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Sample records for weld heat treatment

  1. Induction heat treatment of laser welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Sørensen, Joakim Ilsing

    2003-01-01

    750º to 450º C. Initially, a simple analytical model was used to calculate the ideal energy contributions from a CO2 high power laser source together with an induction heat source such that the temperature can be kept at 600º C for 2.5 seconds. This knowledge was then used for the design......In this paper, a new approach based on induction heat-treatment of flat laser welded sheets is presented. With this new concept, the ductility of high strength steels GA260 with a thickness of 1.8 mm and CMn with a thickness of 2.13 mm is believed to be improved by prolonging the cooling time from...... of an induction coil. A number of systematic laboratory tests were then performed in order to study the effects of the coil on bead-on-plate laser welded samples. In these tests, important parameters such as coil current and distance between coil and sample were varied. Temperature measurements were made...

  2. Induction heat treatment of laser welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Sørensen, Joakim Ilsing

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach based on induction heat-treatment of flat laser welded sheets is presented. With this new concept, the ductility of high strength steels GA260 with a thickness of 1.8 mm and CMn with a thickness of 2.13 mm is believed to be improved by prolonging the cooling time from...... 750º to 450º C. Initially, a simple analytical model was used to calculate the ideal energy contributions from a CO2 high power laser source together with an induction heat source such that the temperature can be kept at 600º C for 2.5 seconds. This knowledge was then used for the design...... of an induction coil. A number of systematic laboratory tests were then performed in order to study the effects of the coil on bead-on-plate laser welded samples. In these tests, important parameters such as coil current and distance between coil and sample were varied. Temperature measurements were made...

  3. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wei [ORNL; Chen, Gaoqiang [ORNL; Chen, Jian [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  4. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  5. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  6. Recovery of Mechanical Properties of a 6061-T6 Aluminum Weld by Heat Treatment After Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Javier Serrano; Ambriz, Ricardo Rafael; López, Francisco Fernando Curiel; Vigueras, David Jaramillo

    2016-07-01

    The dilution effects in welds of a 6061-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy obtained by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA), using an ER4043 filler metal (Al-Si), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) were analyzed. The soft zone (55 to 70 HV0.1) formed by the microstructural transformation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was eliminated. The hardness measurements were presented on a traditional microhardness profile and mapping representation. A hardening effect of the fusion zone was observed; the hardness values were above 120 HV0.1 and tended to be uniform. This behavior could be attributed to the chemical composition of the filler metal, the Mg migration from the base to the weld metal, and the reversible process of the PWHT, which promotes precipitation hardening. Improvement for yield (260 MPa) and tensile strength (310 MPa) of the MIEA joints was observed; these values were similar to those obtained for the base metal. However, the presence of porosity in the fusion zone limits the ductility of the joints (4.3 pct). Even though the yield and tensile strengths of the base metal and welded joints were similar, the stress concentration due to porosity in the weld metal generated data dispersion in fatigue life. As a consequence, the high-cycle fatigue life decreases with respect to the base metal. In contrast, when the crack propagates under elastic conditions, the crack-tip singularity is affected by the porosity in the weld metal (stress liberator). This aspect, in conjunction with the hardening effect in joints subjected to PWHT, improves the fatigue crack growth rate when compared to the as-welded condition.

  7. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welds of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Murali Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT on microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar friction stir welding (FSW of AA2024-T6 to AA6351-T6. FSW is getting widened to be used to join the aluminum alloys. PWHT of AA2024 and AA6351 aluminum alloys are not reported so far even though these alloys are widely used in aerospace and automobile industries. A post weld solution treatment and subsequent ageing resulted in improvement in mechanical properties (hardness and tensile strength.

  8. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior ofthe Laser Continuous Heat Treatment Welded Joints of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Heping; JIN Xuejun

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviors of the welded joints of 2205 duplex stainless steel with the laser continuous heat treatment were investigated.The secondary austenite formation is the outcome of thermodynamic equilibrium breach of the alloy during heat treatment and the result of the continuous heat treatment which has the most important effect on the weld material.The partitioning behaviors of chromium and molybdenum as well as the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite have a remarkable influence on the composition of the individual phase.Mechanical examination of the laser trated weld demonstrates that the tensile strength and yield strength increase with increasing the amount of the secondary austenite.It is shown that the ultimate tensile strength of the 6 kW laser-treated weld is higher about 20 MPa than no heat treatment weld and the ductility can be further improved without compromising strength.The results indicate that the welding alters the corrosion behavior because of different post heat treatment power and the broad active peak is not identified which is attributed to the dissolution of the secondary austenitic in the ferrite phase.It is indicated that pitting resistance equivalent (PRE) values of base metal and 6 kW weld are higher than that of other welds; base metal is 33.7,6 kW weld 33.3,no treatment 32.4,4 kW weld 32.8,8 kW weld 32.5.The extent of corrosion resistance improvement after reheating treatment is mainly caused by the removal of nitrogen from ferritic regions,which occurred as a consequence of secondary austenite growth.

  9. Effects of heat treatment and welding process on superelastic behaviour and microstructure of micro electron beam welded NiTi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balz Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Medical devices with small dimensions made of superelastic NiTi become more popular, but joining these parts remains challenging. Since laser welding was found to be an option, electron beam welding seems to be an interesting alternative as it provides additional advantages due to the precise beam positioning and the high vacuum. Superelasticity is influenced by microstructure and surface layer composition that are mainly affected by welding process and by heat treatment and therefore will be investigated in the present paper.

  10. Effect of Groove Design and Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of P91 Steel Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The martensitic creep-resistant steel designated as ASTM A335 for plate and as P91 for pipe is primarily used for high-temperature and high-pressure applications in steam power plants due to its excellent high-temperature properties such as high creep strength, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and so on. However, in the case of welded joints of such steels, the presence of an inter-critical heat-affected zone (IC-HAZ) can cause the joint to have lower creep strength than the base metal. In the present study, the effect of post-welding heat treatment (PWHT) and weld groove designs on the overall microstructure and mechanical properties of P91 steel pipe welds produced by the gas tungsten arc welding process was studied. Various regions of welded joints were characterized in detail for hardness and metallographic and tensile properties. Sub-size tensile samples were also tested to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) with respect to PWHT. After PWHT, a homogenous microstructure was observed in the HAZ and tensile test fracture samples revealed shifting of the fracture location from the IC-HAZ to the fine-grained heat-affected zone. Before PWHT, the conventional V-grooved welded joints exhibited higher tensile strength compared to the narrow-grooved joints. However, after PWHT, both narrow- and V-grooved joints exhibited similar strength. Fractography of the samples indicates the presence of carbide precipitates such as Cr23C6, VC, and NbC on the fracture surface.

  11. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the mechanical and corrosion behaviour of welded Al-Fe-Si alloy joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isiaka Oluwole OLADELE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Al-Fe-Si alloy was joined by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW process and the effects of post weld heat treatment (PWHT on the mechanical (tensile and hardness properties, corrosion behaviour and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated. The welded samples were divided into as-weld (AW, PWHT, base metal (BM and heat treated base metal (HT BM samples. Artificial aging was carried out on part of the welded sample at 177 °C with holding time of 8 hours to obtain the PWHT samples. The various samples were subjected to tensile, hardness and corrosion tests while microstructures of the fractured surfaces were viewed under optical microscope. From the results, it was observed that corrosion susceptibility of the alloy in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution was highly reduced after PWHT. The hardness was reduced after PWHT while the yield strength and joint efficiency was improved compared to the AW sample. The improvement in corrosion resistance, yield strength and joint efficiency are 78, 8.4 and 8.7 %, respectively.

  12. Influences of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties of friction stir welded AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabari, S. Sree; Balasubramanian, V.; Malarvizhi, S.; Reddy, G. Madusudhan

    2015-12-01

    AA 2519-T87 is an aluminium alloy that principally contains Cu as an alloying element and is a new grade of Al-Cu alloy system. This material is a potential candidate for light combat military vehicles. Fusion welding of this alloy leads to hot cracking, porosity and alloy segregation in the weld metal region. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process which can overcome the above mentioned problems. However, the FSW of age hardenable aluminium alloys results in poor tensile properties in the as-welded condition (AW). Hence, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is used to enhance deteriorated tensile properties of FSW joints. In this work, the effect of PWHT, namely artificial ageing (AA) and solution treatment (ST) followed by ageing (STA) on the microstructure, tensile properties and microhardness were systematically investigated. The microstructural features of the weld joints were characterised using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The tensile strength and microhardness of the joints were correlated with the grain size, precipitate size, shape and its distribution. From the investigation, it was found that STA treatment is beneficial in enhancing the tensile strength of the FSW joints of AA2519-T87 alloy and this is mainly due to the presence of fine and densely distributed precipitates in the stir zone.

  13. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN TITANIUM ALLOY DURING ELECTRON BEAM LOCAL POST-WELD HEAT TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Furong; Huo Lixing; Zhang Yufeng; Liu Fangjun; Chen Gang

    2005-01-01

    The distributions of temperature and residual stresses in thin plates of BT20 titanium alloy are numerically analyzed by three-dimensional finite element software during electron beam welding and electron beam local post-weld heat treatment (EBLPWHT). Combined with numerical calculating results, the effects of different EBLPWHT mode and parameters, including heat treating position,heating width and heating time, on the distribution of welding residual stresses are analyzed. The results show that, the residual tensile stresses in weld center can be largely decreased when the weld is heat treated at back preface of the plate. The numerical results also indicated that the magnitude of the residual longitudinal stresses of the weld and the zone vicinity of the weld is decreased, and the range of the residual longitudinal stresses is increased along with the increase of heating width and heating time.

  14. Effect of Laser Heat Treatment on Microstructures of 1Cr5Mo Steel Welded Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of 1Cr5Mo heat-resistant steel welded joint was treated with CO2 laser,the microstructure and grain size grades of welded joints before and after laser heat treatment (LHT were analyzed with 4XC type optical microscope (OM,and the distribution of residual stress and retained austenite content in the surface of the welded joints were measured with X-ray diffraction (XRD stress tester.The results show that the grains of 1Cr5Mo steel welded joints are refined by LHT,and the microstructure uniformity improves significantly,the grain levels of welded zone,fusion zone,overheated zone and normalized zone increase from level 9,level 9.8,level 8 and level 10.7 to level 10,level 10.2,level 8.5 and level 11 respectively,the mechanical weak areas reduce from overheated zone,welded zone and fusion zone to the overheated zone.The tensile residual stress in the welded joint surface is eliminated by LHT and a layer of compressive residual stress with thickness of about 0.28mm is formed.The residual austenite content in the welded joint surface increases after LHT,of which the distribution is more uniform and conducive to the improvement of mechanical properties.

  15. Effects of post weld heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of dissimilar weld of supermartensític stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares,Sérgio Souto Maior; Rodrigues,Clóvis Ribeiro; Pardal,Juan Manuel; Barbosa,Edvan da Silva; Abreu,Hamilton Ferreira Gomes de

    2014-01-01

    A supermartensitic stainless steel with composition 12.2%Cr-5.8%Ni-1.90%Mo-0.028%C (%wt.) was welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with superduplex stainless steel filler metal. Post weld heat treatments (PWHT) at 650 ºC for different periods of time were performed in order to decrease the hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This paper deals with the effect of these heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Mechanical strength of the weld jo...

  16. Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Similar- and Dissimilar-Alloy Friction Stir Welded Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Sinke, Jos

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process with relatively low welding temperatures. Nevertheless, the mechanical properties of friction stir welded blanks are degraded after welding. Indeed, both strength and ductility of the welds are decreased after welding. Often, the resulting friction stir welded blanks need to be formed to their final structural shape. Therefore, the formability of friction stir welded blanks is of primary importance in the manufacturing of structural parts. This paper studies how the mechanical properties and particularly formability of friction stir welded blanks can be improved by applying a post weld heat treatment. Two aluminum alloys from 2000 and 7000 series, namely 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study. The sheet thickness of both materials is 2,0 mm. The selected alloys are welded in three configurations: 2024-T3 and 2024-T3, 7075-T6 and 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 and 7075-T6. The resulting welds are naturally aged for a few months. Three sets of standard dog bone shape tensile test specimens are then machined from the welds. The first set of the specimens is tested without any heat treatment. The second set of the specimens is solution heat treated and quenched before testing. The third set of the specimens is solution heat treated, quenched, and naturally aged for a week before testing. The mechanical properties of the three different sets of specimens are compared with each other. It is shown that careful selection of post weld heat-treatment can greatly improve the formability of friction stir welded blanks.

  17. On Post-Weld Heat Treatment of a Single Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloy Joint by Linear Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three types of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT, i.e. solution treatment + primary aging + secondary aging (I, secondary aging (II, and primary aging + secondary aging (III, were applied to a single crystal nickel-based superalloy joint made with linear friction welding (LFW. The results show that the grains in the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ coarsen seriously and the primary γ' phase in the TMAZ precipitates unevenly after PWHT I. The primary γ' phase in the TMAZ and weld zone (WZ precipitates insufficiently and fine granular secondary γ' phase is observed in the matrix after PWHT II. After PWHT III, the primary γ' phase precipitates more sufficiently and evenly compared to PWHTs I and II. Moreover, the grains in the TMAZ have not coarsened seriously and fine granular secondary γ' phase is not found after PWHT III. PWHT III seems more suitable to the LFWed single crystal nickel-based superalloy joints when performing PWHT.

  18. Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Strength of Three Aluminum Alloys Used in Light Poles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig C. Menzemer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The conjoint influence of welding and artificial aging on mechanical properties were investigated for extrusions of aluminum alloy 6063, 6061, and 6005A. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on the aluminum alloys 6063-T4, 6061-T4, and 6005A-T1 in both the as-received (AR and as-welded (AW conditions. Tensile tests were also conducted on the AR and AW alloys, subsequent to artificial aging. The welding process used was gas metal arc (GMAW with spray transfer using 120–220 A of current at 22 V. The artificial aging used was a precipitation heat treatment for 6 h at 182 °C (360 °F. Tensile tests revealed the welded aluminum alloys to have lower strength, both for yield and ultimate tensile strength, when compared to the as-received un-welded counterpart. The beneficial influence of post weld heat treatment (PWHT on strength and ductility is presented and discussed in terms of current design provisions for welded aluminum light pole structures.

  19. Investigation into the influence of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure and hardness of Inconel X-750

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachya Peasura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a post-weld heat treatment for a precipitation-hardened nickel alloy. Inconel X-750 is a nickel-based superalloy for gas tungsten arc welding processes. The materials were heat-treated in two steps: solution and aging. The post-weld heat treatment variables examined in this study included post-weld heat treatment temperatures of 705°C, 775°C, and 845°C and post-weld heat treatment time of 2–24 h in 2-h increments. The resulting materials were examined using the full factorial design of experiments to determine the resulting material hardness and observed with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone. The results show that a longer post-weld heat treatment time corresponds to larger γ′ precipitates and a smaller amount of Cr23C6 at the grain boundaries, which can decrease the overall hardness. The post-weld heat treatment analysis indicates that an increase in the amount of γ′ results in better mechanical properties for particles with octagonal shapes and a small size. A factorial analysis, which was conducted on the relationship between the post-weld heat treatment temperature and time to the hardness of the fusion zone, had a 95% confidence level.

  20. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviors of NiTi and Stainless Steel Laser-Welded Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshekari, G. R.; Saatchi, A.; Kermanpur, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Effects of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of NiTi shape memory wire, laser welded to the 304 stainless steel wire were investigated. The results showed that PWHT at 200 °C increased corrosion resistance and tensile strength of the joint up to ~1.8 times that of the as-weld joint, with no heat treatment. On the contrary, precipitation of neoteric intermetallic compounds like Fe2Ti, Cr2Ti, FeNi, Ni3Ti, and Ti2Ni in the welded region deteriorated these properties, when PWHT was conducted at 400 °C. Due to the vital effects of the PWHT performed after the laser welding, careful control of the PWHT temperature was found to be a prerequisite for achievement of desirable properties in the dissimilar NiTi-304 stainless steel laser-welded wires.

  1. Effect of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. SIVARAJ; D. KANAGARAJAN; V. BALASUBRAMANIAN

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of post weld heat treatments, namely artificial ageing and solution treatment followed by artificial ageing, on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 mm thick friction stir welded joints of precipitation hardenable high strength armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy. The tensile properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and notch tensile strength, are evaluated and correlated with the microhardness and microstructural features. The scanning electron microscope is used to characterie the fracture surfaces. The solution treatment followed by ageing heat treatment cycle is found to be marginally beneficial in improving the tensile properties of friction stir welds of AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy.

  2. Investigation into the Influence of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Friction Stir Welded AA6061 Al-Alloy Plates with Different Temper Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    İpekoğlu, Güven; Erim, Seçil; Çam, Gürel

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir butt-joined AA6061 Al-alloy plates both in O and T6-temper conditions was investigated by detailed microstructural investigations and microhardness measurements, in combination with transverse tensile testing. It was determined that the PWHT might result in abnormal grain growth (AGG) in the weld zone particularly in the joints produced in O-temper condition depending on the weld parameters used during friction stir welding. The PWHT generally led to an improvement in the mechanical properties even if AGG took place. Thus, the post-weld heat-treated joints exhibited mechanical properties much higher than those of respective as-welded plates and comparable to those of the respective base plates.

  3. Effects of the laser beam superficial heat treatment on the gas Tungsten arc Ti-6al-4v welded metal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, I.; Dontu, Octavian; Geanta, V.; Ganatsios, S.

    2008-03-01

    The microstructure of the weld and the extent to which it is different from the thermo-mechanically processed base material is strongly influenced by the thermal cycle of welding. The mechanical properties of composite weld structures in titanium alloys depend on structural characteristics of each region (weld, base material and heat affected area), influenced by the specific thermal cycle imposed during welding and the subsequent post-weld heat treatment. In order to improve the as-welded metal toughness and ductility, the welded metal was subjected to various post weld laser heat treatments, above and below beta transus temperature in a shielding atmosphere of pure argon. Standard micro-hardness measurements and tensile strength techniques showed higher mechanical properties of the heat treated samples in different conditions with respect to the base metal. Metallographic investigations attribute this to the formation of α'phases in heat treated material, especially in the weld metal.

