bridges, pipelines and buildings. Effective deployment of these materials is highly dependent upon the development of arc welding technology. Traditional welding technology development is slow and often involves expensive and time-consuming trial and error experimentation. The reason for this is the lack of useful predictive tools that enable welding technology development to keep pace with the deployment of new materials in various industrial sectors. Literature reviews showed two kinds of modeling activities. Academic and national laboratory efforts focus on developing integrated weld process models by employing the detailed scientific methodologies. However, these models are cumbersome and not easy to use. Therefore, these scientific models have limited application in real-world industrial conditions. On the other hand, industrial users have relied on simple predictive models based on analytical and empirical equations to drive their product development. The scopes of these simple models are limited. In this research, attempts were made to bridge this gap and provide the industry with a computational tool that combines the advantages of both approaches. This research resulted in the development of predictive tools which facilitate the development of optimized welding processes and consumables. The work demonstrated that it is possible to develop hybrid integrated models for relating the weld metal composition and process parameters to the performance of welds. In addition, these tools can be deployed for industrial users through user friendly graphical interface. In principle, the welding industry users can use these modular tools to guide their welding process parameter and consumable composition selection. It is hypothesized that by expanding these tools throughout welding industry

  9. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  10. Ultrasonic assessment of tension shear strength in resistance spot welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghanizadeh, Abbas

    2015-05-01

    Resistance spot welding is extensively used to join sheet steel in the automotive industry. Ultrasonic non-destructive techniques for evaluation of the mechanical properties of resistance spot welding are presented. The aim of this study is to develop the capability of the ultrasonic techniques as an efficient tool in the assessment of the welding characterization. Previous researches have indicated that the measurements of ultrasonic attenuation are sensitive to grain- size variations in an extensive range of metallic alloys. Other researchers have frequently described grain sizes which are able to have significant effects on the physical characteristics of the material. This research provides a novel method to estimate the tension-shear strengths of the resistance spot welding directly from the ultrasonic attenuation measurements. The effects of spot welding parameters on the ultrasonic waves are further investigated. The results confirm that it is possible to determine the spot welding parameters for individual quality by using ultrasonic test.

  11. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  12. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate...... measurements for prediction of phases, (3) Various crack tests to assess the crack susceptibility of alloys and (4) A combination of the above for selection of suitable, weldable alloys. The possibility of using such specific methods for alloys and applications has been investigated and recommendations...... crack tests, the Weeter spot weld test has been chosen to form a basis for the development of a practicable method to select specific alloys for welding applications. A new test, the Groove weld test was developed, which has reduced the time consumption and lightened the analysis effort considerably...

  13. Development of Welding Fumes Health Index (WFHI) for Welding Workplace's Safety and Health Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Azian; Paiman, Nuur Azreen; Leman, Abdul Mutalib; Md Yusof, Mohammad Zainal

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to develop an index that can rank welding workplace that associate well with possible health risk of welders. Welding Fumes Health Index (WFHI) were developed based on data from case studies conducted in Plant 1 and Plant 2. Personal sampling of welding fumes to assess the concentration of metal constituents along with series of lung function tests was conducted. Fifteen metal constituents were investigated in each case study. Index values were derived from aggregation analysis of metal constituent concentration while significant lung functions were recognized through statistical analysis in each plant. The results showed none of the metal constituent concentration was exceeding the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for all plants. However, statistical analysis showed significant mean differences of lung functions between welders and non-welders. The index was then applied to one of the welding industry (Plant 3) for verification purpose. The developed index showed its promising ability to rank welding workplace, according to the multiple constituent concentrations of welding fumes that associates well with lung functions of the investigated welders. There was possibility that some of the metal constituents were below the detection limit leading to '0' value of sub index, thus the multiplicative form of aggregation model was not suitable for analysis. On the other hand, maximum or minimum operator forms suffer from compensation issues and were not considered in this study.

  14. Characterization of the mechanical properties and structural integrity of T-welded connections repaired by grinding and wet welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terán, G., E-mail: gteran@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Cuamatzi-Meléndez, R., E-mail: rcuamatzi@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Albiter, A., E-mail: aalbiter@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje central Lázaro Cárdenas 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México D.F. CP 07730, México (Mexico); Maldonado, C., E-mail: cmzepeda@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, UMSNH, PO Box 52-B, 58000, México (Mexico); Bracarense, A.Q., E-mail: bracarense@ufmg.br [UFMG Departamento de Engeharia Mecánica Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental methodology to characterize the structural integrity and mechanical properties of repaired T-welded connections using in fixed offshore structures. Grinding is employed to remove localized damage like cracking and corrosion and subsequent wet welding can be used to fill the grinded material. But it is important to define the grinding depth and profile in order to maintain structural integrity during the repair. Therefore, in this work different grinding depths were performed, for damage material removal, at the weld toe of the T-welded connections. The grinding was filled by wet welding in a hyperbaric chamber, simulating three different water depths: 50 m, 70 m and 100 m. The electrodes were coated with vinilic varnish, which is cheap and easy to apply. The characterization of the mechanical properties of the T-welded connections was done with standard tensile, hardness and Charpy tests; microstructure and porosity analysis were also performed. The samples were obtained from the welded connections in regions of the wet weld beads. The test results were compared with the mechanical properties of the T-welded connections welded in air conditions performed by other authors. The results showed that the wet welding technique performed in this work produced good mechanical properties of the repaired T-welded connection. The mechanical properties, measured in wet conditions, for 6 mm grinding depth, were similar for the 3 different water depths measured in air conditions. But for 10 mm grinding depth, the values of the mechanical properties measured in wet conditions were quite lower than that for air conditions for the 3 water depths. However a porosity analysis, performed with a Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), showed that the level of porosity in the resulted wet weld beads is in the range of that published in the literature and some samples revealed lower level of porosity. The main resulting microstructure was polygonal

  15. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  16. Preliminary assessment of the fracture behavior of weld material in full-thickness clad beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Iskander, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes a testing program that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. A summary of the testing program includes a description of the specimen geometry, material properties, the testing procedure, and the experimental results form three specimens. The yield strength of the weld material was determined to be 36% higher than the yield strength of the base material. An irradiation-induced increase in yield strength of the weld material could result in a yield stress that exceeds the upper limit where code curves are valid. The high yield strength for prototypic weld material may have implications for RPV structural integrity assessments. Analyses of the test data are discussed, including comparisons of measured displacements with finite-element analysis results, applications of toughness estimation techniques, and interpretations of constraint conditions implied by stress-based constraint methodologies. Metallurgical conditions in the region of the cladding heat-affected zone are proposed as a possible explanation for the lower-bound fracture toughness measured with one of the shallow-crack clad beam specimens. Fracture toughness data from the three clad beam specimens are compared with other shallow- and deep-crack uniaxial beam and cruciform data generated previously from A 533 Grade B plate material.

  17. A study on safety and integrity of the unidentified welding point omitted on as-built design drawing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, S. C.; Ha, J. J.; Han, S. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    Issued was one welding point omitted on as-built design drawing of pressurizer spray line(Ulchin 1) in the process of parliamentary inspection of the government offices in 1999. Thereafter, the question of whether there are additional unidentified welding points in domestic nuclear power plants has by now been controversial. In the view of material, this report focuses on the integrity of the welding area which the question was posed on the pressurizer spray line for Ulchin Unit 1. Also, we explore the effect of overall safety likely to result from the hypothetical existence of additional unidentified welding points in nuclear station, using probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) method. As a result, there is no significant risk increase due to unidentified welding points. However, this problem was originated from the violation of pre-descriptive welding procedure in the process of construction and a loose supervision, so must the mechanisms to improve it be strengthen and streamlined. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  18. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  19. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  20. Assessing mechanical properties of the dissimilar metal welding between P92 steels and alloy 617 at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, J. H.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, T. M.; Bae, D. H. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, W. B. [Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Han, J. W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hoseo University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, a new welding technology of dissimilar materials, Cr-based P92 steels and Ni-based Alloy 617 is introduced and demonstrated to investigate its reliability. Firstly, multi-pass dissimilar metal welding between P92 steel and Alloy 617 was performed using DCEN TIG welding technology, buttering welding technique and a narrow gap groove. After welding, in order to understand characteristics of the dissimilar metal welds, metallurgical micro-structures analysis by optical observation and static tensile strength assessment of the dissimilar welded joints were conducted at 700°C.

  1. Friction Stir Welding of HT9 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel: An Assessment of Microstructure and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    May 2007. [36] P. J. Konkol and M. F. Mruczek, ―Comparison of Friction Stir Weldments and Submerged Arc Weldments in HSLA-65 Steel,‖ Welding ... WELDING OF HT9 FERRITIC- MARTENSITIC STEEL: AN ASSESSMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES by Lara L. Ray June 2013 Thesis Advisor: Luke N...2013 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master‘s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FRICTION STIR WELDING OF HT9 FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEEL: AN

  2. Cold Plasma Welding System for Surgical Skin Closure: In Vivo Porcine Feasibility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harats, Moti; Lam, Amnon; Maller, Michael; Kornhaber, Rachel; Haik, Josef

    2016-09-29

    Cold plasma skin welding is a novel technology that bonds skin edges through soldering without the use of synthetic materials or conventional wound approximation methods such as sutures, staples, or skin adhesives. The cold plasma welding system uses a biological solder applied to the edges of a skin incision, followed by the application of cold plasma energy. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of a cold plasma welding system in approximating and fixating skin incisions compared with conventional methods and to evaluate and define optimal plasma welding parameters and histopathological tissue response in a porcine model. The cold plasma welding system (BioWeld1 System, IonMed Ltd, Yokneam, Israel) was used on porcine skin incisions using variable energy parameters. Wound healing was compared macroscopically and histologically to incisions approximated with sutures. When compared to sutured skin closure, cold plasma welding in specific system parameters demonstrated comparable and favorable wound healing results histopathologically as well as macroscopically. No evidence of epidermal damage, thermal or otherwise, was encountered in the specified parameters. Notably, bleeding, infection, and wound dehiscence were not detected at incision sites. Skin incisions welded at extreme energy parameters presented second-degree burns. Implementation of cold plasma welding has been shown to be feasible for skin closure. Initial in vivo results suggest cold plasma welding might provide equal, if not better, healing results than traditional methods of closure.

  3. Sensor development and integration for robotized laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.

    2009-01-01

    Laser welding requires fast and accurate positioning of the laser beam over the seam trajectory. The task of accurate positioning of the laser tools is performed by robotic systems. It is therefore necessary to teach the robot the path it has to follow. Seam teaching is implemented in several ways:

  4. Critical Assessment of Temperature Distribution in Submerged Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Negi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature distribution during any welding process holds the key for understanding and predicting several important welding attributes like heat affected zone, microstructure of the weld, residual stress, and distortion during welding. The accuracy of the analytical approaches for modeling temperature distribution during welding has been constrained by oversimplified assumptions regarding boundary conditions and material properties. In this paper, an attempt has been made to model the temperature distribution during submerged arc welding process using finite element modeling technique implemented in ANSYS v12. In the present analysis, heat source is assumed to be double-ellipsoidal with Gaussian volumetric heat generation. Furthermore, variation of material properties with temperature and both convective and radiant heat loss boundary condition have been considered. The predicted temperature distribution is then validated against the experimental results obtained by thermal imaging of the welded plate, and they are found to be in a good agreement.

  5. Integrated assessment briefs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Integrated assessment can be used to evaluate and clarify resource management policy options and outcomes for decision makers. The defining characteristics of integrated assessment are (1) focus on providing information and analysis that can be understood and used by decision makers rather than for merely advancing understanding and (2) its multidisciplinary approach, using methods, styles of study, and considerations from a broader variety of technical areas than would typically characterize studies produced from a single disciplinary standpoint. Integrated assessment may combine scientific, social, economic, health, and environmental data and models. Integrated assessment requires bridging the gap between science and policy considerations. Because not everything can be valued using a single metric, such as a dollar value, the integrated assessment process also involves evaluating trade-offs among dissimilar attributes. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recognized the importance and value of multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems early on and have pioneered the development of tools and methods for integrated assessment over the past three decades. Major examples of ORNL`s experience in the development of its capabilities for integrated assessment are given.

  6. Environmental assessment, expanded Ponnequin wind energy project, Weld County, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. The purpose of this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project. This EA, and public comments received on it, were used in DOE`s deliberations on whether to release funding for the expanded project under the Commercialization Ventures Program.

  7. Preliminary Study for Development of Welds Integrity Verification Equipment for the Small Bore Piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Geun Suk; Lee, Jong Eun; Ryu, Jung Hoon; Cho, Kyoung Youn; Sohn, Myoung Sung [KEA, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sanghoon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi Ho [SUNG IL(SIM)Co., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hong Seok [KEPCO KPS, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    It has been reported leakage accident of small-bore piping in Korea. Leakage accident of small-bore pipes are those that will increase due to the aging of the nuclear power plant. And if leakage of the pipe is repaired by using the clamping device when it occur accident, it is economically benefits. The clamping device is a fastening device used to hold or secure objects tightly together to prevent movement or separation through the application of inward pressure. However, when the accident occurs, it can't immediately respond because maintenance and repairing technology are not institutionalized in KEPIC. Thus it appears an economic loss. The technology for corresponding thereto is necessary for the safety of the operation of nuclear power plants. The purpose of this research is to develop an online repairing technology of socket welded pipe and vibration monitoring system of small-bore pipe in the nuclear power plant. Specifically, detailed studies are as follows : • Development of weld overlay method of safety class socket welded connections • Development of Mechanical Clamping Devices for Safety Class 2, 3 small-bore pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop an online repairing technology of socket welded pipe and vibration monitoring system of small-bore pipe, resulting in degraded plant systems. And it is necessary to institutionalize the technology. The fatigue crack testing of socket welded overlay will be performed and fatigue life evaluation method will be developed in second year. Also prototype fabrication of mechanical clamping device will be completed. Base on final goal, the intent is to propose practical evaluation tools, design and fabrication methods for socket welded connection integrity. And result of this study is to development of KEPIC code case approved technology for on-line repairing system of socket welded connection and fabrication of mechanical clamping device.

  8. Detection and assessment of flaws in friction stir welded metallic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohammad Ali; Mustapha, Samir; Tarraf, Jaafar; Ayoub, Georges; Hamade, Ramsey

    2017-04-01

    Investigated is the ability of ultrasonic guided waves to detect flaws and assess the quality of friction stir welds (FSW). AZ31B magnesium plates were friction stir welded. While process parameters of spindle speed and tool feed were fixed, shoulder penetration depth was varied resulting in welds of varying quality. Ultrasonic waves were excited at different frequencies using piezoelectric wafers and the fundamental symmetric (S0) mode was selected to detect the flaws resulting from the welding process. The front of the first transmitted wave signal was used to capture the S0 mode. A damage index (DI) measure was defined based on the amplitude attenuation after wave interaction with the welded zone. Computed Tomography (CT) scanning was employed as a nondestructive testing (NDT) technique to assess the actual weld quality. Derived DI values were plotted against CT-derived flaw volume resulting in a perfectly linear fit. The proposed approach showed high sensitivity of the S0 mode to internal flaws within the weld. As such, this methodology bears great potential as a future predictive method for the evaluation of FSW weld quality.

  9. Needs Assessment for Education and Training in Welding on Maui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Jean A.

    In fall 1996, Hawaii's Maui Community College undertook a study to determine the demand for welders and welding education over the next 5 years and to estimate the characteristics of such training in terms of time of offering and courses needed. Questionnaires were mailed to a sample of 282 welding and related businesses in Maui, requesting…

  10. Assessment of Weld Overlays for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking at Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Edward J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-08-01

    This TLR provides an assessment of weld overlays as a mitigation strategy for PWSCC, and includes an assessment of the WOL-related inspection requirements of Code Case N-770-1, as conditioned in §50.55a.

  11. Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic Method of Friction Stir Weld Assessment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the project is demonstration of the feasibility of Friction Stir Weld (FSW) assessment by novel Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) method. Time...

  12. Assessment of Nugget Size of Spot Weld using Neutron Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW has been widely used for many years in the fabrication of car body structures, mainly due to the cost and time considerations. The weld quality as well as the nugget size is an issue in various manufacturing and processes due to the strong link between the weld quality and safety. It has led to the development of various destructive and non-destructive tests for spot welding such as peel testing, ultrasonic inspections, digital shearography, and infrared thermography. However, such methods cannot show spot weld nugget visually and the results are very operator’s skill dependent. The present work proposes a method to visualize the nugget size of spot welds using neutron radiography. Water, oil and various concentrations of gadolinium oxide-alcohol mixture were evaluated as a contrast media to obtain the best quality of radiography. Results show that mixture of 5 g gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 in 25 ml alcohol produces the best contrast. It provides the possibility to visualize the shape and size of the nugget spot weld. Furthermore, it can discriminate between nugget and corona bond. The result of neutron radiography evaluation shows reasonable agreement with that of destructive test.

  13. Environmental Assessment Expanded Ponnequin Wind Energy Project Weld County, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-03-02

    The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) has considered a proposal from the State of Colorado, Office of Energy Conservation (OEC), for funding construction of the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project in Weld County, Colorado. OEC plans to enter into a contracting arrangement with Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) for the completion of these activities. PSCo, along with its subcontractors and business partners, are jointly developing the Expanded Ponnequin Wind Project. DOE completed an environmental assessment of the original proposed project in August 1997. Since then, the geographic scope and the design of the project changed, necessitating additional review of the project under the National Environmental Policy Act. The project now calls for the possible construction of up to 48 wind turbines on State and private lands. PSCo and its partners have initiated construction of the project on private land in Weld County, Colorado. A substation, access road and some wind turbines have been installed. However, to date, DOE has not provided any funding for these activities. DOE, through its Commercialization Ventures Program, has solicited applications for financial assistance from state energy offices, in a teaming arrangement with private-sector organizations, for projects that will accelerate the commercialization of emerging renewable energy technologies. The Commercialization Ventures Program was established by the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technology Competitiveness Act of 1989 (P.L. 101-218) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486). The Program seeks to assist entry into the marketplace of newly emerging renewable energy technologies, or of innovative applications of existing technologies. In short, an emerging renewable energy technology is one which has already proven viable but which has had little or no operational experience. The Program is managed by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The

  14. Header integrity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotvel, F. [ELSAMPROJEKT, Fredericia (Denmark); Sampietri, C. [ENEL, Milano (Italy); Verelst, L. [LABORELEC, Linkebeek (Belgium); Wortel, H. van [TNO, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Li Ying Zhi [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    In the late eighties creep cracks in the nozzle-to-header welds of high temperature headers became internationally recognized as a problem in older steam power plants. To study the problem a 2 1/4Cr1Mo service-exposed header, which was scrapped due to creep damage, was made available for testing. A full-scale model was fabricated with partly repaired nozzle to header welds and then tested at increased temperature. Loads included internal pressure and system loads. Damage accumulation and creep crack initiation and growth were predicted and experimentally verified. Conclusions and the practical implications for power plant operation are described. (orig.) 7 refs.

  15. Residual stress simulation of circumferential welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melicher R.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses are an important consideration in the component integrity and life assessment of welded structure. The welding process is very complex time dependent physical phenomenon with material nonlinearity. The welding is a thermal process with convection between fluid flow and welding body, between welding bodyand environment. Next type of boundary conditions is radiation and thermo-mechanical contact on the outer surface of gas pipe in the near of weld. The temperature variation so obtained is utilised to find the distribution of the stress field.In this paper, a brief review of weld simulation and residual stress modelling using the finite element method (FEM by commercial software ANSYS is presented. Thermo-elastic-plastic formulations using a von Mises yield criterion with nonlinear kinematics hardening has been employed. Residual axial and hoop stresses obtained from the analysis have been shown. The commercial FEM code ANSYS was used for coupled thermalmechanical analysis.

  16. On numerical integration for effective stress assessment at notches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Maggiolini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical method for non-local stress assessment by means of a general FE tool and the local stress field. Unlike usual calculations by means of a numerical PDE solver, a more general numerical integration is used. Different solutions are compared theoretically and numerically by evaluating the results obtained by two different FEM commercial software. The application of the non-local tension field is applied to the strength assessment of notches, welded joints and cracks.

  17. Laser welding of selected aerospace alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadan, Gracie E.

    The study was aimed at developing an understanding of the microstructural effects of the laser welding process on the alloys, and assessing the structural integrity of the resultant welds. The effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, laser beam traverse speed, lens focal length, and the manipulation of these parameters on the welding efficiency and weld area integrity was also investigated. Other tasks within the project included a study on the possibility of using an anodic film to enhance the laser weld ability of Al 6061. Finally, attempts were made to identify phases observed in the weld area of the composite materials. Nimonics C263 and PE11 exhibited laser welds free of cracks and porosity. The difference in composition between the two alloys did not result in any significant dissimilarities in their response to the laser welding process. The welds in both alloys exhibited a fine columnar dendritic microstructure, and while carbides were observed in the interdendritic regions of the welds, electron optical analysis did not reveal any gamma' precipitates in this region. It was concluded that for the welding of thin gage materials above a threshold laser power the resultant welding efficiency shows a greater dependence on laser beam mode, and laser spot size, than on laser power, and beam traverse speed. Aluminum 6061 was not easily welded with a laser in its as received form, and the welds showed some degree of porosity. Anodizing was found to improve the welding efficiency in this material. While the presence of an anodic film on the metal surface increased the welding efficiency of the alloy, no relationship was found between the thickness of the anodic film and welding efficiency in the range of film thicknesses investigated. Weld regions were observed to be cellular dendritic in structure, with narrow heat affected zones. No precipitates or low melting point phases could be identified in the weld region. Melt zones were successfully

  18. The Infrastructure of an Integrated Virtual Reality Environment for International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peter Hor-Ching

    1996-01-01

    This study is a continuation of the summer research of 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. This effort is to provide the infrastructure of an integrated Virtual Reality (VR) environment for the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE) Analytical Tool and Trainer and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Analytical Tool study. Due to the unavailability of the MSG CAD files and the 3D-CAD converter, little was done to the MSG study. However, the infrastructure of the integrated VR environment for ISWE is capable of performing the MSG study when the CAD files become available. Two primary goals are established for this research. First, the essential peripheral devices for an integrated VR environment will be studied and developed for the ISWE and MSG studies. Secondly, the training of the flight crew (astronaut) in general orientation, procedures, and location, orientation, and sequencing of the welding samples and tools are built into the VR system for studying the welding process and training the astronaut.

  19. Sustainability assessment of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahla, Ibrahim; Pervaiz, Salman

    2017-09-01

    Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process is one of the most commonly employed material joining processes utilized in the various industrial sectors such as marine, ship-building, automotive, aerospace, construction and petrochemicals etc. The increasing pressure on manufacturing sector wants the welding process to be sustainable in nature. The SMAW process incorporates several types of inputs and output streams. The sustainability concerns associated with SMAW process are linked with the various input and output streams such as electrical energy requirement, input material consumptions, slag formation, fumes emission and hazardous working conditions associated with the human health and occupational safety. To enhance the environmental performance of the SMAW welding process, there is a need to characterize the sustainability for the SMAW process under the broad framework of sustainability. Most of the available literature focuses on the technical and economic aspects of the welding process, however the environmental and social aspects are rarely addressed. The study reviews SMAW process with respect to the triple bottom line (economic, environmental and social) sustainability approach. Finally, the study concluded recommendations towards achieving economical and sustainable SMAW welding process.

  20. Structure integrity assessment of pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubeljak, N.; Predan, J. (University of Maribor, Faculty of Mech. Eng., Maribor (Slovenia)); Vojvodie-Tuma, J. (Inst. for Metals and Technology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)); Kljajin, M. (University of Osijek, Faculty of Mech. Engineering , Brod (Croatia))

    2009-07-01

    Mechanical properties and fracture toughness testing of substrate pressurizer material is performed on simulated cast with same chemical composition and same production treatment as original material in Nuclear Power Plant. Tests were performed on artificially 2 years aged specimens at service temperature 300 deg C. The fracture toughness values in term of J-integral=81 N/mm was determined according to ASTM test procedure. Mechanical properties of clad and weld metal are taken from ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Considering the material and physical properties of pressurizer bottom and internal pressure, the numerical analysis of displacement and stress distribution through the thickness was performed

  1. FRAPCON-3: Integral assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Berna, G.A.; Berna, G.A.

    1997-12-01

    An integral assessment has been performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to quantify the predictive capabilities of FRAPCON-3, a steady-state fuel behavior code designed to analyze fuel behavior from beginning-of-life to burnup levels of 65 GWd/MTU. FRAPCON-3 code calculations are shown to compare satisfactorily to a pre-selected set of experimental data with steady-state operating conditions. 30 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. Eddy-Current Testing of Welded Stainless Steel Storage Containers to Verify Integrity and Identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolk, Keith M.; Stoker, Gerald C.

    1999-07-20

    An eddy-current scanning system is being developed to allow the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to verify the integrity of nuclear material storage containers. Such a system is necessary to detect attempts to remove material from the containers in facilities where continuous surveillance of the containers is not practical. Initial tests have shown that the eddy-current system is also capable of verifying the identity of each container using the electromagnetic signature of its welds. The DOE-3013 containers proposed for use in some US facilities are made of an austenitic stainless steel alloy, which is nonmagnetic in its normal condition. When the material is cold worked by forming or by local stresses experienced in welding, it loses its austenitic grain structure and its magnetic permeability increases. This change in magnetic permeability can be measured using an eddy-current probe specifically designed for this purpose. Initial tests have shown that variations of magnetic permeability and material conductivity in and around welds can be detected, and form a pattern unique to the container. The changes in conductivity that are present around a mechanically inserted plug can also be detected. Further development of the system is currently underway to adapt the system to verifying the integrity and identity of sealable, tamper-indicating enclosures designed to prevent unauthorized access to measurement equipment used to verify international agreements.

  3. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    the detached metal drops. It was not particularly easy to generate the detachments for this experiment. This document presents the details of the theoretical modeling effort and a summary of the experimental effort to measure molten metal drop detachments from terrestrial electron beam welding in the enclosed vacuum chamber. The results of the experimental effort have shown that molten metal detachments can occur from the sample/weld plate only if a sufficiently large impact force is applied to the weld plate. A "weld pool detachment parameter" was determined to indicate whether detachment would occur. Detachment can be either full or partial (dripping), Partial detachment means that the weld pool detached from one side of the liquid-solid boundary so as to leave a hole at the puddle site but remained attached over part of the liquid-solid boundary and dripped down the plate with no fully detached material detected. Full detachment, however, does not necessarily mean that the whole pool fully detached; in some cases only a smaller portion of the pool detached, the remainder dripping down the plate. The weld pool detachment parameter according to theory and according to the empirical data allows a determination of whether full detachments might occur. Theoretical calculations indicated titanium alloy would be the most difficult from which to detach molten metal droplets followed by stainless steel and then by aluminum. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions. The above theory is applicable to other situations as desired for assessing the potential for molten metal detachments.

  4. Integrated Assessment Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

    2012-10-31

    This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

  5. An integrated multiphysics model for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nourani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new, combined ‘integrated’- ‘multiphysics’ model of friction stir welding (FSW where a set of governing equations from non-Newtonian incompressible fluid dynamics, conductive and convective heat transfer, and plain stress solid mechanics have been coupled for calculating the process variables and material behaviour both during and after welding. More specifically, regarding the multiphysics feature, the model is capable of simultaneously predicting the local distribution, location and magnitude of maximum temperature, strain, and strain rate fields around the tool pin during the process; while for the integrated (post-analysis part, the above predictions have been used to study the microstructure and residual stress field of welded parts within the same developed code. A slip/stick condition between the tool and workpiece, friction and deformation heat source, convection and conduction heat transfer in the workpiece, a solid mechanics-based viscosity definition, and the Zener-Hollomon- based rigid-viscoplastic material properties with solidus cut-off temperature and empirical softening regime have been employed. In order to validate all the predicted variables collectively, the model has been compared to a series of published case studies on individual/limited set of variables, as well as in-house experiments on FSW of aluminum 6061.

  6. Development of laser beam welding transverse-varestraint test for assessment of solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Eun-Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds of type 310S stainless steel, a transverse-Varestraint testing system using a laser beam welding apparatus was newly constructed. The timing-synchronization between the laser oscillator, welding robot and hydraulic pressure devices was established by employing high-speed camera observations together with electrical signal control among the three components. Moreover, the yoke-drop time measured by the camera was used to prevent underestimation of the crack length. The laser beam melt-run welding used a variable welding speed from 10.0 to 40.0 mm/s, while the gas tungsten arc welding varied the welding speed from 1.67 to 5.00 mm/s. As the welding speed increased from 1.67 to 40.0mm/s, the solidification brittle temperature range of type 310S stainless steel welds was reduced from 146 to 120 K. It follows that employing the laser beam welding process mitigates the solidification cracking susceptibility for type 310S stainless steel welds.

  7. Health disorders related to learning the welding trade: assessment of approaches to risk communication 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Clarice Alves; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; da Silva, Lauro Roberto Witt; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Turik, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess the identification of health disorders as self-reported by apprentices of welding and to analyze the strength of the relationship between age and time of experience with self-reported health disorders before and after a socio-environmental nursing intervention. Method this quasi-experimental, non-randomized, before-and-after study was conducted with 86 welding apprentices from a private entity. Results the results show a significant difference for the pre- and post-test means and an increase in the post-test mean score for the cardiovascular, respiratory and cutaneous systems. There was also a negative correlation between the apprentices' ages and the identification of health disorders. Conclusion the socio-environmental nursing intervention enabled obtaining information on health disorders related to welding. In turn, such information enabled the apprentices to assess information and self-report health disorders. PMID:24553702

  8. Health disorders related to learning the welding trade: assessment of approaches to risk communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Clarice Alves; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Silva, Lauro Roberto Witt da; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Turik, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    to assess the identification of health disorders as self-reported by apprentices of welding and to analyze the strength of the relationship between age and time of experience with self-reported health disorders before and after a socio-environmental nursing intervention. this quasi-experimental, non-randomized, before-and-after study was conducted with 86 welding apprentices from a private entity. the results show a significant difference for the pre- and post-test means and an increase in the post-test mean score for the cardiovascular, respiratory and cutaneous systems. There was also a negative correlation between the apprentices' ages and the identification of health disorders. the socio-environmental nursing intervention enabled obtaining information on health disorders related to welding. In turn, such information enabled the apprentices to assess information and self-report health disorders.

  9. Health disorders related to learning the welding trade: assessment of approaches to risk communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Alves Bonow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the identification of health disorders as self-reported by apprentices of welding and to analyze the strength of the relationship between age and time of experience with self-reported health disorders before and after a socio-environmental nursing intervention. METHOD: this quasi-experimental, non-randomized, before-and-after study was conducted with 86 welding apprentices from a private entity. RESULTS: the results show a significant difference for the pre- and post-test means and an increase in the post-test mean score for the cardiovascular, respiratory and cutaneous systems. There was also a negative correlation between the apprentices' ages and the identification of health disorders. CONCLUSION: the socio-environmental nursing intervention enabled obtaining information on health disorders related to welding. In turn, such information enabled the apprentices to assess information and self-report health disorders.

  10. Contributions to risk assessment in the departments of welding mechanical engineering companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amza Gheorghe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk assessment professional should cover every activity and every workstation in an enterprise engineering, considering each component of the production system (the system working, each duty, work equipment and working environment. This represents an extremely complicated and complex problem because of production system that is a powerful polluting technology, especially of the atmosphere and soil. The formation of gas welding process is the result of electrodes burning, fluxes, and development of bath fused metal the welded seam. In welding processes, human operators are exposed to smoke and toxic gases, arising from the welding process, which can be dangerous to health. Many acute intoxication caused by to excessive exposure or short exposure to severe smoke and gases resulting from the welding process were studied the course of time. The paper focuses on smoke inhalation and calculate the score of danger each chemical agent score volatility of process. This conducts to collective protection so ultimately results in a score of inhalation Sinh = 1000, or resulting risk moderate, requiring a set of protective and preventive measures that are proposed in this regard.

  11. Assessment of The Cracking Properties of Stainless Steel Alloys and their Usability for Laser Welding in Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    2001-01-01

    Methods to assess stainless steel alloys’ cracking properties and usability for laser welding has been studied. Also tests to assess alloys’ susceptibility to hot cracking has been conducted. Among these is the so-called Weeter test which assesses the alloy by executing a number of spot welds...... to provoke cracking in the alloy. In this work the Weeter test has been modified and changed in order to develop a faster and easier test also applicable to small specimens. The new test, called a Groove test differs from the Weeter test by its procedure in which linear seam welds are conducted instead...... of spot welds. The Groove test has the advantage of an easier microscopy and analysis in the welds. Results from crack tests was partly confirmed by predictions made on the basis of the alloy’s constituents and solidification growth rate....

  12. Integrated Assessment Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J. A.; Weyant, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessment models of climate change (IAMs) are widely used to provide insights into the dynamics of the coupled human and socio-economic system, including emission mitigation analysis and the generation of future emission scenarios. Similar to the climate modeling community, the integrated assessment community has a two decade history of model inter-comparison, which has served as one of the primary venues for model evaluation and confirmation. While analysis of historical trends in the socio-economic system has long played a key role in diagnostics of future scenarios from IAMs, formal hindcast experiments are just now being contemplated as evaluation exercises. Some initial thoughts on setting up such IAM evaluation experiments are discussed. Socio-economic systems do not follow strict physical laws, which means that evaluation needs to take place in a context, unlike that of physical system models, in which there are few fixed, unchanging relationships. Of course strict validation of even earth system models is not possible (Oreskes etal 2004), a fact borne out by the inability of models to constrain the climate sensitivity. Energy-system models have also been grappling with some of the same questions over the last quarter century. For example, one of "the many questions in the energy field that are waiting for answers in the next 20 years" identified by Hans Landsberg in 1985 was "Will the price of oil resume its upward movement?" Of course we are still asking this question today. While, arguably, even fewer constraints apply to socio-economic systems, numerous historical trends and patterns have been identified, although often only in broad terms, that are used to guide the development of model components, parameter ranges, and scenario assumptions. IAM evaluation exercises are expected to provide useful information for interpreting model results and improving model behavior. A key step is the recognition of model boundaries, that is, what is inside

  13. Selecting Processes to Minimize Hexavalent Chromium from Stainless Steel Welding: Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium in stainless steel welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, M; Siert, A; Stone, S; Chen, B; Slaven, J; Cumpston, A; Antonini, J

    2012-09-01

    Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) in stainless steel welding fumes. The processes examined were gas metal arc welding (GMAW) (axial spray, short circuit, and pulsed spray modes), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The Cr(6+) fractions were measured in the fumes; fume generation rates, Cr(6+) generation rates, and Cr(6+) generation rates per unit mass of welding wire were determined. A limited controlled comparison study was done in a welding shop including SMAW, FCAW, and three GMAW methods. The processes studied were compared for costs, including relative labor costs. Results indicate the Cr(6+) in the fume varied widely, from a low of 2800 to a high of 34,000 ppm. Generation rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 69 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per unit of wire ranged from 1 to 270 μg/g. The results of field study were similar to the findings in the laboratory. The Cr(6+) (ppm) in the fume did not necessarily correlate with the Cr(6+) generation rate. Physical properties were similar for the processes, with mass median aerodynamic diameters ranging from 250 to 336 nm, while the FCAW and SMAW fumes were larger (360 and 670 nm, respectively). The pulsed axial spray method was the best choice of the processes studied based on minimal fume generation, minimal Cr(6+) generation, and cost per weld. This method is usable in any position, has a high metal deposition rate, and is relatively simple to learn and use.

  14. Sensoring Fusion Data from the Optic and Acoustic Emissions of Electric Arcs in the GMAW-S Process for Welding Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eber Huanca Cayo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  15. Experimental assessment of the influence of welding process parameters on Lamb wave transmission across ultrasonically welded thermoplastic composite joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochôa, Pedro; Fernandez Villegas, Irene; Groves, Roger M.; Benedictus, Rinze

    2018-01-01

    One of the advantages of thermoplastic composites relative to their thermoset counterparts is the possibility of assembling components through welding. Ultrasonic welding in particular is very promising for industrialization. However, uncertainty in the fatigue and fracture behaviour of composites is still an obstacle to the full utilisation of these materials. Health monitoring is then of vital importance, and Lamb wave techniques have been widely recognised as some of the most promising approaches for that end. This paper presents the first experimental study about the influence of welding travel on the transmission of Lamb waves across ultrasonically welded thermoplastic composite joints in single-lap configuration. The main aim of this research is to start to understand how guided waves interact with the internal structure of ultrasonic welds, so that benign, manufacturing-related structural features can be distinguished from damaging ones in signal interpretation. The power transmission coefficient and the correlation coefficient proved to be suitable for analysing the wave propagation phenomena, allowing quantitative identification of small variations of weld-line thickness and intermolecular diffusion at the weld interface. The conclusions are used to develop a tentative damage detection criterion which can later on assist the design of a Lamb wave based structural health monitoring system for thermoplastic composite structures. The Lamb wave test results are backed up by phased-array inspections, which also provide some extra insight on the internal structure of ultrasonic welds.

  16. Assessment of the Biological Effects of Welding Fumes Emitted From Metal Active Gas and Manual Metal Arc Welding in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Eva; Gube, Monika; Baumann, Ralf; Bertram, Jens; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Emissions from a particular welding process, metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated steel, induce an increase in C-reactive protein. In this study, it was investigated whether inflammatory effects could also be observed for other welding procedures. Twelve male subjects were separately exposed to (1) manual metal arc welding fumes, (2) filtered air, and (3) metal active gas welding fumes for 6 hours. Inflammatory markers were measured in serum before, and directly, 1 and 7 days after exposure. Although C-reactive protein concentrations remained unchanged, neutrophil concentrations increased directly after exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes, and endothelin-1 concentrations increased directly and 24 hours after exposure. After exposure to metal active gas and filtered air, endothelin-1 concentrations decreased. The increase in the concentrations of neutrophils and endothelin-1 may characterize a subclinical inflammatory reaction, whereas the decrease of endothelin-1 may indicate stress reduction.

  17. Application of welding simulation to block joints in shipbuilding and assessment of welding-induced residual stresses and distortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fricke Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During ship design, welding-induced distortions are roughly estimated as a function of the size of the component as well as the welding process and residual stresses are assumed to be locally in the range of the yield stress. Existing welding simulation methods are very complex and time-consuming and therefore not applicable to large structures like ships. Simplified methods for the estimation of welding effects were and still are subject of several research projects, but mostly concerning smaller structures. The main goal of this paper is the application of a multi-layer welding simulation to the block joint of a ship structure. When welding block joints, high constraints occur due to the ship structure which are assumed to result in accordingly high residual stresses. Constraints measured during construction were realized in a test plant for small-scale welding specimens in order to investigate their and other effects on the residual stresses. Associated welding simulations were successfully performed with fine-mesh finite element models. Further analyses showed that a courser mesh was also able to reproduce the welding-induced reaction forces and hence the residual stresses after some calibration. Based on the coarse modeling it was possible to perform the welding simulation at a block joint in order to investigate the influence of the resulting residual stresses on the behavior of the real structure, showing quite interesting stress distributions. Finally it is discussed whether smaller and idealized models of definite areas of the block joint can be used to achieve the same results offering possibilities to consider residual stresses in the design process.

  18. Application of welding simulation to block joints in shipbuilding and assessment of welding-induced residual stresses and distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Wolfgang; Zacke, Sonja

    2014-06-01

    During ship design, welding-induced distortions are roughly estimated as a function of the size of the component as well as the welding process and residual stresses are assumed to be locally in the range of the yield stress. Existing welding simulation methods are very complex and time-consuming and therefore not applicable to large structures like ships. Simplified methods for the estimation of welding effects were and still are subject of several research projects, but mostly concerning smaller structures. The main goal of this paper is the application of a multi-layer welding simulation to the block joint of a ship structure. When welding block joints, high constraints occur due to the ship structure which are assumed to result in accordingly high residual stresses. Constraints measured during construction were realized in a test plant for small-scale welding specimens in order to investigate their and other effects on the residual stresses. Associated welding simulations were successfully performed with fine-mesh finite element models. Further analyses showed that a courser mesh was also able to reproduce the welding-induced reaction forces and hence the residual stresses after some calibration. Based on the coarse modeling it was possible to perform the welding simulation at a block joint in order to investigate the influence of the resulting residual stresses on the behavior of the real structure, showing quite interesting stress distributions. Finally it is discussed whether smaller and idealized models of definite areas of the block joint can be used to achieve the same results offering possibilities to consider residual stresses in the design process.