  4. Investigation of residual stresses in welded joints of heat-resistant magnesium alloy ML10 after electrodynamic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Lobanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In repair of aircraft structures of magnesium alloy ML10, the argon arc non-consumable electrode welding is used. In this case, the residual welding stresses occur in repair welds, being one of the causes for reducing the service characteristics of the restored products. Residual stresses arise as a result of welding. Post-weld heat treatment is used to reduce the residual stresses. The heat treatment, which occurs after welding, increases the cost of repair. This leads to the search for alternative methods to control the stressed state of welded joints, one of which is electrodynamic treatment, which reduces the level of residual stresses in repair welds, and as a consequence, the cost of the welding repair in restoring aircraft structures. It was found from the results of experiments carried out, that the electrodynamic treatment allows reduces the initial level of stresses in welded joints, reaching 120 MPa, to 30 MPa, and at definite geometric characteristics of the specimens forming the field of compressive stresses, the values of which are equal to –50 MPa. It is shown that the optimum distance between the zones of treatment, being 5 mm, provides the guaranteed covering the zones of electrodynamic effect and, as a consequence, the maximum efficiency of the electric dynamic treatment.

  5. Residual stress distributions in a P91 steel-pipe girth weld before and after post weld heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddea, S., E-mail: s.paddea@open.ac.uk [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Francis, J.A. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX, Oxon (United Kingdom); Bouchard, P.J. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Shibli, I.A. [European Technology Development Ltd., Leatherhead KT22 7RD, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stresses in a pipe girth weld in P91 steel have been measured in both the as-welded and PWHT conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest tensile residual stresses coincided with the HAZ boundary and the microstructural region that is prone to type IV cracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compressive residual stresses were measured in the weld metal, in a location corresponding to the final weld pass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The location of the peak compressive stresses can be explained by the effect of solid-state phase transformation. - Abstract: In this study the residual stresses in a pipe girth weld in a ferritic-martensitic power plant steel were measured by neutron diffraction and compared with the corresponding metallurgical zones in the weld region. It was found that, in both the as-welded and post-weld heat treated condition, the highest tensile stresses resided near the outer boundary of the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and towards the weld root region. Substantial tensile direct and hydrostatic stresses existed across the HAZ, including the fine-grained and intercritically annealed regions, where premature type IV creep failures manifest in 9-12 Cr steel welds. Compressive stresses were found in the weld metal coinciding with the last weld bead to be deposited. Constrained cooling tests on test coupons illustrated that these compressive stresses can be explained in terms of the influence that solid-state phase transformations have on the accumulation of stress in welds.

  6. 3D modelling of a multi pass dissimilar tube welding and post weld heat treatment of nickel based alloy and chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar-Krishnasamy, Ram, E-mail: ram.kumar.krishnasamy@iwm.fraunhofer.d [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials, Woehlerstrasse 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Siegele, Dieter [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials, Woehlerstrasse 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    A dissimilar tube welding is performed between the nickel based Alloy617 and creep resistant steel VM12 using the former as the weld material. SYSWELD welding software is used to model the thermal and mechanical analysis. A readily available thermal history is used to calibrate the heat source input for the thermal analysis to generate the adequate thermal cycle by fitting the welding velocity, heat intensity factor of the GOLDAK heat source and the length of molten zone. The transient temperature field is then incorporated as the input for the mechanical analysis to obtain the residual stresses in which the phase transformation of the materials during welding is taken into account. Subsequently, the weld materials are characterized by using the Norton's creep law to determine the Norton parameters based on relaxation experiments. The residual stresses generated after the multi pass welding by SYSWELD is transferred into ABAQUS as the initial condition for the post weld heat treatment (PWHT) simulation. The simulations show that the residual stresses reduce in magnitude but still present even after PWHT.

  7. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Structure and Properties of Explosion Welded Bimetal Kh20N80 + AD1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmorgun, V. G.; Arisova, V. N.; Slautin, O. V.; Taube, A. O.; Bakuntseva, V. M.

    2017-05-01

    Results of a study of the effect of heat treatment on the microhardness, structure and phase composition of diffusion zone in explosion-welded `refractory nickel alloy Kh20N80 + aluminum alloy AD1' bimetal are presented.

  9. Special Features of Structure Formation in an Explosion-Welded Magnesium-Aluminum Composite Under Deformation and Subsequent Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, L. M.; Arisova, V. N.; Trykov, Yu. P.; Ponomareva, I. A.; Trudov, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of bending deformation and subsequent heat treatment on the variation of microhardness and structure of explosion-welded magnesium-aluminum layered composite material MA2-1 - AD1 is studied.

  10. Effect of Heat Treatment on Mechanical Properties and Phase Composition of Magnesium-Aluminum Composite Prepared by Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisova, V. N.; Trykov, Yu. P.; Slautin, O. V.; Ponomareva, I. A.; Kondakov, A. E.

    2015-09-01

    Results are given for a study of the effect of heat treatment regimes on the nature of change in micromechanical properties and phase composition of magnesium-aluminum composite material AD1-MA2-1 prepared by explosive welding.

  11. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of armor grade AA7075 aluminum alloy friction stir weld nugget zone – Effect of post weld heat treatment and addition of boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW of high strength aluminum alloys has been emerged as an alternative joining technique to avoid the problems during fusion welding. In recent times FSW is being used for armor grade AA7075 aluminum alloy in defense, aerospace and marine applications where it has to serve in non uniform loading and corrosive environments. Even though friction stir welds of AA7075 alloy possess better mechanical properties but suffer from poor corrosion resistance. The present work involves use of retrogression and reaging (RRA post weld heat treatment to improve the corrosion resistance of welded joints of aluminum alloys. An attempt also has been made to change the chemical composition of the weld nugget by adding B4C nano particles with the aid of the FSW on a specially prepared base metal plate in butt position. The effects of peak aged condition (T6, RRA and addition of B4C nano particles on microstructure, hardness and pitting corrosion of nugget zone of the friction stir welds of AA7075 alloy have been studied. Even though RRA improved the pitting corrosion resistance, its hardness was slightly lost. Significant improvement in pitting corrosion resistance was achieved with addition of boron carbide powder and post weld heat treatment of RRA.

  12. Effect of post-weld heat treatment on microstructure, hardness and low-temperature impact toughness of electron beam welds of NIFS-HEAT-2 and CEA-J57 heats of V–4Ti–4Cr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tsisar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bead-on-plate electron beam welding in high vacuum atmosphere was applied to the plates of NIFS-HEAT-2 and CEA-J57 heats of V–4Ti–4Cr alloy. Effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT in the temperature range 673–1273K on the hardness, impact toughness at 77K and microstructure of weld metal was investigated. After PWHT at 773K, hardness of weld metal slightly decreases from 180HV100 (as-welded state to ∼170HV100 while absorbed energy increases up to ∼10J showing ductile fracture mode. PWHT at 973K results in re-hardening of weld metal up to ∼180HV100 caused by re-precipitation of Ti–C,O,N precipitates and corresponding decreasing absorbed energy to ∼2J with brittle fracture mode. PWHT in-between 1073–1273K results in gradual recovery of hardness towards values comparable with those of base metal. Impact toughness (77 K of weld metal after PWHT at 1073K is not recovered nether to the value in as-welded state nor to that one of base metal.

  13. Effects of zonal heat treatment on residual stresses and mechanical properties of electron beam welded TC4 alloy plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Mei-juan; LIU Jin-he

    2009-01-01

    Zonal heat treatment(ZHT) was conducted in situ to 14.5 mm-thick TC4 alloy plates by means of defocused electron beam after welding. The effects of ZHT on residual stresses, microstructures and mechanical properties of electron beam welded joints were investigated. Experimental results show residual stresses after welding are mostly relieved through ZHT, and the maximum values of longitudinal tensile stress and transverse compressive stress reduce by 76% and 65%, respectively. The tensile strength and ductility of welded joint after ZHT at slow scanning velocity are improved because of the reduction of residual stress and the microstructural changes of the base and weld metal. ZHT at fast scanning velocity is detrimental to the ductility of welded joint, which is resulted from insufficiently coarsened alpha phase in the fusion zone and the appearance of martensite in the base metal.

  14. Effect of localized heat treatment on the weld line shift in deep drawing of tailor welded blanks (TWBs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satya Suresh V. V., N.; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash; Ratna Sudheer, G.

    2016-10-01

    This work relates to warm forming of a tailor welded blank (TWB) where in two or more material blanks are welded together and subjected to localized heating before forming to obtain a desired square cup shape. A novel method of selective heating is carried out by using a split punch and a die in which the high strength blank material is subjected to localized heating by the hot punch so as to induce tailored properties by selective heating to soften it thus reducing and controlling the movement of the weld line during forming. TWB sheets which has different thickness/strength need selective heating and cooling to control weld line shift. The stronger material is subjected to localized softening and thereby decreasing the flow stress thus allowing the blank material to flow into the die cavity. Care has been taken so that the heat is not transferred to the weaker blank material otherwise it will lead to further weakening of the part. For this, cooling mechanism is provided by circulating ice water/coolant to the weaker part. The present work is aimed at studying the weld line shift of TWB's of two different materials namely IFHS and DP 590. Cracks appeared in the weld during forming for drawing ratios greater than 1.7. From the results it was found that the weld line shift is considerably reduced as compared with the results using a single punch. Also it was noticed that there is considerable increase in cup height. Local softening increased the formability of the high strength blank material.

  15. PENGARUH VARIASI SUHU POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT ANNEALING TERHADAP SIFAT MEKANIS MATERIAL BAJA EMS-45 DENGAN METODE PENGELASAN SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusiyanto Rusiyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan Untuk mengetahui nilai kekerasan Vickers material Baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan dan setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan tanpa post weld heat treatment annealing, Untuk mengetahui berapakah suhu optimal post weld heat treatment annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 dengan variasi suhu yang digunakan 350 o C, 550 o C, dan 750 C. Untuk mengetahui struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 akibat variasi suhu post weld heat treatment annealing pada proses pengelasan dengan menggunakan metode pengelasan shielded metal arc welding. Bahan atau material dasar yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah Baja EMS-45 dengan ketebalan pelat 10 mm, lebar pelat 20 mm dan panjang 100 mm. Berdasarkan hasil pengujian nilai kekerasan tertinggi setelah proses pengelasan terletak pada daerah Logam Las. Pengelasan non PWHT memiliki nilai kekerasan paling tinggi setelah proses pengelasan yaitu sebesar 183,2 VHN. Suhu optimal Post Weld Heat Treatment Annealing untuk material baja EMS-45 adalah pada suhu 750 C. Karena pada PWHT pada suhu tersebut mengalami penurunan kekerasan yang besar yaitu sebesar 127,2 VHN, sehingga material baja EMS-45 dapat memperbaiki sifat mampu mesinnya. Struktur mikro dari material baja EMS-45 sebelum proses pengelasan berupa grafit serpih, perlit dan ferit, setelah dilakukan proses pengelasan mempunyai struktur mikro berupa matrik ferit dan grafit pada daerah logam las, matrik perlit kasar dan grafit serpih pada daerah HAZ dan struktur perlit, grafit serpih dan ferit pada daerah logam induk o o

  16. Effects of Heat Treatment on Interface Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Explosively Welded Ck60/St37 Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Majid; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Hashemi, Seyyed Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    This study explores the effects of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of explosively welded Ck60 steel/St37 steel. The objective is to find an economical way for manufacturing bimetallic plates that can be used in the rolling stand of hot rolling mill units. The explosive ratio and stand-off distance are set at 1.7 and 1.5 t ( t = flyer thickness), respectively. Since explosive welding is accompanied by such undesirable metallurgical effects as remarkable hardening, severe plastic deformation, and even formation of local melted zones near the interface, heat treatment is required to overcome or alleviate these adverse effects. For this purpose, the composites are subjected to heat treatment in a temperature range of 600-700 °C at a rate of 90 °C/h for 1 h. Results demonstrate well-bonded composite plates with a wavy interface. In the as-welded case, vortex zones are formed along the interface; however, they are transformed into fine grains upon heat treatment. Microhardness is also observed to be maximum near the interface in the welded case before it decreases with increasing temperature. Shear strength is the highest in the as-welded specimen, which later decreases as a result of heat treatment. Moreover, the energy absorbed by the heat-treated specimens is observed to increase with increasing temperature so that the lowest value of absorbed energy belongs to the as-welded specimen. Finally, fractography is carried out using the scanning electron microscope to examine the specimens subjected to shear and impact tests. As a result of heat treatment, fracture surfaces exhibit dimpled ruptures and fail in the mixed mode, while failure in the as-welded specimens predominantly occurs in the brittle mode.

  17. Effects of post-weld heat treatment on dissimilar metal joint between aluminum alloy and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Honggang, E-mail: donghg@dlut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116085 (China); Liao Chuanqing; Yang Liqun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116085 (China); Dong Chuang [Key Lab of Materials Modification, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116085 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al alloy was joined to stainless steel with Zn-15Al flux-cored filler wire. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of post-weld heat treatment on joint performance were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of Zn-rich phases in the weld changed with PWHT conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fine Zn-rich phases uniformly distributed in the weld enhanced the joint strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fractured surfaces of the specimens after tensile testing were examined. - Abstract: Lap joining of 5A02 aluminum alloy to 304 stainless steel sheets was conducted by gas tungsten arc welding with Zn-15%Al flux-cored filler wire, and the effects of the temperature and duration time during post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the resultant joints were investigated. The experimental results show that the concentration and size of the Zn-rich phases in the weld, especially along the weld/steel interface, changed with different temperature and duration time, and consequently affected the joint strength. The fine Zn-rich phases uniformly distributed in the weld could enhance the joint strength; however, the coarse Zn-rich phases along the interfacial layer would degrade the bonding strength of the interfacial layer. The fractured surfaces of the specimens after tensile testing were also examined.

  18. Effect of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sivaraj

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effects of post weld heat treatments, namely artificial ageing and solution treatment followed by artificial ageing, on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 mm thick friction stir welded joints of precipitation hardenable high strength armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy. The tensile properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and notch tensile strength, are evaluated and correlated with the microhardness and microstructural features. The scanning electron microscope is used to characterie the fracture surfaces. The solution treatment followed by ageing heat treatment cycle is found to be marginally beneficial in improving the tensile properties of friction stir welds of AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy.

  19. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Hot Impact Toughness of Various Zones of P91 Welded Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    The new generation super critical thermal power plants are required to operate at enhanced thermal efficiency of over 50% to reduce the fuel consumption and environmental pollution. Creep strength-enhanced ferritic steels, commonly known as Cr-Mo alloys such as P91 (X10CrMoVNb 9-1) are such material of choice for the next generation power plants. The operating requirement of these next generation power plants is that steam temperature of around 650 °C is maintained. For such high-temperature application, creep strength of material is the primary consideration together with adequate weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) toughness. Present work deals with the effect of high service temperature on impact toughness of P91 (X10CrMoVNb 9-1) base material, weld fusion zone, and HAZ. The impact toughness of HAZ for conventional weld groove design and narrow weld groove design has been evaluated experimentally in as-welded and at different post-weld heat treatment conditions. Fractography of the impact toughness specimens of base metal, weld fusion zone, and HAZ was carried out using scanning electron microscope. The effects of heat treatment schemes on the percentage of element present at the fracture surface were also studied.

  20. Effect of heat treatment of formation of columnar ferrite structure in explosively welded titanium/hypoeutectoid steel joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morizono, Y. [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan); Nishida, M.; Chiba, A.; Yamamuro, T. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Explosive welding of titanium to hypoeutectoid steel (SS 400, 0.09 mass% C) was carried out, and interfacial aspects of as-welded and heat treated states have been investigated with a focus on microstructures of the steel. In as-welded joint, plastic flow occurred by high velocity collision was observed in the vicinity of the interface. The steel in the joints retained equiaxed structure consisting of ferrite and pearlite even after prolonged heat treatment up to 1173 K. Columnar grains were generated in the steel near the interface by the heat treatment at 1223 K and above. Although the region of the columnar ferrite structure increased with increasing heating temperature and holding time, texture with specific crystal orientation was not confirmed. It was found that such a microstructural change in the steel was closely related to constituent phases formed at the bonding interface. The formation mechanism of the columnar structure was also discussed. (orig.)

  1. Application of explosive welding to heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, G.

    1983-10-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: advantages of explosive welding; principle of explosive welding; explosive welding of tubes; metallurgy of explosive welds (micrographs; microhardness); tubular heat exchangers; plugging; sleeving; retubing; construction of new heat exchangers; thermal sleeves.

  2. Optimisation of post-weld heat treatment — A simple, practical method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Rodriguez; S K Ray; A K Bhaduri

    2003-06-01

    The authors have evolved an empirical method for characterizing resistance to ductile fracture using two parameters $\\Gamma _f$ and $\\eta_f$ that can be determined from tensile test data of smooth cylindrical specimens. This method stipulates that the post-necking regime during tensile deformation is dominated by microvoid growth and coalescence processes, and therefore the energy absorbed in this regime can be used to estimate the resistance of the necked region to ductile fracture. The test procedure employed is simple and does not require gauge-length extensometry, a distinct advantage at non-ambient temperatures. The tests are carried out in a screw-driven machine at a constant crosshead speed, with online computerized acquisition of load-time data; it is also necessary to have a prior precise calibration for the (nonlinear) elastic deformation of the load train. The method of computing $\\Gamma_f$ and $\\eta_f$ , from tensile data is described, and its engineering application demonstrated by characterizing the effect of ageing of two dissimilar metal welds, namely Alloy 800/2.25Cr–1Mo steel and Alloy 800/9Cr–1Mo steel. From these results, it has been established that this procedure of estimating the ductile fracture toughness from tensile tests can be used as a simple, practical method for optimisation of post-weld heat treatment of weld joints.

  3. Effect of post-weld heat treatment on the mechanical properties of CLAM/316L dissimilar joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Junyu [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Huang, Bo [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wu, Qingsheng, E-mail: qingsheng.wu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Chunjing; Huang, Qunying [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Dissimilar joints between CLAM and 316L steels welded by TIG were investigated. • After PWHTs, the hardening in HAZ on the CLAM steel side decreased remarkably. • Tempering at 740 °C for 2 h was considered as the preferable treatment rule. - Abstract: Dissimilar welding between China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel and 316L austenitic stainless steel was investigated to achieve the reliable connection between test blanket modules (TBMs) and piping system in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The dissimilar joints were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with a filler material type-309. In order to stabilize the microstructure and improve the strength and toughness, post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) of tempering at 740 °C, 780 °C and 820 °C, respectively, for 2 h were performed. The microstructure observation showed that tempering at 740 °C for 2 h was the preferable PWHT rule in this work. After the treatment, the hardening in heat affected zone (HAZ) on the CLAM steel side decreased remarkably. The tensile strength of the joint was roughly the same as that of the base metal. The impact toughness of HAZ on the CLAM steel side was 77% of that of the base metal. The absorbed energy of HAZ of 316L steel decreased by 93 J, and that of weld metal (WM) was 110 J after the treatment.

  4. Microstructural changes in padding welds made from the 713C alloy after heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Lachowicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The following paper presents the results of the metallographic research of the padding welds made from cast alloy Inconel 713C that had undergone heat treatment in four different time and temperature variants. Annealing was applied at temperatures 1150oC and 950oC. Theresults of the research showed a strong coalescence of precipitation of the intermetalic γ’ phase (Ni3Al, resulting in formation ofsubgrains. The coalescence of the γ’ particles ran simultaneously with a diffusive decomposition of carbides (NbTiC, which caused thesupersaturation of the γ’ phase with niobium, and the loss of its coherence with austenite γ. The phenomenon of the formation of subgrains intensified with the lengthening of the time of annealing. The analysis of the results showed that heating the alloy that had undergone pad welding to the temperatures used in the research is detrimental to the alloy because of the loss of the strengthening of the coherent γ’ phase and the increase of the brittleness.

  5. Effect of Prior and Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Electron Beam Weldments of (α + β) Titanium alloy Ti-5Al-3Mo-1.5V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil Kumar, V.; Gupta, R. K.; Manwatkar, Sushant K.; Ramkumar, P.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloy Ti5Al3Mo1.5V is used in the fabrication of critical engine components for space applications. Double vacuum arc re-melted and (α + β) forged blocks were sliced into 10-mm-thick plates and subjected to electron beam welding (EBW) with five different variants of prior and post-weld heat treatment conditions. Effects of various heat treatment conditions on the mechanical properties of the weldments have been studied. The welded coupons were characterized for microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture analysis. An optimized heat treatment and welding sequence has been suggested. Weld efficiency of 90% could be achieved. Weldment has shown optimum properties in solution treated and aged condition. Heat-affected zone adjacent to weld fusion line is found to have lowest hardness in all conditions.

  6. [Effect of different heat treatment on mechanical properties and microstructure of laser welding CoCr-NiCr dissimilar alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rui-ying; Li, Chang-yi; Han, Ya-jing; Hu, Xin; Zhang, Lian-yun

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of heat treatment and porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) processing on mechanical properties and microstructure of laser welding CoCr-NiCr dissimilar alloys. Samples of CoCr-NiCr dissimilar alloys with 0.5 mm thickness were laser-welded single-side under the setting parameters of 280 V, 10 ms pulse duration. After being welded, samples were randomly assigned to three groups, 10 each. Group1 and 2 received heat treatment and PFM processing, respectively. Group 3 was control group without any treatment. Tensile strength, microstructure and element distribution of samples in the three groups were tested and observed using tensile test, metallographic examinations, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. After heat treatment and PFM processing, tensile strength of the samples were (537.15 +/- 43.91) MPa and (534.58 +/- 48.47) MPa respectively, and elongation rates in Group 1 and 2 were (7.65 +/- 0.73)% and (7.40 +/- 0.45)%. Ductile structure can be found on tensile fracture surface of samples and it was more obvious in heat treatment group than in PFM group. The results of EDS analysis indicated that certain CoCr alloy diffused towards fusion zone and NiCr side after heat treatment and PFM processing. Compared with PFM processing group, the diffusion in the heat treatment group was more obvious. Heat treatment and PFM processing can improve the mechanical properties and microstructure of welded CoCr-NiCr dissimilar alloy to a certain degree. The improvements are more obvious with heat treatment than with porcelain treatment.

  7. Effects of laser heat treatment on salt spray corrosion of 1Cr5Mo heat resistant steel welding joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔德军; 郭卫

    2015-01-01

    The surface of 1Cr5Mo heat-resistant steel welding joint was processed with CO2 laser, and the corrosion behaviors before and after laser heat treatment (LHT) were investigated in the salt spray corrosion environments. The microstructures, phases, residual stresses and retained austenite content of 1Cr5Mo steel welding joint before and after LHT were analyzed with optical microscope and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The cracking morphologies and chemical compositions of corrosion products after salt spray corrosion were analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), respectively, the polarization curves were measured on a PS-268A type electrochemical workstation, and the mechanism of corrosion resistance by LHT was investigated as well. The results show that the passive film of original sample is destroyed owing to the corrosive media penetrating into the subsurface, resulting in the redox reaction. The content of residual austenite in the surface and the self-corrosion potential are increased by LHT, which is contributed to improving the capability of salt spray corrosion resistance.

  8. The Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment in Alloy 82/182 Dissimilar Metal Weld between Low Alloy Steel and 316L Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Hong, Jong-Dae; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) using an Alloy 82/182 are widely used to join low alloy steel components and stainless steel pipes in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It has been reported that tensile residual stress would be generated within DMWs during the welding processes. It is thought as main reason for primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) resulting in deterioration of long-term integrity. The application of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) has been considered to reduce the tensile residual stress after welding process. Meanwhile, the PWHT could affect the changes in microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. Therefore, in this study, the effects of PWHT on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors of base metals of low alloy steel and stainless steel and welding materials of Alloy 82/182 are evaluated. The influence of PWHT in DMW has been investigated. SA 508 and 316L SS exhibited tempered bainite and austenitic grains with a few residual stringer type ferrite. Grain boundary carbides are not precipitated owing to low carbon and insufficient exposure time in 316L SS. The change of mechanicals properties in base metals is not observed. In case of Alloy 182, after PWHT, grain boundaries are covered with film-like continuous Cr-rich carbides.

  9. Effects of Severe Plastic Deformation and Heat Treatment on Transformation Behavior of Explosively Welded Duplex TiNi-TiNi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Juntao; Zheng Yanjun; Cui Lishan

    2007-01-01

    The effects of severe plastic deformation and heat treatment on the transformation behavior of explosively welded duplex TiNi-TiNi shape memory alloys (SMAs) were investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurements. The explosively welded duplex TiNi-TiNi plate of 0.7 mm thickness was cold-rolled at room temperature to a 60% reduction in thickness and then annealed at different temperatures for different durations. The results showed that low temperature (623-723K) heat-treatment led to the crystallization of the amorphous region, and re-crystallization occurred in the specimens annealed at higher temperatures (over 873 K). Research indicated that the change of martensitic transformation temperature is due to the change of internal stresses with increasing heat treatment temperature. The change of annealing time also led to a change in martensitic transformation temperature, which was associated with the precipitation and decomposition of Ti3Ni4 in TiNi-1.

  10. Investigation of effect of post weld heat treatment conditions on residual stress for ITER blanket shield blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hun-Chea, E-mail: hcjung@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sa-Woong [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Hee [Division of Convergence Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Seung-Wook [Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Min-Su; Shim, Hee-Jin [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • PWHT for ITER blanket shield block should be performed for dimensional stability. • Investigation of the effect of PWHT conditions on properties was performed. • Instrumented indentation method for evaluation of properties was used. • Residual stress and hardness decreased with increasing PWHT temperature. • Optimization of PWHT conditions would be needed for satisfaction of requirement. - Abstract: The blanket shield block (SB) shall be required the tight tolerance because SB interfaces with many components, such as flexible support keypads, First Wall (FW) support contact surfaces, FW central bolt, electrical strap contact surfaces and attachment inserts for both FW and Vacuum Vessel (VV). In order to fulfil the tight tolerance requirement, stress relieving shall be performed for dimensional stability after cover welding operation. In this paper, effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) conditions, temperature and holding time, was investigated on the residual stress and hardness. The 316L Stainless Steel (SS) was prepared and welded by manual TIG welding by using filler material with 2.4 mm of diameter. Welded 316L SS plate was machined to prepare the specimen for PWHT. PWHT was implemented at 250, 300, 400 °C for 2 and 3 h (400 °C only) and residual stress after relaxation were determined. The evaluation of residual stress and hardness for each specimen was carried out by instrumented indentation technique. The residual stress and hardness were decreased with increasing the heat treatment temperature and holding time.

  11. Influences of post weld heat treatment on tensile strength and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded butt joints of AA2014-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2016-08-01

    Friction stir welded (FSWed) joints of aluminum alloys exhibited a hardness drop in both the advancing side (AS) and retreating side (RS) of the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) due to the thermal cycle involved in the FSW process. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to overcome this problem by post weld heat treatment (PWHT) methods. FSW butt (FSWB) joints of Al-Cu (AA2014-T6) alloy were PWHT by two methods such as simple artificial aging (AA) and solution treatment followed by artificial aging (STA). Of these two treatments, STA was found to be more beneficial than the simple aging treatment to improve the tensile properties of the FSW joints of AA2014 aluminum alloy.

  12. The Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Properties of Explosively Welded Titanium-Steel Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowski, Marcin; Gloc, Michał; Ślęzak, Tomasz; Płociński, Tomasz; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof Jan

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes a study of explosively welded titanium-carbon steel S355J2+N plates. Following the welding, plates underwent heat treatment at temperature of 600 °C for 90 min with cooling in furnace to 300 °C and in air to room temperature. The structure of the bonding was examined by using light, scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical properties before and after heat treatment were examined applying three-point bending tests with cyclic loads and hardness measurements. Fracture surfaces were investigated using computer tomography and SEM. It has been found that the bonding areas are characterized by a specific chemical composition, microstructure and microhardness. Between the steel and the Ti cladding, a strongly defected transition zone was formed and melted areas with altered chemical composition were observed. It was also demonstrated that the heat treatment commonly applied to welded steel-Ti plates had a significant and negative impact on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded plates due to formation of brittle intermetallic phases.

  13. The Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Properties of Explosively Welded Titanium-Steel Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowski, Marcin; Gloc, Michał; Ślęzak, Tomasz; Płociński, Tomasz; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof Jan

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes a study of explosively welded titanium-carbon steel S355J2+N plates. Following the welding, plates underwent heat treatment at temperature of 600 °C for 90 min with cooling in furnace to 300 °C and in air to room temperature. The structure of the bonding was examined by using light, scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical properties before and after heat treatment were examined applying three-point bending tests with cyclic loads and hardness measurements. Fracture surfaces were investigated using computer tomography and SEM. It has been found that the bonding areas are characterized by a specific chemical composition, microstructure and microhardness. Between the steel and the Ti cladding, a strongly defected transition zone was formed and melted areas with altered chemical composition were observed. It was also demonstrated that the heat treatment commonly applied to welded steel-Ti plates had a significant and negative impact on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded plates due to formation of brittle intermetallic phases.

  14. HAZ microstructure in joints made of X13CrMoCoVNbNB9-2-1 (PB2 steel welded with and without post-weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Łomozik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research butt welded joints made of X13CrMoCoVNbNB9-2-1 steel. The joints were welded with post-weld heat treatment PWHT and without PWHT, using the temper bead technique TBT. After welding the joint welded with PWHT underwent stress-relief annealing at 770 °C for 3 hours. The scope of structural tests included the microstructural examination of the coarse-grained heat affected zone (HAZ areas of the joints, the comparison of the morphology of these areas and the determination of carbide precipitate types of the coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ of the joints welded with and without PWHT.

  15. Influences of post weld heat treatment on fatigue crack growth behavior of TIG welding of 6013 T4 aluminum alloy joint (Part 1. Fatigue crack growth across the weld metal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Kim, Seon Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The present study evaluates the influences of PWHT on FCG behavior and tensile properties of TIG butt welded Al 6013-T4 sheets. Crack propagation tests were carried out on compact tension (CT) specimens. The T82 heat treatment was varied in three artificial aging times (soaking) of 6, 18 and 24 hours. The results of T82 heat treatment with artificial aging variations were tested for their fatigue crack growth rates at the main metal zone, the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the welded metal zone. It has been observed that the various agings in heat treatment T82 are sensitive to the mechanical properties (fatigue crack growth rate test, tensile test). The results show that PWHT-T82 for 18 hours aging is the highest fatigue resistance, while the aging 18 hours provided the highest tensile test result.

  16. Effects of laser heat treatment on the fracture morphologies of X80 pipeline steel welded joints by stress corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-jun Kong; Cun-dong Ye

    2014-01-01

    The surfaces of X80 pipeline steel welded joints were processed with a CO2 laser, and the effects of laser heat treatment (LHT) on H2S stress corrosion in the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) solution were analyzed by a slow strain rate test. The frac-ture morphologies and chemical components of corrosive products before and after LHT were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy, respectively, and the mechanism of LHT on stress corrosion cracking was discussed. Results showed that the fracture for welded joints was brittle in its original state, while it was transformed to a ductile fracture after LHT. The tendencies of hydro-gen-induced corrosion were reduced, and the stress corrosion sensitivity index decreased from 35.2%to 25.3%, indicating that the stress corrosion resistance of X80 pipeline steel welded joints has been improved by LHT.

  17. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behavior of high strength AA7075 aluminium alloy friction stir welds – Effect of post weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-12-01

    It was observed that the hardness and strength of weld were observed to be comparatively high in peak aged (T6 condition but the welds showed poor corrosion resistance. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved and the mechanical properties were maintained by RRA treatment. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved in RRA condition with the minimum loss of weld strength.

  18. Experimental Study of Inducing Compressive Stress by Anti-welding Heating Treatment in a Thin Plate Weldment with Variant Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Significant compressive stress may be induced in thin plate weldment by anti-welding heating treatment (AWHT)with a temperature difference above 350℃, and an interesting phenomenon of obvious residual stress reduction on non-treated surface was discovered. The method of AWHT has no great effect on the mechanical properties including hardness, strength and toughness of the metal material. The results in the paper prompt a possibility application in shipbuilding industry.

  19. The effect of post-weld heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Xixue [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Di, Xinjie, E-mail: dixinjie@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Baosen [Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Baoshan District, Shanghai 200431 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Post-weld heat treatment effects on microstructure of deposited metal are studied. • Coarsening of γ′ phase at different post-weld heat treatment temperature is revealed. • Formation of δ phase in deposited metal is a bainite-like transformation process. - Abstract: The effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal (DM) was examined using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The transformation mechanism of the γ{sup ″} → δ phase and the grain growth kinetics of the γ′ phase during PWHT were revealed. The results indicate that the microstructure of as-welded DM is composed of columnar grains of different sizes, of which the average grain size is approximately 160 μm. Certain precipitates, such as the dispersed γ′ phase, blocky MC-type carbide and irregular shape Laves phase, precipitate in the microstructure of the as-welded DM. Compared with as-welded DM, the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 650 °C for 4 h shows minimal variation. With an increase in PWHT temperature, a large number of body-centered tetragonal γ{sup ″} phases precipitate at interdendrite regions in the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 750 °C for 4 h. When the PWHT temperature increases to 850 °C, the metastable γ{sup ″} phase directly transforms into a stable δ phase in shear mode, which exhibits a similar chemical composition but a different crystal structure than the γ{sup ″} phase. At 950 °C, the γ{sup ″} phase and the δ phase disappear, whereas certain M{sub 6}C-type carbides precipitate at the grain boundaries. Alloying elements such as Nb, Mo, Si, Al and Fe in the microstructure of as-welded DM exhibit segregation behavior. Due to an increasing PWHT temperature, the segregation behavior constantly weakens with minimal evolution to the temperature of 750 °C. Above this temperature, partition coefficients

  20. EFFECT OF TOOL PIN PROFILES AND HEAT TREATMENT PROCESS IN THE FRICTION STIR WELDING OF AA 6061 ALUMINIUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir linear welding (FSLW uses a non consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, tool tilt angle, etc., and tool pin profiles play a major role in deciding the joint properties. In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the effect of four different tool pin profiles on mechanical properties of AA 6061 aluminum alloy. Four different profiles have been used to fabricate the butt joints by keeping constant process parameters of tool rotational speed 1200RPM, welding speed 14mm/min and an axial force 7kN. Different heat treatment methods like annealing, normalizing and quenching have been applied on the joints and evaluation of the mechanical properties like tensile strength, percentage of elongation, hardness and microstructure in the friction stirring formation zone are evaluated. From this investigation, it is found that the hexagonal tool profile produces good tensile strength, percent of elongation in annealing and hardness in quenching process.

  1. Reduction of environmentally induced cracking of laser-welded shape memory NiTi wires via post-weld heat-treatment

    OpenAIRE

    C. W. Chan; Man, H. C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the environmentally induced cracking behaviour of the NiTi weldment with and without post-weld heat-treatment (PWHT) in Hanks’ solution at 37.5 °C at OCP were studied by tensile and cyclic slow-strain-rate tests (SSRT), and compared with those tested in oil (an inert environment). Our previous results in the tensile and cyclic SSRT showed that the weldment without PWHT showed high susceptibility to the hydrogen cracking, as evidenced by the degradation of tensile and super-elas...

  2. effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    results of the optical microscopic test show that fine grains of pearlite in ferrite were obtained in normalized samples and ... submerge arc welding, gas metal arc welding, plasma arc welding .... were then etched with 2% Nital solution using the.

  3. Secondary Austenite Morphologies in Fusion Zone of Welded Joint after Postweld Heat Treatment with a Continuous Wave Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping Liu; Xuejun Jin

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the weldability of duplex stainless steels,obtaining more secondary austenite in the weld metal is an effective way.Therefore,optimizing the secondary austenite by changing its morphology,volume fraction and stability may be expected to enhance the ductility of the weld.The secondary austenite morphologies in the fusion zone of the laser continuously heat treated welds of 2205 duplex stainless steel were investigated.The secondary austenite morphologies were found to be influenced by different laser power level.The secondary austenite with penniform,freely grown and dendritic shape appeared in the course of 4,6 and 8 kW continuous heat treatment,respectively.It was found that there were three kinds of morphologies of secondary austenite in the fusion zone treated by different power,i.e.,widmannst¨atten austenite,grain boundary austenite and intragranular austenite.The results demonstrated that the mechanism of the secondary austenite formation was a displacement mechanism during the initial austenite lath formation and a diffusion mechanism during cooling.The nitrides provided the nitrogen for the transformation and at the same time acted as nucleation sites for the secondary austenite.