  19. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  20. The comparative assessment of welders’ exposure to welding fumes based on mass and number concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sajedifar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW is the most widely used arc welding. During the welding operation, typically, various harmful agents such as fumes, gases, heat, sound and ultraviolet radiation are produced of which fume is the most important component from the viewpoint of occupational health. The present study aims to compare the number and the mass concentration emitted in SMAW to determine the most appropriate index of exposure to fumes in the welding processes. Material and Method: In this study, the portable laser aerosol spectrometer and dust monitor of GRIMM, model 1.106, was used to measure the number and mass concentration of fumes emitted from SMAW on 304 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.4 mm. Air sampling was performed at a distance of 41 cm representing the welder’s breathing zone. The measurements of number concentration (NC and mass concentration (MC were taken under the condition of 25 volt voltage and direct current of the electrode polarity. Result: The total NC and MC of welding fumes in welder’s breathing zone was 1140451 particles per liter and 1631.11 micrograms per cubic meter, respectively. The highest number concentration was found to correspond to the particles with 0.35 to 0.5 micrometer-sized distribution (NC1; 938976 particles per liter and the lowest was related to the particles with 5 to 6.5 micrometer-sized distribution (NC7; 288 particles per liter and the particles larger than 6.5 micrometer (NC8; 463 particles per liter. Moreover, the highest mass concentration was related to the particles with 0.35 to 0.5 micrometer-sized distribution (MC1; 450 micrograms per cubic meter and the particles larger than 6.5 micrometer (MC8; 355 micrograms per cubic meter. Conclusion: The findings indicated that there is no agreement between number and mass concentration as two particles assessment index, and as the particles’ size become smaller, the mismatch of them is becoming more apparent

  1. An integrated approach for predictive control of extrusion weld seams: experimental support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.J. den; Werkhoven, R.J.; Sillekens, W.H.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    In hollow aluminium extrusions, longitudinal weld-seams are formed through a solid-state bonding process at elevated temperatures and under conditions of interfacial pressure and plastic deformation. For structurally loaded components, sound weld seams are imperative. In our research, a weld seam

  2. Assessing the Impact of Sequencing Practicums for Welding in Agricultural Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Malcolm; Pate, Michael L.; Lawver, Rebecca G.; Warnick, Brian K.; Dai, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of sequencing practicums for welding on students' ability to perform a 1F (flat position-fillet lap joint) weld on low-carbon steel. Participants were randomly assigned a specific practice sequence of welding for using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). A total of 71 participants…

  3. Assessing the Impact of a Semester-Long Course in Agricultural Mechanics on Pre-Service Agricultural Education Teachers' Importance, Confidence, and Knowledge of Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiby, Brian L.; Robinson, J. Shane; Key, James P.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to assess the perceptions of Oklahoma pre-service agricultural education teachers regarding the importance of identified welding skills standards and their confidence to teach them, based on a semester-long course on metals and welding. This study also sought to determine pre-service teachers' knowledge of welding prior to and at…

  4. Technical Assessment: Integrated Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Photonics for accessible Biomedical Diagnostics” [16] to advance the frontiers of biophotonics research in mid- IR materials systems, integrated photonic...An example of the ongoing research includes recent work from Universiti Teknologi, Malaysia where ring resonator is being targeted for Salmonella

  5. Welding simulation and fatigue assessment of tubular K-joints in high-strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamiri Akhlaghi, F.

    2014-07-01

    Application of newly developed high strength steel hollow sections is increasing in construction industry – especially for bridge structures – due to their satisfactory material properties and fabrication advantages. These sections allow for longer spans, more slender structures. Savings in weight and volume of material compared to traditional steel grades increase sustainability of construction and compensate for part of higher unit cost of material. Nevertheless, use of high strength steels cannot be promoted unless potential fatigue issues are properly addressed. Two fabrication methods are currently available for the planar Warren trusses made of circular hollow sections (CHS): welding the tubes together, or using cast steel nodes and connecting truss members to them by girth welds. Previous research on tubular bridge trusses indicates that the problematic fatigue cracking sites for the first fabrication method are located at weld toes in the gap region of the truss joints. For the second method, cracking occurs at the root of CHS–cast butt welds. Fatigue performance of these two methods were investigated by constant amplitude fatigue testing of two full scale trusses made of steel grade S690QH and with a geometry similar to previous S355J2H investigation. Fatigue lives of K-joints were in agreement with current recommended code values. For CHS–cast welded connections, no visible cracking was observed up to 2£10{sup 6} cycles. Due to the effect of residual stresses, fatigue cracking was observed in compressive joints as well as tensile joints. Indeed, tensile welding residual stresses keep the crack open during all or part of the compressive load cycle. Their distribution and impact on fatigue life of tubular joints has not been fully investigated before for a complex detail such as Tubular K-joint made of high strength steel. Experimental and numerical methods were utilized for assessment of welding residual stresses. Neutron diffraction experiments

  6. State Program Integrity Assessment (SPIA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Program Integrity Assessment (SPIA) is the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) first national data collection on state Medicaid program...

  7. Integrated Environmental Assessment Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardanz, R.; Gimeno, B. S.; Bermejo, V.; Elvira, S.; Martin, F.; Palacios, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Donaire, I. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the results of the Spanish participation in the project Coupling CORINAIR data to cost-effect emission reduction strategies based on critical threshold. (EU/LIFE97/ENV/FIN/336). The subproject has focused on three tasks. Develop tools to improve knowledge on the spatial and temporal details of emissions of air pollutants in Spain. Exploit existing experimental information on plant response to air pollutants in temperate ecosystem and Integrate these findings in a modelling framework that can asses with more accuracy the impact of air pollutants to temperate ecosystems. The results obtained during the execution of this project have significantly improved the models of the impact of alternative emission control strategies on ecosystems and crops in the Iberian Peninsula. (Author) 375 refs.

  8. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...... was prevalent. It is uncertain whether development of a single 'all-inclusive' model for assessing integrated care is desirable. We emphasise the continuing need for validated instruments embedded in theoretical contexts....

  9. Reliability assessment of fatigue critical welded details in wind turbine jacket support structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Kim; Stensgaard Toft, Henrik; Haselbach, Philipp Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic approach to reliability assessment of fatigue critical welded details in jacket support structures for offshore wind turbines. The analysis of the jacket response to the operational loads is performed using Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations in SIMULIA...... Abaqus. Fatigue stress cycles are computed on the jacket members by applying tower top loads from an aeroelastic simulation with superimposed marine loads and in accordance to the IEC-61400-3 guidelines for operational conditions. The combined effect of the hydrodynamic loads and the rotor loads...... on the jacket structure is analyzed in a de-coupled scheme, but including the structural dynamics of the support structure. The failure prediction of the welded joints, connecting the individual members of the support structure is based on SN-curves and Miners rule according to ISO 19902 and DNV-RP-C203/DNV...

  10. Reliability Assessment of Fatigue Critical Welded Details in Wind Turbine Jacket Support Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Kim; Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Haselbach, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    This paper describe a probabilistic approach to reliability assessment of fatigue critical welded details in jacket support structures for offshore wind turbines. The analysis of the jacket response to the operational loads is performed using Finites Element Method (FEM) simulations in SIMULIA...... Abaqus. Fatigue stress cycles are computed on the jacket members by applying tower top loads from an aeroelastic simulation with superimposed marine loads and in accordance to the IEC-61400-3 guidelines for operational conditions. The combined effect of the hydrodynamic loads and the rotor loads...... on the jacket structure is analyzed in a de-coupled scheme, but including the structural dynamicsw of the support structure. The failure prediction of the welded joints, connecting the individual members of the support structure is based on SN-curves and Miners rule according to ISO 19902 and DNV-RP-C203/DNV...

  11. The integrated landscape assessment project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles A. Hemstrom; Janine Salwasser; Joshua Halofsky; Jimmy Kagan; Cyndi Comfort

    2012-01-01

    The Integrated Landscape Assessment Project (ILAP) is a three-year effort that produces information, models, data, and tools to help land managers, policymakers, and others examine mid- to broad-scale (e.g., watersheds to states and larger areas) prioritization of land management actions, perform landscape assessments, and estimate potential effects of management...

  12. Assessment of biological chromium among stainless steel and mild steel welders in relation to welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmé, J L; Shirali, P; Mereau, M; Sobaszek, A; Boulenguez, C; Diebold, F; Haguenoer, J M

    1997-01-01

    Air and biological monitoring were used for assessing external and internal chromium exposure among 116 stainless steel welders (SS welders) using manual metal arc (MMA), metal inert gas (MIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes (MMA: n = 57; MIG: n = 37; TIG: n = 22) and 30 mild steel welders (MS welders) using MMA and MIG welding processes (MMA: n = 14; MIG: n = 16). The levels of atmospheric total chromium were evaluated after personal air monitoring. The mean values for the different groups of SS welders were 201 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 185 micrograms/m3 (MIG), 52 micrograms/m3 (TIG) and for MS welders 8.1 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 7.3 micrograms/m3 (MIG). The curve of cumulative frequency distribution from biological monitoring among SS welders showed chromium geometric mean concentrations in whole blood of 3.6 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 19.9), in plasma of 3.3 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 21.0) and in urine samples of 6.2 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 58.0). Among MS welders, mean values in whole blood and plasma were rather more scattered (1.8 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 9.3 and 1.3 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 8.4, respectively) and in urine the value was 2.4 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 13.3). The analysis of variance of chromium concentrations in plasma previously showed a metal effect (F = 29.7, P welding process. MMA-SS is definitely different from other processes because the biological values are clearly higher. These higher levels are due to the very significant concentrations of total soluble chromium, mainly hexavalent chromium, in welding fumes.

  13. [Assessment of occupational exposure of welders based on determination of fumes and their components produced during stainless steel welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisławska, Magdalena; Janasik, Beata; Trzcinka-Ochocka, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a known health hazard. The aim of this study was to determine concentrations of welding fumes components such as: iron, manganese, nickel and chromium (including chromium speciation) to assess exposure of stainless steel welders. The survey covered 14 workers of two metallurgic plants engaged in welding stainless steel (18% Cr and 8% Ni) by different techniques: manual metal arc (MMA), metal inert gas (MIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG). Personal air samples were collected in the welders' breathing zone over a period of about 6-7 h (dust was collected on a membrane and glass filter) to determine time weighted average (TWA) concentration of welding fumes and its components. The concentrations of welding fumes (total particulate) were determined with use of the gravimetric method. Concentrations and welding fume components, such as: iron, manganese, nickel and chromium were determined by ICP-MS technique. The total hexavalent chromium was analyzed by applying the spectrophotometry method according to NIOSH. The water-soluble chromium species were analyzed by HPLC-ICP-MS. Time weighted average concentrations of the welding fumes and its components at the worker's breathing zone were (mg/m3): dust, 0.14-10.7; iron, 0.004-2.9; manganese, 0.001-1.12; nickel, < 0.001-0.2; and chromium <0.002-0.85 (mainly Cr(III) and insoluble Cr(VI)). The maximum admissible limits for workplace pollutants (TLV-TWA) were exceeded for manganese and for insoluble chromium Cr (VI). For Cr (III) the limit was exceeded in individual cases. The assessment of the workers' occupational exposure, based on the determined time weighted average (TWA) of fumes and their components, shows that the stainless steel welders worked in conditions harmful to their health owing to the significantly exceeded maximum admissible limits for manganese and the exceeded TLV value for insoluble chromium (VI).

  14. Evaluation of canister weld flaw depth for concrete storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Tae Chul; Cho, Chun Hyung [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sung Hun; Lee, Young Oh; Jung, In Su [Korea Nuclear Engineering and Service Corp, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Domestically developed concrete storage casks include an internal canister to maintain the confinement integrity of radioactive materials. In this study, we analyzed the depth of flaws caused by loads that propagate canister weld cracks under normal, off-normal and accident conditions, and evaluated the maximum allowable weld flaw depth needed to secure the structural integrity of the canister weld and to reduce the welding time of the internal canister lid of the concrete storage cask. Structural analyses for normal, off-normal and accident conditions were performed using the general-purpose finite element analysis program ABAQUS; the allowable flaw depth was assessed according to ASME B and PV Code Section XI. Evaluation results revealed an allowable canister weld flaw depth of 18.75 mm for the concrete storage cask, which satisfies the critical flaw depth recommended in NUREG-1536.

  15. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although several measurement instruments have been developed to measure the level of integrated health care delivery, no standardised, validated instrument exists covering all aspects of integrated care. The purpose of this review is to identify the instruments concerning how...... to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...... abstracts were independently reviewed by two investigators. RESULTS: We identified 23 measurement instruments and, within these, eight organisational elements were found. No measurement instrument covered all organisational elements, but almost all studies include well-defined structural and process aspects...

  16. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  17. Correlation between Peel Test and Real Time Ultrasonic Test for Quality Diagnosis in Resistance Spot Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo F. Andreoli

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper aimed to study the correlation between Real Time Integrated Weld Analyzer measurements and peel test results. The experiment involved study of weld nuggets for different combinations of sheet thicknesses, welding time and current of mild steel samples. The intent was to assess the potential use of a real time integrated ultrasonic system in the industrial environment allowing nondestructive evaluation of 100% of the spot welds produced. The results showed high correlation between nugget penetration into the sheets and nugget size measured ultrasonically and destructively, for all evaluated parameters.

  18. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen; Guerrero-Mata, Martha Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature fail...

  19. Control of Saturation level in the magnetic core of a welding transformer by Hysteresis Controller (HC and Proportional Integral (PI Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Subbanna.S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyse the performances of two controllers such as Hysteresis control (HC and proportional integral (PI control to control saturation level in the magnetic core of a welding transformer in a middle-frequency direct current (MFDC resistance spot welding system(RSWS. It consists of an input converter, welding transformer, and a full-wave rectifier mounted at the transformer secondary. The unequal ohmic resistances of the two transformer’s secondary circuits and the different characteristics of the diodes of output rectifier certainly lead to the magnetic core saturation which, consequently, causes the unwanted spikes in the transformer’s primary current and over-current protection switch-off. The goal is to analyse the performance of both controllers in terms of transients, total harmonic distortion(THD and variations in primary current and flux in the magnetic core of a welding transformer of highly nonlinear system of RSWS. The simulation study has been done in Matlab/Simulink environment and presented performance analysis. The responses shows that from the aforementioned aspects, proportional integral Controller is the better choice for controlling the saturation level in magnetic core of a welding transformer which is widely used in automobile industry welding system.

  20. Assessment of cold welding properties of the internal conical interface of two commercially available implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, M R

    1999-02-01

    The cone-screw abutment has been shown to diminish micromovement by reducing the burden of component loosening and fracture. However, anecdotal concern for cold welding of cone-screw joints in implant design has been identified as a potential source for lack of retrievability. This comparative study evaluated the loosening torque, as a percentage of tightening torque, for the ITI Straumann and Astra Tech (3.5 and 4.0 mm diameters) implant systems, which use an 8-degree and 11-degree internal cone, respectively. Implants and abutments from each system were mounted in a torque device, and a range of tightening torques was applied. Loosening torques were then measured, and the influence of conus angle, interfacial surface area, saliva contamination, and time delay to loosening were all assessed. The loosening torque only exceeded tightening torque at the highest levels, just before component failure, when plastic deformation was expected. For all clinically relevant levels of torque, both in a dry environment and with components bathed in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C, loosening torque was always seen to be 80% to 90% of tightening torque, demonstrating that cold welding does not occur. There was a high correlation between loosening and tightening torque for all systems tested, but no statistical difference when comparing wet versus dry or comparing individual data for each system. It can be concluded that for clinically relevant levels of tightening torque, no problems are anticipated with respect to retrievability.

  1. Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping Welds and Thick Section Primary System Cast Piping Welds JCN N6398, Task 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Morra, Marino; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2008-07-21

    Research is being conducted for the NRC at PNNL to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods for the inspection of LWR components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This interim technical letter report (TLR) provides a synopsis of recent investigations at PNNL aimed at evaluating the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of CASS welds in nuclear reactor piping. A description of progress, recent developments and interim results are provided.

  2. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  3. GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) process development for girth welding of high strength pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Vaidyanath; Daniel, Joe; Quintana, Marie [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yaoshan [Center for Reliable Energy Systems (CRES), Dublin, OH (United States); Souza, Antonio [Lincoln Electric do Brasil, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and findings from the first phase of a consolidated program co-funded by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and Pipeline Research Council Inc (PRCI) to develop pipe weld assessment and qualification methods and optimize X 100 pipe welding technologies. One objective of the program is to establish the range of viable welding options for X 100 line pipe, and define the essential variables to provide welding process control for reliable and consistent mechanical performance of the weldments. In this first phase, a series of narrow gap girth welds were made with pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW), instrumented with thermocouples in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal to obtain the associated thermal profiles, and instrumented to measure true energy input as opposed to conventional heat input. Results reveal that true heat input is 16%-22% higher than conventional heat input. The thermal profile measurements correlate very well with thermal model predictions using true energy input data, which indicates the viability of treating the latter as an essential variable. Ongoing microstructural and mechanical testing work will enable validation of an integrated thermal-microstructural model being developed for these applications. Outputs from this model will be used to correlate essential welding process variables with weld microstructure and hardness. This will ultimately enable development of a list of essential variables and the ranges needed to ensure mechanical properties are achieved in practice, recommendations for controlling and monitoring these essential variables and test methods suitable for classification of welding consumables. (author)

  4. New unified fracture toughness estimation scheme for structural integrity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, K.; Nevasmaa, P. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Bannister, A. [Research and Development, British Steel plc., Swinden Technology Centre Rotherham (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    At present, treatment of fracture toughness data varies depending on the type of data (K{sub IC}, J, CTOD) that are available for fracture mechanics analysis. This complicates structural integrity assessment and makes it difficult to apply any single, unified procedure. Within the Brite-Euram project `SINTAP` a fracture toughness estimation scheme has been developed for the unified treatment of data for use in structural integrity assessment. As a procedure, it can be applied to Charpy data, as well as to fracture toughness data, and is suitable for the treatment of data at both single and different temperatures. The data sets may contain results from both homogeneous and inhomogeneous material, making the procedure applicable also to welded joints. The procedure allows fracture toughness assessment with quantified probability and confidence levels. Irrespective of the type of the original data, one material-specific K{sub mat} value representing a conservative estimate of the mean fracture toughness is obtained (with its probability distribution). This information can then be applied to structural integrity assessment. (orig.) 4 refs.

  5. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  6. In vitro infrared thermography assessment of temperature peaks during the intra-oral welding of titanium abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Merla, Arcangelo; Piattelli, Adriano

    2012-07-01

    Control of heat dissipation and transmission to the peri-implant area during intra-oral welding is very important to limit potential damage to the surrounding tissue. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess, by means of thermal infrared imaging, the tissue temperature peaks associated with the thermal propagation pathway through the implants, the abutments and the walls of the slot of the scaffold, generated during the welding process, in three different implant systems. An in vitro polyurethane mandible model was prepared with a 7.0 mm v-shape slot. Effects on the maximum temperature by a single welding procedure were studied using different power supplies and abutments. A total of 36 welding procedures were tested on three different implant systems. The lowest peak temperature along the walls of the 7.0 mm v-shaped groove (31.6 ± 2 °C) was assessed in the specimens irrigated with sterile saline solution. The highest peak temperature (42.8 ± 2 °C) was assessed in the samples with a contemporaneous power overflow and premature pincers removal. The results of our study suggest that the procedures used until now appear to be effective to avoid thermal bone injuries. The peak tissue temperature of the in vitro model did not surpass the threshold limits above which tissue injury could occur.

  7. Analysis of Proportional Integral and Optimized Proportional Integral Controllers for Resistance Spot Welding System (RSWS) - A Performance Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama Subbanna, S.; Suryakalavathi, M., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    This paper is an attempt to accomplish a performance analysis of the different control techniques on spikes reduction method applied on the medium frequency transformer based DC spot welding system. Spike reduction is an important factor to be considered while spot welding systems are concerned. During normal RSWS operation welding transformer’s magnetic core can become saturated due to the unbalanced resistances of both transformer secondary windings and different characteristics of output rectifier diodes, which causes current spikes and over-current protection switch-off of the entire system. The current control technique is a piecewise linear control technique that is inspired from the DC-DC converter control algorithms to register a novel spike reduction method in the MFDC spot welding applications. Two controllers that were used for the spike reduction portion of the overall applications involve the traditional PI controller and Optimized PI controller. Care is taken such that the current control technique would maintain a reduced spikes in the primary current of the transformer while it reduces the Total Harmonic Distortion. The performance parameter that is involved in the spikes reduction technique is the THD, Percentage of current spike reduction for both techniques. Matlab/SimulinkTM based simulation is carried out for the MFDC RSWS with KW and results are tabulated for the PI and Optimized PI controllers and a tradeoff analysis is carried out.

  8. Surface integrity analysis of abrasive water jet-cut surfaces of friction stir welded joints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Dixit, A. R.; Bora, B.; Zeleňák, Michal; Foldyna, Josef; Hloch, Sergej; Hlaváček, Petr; Ščučka, Jiří; Klich, Jiří; Sitek, Libor; Vilaca, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 5 (2017), s. 1687-1701 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding (FSW) * abrasive water jet (AWJ) * optical profilometer * topography * surface roughness Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00170-016-8776-0

  9. Numerical aspects for efficient welding computational mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aburuga Tarek Kh.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the residual stresses and strains is one of the most important parameter in the structure integrity assessment. A finite element model is constructed in order to simulate the multi passes mismatched submerged arc welding SAW which used in the welded tensile test specimen. Sequentially coupled thermal mechanical analysis is done by using ABAQUS software for calculating the residual stresses and distortion due to welding. In this work, three main issues were studied in order to reduce the time consuming during welding simulation which is the major problem in the computational welding mechanics (CWM. The first issue is dimensionality of the problem. Both two- and three-dimensional models are constructed for the same analysis type, shell element for two dimension simulation shows good performance comparing with brick element. The conventional method to calculate residual stress is by using implicit scheme that because of the welding and cooling time is relatively high. In this work, the author shows that it could use the explicit scheme with the mass scaling technique, and time consuming during the analysis will be reduced very efficiently. By using this new technique, it will be possible to simulate relatively large three dimensional structures.

  10. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteucci, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Zor, Kinga

    2016-01-01

    We compare ultrasonic welding (UW) and thermal bonding (TB) for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM) microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones...

  11. Fluid-structure-interaction analysis for welded pipes with flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.; Ding, Y., E-mail: lan.sun@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) entrance effect results in enhanced wall thinning immediately downstream of a weld if the weld connects an upstream FAC-resistant material with a downstream less resistant material. The weld regions, especially those with local repairs, are susceptible to cracking due to the high residual stresses induced by fabrication. The combined effects of the FAC entrance effect and high stresses at a weld might compromise the structural integrity of the piping and lead to a failure. Weld degradation by FAC entrance effect has been observed at nuclear and fossil power plants. This paper describes an application using fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) modelling to study the combined effects of FAC wall thinning, weld residual stresses, and in-service loads on welded structures. Simplified cases analyzed were based on CANDU outlet feeder conditions. The analysis includes the flow and mass transfer modelling of the FAC entrance effect using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and nonlinear structural analyses of the welded structures with wall thinning and an assumed weld residual stress and strain distribution. The FSI analyses were performed using ANSYS Workbench, an integrated platform that enables the coupling of CFD and structural analysis solutions. The obtained results show that the combination of FAC, weld residual stresses, in-service loads (including the internal pressure) and (or) extreme loads could cause high stresses and affect the integrity of the welded pipes. The present work demonstrated that the FSI modelling can be used as an effective approach to assess the integrity of welded structures. (author)

  12. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  13. An Assessment of the Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Analysis of Dissimilar Material Welded Joint between Alloy 617 and 12Cr Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Waqar Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most effective method to reduce CO2 gas emission from the steam power plant is to improve its performance by elevating the steam temperature to more than 700 °C. For this, it is necessary to develop applicable materials at high temperatures. Ni-based Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel are used in steam power plants, due to their remarkable mechanical properties, high corrosion resistance, and creep strength. However, since Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel have different chemical compositions and thermal and mechanical properties, it is necessary to develop dissimilar material welding technologies. Moreover, in order to guarantee the reliability of dissimilar material welded structures, the assessment of mechanical and metallurgical properties, fatigue strength, fracture mechanical analysis, and welding residual stress analysis should be conducted on dissimilar material welded joints. In this study, first, multi-pass dissimilar material welding between Alloy 617 and 12Cr steel was performed under optimum welding conditions. Next, mechanical properties were assessed, including the static tensile strength, hardness distribution, and microstructural analysis of a dissimilar material welded joint. The results indicated that the yield strength and tensile strength of the dissimilar metal welded joint were higher than those of the Alloy 617 base metal, and lower than those of the 12Cr steel base metal. The hardness distribution of the 12Cr steel side was higher than that of Alloy 617 and the dissimilar material weld metal zone. It was observed that the microstructure of Alloy 617 HAZ was irregular austenite grain, while that of 12Cr steel HAZ was collapsed martensite grain, due to repeatable heat input during multi-pass welding.

  14. Assessing the impact of a semester-long course in agricultural mechanics on pre-service agricultural education teachers' importance, confidence, and knowledge of welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leiby, Brian L; Robinson, J. Shane; Key, James P

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to assess the perceptions of Oklahoma pre-service agricultural education teachers regarding the importance of identified welding skills standards and their confidence to teach them...

  15. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  16. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  17. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  18. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  19. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  20. GHGT-11 - Integrated Carbon Risk Assessment (ICARAS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollenweber, J.; Busby, D.; Wessel-Berg, D.; Nepveu, M.; Bossie Codreanu, D.; Grimstad, A-A.; Sijacic, D.; Maurand, N.; Lothe, A.; Wahl, F.; Polak, S.; Boot, H.; Grøver, A.; Wildenborg, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an integrated workflow is described for risk assessment within CCS. IFPEN, SINTEF and TNO joined forces to define a comprehensive and transparent risk assessment methodology. The tools developed in these institutes are thereby integrated. The workflow can be applied to proposed carbon

  1. Assessment of DNA damage as an index of genetic toxicity in welding microenvironments among iron-based industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Zorawar; Chadha, Pooja

    2016-10-01

    Welding is used extensively in different industries. Welders are always at a risk of exposure to a number of gases and metal-containing fumes in their respective microenvironments in which they work. Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can deposit in different parts of their bodies causing serious health problems. In the present study, 35 welders (age: 33.80 ± 1.04 years) from two iron-based industries have been assessed for DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes using single-cell gel electrophoresis. An equal number of subjects (N = 35; age: 30.40 ± 1.51 years) matched to exposed subjects with respect to sex, age, socioeconomic status, smoking, and alcoholic habits were taken as controls. The results revealed that the damaged cell frequency (DCF) and mean comet tail length (CTL) in welders were significantly higher as compared to the controls (DCF: 69.74 ± 1.68 vs. 31.14 ± 1.67 and CTL: 29.21 ± 1.48 vs. 1.47 ± 0.08; p < 0.05). The effect of confounding factors such as age, duration of exposure, smoking, and drinking habits was also studied. Blood lead levels also showed a positive correlation with duration of exposure and CTL, and the overall results indicated an increased genetic damage as an index of genotoxicity in workers occupationally engaged in welding microenvironments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  3. Assessment of the origin of porosity in electron-beam-welded TA6V plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouret, N.; Ollivier, E.; Dour, G.; Fortunier, R.; Miguet, B.

    2004-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical analysis of the origin of porosity in electron-beam (EB) welding is detailed. The experiments are run with several surface treatments and reasonable welding parameters. The plate faces are characterized before welding with a number of methods, such as scanning electron microscope observation, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and, more significantly, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis, elastic-recoil detection analysis (ERDA) for hydrogen analysis, and surface roughness measurement. After welding, pores are sought with X-ray detection, phased-array ultrasonic (US) detection, and destructive control. An original comparison between ERDA and refined SIMS measurements allows a quantitative evaluation of surface pollution with hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. The theoretical analysis is based on the literature concept that the cavities are nucleated from the adjacent plate faces in the solid state, just before melting. A less classical development is proposed in term of the evolution of bubbles in the weld pool. Once in the liquid, the cavities become bubbles. Their radius oscillates, according to Rayleigh-Plesset equations of bubbles, due to temperature and pressure driving forces. Solidification freezes them as they are, thus, forming pores. The extreme values of the oscillation give a good idea of the range of the size of pores in the weld joint, as the comparison between experiments and prediction states. A criterion of surface cleanliness is set, relating the surface pollution and the surface roughness. Above the criterion, the bubbles remain small during their oscillation. Below the criterion they tend to grow large. All the degraded-surface treatments are in dirty situation (large pores), and the reference surface treatment lies around the criterion for cleanliness.

  4. Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, W., IV

    1998-06-01

    Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack oil both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub-surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of tile probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced In the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring tile concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and characterizing the Fourier-Transform infrared (FTIR) spectra before and after the laser exposure.

  5. Integrated climate change risk assessment:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Halsnæs, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Risk assessments of flooding in urban areas during extreme precipitation for use in, for example, decision-making regarding climate adaptation, are surrounded by great uncertainties stemming from climate model projections, methods of downscaling and the assumptions of socioeconomic impact models....... enables the relative importance of the different factors (i.e. degree of climate change, assets value, discount rate etc.) to be determined, thus influencing the overall output of the assessment.......Risk assessments of flooding in urban areas during extreme precipitation for use in, for example, decision-making regarding climate adaptation, are surrounded by great uncertainties stemming from climate model projections, methods of downscaling and the assumptions of socioeconomic impact models...... to address the complex linkages between the different kinds of data required in assessing climate adaptation. It emphasizes that the availability of spatially explicit data can reduce the overall uncertainty of the risk assessment and assist in identifying key vulnerable assets. The usefulness...

  6. Life time assessment and repair of dissimilar metal welds. Part 1; Livslaengdsbedoemning och reparation av blandsvetsskarvar. Etapp 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld

    2005-04-01

    Research on the performance of dissimilar metal welds in high temperature plant has been performed for many years. Nevertheless damages are frequent in such welds. In order to decrease the damage problems and make it possible to estimate residual lifetimes of dissimilar metal welds in our Nordic countries it is first essential to i) collect the knowledge in the literature and ii) map current dissimilar metal welds and their condition in Swedish and Danish plants. The present report describes this first part of the work. There is a comprehensive literature of she subject. Most work has been performed on ferritic/austenitic dissimilar welds. In Swedish and Danish plants the dominating type is ferritic/martensitic dissimilar welds. The damage mechanisms are about the same in the two types, creep is the dominating mechanism, but plant experience indicates that the ferritic/austenitic combination is more prone to damage than the ferritic/martensitic one. An important difference between the two types is that Ni-base weld metal generally prolongs the lifetime for ferritic/austenitic dissimilar welds whereas it shows an opposite effect in ferritic/martensitic ones. In the latter case use of a 5 % Cr weld metal seems to be the best choice but the experiences of such welds are limited. The mapping of dissimilar welds indicates that there are predominantly special kinds of welds which fail whereas ordinary butt welds and branch welds are relatively free from damage.

  7. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  8. Remaining fatigue life time assessment of welded and braced side branches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereboom, H.P.; Beek, P.J.G. van; Pijpers, R.J.M.; MacDonald, K.

    2015-01-01

    High cycle fatigue failure is likely to occur when a rather undamped offshore installation is operated over a long period of time. Especially welded parts are vulnerable to fluctuating stress ranges, if the structural components, such as the small bore side branches, are loaded in resonance. In

  9. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  10. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-11-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  12. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  13. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  14. Through-Thickness Residual Stress Profiles in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds: A Combined Experimental and Prediction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Moat, R. J.; Paddea, S.; Francis, J. A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; Bouchard, P. J.

    2017-10-01

    Economic and safe management of nuclear plant components relies on accurate prediction of welding-induced residual stresses. In this study, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness of austenitic stainless steel welds has been measured using neutron diffraction and the contour method. The measured data are used to validate residual stress profiles predicted by an artificial neural network approach (ANN) as a function of welding heat input and geometry. Maximum tensile stresses with magnitude close to the yield strength of the material were observed near the weld cap in both axial and hoop direction of the welds. Significant scatter of more than 200 MPa was found within the residual stress measurements at the weld center line and are associated with the geometry and welding conditions of individual weld passes. The ANN prediction is developed in an attempt to effectively quantify this phenomenon of `innate scatter' and to learn the non-linear patterns in the weld residual stress profiles. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ANN method for defining through-thickness residual stress profiles in welds for application in structural integrity assessments is evaluated.

  15. Through-Thickness Residual Stress Profiles in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds: A Combined Experimental and Prediction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Moat, R. J.; Paddea, S.; Francis, J. A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; Bouchard, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Economic and safe management of nuclear plant components relies on accurate prediction of welding-induced residual stresses. In this study, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness of austenitic stainless steel welds has been measured using neutron diffraction and the contour method. The measured data are used to validate residual stress profiles predicted by an artificial neural network approach (ANN) as a function of welding heat input and geometry. Maximum tensile stresses with magnitude close to the yield strength of the material were observed near the weld cap in both axial and hoop direction of the welds. Significant scatter of more than 200 MPa was found within the residual stress measurements at the weld center line and are associated with the geometry and welding conditions of individual weld passes. The ANN prediction is developed in an attempt to effectively quantify this phenomenon of `innate scatter' and to learn the non-linear patterns in the weld residual stress profiles. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ANN method for defining through-thickness residual stress profiles in welds for application in structural integrity assessments is evaluated.

  16. Assessment of Gap and Charging Voltage Influence on Mechanical Behaviour of Joints Obtained by Magnetic Pulse Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Buiron, N.; dos Santos, B; Franz, G; Habak, M.; Haye, D.; Jouaffre, D.; Morel, M; Rachik, M; Raoelison, R.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the study of the experimental weldability in magnetic pulse welding process of a one material assembly (aluminium AA6060T6) and a dissimilar metal couple (aluminium6060T6/copper). The weld quality is defined using a destructive process allowing measuring the weld dimension. A diagram charging voltage-air gap is used to establish the variance of weldability. With the criterion of width of the weld, this representation is able to determine the operational w...

  17. Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  18. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  19. Welding sequence effects on residual stress distribution in offshore wind monopile structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mehmanparast

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses are often inevitably introduced into the material during the fabrication processes, such as welding, and are known to have significant effects on the subsequent fatigue crack growth behavior of welded structures. In this paper, the importance of welding sequence on residual stress distribution in engineering components has been reviewed. In addition, the findings available in the literature have been used to provide an accurate interpretation of the fatigue crack growth data on specimens extracted from the welded plates employed in offshore wind monopile structures. The results have been discussed in terms of the role of welding sequence in damage inspection and structural integrity assessment of offshore renewable energy structures.

  20. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  1. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  2. Integrated monitoring and assessment of air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, O.

    2009-09-15

    Improved quality, better understanding of processes and optimisation of allocated resources, these are the main advantages of applying Integrated Monitoring and Assessment (IMA) in air quality management. The IMA is defined as the combined use of measurements and model calculations. The use of IMA is demonstrated with examples with different aims: to obtain data for air pollution in urban streets, to assess human exposure to traffic air pollution, and to assess atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. (author)

  3. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  4. Uncertainty in Integrated Assessment Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mort Webster

    2005-10-17

    The determination of climate policy is a decision under uncertainty. The uncertainty in future climate change impacts is large, as is the uncertainty in the costs of potential policies. Rational and economically efficient policy choices will therefore seek to balance the expected marginal costs with the expected marginal benefits. This approach requires that the risks of future climate change be assessed. The decision process need not be formal or quantitative for descriptions of the risks to be useful. Whatever the decision procedure, a useful starting point is to have as accurate a description of climate risks as possible. Given the goal of describing uncertainty in future climate change, we need to characterize the uncertainty in the main causes of uncertainty in climate impacts. One of the major drivers of uncertainty in future climate change is the uncertainty in future emissions, both of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important species such as sulfur dioxide. In turn, the drivers of uncertainty in emissions are uncertainties in the determinants of the rate of economic growth and in the technologies of production and how those technologies will change over time. This project uses historical experience and observations from a large number of countries to construct statistical descriptions of variability and correlation in labor productivity growth and in AEEI. The observed variability then provides a basis for constructing probability distributions for these drivers. The variance of uncertainty in growth rates can be further modified by expert judgment if it is believed that future variability will differ from the past. But often, expert judgment is more readily applied to projected median or expected paths through time. Analysis of past variance and covariance provides initial assumptions about future uncertainty for quantities that are less intuitive and difficult for experts to estimate, and these variances can be normalized and then applied to mean

  5. Risk assessment of integrated electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsson, Bjarni Thor; Sigurdardottir, Gudlaug; Stefansson, Stefan Orri

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the security concerns related to Electronic Health Records (EHR) both in registration of data and integration of systems. A description of the current state of EHR systems in Iceland is provided, along with the Ministry of Health's future vision and plans. New legislation provides the opportunity for increased integration of EHRs and further collaboration between institutions. Integration of systems, along with greater availability and access to EHR data, requires increased security awareness since additional risks are introduced. The paper describes the core principles of information security as it applies to EHR systems and data. The concepts of confidentiality, integrity, availability, accountability and traceability are introduced and described. The paper discusses the legal requirements and importance of performing risk assessment for EHR data. Risk assessment methodology according to the ISO/IEC 27001 information security standard is described with examples on how it is applied to EHR systems.

  6. Assessing Bond Market Integration in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Ip-wing Yu; Laurence Fung; Chi-sang Tam

    2007-01-01

    Development of the local bond markets has been a top priority for financial reforms in the region after the Asian financial crisis. Various initiatives have also been taken to foster the development of the regional bond market. This paper looks into the degree of integration of sovereign (government) bond markets in Asia. It provides a survey of indicators and measures to monitor the development, measure progress and assess the state of bond market integration in the region. Our empirical res...

  7. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  8. The Application of Stress-Relaxation Test to Life Assessment of T911/T22 Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tieshan; Zhao, Jie; Cheng, Congqian; Li, Huifang

    2016-03-01

    A dissimilar weld metal was obtained through submerged arc welding of a T911 steel to a T22 steel, and its creep property was explored by stress-relaxation test assisted by some conventional creep tests. The creep rate information of the stress-relaxation test was compared to the minimum and the average creep rates of the conventional creep test. Log-log graph showed that the creep rate of the stress-relaxation test was in a linear relationship with the minimum creep rate of the conventional creep test. Thus, the creep rate of stress-relaxation test could be used in the Monkman-Grant relation to calculate the rupture life. The creep rate of the stress-relaxation test was similar to the average creep rate, and thereby the rupture life could be evaluated by a method of "time to rupture strain." The results also showed that rupture life which was assessed by the Monkman-Grant relation was more accurate than that obtained through the method of "time to rupture strain."

  9. Technique for the residual life assessment of high temperature components based on creep-rupture testing on welded miniature specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzillo, A.; Guardamagna, C.; Moscotti, L.; Ranzani, L. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy)

    1995-06-01

    Following the present trend in the development of advanced methodologies for residual life assessment of high temperature components operating in power plants, particularly in non destructive methods, a testing technique has been set up at ENEL-CRAM based on creep-rupture testa in an argon on welded miniature specimens. Five experimental systems for creep-rupture tests in an argon atmosphere have been set up which include high accuracy systems, vacuum chambers and exrwnsometer devices. With the aim of establishing and validating the suitability of the experimental methodology, creep-rupture and interrupted creep testing programmes have been performed on miniature specimens (2 mm diameter and 10 mm gauge lenght). On the basis of experience gathered by various European research laboratories, a miniature specimen construction procedure has been developed using a laser welding technique for joining threaded heads to sample material. Low alloy ferritic steels, such as virgin 2.25CrlMo, 0.5Cr 0.5Mo 0.25V, and IN 738 superalloy miniature specimens have been investigated and the results, compared with those from standard specimens, show a regular trend in deformation vs time. Additional efforts to provide guidelines for material sampling from each plant component will be required in order to reduce uncertainties in residual life prediction.

  10. Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-03-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

  11. A preliminary study on the application of Friction Welding in structural repairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, D.; Santos, J.F. dos [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung; Blakemore, G.R. [Pressure Products Group, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Gibson, D. [National Hyperbaric Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    Friction Welding is characterised by the absence of a fusion zone associated with comparatively low temperatures in the weld. These features allow the application of this welding process in joining and repair of most engineering structures, especially in hazardous environments. This work presents a preliminary study on different friction welding processes, including the recently developed Friction Hydro-Pillar Processing (FHPP) and Friction Stitch Welding, as joining technologies for thick-walled structures. The use of these welding processes in different industrial applications, compared with the commonly used arc welding counterparts, as well as the influence of welding parameters on the weldment integrity are discussed. A brief description of a portable friction welding equipment and its possible implementation for FHPP are presented. Stud welds produced in the commissioning phase of this equipment have been analysed and tested to assess their quality. (orig.) [Deutsch] Da die Schweisszonentemperatur waehrend des Reibschweissvorganges vergleichsweise niedrig ist, bildet sich kein Schmelzbad aus. Anwendbar ist dieses Schweissverfahren zur Verbindung oder Reparatur der meisten Metallkonstruktionen, speziell in risikobehafteter Umgebung. Diese Arbeit enthaelt eine Vorstudie zu verschiedenen Reibschweissprozessen, einschliesslich der neu entwickelten Friction Hydro-Pillar Processing (FHPP)- und Friction Stitch Welding-Verfahren, als Fuegetechniken fuer dickwandige Strukturen. Die Anwendbarkeit dieser Schweissprozesse in verschiedenen Industrien, verglichen mit herkoemmlich verwendeten Lichtbogenschweissverfahren, sowie der Einfluss von Schweissparametern auf die Guete der Verbindung werden diskutiert. Praesentiert wird ausserdem eine tragbare Reibschweissmaschine und ihre moegliche Verwendung zum FHPP-Schweissen. Bolzenschweissungen, die waehrend der Inbetriebnahmephase dieser Maschine hergestellt wurden, sind zur Charakterisierung ihrer Qualitaet analysiert und

  12. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  13. A study of processes for welding pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, J. (ed.)