  4. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  5. Effect of Heat Treatment on Liquation Cracking in Continuous Fiber and Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of HASTELLOY X Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakniat, M.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Torkamany, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    Laser welding of HASTELLOY X is highly feasible; however, hot cracking can be a matter of concern. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of solution heat treatment on susceptibility to liquation cracking in welding of a 2-mm-thick HASTELLOY X plate. In addition, Nd-YAG pulsed laser (400 W) and continuous wave (CW) fiber laser (600 W) were compared with each other in this respect. Results revealed that performing the prewelding solution heat treatment reduces the tendency for occurrence of liquation cracking. Furthermore, it was established that by increasing pulse frequency, there was a significant reduction in the tendency for liquation cracking. With CW laser welding of HASTELLOY X in the solution-heat-treated condition, the tendency for heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking was found to be minimized.

  6. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of X52 Linepipe HFIW Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavousi Sisi, A.; Mirsalehi, S. E.

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, influences of normalization heat treatment on microstructural and mechanical properties of high-frequency induction welded (HFIW) joints of X52 steel have been investigated. HFIW joints were post-weld heat treated at different times and temperatures. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the heat treated joints were then comprehensively investigated. Based on the results, a proper normalization of the primary fine grain steel caused the grain size to increase; but because of converting brittle microstructure into ductile microstructure, it caused the toughness to increase also. In addition, the ductility of the joints was enhanced. Nevertheless, tensile strength, yield strength, and hardness were reduced. The results showed that 950 °C was the optimum normalization temperature from the standpoint of fracture toughness for the X52 steel joints. At 1050 °C, the carbides and/or nitrides in the steel dissolved, and excessive grain growth occurred. Hence, the maximum allowable temperature for normalization was found to be 1000 °C.

  7. The effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure and notched tensile fracture of Ti–15V–3Cr–3Al–3Sn to Ti–6Al–4V dissimilar laser welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, C.T.; Shiue, R.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, R.-T. [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsay, L.W., E-mail: b0186@mail.ntou.edu.tw [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-01-20

    A CO{sub 2} laser was applied for dissimilar welding of Ti–15V–3Cr–3Al–3Sn (Ti–15–3) to Ti–6Al–4V (Ti–6–4) alloys. The microstructures and notched tensile strength (NTS) of the dissimilar welds were investigated in the as-welded and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions, and the results were compared with Ti–6–4 and Ti–15–3 homogeneous laser welds with the same PWHT. The results indicated that predominant α″ with a few α and β phases was formed in the as-welded fusion zone (FZ). Furthermore, the FZ hardness was susceptible to the PWHT and showed a plateau for the specimens aged in the temperature range from 426 to 482 °C/4 h. In comparison with the homogeneous Ti–15–3 weld under the same PWHT conditions, the dilution of Ti–15–3 with Ti–6–4 caused a slight increase in the Al equivalent (Al{sub EQ}) of the FZ, resulting in a further rise in FZ hardness. With the PWHT at/below 538 °C, the dissimilar welds were associated with low NTS or high notch brittleness.

  8. MODEL OF LASER-TIG HYBRID WELDING HEAT SOURCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yanbin; Li Liqun; Feng Xiaosong; Fang Junfei

    2004-01-01

    The welding mechanism of laser-TIG hybrid welding process is analyzed. With the variation of arc current, the welding process is divided into two patterns: deep-penetration welding and heat conductive welding. The heat flow model of hybrid welding is presented. As to deep-penetration welding, the heat source includes a surface heat flux and a volume heat flux. The heat source of heat conductive welding is composed of two Gaussian distribute surface heat sources. With this heat source model, a temperature field is calculated. The finite element code MARC is employed for this purpose. The calculation results show a good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Strength of Three Aluminum Alloys Used in Light Poles

    OpenAIRE

    Craig C. Menzemer; Eric Hilty; Shane Morrison; Ray Minor; Tirumalai S. Srivatsan

    2016-01-01

    The conjoint influence of welding and artificial aging on mechanical properties were investigated for extrusions of aluminum alloy 6063, 6061, and 6005A. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on the aluminum alloys 6063-T4, 6061-T4, and 6005A-T1 in both the as-received (AR) and as-welded (AW) conditions. Tensile tests were also conducted on the AR and AW alloys, subsequent to artificial aging. The welding process used was gas metal arc (GMAW) with spray transfer using 120–220 A of current at ...

  10. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, E.; Hazel, B.; Côté, J.; Godin, S.

    2014-03-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated "CA6NM". This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named "Scompi". This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions.

  11. The influence of the heat treatment on delta ferrite transformation in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shielded metal arc (SMAW welded specimens using austenitic consumable materials with different amount of delta-ferrite are annealed in range 650-750 °C through 2-10 hours. Factorial plan 33 with influenced factors regression analyze of measured delta-ferrite values is used. The transformation i.e. decomposition of delta ferrite during annealing was analyzed regarding on weld cracking resistance using metallographic examination and WRC-1992 diagram.

  12. Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of Microwave Welded and Post-weld Heat-Treated Inconel-718 Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Amit; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, corrosion behavior of microwave welded Inconel-718 at various conditions was investigated. Welding of Inconel-718 in 980 °C solution-treated condition was performed using microwave hybrid heating technique. The microwave welds were subjected to post-heat treatment for improving its microstructure and mechanical properties by solubilizing the Nb-enriched Laves phase. The microstructural features of the fabricated welds at various conditions were investigated through scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical testing results revealed that Inconel-718 welds were galvanic corroded when they were anodically polarized in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at 28 °C. The difference in the corrosion potentials between the base metal (BM) and fusion zone (FZ) in an Inconel-718 weld was the main factor for galvanic corrosion. The highest corrosion was occurred in the as-welded/aged weldments, followed by 980 °C solution-treated and aged weldments, as-welded specimen, and 1080 °C solution-treated and aged (1080STA) weldments. The least galvanic corrosion was occurred in the 1080STA specimens due to almost uniform microstructure developed in the weldment after the treatment. Thus, it was possible to minimize the galvanic corrosion in the microwave welded Inconel-718 by 1080STA treatment which resulted in reducing the difference in corrosion potentials between the BM and the FZ.

  13. Diffusion Bonding and Post-Weld Heat Treatment of Extruded AZ91 Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei LIN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The grain size of as-extruded AZ91 magnesium alloys was refined to 12.31 μm from 21.41 μm by recrystallization annealing. The vacuum diffusion welding of as-annealed AZ91 magnesium alloys was researched. The results showed that the maximum shear strength of joints reached 64.70 MPa in the situation of 10 MPa bonding pressure, 18 Pa vacuum degree, 470 °C bonding temperature and 90 min bonding time; both bonding temperature and time are the main influence factors on as-extruded AZ91 magnesium alloys diffusion welding. Then the diffusion welded specimens were annealed, and the shear strength of joints was further improved to 76.93 MPa.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9699

  14. Microstructure of Welded Joints of X5CrNiCuNb16-4 (17-4 PH Martensitic Stainlees Steel After Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziewiec A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents rezults of microstructure (LM, TEM investigation and hardness measurments of welded joints in martensitic precipitation hardened stainless steel containing copper, subjected to heat treatment. For the aging temperature up to 540 °C even for the very long times, the microstructure of the welded joints is similar to this one at lower temerature aging. After aging at 620 °C a distinct change of the microstructure was observed. Non-equilibrium solidification conditions of the weld metal, segregation and the diffusion of copper and the elements stablilizing the austenite cause the occurrence of the reverse transformation of the martensite into austenite as fast as just 1 hour at 620 °C. TEM investigations revealed the differences in dispersion of hardening copper precipitates after aging at temperature 620 °C for 1 and 4 hours.

  15. Effect of post-welding heat treatment on wear resistance of cast-steel die with surfacing layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wujiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The wear resistance capability of die surfacing layer under different Post-Welding Heat Treatments (PWHT was analysed by Finite Element (FE simulation and experiments. Taking hot forging process of a crankshaft as an example, a wear model of the hot forging die coated with surfacing layer was established using FE software DEFORM-3D. The simulation results indicated that the wear resistance capability of the die surfacing layer is optimal when tempering temperature and holding time are 550 °C and 4 h respectively. To verify the wear computational results, 16 groups of PWHT orthogonal wear tests were performed at a temperature of 400 °C, which is a similar temperature to that occurs in an actual hot forging die. The wear-test result showed a good agreement with the FE simulation. SEM observation of the wear debris on 16 specimens showed that oxidative wear is dominant when the temperature was in 400 °C. Furthermore, when tempering temperature and holding time were 550 °C and 4 h respectively, the carbide alloy dispersively distributes in the metallographic structure, which helps to improve the wear resistance of the surfacing layer.

  16. Metallurgy and Heat Treating. Welding Module 7. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in metallurgy and heat treating. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles of metallurgy and heat treatment and techniques for…

  17. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ITER-grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jijun; Fang, Chao; Song, Yuntao; Wei, Jing; Xu, Shen; Wu, Jiefeng

    2017-04-01

    The effect of postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ITER-grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel joints with ER316LMn filler material was investigated. PWHT aging was performed for 1 h at four different temperatures of 600 °C, 760 °C, 870 °C and 920 °C, respectively. The microstructure revealed the sigma phase precipitation occurred in the weld metals heat-treated at the temperature of 870 °C and 920 °C. The PWHT temperatures have the less effect on the tensile strength, and the maximum tensile strength of the joints is about 630 MPa, reaching the 95% of the base metal, whereas the elongation is enhanced with the rise of PWHT temperatures. Meanwhile, the sigma phase precipitation in the weld metals reduces the impact toughness.

  18. Analysis of Microstructural Evolution and Fracture Mechanisms in Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr-0.4Fe in Response to Electron Beam Welding and Post Weld Heat Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Joseph C.

    Within the last half-century, advances in Ti and Ti alloys have increased their popularity in the aerospace industry as well as in commercial products. Some Ti alloys have even replaced steels and Ni-base alloys due to their high strength and superior corrosion resistance. Of the various Ti alloys, near-beta and metastable beta alloys have become more common since their first large-scale use in the SR-71 Blackbird. In particular, TIMET's Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Timetal Ti555, Ti-5553) gained high attainable strengths, excellent forging characteristics, and increased sensitivity to heat treatments compared to other beta-Ti alloys. Ti-5553 has become widely known for its desirable attributes and has since become the baseline for the next generation of metastable beta and near-beta Ti alloys. However, as well known as Ti-5553 is in the aerospace and Ti industry, its responses to welding have, for the most part, gone uncharacterized. The work presented in this dissertation investigates the influence of electron beam welding and post weld heat treatments on the microstructural, mechanical, and fracture responses of Ti-5553. In this study, Ti-5553 was electron beam welded and heat-treated in accordance to three predetermined heat treatments: 700°C for 4 hours followed by air cooling to room temperature, 804°C for 1 hour followed by air cooling to room temperature, and 804°C for 1 hour followed by air cooling to room temperature then aging at 600°C for 4 hours followed by air cooling to room temperature. Subsequently, the mechanical properties, microstructure, solute partitioning, precipitate identities, and fracture characteristics were evaluated. With the use of traditional techniques and new technology it was shown that electron beam welded Ti-5553 in the as-welded condition and three post weld heat treatment conditions exhibited varying properties, distinctive to each of the corresponding microstructures. It was also found that the o-phase played a large role in the

  19. Analysis on explosive welded Al/Mg plates in as-received state and after heat treatment using the in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Pengwan; Nie, Zhihua; Lan, Yazhu

    2015-06-01

    The synchrotron-based HEXRD method has a much better angular resolution in the reciprocal space than neutron or traditional laboratory XRD, which creates an opportunity that could precisely study the crystal structure and parameter from the XRD pattern. Due to the high penetration depth of high-energy X-ray, the micro-strain and phase distribution could be determined precisely. In this work, the explosive welded 2024 Al/AZ31 Mg plates, both in as-received state and after heat treatment, were investigated by HEXRD method. The XRD patterns were taken shot-by-shot, going from Al to Mg with step width of 0.1mm. The micro-strain, phase distribution and grain size of each step were estimated and analyzed within the general mechanism of explosive welding. It is interesting to find that the intense texture observed in both cladded and base materials disappeared at the welded interface. Residual stress, which was obviously detected at the interface for the as-received sample, was eliminated after heat treatment. For the as-received sample, the strain of Mg along the path from interface to free surface was different for different Azimuth angle and different crystal orientation; but such variations didn't occur for Al.

  20. The Kinetics of TiAl3 Formation in Explosively Welded Ti-Al Multilayers During Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foadian, Farzad; Soltanieh, Mansour; Adeli, Mandana; Etminanbakhsh, Majid

    2016-10-01

    Metallic-intermetallic laminate (MIL) composites, including Ti/TiAl3 composite, are promising materials for many applications, namely, in the aerospace industry. One method to produce Ti/TiAl3 laminate composite is to provide close attachment between desired number of titanium and aluminum plates, so that by applying heat and/or pressure, the formation of intermetallic phases between the layers becomes possible. In this work, explosive welding was used to make a strong bond between six alternative Ti and Al layers. The welded samples were annealed at three different temperatures: 903 K, 873 K, and 843 K (630 °C, 600 °C, and 570 °C) in ambient atmosphere, and the variation of the intermetallic layer thickness was used to study the growth kinetics. Microstructural investigations were carried out on the welded and annealed samples using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was used to identify the formed intermetallic phases. It was found that at each temperature, two different mechanisms govern the process: reaction controlled and diffusion controlled. The calculated values of activation energies for reaction-controlled and diffusion-controlled mechanisms are 232.1 and 17.4 kJ, respectively.

  1. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, F.; Ahmad, A.; Farooq, A.; Haider, W.

    2016-10-01

    In the present research work, corrosion behavior of post-weld heat-treated (PWHT) AISI 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) specimens joined by gas metal arc welding is compared with as-welded samples by using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Welded samples were PWHT at 1323 K for 480 s and quenched. Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of as-welded and PWHT specimens were investigated. Microstructural studies have shown grain size refinement after PWHT. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were found maximum for PWHT samples. Bend test have shown that PWHT imparted ductility in welded sample. Fractographic analysis has evidenced ductile behavior for samples. Potentiodynamic polarization test was carried out in a solution composed of 1 M H2SO4 and 1 N NaCl. Corrosion rate of weld region was 127.6 mpy, but after PWHT, it was decreased to 13.12 mpy.

  2. Analysis of the influence of the multipass welding, welding preheat and welding post heat treatments on the behaviour of GMAW joints of HARDOX 400 microalloyed steel; Influencia de la tecnica de soldaduramultipasada y de los tratamientos termicos de precalentamiento y post-soldadura en el comportamiento de uniones GMAW de un acero microaleado HARDOX 400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Miguel, V.; Coello, J.; Navarro, A.; Calatayud, A.; Manjabacas, M. C.

    2011-07-01

    The microalloyed steels may be supplied in a hardened state. In these cases, the weldability can be improved by pre-heat and/or post-heat welding treatments. In this paper, the effect of those treatments and the influence of multipass welding on GMAW joints behavior are analyzed for a Hardox 400 microalloyed steel. The microstructure evaluation of the different heat affected zones of the steel has been made and the mechanical properties of those zones are obtained for different conditions as it has been mentioned. The obtained results indicate that preheating the steel leads to a beneficial action that consists on the distance increasing from the bead to the zone in which the hardness is lowest. The post heat treatment strengthens that zone and improves the joint plasticity. This benefit is higher if the joint has been made with preheating. Multipass welding has not been found to have any advantage if it is compared to a single welding pass. (Author) 18 refs.

  3. Effect of post-weld heat treatment and neutron irradiation on a dissimilar-metal joint between F82H steel and 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Haiying, E-mail: haigirl1983@gmail.com [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); Nagasaka, Takuya [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Kometani, Nobuyuki [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [SOKENDAI - The Graduated University for Advanced Studies, Toki (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Guan, Wenhai; Nogami, Shuhei; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Iwata, Takuya; Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yamazaki, Masanori [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Kano, Sho; Satoh, Yuhki; Abe, Hiroaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Significant hardening after neutron irradiation at 300 °C for 0.1 dpa was found in the fine-grain HAZ of F82H for the dissimilar-metal joint between F82H and 316L. • The possible hardening mechanism was explained from the viewpoint of carbon behavior. • However, the significant hardening did not degrade the impact property significantly. - Abstract: A dissimilar-metal joint between F82H steel and 316L stainless steel was fabricated by using electron beam welding (EBW). By microstructural analysis and hardness test, the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of F82H was classified into interlayer area, fine-grain area, and coarse-carbide area. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to control the hardness of HAZ. After PWHT at 680 °C for 1 h, neutron irradiation at 300 °C with a dose of 0.1 dpa was carried out for the joint in Belgian Reactor II (BR-II). Compared to the base metals (BMs) and weld metal (WM), significant irradiation hardening up to 450HV was found in the fine-grain HAZ of F82H. However, the impact property of F82H-HAZ specimens, which was machined with the root of the V-notch at HAZ of F82H, was not deteriorated obviously in spite of the significant irradiation hardening.

  4. Evolution of the Structure of Local Regions of Fused Metal in Explosion-Welded Nickel-Aluminum Composites Under Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmorgun, V. G.; Bogdanov, A. I.; Gurevich, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    The methods of electron, optical, and atomic force microscopy are used to study the structure, morphology and phase composition of local regions of fused metal in an explosion-welded nickel-aluminum composite. It is shown that the diffusion zone formed due to the heat treatment repeats the contour of the fuse in the first stage and then "absorbs" it upon duration of the hold thus leveling the phase composition. ANi2Al3 Aluminide layer forms on the side of nickel and a NiAl3 layer forms on the side of aluminum.

  5. Comparison on welding mode characteristics of arc heat source for heat input control in hybrid welding of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Moo-Keun; Kim, Jong-Do; Oh, Jae-Hwan

    2015-03-01

    Presently in shipbuilding, transportation and aerospace industries, the potential to apply welding using laser and laser-arc hybrid heat sources is widely under research. This study has the purpose of comparing the weldability depending on the arc mode by varying the welding modes of arc heat sources in applying laser-arc hybrid welding to aluminum alloy and of implementing efficient hybrid welding while controlling heat input. In the experimental study, we found that hybrid welding using CMT mode produced deeper penetration and sounder bead surface than those characteristics produced during only laser welding, with less heat input compared to that required in pulsed arc mode.

  6. Weld manufacturing of big heat-exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeutigam, M.; Huppertz, P.H.

    1986-06-24

    The topic of this article are big heat exchangers, which are developed and constructed to minimize energy losses in plants of process engineering. Some welding specifications are discussed in detail. Some constructive details, as e.g. materials selection and vibration safety complete this contribution.

  7. Plasma heating effects during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G. K.; Dixon, R. D.

    Laser welding is a relatively low heat input process used in joining precisely machined components with minimum distortion and heat affects to surrounding material. The CO2 (10.6 (MU)m) and Nd-YAG (1.06 (MU)m) lasers are the primary lasers used for welding in industry today. Average powers range up to 20 kW for CO2 and 400 W for Nd-YAG with pulse lengths of milliseconds to continuous wave. Control of the process depends on an understanding of the laser-plasma-material interaction and characterization of the laser beam being used. Inherent plasma formation above the material surface and subsequent modulation of the incident laser radiation directly affect the energy transfer to the target material. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam affect the available power density incident on the target, which is important in achieving repeatability in the process. Other factors such as surface texture, surface contaminants, surface chemistry, and welding environment affect plasma formation which determines the weld penetration. This work involves studies of the laser-plasma-material interaction process and particularly the effect of the plasma on the coupling of laser energy to a material during welding. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used with maximum average power of 400 W.

  8. The mechanical measuring method of welding heat source efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jianqiang; Zhang Guodong; He Jie; Wang Chengquan; Chen Bingquan

    2007-01-01

    Based on the principle of residual deformation induced by superposition of the welding residual stress and working stress, the welding heat source efficiency has been determined by measuring displacement changes of specimens under loading and unloading in tensile tests, and combining with calculating welding parameters. Meanwhile, the welding heat source efficiencies obtained are compared with those of the measuring-calculating method. The research results show that the welding heat source efficiencies are almost the same as those obtained by the measuring-calculating method. Therefore, the welding heat source efficiency can be determined accurately by this method, and a new determining method of the heat source efficiency for the welding heat process calculating has been provided.

  9. 49 CFR 179.100-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.100-10 Section 179...-10 Postweld heat treatment. (a) After welding is complete, steel tanks and all attachments welded... treatment is prohibited. (c) Tank and welded attachments, fabricated from ASTM A 240/A 240M (IBR, see §...

  10. Improving Weld Quality by Arc-Excited Ultrasonic Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春雷; 吴敏生; 杜敬磊

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonic treatment of the solidifying metal is a promising method for improving the quality of fusion welding. A method to combine the ultrasonic waves to the welding process using arc-excited ultrasonic emission, called arc-ultrasonic, was high frequency modulation of the arc-plasma. The effects of arc-ultrasonic on the weld including the fusion zone, the partially melted zone and the heat-affected zone are described. The arc-ultrasonic energy changes the weld microstructure. In the fusion zone, the primary dendrite arm spacing decreases significantly and more acicular ferrite appears. In the partially melted zone, a large amount of fine grains appear. In the heat-affected zone, the width of the tempered zone increases with increasing modulation frequency and the microstructure is refined. The results show that arc-ultrasonic is a new and effective way for improving weld quality.

  11. Effect of heat treatment on the properties of laser-beam welded rheo-cast F357 aluminum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal rheo-cast F357 aluminum plates were joined by autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding and were welded in either the as-cast (F) condition, T4 temper or T6 temper condition. The weldability of this age-hardenable Al–7%Si–0.6%Mg casting alloy...

  12. The softening effect of heat-treated strengthened Al-Zn-Mg alloy in welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Chen, Jingqing; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-01

    Weld joint softening occurs during the welding process of heat-treatable aluminum alloys and strongly influences the mechanical properties. In this work, the softening of heat-treated Al-Zn-Mg alloy was studied in the multipass welding process. By Gleeble-3500 thermal-mechanical simulator, the heat treatment and tensile test with welding thermal cycles were carried out to simulate the microstructure evolution and mechanical softening during multipass welding. After that, the softening mechanism of the HAZ was analyzed by microstructure analysis. The results indicate that the heat-treated Al-Zn-Mg alloy exhibited obvious softening after several thermal cycles with peak temperature higher than 200∘C, and this phenomenon is worse with increasing peak temperature. Based on the microstructure analysis, it was found that the reinforcement phase changes according to the applied thermal cycles, which strongly affects the strength of Al-Zn-Mg alloys.

  13. Role of heat equation in lap joint for welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Rohit, Sooraj

    2017-07-01

    Welding is predominantly used in industrial purposes and growth in their industry, which gives exact welding and more efficient. The major advantage of using this welding technique at initial stage it takes very low heat to weld the portion and gives a good result of low distortion in modules. In this context, two dissimilar metals copper and nickel are chosen for analysis in tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) in which length is 300 mm and breadth is 100 mm thickness 15 mm welded at room temperature a welded portion zone is formed simulation analysis has done on CATIA® and ANSYS®and MATLAB® code is generated for calculating temperatures at each node to calculate temperature at each node a new technique is used tri-diagonal matrix algorithm is used (TDMA) Steady state one dimension heat is calculated results compared between simulation analysis and analytical analysis temperature at each node is calculated both the temperatures are equal with error.

  14. The Effect of Heat Treatment on the Properties of Zirconium - Carbon Steel Bimetal Produced By Explosion Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prażmowski M.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the effect of various values of detonation velocity on the quality of the bond zone, and thus the properties of bimetal zirconium (Zr 700 - steel (P355NL. The research was carried out for as-bonded welds, i.e. immediately following explosion welding. The results of shearing, peeling and tensile tests as well as macro-scale structural analyses were presented. In order to determine the changes in the value of strain hardening, the microhardness measurements across the interface were carried out. Based on the performed analyses it can be claimed that, depending on the applied technological settings of welding, most cases displayed wavy bond with highly diversified parameters of the wave. The changes observed with the detonation velocity are non-monotonic. High detonation velocities favored the formation of waves with large height and length and strongly affect the increase of the volume of brittle melted zones. Increased volume of the melted regions results in strong decrease of strength properties of the clad. The analysis of strength test results allows claiming that a small volume of melted regions in the bond considerably improves the strength of the bond.

  15. Effects of Post-weld Heat Treatment on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy 6061 Welded Joints%焊后热处理对6061铝合金焊接接头微观组织与力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢业东; 农琪

    2011-01-01

    The effect of solid solution and artificial ageing treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy 6061 welded joint was researched by metallographic, mechanical test and SEM technology. The results show that there is a pair of soft zone located symmetrically on both heat-affected zones (HAZs) of welded joint without post-weld heat treatment. The occurrence of soft zone is due to over-aging caused by heat input during welding. More strengthen precipitates (Mg2Si) emerged in both metal and soft HAZs of welded joint with solid solution and artificial aging treatment, which can obviously increase the hardness and tensile properties of the welded joints.%通过金相技术、力学性能试验和SEM技术,研究了固溶+时效热处理对6061铝合金焊接接头微观组织和力学性能的影响.结果表明,热处理前焊接接头两侧热影响区内有一对对称分布的软化区,其原因是由于焊接热输入的影响使该部位发生了过时效.固溶处理+人工时效热处理后,焊缝和热影响软化区析出较多的强化相(Mg2Si),焊接接头硬度和拉伸性能明显提高.

  16. 29 CFR 1915.53 - Welding, cutting and heating in way of preservative coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating in way of preservative... SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.53 Welding, cutting and heating in way of... and shipbulding and shall not apply to shipbreaking. (b) Before welding, cutting or heating...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.51 - Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting and heating... Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.51 Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting and heating. (a) The... dust or dirt from clothing, or for cleaning the work area. (c) Welding, cutting and heating in...

  18. Influence of the welding parameters on the heat affected zone for aluminium welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meseguer-Valdenebro José L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the Heat Affected Zone in an aluminum alloy welded assembly using the Metal Inert Gas welding technique. Making use of numerical simulations of the involved thermal processes, the aluminum alloy cooling curve is calculated and the extension of the Heat Affected Zone is evaluated. The connection between this last parameter, the cooling rate, and the maximum obtained temperature is assessed. Additionally, the response surface method is exploited to fit the dependence of the Heat Affected Zone with the welding parameters and to optimize these parameters in order to minimize that region.

  19. A Rotating Plug Model of Friction Stir Welding Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghulapadu J. K.; Peddieson, J.; Buchanan, G. R.; Nunes, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    A simplified rotating plug model is employed to study the heat transfer phenomena associated with the fiction stir welding process. An approximate analytical solution is obtained based on this idealized model and used both to demonstrate the qualitative influence of process parameters on predictions and to estimate temperatures produced in typical fiction stir welding situations.

  20. 29 CFR 1926.354 - Welding, cutting, and heating in way of preservative coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting, and heating in way of preservative... Welding and Cutting § 1926.354 Welding, cutting, and heating in way of preservative coatings. (a) Before welding, cutting, or heating is commenced on any surface covered by a preservative coating...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.353 - Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting, and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting, and heating... Welding and Cutting § 1926.353 Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting, and heating. (a) Mechanical... the work area. (b) Welding, cutting, and heating in confined spaces. (1) Except as provided...

  2. 49 CFR 179.300-10 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.300-10 Section 179.300-10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... Postweld heat treatment. After welding is complete, steel tanks and all attachments welded thereto, must...

  3. The effect of welding heat input on the weldpool behavior in MIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙俊生; 武传松

    2002-01-01

    For metal-inert gas welding (MIG), the welding heat input includes the arc heat flux on the surface of workpiece and the volumetric distribution of droplets' heat content within the weldpool. Based on the general principle of arc physics and the physical nature of the action of droplets and weldpool, a distribution mode of current density on the deformed weldpool surface and the heat content of filler metal droplets inside the weldpool is established in this paper. 7Numerical analysis is used to study the distribution of current density in MIG welding, the distribution mode of the heat content of filler metal droplets, weldpool geometry, the fluid flow and temperature profiles. Experiments are performed to prove the reliability of the calculated mode.

  4. 49 CFR 179.400-12 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.400-12 Section 179... and 107A) § 179.400-12 Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner tank is not... be attached before postweld heat treatment. Welds securing the following need not be postweld...

  5. Finite element analysis of welding residual stress of aero engine blisk by controlling heat input

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xueqiu; Yang Jianguo; Chen Xuhui; Fang Hongyuan; Qu Shen; Wang Licheng

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve aero engine performance, it is necessary to reduce the welding residual stress of aero engine blisk. In this paper, finite element method was employed to simulate electron beam welding process of blisk, in accordance with the deducing formula (p = kh) , the heat input is changed with the weld depth to control welding residual stress of blisk. The calculation results show that welding residual stress of blisk can be controlled effectively by reducing the heat input on the conditions of meeting the demand of weld penetration and guaranteeing the welding quality, a new theoretical method and some numerical data are provided for controlling welding residual stress of blisk.

  6. Predicting welding residual stresses in a dissimilar metal girth welded pipe using 3D finite element model with a simplified heat source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Dean, E-mail: deandeng@cqu.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Shazheng Street 174, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Kiyoshima, Shoichi [Research Center of Computational Mechanics, Inc., Togoshi NI-Bldg., 1-7-1 Togoshi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-0041 (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuo [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, TOKYU REIT Toranomon Bldg, 3-17-1, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan); Yanagida, Nobuyoshi [Hitachi Ltd. 1-1, Saiwa-cho 3-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 317-8511 (Japan); Saito, Koichi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. 2-2, Omika-cho, 5-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Welding residual stresses have asymmetrical distributions in the dissimilar metal pipe. Variable length heat source model can largely save computing time. Besides welding, other thermal processes also affect residual stresses. - Abstract: Dissimilar metal welds are commonly used in nuclear power plants to connect low alloy steel components and austenitic stainless steel piping systems. The integrity assessment and life estimation for such welded structures require consideration of residual stresses induced by manufacturing processes. Because the fabrication process of dissimilar metal weld joints is considerably complex, it is very difficult to accurately predict residual stresses. In this study, both numerical simulation technology and experimental method were used to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a dissimilar metal pipe joint with a medium diameter, which were performed by a multi-pass welding process. Firstly, an experimental mock-up was fabricated to measure the residual stress distributions on the inside and the outside surfaces. Then, a time-effective 3-D finite element model was developed to simulate welding residual stresses through using a simplified moving heat source. The simplified heat source method could complete the thermo-mechanical analysis in an acceptable time, and the simulation results generally matched the measured data near the weld zone. Through comparing the simulation results and the experimental measurements, we can infer that besides the multi-pass welding process other key manufacturing processes such as cladding, buttering and heat treatment should also be taken into account to accurately predict residual stresses in the whole range of the dissimilar metal pipe.

  7. Heat Control via Torque Control in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Richard; Colligan, Kevin; Knapp, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In a proposed advance in friction stir welding, the torque exerted on the workpiece by the friction stir pin would be measured and controlled in an effort to measure and control the total heat input to the workpiece. The total heat input to the workpiece is an important parameter of any welding process (fusion or friction stir welding). In fusion welding, measurement and control of heat input is a difficult problem. However, in friction stir welding, the basic principle of operation affords the potential of a straightforward solution: Neglecting thermal losses through the pin and the spindle that supports it, the rate of heat input to the workpiece is the product of the torque and the speed of rotation of the friction stir weld pin and, hence, of the spindle. Therefore, if one acquires and suitably processes data on torque and rotation and controls the torque, the rotation, or both, one should be able to control the heat input into the workpiece. In conventional practice in friction stir welding, one uses feedback control of the spindle motor to maintain a constant speed of rotation. According to the proposal, one would not maintain a constant speed of rotation: Instead, one would use feedback control to maintain a constant torque and would measure the speed of rotation while allowing it to vary. The torque exerted on the workpiece would be estimated as the product of (1) the torque-multiplication ratio of the spindle belt and/or gear drive, (2) the force measured by a load cell mechanically coupled to the spindle motor, and (3) the moment arm of the load cell. Hence, the output of the load cell would be used as a feedback signal for controlling the torque (see figure).

  8. Effects of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 2A14 High Strength Aluminum Alloy by Electron Beam Welding%焊后热处理对2A14高强铝合金电子束焊接头组织及力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚荣; 黄文荣; 雷华东

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of significant weight reduction have promoted a focus on selection of light-weight materials. That is the reason that high strength aluminum alloy is becoming widely recognized as the candidates to replace steel. In order to develop proper post weld heat treatment process of 2A14 high strength aluminum alloy welded by electron beam, the effects of post weld heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of 2A14 aluminum alloy welded joint are studied by using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), hardness test and tensile test. The results showed that the eutectic structure of the grain-boundary dissolved into the matrix gradually, dispersion-strengthening phase precipitated in weld zone and the hardness of weld seam increased obviously after post weld heat treatment. The tensile strength of the weld seam increased from 3SS Mpa to 465 Mpa, even larger than the base metal. The fracture analysis show the dimples became deeper and the fracture location is all in weld seam, which proposes that the toughness of the weld increased.%轻质化的需求使得人们把关注的焦点集中于轻质材料,高强铝合金作为钢结构材料的最佳替代品,受到越来越广泛的关注,利用电子束焊接高强铝合金,为获得性能优良的2A14高强铝合金电子束焊接接头,采用焊后热处理,通过组织观察(光学显微镜和扫描电镜)、维氏硬度测试、接头拉伸性能测试等方法研究焊后热处理对2A14电子束焊接接头显微组织和性能的影响.结果表明,通过焊后热处理,焊缝中心原晶界分布的网状共晶组织回溶于基体组织中消失,焊缝内部析出大量弥散强化项,基体强化效果增强,显微硬度显著升高,由焊态下低子母材硬度直接升高至超过母材硬度.接头抗拉强度由原来的355MPa提高到465 MPa,超过了母材强度.接头断裂均发生在焊缝,由断口分析发现热处理后接头韧性增强,韧窝深度

  9. Effect of welding heat input on HAZ character in ultra-fine grain steel welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富巨; 许卫刚; 王玉涛; 王燕; 张学刚; 廖永平

    2003-01-01

    In this essay, we studied how heat input affected the microstructure, hardness, grain size and heat-affected zone(HAZ) dimension of WCX355 ultra-fine grain steel which was welded respectively by the ultra narrow-gap welding (UNGW) process and the overlaying process with CO2 as protective atmosphere and laser welding process. The experimental results show when the heat input changed from 1.65kJ/cm to 5.93kJ/cm, the width of its HAZ ranged from 0.6mm to 2.1mm.The average grain size grew up from 2~5μm of base metal to 20~70μm and found no obvious soften phenomenon in overheated zone. The width of normalized zone was generally wide as 2/3 as that of the whole HAZ, and the grain size in this zone is smaller than that in base metal. Under the circumstance of equal heat input, the HAZ width of UNGW is narrower than that of the laser welding.

  10. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminium alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat input and maximum temperature developed during friction stir welding with different parameters. Aluminium alloy (AA 6061-T6 has been used for experimental and numerical analysis. Experimental analysis is based on temperature measurements by using infrared camera, whereas numerical analysis was based on empirical expressions and finite element method. Different types of defects have been observed in respect to different levels of heat input.

  11. Progress Report for Diffusion Welding of the NGNP Process Application Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Mizia; D.E. Clark; M.V. Glazoff; T.E. Lister; T.L. Trowbridge

    2011-04-01

    The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic, diffusion welded, compact heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary (reactor side) heat transport system to the secondary heat transport system. The intermediate heat exchanger will transfer this heat to downstream applications such as hydrogen production, process heat, and electricity generation. The channeled plates that make up the heat transfer surfaces of the intermediate heat exchanger will have to be assembled into an array by diffusion welding.