    1991-07-01

    A review was made of exisiting and potential processes for welding pipelines: fusion welding (arc, electron beam, laser, thermit) and forge welding (friction, flash, magnetically impelled arc butt, upset butt, explosive, shielded active gas, gas pressure). Consideration of J-lay operations gave indications that were reflections of the status of the processes in terms of normal land and offshore S-lay operation: forge welding processes, although having promise require considerable development; fusion welding processes offer several possibilities (mechanized GMA welding likely to be used in 1991-2); laser welding requires development in all pipeline areas: a production machine for electron beam welding will involve high costs. Nondestructive testing techniques are also reviewed. Demand for faster quality assessment is being addressed by speeding radiographic film processing and through the development of real time radiography and automatic ultrasonic testing. Conclusions on most likely future process developments are: SMAW with cellulosic electrodes is best for tie-ins, short pip runs; SMAW continues to be important for small-diameter lines, although mechanized GMA could be used, along with mechanical joining, MIAB, radial fraction, and flash butt; mechanized GMA welding is likely to predominate for large diameter lines and probably will be used for the first J-lay line (other techniques could be used too); and welding of piping for station facilities involves both shop welding of sub-assemblies and on-site welding of pipe and sub-assemblies to each other (site welding uses both SMAW and GMAW). Figs, tabs.

  14. Risk Communication Concerning Welding Fumes for the Primary Preventive Care of Welding Apprentices in Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Cezar Vaz, Joana

    2015-01-01

    This study’s aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% co...

  15. Effect of buffer-layered buttering on microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar metal weld joints for nuclear plant application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathod, Dinesh W., E-mail: dineshvrathod@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Enggineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz-khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Singh, P.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Pandey, Sunil; Aravindan, S. [Department of Mechanical Enggineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz-khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we present the metallurgical and mechanical investigation of four dissimilar welds between SA508Gr.3Cl.1 and SS304LN. The welding processes for buttering deposition and fill-pass welding were varied with ERNiCr-3/ENiCrFe-3 consumables. The Ni-Fe alloy buffer layer was introduced as intermediate layer in buttering and then the joints (with and without buffer layer in buttering) were fabricated. The effect of Ni-Fe buffer layered buttering and welding processes on the resulting weld joints properties has been addressed. Metallurgical and mechanical properties, fracture toughness were measured and various examinations were carried out for integrity assessment on all the weld joints. Addition of a Ni-Fe buttering layer leads to the development of more favourable properties than observed in welded joints made using the current practice without a buffer layer. Control of carbon migration and its subsequent effect on metallurgical, mechanical properties due to buffer layer has been justified in the study. Conventional procedure of DMW fabrication has been proven to be the least favourable against the new technique suggested. Modification in current integrity assessment procedure would be possible by considering the properties at interfacial regions, introduction of yield strength ratio mismatch and the plastic instability strength in the integrity assessment.

  16. Predicting welding residual stresses in a dissimilar metal girth welded pipe using 3D finite element model with a simplified heat source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Dean, E-mail: deandeng@cqu.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Shazheng Street 174, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Kiyoshima, Shoichi [Research Center of Computational Mechanics, Inc., Togoshi NI-Bldg., 1-7-1 Togoshi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-0041 (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuo [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, TOKYU REIT Toranomon Bldg, 3-17-1, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan); Yanagida, Nobuyoshi [Hitachi Ltd. 1-1, Saiwa-cho 3-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 317-8511 (Japan); Saito, Koichi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. 2-2, Omika-cho, 5-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Welding residual stresses have asymmetrical distributions in the dissimilar metal pipe. Variable length heat source model can largely save computing time. Besides welding, other thermal processes also affect residual stresses. - Abstract: Dissimilar metal welds are commonly used in nuclear power plants to connect low alloy steel components and austenitic stainless steel piping systems. The integrity assessment and life estimation for such welded structures require consideration of residual stresses induced by manufacturing processes. Because the fabrication process of dissimilar metal weld joints is considerably complex, it is very difficult to accurately predict residual stresses. In this study, both numerical simulation technology and experimental method were used to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a dissimilar metal pipe joint with a medium diameter, which were performed by a multi-pass welding process. Firstly, an experimental mock-up was fabricated to measure the residual stress distributions on the inside and the outside surfaces. Then, a time-effective 3-D finite element model was developed to simulate welding residual stresses through using a simplified moving heat source. The simplified heat source method could complete the thermo-mechanical analysis in an acceptable time, and the simulation results generally matched the measured data near the weld zone. Through comparing the simulation results and the experimental measurements, we can infer that besides the multi-pass welding process other key manufacturing processes such as cladding, buttering and heat treatment should also be taken into account to accurately predict residual stresses in the whole range of the dissimilar metal pipe.

  17. Tailoring defect free fusion welds based on phenomenological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit

    In the last few decades, phenomenological models of fusion welding have provided important understanding and information about the welding processes and welded materials. For example, numerical calculations of heat transfer and fluid flow in welding have enabled accurate quantitative calculations of thermal cycles and fusion zone geometry in fusion welding. In many simple systems such as gas tungsten arc (GTA) butt welding, the computed thermal cycles have been used to quantitatively understand weld metal phase compositions, grain sizes and inclusion structure. However, fabrication of defect free welds with prescribed attributes based on scientific principles still remains to be achieved. In addition, higher fabrication speeds are often limited by the occurrence of humping defects which are characterized by periodic bead-like appearance. Furthermore, phenomenological models have not been applied to tailor welds with given attributes. The goal of the present work is to apply the principles of heat transfer and fluid flow to attain defects free welds with prescribed attributes. Since there are a large number of process variables in welding, the desired weld attributes such as the weld geometry and structure are commonly produced by empirically adjusting the welding variables. However, this approach does not always produce optimum welds and inappropriate choice of variables can lead to poor welds. The existing transport phenomena based models of welding can only predict weld characteristics for a given set of input welding variables. What is needed, and not currently available, is a capability to systematically determine multiple paths to tailor weld geometry and assess robustness of each individual solution to achieve safe, defect free welds. Therefore, these heat transfer and fluid flow based models are restructured to predict the welding conditions to achieve the defect free welds with desired attributes. Systematic tailoring of weld attributes based on scientific

  18. Creep-fatigue damage characteristics for a welded cylindrical structure of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeo Yeon; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hoon; Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Jae Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    In the design and assessment of a high temperature structure, it is important to ensure the structural integrity for the welded joint subjected to a creep-fatigue load because a statistical investigation shows that 29 events out of 46 leaks in liquid metal reactors were caused at the welded joints. As for the structural integrity due to thermal ratchet load at the welded joint, KAERI has performed the test and analysis work for a cylindrical structure with welded joints. As a continuation of the study on welded joints at a high temperature structure, a creep-fatigue structural test and analysis work is now on-going and this paper present the interim findings for the structural test and analysis work. Recently the structural and analysis work for the Y-piece made of a 316L stainless steel structure has been carried out. The objectives of the present structural creep-fatigue test with the welded cylindrical specimen are to compare the creep-fatigue damage mechanisms for the 304 and 316L stainless steels, to compare the different behavior of the welding methods in a high temperature austenitic structures and to quantify the conservatism of the design guidelines for a high temperature structure.

  19. Technical And Economical Aspects Of Integrating, Handling And Exploiting High Power Laser Beams In Industrial Welding Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Georges

    1989-03-01

    Analysis of the different factors which affect the improvement of high power laser systems are presented. It concerns ; the laser sources and their power and mode structure stability, their pointing stability and their efficiency, the beam transport and handling with different morphologies of machines according to the dimensions of the parts and the production rate ; the control of the industrial process through a central computer which takes in charge all the functions of the machine. Next, factors to be considered in the economical analysis for installing high power laser systems are discussed ; this covers the investment cost for the source and the associated system, the cost for consummables, for maintenance for training and labor. Comparison of the investment cost as function of power for both laser and electrons beam welding, shows that, generally speaking, there are two regions of beam power : the first located at less than 3 to 4kW where the laser is more advantageous economically, the second located at higher than 10kW where the E.B. is more advantageous. An example of a multi-stations mock-up (12 welding heads) supplied by a single laser beam is finally presented. Located at about 20m from the laser source the welding heads receive the laser beam through a distributor of high alignement precision. A spot weld similar to what is usually obtained with resistance spot welding can be achieved in about 0,5 second. Some technical and scientific problems relative to this application and concerning the transfer of laser beam are presented.

  20. Integrated environmental impact assessment: a Canadian example.

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatkowski, Roy E.; Ooi, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The Canadian federal process for environmental impact assessment (EIA) integrates health, social, and environmental aspects into either a screening, comprehensive study, or a review by a public panel, depending on the expected severity of potential adverse environmental effects. In this example, a Public Review Panel considered a proposed diamond mining project in Canada's northern territories, where 50% of the population are Aboriginals. The Panel specifically instructed the project proposer...

  1. ATD-1 Operational Integration Assessment Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzberger, Kevin E.; Sharma, Shivanjli; Martin, Lynn Hazel; Wynnyk, Mitch; McGarry, Katie

    2015-01-01

    The FAA and NASA conducted an Operational Integration Assessment (OIA) of a prototype Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (formerly TSS, now TSAS) system at the FAA's William J. Hughes Technical Center (WJHTC). The OIA took approximately one year to plan and execute, culminating in a formal data collection, referred to as the Run for Record, from May 12-21, 2015. This report presents quantitative and qualitative results from the Run for Record.

  2. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  3. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  4. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteucci

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compare ultrasonic welding (UW and thermal bonding (TB for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones obtained using TB. Parameters such as metal thickness of electrodes, depth of electrode embedding, delivered power, and height of energy directors (for UW, as well as pressure and temperature (for TB, were systematically studied to evaluate the two bonding methods and requirements for optimal electrochemical performance. The presented technology is intended for easy and effective integration of polymeric Lab-on-Chip systems to encourage their use in research, commercialization and education.

  5. Integrated ecological risk assessment of dioxin compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sany, Seyedeh Belin Tavakoly; Hashim, Rosli; Rezayi, Majid; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Razavizadeh, Bi Bi Marzieh; Abouzari-lotf, Ebrahim; Karlen, David J

    2015-08-01

    Current ecological risk assessment (ERA) schemes focus mainly on bioaccumulation and toxicity of pollutants in individual organisms. Ecological models are tools mainly used to assess ecological risks of pollutants to ecosystems, communities, and populations. Their main advantage is the relatively direct integration of the species sensitivity to organic pollutants, the fate and mechanism of action in the environment of toxicants, and life-history features of the individual organism of concern. To promote scientific consensus on ERA schemes, this review is intended to provide a guideline on short-term ERA involving dioxin chemicals and to identify key findings for exposure assessment based on policies of different agencies. It also presents possible adverse effects of dioxins on ecosystems, toxicity equivalence methodology, environmental fate and transport modeling, and development of stressor-response profiles for dioxin-like chemicals.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY: INTEGRAL ASSESSMENT (CASE OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kharlamova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental security is a key issue in the context of the national security evaluating of each state and the world in whole. The lack of universality in the term definition, not to mention the technology of an assessment of environmental security, encourages researchers to develop and improve methods and approaches to assess integrated index of environmental safety at the level of the country and its regions. The main scientific results of this study include the following: given the analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of well-known techniques and approaches to the evaluation of ecological security in the world and in Ukraine, represented the authorial approach to the calculation of the integral index of environmental security of Ukraine and its regions, with the option of cross-state comparison; calculated integral index of ecological safety of Ukraine (1996 – 2013; held the comparative analysis of the ecological security of Ukraine and other selected countries; proposed the system of indicators for ranking of regions of Ukraine at the level of its environmental security.

  7. A System for Complex Robotic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole; Sørensen, Carsten Bro; Olsen, Birger

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the architecture of a system for robotic welding of complex tasks. The system integrates off-line programming, control of redundant robots, collision-free motion planning and sensor-based control. An implementation for pipe structure welding made at Odense Steel Shipyard Ltd......., Denmark, demonstrates the system can be used for automatic welding of complex products in one-of-a-kind production....

  8. Fiber laser welding of dual-phase galvanized sheet steel (DP590): traditional analysis and new quality assessment techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephanie; Pfeif, Erik; Kazakov, Andrei; Baumann, Esther; Dowell, Marla

    2016-03-01

    Laser welding has many advantages over traditional joining methods, yet remains underutilized. NIST has undertaken an ambitious initiative to improve predictions of weldability, reliability, and performance of laser welds. This study investigates butt welding of galvanized and ungalvanized dual-phase automotive sheet steels (DP 590) using a 10 kW commercial fiber laser system. Parameter development work, hardness profiles, microstructural characterization, and optical profilometry results are presented. Sound welding was accomplished in a laser power range of 2.0 kW to 4.5 kW and travel speed of 2000 mm/min to 5000 mm/min. Vickers hardness ranged from approximately 2 GPa to 4 GPa across the welds, with limited evidence of heat affected zone softening. Decreased hardness across the heat affected zone directly correlated to the appearance of ferrite. A technique was developed to non-destructively evaluate weld quality based on geometrical criteria. Weld face profilometry data were compared between light optical, metallographic sample, and frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser detection and ranging (FMCW LADAR) methods.

  9. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  10. Application of TRIZ Methodology in Diffusion Welding System Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinder Reddy, N.; Satyanarayana, V. V.; Prashanthi, M.; Suguna, N.

    2017-12-01

    Welding is tremendously used in metal joining processes in the manufacturing process. In recent years, diffusion welding method has significantly increased the quality of a weld. Nevertheless, diffusion welding has some extent short research and application progress. Therefore, diffusion welding has a lack of relevant information, concerned with the joining of thick and thin materials with or without interlayers, on welding design such as fixture, parameters selection and integrated design. This article intends to combine innovative methods in the application of diffusion welding design. This will help to decrease trial and error or failure risks in the welding process being guided by the theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ) design method. This article hopes to provide welding design personnel with innovative design ideas under research and for practical application.

  11. APPLICATION OF TRIZ METHODOLOGY IN DIFFUSION WELDING SYSTEM OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. RAVINDER REDDY

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Welding is tremendously used in metal joining processes in the manufacturing process. In recent years, diffusion welding method has significantly increased the quality of a weld. Nevertheless, diffusion welding has some extent short research and application progress. Therefore, diffusion welding has a lack of relevant information, concerned with the joining of thick and thin materials with or without interlayers, on welding design such as fixture, parameters selection and inte-grated design. This article intends to combine innovative methods in the application of diffusion welding design. This will help to decrease trial and error or failure risks in the welding process being guided by the theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ design method. This article hopes to provide welding design personnel with innovative design ideas under research and for practical application.

  12. IkusaSA. Integrated Assessment for Sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available , energy, water, and food security while uplifting the population requires a new way of collaborative planning. It is clear that planning in the economic, population, energy, land and water domains can no longer occur in isolation. The challenge... is to provide innovative ways to address the complexities of inter- and cross-sectoral planning. THE IKUSASA SOLUTION The IkusaSA project sets out to develop, for the first time, a suite of Integrated Assessment Models for South Africa, and to promote...

  13. A study of reactor vessel integrity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Kyung; Shin, Chang Ho; Seo, Bo Kyun [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-15

    The fast neutron fluence at the Reactor Pressure Vessel(RPV) of KNGR designed for 60 years lifetime was calculated by full-scope Monte Carlo simulation for reactor vessel integrity assessment. KNGR core geometry was modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-sixteenth of the reactor in-vessel component. Each fuel assemblies were modeled explicitly, and each fuel pins were axially divided into 5 segments. The maximum flux of 4.3 x 10{sup 10} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. sec at the RPV was obtained by tallying neutrons crossing the beltline of inner surface of the RPV.

  14. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards for Electron Beam Welding in the Space Environment: Analysis and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Bhat, B.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment are analyzed. A weld pool detachment parameter specifying conditions for pool detachment by impact is derived and corroborated by experimental evidence. Impact detachment for the pool is unlikely. Impact detachment for a drop of metal on the end of the weld wire may be possible under extreme conditions. Other potential causes of molten metal detachment considered, vaporization pressure forces and wire flickout from the pool, did not appear to present significant detachment threats.

  15. Local strain energy density for the fatigue assessment of hot dip galvanized welded joints: some recent outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Peron

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since in literature only data about the effect of the hot-dip galvanizing coating on fatigue behavior of unnotched specimens are available, whereas very few for notched components and none for welded joints, the aim of this paper is to partially fill this lack of knowledge comparing fatigue strength of uncoated and hot-dip galvanized fillet welded cruciform joints made of structural steel S355 welded joints, subjected to a load cycle R = 0. 34. The results are shown in terms of stress range ?s and of the averaged strain energy density range DW in a control volume of radius R0 = 0.28 mm

  16. Determination of Grain Size and Resistance to Corrosion of Stainless Steel Welded Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Hudeček

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Discover problems of welds is not so easy from time to time. Specially, If welding was made in rough environmental conditions such as high temperature, humidity and dusty wind. It is necessary to provide good conditions to realize basic step of welding. For welding, have been used welding procedures specification and procedure qualification record. However, difficult conditions, documentations rightness or human errors are always here. Common weld defects like cracks, porosity, lack of penetration and distortion can compromise the strength of the base metal, as well as the integrity of the weld. According of site inspection, there were suspicion of intercrystalline corrosion, inclusions, leaker or segregation in root of weld, root weld stretches to the pipe inside, the welded pipes are not in axially level, the not proper surface treatment after welding and keep the intervals between single welds to not overheat the pipes.

  17. The Integrated Assessment of Land Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Salvati

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent findings on the complex field of land degradation (LD with focus on the Mediterranean Basin and Italy, in particular. The LD definition and assessment methods are examined in the light of the most important natural and human driving forces of the phenomenon, such as land use and climate changes.Various methodological issues are dealt with from multidisciplinary perspective with the aim of providing the ground for the development of integrated approaches: monitoring needs, assessment of costs, development of mitigation strategies, etc. Factors affecting land vulnerability to degradation are classified into bio-physical and socio-economic drivers with some examples of applications in Italy. The role of determinants such as agricultural development, population growth, and urban sprawl is recognised as important but still ambiguous and thus needs further studies. Based on these findings, policy responses aimed at mitigating LD and thus reducing desertification risk are discussed and methodological proposal are presented.

  18. Evaluation of Residual Stress Measurements Before and After Post-Weld Heat Treatment in the Weld Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardowska, Anna M.; Price, John W. H.; Finlayson, Trevor R.; Ibrahim, R.

    2010-11-01

    Welding repairs are increasingly a structural integrity concern for aging pressure vessel and piping components. It has been demonstrated that the residual stress distribution near repair welds can be drastically different from that of the original weld. Residual stresses have a significant effect on the lifetime performance of a weld, and a reduction of these stresses is normally desirable. The aim of this paper is to investigate residual stresses in various weld repair arrangements using the non-destructive neutron diffraction technique. This research is focused on characterization of the residual stress distribution: (i) in the original weld; (ii) in a shallow toe weld repair; and (iii) after conventional post-weld heat treatment. The focus of the measurements is on the values of the subsurface strain/stress variations across the weld.

  19. Multiple Crack Growth Prediction in AA2024-T3 Friction Stir Welded Joints, Including Manufacturing Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Citarella, Roberto; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2016-01-01

    boundary element method (FEM-DBEM) procedure, coupling the welding process simulation to the subsequent crack growth assessment, is proposed and applied to simulate multiple crack propagation, with allowance for manufacturing effects. The friction stir butt welding process of the precipitation hardened AA......A great deal of attention is currently paid by several industries toward the friction stir welding process to realize lightweight structures. Within this aim, the realistic prediction of fatigue behavior of welded assemblies is a key factor. In this work an integrated finite element method - dual......2024-T3 alloy was simulated using a thermo-mechanical FEM model to predict the process induced residual stress field and material softening. The computed stress field was transferred to a DBEM environment and superimposed to the stress field produced by a remote fatigue traction load applied...

  20. The influence of plate thickness on the welding residual stresses from submerged arc welding in offshore steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    to an improved design, which consequently may be included in future norms and standards. Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) was used to make a fully penetrated butt weld in 10 mm and 40 mm thick steel plates with the same welding parameters as used in the production procedures. The base material is thermomechanical hot......Welding-induced residual tensile stresses and distortion have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of welded structures within the offshore wind industry. The stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint, as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue...... life, and attribute to the corrosion cracking and brittle fracture in the weld components. This study investigates the influence of plate thickness on the welding-induced residual stresses. The residual stresses are investigated through experiments and in accordance with existing production procedures...

  1. Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection Method for Welds in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping JCN N6398, Task 1B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Mathews, Royce; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-07-28

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS); dissimilar metal welds; piping with corrosion-resistant cladding; weld overlays, inlays and onlays; and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. In this effort, PNNL supports cooperation with Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) to assess reliable inspection of CASS materials. The NRC Project Manager has established a cooperative effort with the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN). CEA, under funding from IRSN, are supporting collaborative efforts with the NRC and PNNL. Regarding its work on the NDE of materials, CEA is providing its modeling software (CIVA) in exchange for PNNL offering expertise and data related to phased-array detection and sizing, acoustic attenuation, and back scattering on CASS materials. This collaboration benefits the NRC because CEA performs research and development on CASS for Électricité de France (EdF). This technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of welds in CASS pressurizer (PZR) surge line nuclear reactor piping. A set of thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) was implanted into three CASS PZR surge-line specimens (pipe-to-elbow welds) that were fabricated using vintage CASS materials formed in the 1970s, and flaw responses from these cracks were used to evaluate detection and sizing

  2. Prevention and early diagnostic of health insult at welding works

    OpenAIRE

    Motejlková, Kateřina

    2010-01-01

    The work is dealing with problems of safety aspects of welding in conjunction with connected preventive provisions. The work seeks to outline complex problem particularly by integration of information from obtainable sources dealing with only alone part of the wide range topic. From technological point of view there are briefly described different welding processes with their summary of health hazards referring to welding. It contains provisions relation impeding health during welding activit...

  3. Comparison of Plasma, Metal Inactive Gas (MIG) and Tungsten Inactive Gas (TIG) Processes for Laser Hybrid Welding (302)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    source, ignition and running torch stability, weld phase transformation and change in ductility and overall weld quality are described. The results show that all three processes can successfully be integrated with a CO2 laser beam for hybrid welding. Due to the pilot arc in plasma welding, this process......, the MIG process is more difficult to control than laser/plasma and laser/TIG processes. All three types of secondary heat sources enable an increased ductility of the weld as compared to pure laser welding when welding 1.8 mm GA 260 with a TIG torch and 2.13 mm CMn steel with a plasma arc or MIG......In this paper, TIG, plasma, and MIG processes have been individually combined with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the general benefits and drawbacks of each process have been individually assessed and compared. Aspects such as ease of integration with a CO2 laser...

  4. Radiological impact assessment of arc welding supplies rutile; Evaluacion del impacto radiologico de la soldadura por arco con consumibles de rutilo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozas Guinea, S.; Herranz Soler, M.; Perez Marin, C.; Idoeta Hermandorena, R.; Alegria gutierrez, N.; Nunez-Lagos Rogla, R.; Legarda Ibanez, F.

    2013-07-01

    Consumables for welding containing rutile, the coating of the electrode or the filling of tubular thread, are the most widely used and also the most radioactive since the rutile is a mineral containing traces of natural radionuclides, and is therefore considered Normal Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). As these electrodes and wire are consumed, small particles, aerosols and gases are emitted to the atmosphere of work, and may be inhaled by the welder. Therefore, and also according to the current regulatory framework and work carried out previously by the author on the radiological impact of the process of manufacture and storage of coated rutile electrodes, the objectives are: 1Calcular the internal dose for inhalation during two types of welding, one with electrodes coated and the other with thread. 2 calculate the external dose due to the deposition of particles in the work environment, slag and the immersion of the soldering iron in the cloud of smoke. 3 to assess the radiological impact. (Author)

  5. Integrating Urban Heat Assessment in Urban Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Echevarría Icaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The world is increasingly concerned with sustainability issues. Climate change is not the least of these concerns. The complexity of these issues is such that data and information management form an important means of making the right decisions. Nowadays, however, the sheer quantity of data is overwhelming; large quantities of data demand means of representation that are comprehensible and effective. The above dilemma poses questions as to how one incorporates unknown climatologic parameters, such as urban heat, in future urban planning processes, and how one ensures the proposals are specific enough to actually adapt cities to climate change and flexible enough to ensure the proposed measures are combinable and compatible with other urban planning priorities. Conventional urban planning processes and mapping strategies are not adapted to this new environmental, technological and social context. In order come up with more appropriate urban planning strategies, in its first section this paper analyzes the role of the urban planner, reviews the wide variety of parameters that are starting to be integrated into the urban planners practice, and considers the parameters (mainly land surface temperature, albedo, vegetation, and imperviousness and tools needed for the assessment of the UHI (satellite imagery and GIS. The second part of the study analyzes the potential of four catalyzing mapping categories to integrate urban heat into spatial planning processes: drift, layering, game-board, and rhizome.

  6. Industrial ecology in integrated assessment models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Arvesen, Anders; Stadler, Konstantin; Hertwich, Edgar G.

    2017-01-01

    Technology-rich integrated assessment models (IAMs) address possible technology mixes and future costs of climate change mitigation by generating scenarios for the future industrial system. Industrial ecology (IE) focuses on the empirical analysis of this system. We conduct an in-depth review of five major IAMs from an IE perspective and reveal differences between the two fields regarding the modelling of linkages in the industrial system, focussing on AIM/CGE, GCAM, IMAGE, MESSAGE, and REMIND. IAMs ignore material cycles and recycling, incoherently describe the life-cycle impacts of technology, and miss linkages regarding buildings and infrastructure. Adding IE system linkages to IAMs adds new constraints and allows for studying new mitigation options, both of which may lead to more robust and policy-relevant mitigation scenarios.

  7. Final Assessment of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2014-03-24

    PNNL conducted a technical assessment of the NDE issues and protocols that led to missed detections of several axially oriented flaws in a steam generator primary inlet dissimilar metal weld at North Anna Power Station, Unit 1 (NAPS-1). This particular component design exhibits a significant outside-diameter (OD) taper that is not included as a blind performance demonstration mock-up within the industry’s Performance Demonstration Initiative, administered by EPRI. For this reason, the licensee engaged EPRI to assist in the development of a technical justification to support the basis for a site-specific qualification. The service-induced flaws at NAPS-1 were eventually detected as a result of OD surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the dissimilar metal weld. A total of five axially oriented flaws were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference. The field volumetric examination that was conducted at NAPS-1 was a non-encoded, real-time manual ultrasonic examination. PNNL conducted both an initial assessment, and subsequently, a more rigorous technical evaluation (reported here), which has identified an array of NDE issues that may have led to the subject missed detections. These evaluations were performed through technical reviews and discussions with NRC staff, EPRI NDE Center personnel, industry and ISI vendor personnel, and ultrasonic transducer manufacturers, and laboratory tests, to better understand the underlying issues at North Anna.

  8. Integrated ecosystem assessment: Lake Ontario water management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B Bain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ecosystem management requires organizing, synthesizing, and projecting information at a large scale while simultaneously addressing public interests, dynamic ecological properties, and a continuum of physicochemical conditions. We compared the impacts of seven water level management plans for Lake Ontario on a set of environmental attributes of public relevance. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Our assessment method was developed with a set of established impact assessment tools (checklists, classifications, matrices, simulations, representative taxa, and performance relations and the concept of archetypal geomorphic shoreline classes. We considered each environmental attribute and shoreline class in its typical and essential form and predicted how water level change would interact with defining properties. The analysis indicated that about half the shoreline of Lake Ontario is potentially sensitive to water level change with a small portion being highly sensitive. The current water management plan may be best for maintaining the environmental resources. In contrast, a natural water regime plan designed for greatest environmental benefits most often had adverse impacts, impacted most shoreline classes, and the largest portion of the lake coast. Plans that balanced multiple objectives and avoided hydrologic extremes were found to be similar relative to the environment, low on adverse impacts, and had many minor impacts across many shoreline classes. SIGNIFICANCE: The Lake Ontario ecosystem assessment provided information that can inform decisions about water management and the environment. No approach and set of methods will perfectly and unarguably accomplish integrated ecosystem assessment. For managing water levels in Lake Ontario, we found that there are no uniformly good and bad options for environmental conservation. The scientific challenge was selecting a set of tools and practices to present broad, relevant, unbiased, and accessible

  9. [Study on the arc spectral information for welding quality diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Gu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-Jun

    2009-03-01

    Through collecting the spectral signals of TIG and MIG welding arc with spectrometer, the arc light radiations were analyzed based on the basic theory of plasma physics. The radiation of welding arc distributes over a broad range of frequency, from infrared to ultraviolet. The arc spectrum is composed of line spectra and continuous spectra. Due to the variation of metal density in the welding arc, there is great difference between the welding arc spectra of TIG and MIG in both their intensity and distribution. The MIG welding arc provides more line spectra of metal and the intensity of radiation is greater than TIG. The arc spectrum of TIG welding is stable during the welding process, disturbance factors that cause the spectral variations can be reflected by the spectral line related to the corresponding element entering the welding arc. The arc spectrum of MIG welding will fluctuate severely due to droplet transfer, which produces "noise" in the line spectrum aggregation zone. So for MIG welding, the spectral zone lacking spectral line is suitable for welding quality diagnosis. According to the characteristic of TIG and MIG, special spectral zones were selected for welding quality diagnosis. For TIG welding, the selected zone is in ultraviolet zone (230-300 nm). For MIG welding, the selected zone is in visible zone (570-590 nm). With the basic theory provided for welding quality diagnosis, the integral intensity of spectral signal in the selected zone of welding process with disturbing factor was studied to prove the theory. The results show that the welding quality and disturbance factors can be diagnosed with good signal to noise ratio in the selected spectral zone compared with signal in other spectral zone. The spectral signal can be used for real-time diagnosis of the welding quality.

  10. Critical Assessment Issues in Work-Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, Sonia; Zegwaard, Karsten E.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment has long been a contentious issue in work-integrated learning (WIL) and cooperative education. Despite assessment being central to the integrity and accountability of a university and long-standing theories around best practice in assessment, enacting quality assessment practices has proven to be more difficult. Authors in this special…

  11. Study on unified fatigue strength assessment method for welded structure. Hot spot stress evaluating method for various combinations of plate thickness and weld leg length; Yosetsu kozo no toitsutekina hiro kyodo hyokaho ni kansuru kenkyu. Itaatsu to yosetsu ashinaga no kumiawase ni taisuru hot spot oryoku sanshutsu ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihei, K.; Inamura, F.; Koe, S. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    There has been tried to apply unified assessment method using hot spot stress, which is effective to evaluate fatigue strength of fillet welded structures for ships and marine structures. This method can be applied to complicated structures and is independent of welding processes. In this study, first, stress analysis has been conducted for two-dimensional fillet welded joint models with various combinations of plate thickness and weld leg length of general fillet structures by means of boundary element method. Then, critical position, which is not affected by local stress concentration due to bead, was determined from the detailed stress distribution in the vicinity of weld toe. As a result, a general equation has been proposed to estimate the hot spot stress by one-point representative method. Second, the fatigue tests of typical fillet welded joints have been conducted by applying this method. Consequently, it was demonstrated that the unified fatigue strength can be evaluated by the S-N data based on hot spot stress range determined from the proposed equation, independent of structural stress concentration. 22 refs., 14 figs.

  12. HANFORD Pu-238 DRUM INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-10-20

    Hanford is presently retrieving contact-handled, transuranic (CH-TRU) waste drums from the site's Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) for processing and disposition. A subgroup of these drums (12 total), referred to as Pu-238 drums, has some unique characteristics that may impact the current drum handling and processing activities. These characteristics include content, shielding, thermal, pressurization and criticality issues. An effort to evaluate these characteristics, for the purpose of developing a specific plan for safe retrieval of the Pu-238 drums, is underway. In addition to the above evaluation, the following integrity assessment of the inner container material and/or confinement properties, with primary emphasis on the Source Capsule (primary confinement barrier) and Shipping Container has been performed. Assessment included review of the inner container materials and the potential impact the service history may have had on material and/or confinement properties. Several environmental degradation mechanisms were considered with the objective of answering the following question: Is it likely the container material and/or confinement properties have been significantly altered as a result of service history?

  13. Friction stir welding - an alternative method for sealing nuclear waste storage canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.E. [TWI Ltd, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    When welding 50 mm thick copper a very high heat input is required to combat the high thermal diffusivity and only the Electron Beam Welding (EBW) process had this capability when this copper canister concept was conceived. Despite the encouraging results achieved using EBW with thick section copper, SKB felt that it would be prudent to assess other joining methods. This assessment concluded that friction welding, could also provide very high quality welds to satisfy the service life requirements of the SKB canister design. A friction welding variant called Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was shown to have the capability of welding 3 mm thick copper sheet with excellent integrity and reproducibility. This later provided sufficient encouragement for SKB to consider the potential of FSW as a method for joining thick section copper, using relatively simple machine tool based technology. It was thought that FSW might provide an alternative or complementary method for welding lids, or bases to canisters. In 1997 an FSW development programme started at TWI, focussed on the feasibility of welding 10 mm thick copper plate. Once this task was successfully completed, work continued to demonstrate that progressively thicker plate, up to 50 mm thick, could be joined. At this stage, with process viability established, a full size experimental FSW canister machine was designed and built. Work with this machine finished in January 2003, when it had been shown that FSW could definitely be used to weld lids to full size canisters. This report summarises the TWI development of FSW for SKB from 1997 to January 2003. It also highlights the important aspects of the process and the project milestones that will help to ensure that SKB has a welding technology that can be used with confidence for production fabrication of copper waste storage canisters in the future. The overall conclusion to this FSW development is that there is no doubt that the FSW process could be used to produce full

  14. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  15. Reliability of non-destructive test methods for ensuring the integrity of Cu welds for safe final storage of radioactive waste; Zuverlaessigkeit von ZfP-Verfahren zur Gewaehrleistung der Integritaet von Cu-Schweissnaehten zur sicheren Endlagerung radioaktiver Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Ewert, U.; Pavlovic, M.; Scharmach, M. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Ronneteg, U. [Materialteknik, Linkoeping (Sweden); Ryden, H. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Okarshamm (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co) is responsible for ultimate storage of spent nuclear fuel rods in Sweden. These will be stored in granite rock near the Swedish Baltic Sea coast at a depth of 500 m, in sealed concrete chambers which will require no further access in the future. The fuel rods will be embedded in a matrix consisting of a mixture of graphite and cast iron inside a sealed cylindrical tube made of Cu. Sealing will be carried out by electron beam welding or by friction stir welding. Modern methods of risk management are to ensure safe storage in all possible influencing scenarios up to the theoretical decay time 100 000 years hence. The welds are the weakest point of the system, so weld integrity testing is an important aspect. This is achieved by the method of 'probability of detection' (POD), which was originally developed for military aircrafts of the USA and was adapted for the more complex situations of 3D defects and 2D data fields of ultrasonic and X-ray testing. The POD is defined as a function of defect size. From the POD curve and the corresponding confidence limit, the system will identify the defect size with an acceptable certainty of detection with the required confidence range; this will be compared with the requirements on overall integrity. (orig.)

  16. Clear Channel Assessment in Integrated Medical Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hara Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complementary WLAN and WPAN technologies as well as other wireless technologies will play a fundamental role in the medical environments to support ubiquitous healthcare delivery. This paper investigates clear channel assessment (CCA and its impact on the coexistence of WLAN (IEEE 802.11 high rate direct sequence spread spectrum (HR/DSSS PHY and WPAN (IEEE 802.15.4b in the 2.4 GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM band. We derived closed-form expressions of both energy-based CCA and feature-based CCA. We qualified unequal sensing abilities between them and termed this inequality asymmetric CCA, which is different from the traditional "hidden node" or "exposed node" issues in the homogeneous network. The energy-based CCA was considered in the considered integrated medical environment because the 2.4 GHz ISM band is too crowded to apply feature-based CCA. The WPAN is oversensitive to the 802.11 HR/DSSS signals and the WLAN is insensitive to the 802.15.4b signals. Choosing an optimal CCA threshold requires some prior knowledge of the underlying signals. In the integrated medical environment we considered here, energy-based CCA can effectively avoid possible packet collisions when they are close within the "heterogeneous exclusive CCA range" (HECR. However, when they are separated beyond the HECR, WPAN can still sense the 802.11 HR/DSSS signals, but WLAN loses its sense to the 802.15.4b signals. The asymmetric CCA leads to WPAN traffic in a position secondary to WLAN traffic.

  17. Determination of Elements and Carbon Content of Stainless Steel Welded Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Hudeček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Find out defects or problems of welds are not so simple from time to time. Specially, if weld has been made in rough environmental conditions like high temperature, dusty wind and humidity. It is important to assure have good conditions to realize basic step of welding. For welding, have been used welding procedures specification and procedure qualification record. However, difficult conditions, documentations rightness or human errors are always here. Common weld defects like cracks, porosity, lack of penetration and distortion can compromise the strength of the base metal, as well as the integrity of the weld. According of site inspection, there were suspicion of inclusions, leaker or segregation in root of weld. Surface treatment after welding and keep the intervals between single welds to not overheat the pipes. To recognize those suspicions, mechanical testing around weld joint, determination of carbon content and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy will be done.

  18. Método integral configurable y flexible de ensayo de materiales consumibles de soldadura por arco eléctrico. // Integral, flexible and shaped method for electric arc welding consumable materials test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. García Rodríguez

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available La presente publicación propone un método integral configurable y flexible para facilitar el ensayo de materialesconsumibles de soldadura por arco eléctrico en las condiciones tecnológicas para las que han sido diseñados estosmateriales, en relación a la calidad de la unión soldada. Se puede llegar a conclusiones definitivas sobre la calidad de lasoldadura usando un determinado material consumible mediante: la relación operacional de técnicas de inteligencia naturaly/o artificial, el uso de sistemas expertos, el trabajo con bases de datos, la simulación y la realización práctica del procesomientras se registran ciertos parámetros del arco eléctrico, digitalmente procesados estadísticamente y relacionados a losresultados de la caracterización de la unión soldada. El método permite registrar adecuadamente la información referente acada aspecto del proceso exigida en los procesos de certificación de la calidad de los consumibles, así como en lainvestigación dirigida a optimizar la composición química y las propiedades físicas de un material, para obtener calidadesóptimas en un determinado proceso; además es posible obtener las bases de datos de parámetros del arco eléctrico útilespara investigar, desarrollar y valorar métodos y algoritmos para el monitoreo en tiempo real de la calidad de la soldaduradurante un determinado proceso tecnológico de soldadura con arco eléctrico.Palabras Clave: Ensayo, materiales, soldadura, arco eléctrico, estabilidad, calidad, simulación, optimización,unión soldada.___________________________________________________________________________Abstract.This paper presenst an integral, flexible and shaped method that make easy the electric arc welding consumable materials test at thedesigned technological conditions, related to the quality of the welding joint. It is possible to arrive to definitive conclusions about thewelding quality using a fixed material through: operational

  19. Structural degradation of heterogeneous welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analyses of heterogeneous weld interfaces experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the weld interface and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  20. Closing the weld gap with laser/mig hybrid welding process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Wiwe, Bjarne David

    2003-01-01

    In this article, laboratory tests are demonstrated that systematically accesses the critical gap distance when welding CMn 2.13 mm steel with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser, combined with a MIG energy source. In the work, the welding speed is varied at gap distances from 0 to 0.8 mm such that the limits...... for obtaining sound welds are identified. The welds are quality assessed according to ISO 13.919-1 and EN25817, transversal hardness measurements are made and the heat input to the workpiece is calculated. The results show that the critical gap is 0.1 mm for a laser weld alone. With hybrid welding, this can...... be increased to 0.6 mm, even at a welding speed of 3.5 m/min. The maximum welding speed with the hybrid process is comparable to laser welding alone, 4.5 m/min. The measured hardness is comparable to MIG welding, and this corresponds to a 33 percent reduction compared to laser welding alone. The heat input...

  1. Laser welding to expand the allowable gap in bore welding for ITER blanket hydraulic connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Hisashi, E-mail: tanigawa.hisashi@jaea.go.jp; Maruyama, Takahito; Noguchi, Yuto; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    For application to bore welding of hydraulic connection in the ITER blanket module, laser welding presents the following benefits: low weld heat input is preferred for re-welding of the irradiated material. Its contactless process can intrinsically avoid a failure mode of the tool sticking on the weld. The exact requirements for pipe alignment were assessed in comparison with the assembly tolerance. The groove geometry was modified to expand the allowable initial gap. The groove was machined to be partially thick to obviate the filler wire. First, plates with partially thick grooves were welded to elucidate the preferred groove geometry and welding conditions. With the modified groove, the plates were welded for the initial gap of 1.0 mm. Then the groove geometry and welding conditions were adjusted based on results of pipe welding tests. By application of the additional 0.5-mm-thick and 2.5-mm-wide metal in the groove, pipes with an initial gap of 0.7 mm were welded successfully.