  12. Elemental distribution inside a heat treated stainless steel weld.

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The video shows the elemental distribution of Molybdenum (red), Manganese (green) and Chromium (blue) within a 20 μm × 20 μm × 20 μm region of a heat treated stainless steel weld. This data has been collected using 3D Focused Ion Beam Milling and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, an elemental characterisation analysis technique. High resolution (75 nm voxel size) mapping is necessary to gain insight into the distribution of regions with distinct elemental composition (phases), which are shown in purple (sigma) and yellow (delta ferrite) in the video. These features have important implications for the toughness and the magnetic properties of the weld, especially at cryogenic temperatures. The video shows the individual slices which were collected in a direction perpendicular to the weld bead direction, followed by a 3D representation of the gauge volume.

  13. Efeito do tratamento térmico pós-soldagem nas propriedades mecânicas e microestruturais de metal de solda de aço de extra alta resistência para utilização em equipamentos de ancoragem Effect of post welding heat treatment on the mechanical and microstructural properties of extra high strength steel weld metals for mooring equipments application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Carlos Ferreira Jorge

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se a avaliação de metal de solda com resistência a tração superior à 860MPa, para utilização na soldagem de aço grau R4 da norma IACS W22. Para tanto, foram soldadas juntas multipasse com preaquecimentos realizados à 200 e 250ºC pelo processo eletrodo revestido, utilizando um consumível com 4,0mm de diâmetro e cuja composição base é C-0,06%, Mn-1,89%, e Ni-2,95%. Após a soldagem foram realizados ensaios mecânicos e metalográficos em corpos-de-prova retirados integralmente do metal depositado nas condições de como soldado e após tratamento térmico pós-soldagem realizados à 600ºC por 2 horas. Os resultados mostraram que os metais de solda obtidos apresentaram propriedades mecânicas adequadas para todas as condições de análise, propiciando resultados superiores aos mínimos requeridos para a utilização na soldagem do aço grau R4 utilizados em equipamentos de ancoragem de plataformas de petróleo. A análise metalográfica permitiu clarificar a microestrutura presente e explicar o comportamento das propriedades mecânicas após o tratamento térmico.A weld metal with tensile strength higher than 860 MPa for the welding of a IACS W22 R4 Grade Steel was evaluated. Welded joints with preheat of 200 and 250ºC were produced by SMAW process using 4.0 mm diameter covered electrodes in multipass technique whose basic composition was: C-0,06%, Mn-1,89%, e Ni-2,95%. After welding, mechanical and metallographic tests were done in all-weld metal samples in both as-welded and post welded heat treatment conditions performed at600ºC for 2 hours. The results show that the obtained weld metals have mechanical properties higher than the minimum required for the welding of a IACS W22 R4 Grade steel in all condition analysis, which makes possible to attain an adequate strength/toughness relationship for high strength steel applied in mooring equipments. The metallographic analysis allowed the identification of microstructure

  14. Study on heat source model in twin-arc GMAW with a common weld pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Pengcheng; Wang Lulu; Liu Chunting; Huang Shisheng

    2009-01-01

    The heat input from arcs to weld pool in twin-arc gas metal arc welding (GMAW) with a common weld pool is investigated by high-speed photography. The characteristics of arc shapes and droplet transfer are studied and then the models for heat flux distribution on top surface of weld pool and enthalpy distribution of metal droplets transferred into weld pool are established. By using the model, 3-D geometries of weld pools in twin-arc GMAW with a common weld pool are predicted. Corresponding welding experiments on mild steel plates are carried out and the results indicate that the predicted shape of weld bead on cross section shows good agreement with measured one.

  15. 49 CFR 179.200-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.200-11 Section 179.200-11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... Postweld heat treatment. When specified in § 179.201-1, after welding is complete, postweld heat...

  16. Research on modeling of heat source for electron beam welding fusion-solidification zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yajun; Fu Pengfei; Guan Yongjun; Lu Zhijun; Wei Yintao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,the common heat source model of point and linear heat source in the numerical simulation of electron beam welding (EBW) were summarized and introduced.The combined point-linear heat source model was brought forward and to simulate the welding temperature fields of EBW and predicting the weld shape.The model parameters were put forward and regulated in the combined model,which included the ratio of point heat source to linear heat source Qpr and the distribution of linear heat source Lr.Based on the combined model,the welding temperature fields of EBW were investigated.The results show that the predicted weld shapes are conformable to those of the actual,the temperature fields are reasonable and correct by simulating with combined point-linear heat source model and the typical weld shapes are gained.

  17. Effect of Pre/Post T6 Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Laser Welded SSM Cast A356 Aluminium Alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhter, R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available a weld seams h acceptable properties. R. Akhter et al. / Materials Science and Engineering A 447 (2007) 192–196 193 wit centre-to-centr Th condition ejectio configurations an g durin t c hig plasma rate othe h he pool... prone to plasma formation and because it is much avier than helium it transfers more momentum to the weld . In the case of aluminium the weld metal has low viscosity d is easily disturbed. We believed that a mixture of helium d argon would strike...

  18. Microstructural characteristics and mechanism of toughness improvement of laser and electron-beam welds of V-4Cr-4Ti following postwelding heat-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Park, J.H.; Gazda, J.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The authors are conducting a program to develop an optimal laser welding procedure for large-scale fusion-reactor structural components to be fabricated from vanadium-base alloys. Microstructural characteristics were investigated by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and chemical analysis to provide an understanding of the mechanism of the drastic improvement of impact toughness of laser and electron-beam (EB) welds of V-4Cr-4Ti following postwelding annealing at 1000{degrees}C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that annealed weld zones were characterized by extensive networks of fine V(C,O,N) precipitates, which appear to clean away O, C, and N from grain matrices. This process is accompanied by simultaneous annealing-out of the dense dislocations present in the weld fusion zone. It seems possible to produce high-quality welds under practical conditions by controlling and adjusting the cooling rate of the weld zone by some innovative method to maximize the precipitation of V(C,O,N).

  19. Heat sink welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes to control distortion and residual stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Div., Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-07-01

    Construction of India's Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) involves extensive welding of austenitic stainless steels pipes of different dimensions. Due to high thermal expansion coefficient and poor thermal conductivity of this class of steels, welding can result in significant distortion of these pipes. Attempts to arrest this distortion can lead to high levels of residual stresses in the welded parts. Heat sink welding is one of the techniques often employed to minimize distortion and residual stress in austenitic stainless steel pipe welding. This technique has also been employed to repair welding of the piping of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) subjected to radiation induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In the present study, a comparison of the distortion in two pipe welds, one made with heat sink welding and another a normal welds. Pipes of dimensions 350{phi} x 250(L) x 8(t) mm was fabricated from 316LN plates of dimensions 1100 x 250 x 8 mm by bending and long seam (L-seam) welding by SMAW process. Two fit ups with a root gap of 2 mm, land height of 1mm and a groove angle of 70 were prepared using these pipes for circumferential seam (C-seam) welding. Dimensions at predetermined points in the fit up were made before and after welding to check the variation in radius, circumference and and ovality of the pipes. Root pass for both the pipe fit up were carried out using conventional GTAW process with 1.6 mm AWS ER 16-8-2 as consumables. Welding of one of the pipe fit ups were completed using conventions GTAW process while the other was completed using heat sink welding. For second and subsequent layers of welding using this process, water was sprayed at the root side of the joint while welding was in progress. Flow rate of the water was {proportional_to}6 1/minute. Welding parameters employed were same as those used for the other pipe weld. Results of the dimensional measurements showed that there is no circumferential shrinkage in

  20. Heat generation during plunge stage in friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat generation in the Al alloy Al2024-T3 plate under different rotating speeds and plunge speeds during the plunge stage of friction stir welding (FSW. A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM is developed in the commercial code ABAQUS/Explicit using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, the Johnson-Cook material law and Coulomb’s Law of friction. The heat generation in FSW can be divided into two parts: frictional heat generated by the tool and heat generated by material deformation near the pin and the tool shoulder region. Numerical results obtained in this work indicate a more prominent influence from the friction-generated heat. The slip rate of the tool relative to the workpiece material is related to this portion of heat. The material velocity, on the other hand, is related to the heat generated by plastic deformation. Increasing the plunging speed of the tool decreases the friction-generated heat and increases the amount of deformation-generated heat, while increasing the tool rotating speed has the opposite influence on both heat portions. Numerical results are compared with the experimental ones, in order to validate the numerical model, and a good agreement is obtained.

  1. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  2. Effect of Heat Input During Disk Laser Bead-On-Plate Welding of Thermomechanically Rolled Steel on Penetration Characteristics and Porosity Formation in the Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed analysis of the influence of heat input during laser bead-on-plate welding of 5.0 mm thick plates of S700MC steel by modern Disk laser on the mechanism of steel penetration, shape and depth of penetration, and also on tendency to weld porosity formation. Based on the investigations performed in a wide range of laser welding parameters the relationship between laser power and welding speed, thus heat input, required for full penetration was determined. Additionally the relationship between the laser welding parameters and weld quality was determined.

  3. Comparison of Post Weld Treatment of High Strength Steel Welded Joints in Medium Cycle Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Melters; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2010-01-01

    the stress range can exceed the yield-strength of ordinary structural steel, especially when considering positive stress ratios (R > 0). Fatigue experiments and qualitative evaluation of the different post-weld treatments leads to the selection of TIG dressing. The process of implementing TIG dressing......This paper presents a comparison of three post-weld treatments for fatigue life improvement of welded joints. The objective is to determine the most suitable post-weld treatment for implementation in mass production of certain crane components manufactured from very high-strength steel....... The processes investigated are: burr grinding, TIG dressing and ultrasonic impact treatment. The focus of this investigation is on the so-called medium cycle area, i.e. 10 000-500 000 cycles and very high stress ranges. In this area of fatigue design, the use of very high strength steel becomes necessary, since...

  4. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu 608002 (India)], E-mail: visvabalu@yahoo.com; Ravisankar, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu 608002 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbag (P.O.), Hyderabad 560058 (India)

    2007-06-25

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility.

  5. Heat transfer modeling of double-side arc welding

    CERN Document Server

    Sun Jun Sheng; Zhang Yan Ming

    2002-01-01

    If a plasma arc and a TIG arc are connected in serial and with the plasma arc placed on the obverse side and the TIG arc on the opposite side of the workpiece, a special double-side arc welding (DSAW) system will be formed, in which the PAW current is forced to flow through the keyhole along the thickness direction so as to compensate the energy consumed for melting the workpiece and improve the penetration capacity of the PAW arc. By considering the mechanics factors which influence the DSAW pool geometric shape, the control equations of the pool surface deformation are derived, and the mathematics mode for DSAW heat transfer is established by using boundary-fitted non-orthogonal coordinate systems. With this model, the difference between DSAW and PAW heat transfer is analyzed and the reason for the increase of DSAW penetration is explained from the point of heat transfer. The welding process experiments show that calculated results are in good agreement with measured ones

  6. Effect of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone in submerged arc welding process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Om; Sunil Pandey

    2013-12-01

    Submerged arc welding (SAW) is a fusion joining process, known for its high deposition capabilities. This process is useful in joining thick section components used in various industries. Besides joining, SAW can also be used for surfacing applications. Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) produced within the base metal as a result of tremendous heat of arc is of big concern as it affects the performance of welded/surfaced structure in service due to metallurgical changes in the affected region. This work was carried out to investigate the effect of polarity and other SAW parameters on HAZ size and dilution and to establish their correlations. Influence of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone was then carried out. Four levels of heat input were used to study their effect on % dilution and HAZ area at both the electrode positive and electrode negative polarities. Proper management of heat input in welding is important, because power sources can be used more efficiently if one knows how the same heat input can be applied to get the better results. Empirical models have been developed using statistical technique.

  7. An analytical model for the heat generation in friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper; Wert, John

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish an analytical model for heat generation by friction stir welding (FSW), based on different assumptions of the contact condition between the rotating tool surface and the weld piece. The material flow and heat generation are characterized by the contact...

  8. Heat transfer and fluid flow during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    CERN Document Server

    He, X; Debroy, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and velocity fields during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel was studied using a transient, heat transfer and fluid flow model based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the weld pool. The weld pool geometry, weld thermal cycles and various solidification parameters were calculated. The fusion zone geometry, calculated from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model, was in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values for various welding conditions. Dimensional analysis was used to understand the importance of heat transfer by conduction and convection and the roles of various driving forces for convection in the weld pool. During solidification, the mushy zone grew at a rapid rate and the maximum size of the mushy zone was reached when the pure liquid region vanished. The solidification rate of the mushy zone/liquid interface was shown to increase while the temperature gradient in the liquid zone at...

  9. Manipulation and Joule heat welding of Ag nanowires prepared by atomic migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori, E-mail: tohmyoh@ism.mech.tohoku.ac.jp; Fukui, Satoru [Tohoku University, Department of Nanomechanics (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Ag nanowires (NWs) with diameters of about 200 nm and length of 2-7 {mu}m are prepared on a substrate by an atomic migration called stress-induced migration and are picked up from the substrate with electrostatic forces. The Ag NWs are then offered for the welding experiment in a scanning electron microscope and successfully welded together using Joule heating introduced into the NWs by supplying the constant direct current. It is discovered that the welding of Ag NWs is achieved under the current supply in a self-completed manner. The conditions for successful Joule heat welding are analyzed by the parameter that governs the melting phenomenon at the nanocontacts of two NWs. From the experiment and the analysis, electromigration, i.e., another type of atomic migration due to higher electron flow, is found to be occurred during the welding and this is considered to enhance the welding performance of two NWs with Joule heat.

  10. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Heat Transfer Modeling and Thermal History Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-02-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a technique that can be used for materials joining and local microstructural refinement. Owing to the solid-state character of the process, FSW has significant advantages over traditional fusion welding, including reduced part distortion and overheating. In this study, a novel heat transfer model was developed to predict weld temperature distributions and quantify peak temperatures under various combinations of processing parameters for different wrought and cast Al alloys. Specifically, an analytical analysis was first developed to characterize and predict heat generation rate within the weld nugget, and then a two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation was performed to evaluate the temperature distribution in the weld cross-section and top-view planes. A further three-dimensional (3D) simulation was developed based on the heat generation analysis. The model was validated by measuring actual temperatures near the weld nugget using thermocouples, and good agreement was obtained for all studied materials and conditions.

  11. Susceptibility to Hot Cracking and Weldment Heat Treatment of Haynes 230 Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.M.Cheng; C.P.Chou; I.K.Lee; I.C.Kuo

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the susceptibility of hot cracking and weldment heat treatment of Haynes 230 superalloy.The Varestriant test was conducted to evaluate this susceptibility. Welding was performed by gas tungsten arc welding(GTAW)and plasma arc welding(PAW)with stress relief heat treatment and solid solution heat treatment. A tensile test is then performed to measure the changes in the mechanical properties of the heattreated material. The results indicate that the number of thermal cycles does not affect the susceptibility of Haynes 230 superalloy to hot cracking. However, it does increase the strain. In weldment of heat treatment,stress relief annealing increases the yield strength and tensile strength of the welded parts. The section of the tensile specimens shows fibrous fractures on the welded parts, regardless of whether they are heat-treated.

  12. Friction Stir Welding of Steel: Heat Input, Microstructure, and Mechanical Property Co-relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Md. M.; Sarkar, R.; Pal, T. K.; Prabhu, N.; Ghosh, M.

    2015-09-01

    Friction stir welding was performed to join carbon steel plates at tool rotational rate of 800-1400 rpm. Microstructure and microhardness of welded specimens were evaluated across weld centerline. Torque base index, peak temperature, cooling rate, strain, strain rate, volumetric material flow rate, and width of extruded zone at weld nugget were calculated. Peak temperature at weld nugget was ~1300-1360 K. At this temperature, ferrite transformed to austenite during welding. Austenite was decomposed in to ferrite and bainite at cooling rate of ~4-7.5 K/s. The presence of bainite was endorsed by increment in microhardness with respect to base material. Ferrite grain size at weld nugget was finer in comparison to as-received alloy. With the increment in tool rotational rate strain, strain rate, total heat input, and peak temperature at weld nugget were increased. High temperature at weld nugget promoted increment in ferrite grain size and reduction in area fraction of bainite. Heat-affected zone also experienced phase transformation and exhibited enhancement in ferrite grain size in comparison to base alloy at all welding parameters with marginal drop in microhardness. Maximum joint strength was obtained at the tool rotational rate of 1000 rpm. Increment in tool rational rate reduced the joint efficiency owing to increment in ferrite grain size and reduction in pearlite area fraction at heat-affected zone.

  13. Evaluation of the Low Heat Input Process for Weld Repair of Nickel-Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2011-10-01

    The repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding or an equivalent process, but unfortunately these components are often susceptible to heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking during the weld repair process. This is a major problem especially in cast alloys due to their coarse-grain size and where the (Al + Ti) contents is in excess of 3-4%; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low stress non-rotating components such as vanes. Micro-welding has the potential to deposit small amounts of filler at low heat input levels with minimum HAZ and thus is an attractive process for depositing a quality weld. As with conventional fusion processes, the filler alloy is deposited by the generation of a low power arc between a consumable electrode and the substrate. The low heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. In this study, the low heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been used to simulate weld repair using Inconel (IN) (Inconel and IN are trademarks of INCO Alloys International) 625, Rene (Rene is a trademark of General Electric Company) 41, Nimonic (Nimonic is a trademark of INCO Alloys International) 105 and Inconel 738LC filler alloys, to a cast Inconel 738LC substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  14. Experimental studies of parameters affecting the heat generation in friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat generation is a complex process of transformation of a specific type of energy into heat. During friction stir welding, one part of mechanical energy delivered to the welding tool is consumed in the welding process, another is used for deformational processes etc., and the rest of the energy is transformed into heat. The analytical procedure for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding is very complex because it includes a significant number of variables and parameters, and many of them cannot be fully mathematically explained. Because of that, the analytical model for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding defines variables and parameters that dominantly affect heat generation. These parameters are numerous and some of them, e. g. loads, friction coefficient, torque, temperature, are estimated experimentally. Due to the complex geometry of the friction stir welding process and requirements of the measuring equipment, adequate measuring configurations and specific constructional solutions that provide adequate measuring positions are necessary. This paper gives an overview of the process of heat generation during friction stir welding, the most influencing parameters on heat generation, constructional solutions for the measuring equipment needed for these experimental researches and examples of measured values.

  15. Monotonic and cyclic deformation behavior of MIG-CMT welded and heat-treated joints of aluminum cast and wrought alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantehm, Matthias; Soeker, Marcus; Krupp, Ulrich; Michels, Wilhelm [Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, Institute of Materials Design and Structural Integrity, University of Applied Sciences Osnabrueck, 49009 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    While the fatigue behavior of die cast aluminum as well as welded aluminum wrought alloys have been subject of several studies, no systematic work has been carried out on hybrid structures made as a combination of welded sand castings and wrought alloys. Aim of the present study is to correlate the monotonic and cyclic deformation behavior of thin sheet welded joints with the microstructure in the heat affected zone of the material combination sand cast EN AC-Al Si7Mg0.3 and wrought alloy EN AW-Al Si1MgMn (EN AW-6082). The metal sheets were welded using a metal inert gas cold metal transfer process under variation of the welding gap, the heat treatment parameters, as well as the surface finishes. It was demonstrated by Woehler diagrams based on bending fatigue tests that the fatigue life could be increased for the welded and heat treated specimens as compared to the as-received cast specimens. By means of optical microscopy this effect was attributed to microstructural changes due to the optimized welding and heat treatment process. A detailed analysis of the mechanical tests was possible by the application of an optical 3D strain analysis. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Effect of Heat Input on the Tensile Damage Evolution in Pulsed Laser Welded Ti6Al4V Titanium Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2016-11-01

    The present paper is focused on studying the effect of heat input on the tensile damage evolution of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Ti6Al4V alloy under monotonic loading. To analyze the reasons that the tensile fracture site of the pulsed-laser-welded Ti6Al4V sheet joints changes with the heat input under monotonic loading, the microstructure of the sample with different nominal strain values was investigated by in situ observation. Experiment results show that the tensile ductility and fatigue life of welded joints with low heat input are higher than that of welded joints with high heat input. Under tensile loads, the critical engineering strain for crack initiation is much lower in the welded joint with high heat input than in the welded joints with low and medium heat input. And the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the fusion zone than in the base metal for the welded joints with high input, whereas the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the base metal than in the fusion zone for the welded joints with low input. Consequently, the welded joints fractured in the fusion zone for the welds with high heat input, whereas the welded joints ruptured in the base metal for the welds with low heat input. It is proved that the fine grain microstructure produced by low heat input can improve the critical nominal strain for crack initiation and the resistance ability of microstructural damage.

  17. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  18. Influence of heat treatments for laser welded semi solid metal cast A356 alloy on the fracture mode of tensile specimens

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kunene, G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available . Sample Si Fe Cu Mn Mg Zn Ti Cr Sr Al A356 Literature Spec10 6.5 - 7.5 0.2 max. 0.20 max. 0.10 max. 0.25 - 0.45 0.10 max. 0.20 max. - - 0.30 max Bal. Virgin material 7.33 0.13 0.01 0.01 0... for Laser Welded Semi Solid Metal Cast A356 Alloy on the Fracture Mode of Tensile Specimens G. Kunene1, a, G. Govender1,b, L. Ivanchev1,c, R. Knutsen2,d and H. Burger3,e 1CSIR: Materials Science and Manufacturing, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria, 0001 South...

  19. Heat source models in simulation of heat flow in friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    . The convective heat transfer due to the material flow affects the temperature fields. Models presented previously in the literature allow the heat to flow through the probe volume, and the majority neglects the influence of the contact condition as the sliding condition is assumed. In this work, a number......The objective of the present paper is to investigate the effect of including the tool probe and the material flow in the numerical modelling of heat flow in friction stir welding (FSW). The contact condition at the interface between the tool and workpiece controls the heat transfer mechanisms...... of cases is established. Each case represents a combination of a contact condition, i.e. sliding and sticking, and a stage of refinement regarding the heat source distribution. In the most detailed models, the heat flow is forced around the probe volume by prescribing a velocity field in shear layers...

  20. Heat Source Models in Simulation of Heat Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    . The convective heat transfer due to the material flow affects the temperature fields. Models presented previously in literature allow the heat to flow through the probe volume, and the majority of them neglect the influence of the contact condition as the sliding condition is assumed. In the present work......The objective of the present paper is to investigate the effect of including the tool probe and the material flow in the numerical modelling of heat flow in Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The contact condition at the interface between the tool and workpiece controls the heat transfer mechanisms......, a number of cases are established. Each case represents a combination of a contact condition, i.e. sliding and sticking, and a stage of refinement regarding the heat source distribution. In the most detailed models the heat flow is forced around the probe volume by prescribing a velocity field in shear...

  1. Numerical simulation of side heating for controlling angular distortion in multipass MMAW butt welded plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Adinath V Damale; Keshav N Nandurkar

    2015-04-01

    Distortion is a severe problem in weld products.It depends on various process parameters like plate thickness, current, voltage, type of weld joint and restraints put on. If distortion is not properly dealt during welding then the product may become useless from geometric accuracy point of view. In the present study, a 3-D coupled transient thermal analysis model with auxiliary side heating (parallel heating) is developed to control angular distortion. During analysis, parallel heating flames are placed at several locations from weld line in cross direction. A user defined subroutine is used to apply transient heat source and side heating flames. Element birth and death technique is used to simulate the filler material deposition. One side multipass 'V' butt weld configuration is used for this study. A series of observational tests are done with a special experimental fixture using Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMAW) to validate the proposed FEA model. It is found that the angular distortion has decreased from 2 mm to 0.4 mm with change in side heating distance from 50 to 90 mm from the weld line.

  2. Finite element analysis of keyhole plasma arc welding based on an adaptive heat source mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Qingxian; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Yuming

    2007-01-01

    An adaptive heat source mode is proposed to account for the keyhole effect and the characteristics of volumetric distribution along the direction of the workpiece thickness. Finite element analysis of the temperature field in keyhole plasma arc welding is conducted and the weld geometry is obtained. The predicted results are in agreement with the measured ones.

  3. Influence of Heat Input on Martensite Formation and Impact Property of Ferritic-Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Metals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Mukherjee T.K. Pal

    2012-01-01

    .... The welded joints were evaluated by microstructure and charpy impact toughness. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on heat input and filler wires were determined by dilution calculation, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE...

  4. Progress Report for Diffusion Welding of the NGNP Process Application Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Mizia; D.E. Clark; M.V. Glazoff; T.E. Lister; T.L. Trowbridge

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor as the basis for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity, hydrogen production, and process heat applications. The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic, diffusion welded, compact heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary (reactor side) heat transport system to the secondary heat transport system. An intermediate heat exchanger will transfer this heat to downstream applications such as hydrogen production, process heat, and electricity generation. The channeled plates that make up the heat transfer surfaces of the intermediate heat exchanger will have to be assembled into an array by diffusion welding. This report describes the preliminary results of a scoping study that evaluated the diffusion welding process parameters and the resultant mechanical properties of diffusion welded joints using Alloy 800H. The long-term goal of the program is to progress towards demonstration of small heat exchanger unit cells fabricated with diffusion welds. Demonstration through mechanical testing of the unit cells will support American Society of Mechanical Engineers rules and standards development, reduce technical risk, and provide proof of concept for heat exchanger fabrication methods needed to deploy heat exchangers in several potential NGNP configurations.1 Researchers also evaluated the usefulness of modern thermodynamic and diffusion computational tools (Thermo-Calc and Dictra) in optimizing the parameters for diffusion welding of Alloy 800H. The modeling efforts suggested a temperature of 1150 C for 1 hour with an applied pressure of 5 MPa using 15 {micro}m nickel foil as joint filler to reduce chromium oxidation on the welded surfaces. Good agreement between modeled and experimentally determined concentration gradients was achieved

  5. Thermostructural Analysis of Plate-Type Heat Exchanger Prototypes Considering Weld Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-nam Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties in a weld zone are different from those in the parent material owing to their different microstructures and residual weld stresses. Welded plate-type heat exchanger prototypes made of Hastelloy-X alloy were manufactured, and performance tests on the prototypes were performed in a small-scale nitrogen gas loop at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Owing to a lack of mechanical properties in the weld zone, previous research on the strength analyses of the prototypes was performed using the parent material properties. In this study, based on the mechanical properties of Hastelloy-X alloy obtained using an instrumented indentation technique, strength analyses considering the mechanical properties in the weld zone were performed, and the analysis results were compared with previous research. As a result of the comparison, a thermostructural analysis considering the weld material properties is needed to understand the structural behavior and evaluate the structural integrity of the prototype more reliably.

  6. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  7. Effect of the aging treatment in the fractures mechanics of welded joints of steel 316L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Luisa Lima Silveira; Carneiro, Joao Pedro Santiago; Vilela, Jerfferson Jose, E-mail: luisa_lima11@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: jsantiagocarneiro@gmail.com, E-mail: jjv@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The austenitic stainless steel 316L is widely used in nuclear industry because of its excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. These properties must be evaluated in order to prevent failure and extend the life of equipment. The microstructure in the weld fusion zone consists on an austenite matrix with 5-12% of delta ferrite met stable at room temperature. However the pressurized water reactors operate at temperatures in the range 290-325 deg C, thus welds may be susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement after long service life. According to the literature, this occurs due to the spinodal decomposition. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel welds by hardness and tensile tests before and after heat treatment. In this regard, two steel plates were welded and part of the material was heat treated at 335 deg C for 1000 hours. The tests after heat treatment showed an increase of only 4% in ultimate tensile strength and an increase of 28% in hardness. No changes were observed in the material microstructure, however according to literature changes can be identified by transmission electron microscopy. The curves of impact energy vs. temperature showed little change but, it was not able to observe a ductile-brittle transition and images of microstructure from scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) did not show fragile behavior. (author)

  8. FE analysis of cruciform welded joints considering different mechanical properties for base material, heat affected zone and weld metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino Corigliano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific work was to investigate the behaviour of cruciform welded joints under static loading using a full-field technique: Digital Image Correlation. The material curves, relative to different zones (base material, heat affected zone, weld, were obtained by hardness measurements, which were done by means of a fully automated hardness scanner with high resolution. This innovative technique, based on the UCI method, allowed to identify the different zones and to assess their different mechanical properties, which were considered in the finite element model. Finally the finite element model was validated experimentally, comparing the results with the measurements obtained using the Digital Image Correlation technique.

  9. The modeling of heat affected zone (HAZ in submerged arc welding (SAW surfacing steel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Winczek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work the bimodal heat source model in the description of the temperature field is presented. The electric arc was treated physically as one heat source, whose heat was divided: part of the heat is transferred by the direct impact of the electric arc, but another part of the heat is transferred to the weld by the melted material of the electrode. Computations of the temperature field during SAW surfacing of S355 steel element are carried out. The macrographic and metallographic analysis of the weld confirmed the depth and shapes of the fusion line and HAZ defined by the numerical simulation.

  10. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Jang, Beom Seon; Kim, Yong Tai; Chun, Kwang San

    2013-09-01

    The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  11. The influence of electric ARC activation on the speed of heating and the structure of metal in welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savytsky Oleksandr M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research related to the impact of electric arc activation onto drive welding energy and metal weld heating speed. It is confirmed that ATIG and AMIG methods, depending on metal thickness, single pass weldability and chemical composition of activating flux, enable the reduction of welding energy by 2-6 times when compared to conventional welding methods. Additionally, these procedures create conditions to increase metal weld heating speed up to 1,500-5,500°C/s-1. Steel which can be rapidly heated, allows for a hardened structure to form (with carbon content up to 0.4%, together with a released martensitic structure or a mixture of bainitic-martensitic structures. Results of the research of effectiveness of ATIG and AMIG welding showed that increase in the penetration capability of electric arc, which increases welding productivity, is the visible side of ATIG and AMIG welding capabilities.

  12. Investigations on bending condition for welded carbon steel pipe by high frequency induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Toshimi; Matsumoto, Teruo; Tamai, Yasumasa

    1987-08-01

    The induction heating bent pipes of carbon steel welded pipes are used for the piping in nuclear power plants, in place of elbows. This application is useful to suppress the radiation exposure at in-service inspection. The quality of the bent pipes are controlled on the technical standards of welding for electrical equipments. However, the influence of the bending condition has not been yet sufficiently understood on the mechanical properties of the bent pipes. The purpose of this investigation is to establish the appropriate bending condition for the carbon steel weld pipe which corresponds to the carbon steel pipe STPT 42 in JIS G 3456, in relation to the transformation of the structures of the base metal and the weld metal during bending. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The maximum heating temperature should be set in the range from 900 deg C to 1000 deg C, in order to assure the high Charpy impact properties. (2) The maximum heating temperature which is lower than 900 deg C causes the imperfect transformation of the base metal and the weld metal, then is likely to spoil the Charpy impact properties. (3) Higher heating rate causes the increase of A/sub c1/ point, remarkably for the base metal which has higher carbon content than weld metal. (4) Higher cooling rate causes hardening of the base metal and weld metal, however, the transformation temperature does not change remarkably, except for the Ar/sub 1/ point of base metal.

  13. Energetic peculiarities of metal heating under laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oparin, M.I.; Nikiforov, G.D.; Fedorov, S.A. (Moskovskij Aviatsionnyj Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1981-07-01

    A connection between the energy and thermal parameters of the welding process of laser welding is studied. It is established that the connection between energy and thermal parameters of laser welding regime is carried out through the coefficient of metal absorption. Experimental determination of absorption coefficients of various metals (aluminium alloys, copper, 12Kh18N10T steel, St 3 steel, 0T4 titanium alloy, VN2 niobium alloy) has permitted to develope the methodics of approximated thermal calculations and to built up a nomogram for determining parameters of lazer welding regime. Limits of the thickness of welded sheets of the above materials in dependence on the welding speed are determined according to the nomogram.

  14. Study on heat efficiency of laser-TIG double-side welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Yugang; Li Liqun; Chen Yanbin; Wu Lin

    2008-01-01

    A series of laser-TIG double-side welding experiments for aluminum alloys were carried out to investigate the heat efficiency of the process. The melting efficiency was introduced to evaluate quantitatively the degree of the mutual effect of the laser and the arc. The results showed that the melting efficiency of laser-TIG double-side welding exceeded the sum of the laser and the arc taken separately. With the increase of heat input, the weld depth and melting efficiency of the laser and the arc were increased significantly. This, in fact, implies the strong mutual effect of the laser and the arc as heat sources joined simultaneously in the process. Comparatively, the higher efficiency of the laser constituent of heat sources plays the main role in the increase of the process efficiency. The phenomena of arc column convergence, increased laser absorptivity and the formation of heat accumulation region are the causes of the improvement of heat efficiency.

  15. Heat treatment furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  16. Numerical analysis of the heat transfer and fluid flow in the butt-fusion welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Hyun; Choi, Sunwoong; Nam, Jaewook; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Ju Seok

    2017-02-01

    Butt-fusion welding is an effective process for welding polymeric pipes. The process can be simplified into two stages. In heat soak stage, the pipe is heated using a hot plate contacted with one end of the pipe. In jointing stage, a pair of heated pipes is compressed against one another so that the melt regions become welded. In previous works, the jointing stage that is highly related to the welding quality was neglected. However, in this study, a finite element simulation is conducted including the jointing stage. The heat and momentum transfer are considered altogether. A new numerical scheme to describe the melt flow and pipe deformation for the butt-fusion welding process is introduced. High density polyethylene (HDPE) is used for the material. Flow via thermal expansion of the heat soak stage, and squeezing and fountain flow of the jointing stage are well reproduced. It is also observed that curling beads are formed and encounter the pipe body. The unique contribution of this study is its capability of directly observing the flow behaviors that occur during the jointing stage and relating them to welding quality.

  17. Comparison of friction stir welding heat transfer analysis methods and parametric study on unspecified input variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A three-dimensional numerical model was constructed to analyze the heat transfer of friction stir welding using Fluent and ANSYS multi-physics. The analysis result was used to calculate welding deformation and residual stress. Before the numerical simulation, several simplifying assumptions were applied to the model. Three different methods of heat transfer analysis were employed, and several assumptions were applied to each heat source model. In this work, several parametric studies were performed for certain unspecified variables. The calculated temperature data were compared with experimental data from relevant studies. Additionally, the advantages and disadvantages of the three heat transfer analysis methods were compared.

  18. Cold welding sealing of copper-water micro heat pipe ends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yong; LU Long-sheng; DENG Da-xiang; YUAN Dong

    2009-01-01

    The quality of micro heat pipe(MHP) is strongly affected by sealing technology. Based on the analysis of requirements of sealing technology, a cold welding technology was presented to seal MHP. In the cold welding process, compression force was used to flatten micro groove copper(MGC) tube. Then the bonding of MGC tube was reached because of intensively plastic deformation of MGC tube under pressure. It is found that the plastic deformation area of the cold welding of MGC tube can be divided into three sections. The deformation of micro grooves in each section was investigated; the influence of the dimensions of cylindrical heads on the weld joint shape and strength was studied; and a comparison between smooth copper tube and MGC tube was done. The results show that a groove compression stage exists in the cold welding of MGC tube besides a flattened stage and a melting stage.

  19. Influence of heat input on HAZ liquation cracking in laser welded GH909 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Hu, Chongjing; Zhang, Xiong; Cai, Yuanzheng; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Jun; Hu, Xiyuan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we describe influence of heat input on HAZ liquation cracking in laser welded GH909 alloy. The results demonstrated that more cracks were produced using high laser power and welding speed. The presence of cracks greatly weakened the hot ductility of this material and the binding force between the adjacent grains, resulting in reducing the tensile strength of welded joints. The occurrence of HAZ cracking was mainly attributable to the coarseness of microstructures and large tensile stresses. A new method was proposed to prevent HAZ liquation cracking using low laser power and welding speed at a constant heat input. The simulated results were consistent with the experimental results, verifying the correctness and feasibility of the method.