  2. Assessment of the effect of welding fumes on welders' cognitive failure and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Abdolrasoul; Golbabaei, Farideh; Dehghan, Somayeh Farhang; Mazlomi, Adel; Akbarzadeh, Arash

    2016-09-01

    This study examined whether cognitive symptoms and health-related quality of life can be affected by welding fume exposure. Participants consisted of welders (n = 40) and welder assistants (n = 25) from welding units as the exposed group, and office workers (n = 44) as the non-exposed group. All participants were studied using ambient air monitoring and two types of questionnaires: the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Welders and welder assistants were exposed to higher concentrations of all airborne metals than office employees, except for aluminum and chromium (p health-related quality of life were not related to the measures of welding fume exposure and further research should be performed to find other influencing factors.

  3. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  4. Integrated Modelling Frameworks for Environmental Assessment and Decision Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzoli, A.E.; Leavesley, G.; Ascough, J.C.; Argent, R.M.; Athanasiadis, I.N.; Brilhante, V.; Claeys, F.H.A.; David, O.; Donatelli, M.; Gijsbers, P.; Havlik, D.; Kassahun, A.; Krause, P.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Scholten, H.; Sojda, R.S.; Villa, F.

    2008-01-01

    Modern management of environmental resources defines problems from a holistic and integrated perspective, imposing strong requirements to Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSSs) and Integrated Assessment Tools (IATs), which tend to be increasingly complex in terms of software architecture and

  5. Assessment of Corona/Arcing Hazard for Electron Beam Welding in Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for ISWE: Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Vaughn, J.; Stocks, C.; ODell, D.; Bhat, B.

    1996-01-01

    Test welds were made in argon over a range of pressures from 10-5 to 10-3 torr (the latter pressure an order of magnitude above pressures anticipated in the space shuttle bay during welding) with and without plasma on 304 stainless steel, 6Al-4V titanium, and 5456 aluminum in search of any possible unwanted electrical discharges. Only a faint steady glow of beam-excited atoms around the electron beam and sometimes extending out into the vacuum chamber was observed. No signs of current spiking or of any potentially dangerous electrical discharge were found.

  6. Artificial Optical Radiation photobiological hazards in arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourzoulidis, G A; Achtipis, A; Topalis, F V; Kazasidis, M E; Pantelis, D; Markoulis, A; Kappas, C; Bourousis, C A

    2016-08-01

    Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) is associated with crucial social, economic, cultural and technical issues. A highly specialized OHS sector deals with the photobiological hazards from artificial optical radiation (AOR), which is divided into visible light, UV and IR emitted during various activities and which is legally covered by European Directive 2006/25/EC. Among the enormous amount of sources emitting AOR, the most important non-coherent ones to consider for health effects to the whole optical range, are arcs created during metal welding. This survey presents the effort to assess the complicated exposure limits of the Directive in the controlled environment of a welding laboratory. Sensors covering the UV and blue light range were set to measure typical welding procedures reproduced in the laboratory. Initial results, apart from apparently justifying the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) due to even subsecond overexposures measured, also set the basis to evaluate PPE's properties and support an integrated risk assessment of the complex welding environment. These results can also improve workers' and employer's information and training about radiation hazards, which is a crucial OHS demand. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  8. Integrated environmental impact assessment: a Canadian example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Roy E; Ooi, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The Canadian federal process for environmental impact assessment (EIA) integrates health, social, and environmental aspects into either a screening, comprehensive study, or a review by a public panel, depending on the expected severity of potential adverse environmental effects. In this example, a Public Review Panel considered a proposed diamond mining project in Canada's northern territories, where 50% of the population are Aboriginals. The Panel specifically instructed the project proposer to determine how to incorporate traditional knowledge into the gathering of baseline information, preparing impact prediction, and planning mitigation and monitoring. Traditional knowledge is defined as the knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and/or local communities developed from experience gained over the centuries and adapted to local culture and environment. The mining company was asked to consider in its EIA: health, demographics, social and cultural patterns; services and infrastructure; local, regional and territorial economy; land and resource use; employment, education and training; government; and other matters. Cooperative efforts between government, industry and the community led to a project that coordinated the concerns of all interested stakeholders and the needs of present and future generations, thereby meeting the goals of sustainable development. The mitigation measures that were implemented take into account: income and social status, social support networks, education, employment and working conditions, physical environments, personal health practices and coping skills, and health services.

  9. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  10. Robotic Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffery, Waris S.

    1993-01-01

    The need for automated plasma welding was identified in the early stages of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) because it requires approximately 1.3 miles of welding for assembly. As a result of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process's ability to make virtually defect-free welds in aluminum, it was chosen to fulfill the welding needs. Space Station Freedom will be constructed of 2219 aluminum utilizing the computer controlled VPPAW process. The 'Node Radial Docking Port', with it's saddle shaped weld path, has a constantly changing surface angle over 360 deg of the 282 inch weld. The automated robotic VPPAW process requires eight-axes of motion (six-axes of robot and two-axes of positioner movement). The robot control system is programmed to maintain Torch Center Point (TCP) orientation perpendicular to the part while the part positioner is tilted and rotated to maintain the vertical up orientation as required by the VPPAW process. The combined speed of the robot and the positioner are integrated to maintain a constant speed between the part and the torch. A laser-based vision sensor system has also been integrated to track the seam and map the surface of the profile during welding.

  11. Flaws detection and localization in weld structure using the topological energy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubeigt, Emma; Mensah, Serge; Rakotonarivo, Sandrine; Chaix, Jean-François; Gobillot, Gilles; Baqué, François

    2017-02-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity and safety of critical structures in a nuclear reactor. The bedspring and the deck are complex welded structures of very restricted access; the ability to reliably detect and locate defects like cracks is therefore a difficult challenge. Ultrasonic testing is a well-recognized non-invasive technique which exhibits high characterization performances in homogeneous media (steel). However, its capabilities are hampered when operating in heterogeneous and anisotropic austenitic welds because of deviation and splitting of the ultrasonic beam. In order to rise to this important challenge, a model-based method is proposed, which takes into account a prior knowledge corresponding to the welding procedure specifications that condition the austenitic grains orientation within the weld and thus the wave propagation. The topological imaging method implemented is a differential approach which, compares signals from the reference defect-free medium to the inspected medium. It relies on combinations of two computed ultrasonic fields, one forward and one adjoint. Numerical simulations and experiments have been carried out to validate the practical relevance of this approach to detect and locate a flaw in a weld.

  12. Experimental analysis of dissimilar metal weld joint: Ferritic to austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathod, Dinesh W., E-mail: dineshvrathod@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Pandey, Sunil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Singh, P.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Prasad, Rajesh [Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-07-15

    The dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint between SA508Gr.3Cl.1 ferritic steel and SS304LN using Inconel 82/182 consumables was required in the nuclear power plants. The joint integrity assessment of these welds requires mechanical and metallurgical properties evaluation in weldment regions. The joint was subjected to 100% radiography test and bend test and transverse tensile test. Welding and testing were carried out as per the requirements of ASME Sec-IX and acceptance criteria as per ASME Sec-III. The transverse tensile test results indicated the failure from the weld metal although it satisfies the minimum strength requirement of the ASME requirements; therefore, the DMW joint was analyzed in detail. Straight bead deposition technique, fine slag inclusion, less reliable radiograph technique, plastic instability stress, yield strength ratio and metallurgical deteriorations have been contributed to failure of the DMW joint from the weld region. In the present work, the factors contributing to the fracture from weld metal have been discussed and analyzed.

  13. Potential Benefits of Ultrasonically Assisted Fusion Welding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many of the processes in which ultrasonic oscillations have been beneficial are similar to fusion welding process where the quality of welds depends on porosity, crystallisation rate, inclusions, inter-metallic compounds, depth of penetration, heat affected zone, etc. Some preliminary tests were performed to assess the effects ...

  14. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  15. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  16. A study on the fatigue strength characteristics of ship structural steel with gusset welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jo Park

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess fatigue property by the static overload and average load in the fillet welded joints which is on the ship structural steel having gusset welds. To this end, a small specimen was made, to which the same welding condition for the actual ship structure was applied, to perform fatigue tests. In this study, a method to simply assess changes in welding residual stress according to different static overload was suggested. By measuring actual strain at the weld toe, the weld stress concentration factor and property which is determined by recrystallization in the process of welding were estimated to investigate the relation between overload and fatigue strength.

  17. A study on the fatigue strength characteristics of ship structural steel with gusset welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jo; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to assess fatigue property by the static overload and average load in the fillet welded joints which is on the ship structural steel having gusset welds. To this end, a small specimen was made, to which the same welding condition for the actual ship structure was applied, to perform fatigue tests. In this study, a method to simply assess changes in welding residual stress according to different static overload was suggested. By measuring actual strain at the weld toe, the weld stress concentration factor and property which is determined by recrystallization in the process of welding were estimated to investigate the relation between overload and fatigue strength.

  18. Weld-brazing of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  19. Online resistance spot weld NDE using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2017-04-01

    A new online resistance spot weld non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique based on infrared (IR) thermography has been developed. It is capable of both real-time online (during welding) and post-weld online/offline (after welding) inspections. The system mainly consists of an IR camera and a computer program with proprietary thermal imaging analysis algorithms integrated into existing production lines. For real-time inspection, the heat flow generated from the welding process (with temperature exceeding 1000°C) is monitored by the IR camera. For post-weld inspection, a novel auxiliary heating device is applied to locally heat the weld region, resulting in temperature changes on the order of 10°C, and the transmitted heat flow is monitored. Unlike the conventional IR NDE method that requires surface coating to reduce the influence of unknown emissivity, the new method can be applied on as-is bare metal surface thanks to the unique "thermal signatures" extracted from infrared thermal images, which positively correlates to weld quality with a high degree of confidence. The new method can be used to reliably detect weld size, surface indents and defects such as cold weld with sufficient accuracy for welds made from various combinations of materials, thickness, stack-up configuration, surface coating conditions and welding conditions.

  20. Bringing Water into an Integrated Assessment Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Sands, Ronald; Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2010-11-30

    We developed a modeling capability to understand how water is allocated within a river basin and examined present and future water allocations among agriculture, energy production, other human requirements, and ecological needs. Water is an essential natural resource needed for food and fiber production, household and industrial uses, energy production, transportation, tourism and recreation, and the functioning of natural ecosystems. Anthropogenic climate change and population growth are anticipated to impose unprecedented pressure on water resources during this century. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers have pioneered the development of integrated assessment (IA) models for the analysis of energy and economic systems under conditions of climate change. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort led to the development of a modeling capability to evaluate current and future water allocations between human requirements and ecosystem services. The Water Prototype Model (WPM) was built in STELLA®, a computer modeling package with a powerful interface that enables users to construct dynamic models to simulate and integrate many processes (biological, hydrological, economics, sociological). A 150,404-km2 basin in the United States (U.S.) Pacific Northwest region served as the platform for the development of the WPM. About 60% of the study basin is in the state of Washington with the rest in Oregon. The Columbia River runs through the basin for 874 km, starting at the international border with Canada and ending (for the purpose of the simulation) at The Dalles dam. Water enters the basin through precipitation and from streamflows originating from the Columbia River at the international border with Canada, the Spokane River, and the Snake River. Water leaves the basin through evapotranspiration, consumptive uses (irrigation, livestock, domestic, commercial, mining, industrial, and off-stream power generation), and streamflow

  1. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  2. IDA’s Integrated Risk Assessment and Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Management Model James S. Thomason, Project Leader Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This work was conducted under IDA’s independent...P-4470 IDA’s Integrated Risk Assessment and Management Model James S. Thomason, Project Leader IDA’s Integrated Risk Assessment and... Management Model INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES “There has been plenty of risk management talk,

  3. 75 FR 4815 - Integrated Science Assessment for Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... AGENCY Integrated Science Assessment for Carbon Monoxide AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... availability of a final document titled, ``Integrated Science Assessment for Carbon Monoxide'' (EPA/600/R-09... standards (NAAQS) for carbon monoxide. DATES: The document will be available on January 29, 2010. ADDRESSES...

  4. Assessment of Integrated Information System (IIS) in organization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The assessment of Integrated Information System (IIS) in organisation is an important initiative to enable the Information System (IS) managers, as well as top management to understand the success status of their investment in IS integration efforts. However, without a proper assessment, an organisation will not know its IIS ...

  5. 78 FR 38318 - Integrated Science Assessment for Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... AGENCY Integrated Science Assessment for Lead AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION..., ``Integrated Science Assessment for Lead'' (EPA/600/R-10/075F). The document was prepared by the National... review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for lead (Pb). DATES: The document will be...

  6. 76 FR 38650 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION... Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead'' (EPA/600/R-10/075A). The original Federal Register notice... Development as part of the review of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Lead. DATES: The...

  7. Effects of select parameters on electron beam welding of AL6061-T6 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Thomas E.

    Electron beam welding was used for joining Al6061-T6, precision machined, cylindrical sections. The welded assembly exhibited a minimum amount of distortion, but a better understanding of the effects of several key welding parameters on the structural integrity of the weld was required. The contents of this document describe the relative importance and interaction between welding speed, volume of filler, and beam pattern on the microstructural and mechanical properties of the welded joint. Understanding of the relationship between welding parameters and weld properties was accomplished by macrophotography and microstructural examination, microhardness testing, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), and mechanical tensile testing of weld coupons. The results of this study will help quantify the robustness of the EBW process for this common aerospace material and joint geometry and will help determine the impacts of process deviations on weld fidelity in the production environment.

  8. Analysis of the Covered Electrode Welding Process Stability on the Basis of Linear Regression Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Słania J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the process of production of coated electrodes and their welding properties. The factors concerning the welding properties and the currently applied method of assessing are given. The methodology of the testing based on the measuring and recording of instantaneous values of welding current and welding arc voltage is discussed. Algorithm for creation of reference data base of the expert system is shown, aiding the assessment of covered electrodes welding properties. The stability of voltage–current characteristics was discussed. Statistical factors of instantaneous values of welding current and welding arc voltage waveforms used for determining of welding process stability are presented. The results of coated electrodes welding properties are compared. The article presents the results of linear regression as well as the impact of the independent variables on the welding process performance. Finally the conclusions drawn from the research are given.

  9. Weldability characteristics of shielded metal arc welded high strength quenched and tempered plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R.; Mukerjee, D.; Jha, S.; Narasimhan, K.; Veeraraghavan, R.

    2002-02-01

    High strength, quench and tempered (Q&T) plates having yield strength of a minimum of 670 MPa and conforming to SA 517 Gr. F specification were successfully developed at Rourkela Steel Plant in plates up to 40 mm thickness. The plates are used extensively for the fabrication of impellers, penstocks, excavators, dumpers, and raw material handling devices, where welding is an important processing step. SA 517 Gr. F plates, characterized by a relatively high carbon equivalent (CE: ˜0.6) and alloyed with Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, and V, are susceptible to a crack-sensitive microstructure and cold cracking during welding. In view of the above, the present study investigated the weldability properties of 20 mm thick plates using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Implant and elastic restraint cracking (ERC) tests were carried out to assess the cold cracking resistance of the weld joint under different welding conditions. Preheat of 100 °C, partial or full rebake, and a heat input of 14.9 to 15.4 KJ/cm resulted in static fatigue limit (SFL) values well in excess of the minimum specified yield strength (MSYS) of 670 MPa and a critical restraint intensity (K cr) value of 34,650 MPa, indicating adequate cold cracking resistance. Lamellar tear tests conducted using full thickness plates at heat input levels ranging from 9.7 to 14.4 KJ/cm and weld restraint loads (WRL) of 510 to 685 MPa showed no incidence of lamellar tear upon visual, ultrasonic, and four-section macroexamination. The weld joint, based on optimized welding parameters, exhibited adequate tensile strength (812.4 MPa) and low temperature impact toughness 88.3 and 63.4 J (9.2 and 6.6 kg-m) at -40 °C for weld metal (WM), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) properties, respectively. The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) values of WM and HAZ (0.40 and 0.36 mm, respectively) were superior to that of the parent metal (0.29 mm), indicating adequate resistance of weld joint to brittle fracture. It was concluded that

  10. Flexible Vision Control System For Precision Robotic Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Richard W.

    1989-02-01

    A system is described which is based on a unique weld image sensor design which integrates the optical system into the weld end effector to produce the so-called "coaxial view" of the weld zone. The resulting weld image is processed by a flexible, table driven vision processing system which can be adapted to detect a variety of features and feature relationships. Provision is made for interactive "teaching" of image features for generation of table parameters from test welds. A table driven control program allows various vision control strategies to be invoked. The main result of the system is a level of emulation of the capability of the expert welder or welding operator, essential to successful precision welding robotization.

  11. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filacchioni, G. E-mail: gianni.filacchioni@casaccia.enea.it; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  12. STRUCTURAL DEGRADATION OF HETEROGENEOUS WELDED JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schmidová

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Developing the techniques of welding materials with higher dynamic strength onto the rolling surfaces of rails is one of the options for increasing their operational endurance. The subject of this paper is an analysis of heterogeneous weld joints experimentally manufactured by welding medium-carbon austenitic steels onto high-carbon unalloyed pearlitic steels. The analyses focus on examinations of the marginal mixing of the materials at the fusion line and the circumstances under which intercrystalline cracks form in the weld deposit layers. Structural analyses, chemical microanalyses and a hardness assessment were performed in order to identify the corresponding structural changes. The proportion of zonal vs. interdendritic segregation of the alloying elements in the degradation of the welded joint was distinguished. We described the nature of the structural heterogeneities produced, locally connected with the martensitic transformation. The chemical heterogeneity leading to the formation of martensite at grain boundaries was identified as the limiting effect.

  13. Fine particles in welding workshop; Hitsaamon pienhiukkaset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, H.; Koskinen, A. [Helsinki Unviv. of Technology, Materials Sciences and Engineering, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-10-15

    The objectives of the project were to research ultra- fine particles developed in the welding and cutting processes, to classify the particles in the welding fume, as well as to assess how they transform in air and drift in the internal air. Also it was attempted to decrease the amount of ultra-fine particles in the welding processes and in the internal air. Experiments were performed in the laboratory environments so that the results are valid and comparable. The fine particles in the fumes were measured and sampled by cascade impactors (ELPI, DLPI), by SMPS and by filter samplers (personal and area). The composition, size, shape and activity of the particles were determined. During the project efficiency of personal welding helmets, fume extraction welding guns and MFI-precipitator were tested. Tests were carried out in the laboratory and in the industrial workshops. The three-year project started in the beginning of February 2003. (orig.)

  14. Contamination and solid state welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-05-01

    Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

  15. Integration of Mobile AR Technology in Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo-Hung, Chao; Kuo-En, Chang; Chung-Hsien, Lan; Kinshuk; Yao-Ting, Sung

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at exploring how to use augmented reality (AR) technology to enhance the effect of performance assessment (PA). A mobile AR performance assessment system (MARPAS) was developed by integrating AR technology to reduce the limitations in observation and assessment during PA. This system includes three modules: Authentication, AR…

  16. The Challenge of Assessing Professional Competence in Work Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Judith

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of work integrated learning (WIL) is the development of professional competence, the ability of students to perform in the workplace. Alignment theory therefore suggests that the assessment of WIL should include an assessment of students' demonstration of professional competence in the workplace. The assessment of professional…

  17. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  18. Physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of welding fume derived particles generated from real time welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cali; Demokritou, Philip; Shafer, Martin; Christiani, David

    2013-01-01

    Welding fume particles have been well studied in the past; however, most studies have examined welding fumes generated from machine models rather than actual exposures. Furthermore, the link between physicochemical and toxicological properties of welding fume particles has not been well understood. This study aims to investigate the physicochemical properties of particles derived during real time welding processes generated during actual welding processes and to assess the particle size specific toxicological properties. A compact cascade impactor (Harvard CCI) was stationed within the welding booth to sample particles by size. Size fractionated particles were extracted and used for both off-line physicochemical analysis and in vitro cellular toxicological characterization. Each size fraction was analyzed for ions, elemental compositions, and mass concentration. Furthermore, real time optical particle monitors (DustTrak™, TSI Inc., Shoreview, Minn.) were used in the same welding booth to collect real time PM2.5 particle number concentration data. The sampled particles were extracted from the polyurethane foam (PUF) impaction substrates using a previously developed and validated protocol, and used in a cellular assay to assess oxidative stress. By mass, welding aerosols were found to be in coarse (PM 2.5–10), and fine (PM 0.1–2.5) size ranges. Most of the water soluble (WS) metals presented higher concentrations in the coarse size range with some exceptions such as sodium, which presented elevated concentration in the PM 0.1 size range. In vitro data showed size specific dependency, with the fine and ultrafine size ranges having the highest reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity. Additionally, this study suggests a possible correlation between welders' experience, the welding procedure and equipment used and particles generated from welding fumes. Mass concentrations and total metal and water soluble metal concentrations of welding fume particles may be

  19. Integrated Climate Change Impacts Assessment in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayan, D. R.; Franco, G.; Meyer, R.; Anderson, M.; Bromirski, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    This paper summarizes lessons learned from an ongoing series of climate change assessments for California, conducted by the scientific community and State and local agencies. A series of three Assessments have considered vulnerability and adaptation issues for both managed and natural systems. California's vulnerability is many faceted, arising because of an exceptionally drought prone climate, open coast and large estuary exposure to sea level rise, sensitive ecosystems and complex human footprint and economy. Key elements of the assessments have been a common set of climate and sea-level rise scenarios, based upon IPCC GCM simulations. Regionalized and localized output from GCM projections was provided to research teams investigating water supply, agriculture, coastal resources, ecosystem services, forestry, public health, and energy demand and hydropower generation. The assessment results are helping to investigate the broad range of uncertainty that is inherent in climate projections, and users are becoming better equipped to process an envelope of potential climate and impacts. Some projections suggest that without changes in California's present fresh-water delivery system, serious water shortages would take place, but that technical solutions are possible. Under a warmer climate, wildfire vulnerability is heightened markedly in some areas--estimated increases in burned area by the end of the 21st Century exceed 100% of the historical area burned in much of the forested areas of Northern California Along California coast and estuaries, projected rise in mean sea level will accelerate flooding occurrences, prompting the need for better education and preparedness. Many policymakers and agency personnel in California are factoring in results from the assessments and recognize the need for a sustained assessment process. An ongoing challenge, of course, is to achieve more engagement with a broader community of decision makers, and notably with the private sector.

  20. Integration needs in assessments of nanotechnology in food and agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen-Marie Forsberg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present a study of assessments of nanotechnology in food and agriculture. The study was conducted as a part of a project studying the need for integrated assessment of emerging science and technologies. The article first introduces central hopes and concerns regarding nanotechnology in food and agriculture, and how these are assessed in different assessment spheres. The question of whether there is a need for more integration in assessments in this field is then introduced and the multiple interpretations of this notion are discussed, first in a sustainability context and then in the specific context of emerging science and technologies. This serves as the basis for analysing the current status of integration of nano-food assessments. The validity of our findings is discussed and the article ends with a summary of the main conclusions from the discussion.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v7i1.1789

  1. Assessment of pollution impacts on the ecological integrity of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macro-invertebrate assemblages were used as bioindicators to assess the ecological integrity of Rivers Kisat (influenced by urban development) and Kisian (influenced by agriculture) using community attributes and the Index of Biotic Integrity. Six stations, three per river, were selected to correspond to different impact types ...

  2. Towards an Integrated Academic Assessment: Closing Employers' Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ngat-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to showcase that the integration of academic assessment with workplace performance appraisal practices can help to address the gap between graduate employability skills and employers' requirements. Employability refers to learning of transferable skills. Design/Methodology/Approach: The integrated assessment…

  3. Flash-flood potential assessment and mapping by integrating the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    flood potential assessment and mapping by integrating the ... A basic step in flood risk management is identifying areas susceptible to flood occurrences. This paper proposes a methodology allowing the identification of areas with high potential ...

  4. FRAMEWORK FOR THE INTEGRATION OF HEALTH AND ECOLOIGCAL RISK ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The World Health Organization's International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have developed a collaborative partnership to foster integration; of assessment approa...

  5. Risk Informed Design Using Integrated Vehicle Rapid Assessment Tools Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A successful proof of concept was performed in FY 2012 integrating the Envision tool for parametric estimates of vehicle mass and the Rapid Response Risk Assessment...

  6. Integrated water resource assessment for the Adelaide region, South Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cox, James W; Akeroyd, Michele; P. Oliver, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    .... WaterResourcesAssessmentandSeasonalPrediction Integrated water resource assessment for the Adelaide region, South Australia James W. Cox1,3, Michele Akeroyd2, and Danielle P. Oliver2,4 1South Australian...

  7. A conceptual theoretical framework to integrally assess the possible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A conceptual theoretical framework to integrally assess the possible impacts of climate change on domestic irrigation water use. Chikondi Makwiza, Musandji Fuamba, Fadoua Houssa, Heinz Erasmus Jacobs ...

  8. Ecological Integrity Assessment for Colorado Wetlands, Field Manual

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A quick reviewed survey protocol framework developed by the Colorado Natural Heritage program on performing an Ecological Integrity Assessment (EIA) for Colorado...

  9. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  10. Integrating Ecohealth Assessment in the Americas | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Countries of the Americas are proceeding with economic negotiations that could either support or inhibit sustainable development. Impact assessment can help mitigate serious health and environmental risks arising from new trade and economic development policies, and open space for greater public participation.

  11. [Integral parameters of electrocardiogram: perfection of assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volobuev, A N; Kondurtsev, V A; Romanchuk, P I; Bazarova, V N

    2001-01-01

    The role of such parameter as electric quality of the heart (EQH) is assessed by a biophysical analysis of a new model of dipolic equivalent electric generator of the heart taking account of myocardial inductivity in the course of excitation. How to estimate EQH by standard ECG parameters using calculated nomogram is shown. Results of EQH estimation in the course of treatment are provided.

  12. Assessment and Integrity in the Digital Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Michael; Watkins, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Discusses problems with using tutorials for digital art assignments in higher education, including plagiarism, and suggests focusing on concept mastery and customizing assignments for better assessment. Provides three examples, including using shapes to draw a series of objects, designing a thumbnail gallery of 10 images, and creating a computer…

  13. Integrating Exposure into Chemical Alternatives Assessment ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most alternatives assessments (AA) published to date are largely hazard-based rankings, and as such may not represent a fully informed consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of possible alternatives. With an assessment goal of identifying an alternative chemical that is more sustainable, other attributes beyond hazard are also important, including exposure, risk, life-cycle impacts, performance, cost, and social responsibility. Building on the 2014 recommendations by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences to improve AA decisions by including comparative exposure assessment, the HESISustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four chemical-product application scenarios were examined to test the concept, to understand the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision-making. The group has developed a classification approach for ingredient and product parameters to support compariso

  14. Integrating methods for ecosystem service assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunford, Rob; Harrison, Paula; Smith, Alison; Dick, Jan; Barton, David N.; Martin-Lopez, Berta; Kelemen, Ezsther; Jacobs, Sander; Saarikoski, Heli; Turkelboom, Francis; Verheyden, Wim; Hauck, Jennifer; Antunes, Paula; Aszalós, Réka; Badea, Ovidu; Baró, Francesc; Berry, Pam; Carvalho, Laurence; Conte, Giulio; Czúcz, Bálint; Garcia Blanco, Gemma; Howard, Dave; Giuca, Relu; Gomez-Baggethun, Erik; Grizetti, Bruna; Izakovicova, Zita; Kopperoinen, Leena; Langemeyer, Johannes; Luque, Sandra; Lapola, David M.; Martinez-Pastur, Guillermo; Mukhopadhyay, Raktima; Roy, S.B.; Niemelä, Jari; Norton, Lisa; Ochieng, John; Odee, David; Palomo, Ignacio; Pinho, Patricia; Priess, Joerg; Rusch, Graciella; Saarela, Sanna Riikka; Santos, Rui; Wal, van der Jan Tjalling; Vadineanu, Angheluta; Vári, Ágnes; Woods, Helen; Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa

    2018-01-01

    The Ecosystem Services (ES) concept highlights the varied contributions the environment provides to humans and there are a wide range of methods/tools available to assess ES. However, in real-world decision contexts a single tool is rarely sufficient and methods must be combined to meet practitioner

  15. 241-AY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations. are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  16. 241-AZ Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-A2 double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  17. Imprecise probability analysis for integrated assessment of climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegler, Elmar

    2005-01-01

    We present an application of imprecise probability theory to the quantification of uncertainty in the integrated assessment of climate change. Our work is motivated by the fact that uncertainty about climate change is pervasive, and therefore requires a thorough treatment in the integrated assessment process. Classical probability theory faces some severe difficulties in this respect, since it cannot capture very poor states of information in a satisfactory manner. A more general framework is...

  18. Triangular model integrating clinical teaching and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Adel; Koshak, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Structuring clinical teaching is a challenge facing medical education curriculum designers. A variety of instructional methods on different domains of learning are indicated to accommodate different learning styles. Conventional methods of clinical teaching, like training in ambulatory care settings, are prone to the factor of coincidence in having varieties of patient presentations. Accordingly, alternative methods of instruction are indicated to compensate for the deficiencies of these conventional methods. This paper presents an initiative that can be used to design a checklist as a blueprint to guide appropriate selection and implementation of teaching/learning and assessment methods in each of the educational courses and modules based on educational objectives. Three categories of instructional methods were identified, and within each a variety of methods were included. These categories are classroom-type settings, health services-based settings, and community service-based settings. Such categories have framed our triangular model of clinical teaching and assessment.

  19. Integrating tidal and nontidal ecological assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Southerland; Roberto Llanso

    2016-01-01

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has a long history of conducting rigorous assessments of ecological conditions in both tidal and nontidal waters. The Long-Term Benthic (LTB) Monitoring Program and the Maryland Biological Stream Survey (MBSS) both use reference-based indicators of benthic invertebrate communities to provide areawide estimates of ...

  20. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  1. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  2. A Call for an Integrated Program of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    An integrated curriculum that does not incorporate equally integrated assessment strategies is likely to prove ineffective in achieving the desired educational outcomes. We suggest it is time for colleges and schools of pharmacy to re-engineer their approach to assessment. To build the case, we first discuss the challenges leading to the need for curricular developments in pharmacy education. We then turn to the literature that informs how assessment can influence learning, introduce an approach to learning assessment that is being used by several medical education programs, and provide some examples of this approach in operation. Finally, we identify some of the challenges faced in adopting such an integrated approach to assessment and suggest that this is an area ripe with research opportunities for pharmacy educators. PMID:28630518

  3. Measurement of ultrasonic scattering attenuation in austenitic stainless steel welds: realistic input data for NDT numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploix, Marie-Aude; Guy, Philippe; Chassignole, Bertrand; Moysan, Joseph; Corneloup, Gilles; El Guerjouma, Rachid

    2014-09-01

    Multipass welds made of 316L stainless steel are specific welds of the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors in nuclear power plants. Because of their strong heterogeneous and anisotropic nature due to grain growth during solidification, ultrasonic waves may be greatly deviated, split and attenuated. Thus, ultrasonic assessment of the structural integrity of such welds is quite complicated. Numerical codes exist that simulate ultrasonic propagation through such structures, but they require precise and realistic input data, as attenuation coefficients. This paper presents rigorous measurements of attenuation in austenitic weld as a function of grain orientation. In fact attenuation is here mainly caused by grain scattering. Measurements are based on the decomposition of experimental beams into plane-wave angular spectra and on the modeling of the ultrasonic propagation through the material. For this, the transmission coefficients are calculated for any incident plane wave on an anisotropic plate. Two different hypotheses on the welded material are tested: first it is considered as monoclinic, and then as triclinic. Results are analyzed, and validated through comparison to theoretical predictions of related literature. They underline the great importance of well-describing the anisotropic structure of austenitic welds for UT modeling issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  5. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  6. Heat sink effects in VPPA welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steranka, Paul O., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a model for prediction of heat sink effects associated with the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process is discussed. The long term goal of this modeling is to provide means for assessing potential heat sink effects and, eventually, to provide indications as to changes in the welding process that could be used to compensate for these effects and maintain the desired weld quality. In addition to the development of a theoretical model, a brief experimental investigation was conducted to demonstrate heat sink effects and to provide an indication of the accuracy of the model.

  7. Integration needs in assessments of nanotechnology in food and agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forsberg, E.M.; Lauwere, de C.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we present a study of assessments of nanotechnology in food and agriculture. The study was conducted as a part of a project studying the need for integrated assessment of emerging science and technologies. The article first introduces central hopes and concerns regarding

  8. IES Integrated Learning Assessment Final Report. CRESST Report 788

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, David; Hansen, Mark; Herman, Joan; Silk, Yael; Greenleaf, Cynthia L.

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the Reading Apprenticeship professional development program on several teacher and student outcomes, including effects on student learning. A key part of the study was the use of an enhanced performance assessment program, the Integrated Learning Assessment (ILA), to measure student…

  9. Integration of Probabilistic Exposure Assessment and Probabilistic Hazard Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, van der H.; Slob, W.

    2007-01-01

    A method is proposed for integrated probabilistic risk assessment where exposure assessment and hazard characterization are both included in a probabilistic way. The aim is to specify the probability that a random individual from a defined (sub)population will have an exposure high enough to cause a

  10. Embedding of Authentic Assessment in Work-Integrated Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Anna Maria; Ferns, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary perspectives of higher education endorse a work integrated learning (WIL) approach to curriculum content, delivery and assessment. It is agreed that authenticity in learning relates to real-world experience, however, differentiating and strategically linking WIL provision and facilitation to assessment tasks and collation of authentic…

  11. AN INTEGRATED PERSPECTIVE ON THE ASSESSMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES: INTEGRATE-HTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlster, Philip; Brereton, Louise; Burns, Jacob; Hofmann, Björn; Mozygemba, Kati; Oortwijn, Wija; Pfadenhauer, Lisa; Polus, Stephanie; Rehfuess, Eva; Schilling, Imke; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Gerhardus, Ansgar

    2017-07-31

    Current health technology assessment (HTA) is not well equipped to assess complex technologies as insufficient attention is being paid to the diversity in patient characteristics and preferences, context, and implementation. Strategies to integrate these and several other aspects, such as ethical considerations, in a comprehensive assessment are missing. The aim of the European research project INTEGRATE-HTA was to develop a model for an integrated HTA of complex technologies. A multi-method, four-stage approach guided the development of the INTEGRATE-HTA Model: (i) definition of the different dimensions of information to be integrated, (ii) literature review of existing methods for integration, (iii) adjustment of concepts and methods for assessing distinct aspects of complex technologies in the frame of an integrated process, and (iv) application of the model in a case study and subsequent revisions. The INTEGRATE-HTA Model consists of five steps, each involving stakeholders: (i) definition of the technology and the objective of the HTA; (ii) development of a logic model to provide a structured overview of the technology and the system in which it is embedded; (iii) evidence assessment on effectiveness, economic, ethical, legal, and socio-cultural aspects, taking variability of participants, context, implementation issues, and their interactions into account; (iv) populating the logic model with the data generated in step 3; (v) structured process of decision-making. The INTEGRATE-HTA Model provides a structured process for integrated HTAs of complex technologies. Stakeholder involvement in all steps is essential as a means of ensuring relevance and meaningful interpretation of the evidence.

  12. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft document provides EPA’s evaluation and synthesis of the most policy-relevant science related to the health effects of sulfur oxides. When final, it will provide a critical part of the scientific foundation for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current primary (health-based) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for sulfur dioxide. The references considered for inclusion in or cited in the external review draft ISA are available at https://hero.epa.gov/hero/sulfur-oxides. The intent of the ISA, according to the CAA, is to “accurately reflect the latest scientific knowledge expected from the presence of [a] pollutant in ambient air” (U.S. Code, 1970a, 1970b). It includes an assessment of scientific research from atmospheric sciences, exposure sciences, dosimetry, mode of action, animal and human toxicology, and epidemiology. Key information and judgments formerly found in the Air Quality Criteria Documents (AQCDs) for sulfur oxides (SOx) are included; Annexes provide additional details supporting the ISA. Together, the ISA and Annexes serve to update and revise the last SOx ISA which was published in 2008.

  13. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  14. Weld-brazing of titanium. [resistance spot welding combined with brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spot-welding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and aline the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing and contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vaccum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  15. Assessment of occupational exposure to welding fumes by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy and by the alkaline Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Céline; Iarmarcovai, Gwenaëlle; Chaspoul, Florence; Sari-Minodier, Irène; Pompili, Jocelyne; Orsière, Thierry; Bergé-Lefranc, Jean-Louis; Botta, Alain; Gallice, Philippe; De Méo, Michel

    2006-05-01

    Welding fumes are classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In the current study, blood and urine concentrations of aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were monitored by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in 30 welders and in 22 controls. In addition, DNA damage was examined in the lymphocytes of these subjects by the alkaline Comet assay. Two biological samples were taken from the welders at the beginning (BW) and at the end (EW) of a work week. In controls, collection of samples was limited to BW. Blood concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, and Pb were higher in the welders than in the control group while higher concentrations of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, and Pb were detected in welder urines. There was no significant difference in the metal concentrations for the BW and EW welder samples. Increased levels of DNA damage were found in lymphocytes from welders as compared to the controls, and 20/30 welders had higher levels of DNA lesions in the EW than in the BW samples. Age had a significant effect on DNA damage in the control group. Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated that there were positive correlations between blood concentrations of Al, Co, Ni, and Pb and the levels of DNA damage. A negative correlation was found between DNA damage and Mn in blood, while there was a positive correlation between urinary Mn concentration and DNA damage. These data indicate that occupational exposure to welding fumes increases DNA damage in lymphocytes. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Effects of the heat input in the mechanical integrity of the welding joints welded by GMAW and LBW process in Transformation Induced Plasticity steel (TRIP used in the automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H. López Cortéz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work an Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS sheet of the Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP type currently employed in the automotive sector was welded using a Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW and a CO2 Laser Beam Welding (LBW processes. The mechanical properties of welded tensile specimens including microhardness were determined and the results were related to the exhibited microstructures. It was found that LBW lead to relatively high hardness in the fusion zone (FZ indicating that the resultant microstructure was predominantly martensite. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, a mixture of phases consisting of bainite and ferrite was present. Similar phase mixtures were found in the HAZ and Fusion Zone (FZ of the GMAW samples. The exhibited microstructure did not result in mechanical degradation when the GMAW specimens were tested in tension as all the fractures occurred in the BM. In contrast, the region adjacent to the HAZ of most tensile specimens welded using LBW failed by brittle cleavage. Apparently, in this region tempering effects due to heat dissipation in the LBW process promoted carbide growth and a relatively coarse microstructure. No embrittlement was found that could be associated with the development of martensite.Neste trabalho, uma chapa de aço de alta resistência (AHSS - Advanced High Strength Steel tipo TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity empregado atualmente no setor automotivo foi soldado usando o processo de soldagem a arco com arame solido sob proteção gasosa (GMAW e soldagem com LASER de CO2 (LBW. As propriedades mecânicas das amostras soldadas quanto a tração e microdureza foram determinadas e os resultados foram relacionados com as microestruturas apresentadas. Verificou-se que a solda com LBW chegou a valores realtivamente altos de dureza na zona fundida (ZF, indicando que a microestrutura resultante foi predominantemente de martensita. Na zona termicamente afetadas (ZTA, encontrou-se uma mistura de fases

  17. Implementation of Submerged Arc Welding Training. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Earl; Todd, John

    A unit on submerged arc welding (SAW) was developed and integrated into the welding program at Seattle Central Community College (Washington) during the period December 1983 through May 1984. During this time, 10 major users of SAW in the area were contacted and mailed questionnaires. Follow up consisted of telephone calls and personal contact as…

  18. Finite element analysis for three dimensional welding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Wan; Cho, Young Sam; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Kang Hyouk; Im, Se Young [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    We propose an implicit numerical implementation for the Leblond's transformation plasticity constitutive equations, which are widely used in welded steel structure. We apply generalized trapezoidal rule to integrate the equations and determine the consistent tangent moduli. The implementation may be used with updated Lagrangian formulation. We test a simple butt-welding process to compare with SYSWELD and discuss the accuracy.

  19. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  20. Towards an interpretive measurement framework to assess the levels of integrated and integrative thinking within organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schörger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research study is located within the context of corporate reporting and is relevant for the agenda of sustainability and sustainable development. The specific context for this study is the South African mining industry, within which three units in the form of three companies, were chosen to provide a coherent case for this study. The sample for the analysis is based on the integrated reports of these companies for the years 2012 and 2013. This gives this research a total sample size of six reports. Based on the research findings an initial interpretive measurement framework to assess the levels of capital integration has been theorised which enables the various stakeholders of an organisation to assess the integrated and integrative thinking capabilities. The level of integration is represented as a maturity scale on which integrated thinking is associated with the lower levels, while integrative thinking is attributed to higher levels of maturity. In the elaborated framework, integrated thinking is perceived as being a prerequisite for integrative thinking. The practical implication of this study is that it provides a potential measurement framework for various organisational stakeholders, including investors, to assess the thinking capabilities that are more likely to lead to long term financial stability and sustainability. The value of this research study is that it provides an initial step towards measuring the level of integrated and integrative thinking capabilities within organisations where no such measurement framework currently exists. The limitations and implications of this research study are that the interpretive measurement framework represents merely an initial step and an ongoing working hypothesis which requires further research to develop its maturity and usefulness.

  1. Visualization of the Coated Electrode Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Michal Černý; Petr Dostál; Michal Šustr

    2016-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the evaluation of the welding process in terms of assessing the impact of weldability based on the recording of the non-destructive testing of the acoustic emission (AE). Measurements are performed utilising both materials with guaranteed weldability and materials with reduced weldability. In addition to welding, the thesis also discusses the material (metallographic and fractographic) and mechanical verification of joint formation and the variations in behaviour of ...

  2. Power Fingerprinting for Integrity Assessment of Embedded Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aguayo Gonzalez, Carlos Roberto

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation introduces Power Fingerprinting (PFP), a novel technique for assessing the execution integrity of embedded devices. A PFP monitor is an external device that captures the dynamic power consumption of a processor using fine-grained measurements at the clock-cycle level and applies anomaly detection techniques to determine whether the integrity of the system has been compromised. PFP uses a set of trusted signatures from the target code that are extracted during a pre-character...

  3. IIW guidelines on weld quality in relationship to fatigue strength

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Bertil; Hobbacher, A F; Kassner, M; Marquis, G

    2016-01-01

    This book presents guidelines on quantitative and qualitative measures of the geometric features and imperfections of welds to ensure that it meets the fatigue strength requirements laid out in the recommendations of the IIW (International Institute of Welding). Welds that satisfy these quality criteria can be assessed in accordance with existing IIW recommendations based on nominal stress, structural stress, notch stress or linear fracture mechanics. Further, the book defines more restrictive acceptance criteria based on weld geometry features and imperfections with increased fatigue strength. Fatigue strength for these welds is defined as S-N curves expressed in terms of nominal applied stress or hot spot stress. Where appropriate, reference is made to existing quality systems for welds.In addition to the acceptance criteria and fatigue assessment curves, the book also provides guidance on their inspection and quality control. The successful implementation of these methods depends on adequate training for o...

  4. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  5. Cognitive symptoms and welding fume exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John A S; Macdiarmid, Jennifer I; Semple, Sean; Watt, Stephen J; Moir, Gill; Henderson, George

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of moderate to severe cognitive symptoms is markedly higher in UK professional divers who have also worked as a welder (28%) than in either divers who have not welded (18%) or offshore workers who have worked neither as a diver nor as a welder (6%). To determine whether cognitive symptoms are related to welding fume exposure or diving. Three age-matched groups of male workers were studied using postal questionnaire: professional divers who had worked as a welder (PDW, n = 361), professional welders who had not dived (NDW, n = 352), and offshore oil field workers who had neither dived nor welded (NDNW, n =503). Health-related quality of life was assessed by the Short Form 12 questionnaire (SF12). Cognitive symptomatology was assessed using the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ). A single variable for welding fume exposure (mg m(-3) days) was calculated, incorporating welding experience in different environments and using different welding techniques and respiratory protective equipment. The level of fume exposure during hyperbaric welding operations was measured during such work as ambient PM(10) (particles of 10 µm or less). Diving exposure was assessed as the number of dives performed plus the number of days spent working during saturation diving. Questionnaires were returned by 153 PDW, 108 NDW, and 252 NDNW. SF12 scores were the same in all groups and fell within normative values. Mean (95% CI) CFQ scores were higher in PDW [40.3 (37.7-42.9)] than in both NDW [34.6 (31.6-37.7)] and NDNW [32.1 (30.4-33.9)], but the scores in no groups fell outside the normative range. The mean PM(10) exposure during hyperbaric welding operations was 2.58 mg m(-3). The geometric mean mg m(-3) days (95% CI) for welding fume exposure in NDW [33 128 (24 625-44 567) n = 85] was higher than for that in PDW [10 904 (8103-14 673) n = 112]. For PDW the geometric mean (95% CI) diving exposure was 1491 [(1192-1866) n = 94] dives and days in saturation. In the general linear

  6. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  7. General support for integrated assessment research. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowlatabadi, Hadi

    2001-03-01

    The climate change problem spans an extraordinarily large number of disciplines from earth sciences to social and political sciences. The interaction of processes described by these different fields is why climate change is such a complex issue. Keeping track of these interactions and bringing coherence to the assumptions underlying each disciplinary insight on the climate problem is a massive undertaking. Integrated assessment is an interdisciplinary approach designed to provide systematic evaluations of technically complex problems such as the analysis of environmental change challenges facing humanity. Ph.D. theses stemming from this application are summarized. Then some aspects of Integrated Climate Assessment Models are described.

  8. Fatigue of friction stir welded 2024-T351 aluminium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, D.; Sinclair, I.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue failure characteristics of friction stir welds in 13mm gauge 2024-T351 plate have been assessed. Failure occurred from either the weld region (nugget/flow arm) or from the material immediately surrounding the weld. Fatigue failure from the surrounding material was essentially conventional, initiating from large S-phase intermetallic particles and growing in a macroscopic mode I manner. Corresponding fatigue lives were seen to be comparable to parent plate and results previously report...

  9. Aluminum Lithium Alloy 2195 Fusion Welding Improvements with New Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the B218 weld filler wire for Super Lightweight External Tank production, which could improve current production welding and repair productivity. We took the following approaches: (1) Perform a repair weld quick look evaluation between 4043/B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile properties for planished and unplanished conditions; and (2) Perform repair weld evaluation on structural simulation panel using 4043-B218 and B218/B218 weld filler wire combinations and evaluation tensile and simulated service fracture properties for planished and unplanished conditions.

  10. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  11. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  12. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  13. Integrated Monitoring System for Durability Assessment of Concrete Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian-Claudiu Comisu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An ageing and deteriorating bridge stock presents the bridge owners with the growing challenge of maintaining the structures at a satisfactory level of safety, performance and aesthetic appearance within the allocated budgets. This task calls for optimized bridge management based on efficient methods of selecting technical and economical optimal maintenance and rehabilitation strategies. One of the crucial points in the assessment of the current condition and future development and performance. Selecting the optimal maintenance and rehabilitation strategy within the actual budget is a key point in bridge management for which an accurate assessment of performance and deterioration rate is necessary. For this assessment, the use of integrated monitoring system has several advantages compared to the traditional approach of scattered visual inspections combined with occasional on site testing with portable equipment and laboratory testing of collected samples. For this reason, attention is more focusing on the development of permanent integrated monitoring system for durability assessment of concrete bridges. It is estimated that with the implementation of such integrated monitoring systems, it should be possible to reduce the operating costs of inspections and maintenance by 25% and the operator of the structures will be able to take protective actions before damaging processes start. This paper indentifies the main bridge owner requirements to integrated monitoring systems and outlines how monitoring systems may be used for performance and deterioration rate assessment to establish a better basis for selecting the optimal maintenance and rehabilitation strategy.

  14. Overcoming barriers to integrating economic analysis into risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sandra

    2011-09-01

    Regulatory risk analysis is designed to provide decisionmakers with a clearer understanding of how policies are likely to affect risk. The systems that produce risk are biological, physical, and social and economic. As a result, risk analysis is an inherently interdisciplinary task. Yet in practice, risk analysis has been interdisciplinary in only limited ways. Risk analysis could provide more accurate assessments of risk if there were better integration of economics and other social sciences into risk assessment itself. This essay examines how discussions about risk analysis policy have influenced the roles of various disciplines in risk analysis. It explores ways in which integrated bio/physical-economic modeling could contribute to more accurate assessments of risk. It reviews examples of the kind of integrated economics-bio/physical modeling that could be used to enhance risk assessment. The essay ends with a discussion of institutional barriers to greater integration of economic modeling into risk assessment and provides suggestions on how these might be overcome. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. Structural integrity assessments for the category C liquid low-level waste tank systems at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the structural integrity certification of 14 Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) Tank Systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and ten of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily, and (3) leak testing program results. Design plans and specifications were reviewed for a general description of the tanks and associated pipelines. Information of primary significance included tank age, material of construction, tank design and construction specifications. Design plans were also reviewed for the layouts and materials of pipeline constructions, and ages of pipelines. Next, a generic corrosion assessment was conducted for each tank system. Information was gathered, when available, related to the historical use of the tank and the likely contents. The corrosion assessments included a qualitative evaluation of the walls of each tank and pipelines associated with each tank, as well as the welds and joints of the systems. A general discussion of the stainless steel types encountered is included in Section 4.0 of this report. The potential for soils to have caused corrosion is also evaluated within the sections on the individual tank systems.

  16. Surgical wound assessment and documentation of nurses: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, S; Lin, F; Gillespie, B M

    2016-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are serious complications that can lead to adverse patient outcomes such as prolonged hospital length of stay, increased health-care costs, and even death. There is an imperative worldwide to reduce the morbidity associated with SSIs. The importance of surgical wound assessment and documentation to reduce SSI complications is increasingly recognised. Evidence-based guidelines have been published internationally to highlight recommended practices. The aim of this integrated review is to evaluate current surgical wound assessment and documentation practices of nurses in order to inform future evidence-based research on acute wound care practices. Databases including CINAHL, Cochrane, Medline and Proquest Nursing were searched using key terms of 'wound assessment' AND 'surgical, wound assessment' AND 'documentation, wound assessment' AND 'practice, wound assessment' AND 'postoperative, wound assessment' AND 'nurse, and wound assessment' AND 'surgical site infection'. A total of 188 articles were identified from the database searches; searching the reference lists provided an additional 8 articles. After careful exclusion processes, a total of six papers were included in the review. Despite the recommendations around wound assessment, there is little discussion on how the clinical characteristics of surgical wounds should be assessed, the frequency of the wound assessments and to what extent wound assessments are documented in the literature. There is limited research evidence on acute wound assessment and documentation. Therefore, further research is needed to provide evidence for surgical nurses in relation to wound assessment and documentation practices. The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

  17. Laser welding of Zn-coated sheet steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Marianne P.; Kerr, Hugh W.; Weckman, David C.

    1996-04-01

    Compared to other welding processes, laser welding of sheet steels coated with various zinc- rich layers (galvanized, electrogalvanized, galvannealed, etc.) can permit weight reduction of automobiles plus increase in productivity. Some instances of laser welding of such coated steels have been reported. However, wider applications of lasers for this purpose are hampered by the low boiling temperature of zinc compared to the melting temperature of steel. During laser welding in the lap-joint configuration, the presence of vaporized zinc between the steel sheets often leads to expulsion of the weld metal or considerably weld porosity. Attempts to overcome this problem using Nd:YAG laser welding are reviewed. For the lap-joint configuration, techniques examined include provision of a gap between the sheets, use of geometrical solutions such as concave or convex surfaces, and pulsing or modulating the laser waveform. The effects on weld quality of power density, pulse time and pulse shaping (for pulsed welding), the coating type and weight, the location of the beam axis and beam focus with respect to the sheet surface(s) and the joint geometry (lap and edge) have been examined. The results provide insight into the weldability of coated sheet steels by the laser welding process as well as better assessment of viable approaches to this problem.

  18. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  19. Annual Summary of the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, L. L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-01-11

    An annual summary on the adequacy of the Hanford Imnmobilized Low-Activity Waste (RLAW) Performance Assessment (PA) is required for each year in which a PA is not issued (DOE 0 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management; DOE M 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual; DOE/ORP-2000-0 1, Maintenance Plan For The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment). The most recently approved PA is DOE/ORP-2000-24, Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment: 2001 Version. The ELAW PA evaluated the adequacy of the ILAW disposal facility, now referred to as the Integrated Disposal Facility (11DF), for the safe disposal of vitrified Hanford Site tank waste. More recently, a preliminary evaluation for the disposal of offsite low-level waste and mixed low-level waste was considered in 12 RPP- 15834, Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment.

  20. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  1. Modeling of plasma and thermo-fluid transport in hybrid welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribic, Brandon D.

    processes parameters on heat transfer, fluid flow, and plasma characteristics for arc and laser welding. However, numerical modeling of laser/GTA hybrid welding is just beginning. Arc and laser welding plasmas have been previously analyzed successfully using optical emission spectroscopy in order to better understand arc and laser plasma properties as a function of plasma radius. Variation of hybrid welding plasma properties with radial distance is not known. Since plasma properties can affect arc and laser energy absorption and weld integrity, a better understanding of the change in hybrid welding plasma properties as a function of plasma radius is important and necessary. Material composition influences welding plasma properties, arc and laser energy absorption, heat transfer, and fluid flow. The presence of surface active elements such as oxygen and sulfur can affect weld pool fluid flow and bead geometry depending upon the significance of heat transfer by convection. Easily vaporized and ionized alloying elements can influence arc plasma characteristics and arc energy absorption. The effects of surface active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow are well understood in the case of arc and conduction mode laser welding. However, the influence of surface active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow during keyhole mode laser welding and laser/arc hybrid welding are not well known. Modeling has been used to successfully analyze the influence of surface active elements during arc and conduction mode laser welding in the past and offers promise in the case of laser/arc hybrid welding. A critical review of the literature revealed several important areas for further research and unanswered questions. (1) The understanding of heat transfer and fluid flow during hybrid welding is still beginning and further research is necessary. (2) Why hybrid welding weld bead width is greater than that of laser or arc welding is not well understood. (3) The influence of arc power and

  2. Advancing Integrated Systems Modelling Framework for Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Halog

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The need for integrated methodological framework for sustainability assessment has been widely discussed and is urgent due to increasingly complex environmental system problems. These problems have impacts on ecosystems and human well-being which represent a threat to economic performance of countries and corporations. Integrated assessment crosses issues; spans spatial and temporal scales; looks forward and backward; and incorporates multi-stakeholder inputs. This study aims to develop an integrated methodology by capitalizing the complementary strengths of different methods used by industrial ecologists and biophysical economists. The computational methodology proposed here is systems perspective, integrative, and holistic approach for sustainability assessment which attempts to link basic science and technology to policy formulation. The framework adopts life cycle thinking methods—LCA, LCC, and SLCA; stakeholders analysis supported by multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA; and dynamic system modelling. Following Pareto principle, the critical sustainability criteria, indicators and metrics (i.e., hotspots can be identified and further modelled using system dynamics or agent based modelling and improved by data envelopment analysis (DEA and sustainability network theory (SNT. The framework is being applied to development of biofuel supply chain networks. The framework can provide new ways of integrating knowledge across the divides between social and natural sciences as well as between critical and problem-solving research.

  3. Integrative Assessment of Mitigation, Impacts, and Adaptation to Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Nakicenovic, N.; Nordhaus, W.D.; Richels, R.; Toth, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the second international workshop held at IIASA in October 1993 assessing the current state of integrated assessments. Numerous models and less formalized approaches analyze anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas emissions, their concentrations in the atmosphere, the resulting climate forcing, impacts of the induced climate change on the economy and other human activities, as well as possible mitigation and adaptation strategies. Studies that include a...

  4. Assessment and management of ecological integrity: Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Thomas J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Assessing and understanding the impacts of human activities on aquatic ecosystems has long been a focus of ecologists, water resources managers, and fisheries scientists. While traditional fisheries management focused on single-species approaches to enhance fish stocks, there is a growing emphasis on management approaches at community and ecosystem levels. Of course, as fisheries managers shift their attention from narrow (e.g., populations) to broad organizational scales (e.g., communities or ecosystems), ecological processes and management objectives become more complex. At the community level, fisheries managers may strive for a fish assemblage that is complex, persistent, and resilient to disturbance. Aquatic ecosystem level objectives may focus on management for habitat quality and ecological processes, such as nutrient dynamics, productivity, or trophic interactions, but a long-term goal of ecosystem management may be to maintain ecological integrity. However, human users and social, economic, and political demands of fisheries management often result in a reduction of ecological integrity in managed systems, and this conflict presents a principal challenge for the modern fisheries manager. The concepts of biotic integrity and ecological integrity are being applied in fisheries science, natural resource management, and environmental legislation, but explicit definitions of these terms are elusive. Biotic integrity of an ecosystem may be defined as the capability of supporting and maintaining an integrated, adaptive community of organisms having a species composition, diversity, and functional organization comparable to that of a natural habitat of the region (Karr and Dudley 1981). Following that, ecological integrity is the summation of chemical, physical, and biological integrity. Thus, the concept of ecological integrity extends beyond fish and represents a holistic approach for ecosystem management that is especially applicable to aquatic systems. The

  5. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  6. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  7. Risk Communication Concerning Welding Fumes for the Primary Preventive Care of Welding Apprentices in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Regina Cezar-Vaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study’s aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% confidence interval and 5% (p ≤ 0.05 significance level. Significant association was found between perceptions of worsened symptoms of respiratory disorders caused by welding fumes and educational level (p = 0.049, the use of goggles to protect against ultraviolet rays (p = 0.023, and access to services in private health facilities without insurance coverage (p = 0.001. Apprentices younger than 25 years old were 4.9 times more likely to perceive worsened cardiovascular symptoms caused by welding fumes after risk communication (RR = 4.91; CI 95%: 1.09 to 22.2. The conclusion is that risk communication as a primary preventive measure in continuing education processes implemented among apprentices, who are future welders, was efficacious. Thus, this study confirms that risk communication can be implemented as a primary prevention tool in welding apprenticeships.

  8. Risk communication concerning welding fumes for the primary preventive care of welding apprentices in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Vaz, Joana Cezar

    2015-01-19

    This study's aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% confidence interval and 5% (p ≤ 0.05) significance level. Significant association was found between perceptions of worsened symptoms of respiratory disorders caused by welding fumes and educational level (p = 0.049), the use of goggles to protect against ultraviolet rays (p = 0.023), and access to services in private health facilities without insurance coverage (p = 0.001). Apprentices younger than 25 years old were 4.9 times more likely to perceive worsened cardiovascular symptoms caused by welding fumes after risk communication (RR = 4.91; CI 95%: 1.09 to 22.2). The conclusion is that risk communication as a primary preventive measure in continuing education processes implemented among apprentices, who are future welders, was efficacious. Thus, this study confirms that risk communication can be implemented as a primary prevention tool in welding apprenticeships.

  9. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  10. An Academic Integrity Approach to Learning and Assessment Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Margaret; Richardson, Joan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the role of the educator in terms of designing a learning environment for the student which encourages the student to develop their own academic integrity. In such an environment, there is no need for the student to resort to plagiarism, as the learning and assessment tasks are not conducive to cheating, being unique and…

  11. 75 FR 8934 - Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Advisory Committee (CASAC), an independent science advisory committee mandated by the Clean Air Act and part of the EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB), is charged with independent expert scientific review of... AGENCY Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Pb) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION...

  12. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Lead (Final Report, Jul 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Lead (Pb). This document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regard...

  13. 77 FR 5247 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... policy, viewpoint, or determination. EPA will consider any public comments submitted in response to this... the submission of recent scientific information on specified topics. Soon after, a science policy... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...

  14. 76 FR 26284 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... workshop was held on May 10-11, 2010 (75 FR 20843) to discuss policy- relevant science to inform EPA's... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Pb) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ] ACTION: Notice of public comment period. SUMMARY: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is...

  15. Integrated assessment of climate change with reductions of methane emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amstel, van A.R.

    2005-01-01

    We have been living in the anthropocene era since about 1950, and evidence of human influence on the natural ecosystems and climate is mounting. Reductions of greenhouse gas emissions are needed to reduce the effects of climate change in the future. In an integrated assessment with the IMAGE model

  16. Uncertainty analysis in integrated assessment: the users' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabbert, S.G.M.; Ittersum, van M.K.; Kroeze, C.; Stalpers, S.I.P.; Ewert, F.; Alkan Olsson, J.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Assessment (IA) models aim at providing information- and decision-support to complex problems. This paper argues that uncertainty analysis in IA models should be user-driven in order to strengthen science–policy interaction. We suggest an approach to uncertainty analysis that starts with

  17. Assessment on Vulnerable Youths Integration to Dar es Salaam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment on Vulnerable Youths Integration to Dar es Salaam Solid Waste Management for Improvement: Kinondoni Municipality Case. ... Thus, questionnaires and in-depth study were interchangeably employed to probe different stakeholder institutions involved in decentralized MSWM system on general performance in ...

  18. Diagnostic indicators for integrated assessment models of climate policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Petermann, Nils; Krey, Volker; Schwanitz, Valeria Jana; Luderer, Gunnar; Ashina, Shuichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Eom, Jiyong; Kitous, Alban; Méjean, Aurélie; Paroussos, Leonidas; Sano, Fuminori; Turton, Hal; Wilson, Charlie; Van Vuuren, Detlef P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11522016X

    2015-01-01

    Integrated assessments of how climate policy interacts with energy-economy systems can be performed by a variety of models with different functional structures. In order to provide insights into why results differ between models, this article proposes a diagnostic scheme that can be applied to a

  19. Land Use Policies For Sustainable Development : exploring Integrated Assessment Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McNeill, D.; Nesheim, I.; Brouwer, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    The urgent need to enhance sustainable development in developing countries has never been greater: poverty levels are growing, land conversions are uncontrolled, and there is rapid loss of biodiversity through land use change. This timely book highlights the need for integrated assessment tools for

  20. Formative Assessment Design for PDA Integrated Ecology Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Pi-Hsia; Lin, Yu-Fen; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing and mobile technologies provide a new perspective for designing innovative outdoor learning experiences. The purpose of this study is to propose a formative assessment design for integrating PDAs into ecology observations. Three learning activities were conducted in this study. An action research approach was applied to…

  1. Assessment of Online Discussion in Work-Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Judith; Brown, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how online discussion can be used in work-integrated learning as a vehicle for students to demonstrate their learning in the workplace and to facilitate collaborative learning where face-to-face classes are not feasible. Design/methodology/approach: The paper evaluates the use of assessable online…

  2. Assessment of delta ferrite in multipass TIG welds of 40 mm thick SS 316L: A comparative study of ferrite number (FN) prediction and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Raole, P. M.; Sarkar, B.

    2017-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the fabrication of fusion reactor major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, cryostat and other structural components development. Multipass welding is used for the development of thick plates for the structural components fabrication. Due to the repeated weld thermal cycles, the microstructure adversely alters owing to the presence of complex phases like austenite, ferrite and delta ferrite and subsequently influences the mechanical properties like tensile and impact toughness of joints. The present paper reports the detail analysis of delta ferrite phase in welded region of 40 mm thick SS316L plates welded by special design multipass narrow groove TIG welding process under three different heat input conditions. The correlation of delta ferrite microstructure of different type structures acicular and vermicular is observed. The chemical composition of weld samples was used to predict the Ferrite Number (FN), which is representative form of delta ferrite in welds, with Schaeffler’s, WRC-1992 diagram and DeLong techniques by calculating the Creq and Nieq ratios and compared with experimental data of FN from Feritescope measurements. The low heat input conditions (1.67 kJ/mm) have produced higher FN (7.28), medium heat input (1.72 kJ/mm) shown FN (7.04) where as high heat input (1.87 kJ/mm) conditions has shown FN (6.68) decreasing trend and FN data is compared with the prediction methods.

  3. Stimulating Learning with Integrated Assessments in Construction Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imriyas Kamardeen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality of learning students experience is heavily dependent on the effectiveness of course design. Assessments are a key component in course design and students determine their level of involvement in a learning activity based on whether it is assessed or not. Assessments are therefore a powerful tool that lecturers can utilise to drive learning. However, designing effective assessments to stimulate learning is challenging in the presence of disciplinary, contextual dimensions. A case study approach is adopted to demonstrate how effective integrated assessment schemes may be developed and implemented for construction education. The scheme in the case study amalgamated case-based learning, online quizzes and adaptive eTests to provide a variety of assessments, aligned with lecture topics and contemporary real-word scenarios. It was found that the presence of both formative and summative tasks in the assessment scheme complemented each other, kept students constantly motivated and engaged in learning, and resulted in a good learning experience for them. The study provide evidence, and valuable insights and tips for lecturers in similar degree programs as to how they could modify pedagogical styles in their courses for better learning experiences for students and improved teaching ratings for themselves. Keywords: Pedagogy, Integrated assessment, Case-based learning, Online quiz, Adaptive eLearning

  4. Stimulating Learning with Integrated Assessments in Construction Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imriyas Kamardeen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality of learning students experience is heavily dependent on the effectiveness of course design. Assessments are a key component in course design and students determine their level of involvement in a learning activity based on whether it is assessed or not. Assessments are therefore a powerful tool that lecturers can utilise to drive learning. However, designing effective assessments to stimulate learning is challenging in the presence of disciplinary, contextual dimensions. A case study approach is adopted to demonstrate how effective integrated assessment schemes may be developed and implemented for construction education. The scheme in the case study amalgamated case-based learning, online quizzes and adaptive eTests to provide a variety of assessments, aligned with lecture topics and contemporary real-word scenarios. It was found that the presence of both formative and summative tasks in the assessment scheme complemented each other, kept students constantly motivated and engaged in learning, and resulted in a good learning experience for them. The study provide evidence, and valuable insights and tips for lecturers in similar degree programs as to how they could modify pedagogical styles in their courses for better learning experiences for students and improved teaching ratings for themselves.   Keywords: Pedagogy, Integrated assessment, Case-based learning, Online quiz, Adaptive eLearning

  5. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  6. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  7. Overview of integrative tools and methods in assessing ecological integrity in estuarine and coastal systems worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Angel; Bricker, Suzanne B; Dauer, Daniel M; Demetriades, Nicolette T; Ferreira, João G; Forbes, Anthony T; Hutchings, Pat; Jia, Xiaoping; Kenchington, Richard; Carlos Marques, João; Zhu, Changbo

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, several sets of legislation worldwide (Oceans Act in USA, Australia or Canada; Water Framework Directive or Marine Strategy in Europe, National Water Act in South Africa, etc.) have been developed in order to address ecological quality or integrity, within estuarine and coastal systems. Most such legislation seeks to define quality in an integrative way, by using several biological elements, together with physico-chemical and pollution elements. Such an approach allows assessment of ecological status at the ecosystem level ('ecosystem approach' or 'holistic approach' methodologies), rather than at species level (e.g. mussel biomonitoring or Mussel Watch) or just at chemical level (i.e. quality objectives) alone. Increasing attention has been paid to the development of tools for different physico-chemical or biological (phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, algae, phanerogams, fishes) elements of the ecosystems. However, few methodologies integrate all the elements into a single evaluation of a water body. The need for such integrative tools to assess ecosystem quality is very important, both from a scientific and stakeholder point of view. Politicians and managers need information from simple and pragmatic, but scientifically sound methodologies, in order to show to society the evolution of a zone (estuary, coastal area, etc.), taking into account human pressures or recovery processes. These approaches include: (i) multidisciplinarity, inherent in the teams involved in their implementation; (ii) integration of biotic and abiotic factors; (iii) accurate and validated methods in determining ecological integrity; and (iv) adequate indicators to follow the evolution of the monitored ecosystems. While some countries increasingly use the establishment of marine parks to conserve marine biodiversity and ecological integrity, there is awareness (e.g. in Australia) that conservation and management of marine ecosystems cannot be restricted to Marine Protected

  8. 1998 interim 242-A Evaporator tank system integrity assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.E.

    1998-07-02

    This Integrity Assessment Report (IAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest (FDNW) under contract to Lockheed-Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) for Waste Management Hanford (WMH), the 242-A Evaporator (facility) operations contractor for Fluor Daniel Hanford, and the US Department of Energy, the system owner. The contract specifies that FDNW perform an interim (5 year) integrity assessment of the facility and prepare a written IAR in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640. The WAC 173-303 defines a treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facility tank system as the ``dangerous waste storage or treatment tank and its ancillary equipment and containment.`` This integrity assessment evaluates the two tank systems at the facility: the evaporator vessel, C-A-1 (also called the vapor-liquid separator), and the condensate collection tank, TK-C-100. This IAR evaluates the 242-A facility tank systems up to, but not including, the last valve or flanged connection inside the facility perimeter. The initial integrity assessment performed on the facility evaluated certain subsystems not directly in contact with dangerous waste, such as the steam condensate and used raw water subsystems, to provide technical information. These subsystems were not evaluated in this IAR. The last major upgrade to the facility was project B-534. The facility modifications, as a result of project B-534, were evaluated in the 1993 facility interim integrity assessment. Since that time, the following upgrades have occurred in the facility: installation of a process condensate recycle system, and installation of a package steam boiler to provide steam for the facility. The package boiler is not within the scope of the facility TSD.

  9. Influence of the welding parameters on the heat affected zone for aluminium welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meseguer-Valdenebro José L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the Heat Affected Zone in an aluminum alloy welded assembly using the Metal Inert Gas welding technique. Making use of numerical simulations of the involved thermal processes, the aluminum alloy cooling curve is calculated and the extension of the Heat Affected Zone is evaluated. The connection between this last parameter, the cooling rate, and the maximum obtained temperature is assessed. Additionally, the response surface method is exploited to fit the dependence of the Heat Affected Zone with the welding parameters and to optimize these parameters in order to minimize that region.

  10. Development of Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Michael [Geomechanics Technologies, Incorporated, Monrovia, CA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    GeoMechanics Technologies has completed a geomechanical caprock integrity analysis and risk assessment study funded through the US Department of Energy. The project included: a detailed review of historical caprock integrity problems experienced in the natural gas storage industry; a theoretical description and documentation of caprock integrity issues; advanced coupled transport flow modelling and geomechanical simulation of three large-scale potential geologic sequestration sites to estimate geomechanical effects from CO₂ injection; development of a quantitative risk and decision analysis tool to assess caprock integrity risks; and, ultimately the development of recommendations and guidelines for caprock characterization and CO₂ injection operating practices. Historical data from gas storage operations and CO₂ sequestration projects suggest that leakage and containment incident risks are on the order of 10-1 to 10-2, which is higher risk than some previous studies have suggested for CO₂. Geomechanical analysis, as described herein, can be applied to quantify risks and to provide operating guidelines to reduce risks. The risk assessment tool developed for this project has been applied to five areas: The Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California, Kevin Dome in Montana, the Louden Field in Illinois, the Sleipner CO₂ sequestration operation in the North Sea, and the In Salah CO₂ sequestration operation in North Africa. Of these five, the Wilmington Graben area represents the highest relative risk while the Kevin Dome area represents the lowest relative risk.

  11. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This method is a solid-state weld process capable of joining metallic alloys without melting. The weld workpieces to be joined by thermal stir welding (TSW) are drawn, by heavy forces, between containment plates past the TSW stir tool that then causes joining of the weld workpiece. TSW is similar to friction stir welding (FSW) in that material is heated into a plastic state (not melted) and stirred using a stir rod. The FSW pin tool is an integrated geometrical structure consisting of a large-diameter shoulder, and a smaller-diameter stir pin protruding from the shoulder. When the pin is plunged into a weld workpiece, the shoulder spins on the surface of the weld workpiece, thus inducing frictional heat into the part. The pin stirs the fraying surfaces of the weld joint, thus joining the weld workpiece into one structure. The shoulder and stir pin of the FSW pin tool must rotate together at a desired rotational speed. The induced frictional energy control and stir pin control of the pin tool cannot be de-coupled. The two work as one integrated unit. TSW, on the other hand, de-couples the heating and stirring of FSW, and allows for independent control of each process element. A uniquely designed induction coil heats the weld workpiece to a desired temperature, and once heated, the part moves into a stir rod whose RPM is also independently controlled. As the weld workpiece moves into the stir rod, the piece is positioned, or sandwiched, between upper and lower containment plates. The plate squeezes together, thus compressing the upper and lower surfaces of the weld workpiece. This compressive force, also called consolidation force, consolidates the plastic material within the weld nugget material as it is being stirred by the stir rod. The stir rod is positioned through the center of the top containment plate and protrudes midway through the opposite lower containment plate where it is mechanically captured. The upper and lower containment plates are separated by a

  12. Ocular effects of chronic exposure to welding light on calabar welders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was generally observed that welders in Calabar, Nigeria did not always wear their protective goggles during welding. Since chronic exposure to welding light can impair vision this study was done to assess the effect of exposure to welding light on ocular function of welders in Calabar, Nigeria. There were 195 subjects ...

  13. Environmental cracking behavior of submerged arc-welded supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Sharkawy, S. W.; Dietzel, W.

    2004-04-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steel welds produced by submerged are welding were assessed for their microstructure and properties. Slow strain rate tests conducted on these specimens revealed that both the parent material and the weld metals are susceptible to cracking under conditions of hydrogen (H) charging.

  14. Practical significance of weld strength matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloterdijk, W. [N.V. Nederlandse Gasunie, Groningen (Netherlands); Schipaanboord, W.N. [N.V. Nederlandse Gasunie, Groningen (Netherlands)

    1996-10-01

    Defect tolerance in welds in pipelines constructed in modern high strength material depends on the balance in strength between weld material and pipe material. The Guidelines on the assessment of girth weld defects published by the European Pipeline Research Group (EPRG) define in Tier 2 defect limits assuming that the (actual) weld metal yield strength is equal or greater than the yield strength of the parent material. The defect limits according to Tier 2 exceed the defect limits in `workmanship standards` (l>25 mm). Nevertheless, the draft European welding standard EN 288 does not yet require a test to measure and verify the weld metal yield strength. Gasunie has performed a test program with the aim to look at the practical significance of weld strength matching in a strain controlled situation and to verify the relevance of limits given in the European welding and line pipe codes, in combination with the EPRG Guidelines. It is concluded that the results of the tests confirm the defect acceptance limits according to Tier 2 of the EPRG Guidelines. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Zulaessigkeit von Fehlern in Rundschweissnaehten in Rohrleitungen aus modernen hochfesten Baustaehlen haengt von dem Verhaeltnis der Werkstofffestigkeit des Schweissgutes zu der des Grundwerkstoffs ab. Die von der European Pipeline Research Group (EPRG) veroeffentlichte Richtlinie zur Bewertung von Schweissnahtfehlern gibt in der zweiten Bewertungsstufe (Tier 2) Werte fuer zulaessige Schweissnahtfehlergroessen unter der Bedingung an, dass die Dehngrenze des Schweissgutes groesser oder gleich der Dehngrenze des Grundwerkstoffs ist. Die nach Tier 2 zulaessigen Fehler sind groesser als die in `Good-workmanship`-Regelwerken angegebenen Fehlerlaenge (l>25 mm). Demgegenueber fehlt im Entwurf der europaeischen Schweissnorm EN 288 bislang ein solcher Dehngrenzennachweis. Gasunie hat ein Versuchsprogramm durchgefuehrt, um die Bedeutung der Schweissgutfestigkeit bei dehnungskontrollierter Belastung sowie

  15. Integrated Environmental Health Impact Assessment for Risk Governance Purposes; Across What Do We Integrate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebret, Erik

    Integrated Environmental Health Impact Assessment (IEHIA) can be considered as an element in the third phase of environmental risk management. Its focus is on providing inclusive descriptions of multiple impacts from multiple stressors in such a way that they can be evaluated against the potential

  16. The analysis of spot welding joints of steel sheets with closed profile by ultrasonic method

    OpenAIRE

    Dariusz Ulbrich; Jakub Kowalczyk; Marian Jósko; Jarosław Selech

    2015-01-01

    Resistance spot welding is widely used in the fabrication of vehicle bodies and parts of their equipment. The article presents the methodology and the results of non-destructive ultrasonic testing of resistance spot welded joints of thin steel sheet with closed profile. Non-destructive test results were verified on the basis of welded joint area after destructive testing. The obtained results were used to develop an assessment technique for spot welded joints of closed profile with steel shee...

  17. Assessment of Negligible Creep, Off-Normal Welding and Heat Treatment of Gr91 Steel for Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Terry, Totemeier [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2006-10-01

    Two different topics of Grade 91 steel are investigated for Gen IV nuclear reactor pressure vessel application. On the first topic, negligible creep of Grade 91 is investigated with the motivation to design the reactor pressure vessel in negligible creep regime and eliminate costly surveillance programs during the reactor operation. Available negligible creep criteria and creep strain laws are reviewed, and new data needs are evaluated. It is concluded that modifications of the existing criteria and laws, together with their associated parameters, are needed before they can be reliably applied to Grade 91 for negligible creep prediction and reactor pressure vessel design. On the second topic, effects of off-normal welding and heat treatment on creep behavior of Grade 91 are studied with the motivation to better define the control over the parameters in welding and heat treatment procedures. The study is focused on off-normal austenitizing temperatures and improper cooling after welding but prior to post-weld heat treatment.

  18. An overview of data integration methods for regional assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locantore, Nicholas W; Tran, Liem T; O'Neill, Robert V; McKinnis, Peter W; Smith, Elizabeth R; O'Connell, Michael

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protections Agency's (U.S. EPA) Regional Vulnerability Assessment(ReVA) program has focused much of its research over the last five years on developing and evaluating integration methods for spatial data. An initial strategic priority was to use existing data from monitoring programs, model results, and other spatial data. Because most of these data were not collected with an intention of integrating into a regional assessment of conditions and vulnerabilities, issues exist that may preclude the use of some methods or require some sort of data preparation. Additionally, to support multi-criteria decision-making, methods need to be able to address a series of assessment questions that provide insights into where environmental risks are a priority. This paper provides an overview of twelve spatial integration methods that can be applied towards regional assessment, along with preliminary results as to how sensitive each method is to data issues that will likely be encountered with the use of existing data.

  19. RISK MANAGEMENT: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO RISK MANAGEMENT AND ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabo Alina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this paper is to offer an overview over risk management cycle by focusing on prioritization and treatment, in order to ensure an integrated approach to risk management and assessment, and establish the ‘top 8-12’ risks report within the organization. The interface with Internal Audit is ensured by the implementation of the scoring method to prioritize risks collected from previous generated risk report. Methodology/approach: Using evidence from other research in the area and the professional expertise, this article outlines an integrated approach to risk assessment and risk management reporting processes, by separating the risk in two main categories: strategic and operational risks. The focus is on risk prioritization and scoring; the final output will comprise a mix of strategic and operational (‘top 8-12’ risks, which should be used to establish the annual Internal Audit plan. Originality/value: By using an integrated approach to risk assessment and risk management will eliminate the need for a separate Internal Audit risk assessment over prevailing risks. It will reduce the level of risk assessment overlap by different functions (Tax, Treasury, Information System over the same risk categories as a single methodology, is used and will align timings of risk assessment exercises. The risk prioritization by usage of risk and control scoring criteria highlights the combination between financial and non-financial impact criteria allowing risks that do not naturally lend themselves to a financial amount to be also assessed consistently. It is emphasized the usage of score method to prioritize the risks included in the annual audit plan in order to increase accuracy and timelines.

  20. Study of verification and validation of standard welding procedure specifications guidelines for API 5L X-70 grade line pipe welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qazi H. A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Verification and validation of welding procedure specifications for X-70 grade line pipe welding was performed as per clause 8.2, Annexure B and D of API 5L, 45th Edition to check weld integrity in its future application conditions. Hot rolled coils were imported from China, de-coiling, strip edge milling, three roller bending to from pipe, inside and outside submerged arc welding of pipe, online ultrasonic testing of weld, HAZ and pipe body, cutting at fixed random length of pipe, visual inspection of pipe, Fluoroscopic inspection of pipe, welding procedure qualification test pieces marking at weld portion of the pipe, tensile testing, guided bend testing, CVN Impact testing were performed. Detailed study was conducted to explore possible explanations and variation in mechanical properties, WPS is examined and qualified as per API 5L 45th Edition.

  1. Technology integration performance assessment using lean principles in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Florentino; Yalcin, Ali; Eikman, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of an automated infusion system (AIS) integration at a positron emission tomography (PET) center based on "lean thinking" principles. The authors propose a systematic measurement system that evaluates improvement in terms of the "8 wastes." This adaptation to the health care context consisted of performance measurement before and after integration of AIS in terms of time, utilization of resources, amount of materials wasted/saved, system variability, distances traveled, and worker strain. The authors' observations indicate that AIS stands to be very effective in a busy PET department, such as the one in Moffitt Cancer Center, owing to its accuracy, pace, and reliability, especially after the necessary adjustments are made to reduce or eliminate the source of errors. This integration must be accompanied by a process reengineering exercise to realize the full potential of AIS in reducing waste and improving patient care and worker satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ying An; Francisco Piorino Neto; Eder Paduan Alves

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The ...

  3. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  4. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  5. Moving towards integrated aged care assessment: A comparison of assessment tools across three regional Victorian services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Jeni; Cowan, Suzanne; Savy, Pauline; MacPhee, Fiona

    2015-09-01

    Recent National Aged Care Policy Reforms are directed at streamlining entry into aged care services, building on the challenges associated with developing integrated assessment processes. Such reform is core to achieving a comprehensive, efficient process. Here, we report the first stage of a collaborative project with three regional aged care assessment services to explore how services can better work together and improve the assessment process. Specifically, this paper reports the collection of local demographic and assessment data to describe and compare assessment tools and processes across services. Findings demonstrate the high level of need of those entering the community aged care system; the diversity of tools and processes utilised by the three services; and the high level of duplication and commonality across assessment categories. Findings suggest the need for improved service integration to clarify the assessment process for older people and conserve regional aged care workforce. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  6. Applications of robotics in laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, M.W.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Katayama, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how seam-tracking sensors can be integrated in a robotic laser welding system for automatic teaching of the seam trajectory as well as for correcting small errors from a pre-defined seam trajectory. Calibration procedures are required to derive accurate transformations of

  7. Integrated testing and intelligent assessment-new challenges under REACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, Jan; Stock, Frauke; Werschkun, Barbara

    2008-10-01

    Due to a number of drawbacks associated with the previous regime for the assessment of new and existing chemicals, the European Union established a new regulation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals (REACH). All relevant industrial chemicals must now be assessed. Instead of the authorities, industry itself is responsible for the risk assessment. To achieve better and more efficient assessments while reducing animal testing, all information-standard, non-standard and non-testing-has to be used in an integrated manner. To meet these challenges, the current technical guidance documents for risk assessment of new and existing chemicals had to be updated and extended considerably. This was done by experts in a number of REACH Implementation Projects. This paper presents the most relevant results of the expert Endpoint Working Group on Aquatic Toxicity in order to illustrate the change of paradigm in the future assessment of hazards to the aquatic environment by chemical substances. REACH sets certain minimum data requirements in order to achieve a high level of protection for human health and the environment. It encourages the assessor to use alternative information instead of or in addition to standard one. This information has to be equivalent to the standard information requirement and adequate to draw overall conclusions with respect to the regulatory endpoints classification and labelling, persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) assessment and predicted no-effect concentrations (PNEC) derivation. The main task of the expert working group was to develop guidance on how to evaluate the toxicity of a substance based on integration of information from different sources and of various degrees of uncertainty in a weight of evidence approach. In order to verify the equivalence and adequacy of different types of information, a flexible sequence of steps was proposed, covering characterisation of the substance, analysis of

  8. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and tensile properties of activated flux TIG welds of Inconel X750

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath, E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com; Ramanand, R.; Ameer, Ajmal; Simon, K. Aghil; Arivazhagan, N.

    2016-03-21

    This study addresses the effect of post weld heat treatment on the fusion zone microstructure and the mechanical properties of activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) weldments of Inconel X750. In this study, a compound flux of 50% SiO{sub 2}+50% MoO{sub 3} was used for A-TIG welding of the samples. Comparative studies on the microstructure and mechanical properties have been made on the weldments both in the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions. Direct ageing post weld heat treatment (PWHT) was carried out at 705 °C for 22 h on the A-TIG weldment to assess the structure–property relationships. It was inferred that direct ageing post weld heat treatment resulted in better tensile strength (1142 MPa) compared to the as-welded coupons (736 MPa). The joint efficiencies of the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions were found to be 60.7% and 94.07% respectively. The impact toughness of the as-welded coupons were found to be greater than the post weld heat treated samples; however the impact toughness of the welds are greater than the parent metal employed in both the cases. This study also attested the detailed structure–property relationships of A-TIG weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy, Electron Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) techniques.

  9. Methods for Developing Emissions Scenarios for Integrated Assessment Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prinn, Ronald [MIT; Webster, Mort [MIT

    2007-08-20

    The overall objective of this research was to contribute data and methods to support the future development of new emissions scenarios for integrated assessment of climate change. Specifically, this research had two main objectives: 1. Use historical data on economic growth and energy efficiency changes, and develop probability density functions (PDFs) for the appropriate parameters for two or three commonly used integrated assessment models. 2. Using the parameter distributions developed through the first task and previous work, we will develop methods of designing multi-gas emission scenarios that usefully span the joint uncertainty space in a small number of scenarios. Results on the autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) parameter are summarized, an uncertainty analysis of elasticities of substitution is described, and the probabilistic emissions scenario approach is presented.

  10. Complete Report on the Development of Welding Parameters for Irradiated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Greg [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Sutton, Benjamin J. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Tatman, Jonathan K. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Vance, Mark Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gibson, Brian T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The advanced welding facility at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which was conceived to enable research and development of weld repair techniques for nuclear power plant life extension, is now operational. The development of the facility and its advanced welding capabilities, along with the model materials for initial welding trials, were funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, the Electric Power Research Institute, Long Term Operations Program and the Welding and Repair Technology Center, with additional support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Welding of irradiated materials was initiated on November 17, 2017, which marked a significant step in the development of the facility and the beginning of extensive welding research and development campaigns on irradiated materials that will eventually produce validated techniques and guidelines for weld repair activities carried out to extend the operational lifetimes of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years. This report summarizes the final steps that were required to complete weld process development, initial irradiated materials welding activities, near-term plans for irradiated materials welding, and plans for post-weld analyses that will be carried out to assess the ability of the advanced welding processes to make repairs on irradiated materials.

  11. Applying of dilatometric effect for resistance welding automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko O. F.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The important issue of resistance spot welding control to obtain high quality welded joints, especially in living tissue welding, is considered. The actual state of the issue is described and analyzed. In order to improve the quality of welded joints, the applying of dilatometric effect to control the resistance spot welding process, namely of shifting the welding electrodes, is suggested. To register the shifting, the use of modern inertial microelectromechanical sensors (MEMS is proposed. The experimental measuring system, which processes the MEMS-sensor signal and makes it suitable for use as a feedback signal, is developed. The structure and operational algorithm of the system are described. The abilities of measuring with MEMS-sensors the values of electrode shifting caused by dilatometric effect under resistance welding are assessed. These method and equipment are recommended for welding the metals, as well as for welding the living tissues. The results of preliminary studies prove the advisability and relevance of the suggested solutions.

  12. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Lead (Final Report ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Lead (Pb). This document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding whether the current standards for Pb sufficiently protect public health and the environment. Lead (Pb) is one of six principal (or criteria) pollutants for which EPA has established NAAQS

  13. THE ASSESSMENT AND USE OF INTEGRATED PRODUCT POLICY IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ANDRYKIEWICZ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the implementation of Integrated Product Policy in Poland in the light of the European activities. It analyses the EU laws within this scope. It assesses the progress of LCA implementation, ecolabelling, ecotaxes, EMAS and green public procurement in Poland. It explains the reasons of slow IPP implementation in Polish organisations. It mainly refers to the distribution and promotion of ecolabelling, based on empirical research in Germany and Poland.

  14. Fracture assessment of laser welde joints using numerical crack propagation simulation with a cohesive zone model; Bruchmechanische Bewertung von Laserschweissverbindungen durch numerische Rissfortschrittsimulation mit dem Kohaesivzonenmodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheider, I.

    2001-07-01

    This thesis introduces a concept for fracture mechanical assessment of structures with heterogenuous material properties like weldments. It is based on the cohesive zone model for numerical crack propagation analysis. With that model the failure of examined structures due to fracture can be determined. One part of the thesis contains the extension of the capabilities of the cohesive zone model regarding modelling threedimensional problems, shear fracture and unloading. In a second part new methods are developed for determination of elastic-plastic and fracture mechanical material properties, resp., which are based on optical determination of the specimen deformation. The whole concept has been used successfully for the numerical simulation of small laser welded specimens. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein Konzept vorgestellt, mit dem es moeglich ist, Bauteile mit heterogenen Materialeigenschaften, wie z.B. Schweissverbindungen, bruchmechanisch zu bewerten. Es basiert auf einem Modell zur numerischen Rissfortschrittsimulation, dem Kohaesivzonenmodell, um das Versagen des zu untersuchenden Bauteils infolge von Bruch zu bestimmen. Ein Teil der Arbeit umfasst die Weiterentwicklung des Kohaesivzonenmodells zur Vorhersage des Bauteilversagens in Bezug auf die Behandlung dreidimensionaler Probleme, Scherbuch und Entlastung. In einem zweiten Teil werden Methoden zur Bestimmung sowohl der elastischplastischen als auch der bruchmechanischen Materialparameter entwickelt, die zum grossen Teil auf optischen Auswertungsmethoden der Deformationen beruhen. Das geschlossene Konzept wird erfolgreich auf lasergeschweisste Kleinproben angewendet. (orig.)

  15. Enhancing impact: visualization of an integrated impact assessment strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary R. Krieger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact assessment process is over 40 years old and has dramatically expanded. Topics, such as social, health and human rights impact are now included. The main body of an impact analysis is generally hundreds of pages long and supported by countless technical appendices. For large, oil/gas, mining and water resources projects both the volume and technical sophistication of the reports has far exceeded the processing ability of host communities. Instead of informing and empowering, the reports are abstruse and overwhelming. Reinvention is required. The development of a visual integrated impact assessment strategy that utilizes remote sensing and spatial analyses is described.

  16. Integrated Environmental Health Impact Assessment for Risk Governance Purposes; Across What Do We Integrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebret, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Health Impact Assessment (IEHIA) can be considered as an element in the third phase of environmental risk management. Its focus is on providing inclusive descriptions of multiple impacts from multiple stressors in such a way that they can be evaluated against the potential societal benefits of the causes of the stressors. This paper emphasises some differences and difficulties in the integration across professional paradigms and scientific fields, across stakeholder perspectives and differences in impact indicators that emanate from these different fields and paradigms. PMID:26703709

  17. Integrated Environmental Health Impact Assessment for Risk Governance Purposes; Across What Do We Integrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebret, Erik

    2015-12-23

    Integrated Environmental Health Impact Assessment (IEHIA) can be considered as an element in the third phase of environmental risk management. Its focus is on providing inclusive descriptions of multiple impacts from multiple stressors in such a way that they can be evaluated against the potential societal benefits of the causes of the stressors. This paper emphasises some differences and difficulties in the integration across professional paradigms and scientific fields, across stakeholder perspectives and differences in impact indicators that emanate from these different fields and paradigms.

  18. Digital Radiography Qualification of Tube Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Chad

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Project will be directing Lockheed Martin to perform orbital arc welding on commodities metallic tubing as part of the Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle assembly and integration process in the Operations and Checkout High bay at Kennedy Space Center. The current method of nondestructive evaluation is utilizing traditional film based x-rays. Due to the high number of welds that are necessary to join the commodities tubing (approx 470), a more efficient and expeditious method of nondestructive evaluation is desired. Digital radiography will be qualified as part of a broader NNWG project scope.

  19. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  20. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  1. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  2. Analysis on Development of Transverse - Sectioned Weld Zone using FEM Verified with Multipulsed Resistance Seam Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper details an investigation, through an experimental study, of the development of weld nuggets and a heat-affected zone (HAZ in resistance seam welding(RSEW using a numerical simulation approach. SYSWELD software for the simulation of heat treatment, welding, and welding assembly was utilized for the simulation process. The integrated Spot Weld Advisor (SWA in SYSWELD was applied to simulate the RSEW model using a two-dimensional axis-symmetric FE model with customized electrode meshing. The thermal-mechanical-electrical characteristic and contact condition were taken into account throughout this study. The developed model comprised a transverse cross section for welding two layers of low carbon steel with a thickness of 1 mm. For the experimental verification, three-pulsed RSEW with two different current stages was carried out. It was discovered that this program code, Spotweld Advisor, when used with the meshing method, was capable of offering results that were in agreement with physical experiments.

  3. Considerations for the integration of human and wildlife radiological assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copplestone, D [Environment Agency, PO Box 12, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Warrington WA4 1HG (United Kingdom); Brown, J E [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini Naeringspark 13, 1361 Oesteraas (Norway); Beresford, N A, E-mail: david.copplestone@environment-agency.gov.u [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH-Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    A number of tools and approaches have been developed recently to allow assessments of the environmental impact of radiation on wildlife to be undertaken. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has stated an intention to provide a more inclusive protection framework for humans and the environment. Using scenarios, which are loosely based on real or predicted discharge data, we investigate how radiological assessments of humans and wildlife can be integrated with special consideration given to the recent outputs of the ICRP. We highlight how assumptions about the location of the exposed population of humans and wildlife, and the selection of appropriate benchmarks for determining potential risks can influence the outcome of the assessments. A number of issues associated with the transfer component and numeric benchmarks were identified, which need to be addressed in order to fully integrate the assessment approaches. A particular issue was the lack of comparable benchmark values for humans and wildlife. In part this may be addressed via the ICRP's recommended derived consideration reference levels for their 12 Reference Animals and Plants.

  4. Integrating causation in investigative ecological weight of evidence assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan W; Chapman, Peter M

    2017-07-01

    Weight of evidence (WOE) frameworks integrate environmental assessment data to reach conclusions regarding relative certainty of adverse environmental effects due to stressors, possible causation, and key uncertainties. Such studies can be investigative (i.e., determining whether adverse impact is occurring to identify a need for management) or retrospective (i.e., determining the cause of a detected impact such that management efforts focus on the correct stressor). Such WOE assessments do not themselves definitively establish causation; they provide the basis for subsequent follow-up studies to further investigate causation. We propose a modified investigative WOE framework that includes an additional weighting step, which we term "direction weighting." This additional step allows for the examination of alternative hypotheses and provides improved certainty regarding possible causation. To our knowledge, this approach has not been previously applied in investigative ecological WOE assessments. We provide a generic example of 2 conflicting hypotheses related to a mine discharging treated effluent to a freshwater lake: chemical toxicity versus nutrient enrichment. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:702-713. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  6. [Assessing environmental and economical benefits of integrated sewage treatment systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-rong; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Hang-bin; Pan, Heng-yu; Liu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Sewage treatment, treated water treatment and sludge treatment are three basic units of an integrated sewage treatment system. This work assessed the influence of reusing or discharge of treated water and sludge landfill or compost on the sustainability of an integrated sewage treatment system using emergy analysis and newly proposed emergy indicators. This system's value included its environmental benefits and the products. Environmental benefits were the differences of the environmental service values before and after sewage treatment. Due to unavailability of data of the exchanged substance and energy in the internal system, products' values were attained by newly proposed substitution values. The results showed that the combination of sewage treatment, treated water reuse and sludge landfill had the strongest competitiveness, while the combination of sewage treatment, treated water reuse and earthworm compost was the most sustainable. Moreover, treated water reuse and earthworm compost were helpful for improving the sustainability of the integrated sewage treatment system. The quality of treated water and local conditions should be also considered when implementing the treated water reuse or discharge. The resources efficiency of earthworm compost unit needed to be further improved. Improved emergy indices were more suitable for integrated sewage treatment systems.

  7. Student perceptions of assessment and feedback in longitudinal integrated clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Joanna; Konkin, Jill; Suddards, Carol; Dobson, Sarah; Pratt, Dan

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate how the learning environment and the student-preceptor relationship influence student experiences of being assessed and receiving feedback on performance. Thus, we examined how long-term clinical clerkship placements influence students' experiences of and views about assessment and feedback. We took a constructivist grounded approach, using authentic assessment and communities of practice as sensitising concepts. We recruited and interviewed 13 students studying in longitudinal integrated clerkships across two medical schools and six settings, using a semi-structured interview framework. We used an iterative coding process to code the data and arrive at a coding framework and themes. Students valued the unstructured assessment and informal feedback that arose from clinical supervision, and the sense of progress derived from their increasing responsibility for patients and acceptance into the health care community. Three themes emerged from the data. Firstly, students characterised their assessment and feedback as integrated, developmental and longitudinal. They reported authenticity in the monitoring and feedback that arose from the day-to-day delivery of patient care with their preceptors. Secondly, students described supportive and caring relationships and a sense of safety. These enabled them to reflect on their strengths and weaknesses and to interpret critical feedback as supportive. Students developed similar relationships across the health care team. Thirdly, the long-term placement provided for multiple indicators of progress for students. Patient outcomes were perceived as representing direct feedback about students' development as doctors. Taking increasing responsibility for patients over time is an indicator to students of their increasing competence and contributes to the developing of a doctor identity. Clerkship students studying for extended periods in one environment with one preceptor perceive assessment and

  8. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  9. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  10. Solar array welding developement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  11. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  12. Advancing human health risk assessment: integrating recent advisory committee recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourson, Michael; Becker, Richard A; Haber, Lynne T; Pottenger, Lynn H; Bredfeldt, Tiffany; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A

    2013-07-01

    Over the last dozen years, many national and international expert groups have considered specific improvements to risk assessment. Many of their stated recommendations are mutually supportive, but others appear conflicting, at least in an initial assessment. This review identifies areas of consensus and difference and recommends a practical, biology-centric course forward, which includes: (1) incorporating a clear problem formulation at the outset of the assessment with a level of complexity that is appropriate for informing the relevant risk management decision; (2) using toxicokinetics and toxicodynamic information to develop Chemical Specific Adjustment Factors (CSAF); (3) using mode of action (MOA) information and an understanding of the relevant biology as the key, central organizing principle for the risk assessment; (4) integrating MOA information into dose-response assessments using existing guidelines for non-cancer and cancer assessments; (5) using a tiered, iterative approach developed by the World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety (WHO/IPCS) as a scientifically robust, fit-for-purpose approach for risk assessment of combined exposures (chemical mixtures); and (6) applying all of this knowledge to enable interpretation of human biomonitoring data in a risk context. While scientifically based defaults will remain important and useful when data on CSAF or MOA to refine an assessment are absent or insufficient, assessments should always strive to use these data. The use of available 21st century knowledge of biological processes, clinical findings, chemical interactions, and dose-response at the molecular, cellular, organ and organism levels will minimize the need for extrapolation and reliance on default approaches.

  13. Integrated Testlets and the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Slepkov, Aaron D

    2013-01-01

    The increased use of multiple-choice (MC) questions in introductory-level physics final exams is largely hindered by reservations about its ability to test the broad cognitive domain that is routinely accessed with typical constructed-response (CR) questions. Thus, there is a need to explore ways in which MC questions can be utilized pedagogically more like CR questions while maintaining their attendant procedural advantages. we describe how an answer-until-correct MC response format allows for the construction of multiple-choice examinations designed to operate much as a hybrid between standard MC and CR testing. With this tool - the immediate feedback assessment technique (IF-AT) - students gain complete knowledge of the correct answer for each question during the examination, and can use such information for solving subsequent test items. This feature allows for the creation of a new type of context-dependent item sets; the "integrated testlet". In an integrated testlet certain items are purposefully inter...

  14. Efficient Assessment of the Environment for Integral Urban Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Grit; Londong, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Introduction: Sustainable water supply and sanitation is fundamental, especially in countries that are also particularly vulnerable to water-related problems. The Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) approach makes sure that water management is organised in a transdisciplinary way taking into account the river basin, the hydrologic system and the appendant organisation like culture, law and economics. The main objective of IWRM is the sustainable organisation of water resources quality and quantity (GWP and INBO 2009). However there are more important targets in sustainable use of water resources. New sanitation systems are focussing on adding value and maintaining essential resources in circular flow. Focussing on material fluxes can contribute on water quality, food security, sustainable use of renewable energy, adaption on water scarcity and also on rising water and sanitation demand because of rapid urban and suburban growth (Price and Vojinović 2011; Rost et al 2013; Stäudel et al 2014). Problem: There are several planning tools for IWRM as well as for urban water management. But to complete the IWRM approach for the resource oriented concept a systematic assessment tool is missing. The assessment of crucial indicators obviously requires a lot of data from different subjects/disciplines, in different scales of detail and in different accuracy and in data acquisition (Karthe et al 2014). On the one hand there will be data abundance and on the other hand the data can be unavailable or unfeasible for example because of scale and specification(Rost et al 2013). Such a complex integrated concept requires a clearly worked out structure for the way of managing and priority setting. Purpose: To get systematic in the complex planning process the toolbox model is going to develop. The assessment of the environmental screening (one part of the toolbox) is going to be presented in this paper. The first step of assessment leans on the assertion that each of the

  15. Dietary intake assessment using integrated sensors and software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Junqing; Pepin, Eric; Johnson, Eric; Hazel, David; Teredesai, Ankur; Kristal, Alan; Mamishev, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    The area of dietary assessment is becoming increasingly important as obesity rates soar, but valid measurement of the food intake in free-living persons is extraordinarily challenging. Traditional paper-based dietary assessment methods have limitations due to bias, user burden and cost, and therefore improved methods are needed to address important hypotheses related to diet and health. In this paper, we will describe the progress of our mobile Diet Data Recorder System (DDRS), where an electronic device is used for objective measurement on dietary intake in real time and at moderate cost. The DDRS consists of (1) a mobile device that integrates a smartphone and an integrated laser package, (2) software on the smartphone for data collection and laser control, (3) an algorithm to process acquired data for food volume estimation, which is the largest source of error in calculating dietary intake, and (4) database and interface for data storage and management. The estimated food volume, together with direct entries of food questionnaires and voice recordings, could provide dietitians and nutritional epidemiologists with more complete food description and more accurate food portion sizes. In this paper, we will describe the system design of DDRS and initial results of dietary assessment.

  16. Adoption of High Performance Computational (HPC) Modeling Software for Widespread Use in the Manufacture of Welded Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brust, Frederick W. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Punch, Edward F. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Twombly, Elizabeth Kurth [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Kalyanam, Suresh [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Kennedy, James [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Hattery, Garty R. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Dodds, Robert H. [Professional Consulting Services, Inc., Lisle, IL (United States); Mach, Justin C [Caterpillar, Peoria, IL (United States); Chalker, Alan [Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), Columbus, OH (United States); Nicklas, Jeremy [Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), Columbus, OH (United States); Gohar, Basil M [Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), Columbus, OH (United States); Hudak, David [Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-12-30

    . Through VFT®, manufacturing companies can avoid costly design changes after fabrication. This leads to the concept of joint design/fabrication where these important disciplines are intimately linked to minimize fabrication costs. Finally service performance (such as fatigue, corrosion, and fracture/damage) can be improved using this product. Emc2’s DOE SBIR Phase II effort successfully adapted VFT® to perform efficiently in an HPC environment independent of commercial software on a platform to permit easy and cost effective access to the code. This provides the key for SMEs to access this sophisticated and proven methodology that is quick, accurate, cost effective and available “on-demand” to address weld-simulation and fabrication problems prior to manufacture. In addition, other organizations, such as Government agencies and large companies, may have a need for spot use of such a tool. The open source code, WARP3D, a high performance finite element code used in fracture and damage assessment of structures, was significantly modified so computational weld problems can be solved efficiently on multiple processors and threads with VFT®. The thermal solver for VFT®, based on a series of closed form solution approximations, was extensively enhanced for solution on multiple processors greatly increasing overall speed. In addition, the graphical user interface (GUI) was re-written to permit SMEs access to an HPC environment at the Ohio Super Computer Center (OSC) to integrate these solutions with WARP3D. The GUI is used to define all weld pass descriptions, number of passes, material properties, consumable properties, weld speed, etc. for the structure to be modeled. The GUI was enhanced to make it more user-friendly so that non-experts can perform weld modeling. Finally, an extensive outreach program to market this capability to fabrication companies was performed. This access will permit SMEs to perform weld modeling to improve their competitiveness at a

  17. Evaluation on ductile tearing properties of girth weld pipelines using SE(T) and SE(B) specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathias, Leonardo Luiz Siqueira; Ruggieri, Claudio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Naval e Oceanica

    2012-07-01

    Predictive methodologies aimed at quantifying the impact of defects in oil and gas pipelines play a key role in safety assessment procedures of in-service facilities. Current methodologies for structural integrity assessments advocate the use of geometry dependent resistance curves so that crack-tip constraint in the test specimen closely matches the crack tip constraint for the structural component. Testing standards now under development to measure fracture resistance of pipeline steels (J and CTOD) most often employ single edge notched specimens under tension (SENT) to match a postulated defect in the structural component. This paper presents an investigation of the ductile tearing properties for a girth weld of an API 5L X80 pipeline steel using experimentally measured crack growth resistance curves (J-R curves). Testing of the girth weld pipeline steels employed side-grooved, clamped SE(T) specimen with center-crack weld and side-grooved, three-point bending SE(B) (or SENB) specimens to determine the J-R curves. The methods were compared in terms of geometry, relative crack size and crack-tip constraint, and the results were applied to a case study, to evaluate the degree of conservativeness in defect acceptance criteria. The tests involving SE(B) specimens are usually considered conservative, however, the comparison between this two methods may point an accurate alternative for girth weld assessments, since adequate geometry is adopted to describe accurately the structure's behavior. (author)

  18. Annual Summary of the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M. I. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) order on radioactive waste management (DOE 1 999a) as well as the Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (Mann 2004) require an annual summary on the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (RLAW PA) in each year in which a performance assessment is not issued. The most recent approved PA is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment: 2001 Version (Mann et al 2001). The RLAW PA evaluated the adequacy of the ILAW disposal facility, now referred to as the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), to safely dispose vitrified Hanford Site tank waste. More recently, a preliminary evaluation for the disposal of offsite low-level and mixed low-level waste was considered in the Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment (Mann et al. 2003a). The first phase of IDF construction was completed on April 28, 2006 and included the installation of the cell liners and leachate collection tanks. The IDF is now in a preoperational maintenance mode and will not receive treated tank waste for several years. In view of these circumstances, the RCRA Part B Permit for the Integrated Disposal Facility has been modified to recognize that the facility will not be receiving waste in the near future. A subsequent modification indicated transfer of the IiDF from the DOE Office of River Protection (DOE/ORP) operation to the DOE Richland Operations Field Office (DOE/RL). This summary is the latest in a succession of sumnmaries that have been published since 2000 (Mann, 2000b, 2002, 2003b, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007) and approved by the Field Manager, Office of River Protection (e.g., Schepens 2005c). This annual summary compares new data collected during Fiscal Year 2008 with the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment: 2001 Version (Mann et al 2001), which has been approved by DOE (DOE 2003a). Most of the data collected during

  19. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  20. Annual Summary of the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, R. [INTERA, Austin, TX (United States); Nichols, W. E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-12-27

    An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) is required each year (DOE O 435.1 Chg 1,1 DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1;2 and DOE/ORP-2000-013). The most recently approved PA is DOE/ORP-2000-24.4 The ILAW PA evaluated the adequacy of the ILAW disposal facility, now referred to as the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), for the safe disposal of vitrified Hanford Site tank waste.

  1. Integrated testing strategy (ITS) for bioaccumulation assessment under REACH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Benfentati, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    in a dossier. REACH promotes the use of alternative methods to replace, refine and reduce the use of animal (eco)toxicity testing. Within the EU OSIRIS project, integrated testing strategies (ITSs) have been developed for the rational use of non-animal testing approaches in chemical hazard assessment. Here we...... methods are used only as last resort. Using the ITS, in vivo testing could be waived for about 67% of the examined compounds, but bioaccumulation potential could be estimated on the basis of non-animal methods. The presented ITS is freely available through a web tool. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd....

  2. Objective Integrated Assessment of Functional Outcomes in Reduction Mammaplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Ilaria; Malovini, Alberto; Faga, Angela; Toffola, Elena Dalla

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of our study was an objective integrated assessment of the functional outcomes of reduction mammaplasty. Methods: The study involved 17 women undergoing reduction mammaplasty from March 2009 to June 2011. Each patient was assessed before surgery and 2 months postoperatively with the original association of 4 subjective and objective assessment methods: a physiatric clinical examination, the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, the Berg Balance Scale, and a static force platform analysis. Results: All of the tests proved multiple statistically significant associated outcomes demonstrating a significant improvement in the functional status following reduction mammaplasty. Surgical correction of breast hypertrophy could achieve both spinal pain relief and recovery of performance status in everyday life tasks, owing to a muscular postural functional rearrangement with a consistent antigravity muscle activity sparing. Pain reduction in turn could reduce the antalgic stiffness and improved the spinal range of motion. In our sample, the improvement of the spinal range of motion in flexion matched a similar improvement in extension. Recovery of a more favorable postural pattern with reduction of the anterior imbalance was demonstrated by the static force stabilometry. Therefore, postoperatively, all of our patients narrowed the gap between the actual body barycenter and the ideal one. The static force platform assessment also consistently confirmed the effectiveness of an accurate clinical examination of functional impairment from breast hypertrophy. Conclusions: The static force platform assessment might help the clinician to support the diagnosis of functional impairment from a breast hypertrophy with objectively based data. PMID:25289256

  3. [Integrative assessment of evidence in healthcare: the GRADE system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schünemann, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Decisions are a double-edged sword: they always and inevitably come with positive and negative consequences. Decisions in healthcare--from a systems level to the individual patient--are not different. This approach acknowledges that for all recommendations and decisions all the important consequences need to be considered. Along these lines, one must evaluate the certainty that estimates of effects and decisions are likely to be correct. Thus, as institutions, professional societies, organisations and individuals, we should follow approaches focusing on systematic and integrative assessment of available best evidence. Longstanding and broad experience with the development of recommendations, including systematically developed guidelines, led a group of methodologists, health officers, clinicians and guideline developers to form the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group. The GRADE approach differentiates the assessment of the quality of evidence from the strength of a recommendation in healthcare. For a step-by-step evaluation of the quality of evidence, one must consider all patient relevant endpoints. It is common that many relevant and acceptable studies provide evidence for single outcomes. Therefore, integrating summaries and assessments beyond meta-analyses are required. The explicit and transparent description of the single steps in these assessments and the consideration of all currently known criteria for the assessment of the quality of evidence are among the most important advantages and innovations of the GRADE system and are described here briefly. The overall quality of evidence of all outcomes that are critical for decision-making are summarized on the basis of the lowest quality of evidence. If, for example, the evidence for six of seven critical outcomes is of low quality while moderate quality evidence is available for the other critical outcome, the overall quality of evidence is considered low to

  4. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  5. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  6. Hybrid/Tandem Laser-Arc Welding of Thick Low Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh

    High efficiency and long-term life of hydraulic turbines and their assemblies are of utmost importance for the hydropower industry. Usually, hydroelectric turbine components are made of thick-walled low carbon martensitic stainless steels. The assembly of large hydroelectric turbine components has been a great challenge. The use of conventional welding processes involves typical large groove design and multi-pass welding to fill the groove which exposes the weld to a high heat input creating relatively large fusion zone and heat affected zone. The newly-developed hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding technique is believed to offer a highly competitive solution to improve the overall hydro-turbine performance by combining the high energy density and fast welding speed of the laser welding technology with the good gap bridging and feeding ability of the gas metal arc welding process to increase the productivity and reduce the consumable material. The main objective of this research work is to understand different challenges appearing during hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) of thick gauge assemblies of low carbon 13%Cr- 4%Ni martensitic stainless steel and find a practical solution by adapting and optimizing this relatively new welding process in order to reduce the number of welding passes necessary to fill the groove gap. The joint integrity was evaluated in terms of microstructure, defects and mechanical properties in both as-welded and post-welded conditions. A special focus was given to the hybrid and tandem laser-arc welding technique for the root pass. Based on the thickness of the low carbon martensitic stainless steel plates, this work is mainly focused on the following two tasks: • Single pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick low carbon martensitic stainless steel. • Multi-pass hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding of 25-mm thick martensitic stainless steel.

  7. Microstructural Aspects in FSW and TIG Welding of Cast ZE41A Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Astarita, Antonello; Rubino, Felice; Pasquino, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, magnesium ZE41A alloy plates were butt joined through friction stir welding (FSW) and Tungsten Inert Gas welding processes. Process-induced microstructures were investigated by optical and SEM observations, EDX microanalysis and microhardness measurements. The effect of a post-welded T5 heat treatment on FSW joints was also assessed. Sound joints were produced by means of both techniques. Different elemental distributions and grain sizes were found, whereas microhardness profiles reflect microstructural changes. Post-welding heat treatment did not induce significant alterations in elemental distribution. The FSW-treated joint showed a more homogeneous hardness profile than the as-welded FSW joint.

  8. Learning Assessment Using Wikis: Integrated or LMS Independent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forment, Marc Alier; de Pedro, Xavier; Casañ, Maria Jose; Piguillem, Jordi; Galanis, Nikolas

    Wikis have a potentially huge educational value. This article outlines a feature set that wiki engines need in order to successfully host collaborative educational scenarios using wiki technology. One of the first issues to solve is the need for assessment methodologies supported by the software. And the second one is to choose between using an integrated wiki engine inside the Learning Management System (LMS), or an external standalone wiki engine. Advantages and disadvantages from both options of this second issue are discussed, with each choice presenting different implications as far as individual student assessment, feedback and grading are concerned. Among the expected results, the most notable are incentives to incorporate wikis in the teaching procedure, significant enhancements in usability, as well as allowing teachers to provide more timely written feedback on their students' individual contributions on wiki based activities, on top of the usual numerical grading.

  9. Natriuretic peptides and integrated risk assessment for cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeit, Peter; Kaptoge, Stephen; Welsh, Paul

    2016-01-01

    blood pressure, history of diabetes, and total and HDL cholesterol concentrations). Primary outcomes were the combination of coronary heart disease and stroke, and the combination of coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure. FINDINGS: We recorded 5500 coronary heart disease, 4002 stroke......BACKGROUND: Guidelines for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases focus on prediction of coronary heart disease and stroke. We assessed whether or not measurement of N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration could enable a more integrated approach than at present...... by predicting heart failure and enhancing coronary heart disease and stroke risk assessment. METHODS: In this individual-participant-data meta-analysis, we generated and harmonised individual-participant data from relevant prospective studies via both de-novo NT-proBNP concentration measurement of stored...

  10. An Integrated Method of Supply Chains Vulnerability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaguo Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Supply chain vulnerability identification and evaluation are extremely important to mitigate the supply chain risk. We present an integrated method to assess the supply chain vulnerability. The potential failure mode of the supply chain vulnerability is analyzed through the SCOR model. Combining the fuzzy theory and the gray theory, the correlation degree of each vulnerability indicator can be calculated and the target improvements can be carried out. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, we use Kendall’s tau coefficient to measure the effect of different methods. The result shows that the presented method has the highest consistency in the assessment compared with the other two methods.

  11. X 100 welding technology - past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, Marie [Lincoln Electric, Cleveland, OH, (United States); Hammond, John [Consultant Mettalurgist and Welding Enginner, Helfordshire, (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The X100 steel pipeline has been widely studied in the last decade. The welding process remains a major concern. This paper presents a review of the X100 welding technology literature. It summarizes the current state of the art regarding welding technology (manual, semi-automatic and mechanized) applied to X100 pipeline construction. The following aspects are developed: a synopsis of experience to date, a description of the current status and the pending developments in welding processes and consumables, an assessment of first and second level contractor capability and, to summarize, a review of the key knowledge and experience gaps. It appears that the modern X100 line pipe has been largely improved lately. The X100 pipeline reached the ISO, API and CSA requirements which is a first step to standardization. The development of main-line girth welding of X100 has been successful.

  12. Ultra fine particles from the welding process; Hitsaamon pienhiukkaset - HIPHI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, H.; Kasurinen, H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Laboratory of Engineering Materials

    2004-07-01

    The objects of the project are to research ultra fine particles developed in the welding and cutting processes, to classify the particles in the welding fume, as well as to assess how they transform in air and drift in internal air. Also will be attempted to decrease the amount of ultra fine particles in welding processes and in internal air. Experiments will be performed in the laboratory environments so that the results are valid and comparable. The fine particles in the fumes will be measured and sampled by cascade impactors (ELPI, DLPI) and by SMPS by filter samplers (personal and area). The composition, size, shape and activity of the particles will be determined. During the project both personal welding helmets and fume extraction welding guns will be tested. Tests will be carried out in the laboratory and in industrial workshops. The three-year project started in the beginning of February 2003. (orig.)

  13. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  14. An Integrated Assessment of Investments towards Global Water Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Bassi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available To date there has been limited research on integrated water resource management, specifically regarding investments, from a global perspective, largely due to the complexity of the problem and to generally local water management practices. Water demand and supply are very often affected by international factors and with global climate change, population growth and increasing consumption, water management is now more than ever a global issue. This paper gives an overview of current and impending water problems while assessing investment needs for integrated water management as a possible solution to projected water challenges. The analysis compares a business as usual case (BAU to a scenario in which investments improve water efficiency use across sectors to curb demand, increase innovative supply from desalination and enhance conventional water resources management measures. System dynamics modeling is employed to represent the structural factors influencing water demand and supply in the context of an integrated framework including cross-sectoral linkages. The analysis confirms that sustainable water management is feasible, but it requires investments in the range of $145 billion per year between 2011 and 2050 (0.16% of GDP or $17/person/year and timely, effective action.

  15. Integrated assessment of genomic correlates of protein evolutionary rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rates of evolution differ widely among proteins, but the causes and consequences of such differences remain under debate. With the advent of high-throughput functional genomics, it is now possible to rigorously assess the genomic correlates of protein evolutionary rate. However, dissecting the correlations among evolutionary rate and these genomic features remains a major challenge. Here, we use an integrated probabilistic modeling approach to study genomic correlates of protein evolutionary rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure and rank degrees of association between (i an approximate measure of protein evolutionary rate with high genome coverage, and (ii a diverse list of protein properties (sequence, structural, functional, network, and phenotypic. We observe, among many statistically significant correlations, that slowly evolving proteins tend to be regulated by more transcription factors, deficient in predicted structural disorder, involved in characteristic biological functions (such as translation, biased in amino acid composition, and are generally more abundant, more essential, and enriched for interaction partners. Many of these results are in agreement with recent studies. In addition, we assess information contribution of different subsets of these protein properties in the task of predicting slowly evolving proteins. We employ a logistic regression model on binned data that is able to account for intercorrelation, non-linearity, and heterogeneity within features. Our model considers features both individually and in natural ensembles ("meta-features" in order to assess joint information contribution and degree of contribution independence. Meta-features based on protein abundance and amino acid composition make strong, partially independent contributions to the task of predicting slowly evolving proteins; other meta-features make additional minor contributions. The combination of all meta-features yields predictions

  16. 78 FR 11172 - Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Committee (CASAC), an independent science advisory committee whose existence and whose review and advisory... AGENCY Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY: Environmental... final document titled, ``Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants...

  17. COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF COMPLEX TECHNOLOGIES: INTEGRATING VARIOUS ASPECTS IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Mozygemba, Kati; Burns, Jacob; Brönneke, Jan Benedikt; Chilcott, James B; Ward, Sue; Hofmann, Bjørn

    2017-08-07

    Despite recent development of health technology assessment (HTA) methods, there are still methodological gaps for the assessment of complex health technologies. The INTEGRATE-HTA guidance for effectiveness, economic, ethical, socio-cultural, and legal aspects, deals with challenges when assessing complex technologies, such as heterogeneous study designs, multiple stakeholder perspectives, and unpredictable outcomes. The objective of this article is to outline this guidance and describe the added value of integrating these assessment aspects. Different methods were used to develop the various parts of the guidance, but all draw on existing, published knowledge and were supported by stakeholder involvement. The guidance was modified after application in a case study and in response to feedback from internal and external reviewers. The guidance consists of five parts, addressing five core aspects of HTA, all presenting stepwise approaches based on the assessment of complexity, context, and stakeholder involvement. The guidance on effectiveness, health economics and ethics aspects focus on helping users choose appropriate, or further develop, existing methods. The recommendations are based on existing methods' applicability for dealing with problems arising with complex interventions. The guidance offers new frameworks to identify socio-cultural and legal issues, along with overviews of relevant methods and sources. The INTEGRATE-HTA guidance outlines a wide range of methods and facilitates appropriate choices among them. The guidance enables understanding of how complexity matters for HTA and brings together assessments from disciplines, such as epidemiology, economics, ethics, law, and social theory. This indicates relevance for a broad range of technologies.

  18. Integrated assessment of marine biodiversity status using a prototype indicator-based assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper H. Andersen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Integrated assessment of the status of marine biodiversity is and has been problematic compared to, for example, assessments of eutrophication and contamination status, mostly as a consequence of the fact that monitoring of marine habitats, communities and species is expensive, often collected at an incorrect spatial scale and/or poorly integrated with existing marine environmental monitoring efforts. The objective of this Method Paper is to introduce and describe a simple tool for integrated assessment of biodiversity status based on the HELCOM Biodiversity Assessment Tool (BEAT, where interim biodiversity indicators are grouped by themes: broad-scale habitats, communities, and species as well as supporting non-biodiversity indicators. Further, we report the application of an initial indicator-based assessment of biodiversity status of Danish marine waters where we have tentatively classified the biodiversity status of Danish marine waters. The biodiversity status was in no areas classified as ‘unaffected by human activities’. In all the 22 assessment areas, the status was classified as either ‘moderately affected by human activities’ or ‘significantly affected by human activities. Spatial variations in the biodiversity status were in general related to the eutrophication status as well as fishing pressure.

  19. University Students' Perceptions of Integrated Performance Assessment and the Connection between Classroom Learning and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Gabriela C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, Integrated Performance Assessment (IPA) was adopted at all levels of instruction at a private university in southern California. The study reports the opinions of 1,236 Novice, Intermediate Low, and Intermediate Mid Spanish students concerning IPA and their perceptions of the way in which classroom instruction was reflected in the content…

  20. Visualization of the Coated Electrode Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is dedicated to the evaluation of the welding process in terms of assessing the impact of weldability based on the recording of the non-destructive testing of the acoustic emission (AE. Measurements are performed utilising both materials with guaranteed weldability and materials with reduced weldability. In addition to welding, the thesis also discusses the material (metallographic and fractographic and mechanical verification of joint formation and the variations in behaviour of metals of differing chemical composition. It also includes an analysis of AE records in relation to the condition of the material during the developing of fusion and resistance joints.

  1. Static and dynamic fracture toughness of 25mm thick single edge notch bend (SENB) specimen of C-Mn pressure vessel submerged arc weld metal and flaw assessment under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Wiesner, C. S.

    2003-09-01

    Although there are well established procedures for assessing the significance of defects in welded structures in a number of countries, such as BS7910 and R6 procedures in the UK, the Japanese WES 2807 procedure, the API and MPC procedures in the USA and the recently completed SINT AP procedure resulting from European collaboration, there are no clear guidelines for assessment of the effects of dynamic loading. In principle, the standard procedure can be applied for any rate of loading but there is little or no experience of how to allow for the effects of dynamic loading on load magnitude and material properties. Submerge arc weldments of 100mm thick have been manufactured. The effect of loading rate was investigated by testing 25mm thick SENB specimens. The fracture toughness of the weld metal exhibited marked loading rate sensitivity; shift in fracture toughness transition temperature for high loading rate tests of up to 115^{circ}C for 25mm specimens. Finite element (FE) analyses have been carried out to obtain plastic collapse load solutions for SENB fracture mechanics test piece. A simple equation for estimate of dynamic plastic yielding load has been suggested. Flaw assessment under dynamic loading has been demonstrated using the results of dynamic fracture toughness and plastic yiending load. The general methods of assessment of the significance of defects in BS7910 is shown to be applicable to assessments under dynamic loading up to impact.

  2. Hybrid laser-gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of high strength steel gas transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Ian D.; Norfolk, Mark I. [Edison Welding Institute (EWI), Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid Laser/arc welding process (HLAW) can complete 5G welds, assure weld soundness, material properties, and an acceptable geometric profile. Combining new lasers and pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P) has led to important innovations in the HLAW process, increasing travel speed for successful root pass welding. High power Yb fiber lasers allow a 10 kW laser to be built the size of a refrigerator, allowing portability for use on the pipeline right-of-way. The objective was to develop and apply an innovative HLAW system for mechanized welding of high strength, high integrity, pipelines and develop 5G welding procedures for X80 and X100 pipe, including mechanical testing to API 1104. A cost-matched JIP developed a prototype HLAW head based on a commercially available bug and band system (CRC-Evans P450). Under the US Department of Transportation (DOT) project, the subject of this paper, the system was used to advance pipeline girth welding productivity. External hybrid root pass welding achieved full penetration welds with a 4-mm root at a travel speed of 2.3-m/min. Welds were made 'double down' using laser powers up to 10 kW and travel speeds up to 3-m/min. The final objective of the project was to demonstrate the hybrid LBW/GMAW system under simulated field conditions. (author)

  3. Metrics for Assessment of Smart Grid Data Integrity Attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annarita Giani; Miles McQueen; Russell Bent; Kameshwar Poolla; Mark Hinrichs

    2012-07-01

    There is an emerging consensus that the nation’s electricity grid is vulnerable to cyber attacks. This vulnerability arises from the increasing reliance on using remote measurements, transmitting them over legacy data networks to system operators who make critical decisions based on available data. Data integrity attacks are a class of cyber attacks that involve a compromise of information that is processed by the grid operator. This information can include meter readings of injected power at remote generators, power flows on transmission lines, and relay states. These data integrity attacks have consequences only when the system operator responds to compromised data by redispatching generation under normal or contingency protocols. These consequences include (a) financial losses from sub-optimal economic dispatch to service loads, (b) robustness/resiliency losses from placing the grid at operating points that are at greater risk from contingencies, and (c) systemic losses resulting from cascading failures induced by poor operational choices. This paper is focused on understanding the connections between grid operational procedures and cyber attacks. We first offer two examples to illustrate how data integrity attacks can cause economic and physical damage by misleading operators into taking inappropriate decisions. We then focus on unobservable data integrity attacks involving power meter data. These are coordinated attacks where the compromised data are consistent with the physics of power flow, and are therefore passed by any bad data detection algorithm. We develop metrics to assess the economic impact of these attacks under re-dispatch decisions using optimal power flow methods. These metrics can be use to prioritize the adoption of appropriate countermeasures including PMU placement, encryption, hardware upgrades, and advance attack detection algorithms.

  4. Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeMar, P.

    2002-10-29

    to treat the heating, ventilation, air conditioning, water heating, lighting, and power systems loads as parts of an integrated system, serving the majority of these loads either directly or indirectly from the CHP output. The CHP Technology Roadmaps (Buildings and Industry) have focused research and development on a comprehensive integration approach: component integration, equipment integration, packaged and modular system development, system integration with the grid, and system integration with building and process loads. This marked change in technology research and development has led to the creation of a new acronym to better reflect the nature of development in this important area of energy efficiency: Integrated Energy Systems (IES). Throughout this report, the terms ''CHP'' and ''IES'' will sometimes be used interchangeably, with CHP generally reserved for the electricity and heat generating technology subsystem portion of an IES. The focus of this study is to examine the potential for IES in buildings when the system perspective is taken, and the IES is employed as a dynamic system, not just as conventional CHP. This effort is designed to determine market potential by analyzing IES performance on an hour-by-hour basis, examining the full range of building types, their loads and timing, and assessing how these loads can be technically and economically met by IES.

  5. Weld formation control at electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Koleva, Elena; Mladenov, Georgy; A. Shcherbakov

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam welding is used extensively to produce essential machine parts. The control of the basic beam parameters beam power or beam current at constant accelerating voltage, welding speed, current of focusing lens and distance between electron gun and welded sample surface is not enough to obtain at most of the regimes sound welds. Control of the focus position using analysis of the high frequency component of the current, collected by plasma, at periodic interactions on the beam (the o...

  6. Induction-assisted laser beam welding of a thermomechanically rolled HSLA S500MC steel: A microstructure and residual stress assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, R.S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Former at Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Corpas, M. [Former at Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Moreto, J.A. [Universidade de São Paulo, Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Jahn, A.; Standfuß, J. [Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Kaysser-Pyzalla, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Former at Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Pinto, H., E-mail: haroldo@sc.usp.br [Former at Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Universidade de São Paulo, Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-08-20

    The present work deals with the effect of different combinations of induction heating and autogenous CO{sub 2} laser welding on the gradients of microstructure, microhardness and residual stresses in butt-joints of thermomechanically processed S500MC steel grade. Five strategies were pursued by varying the inductor position with respect to the laser beam. This enabled in-line pre-, post-, and simultaneous pre- and post-heating as well as annealing of the fusion and heat-affected zones. The induction-assisted CO{sub 2} laser welding strategies were compared to individual CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG fiber welding procedures. The results demonstrate that induction heating can be combined to laser welding in order to effectively increase the cooling times. Martensite formation could be suppressed within the fusion and heat-affected zones and smooth hardness distributions were obtained by pre-heating and combined pre- and post-heating. The tensile residual stresses are, however, still of significance because of the high transformation temperatures (>500 °C) observed for the S500MC steel. This allowed for extensive thermal contraction after exhaustion of the austenite to ferrite transformation.

  7. Evaluation of a monthly hydrological model for Integrated Assessment Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Hejazi, M. I.; Li, H. Y.; Zhang, X.; Leng, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Integrated Assessment modeling (IAM) community, which generated the four representative concentration pathways (RCPs), is actively moving toward including endogenous representations of water supply and demand in their economic modeling frameworks. Toward integrating the water supply module, we build an efficient object-oriented and open-source hydrologic model (HM) to be embedded in IAMs - Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The main objective for this new HM is to strike a balance between model complexity and computational efficiency; i.e., possessing sufficient fidelity to capture both the annual and the seasonal signals of water fluxes and pools and being highly computationally efficient so that it can be used for large number of simulations or uncertainty quantification analyses. To this end, we build a monthly gridded hydrological model based on the ABCD model with some additional features such as a snow scheme and the effects of land use and land cover change (LULCC) on the hydrological cycle. In this framework, we mainly simulate the pools of soil moisture, snowpack and groundwater storage, and the fluxes of evapotranspiration, recharge to groundwater, direct runoff and groundwater discharge. We assess the performance of the model by comparing the model results against runoff simulation from the model of Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) as well as historical streamflow observations at various gauge stations. We will present results on the model performance, the gains of adding different model components (e.g., snow scheme, effects of LULCC), and the variations of hydrological cycle globally over the historical period of 1901-2010.

  8. Integrated Safeguards and Security Management Self-Assessment 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunford, Dan; Ramsey, Dwayne

    2005-04-01

    In 2002 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory deployed the first Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) Self-Assessment process, designed to measure the effect of the Laboratory's ISSM efforts. This process was recognized by DOE as a best practice and model program for self-assessment and training. In 2004, the second Self-Assessment was launched. The cornerstone of this process was an employee survey that was designed to meet several objectives: (1) Ensure that Laboratory assets are protected. (2) Provide a measurement of the Laboratory's current security status that can be compared against the 2002 Self-Assessment baseline. (3) Educate all Laboratory staff about security responsibilities, tools, and practices. (4) Provide security staff with feedback on the effectiveness of security programs. (5) Provide line management with the information they need to make informed decisions about security. This 2004 Self Assessment process began in July 2004 with every employee receiving an information packet and instructions for completing the ISSM survey. The Laboratory-wide survey contained questions designed to measure awareness and conformance to policy and best practices. The survey response was excellent--90% of Berkeley Lab employees completed the questionnaire. ISSM liaisons from each division followed up on the initial survey results with individual employees to improve awareness and resolve ambiguities uncovered by the questionnaire. As with the 2002 survey, the Self-Assessment produced immediate positive results for the ISSM program and revealed opportunities for longer-term corrective actions. Results of the questionnaire provided information for organizational profiles and an institutional summary. The overall level of security protection and awareness was very high--often above 90%. Post-survey work by the ISSM liaisons and line management consistently led to improved awareness and metrics, as shown by a comparison of

  9. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  10. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  11. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Sang-Sub

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  12. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  13. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  14. Methodologies for Crack Initiation in Welded Joints Applied to Inspection Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Guang; Banisoleiman, Kian; González, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Crack initiation and propagation threatens structural integrity of welded joints and normally inspections are assigned based on crack propagation models. However, the approach based on crack propagation models may not be applicable for some high-quality welded joints, because the initial flaws in them may be so small that it may take long time for the flaws to develop into a detectable size. This raises a concern regarding the inspection planning of high-quality welded joins, as there is no g...

  15. Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach (CARMINA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Pierfrancesco; Tardivo, Stefano; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Moretti, Francesca; Poletti, Piera; Fiore, Alberto; Monturano, Massimo; Mura, Ida; Privitera, Gaetano; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2016-08-08

    Purpose - The European Union recommendations for patient safety calls for shared clinical risk management (CRM) safety standards able to guide organizations in CRM implementation. The purpose of this paper is to develop a self-evaluation tool to measure healthcare organization performance on CRM and guide improvements over time. Design/methodology/approach - A multi-step approach was implemented including: a systematic literature review; consensus meetings with an expert panel from eight Italian leader organizations to get to an agreement on the first version; field testing to test instrument feasibility and flexibility; Delphi strategy with a second expert panel for content validation and balanced scoring system development. Findings - The self-assessment tool - Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach includes seven areas (governance, communication, knowledge and skills, safe environment, care processes, adverse event management, learning from experience) and 52 standards. Each standard is evaluated according to four performance levels: minimum; monitoring; outcomes; and improvement actions, which resulted in a feasible, flexible and valid instrument to be used throughout different organizations. Practical implications - This tool allows practitioners to assess their CRM activities compared to minimum levels, monitor performance, benchmarking with other institutions and spreading results to different stakeholders. Originality/value - The multi-step approach allowed us to identify core minimum CRM levels in a field where no consensus has been reached. Most standards may be easily adopted in other countries.

  16. Emission of dust and gases in tubular cored wire welding of steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Jolanta; Rams, Beata

    2003-01-01

    The emission of dusts and gases, which are generated during tubular cored wire welding and which are hazardous to health and the environment, were studied. Tests included various kinds of tubular electrode wires used for welding steel, that is, rutile flux cored wires, basic flux cored wires, and metal cored wires for welding unalloyed, low-alloy, and high-alloy steels as well as self-shielded flux cored wires used for welding low-alloy steels. The research results make it possible to assess the influence of the type of wire and welding conditions on the emission volume and to compare chemical hazards generated during tubular cored wire welding with those typical for other arc welding processes.

  17. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  18. Fracture Mechanics in Design and Assessment of Existing Structures: Two Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Noury, Pourya

    2014-01-01

    In the present thesis, the application of fracture mechanics in design and assessment of steel structures has been studied.The first case study concerns a ring-flange connection used in wind turbine towers. The flange is rolled from straight steel profile into a complete ring. Subsequently, at the ends of the ring are welded by way of electron beam welding. This weld providing the integrity of the ring-flange was designed against fracture. To avoid potential failure by fracture and/or fatigue...

  19. Distributed Energy Resources and Dynamic Microgrid: An Integrated Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Duo Rick

    The overall goal of this thesis is to improve understanding in terms of the benefit of DERs to both utility and to electricity end-users when integrated in power distribution system. To achieve this goal, a series of two studies was conducted to assess the value of DERs when integrated with new power paradigms. First, the arbitrage value of DERs was examined in markets with time-variant electricity pricing rates (e.g., time of use, real time pricing) under a smart grid distribution paradigm. This study uses a stochastic optimization model to estimate the potential profit from electricity price arbitrage over a five-year period. The optimization process involves two types of PHEVs (PHEV-10, and PHEV-40) under three scenarios with different assumptions on technology performance, electricity market and PHEV owner types. The simulation results indicate that expected arbitrage profit is not a viable option to engage PHEVs in dispatching and in providing ancillary services without more favorable policy and PHEV battery technologies. Subsidy or change in electricity tariff or both are needed. Second, it examined the concept of dynamic microgrid as a measure to improve distribution resilience, and estimates the prices of this emerging service. An economic load dispatch (ELD) model is developed to estimate the market-clearing price in a hypothetical community with single bid auction electricity market. The results show that the electricity market clearing price on the dynamic microgrid is predominantly decided by power output and cost of electricity of each type of DGs. At circumstances where CHP is the only source, the electricity market clearing price in the island is even cheaper than the on-grid electricity price at normal times. Integration of PHEVs in the dynamic microgrid will increase electricity market clearing prices. It demonstrates that dynamic microgrid is an economically viable alternative to enhance grid resilience.

  20. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  1. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  2. Integrated assessment of thermal performance and room acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephane, C.; Iain, M. [Energy Systems Research Unit, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    The acoustical and thermal properties of materials have contradictory behaviour. Constructions, which provide good acoustic absorption usually, have a low thermal inertia and vice versa. It is therefore important to find a balance between acoustic absorption and thermal inertia in order to deliver well designed buildings. This paper presents an integrated solution, developed to assess the room acoustics performance of a building within the ESP-r environment. The approach used in this work applies the diffuse-sound field theory to calculate the reverberation time via three analytical equations: Sabine, Eyring and Millington approaches. The calculation includes the absorption of the space boundaries, the occupants and furniture. Also included is the air absorption, which takes into account the air temperature and humidity from the thermal simulation. Finally, a case study has been analysed. The simulation results have been compared with measurements from a monitored building to verify the validity of the approach. (author)

  3. Annual Summary of the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, L. L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-03-12

    An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) is required each year (DOE O 435.1 Chg 1,1 DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1,2 DOE/ORP-2000-013). The most recently approved PA is DOE/ORP-2000-24.4 The ILAW PA evaluated the adequacy of the ILAW disposal facility, now referred to as the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), for the safe disposal of vitrified Hanford Site tank waste. More recently, a preliminary evaluation for the disposal of offsite low-level waste and mixed low-level waste was considered in RPP-1583.

  4. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  5. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  6. Challenges and opportunities for integrated environmental assessment : proceedings of the First Workshop of the European Forum on Integrated Environmental Assessment, Amsterdam, 12-14 March 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosen, H.; Tol, R.S.J.; Vellinga, P.

    2004-01-01

    The first workshop of the European Forum on Integrated Environmental Assessment (EFIEA) took place in Amsterdam on 12-14 March 1998. Integrated Environmental Assessment is loosely defined as policy-relevant, multi-disciplinary research into complex environmental issues. The workshop provided an

  7. Integration of Regional Mitigation Assessment and Conservation Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Thorne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Government agencies that develop infrastructure such as roads, waterworks, and energy delivery often impact natural ecosystems, but they also have unique opportunities to contribute to the conservation of regional natural resources through compensatory mitigation. Infrastructure development requires a planning, funding, and implementation cycle that can frequently take a decade or longer, but biological mitigation is often planned and implemented late in this process, in a project-by-project piecemeal manner. By adopting early regional mitigation needs assessment and planning for habitat-level impacts from multiple infrastructure projects, agencies could secure time needed to proactively integrate these obligations into regional conservation objectives. Such practice can be financially and ecologically beneficial due to economies of scale, and because earlier mitigation implementation means potentially developable critical parcels may still be available for conservation. Here, we compare the integration of regional conservation designs, termed greenprints, with early multi-project mitigation assessment for two areas in California, USA. The expected spatial extent of habitat impacts and associated mitigation requirements from multiple projects were identified for each area. We used the reserve-selection algorithm MARXAN to identify a regional greenprint for each site and to seek mitigation solutions through parcel acquisition that would contribute to the greenprint, as well as meet agency obligations. The two areas differed in the amount of input data available, the types of conservation objectives identified, and local land-management capacity. They are representative of the range of conditions that conservation practitioners may encounter, so contrasting the two illustrates how regional advanced mitigation can be generalized for use in a wide variety of settings. Environmental organizations can benefit from this approach because it provides a

  8. Integrated flash flood vulnerability assessment: Insights from East Attica, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiorgos, Konstantinos; Thaler, Thomas; Heiser, Micha; Hübl, Johannes; Fuchs, Sven

    2016-10-01

    In the framework of flood risk assessment, vulnerability is a key concept to assess the susceptibility of elements at risk. Besides the increasing amount of studies on flash floods available, in-depth information on vulnerability in Mediterranean countries was missing so far. Moreover, current approaches in vulnerability research are driven by a divide between social scientists who tend to view vulnerability as representing a set of socio-economic factors, and natural scientists who view vulnerability in terms of the degree of loss to an element at risk. Further, vulnerability studies in response to flash flood processes are rarely answered in the literature. In order to close this gap, this paper implemented an integrated vulnerability approach focusing on residential buildings exposed to flash floods in Greece. In general, both physical and social vulnerability was comparable low, which is interpreted as a result from (a) specific building regulations in Greece as well as general design principles leading to less structural susceptibility of elements at risk exposed, and (b) relatively low economic losses leading to less social vulnerability of citizens exposed. The population show high risk awareness and coping capacity to response to natural hazards event and in the same time the impact of the events are quite low, because of the already high use of local protection measures. The low vulnerability score for East Attica can be attributed especially to the low physical vulnerability and the moderate socio-economic well-being of the area. The consequence is to focus risk management strategies mainly in the reduction of the social vulnerability. By analysing both physical and social vulnerability an attempt was made to bridge the gap between scholars from sciences and humanities, and to integrate the results of the analysis into the broader vulnerability context.

  9. Integrated manure utilization system life-cycle value assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Row, J.; Neabel, D. [Pembina Inst. for Appropriate Development, Drayton Valley, AB (Canada)

    2005-10-15

    A life-cycle assessment of the Alberta Research Council (ARC) and Highmark Renewables' development of an integrated manure utilization system (IMUS) were presented. The assessment focused on an evaluation of factors of primary importance to government, investors and the livestock industry. IMUS technology uses manure as a resource to produce electricity, heat, bio-based fertilizer and reusable water. Results of the assessment indicated that IMUS plants have the potential to be financially viable if a power purchase of $90 MWh on average can be purchased from a 30,000 head livestock operation. A capital cost of under $11 million is necessary, and an established biofertilizer price of $50 per tonne should be established. An IMUS plant was estimated to reduce life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions by 70 to 80 per cent when compared to land spreading. Reductions are accomplished through displacing electricity from the provincial grid and reducing nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from spreading of manure The IMUS plants lessen environment impacts by reducing the extraction and consumption of non-renewable resources, and by displacing an estimated 11,700 GJ of coal and natural gas per 1000 head of cattle per year. In addition, various pathogens within manure are eliminated. The plants have the potential to eliminate the environmental hazards associated with the disposal of deadstock. The systems reduce manure odour, lessen truck traffic and are expected to contribute to rural economic diversification. Barriers to further implementation of IMUS were discussed, as well as emerging opportunities for IMUS developers. It was concluded that the initial assessments of the IMUS were positive. Further investigation is needed to determine actual life-cycle performance of the operations. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  11. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  12. Evaluation of Distortion in Welding Unions of 304 Stainless Steel with Elliptic Trajectory Using a Welding Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-González, L. A.; Hurtado-Delgado, E.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.

    The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the distortions generated in welding unions of stainless steel 304 by effect of the welding temperature and the microestructural changes. The joint design is a 100 × 100 mm steel plate of 3 mm thickness. The plate was joined to a tube of 50 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness, which has a defined angular cut; therefore, the trajectory followed by the seam has an elliptic form. Temperature data acquisition was developed by type K thermocouples, placed in pairs at 0°, 90°, 180° and 270° along the welding trajectory and connected to a data acquisition device yo obtain the measures to generate time-temperature plots. The welding process was executed by a KUKA ®; KR16 welding robot with an integrated GMAW (Gas metal arc welding) process where the input parameters of voltage, wire feed and travel speed are set to constant. The distortion of the work piece was measured using a laser scanning technique that generates a point cloud with the VXelements TM software for comparison between the pre and post-weld condition. Microstructural evaluation was performed on transversal sections of the seam, at the mentioned angles for correlation.

  13. Development of Technology and Equipment of the Automated Laser Welding for Manufacturing Heat Exchanger Details of Marine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelyagin, V.D.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the developed automated laser welding technology for flat tubes of copper-nickel alloys laser welding complex technological equipment, which can be applied on the enterprises of machine building, aerospace, shipbuilding and automobile industries, was designed and created. To control the integrity of welded flat tubes a technique, which consists in testing sample pressure and finding defective sections by laser interferometry in the automated mode, was developed. Specialized welding head was designed and manufactured for the industrial use of the developed laser welding technology.

  14. Weld bead profile of laser welding dissimilar joints stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghusoon R.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.; Abdulhadi, Hassan A.

    2017-10-01

    During the process of laser welding, the material consecutively melts and solidifies by a laser beam with a peak high power. Several parameters such as the laser energy, pulse frequency, pulse duration, welding power and welding speed govern the mode of the welding process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of peak power, incident angle, and welding speed on the weld bead geometry. The first investigation in this context was conducted using 2205-316L stainless steel plates through the varying of the welding speed from 1.3 mm/s to 2.1 mm/s. The second investigation was conducted by varying the peak power from 1100 W to 1500 W. From the results of the experiments, the welding speed and laser power had a significant effect on the geometry of the weld bead, and the variation in the diameter of the bead pulse-size. Due to the decrease in the heat input, welding speed affected penetration depth more than bead width, and a narrow width of heat affected zone was achieved ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Conclusively, weld bead geometry dimensions increase as a function of peak power; at over 1350 W peak power, the dimensions lie within 30 μm.

  15. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  16. Architecture for Integrated Medical Model Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Myers, J. G.; Goodenow, D.; Young, M.; Arellano, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is a modeling tool used to predict potential outcomes of a complex system based on a statistical understanding of many initiating events. Utilizing a Monte Carlo method, thousands of instances of the model are considered and outcomes are collected. PRA is considered static, utilizing probabilities alone to calculate outcomes. Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (dPRA) is an advanced concept where modeling predicts the outcomes of a complex system based not only on the probabilities of many initiating events, but also on a progression of dependencies brought about by progressing down a time line. Events are placed in a single time line, adding each event to a queue, as managed by a planner. Progression down the time line is guided by rules, as managed by a scheduler. The recently developed Integrated Medical Model (IMM) summarizes astronaut health as governed by the probabilities of medical events and mitigation strategies. Managing the software architecture process provides a systematic means of creating, documenting, and communicating a software design early in the development process. The software architecture process begins with establishing requirements and the design is then derived from the requirements.

  17. Development and assessment of best estimate integrated safety analysis code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Lee, Young Jin; Hwang, Moon Kyu (and others)

    2007-03-15

    Improvement of the integrated safety analysis code MARS3.0 has been carried out and a multi-D safety analysis application system has been established. Iterative matrix solver and parallel processing algorithm have been introduced, and a LINUX version has been generated to enable MARS to run in cluster PCs. MARS variables and sub-routines have been reformed and modularised to simplify code maintenance. Model uncertainty analyses have been performed for THTF, FLECHT, NEPTUN, and LOFT experiments as well as APR1400 plant. Participations in international cooperation research projects such as OECD BEMUSE, SETH, PKL, BFBT, and TMI-2 have been actively pursued as part of code assessment efforts. The assessment, evaluation and experimental data obtained through international cooperation projects have been registered and maintained in the T/H Databank. Multi-D analyses of APR1400 LBLOCA, DVI Break, SLB, and SGTR have been carried out as a part of application efforts in multi-D safety analysis. GUI based 3D input generator has been developed for user convenience. Operation of the MARS Users Group (MUG) was continued and through MUG, the technology has been transferred to 24 organisations. A set of 4 volumes of user manuals has been compiled and the correction reports for the code errors reported during MARS development have been published.

  18. An integrated approach to oversight assessment for emerging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Paradise, Jordan; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Kim, Jee-Ae; Kokotovich, Adam; Wolf, Susan M

    2008-10-01

    Analysis of oversight systems is often conducted from a single disciplinary perspective and by using a limited set of criteria for evaluation. In this article, we develop an approach that blends risk analysis, social science, public administration, legal, public policy, and ethical perspectives to develop a broad set of criteria for assessing oversight systems. Multiple methods, including historical analysis, expert elicitation, and behavioral consensus, were employed to develop multidisciplinary criteria for evaluating oversight of emerging technologies. Sixty-six initial criteria were identified from extensive literature reviews and input from our Working Group. Criteria were placed in four categories reflecting the development, attributes, evolution, and outcomes of oversight systems. Expert elicitation, consensus methods, and multidisciplinary review of the literature were used to refine a condensed, operative set of criteria. Twenty-eight criteria resulted spanning four categories: seven development criteria, 15 attribute criteria, five outcome criteria, and one evolution criterion. These criteria illuminate how oversight systems develop, operate, change, and affect society. We term our approach "integrated oversight assessment" and propose its use as a tool for analyzing relationships among features, outcomes, and tradeoffs of oversight systems. Comparisons among historical case studies of oversight using a consistent set of criteria should result in defensible and evidence-supported lessons to guide the development of oversight systems for emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology.

  19. Integrated risk assessment for spent fuel transportation using developed software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Mi Rae; Christian, Robby; Kim, Bo Gyung; Almomani, Belal; Ham, Jae Hyun; Kang, Gook Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang hoon [Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As on-site spent fuel storage meets limitation of their capacity, spent fuel need to be transported to other place. In this research, risk of two ways of transportation method, maritime transportation and on-site transportation, and interim storage facility were analyzed. Easier and integrated risk assessment for spent fuel transportation will be possible by applying this software. Risk assessment for spent fuel transportation has not been researched and this work showed a case for analysis. By using this analysis method and developed software, regulators can get some insights for spent fuel transportation. For example, they can restrict specific region for preventing ocean accident and also they can arrange spend fuel in interim storage facility avoiding most risky region which have high risk from aircraft engine shaft. Finally, they can apply soft material on the floor for specific stage for on-site transportation. In this software, because we targeted Korea, we need to use Korean reference data. However, there were few Korean reference data. Especially, there was no food chain data for Korean ocean. In MARINRAD, they used steady state food chain model, but it is far from reality. Therefore, to get Korean realistic reference data, dynamic food chain model for Korean ocean need to be developed.

  20. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  1. Pulsed welding plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in order to form the current pulse of a near rectangular shape, which provides conversion of the welding arc into a dynamic mode, it is rational to connect a forming element made on the basis of an artificial forming line in series to the welding DC circuit. The paper presents a diagram of a pulsed device for welding with a non-consumable electrode in argon which was developed using the forming element. The conversion of the arc into the dynamic mode is illustrated by the current and voltage oscillograms of the arc gap and the dynamic characteristic of the arc within the interval of one pulse generation time in the arc gap. The background current travels in the interpulse interval.

  2. Multivariable Intelligent Control for M.A.G. Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin MIHOLCA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A neural control technique, applied to the MAG (Metal-Active Gas welding process, is presented in the paper. The static nonlinear model of welding process is based on experimental determinations. The geometric parameters of the welding beam are considered as output parameters of the MAG process (Bs, a, p, and they are measured for different step-variations of the input parameters (Ve, Vs, Ua. The analysis of the output dynamics was further used to model the MAG welding process using a 3- layer neural network with 6 hidden-layer neurons. In order to reject perturbations and cancel the stationary error, an error compensator was used, which consists of the reversedynamic model connected to a proportional integrator controller. imulation results for the multivariable neural controller are presented.

  3. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  4. Developing an integration tool for soil contamination assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Romero, Maria; Zingg, Felix; Pérez-Álvarez, José Miguel; Madejón, Paula; Kotb Abd-Elmabod, Sameh

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades, huge soil areas have been negatively influenced or altered in multiples forms. Soils and, consequently, underground water, have been contaminated by accumulation of contaminants from agricultural activities (fertilizers and pesticides) industrial activities (harmful material dumping, sludge, flying ashes) and urban activities (hydrocarbon, metals from vehicle traffic, urban waste dumping). In the framework of the RECARE project, local partners across Europe are focusing on a wide range of soil threats, as soil contamination, and aiming to develop effective prevention, remediation and restoration measures by designing and applying targeted land management strategies (van Lynden et al., 2013). In this context, the Guadiamar Green Corridor (Southern Spain) was used as a case study, aiming to obtain soil data and new information in order to assess soil contamination. The main threat in the Guadiamar valley is soil contamination after a mine spill occurred on April 1998. About four hm3 of acid waters and two hm3 of mud, rich in heavy metals, were released into the Agrio and Guadiamar rivers affecting more than 4,600 ha of agricultural and pasture land. Main trace elements contaminating soil and water were As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Tl and Zn. The objective of the present research is to develop informatics tools that integrate soil database, models and interactive platforms for soil contamination assessment. Preliminary results were obtained related to the compilation of harmonized databases including geographical, hydro-meteorological, soil and socio-economic variables based on spatial analysis and stakeholder's consultation. Further research will be modellization and upscaling at the European level, in order to obtain a scientifically-technical predictive tool for the assessment of soil contamination.

  5. Fuzzy logic knowledge bases in integrated landscape assessment: examples and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith M. Reynolds

    2001-01-01

    The literature on ecosystem management has articulated the need for integration across disciplines and spatial scales, but convincing demonstrations of integrated analysis to support ecosystem management are lacking. This paper focuses on integrated ecological assessment because ecosystem management fundamentally is concerned with integrated management, which...

  6. Truck frame welding reparation by steel covered electrodes with varied amount of Ni and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz WĘGRZYN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to study safety and exploitation conditions of weld steel structure reparation of car body truck frames. Car (auto body is the name given to the portion of an automobile which gives it shape. The work is a theoretical investigation and concentrates on structural integrity and vehicle safety after the reparation welding of truck frames. To study the effects of the frame flexibility and resistance, the truck frame has been welded by steel electrodes with varied amount of Ni and Mo. The most significant of factors influencing that conditions are connected with material choice, welding technology, state of stress and temperature. Because of that a good selection of steel and welding method is crucial to obtain proper steel structure. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW is a very popular method of welding used for car body reparation. Car body elements of higher durability are made of low carbon and low alloy steel, very often with small amount of carbon and the amount of alloy elements such as Ni, Mn, Mo, Cr, Ti, Al, V in low alloy steel and their welds. In the paper only the influence of the variable amounts of nickel, molybdenum on impact and fatigue properties of low alloy metal weld deposit was tested. The results show that there is good agreement between proper chemical composition of weld metal deposit (WMD and truck structure properties.

  7. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  8. Assessment of integrated solar ultraviolet radiation by PM-355 detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Elhadidy, M.A.; Shaahid, S.M.; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2000-06-01

    The increase in environmental solar UV radiation due to depletion of ozone layer is a recent challenge to human health (skin cancer and eye effects) in countries having clear skies. Therefore, applying integrated, passive and inexpensive techniques to assess solar UV radiation is very much essential. Measurements of environmental solar UV radiation in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia area were carried out for a period of two months in the summer period in 1996 using two techniques in parallel namely: passive nuclear track detectors and active solar UV radiometers. Some of the nuclear track detectors were mounted in different conditions such as: under shadow band, on solar tracking mechanism following the solar rays. Others were mounted on perpendicular, tilted and horizontal surfaces in sunlight. All detectors were attached to a wooden background of the same thickness (0.5 cm) to eliminate interference of the heat effect of various support materials and have uniformity of the support materials. The assessment was carried out for different periods extending from two to nine weeks continuously. The investigated period covered the hottest months in Saudi Arabia (July and August) when the sky was clear of clouds. The results indicate linear correlation between alpha track diameters and the integrated exposure to solar UV as measured by the solar UV radiometer for all nuclear track detector positions and orientations. The highest slope has been observed for the detectors placed on solar tracking mechanism following the solar rays and the lowest from detectors oriented under the shadow band on horizontal position (measuring the diffused UV radiation only). The results show that most of the measured UV radiation (60%) were from the diffused UV radiation. The characteristics of the upper layer of the detectors are changed after chemical etching very quickly, with increase in the exposure time to UV solar radiation at certain orientation. The results encourage the use of nuclear track

  9. Fatigue life estimation in welded joints under multiaxial loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Vantadori

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Welded joints are frequently locations for cracks initiation and propagation that may cause fatigue failure of engineering structures. Biaxial or triaxial stress-strain states are present in the vicinity of welded joints, due to local geometrical constraints, welding processes and/or multiaxial external loadings. Fatigue life evaluation of welded joints under multiaxial proportional (in-phase cyclic loading can be performed by using conventional hypotheses (e.g. see the von Mises criterion or the Tresca criterion on the basis of local approaches. On the contrary, the fatigue life predictions of welded joints under non-proportional (out-ofphase cyclic loading are generally unsafe if these conventional hypotheses are used. A criterion initially proposed by the authors for smooth and notched structural components has been extended to the fatigue assessment of welded joints. In more detail, fatigue life of welded joints under multiaxial stress states can be evaluated by considering a nonlinear combination of the shear stress amplitude (acting on the critical plane and the amplitude and the mean value of the normal stress (acting on the critical plane. In the present paper, fatigue lifetimes predicted through the proposed criterion are compared with experimental fatigue life data available in the literature, related to fatigue biaxial tests.

  10. Welding, a risk factor of lung cancer: the ICARE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrat, Mireille; Guida, Florence; Mattei, Francesca; Cénée, Sylvie; Cyr, Diane; Févotte, Joëlle; Sanchez, Marie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Radoï, Loredana; Schmaus, Annie; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between lung cancer and occupational exposure to welding activity in ICARE, a population-based case-control study. Analyses were restricted to men (2276 cases, 2780 controls). Welding exposure was assessed through detailed questionnaires, including lifelong occupational history. ORs were computed using unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for lifelong cigarette smoking and occupational exposure to asbestos. Among the regular welders, welding was associated with a risk of lung cancer (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.5), which increased with the duration (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.0 to 3.9 when duration >10 years), and was maximum 10-20 years since last welding. The risk was more pronounced in case of gas welding (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3), when the workpiece was covered by paint, grease, or other substances (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4) and when it was cleaned with chemical substances before welding. No statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk was observed among occasional welders. Although these results should be confirmed, we showed that type of welding and mode of workpiece preparation are important determinants of the lung cancer risk in regular welders. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Research on Kinematic Trajectory Simulation System of KUKA Arc Welding Robot System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the simulation trajectory simulation of KUKA arc welding robot system is realized by means of VC platform. It is used to realize the teaching of professional training of welding robot in middle school. It provides teaching resources for the combination of work and study and integration teaching, which enriches the content of course teaching.

  12. Deformation of two welded elastic half-spaces due to a long inclined ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    inclined shear fault in two welded half-spaces is well known. The purpose of this note is to present the corresponding solution for a tensile fault. Closed-form analytical expressions for the. Airy stress function for a tensile line source in two welded half-spaces are first obtained. These expressions are then integrated ...

  13. Acoustic-Emission Weld-Penetration Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, J.; Collins, J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld penetration monitored by detection of high-frequency acoustic emissions produced by advancing weld pool as it melts and solidifies in workpiece. Acoustic emission from TIG butt weld measured with 300-kHz resonant transducer. Rise in emission level coincides with cessation of weld penetration due to sudden reduction in welding current. Such monitoring applied to control of automated and robotic welders.

  14. Design assessment for manufacturability of supporting structures for IWS and ELM coil of ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu-Gyeong, E-mail: aspirany@hhi.co.kr [Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Dong-gu, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yun-Seok; Kwon, Tae-Hoon; Jung, Yung-Jin [Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Dong-gu, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hee-Jae; Kim, Byung-Chul; Lee, Young-Ju [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A “bridge type” welding method was proposed for IWS rib and ELM coil supports. ► This method could reduce the welding distortion and increase the manufacturability. ► Structural integrity of proposed design was assessed for both P and S type damages. ► Results show that the proposed designs meet the design criteria of RCC-MR. -- Abstract: A vacuum vessel is one of the core facilities of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and basically all-welded structure. Korea is responsible for the procurement of sector 1 and 6 of the main vessel. Accordingly, the design review for the fabrication is in progress by ITER Korea and Hyundai Heavy Industries. Due to anticipated manufacturing problems such as the welding distortion, the design of some components of main vessel, IWS (In-Wall Shield) supporting rib and ELM (Edge Localized Mode) coil support, needs to be modified. To release the risk of welding distortion, the welding method called “bridge type” is suggested and the shape of weld joint is adjusted to secure the manufacturability of the issued components. The elastic and limit analyses with fatigue evaluation have been performed under the most critical loading condition to verify the structural integrity of modified design. Analysis results show that the proposed designs meet the design criteria of RCC-MR. The design deviation requests have been submitted to ITER Organization and ANB (Agreed Notified Body) for approval and their verification is currently in progress.

  15. Multi Objective Optimization of Weld Parameters of Boiler Steel Using Fuzzy Based Desirability Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Satheesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The high pressure differential across the wall of pressure vessels is potentially dangerous and has caused many fatal accidents in the history of their development and operation. For this reason the structural integrity of weldments is critical to the performance of pressure vessels. In recent years much research has been conducted to the study of variations in welding parameters and consumables on the mechanical properties of pressure vessel steel weldments to optimize weld integrity and ensure pressure vessels are safe. The quality of weld is a very important working aspect for the manufacturing and construction industries. Because of high quality and reliability, Submerged Arc Welding (SAW is one of the chief metal joining processes employed in industry. This paper addresses the application of desirability function approach combined with fuzzy logic analysis to optimize the multiple quality characteristics (bead reinforcement, bead width, bead penetration and dilution of submerged arc welding process parameters of SA 516 Grade 70 steels(boiler steel. Experiments were conducted using Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal array with varying the weld parameters of welding current, arc voltage, welding speed and electrode stickout. By analyzing the response table and response graph of the fuzzy reasoning grade, optimal parameters were obtained. Solutions from this method can be useful for pressure vessel manufacturers and operators to search an optimal solution of welding condition.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFECTS IN ALLOY 152, 52 AND 52M WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Seffens, Rob J.; Efsing, Pal G.

    2009-08-27

    Defect distributions have been documented by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction in alloy 152 and 52 mockups welds, alloy 52 and 52M overlay mockups and an alloy 52M inlay. Primary defects were small cracks at grain boundaries except for more extensive cracking in the dilution zone of an alloy 52 overlay on 304SS. Detailed characterizations of the dilution zone cracks were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy identifying grain boundary titanium-nitride precipitation associated with the intergranular separations. I. INTRODUCTION Weldments continue to be a primary location of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in light-water reactor systems. While problems related to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) sensitization and intergranular (IG) SCC of austenitic stainless alloys in boiling-water reactors (BWRs) have been significantly reduced, SCC has now been observed in HAZs of non-sensitized materials and in dissimilar metal welds where Ni-base alloy weld metals are used. IGSCC in weld metals has been observed in both BWRs and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with recent examples for PWR pressure vessel penetrations producing the most concern. This has led to the replacement of alloy 600/182/82 welds with higher Cr, more corrosion-resistant replacement materials (alloy 690/152/52/52M). Complicating this issue has been a known susceptibility to cracking during welding [1-7] of these weld metals. There is a critical need for an improved understanding of the weld metal metallurgy and defect formation in Ni-base alloy welds to effectively assess long-term performance. A series of macroscopic to microscopic examinations were performed on available mockup welds made with alloy 52 or alloy 152 plus selected overlay and inlay mockups. The intent was to expand our understanding of weld metal structures in simulated LWR service components with a focus on as-welded defects. Microstructural features, defect distributions

  17. Using integrated environmental modeling to automate a process-based Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) organizes multidisciplinary knowledge that explains and predicts environmental-system response to stressors. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is an approach integrating a range of disparate data (fate/transport, exposure, and human health effect...

  18. Weld procedure development with OSLW - optimization software for laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Eisler, G.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, R.J. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Weld procedure development can require extensive experimentation, in-depth process knowledge, and is further complicated by the fact that there are often multiple sets of parameters that will meet the weld requirements. Choosing among these multiple weld procedures can be hastened with computer models that find parameters to meet selected weld dimensional requirements while simultaneously optimizing important figures of merit. Software is described that performs this task for CO{sub 2} laser beam welding. The models are based on dimensionless parameter correlations that are derived from solutions to the moving heat source equations. The use of both handbook and empirically verified thermophysical property values allows OSLW to be extended to many different materials. Graphics displays show the resulting solution on contour plots that can be used to further probe the model. The important figures of merit for laser beam welding are energy transfer efficiency and melting efficiency. The application enables the user to input desired weld shape dimensions, select the material to be welded, and to constrain the search problem to meet the application requirements. Successful testing of the software at a laser welding fabricator has validated this tool for weld procedure development.

  19. Flexural testing of weld site and HVOF coating characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Sahin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    This book provides fundamental understanding and practical application of characteristics of flexural motion in the assessment of the weld size and coating thickness. Some formulations of heat transfer and flexural motion are introduced while displacement and load correlation are used to estimate elastic modules and the size of the heat affected zone as well as the coating thickness. The case studies presented give a practical understanding of weld size and coating thickness characterizations.

  20. Application of the Hydroecological Integrity Assessment Process for Missouri Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennen, Jonathan G.; Henriksen, James A.; Heasley, John; Cade, Brian S.; Terrell, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Natural flow regime concepts and theories have established the justification for maintaining or restoring the range of natural hydrologic variability so that physiochemical processes, native biodiversity, and the evolutionary potential of aquatic and riparian assemblages can be sustained. A synthesis of recent research advances in hydroecology, coupled with stream classification using hydroecologically relevant indices, has produced the Hydroecological Integrity Assessment Process (HIP). HIP consists of (1) a regional classification of streams into hydrologic stream types based on flow data from long-term gaging-station records for relatively unmodified streams, (2) an identification of stream-type specific indices that address 11 subcomponents of the flow regime, (3) an ability to establish environmental flow standards, (4) an evaluation of hydrologic alteration, and (5) a capacity to conduct alternative analyses. The process starts with the identification of a hydrologic baseline (reference condition) for selected locations, uses flow data from a stream-gage network, and proceeds to classify streams into hydrologic stream types. Concurrently, the analysis identifies a set of non-redundant and ecologically relevant hydrologic indices for 11 subcomponents of flow for each stream type. Furthermore, regional hydrologic models for synthesizing flow conditions across a region and the development of flow-ecology response relations for each stream type can be added to further enhance the process. The application of HIP to Missouri streams identified five stream types ((1) intermittent, (2) perennial runoff-flashy, (3) perennial runoff-moderate baseflow, (4) perennial groundwater-stable, and (5) perennial groundwater-super stable). Two Missouri-specific computer software programs were developed: (1) a Missouri Hydrologic Assessment Tool (MOHAT) which is used to establish a hydrologic baseline, provide options for setting environmental flow standards, and compare past and

  1. Integrated Watershed Assessment: The Northern River Basins Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, F. J.; Gummer, W. D.

    2001-05-01

    Begun in 1991 and completed in 1996, the Northern River Basins Study (NRBS) was a \\$12 M initiative established by the governments of Canada, Alberta, and the Northwest Territories to assess the cumulative impacts of development, particularly pulp mill related effluent discharges, on the health of the Peace, Athabasca and Slave river basins. The NRBS was launched in response to concerns expressed by northern residents following the 1991 approval of the Alberta Pacific Pulp Mill in Athabasca. Although initiated by governments, the NRBS was set-up to be `arms-length' and was managed by a 25 member Study Board that represented the many interests in the basins, including industry, environmental groups, aboriginal peoples, health, agriculture, education, municipalities, and the federal, territorial and provincial governments. Overseen by an independent Science Advisory Committee, an integrated research program was designed covering eight scientific components: fate and distribution of contaminants, food chain impacts, nutrients, hydrology/hydraulics and sediment transport, uses of the water resources, drinking water quality, traditional knowledge, and synthesis/modeling. Using a 'weight of evidence' approach with a range of ecological and sociological indicators, cumulative impacts from pulp and paper-related discharges and other point and non-point sources of pollution were determined in relation to the health and contaminant levels of aquatic biota, nutrient and dissolved oxygen-related stress, hydrology and climate related changes, and human health and use of the river basins. Based on this assessment and Study Board deliberations, site-specific and basin-wide scientific and management-related recommendations were made to Ministers regarding regulatory and policy changes, basin management and monitoring options, and future research. The Study reinforces the importance of conducting ecosystem-based , interdisciplinary science and the need for public involvement in

  2. The analysis of spot welding joints of steel sheets with closed profile by ultrasonic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Ulbrich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding is widely used in the fabrication of vehicle bodies and parts of their equipment. The article presents the methodology and the results of non-destructive ultrasonic testing of resistance spot welded joints of thin steel sheet with closed profile. Non-destructive test results were verified on the basis of welded joint area after destructive testing. The obtained results were used to develop an assessment technique for spot welded joints of closed profile with steel sheet, which could be used in factories employing such joints. In addition, the article makes comparison between the costs of the developed assessment technique and currently used destructive method.

  3. RECOVERY ACT - Methods for Decision under Technological Change Uncertainty and Risk Assessment for Integrated Assessment of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, Mort David [MIT

    2015-03-10

    This report presents the final outcomes and products of the project as performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The research project consists of three main components: methodology development for decision-making under uncertainty, improving the resolution of the electricity sector to improve integrated assessment, and application of these methods to integrated assessment. Results in each area is described in the report.

  4. RECOVERY ACT - Methods for Decision under Technological Change Uncertainty and Risk Assessment for Integrated Assessment of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, Mort D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy and Mineral Engineering

    2015-11-30

    This report presents the final outcomes and products of the project as performed both at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and subsequently at Pennsylvania State University. The research project can be divided into three main components: methodology development for decision-making under uncertainty, improving the resolution of the electricity sector to improve integrated assessment, and application of these methods to integrated assessment.

  5. Integrated Risk Assessment to Natural Hazards in Motozintla, Chiapas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    An integrated risk assessment includes the analysis of all components of individual constituents of risk such as baseline study, hazard identification and categorization, hazard exposure, and vulnerability. Vulnerability refers to the inability of people, organizations, and societies to withstand adverse impacts from multiple stressors to which they are exposed. These impacts are due to characteristics inherent in social interactions, institutions, and systems of cultural values. Thus, social vulnerability is a pre-existing condition that affects a society's ability to prepare for and recover from a disruptive event. Risk is the probability of a loss, and this loss depends on three elements: hazard, exposure, and vulnerability. Thus, risk is the estimated impact that a hazard event would have on people, services, facilities, structures and assets in a community. In this work we assess the risk to natural hazards in the community of Motozintla located in southern Mexico in the state of Chiapas (15.37N, 92.25W) with a population of about 20 000 habitants. Due to its geographical and geological location, this community is continuously exposed to many different natural hazards (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, and floods). To determine the level of exposure of the community to natural hazards, we developed integrated studies and analysis of seismic microzonation, landslide and flood susceptibility as well as volcanic impact using standard methodologies. Social vulnerability was quantified from data obtained from local families interviews. Five variables were considered: household structure quality and design, availability of basic public services, family economic conditions, existing family plans for disaster preparedness, and risk perception.The number of families surveyed was determined considering a sample statistically significant. The families that were interviewed were selected using the simple random sampling technique with replacement. With these

  6. Integrated spatial assessment of wind erosion risk in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pásztor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion susceptibility of Hungarian soils was mapped on the national level integrating three factors of the complex phenomenon of deflation (physical soil features, wind characteristics, and land use and land cover. Results of wind tunnel experiments on erodibility of representative soil samples were used for the parametrization of a countrywide map of soil texture compiled for the upper 5 cm layer of soil, which resulted in a map representing threshold wind velocity exceedance. Average wind velocity was spatially estimated with 0.5′ resolution using the Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenised Data Basis (MISH method elaborated for the spatial interpolation of surface meteorological elements. The probability of threshold wind velocity exceedance was determined based on values predicted by the soil texture map at the grid locations. Ratio values were further interpolated to a finer 1 ha resolution using sand and silt content of the uppermost (0–5 cm layer of soil as spatial co-variables. Land cover was also taken into account, excluding areas that are not relevant to wind erosion (forests, water bodies, settlements, etc., to spatially assess the risk of wind erosion. According to the resulting map of wind erosion susceptibility, about 10 % of the total area of Hungary can be identified as susceptible to wind erosion. The map gives more detailed insight into the spatial distribution of wind-affected areas in Hungary compared to previous studies.

  7. Integrated spatial assessment of wind erosion risk in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Négyesi, Gábor; Laborczi, Annamária; Kovács, Tamás; László, Elemér; Bihari, Zita

    2016-11-01

    Wind erosion susceptibility of Hungarian soils was mapped on the national level integrating three factors of the complex phenomenon of deflation (physical soil features, wind characteristics, and land use and land cover). Results of wind tunnel experiments on erodibility of representative soil samples were used for the parametrization of a countrywide map of soil texture compiled for the upper 5 cm layer of soil, which resulted in a map representing threshold wind velocity exceedance. Average wind velocity was spatially estimated with 0.5' resolution using the Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenised Data Basis (MISH) method elaborated for the spatial interpolation of surface meteorological elements. The probability of threshold wind velocity exceedance was determined based on values predicted by the soil texture map at the grid locations. Ratio values were further interpolated to a finer 1 ha resolution using sand and silt content of the uppermost (0-5 cm) layer of soil as spatial co-variables. Land cover was also taken into account, excluding areas that are not relevant to wind erosion (forests, water bodies, settlements, etc.), to spatially assess the risk of wind erosion. According to the resulting map of wind erosion susceptibility, about 10 % of the total area of Hungary can be identified as susceptible to wind erosion. The map gives more detailed insight into the spatial distribution of wind-affected areas in Hungary compared to previous studies.

  8. Intrinsic ethics regarding integrated assessment models for climate management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schienke, Erich W; Baum, Seth D; Tuana, Nancy; Davis, Kenneth J; Keller, Klaus

    2011-09-01

    In this essay we develop and argue for the adoption of a more comprehensive model of research ethics than is included within current conceptions of responsible conduct of research (RCR). We argue that our model, which we label the ethical dimensions of scientific research (EDSR), is a more comprehensive approach to encouraging ethically responsible scientific research compared to the currently typically adopted approach in RCR training. This essay focuses on developing a pedagogical approach that enables scientists to better understand and appreciate one important component of this model, what we call intrinsic ethics. Intrinsic ethical issues arise when values and ethical assumptions are embedded within scientific findings and analytical methods. Through a close examination of a case study and its application in teaching, namely, evaluation of climate change integrated assessment models, this paper develops a method and case for including intrinsic ethics within research ethics training to provide scientists with a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the critical role of values and ethical choices in the production of research outcomes.

  9. An integrated assessment framework for land subsidence in delta cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. M. Bucx

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In many delta cities land subsidence exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten by excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without change, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other delta (and coastal cities will sink below sea level. Increased flooding and also other widespread impacts of land subsidence result already in damage of billions of dollars per year. In order to gain insight in the complex, multi-sectoral aspects of subsidence, to raise awareness and to support decision making on appropriate adaptation strategies and measures, an Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF for subsidence is introduced, illustrated by several (delta case studies. Based on that a list of 10 generic key issues and possible solutions is presented in order to further develop and support a (generic approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas. For exchange of experiences and knowledge development.on subsidence in deltas the Delta Alliance, a knowledge network of deltas worldwide, can be supportive.

  10. Integrated testing strategy (ITS) for bioaccumulation assessment under REACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Anna; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Benfentati, Emilio; Nendza, Monika; Segner, Helmut; Fernández, Alberto; Kühne, Ralph; Franco, Antonio; Pauné, Eduard; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2014-08-01

    REACH (registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals) regulation requires that all the chemicals produced or imported in Europe above 1 tonne/year are registered. To register a chemical, physicochemical, toxicological and ecotoxicological information needs to be reported in a dossier. REACH promotes the use of alternative methods to replace, refine and reduce the use of animal (eco)toxicity testing. Within the EU OSIRIS project, integrated testing strategies (ITSs) have been developed for the rational use of non-animal testing approaches in chemical hazard assessment. Here we present an ITS for evaluating the bioaccumulation potential of organic chemicals. The scheme includes the use of all available data (also the non-optimal ones), waiving schemes, analysis of physicochemical properties related to the end point and alternative methods (both in silico and in vitro). In vivo methods are used only as last resort. Using the ITS, in vivo testing could be waived for about 67% of the examined compounds, but bioaccumulation potential could be estimated on the basis of non-animal methods. The presented ITS is freely available through a web tool. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrated analysis environment for the Movement Assessment Battery for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Norberto Fischer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD, a chronic and usually permanent condition found in children, is characterized by motor impairment that interferes with a child's activities of daily living and with academic achievement. One of the most popular tests for the quantitative diagnosis of DCD is the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC. Based on the Battery's standardized scores, it is possible to identify children with typical development, children at risk of developing DCD, and children with DCD. This article describes a computational system we developed to assist with the analysis of results obtained in the MABC test. The tool was developed for the web environment and its database provides integration of MABC data. Thus, researchers around the world can share data and develop collaborative work in the DCD field. In order to help analysis processes, our system provides services for filtering data to show more specific sets of information and present the results in textual, table, and graphic formats, allowing easier and more comprehensive evaluation of the results.

  12. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  13. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  14. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  15. The Development and Validation of the Religious/Spiritually Integrated Practice Assessment Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxhandler, Holly K.; Parrish, Danielle E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the development and validation of the Religious/Spiritually Integrated Practice Assessment Scale (RSIPAS). The RSIPAS is designed to assess social work practitioners' self-efficacy, attitudes, behaviors, and perceived feasibility concerning the assessment or integration of clients' religious and spiritual beliefs…

  16. Same-Scorer Judgments on Multiple Content Area Items in Integrated Performance Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gail Lynn; Michaels, Hillary

    Preliminary data was gathered to guide subsequent research that will shape training procedures and scoring practice for performance assessment activities that integrate multiple content areas. Content area integration is a key feature of many of the tasks in the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP), a large-scale assessment of…

  17. An Exploration of Three-Dimensional Integrated Assessment for Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Baichang; Wang, Qiyun; Chen, Jie; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Computational thinking (CT) is a fundamental skill for students, and assessment is a critical factor in education. However, there is a lack of effective approaches to CT assessment. Therefore, we designed the Three-Dimensional Integrated Assessment (TDIA) framework in this article. The TDIA has two aims: one was to integrate three dimensions…

  18. A study of the bio-accessibility of welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlinger, Balázs; Ellingsen, Dag G; Náray, Miklós; Záray, Gyula; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2008-12-01

    The respiratory bio-accessibility of a substance is the fraction that is soluble in the respiratory environment and is available for absorption. In the case of respiratory exposure the amount of absorbed substance plays a main role in the biological effects. Extensive bio-accessibility studies have always been an essential requirement for a better understanding of the biological effects of different workplace aerosols, such as welding fumes. Fumes generated using three different welding techniques, manual metal arc (MMA) welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding, and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were investigated in the present study. Each technique was used for stainless steel welding. Welding fumes were collected on PVC membrane filters in batches of 114 using a multiport air sampler. Three different fluids were applied for the solubility study: deionised water and two kinds of lung fluid simulants: lung epithelial lining fluid simulant (Gamble's solution) and artificial lung lining fluid simulant (Hatch's solution). In order to obtain sufficient data to study the tendencies in solubility change with time, seven different leaching periods were used (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 h), each of them with three replicates. The effect of dissolution temperature was also studied. The total amounts of selected metals in the three different welding fumes were determined after microwave-assisted digestion with the mixture of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid. The most obvious observation yielded by the results is that the solubility of individual metals varies greatly depending on the welding technique, the composition of the leaching fluid and leaching time. This study shows that the most reasonable choice as a media for the bio-assessment of solubility might be Hatch's solution by a dissolution time of 24 h.

  19. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Welding (Program CIP: 48.0508--Welder/Welding Technologist). Secondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for welding I and II. Presented first are a program description and course…

  20. Combining assessment and research during development of large technology integration projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszalka, Tiffany A; Grabowski, Barbara L

    2003-05-01

    Descriptions of large technology integration projects can be found in the literature. Amongst reports of instructionally sound designs and increases in learning loom debates on the effectiveness and impact of the use of technology in education. Combining assessment and research components for large technology integration projects should yield results that inform this debate. The task of integrating assessment and research, however, is complex. Descriptions about how either assessment or research should be conducted can be found, but detailed examples illustrating integration of such strategies are scarce. This paper provides brief definitions of assessment, evaluation, and research and describes strategies for integrating and managing assessment and research activities for a large education technology development project. Examples of tools used to develop and manage a comprehensive assessment and research plan in a large technology integration development and research project are provided.

  1. effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    among others are shielded metal arc welding, submerge arc welding, gas metal arc welding, plasma arc welding, gas ... welding (SMAW) technique is preferable to the other techniques ..... studies''International Journal of Innovative Research.

  2. Parameter Design in Fusion Welding of AA 6061 Aluminium Alloy using Desirability Grey Relational Analysis (DGRA) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalarasan, R.; Santhanakumar, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, yield strength, ultimate strength and micro-hardness of the lap joints formed with Al 6061 alloy sheets by using the processes of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding and Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding were studied for various combinations of the welding parameters. The parameters taken for study include welding current, voltage, welding speed and inert gas flow rate. Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array was used to conduct the experiments and an integrated technique of desirability grey relational analysis was disclosed for optimizing the welding parameters. The ignored robustness in desirability approach is compensated by the grey relational approach to predict the optimal setting of input parameters for the TIG and MIG welding processes which were validated through the confirmation experiments.

  3. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  4. WETLAND VEGETATION INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT WITH LOW ALTITUDE MULTISPECTRAL UAV IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Boon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of multispectral sensors on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs was until recently too heavy and bulky although this changed in recent times and they are now commercially available. The focus on the usage of these sensors is mostly directed towards the agricultural sector where the focus is on precision farming. Applications of these sensors for mapping of wetland ecosystems are rare. Here, we evaluate the performance of low altitude multispectral UAV imagery to determine the state of wetland vegetation in a localised spatial area. Specifically, NDVI derived from multispectral UAV imagery was used to inform the determination of the integrity of the wetland vegetation. Furthermore, we tested different software applications for the processing of the imagery. The advantages and disadvantages we experienced of these applications are also shortly presented in this paper. A JAG-M fixed-wing imaging system equipped with a MicaScene RedEdge multispectral camera were utilised for the survey. A single surveying campaign was undertaken in early autumn of a 17 ha study area at the Kameelzynkraal farm, Gauteng Province, South Africa. Structure-from-motion photogrammetry software was used to reconstruct the camera position’s and terrain features to derive a high resolution orthoretified mosaic. MicaSense Atlas cloud-based data platform, Pix4D and PhotoScan were utilised for the processing. The WET-Health level one methodology was followed for the vegetation assessment, where wetland health is a measure of the deviation of a wetland’s structure and function from its natural reference condition. An on-site evaluation of the vegetation integrity was first completed. Disturbance classes were then mapped using the high resolution multispectral orthoimages and NDVI. The WET-Health vegetation module completed with the aid of the multispectral UAV products indicated that the vegetation of the wetland is largely modified (“D” PES Category and that the

  5. Wetland Vegetation Integrity Assessment with Low Altitude Multispectral Uav Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, M. A.; Tesfamichael, S.

    2017-08-01

    The use of multispectral sensors on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) was until recently too heavy and bulky although this changed in recent times and they are now commercially available. The focus on the usage of these sensors is mostly directed towards the agricultural sector where the focus is on precision farming. Applications of these sensors for mapping of wetland ecosystems are rare. Here, we evaluate the performance of low altitude multispectral UAV imagery to determine the state of wetland vegetation in a localised spatial area. Specifically, NDVI derived from multispectral UAV imagery was used to inform the determination of the integrity of the wetland vegetation. Furthermore, we tested different software applications for the processing of the imagery. The advantages and disadvantages we experienced of these applications are also shortly presented in this paper. A JAG-M fixed-wing imaging system equipped with a MicaScene RedEdge multispectral camera were utilised for the survey. A single surveying campaign was undertaken in early autumn of a 17 ha study area at the Kameelzynkraal farm, Gauteng Province, South Africa. Structure-from-motion photogrammetry software was used to reconstruct the camera position's and terrain features to derive a high resolution orthoretified mosaic. MicaSense Atlas cloud-based data platform, Pix4D and PhotoScan were utilised for the processing. The WET-Health level one methodology was followed for the vegetation assessment, where wetland health is a measure of the deviation of a wetland's structure and function from its natural reference condition. An on-site evaluation of the vegetation integrity was first completed. Disturbance classes were then mapped using the high resolution multispectral orthoimages and NDVI. The WET-Health vegetation module completed with the aid of the multispectral UAV products indicated that the vegetation of the wetland is largely modified ("D" PES Category) and that the condition is expected to

  6. An Intelligent System for Analyzing Welding Defects using Image Retrieval Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Pein, Raoul Pascal; Lu, Joan; Stav, John Birger; Xu, Qiang; Uran, Miro; Mráz, Luboš

    2009-01-01

    The development of new approaches in image processing and retrieval provides several opportunities in supporting in different\\ud domains. The group of welding engineers frequently needs to conduct visual inspections to assess the quality of welding products.\\ud It is investigated, if this process can be supported by different kinds of software. Techniques from a generic CBIR system have\\ud been successfully used to cluster welding photographs according to the severeness of visual faults. Simi...

  7. Advanced computer architecture specification for automated weld systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinis, Constantine

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the requirements for an advanced automated weld system and the associated computer architecture, and defines the overall system specification from a broad perspective. According to the requirements of welding procedures as they relate to an integrated multiaxis motion control and sensor architecture, the computer system requirements are developed based on a proven multiple-processor architecture with an expandable, distributed-memory, single global bus architecture, containing individual processors which are assigned to specific tasks that support sensor or control processes. The specified architecture is sufficiently flexible to integrate previously developed equipment, be upgradable and allow on-site modifications.

  8. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  9. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  10. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  11. Indirect Prediction of Welding Fume Diffusion inside a Room Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Dahal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Welding is an important and widely used process in the manufacturing and maintenance of various works involving metals and alloys. While welding has broad applications, the welding fume generated during the process has impacts on workers’ health, which needs to be addressed. One of the major steps that can be undertaken to take care of this issue is the use of ventilation, which requires knowledge of characteristics and dispersion of the welding fume in the workers’ breathing zone. It is difficult to assess welding fume dispersion from manual measurement due to numerous welding processes and sufficient data requirement. Numerical prediction of welding fume is dubious due to several errors. This paper considers the use of numerically predicted CO2 concentrations to indirectly predict welding fume distribution in workshops. This is based on the assumption that if the particles are sufficiently small size, they follow the diffusion pattern of gases. Experiments are carried out in a room with an opening and a welding fume generation system for measurement of CO2 and fume diffusion. The results show high possibility of predicting welding fume concentration based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulated CO2 concentration with a correlation coefficient of 0.74.

  12. Incidence of rhinitis and asthma related to welding in Northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storaas, Torgeir; Zock, Jan-Paul; Morano, Ana Espinosa; Holm, Mathias; Bjørnsson, Eythor; Forsberg, Bertil; Gislason, Thorarinn; Janson, Christer; Norback, Dan; Omenaas, Ernst; Schlünssen, Vivi; Torén, Kjell; Svanes, Cecilie

    2015-11-01

    Welding-related asthma is well recognised but less is known about rhinitis in relation to welding. The aim here, was to study associations between welding, rhinitis and asthma in a general population sample, and factors influencing selection into and out of a welding occupation.Adult-onset asthma and non-infectious rhinitis were investigated in the international multicentre population-based Respiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) study, including 16,191 responders aged 26-54 years. Ever welding (n=2181), welding >25% of working time (n=747), and welding in stainless steel >6 months (n=173) were assessed by questionnaire. Subjects with rhinitis or asthma onset when aged welding job. Cox's proportional hazard models adjusting for age, sex, parental education and study centre, and Kaplan-Meier curves were used.Rhinitis incidence was higher among welders (hazard ratio (HR) 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.6), consistent in men and women, and across centres (pheterogeneity=0.4). In men, asthma incidence was higher among welders (HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.04-1.97). Quitting welding was indicated higher after adult-onset rhinitis (HR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.3). Adult-onset rhinitis and asthma was higher among welders, consistent across population samples from Northern Europe. No pre-employment selection was found, whereas selection out of welding jobs was suggested. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  13. The Investigation of Structure Heterogeneous Joint Welds in Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubimova Lyudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding joints of dissimilar steels don’t withstand design life. One of the important causes of premature destructions can be the acceleration of steel structural degradation due to cyclic mechanical and thermal gradients. Two zones of tube from steel 12H18N9T, exhibiting the structural instability at early stages of the decomposition of a supersaturated solid austenite solution, were subjected to investigation. Methods of x-ray spectral and structure analysis, micro hardnessmetry were applied for the research. Made the following conclusions, inside and outside tube wall surfaces of hazardous zones in welding joint have different technological and resource characteristics. The microhardness very sensitive to changes of metal structure and can be regarded as integral characteristic of strength and ductility. The welding processes are responsible for the further fibering of tube wall structure, they impact to the characteristics of hot-resistance and long-term strength due to development of ring cracks in the welding joint of pipeline. The monitoring of microhardness and structural phase conversions can be used for control by changes of mechanical properties in result of post welding and reductive heat treatment of welding joints.

  14. Assessing the Impacts of Wind Integration in the Western Provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopinka, Amy

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels and the fear of irreversible climate change has prompted policy makers to implement renewable portfolio standards. These renewable portfolio standards are meant to encourage the adoption of renewable energy technologies thereby reducing carbon emissions associated with fossil fuel-fired electricity generation. The ability to efficiently adopt and utilize high levels of renewable energy technology, such as wind power, depends upon the composition of the extant generation within the grid. Western Canadian electric grids are poised to integrate high levels of wind and although Alberta has sufficient and, at times, an excess supply of electricity, it does not have the inherent generator flexibility required to mirror the variability of its wind generation. British Columbia, with its large reservoir storage capacities and rapid ramping hydroelectric generation could easily provide the firming services required by Alberta; however, the two grids are connected only by a small, constrained intertie. We use a simulation model to assess the economic impacts of high wind penetrations in the Alberta grid under various balancing protocols. We find that adding wind capacity to the system impacts grid reliability, increasing the frequency of system imbalances and unscheduled intertie flow. In order for British Columbia to be viable firming resource, it must have sufficient generation capability to meet and exceed the province's electricity self-sufficiency requirements. We use a linear programming model to evaluate the province's ability to meet domestic load under various water and trade conditions. We then examine the effects of drought and wind penetration on the interconnected Alberta -- British Columbia system given differing interconnection sizes.

  15. An Assessment of Integrated Health Management (IHM) Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Lybeck; M. Tawfik; L. Bond; J. Coble

    2012-05-01

    In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging nuclear power plants presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to the better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging nuclear power plants. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of a NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of a NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system

  16. Thermite welding of Cu-Nb microcomposite wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visniakov, Nikolaj; Mikalauskas, Gediminas; Lukauskaite, Raimonda; Cernasejus, Olegas; Rudzinskas, Vitalijus [Vilnius Gediminas Technical Univ. (Lithuania). Faculty of Mechanics; Skamat, Jelena; Boris, Renata [Vilnius Gediminas Technical Univ. (Lithuania). Inst. of Thermal Insulation

    2017-10-15

    Thermite welding of Cu-Nb microcomposite wires was investigated. Suitable compositions of thermite material and slag were determined from the equation of the exothermic combustion synthesis reaction. The phase compositions of the thermite mixture and slag determined by X-ray diffraction analysis correspond to those assessed from the equation. According to non-destructive radiographic testing, the joint structure does not have welding defects. Microstructural examination of the joint cross-section with scanning electron microscopy showed that the Cu-Nb wire retained its shape and microstructure and only a thin surface layer of wire was melted during welding. The difference in electrical resistances of the conductor and welded joint was below 20 %. The thermite joint can withstand a maximum load equal to 62.5 % of the load-bearing capacity of microcomposite conductor.

  17. Framatome-ANP experience in numerical simulation of welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, P. [FRAMATOME ANP SAS, NFPM, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Pont, D. [FRAMATOME ANP SAS, NFVED, 69 - Lyon (France); Keim, E. [Framatome ANP GmbH -NGTM, Erlangen (Germany); Devaux, J. [ESI France, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2004-07-01

    For nuclear reactor manufacturers, ensuring a high quality of welded joints is one of the basic design rules. Qualification of welders, specific procedures, stress relief heat treatments serve efficiently this goal. Numerical simulation of welding adds the capability of assessing residual stresses, distortions, and in a near future quality of welds. Since almost 25 years, Framatome-ANP has been working on numerical simulation of welding to improve predictions and efficiency of computational tools, namely using the worldwide known SYSWELD. The largest part of Framatome-ANP experience in this field relies in the numerous studies performed by German and French teams on industrial components. This paper tries to account for all these efforts, following a presentation oriented on types of problem. (authors)

  18. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  19. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  1. Assessment of the Effectiveness of an Aid for the Development of the Kinetic Skills Required for T.I.G. Welding

    OpenAIRE

    COLLINS, Maurice; Morris, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This action research project was carried out in the Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland. The authors are both Lecturers of Engineering in this college and have a keen interest in providing the best possible aids to their students learning. Three groups of engineering apprentices and one group of part time students took part in this project. At the time these students were taking a third level Tungsten Inert Gas welding (T.I.G.) training module. Qualified T.I.G. welders are in very high de...

  2. An integrated model for the assessment of global water resources – Part 2: Applications and assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hanasaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess global water resources from the perspective of subannual variation in water availability and water use, an integrated water resources model was developed. In a companion report, we presented the global meteorological forcing input used to drive the model and six modules, namely, the land surface hydrology module, the river routing module, the crop growth module, the reservoir operation module, the environmental flow requirement module, and the anthropogenic withdrawal module. Here, we present the results of the model application and global water resources assessments. First, the timing and volume of simulated agriculture water use were examined because agricultural use composes approximately 85% of total consumptive water withdrawal in the world. The estimated crop calendar showed good agreement with earlier reports for wheat, maize, and rice in major countries of production. In major countries, the error in the planting date was ±1 mo, but there were some exceptional cases. The estimated irrigation water withdrawal also showed fair agreement with country statistics, but tended to be underestimated in countries in the Asian monsoon region. The results indicate the validity of the model and the input meteorological forcing because site-specific parameter tuning was not used in the series of simulations. Finally, global water resources were assessed on a subannual basis using a newly devised index. This index located water-stressed regions that were undetected in earlier studies. These regions, which are indicated by a gap in the subannual distribution of water availability and water use, include the Sahel, the Asian monsoon region, and southern Africa. The simulation results show that the reservoir operations of major reservoirs (>1 km3 and the allocation of environmental flow requirements can alter the population under high water stress by approximately −11% to +5% globally. The integrated model is applicable to

  3. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  4. Assessing the Problem Formulation in an Integrated Assessment Model: Implications for Climate Policy Decision-Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, G. G.; Reed, P. M.; Keller, K.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated assessment models (IAMs) are often used with the intent to aid in climate change decisionmaking. Numerous studies have analyzed the effects of parametric and/or structural uncertainties in IAMs, but uncertainties regarding the problem formulation are often overlooked. Here we use the Dynamic Integrated model of Climate and the Economy (DICE) to analyze the effects of uncertainty surrounding the problem formulation. The standard DICE model adopts a single objective to maximize a weighted sum of utilities of per-capita consumption. Decisionmakers, however, may be concerned with a broader range of values and preferences that are not captured by this a priori definition of utility. We reformulate the problem by introducing three additional objectives that represent values such as (i) reliably limiting global average warming to two degrees Celsius and minimizing both (ii) the costs of abatement and (iii) the damages due to climate change. We derive a set of Pareto-optimal solutions over which decisionmakers can trade-off and assess performance criteria a posteriori. We illustrate the potential for myopia in the traditional problem formulation and discuss the capability of this multiobjective formulation to provide decision support.

  5. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  6. Correlation of Stress Concentration Factors for T-Welded Connections – Finite Element Simulations and Fatigue Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Terán Méndez

    Full Text Available Abstract The stress concentration factors (SCFs in welded connections usually occur at zones with high stress levels. Stress concentrations reduce the fatigue behavior of welded connections in offshore structures and cracking can develop. By using the grinding technique, cracking can be eliminated. Stress concentration factors are defined as a ratio of maximum stress at the intersection to nominal stress on the brace. Defining the stress concentration factor is an important stage in the fatigue behavior of welded connections. Several approaches have evolved for designing structures with the classical S-N approach for estimating total life. This work correlates to the stress concentration factors of T-welded connections and the fatigue behavior. Stress concentration factors were computed with the finite element employing 3D T-welded connections with intact and grinding depth conditions. Then, T-welded connections were constructed with A36 plate steel and welded with E6013 electrodes to obtain the stress-life (S-N approach. The methodology from previous works was used to compute the SCF and fabricate the T-welded connections. The results indicated that the grinding process could restore the fatigue life of the T-welded connections for SCFs values in the range of 1.29. This value can be considered to be a low SCF value in T-welded connection. However, for higher SCF values, the fatigue life decreased, compromising and reducing the structural integrity of the T-welded connections.

  7. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    effect of the post-welding conditions when subjecting a friction stir weld to loading transverse to the weld line. The numerical model of the friction stir welded joint, employs a step-wise modeling approach to combine an in-situ weld simulation with a post-welding failure analysis. Using the commercial......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence...... the weld performance. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the main conflicts that arise when taking both the post-welding material conditions and stressestrain state into account in a subsequent structural analysis. The discussion is here based on a preliminary numerical study of the possible...

  8. On-line quality monitoring in short-circuit gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolfsson, S. [Univ. of Karlskrono/Ronneby (Sweden). Dept. of Signal Processing]|[Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Production and Materials Engineering; Bahrami, A. [Technology Center of Kronoberg, Vaexjoe (Sweden)]|[Lund Univ. (Sweden); Bolmsjoe, G. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Claesson, I. [Univ. of Karlskrono/Ronneby (Sweden)

    1999-02-01

    This paper addresses the problems involved in the automatic monitoring of the weld quality produced by robotized short-arc welding. A simple statistical change detection algorithm for the weld quality, the repeated Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT), was used. The algorithm may similarly be viewed as a cumulative sum (CUSUM) type test, and is well-suited to detecting sudden minor changes in the monitored test statistic. The test statistic is based on the variance of the weld voltage, wherein it will be shown that the variance decreases when the welding process is not operating under optimal conditions. The performance of the algorithm is assessed through the use of experimental data. The results obtained from the algorithm show that it is possible to detect changes in weld quality automatically and on-line.

  9. Laser-welded V-Cr-Ti alloys: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Smith, D.L.; Xu, Z.; Leong, K.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    A systematic study has been in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to examine the use of YaG or CO{sub 2} lasers to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the laser-welded materials. In addition, several postwelding heat treatments are being applied to the welded samples to evaluate their benefits, if any, to the structure and properties of the weldments. Hardness measurements are made across the welded regions of different samples to evaluate differences in the characteristics of various weldments. Several weldments were used to fabricate specimens for four-point bend tests. Several additional weldments were made with a YaG laser; here, the emphasis was on determining the optimal weld parameters to achieve deep penetration in the welds. A preliminary assessment was then made of the weldments on the basis of microstructure, hardness profiles, and defects.

  10. A multiaspect program integrity assessment of the cognitive-behavioral program EQUIP for incarcerated offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmond, P.; Overbeek, G.; Brugman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of correctional treatment have widely failed to assess program integrity. This study examined the program integrity of EQUIP in 34 treatment groups of incarcerated offenders, using a new multiaspect program integrity instrument (MIPIE). The first aim of our study was to

  11. Untangling the web : integrating energy and environmental policy instruments by assessing their interactions along power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simões, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation the necessity and benefits of developing integrated policy approaches to the energy systems in general, and power systems in particular were assessed. The research work covers not only the integration of energy and environment policy objectives, but also the integration of

  12. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  13. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  14. Portable electron beam weld chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Dimino, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of portable vacuum chamber for skate type electron beam welding are discussed. Construction and operational details of equipment are presented. Illustrations of equipment are provided.

  15. Effect of joint design and welding type on the flexural strength and weld penetration of Ti-6Al-4V alloy bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Resende Novais, Veridiana; Rodrigues Machado, Asbel; Soares, Carlos José; Araújo Raposo, Luís Henrique

    2015-05-01

    Framework longevity is a key factor for the success of complete-arch prostheses and commonly depends on the welding methods. However, no consensus has been reached on the joint design and welding type for improving framework resistance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of different joint designs and welding methods with tungsten inert gas (TIG) or laser to join titanium alloy bars (Ti-6Al-4V). Seventy titanium alloy bar specimens were prepared (3.18 mm in diameter × 40.0 mm in length) and divided into 7 groups (n=10): the C-control group consisting of intact specimens without joints and the remaining 6 groups consisting of specimens sectioned perpendicular to the long-axis and rejoined using an I-, X30-, or X45-shaped joint design with TIG welding (TI, TX30, and TX45) or laser welding (LI, LX30, and LX45). The specimens were tested with 3-point bending. The fracture surfaces were first evaluated with stereomicroscopy to measure the weld penetration area and then analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test, 1-way ANOVA and the Dunnett test, and the Pearson correlation test (α=.05). Specimens from the X30 and X45 groups showed higher flexural strength (Pwelded area (Pwelding type. TIG welded groups showed significantly higher flexural strength than the laser groups (PTIG welding also resulted in higher welded areas than laser welding for the I-shaped specimens. No significant differences were found for the weld penetration area in the X45 group, either for laser or TIG welding. SEM analysis showed more pores at the fracture surfaces of the laser specimens. Fracture surfaces indicative of regions of increased ductility were detected for the TIG specimens. TIG welding resulted in higher flexural strength for the joined titanium specimens than laser welding. For both welding methods, X30- and X45-shaped joint designs resulted in higher flexural strength and

  16. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Integrated Grants Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Integrated Management System collects contact information and other Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Learn how this data is collected, how it will be used, access to the data, the purpose of data collection, and record retention policies.

  17. Assessment of electrosurgical hand controls integrated into a laparoscopic grasper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown-Clerk, B.; Rousek, J.B.; Lowndes, B.R.; Eikhout, S.M.; Balogh, B.J.; Hallbeck, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively determine the optimal ergonomic placement of novel electrosurgical hand controls integrated into a standard laparoscopic grasper to optimize functionality. This device will allow laparoscopic surgeons to hand-operate standard

  18. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Integrated Contracts Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Integrated Contracts Management System collects contact information and other Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Learn how this data will be collected in the system, how it will be used, access to the data, and the purpose of data collection.

  19. Toward Integrated DoD Biosurveillance: Assessment and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Melinda; Fisher, Gail; Stevens, Clare

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the 2012 National Strategy for Biosurveillance, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) asked the Department of Defense (DoD) to review its biosurveillance programs, prioritize missions and desired outcomes, evaluate how DoD programs contribute to these, and assess the appropriateness and stability of the department's funding system for biosurveillance. DoD sought external analytic support through the RAND Arroyo Center. In response to the questions posed by OMB request, this study finds the following: (1) Current DoD biosurveillance supports three strategic missions. Based mostly on existing statute, the highest-priority mission is force health protection, followed by biological weapons defense and global health security. (2) Guidance issued by the White House on June 27, 2013, specified priorities for planning fiscal year 2015 budgets; it includes an explicit global health security priority, which strengthens the case for this as a key DoD biosurveillance strategic mission. (3) DoD biosurveillance also supports four desired outcomes: early warning and early detection, situational awareness, better decision making at all levels, and forecast of impacts. (4) Programs and measures that address priority missions-force health protection in particular-and desired outcomes should be prioritized over those that do not do so. (5) More near-real-time analysis and better internal and external integration could enhance the performance and value of the biosurveillance enterprise. (6) Improvements are needed in key enablers, including explicit doctrine/policy, efficient organization and governance, and increased staffing and improved facilities for the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC). (7) AFHSC has requested additional funding to fully implement its current responsibilities under the 2012 Memorandum of Understanding between the Assistant Secretaries of Defense for Health Affairs and for Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Defense Programs

  20. Integration of strategic environmental assessment in spatial planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørnøv, Lone

    The paper explores the similarities between the content of the EU directive, SEA practice and the existing spatial planning in Denmark, and how SEA can be integrated into plan making and plan implementation.......The paper explores the similarities between the content of the EU directive, SEA practice and the existing spatial planning in Denmark, and how SEA can be integrated into plan making and plan implementation....