  20. Specimen Test of Large-Heat-Input Fusion Welding Method for Use of SM570TMCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkyu Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the large-heat-input welding conditions optimized to use the rear plate and the high-performance steel of SM570TMCP, a new kind of steel suitable for the requirements of prospective customers, are proposed. The goal of this research is to contribute to securing the welding fabrication optimized to use the high-strength steel and rear steel plates in the field of construction industry in the future. This research is judged to contribute to securing the welding fabrication optimized to use the high-strength steel and rear steel plates in the field of construction industry in the future.

  1. Microstructure evaluation in low alloy steel weld metal from convective heat transfer calculations in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundra, K.; DebRoy, T.; Babu, S.S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heat transfer and fluid flow during manual metal arc welding of low alloy steels were investigated by solving the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in three dimensions. Cooling rates were calculated at various locations in the weldment. Calculated cooling rates were coupled with an existing phase transformation model to predict percentages of acicular, allotriomorphic, and Widmanstaetten ferrites in various low alloy steel welds containing different concentration of V and Mn. Computed microstructures were in good agreement with experiment, indicating promise for predicting weld metal microstructure from the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  2. A Study on Tooling and Its Effect on Heat Generation and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikader, Sujoy; Biswas, Pankaj; Puri, Asit Baran

    2016-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been the most attracting solid state welding process as it serves numerous advantages like good mechanical, metallurgical properties etc. Non weldable aluminium alloys like 5XXX, 7XXX series can be simply joined by this process. In this present study a mathematical model has been developed and experiments were successfully performed to evaluate mechanical properties of FSW on similar aluminium alloys i.e. AA1100 for different process parameters and mainly two kind of tool geometry (straight cylindrical and conical or cylindrical tapered shaped pin with flat shoulder). Tensile strength and micro hardness for different process parameters are reported of the welded plate sample. It was noticed that in FSW of similar alloy with tool made of SS-310 tool steel, friction is the major contributor for the heat generation. It was seen that tool geometry, tool rotational speed, plunging force by the tool and traverse speed have significant effect on tensile strength and hardness of friction stir welded joints.

  3. Heat treatment deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavaro, A. (Soliveri SpA, Caravaggio (Italy))

    1990-02-01

    Types and causes of heat treatement derived isotropic and anisotropic dilatancies in ferrous materials are reviewed. The concepts are developed in such a way as to allow extension to all materials exhibiting martensitic tempering behaviour. This paper intends to illustrate the basic processes of dimensional variations undergone by the materials under heat treatments. The parametric analysis includes an analysis of the interactions amongst the parameters themselves. The relative importance of each parameter is assessed in order to determine methods to attenuate deformation action. Simplified examples are offered to provide technicians explanations as to why specific deformations occur and indications on improved materials working techniques.

  4. Segregation behavior of phosphorus in the heat-affected zone of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after simulated thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing, E-mail: ziqing.zhai@rbm.qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Miyahara, Yuichi [Material Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Impacts of aging on P segregation in actual heat-affected zone were examined by 3D-APT. • Non-equilibrium segregation of P dominated in subsequent cooling after welding. • Equilibrium segregation of P prevailed in step-cooling heat treatment. • High enrichment of P at grain/packet boundaries occurred in CGHAZ and ICCGHAZ. • Level of P enrichment at precipitate/matrix interface seemed species-dependent. - Abstract: The segregation behavior of phosphorus (P) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after step cooling was investigated with atom probe tomography. At grain/packet boundaries, the final P segregation level consisted of non-equilibrium segregation that occurred during cooling after welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and equilibrium segregation that occurred during step cooling. In both processes, higher P coverage was observed in the coarse-grained and intercritically reheated coarse-grained HAZ than in the fine-grained HAZ and base material. The cooling after welding and PWHT seemed to have a pronounced impact on P segregation in the subsequent aging process. In addition, P segregation also occurred at the precipitate/matrix interfaces of cementite, Mo{sub 2}C and Al–Si rich precipitates. The evolution of P coverage at these two types of sites suggested increasing risks of embrittlement with an increase in aging time.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel relative to different heat input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Hakan, E-mail: hakanay@uludag.edu.tr [Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Mechanical Engineering Department, Uludag University, 16059 Gorukle-Bursa (Turkey); Nelson, Tracy W. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, 435 CTB, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of the hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel at different heat inputs. Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness. Heat input during friction stir welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the hard zone along the advancing side of the weld nugget. Based on the results, the linear relationships between heat input and post-weld microstructures and mechanical properties in the hard zone of friction stir welded X80 steels were established. It can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone strength increases.

  6. Effects of distance between arc and heat sink on stress and distortion in DC-LSND welding technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of temperatures, stresses and strains fields have been studied numerically for a titanium alloy sheet welded with an improved gas tungsten arc welding method, in which a trailing spot heat sink is introduced to control the welding stress and distortion. The impinging jet model is employed to describe the intense heat transfer between the cooling media and the top surface of the workpiece. The influence of the distance between arc and heat sink is investigated. Results show that there is an ideal range of distance. Using the ideal distance, a low stress and no distortion welding structure can be derived.

  7. Metallographic Characteristics of Stainless Steel Overlay Weld with Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Disbonding : Study on a Stainless Steel Overlay Welding Process for Superior Resistance to Disbonding (Report 3)

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyoshi, FUJI; Etsuo, KUDO; Tomoyuki, TAKAHASHI; The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Muroran Plant

    1986-01-01

    The metallographic characteristics of the disbanding resistant stainless steel overlay weld were studied and compared with those of the conventional overlay weld. It was found that the first layer overlay weld metal of the disbanding resistant overlay weld consisted of austenite and martensite after regular post-weld heat treatment. A coarse planar grain, which strongly affects the disbanding resistance of over-lay welds, scarcely existed in the disbanding resistant overlay weld. A higher wel...

  8. Welding of Semiconductor Nanowires by Coupling Laser-Induced Peening and Localized Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickey, Kelly M.; Nian, Qiong; Zhang, Genqiang; Chen, Liangliang; Suslov, Sergey; Bhat, S. Venkataprasad; Wu, Yue; Cheng, Gary J.; Ruan, Xiulin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that laser peening coupled with sintering of CdTe nanowire films substantially enhances film quality and charge transfer while largely maintaining basic particle morphology. During the laser peening phase, a shockwave is used to compress the film. Laser sintering comprises the second step, where a nanosecond pulse laser beam welds the nanowires. Microstructure, morphology, material content, and electrical conductivities of the films are characterized before and after treatment. The morphology results show that laser peening can decrease porosity and bring nanowires into contact, and pulsed laser heating fuses those contacts. Multiphysics simulations coupling electromagnetic and heat transfer modules demonstrate that during pulsed laser heating, local EM field enhancement is generated specifically around the contact areas between two semiconductor nanowires, indicating localized heating. The characterization results indicate that solely laser peening or sintering can only moderately improve the thin film quality; however, when coupled together as laser peen sintering (LPS), the electrical conductivity enhancement is dramatic. LPS can decrease resistivity up to a factor of ~10,000, resulting in values on the order of ~105 Ω-cm in some cases, which is comparable to CdTe thin films. Our work demonstrates that LPS is an effective processing method to obtain high-quality semiconductor nanocrystal films.

  9. Welding of Semiconductor Nanowires by Coupling Laser-Induced Peening and Localized Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickey, Kelly M.; Nian, Qiong; Zhang, Genqiang; Chen, Liangliang; Suslov, Sergey; Bhat, S. Venkataprasad; Wu, Yue; Cheng, Gary J.; Ruan, Xiulin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that laser peening coupled with sintering of CdTe nanowire films substantially enhances film quality and charge transfer while largely maintaining basic particle morphology. During the laser peening phase, a shockwave is used to compress the film. Laser sintering comprises the second step, where a nanosecond pulse laser beam welds the nanowires. Microstructure, morphology, material content, and electrical conductivities of the films are characterized before and after treatment. The morphology results show that laser peening can decrease porosity and bring nanowires into contact, and pulsed laser heating fuses those contacts. Multiphysics simulations coupling electromagnetic and heat transfer modules demonstrate that during pulsed laser heating, local EM field enhancement is generated specifically around the contact areas between two semiconductor nanowires, indicating localized heating. The characterization results indicate that solely laser peening or sintering can only moderately improve the thin film quality; however, when coupled together as laser peen sintering (LPS), the electrical conductivity enhancement is dramatic. LPS can decrease resistivity up to a factor of ~10,000, resulting in values on the order of ~105 Ω-cm in some cases, which is comparable to CdTe thin films. Our work demonstrates that LPS is an effective processing method to obtain high-quality semiconductor nanocrystal films. PMID:26527570

  10. Research into the Reliability of the Overlap Joint of Bituminous Heat Welded Roofing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Balčiūnas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The conducted analysis has revealed that the most common reason of leaks in bituminous roofs is caused by a lack of adhesion between two nearby sheets of roof cover. Regarding the above mentioned problems, reliability, testing methods and data analysis methods of the overlap joint is observed more closely. The research conducted by different scientists worldwide has showed difficulties in evaluating the obtained data due to a lack of information on how these samples were produced. Therefore, it is proposed to evaluate the influence of welding time analyzing the mechanical properties of the joints of bituminous heat welded roofing materials. The influence of welding time, when the samples are produced, and mechanical properties of overlap joints are practically proved according to LST standards. The test results have showed that welding time does not have a significant influence on the shear resistance of overlap joints but is important regarding its limited deformation.

  11. Physical and Theoretical Models of Heat Pollution Applied to Cramped Conditions Welding Taking into Account the Different Types of Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulygin, Y. I.; Koronchik, D. A.; Legkonogikh, A. N.; Zharkova, M. G.; Azimova, N. N.

    2017-05-01

    The standard k-epsilon turbulence model, adapted for welding workshops, equipped with fixed workstations with sources of pollution took into account only the convective component of heat transfer, which is quite reasonable for large-volume rooms (with low density distribution of sources of pollution) especially the results of model calculations taking into account only the convective component correlated well with experimental data. For the purposes of this study, when we are dealing with a small confined space where necessary to take account of the body heated to a high temperature (for welding), located next to each other as additional sources of heat, it can no longer be neglected radiative heat exchange. In the task - to experimentally investigate the various types of heat transfer in a limited closed space for welding and behavior of a mathematical model, describing the contribution of the various components of the heat exchange, including radiation, influencing the formation of fields of concentration, temperature, air movement and thermal stress in the test environment. Conducted field experiments to model cubic body, allowing you to configure and debug the model of heat and mass transfer processes with the help of the developed approaches, comparing the measurement results of air flow velocity and temperature with the calculated data showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between process parameters, that is an indicator of the adequacy of heat and mass transfer model.

  12. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Weld Metal and Heat-Affected Zone of Electron Beam-Welded Joints of HG785D Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Han, Jianmin; Tan, Caiwang; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Junqiang

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum electron beam welding (EBW) process was employed to butt weld 10-mm-thick HG785D high-strength steels. The penetration into the steel was adjusted by beam current. Microstructures at weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) regions were comparatively observed. Mechanical properties of the EBWed joints including Vickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact tests were evaluated. The results indicated that microstructures at the weld metal consisted of coarse lath martensite and a small amount of acicular martensite, while that in the HAZ was tempered sorbite and martensite. The grain size in the weld metal was found to be larger than that in the HAZ, and its proportion in weld metal was higher. The hardness in the weld metal was higher than the HAZ and base metal. The tensile strength and impact toughness in the HAZ was higher than that in the weld metal. All the behaviors were related to microstructure evolution caused by higher cooling rates and state of base metal. The fracture surfaces of tensile and impact tests on the optimized joint were characterized by uniform and ductile dimples. The results differed significantly from that obtained using arc welding process.

  13. Effect of Li on mechanical and corrosion properties of electron beam welds of V–4Ti–4Cr alloy (NIFS-HEAT-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsisar, Valentyn, E-mail: valentyn_tsisar@ukr.net [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Physical-Mechanical Institute of NASU, 5 Naukova St., 79601 Lviv (Ukraine); Nagasaka, Takuya; Muroga, Takeo; Miyazawa, Takeshi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yeliseyeva, Olga [Physical-Mechanical Institute of NASU, 5 Naukova St., 79601 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2013-11-15

    The 4 mm thick plate of V–4Ti–4Cr alloy (NIFS-HEAT-2) was bead-on-plate welded by electron beam (1.5 kW) under high vacuum atmosphere. The samples were placed in V–5Ti capsule subsequently filled by liquid Li (8 g) in glove box under high-purity He atmosphere in order to avoid contamination of Li by O and/or N. Static corrosion tests were carried out at 700 °C for 500 h utilizing vertical water cooling furnace placed in the same glove box. During the test, liquid Li contacted with recirculating helium which was continuously purified with respect to O (4–30 wppm). After the test, the samples were cleaned against adhered Li in 30%H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 5 °C in order to avoid hydrogenation of V-alloy. After the welding, the impact properties of the weld metal measured at 77 K remained high enough (9.5 J) while fracture mode was ductile in spite of the solid-solution hardening by O released from Ti–C,O,N precipitates during high temperature electron beam welding. In contrast, impact properties of weld metal degraded after exposure to liquid Li (2.2 J) and post welding heat treatment (1.8 J) both carried out at 973 K. Character of fracture mode also changed to brittle due to the re-precipitation assisted hardening caused by aging effect.

  14. Weldability with Process Parameters During Fiber Laser Welding of a Titanium Plate (II) - The Effect of Control of Heat Input on Weldability -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Ji Sung [Korea Maritime and Ocean Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Laser welding is a high-density energy welding method. Hence, deep penetration and high welding speed can be realized with lower heat input as compared with conventional welding. The heat input of a CW laser welding is determined by laser power and welding speed. In this study, bead and lap welding of 0.5 mmt pure titanium was performed using a fiber laser. Its weldability with laser power and welding speed was evaluated. Penetration, bead width, joining length, and bead shape were investigated, and the mechanical properties were examined through tensile-shear strength tests. Welds with sound joining length were obtained when the laser power and welding speed were respectively 0.5 kW and 2.5 m/min, and 1.5 kW and 6 m/min, and the weld obtained at low output presented better ductility than that obtained at high output.

  15. Temperature based validation of the analytical model for the estimation of the amount of heat generated during friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milčić Dragan S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is a solid-state welding technique that utilizes thermomechanical influence of the rotating welding tool on parent material resulting in a monolith joint - weld. On the contact of welding tool and parent material, significant stirring and deformation of parent material appears, and during this process, mechanical energy is partially transformed into heat. Generated heat affects the temperature of the welding tool and parent material, thus the proposed analytical model for the estimation of the amount of generated heat can be verified by temperature: analytically determined heat is used for numerical estimation of the temperature of parent material and this temperature is compared to the experimentally determined temperature. Numerical solution is estimated using the finite difference method - explicit scheme with adaptive grid, considering influence of temperature on material's conductivity, contact conditions between welding tool and parent material, material flow around welding tool, etc. The analytical model shows that 60-100% of mechanical power given to the welding tool is transformed into heat, while the comparison of results shows the maximal relative difference between the analytical and experimental temperature of about 10%.

  16. Management of heat in laser tissue welding using NIR cover window material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Savage, Howard; Katz, Alvin; Muthukattil, Ronex; Alfano, Robert R

    2011-12-01

    Laser tissue welding (LTW) is a novel method of surgical wound closure by the use of laser radiation to induce fusion of the biological tissues. Molecular dynamics associated with LTW is a result of thermal and non-thermal mechanisms. This research focuses exclusively on better heat management to reduce thermal damage of tissues in LTW using a near infrared laser radiation. An infrared continuous-wave (CW) laser radiation at 1,450 nm wavelength corresponding to the absorption band from combination vibrational modes of water is used to weld together ex vivo porcine aorta. In these studies we measured the optimal laser power and scan speed, for better tensile strength of the weld and lesser tissue dehydration. Significant amount of water loss from the welded tissue results in cellular death and tissue buckling. Various thermally conductive optical cover windows were used as heat sinks to reduce thermal effects during LTW for the dissipation of the heat. The optimal use of the method prevents tissue buckling and minimizes the water loss. Diamond, sapphire, BK7, fused silica, and IR quartz transparent optical cover windows were tested. The data from this study suggests that IR-quartz as the material with optimal thermal conductivity is ideal for laser welding of the porcine aorta. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Heat input effect on the microstructural transformation and mechanical properties in GTAW welds of a 409L ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, J. A.; Ambriz, R. R.; Cuenca-Alvarez, R.; Alatorre, N.; Curiel, F. F.

    2016-10-01

    Welds without filler metal and welds using a conventional austenitic stainless steel filler metal (ER308L) were performed to join a ferritic stainless steel with Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW). Welding parameters were adjusted to obtain three different heat input values. Microstructure reveals the presence of coarse ferritic matrix and martensite laths in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). Dilution between filler and base metal was correlated with the presence of austenite, martensite and ferrite in the weld metal. Weld thermal cycles were measured to correlate the microstructural transformation in the HAZ. Microhardness measurements (maps and profiles) allow to identify the different zones of the welded joints (weld metal, HAZ, and base metal). Comparing the base metal with the weld metal and the HAZ, a hardness increment (∼172 HV{sub 0}.5 to ∼350 HV{sub 0}.5 and ∼310 HV{sub 0}.5, respectively) was observed, which has been attributed to the martensite formation. Tensile strength of the welded joints without filler metal increased moderately with respect to base metal. In contrast, ductility was approximately 25% higher than base metal, which provided a toughness improvement of the welded joints. (Author)

  18. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayana, B [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Mills, Michael J. [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Ohio State University, The, Columbus

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  19. Butt-welding Residual Stress of Heat Treatable Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.M. Cheng

    2007-01-01

    This study, taking three types of aluminum alloys 2024-T351, 6061-T6 and 7075-T6 as experimental materials, conducted single V-groove GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) butt-welding to analyze and compare the magnitude and differences of residual stress in the three aluminum alloys at different single V-groove angles and in restrained or unrestrained conditions. The results show that the larger the grooving angle of butt joint, the higher the residual tensile stress. Too small grooving angle will lead to dramatic differences due to the amount of welding bead filler metal and pre-set joint geometry. Therefore, only an appropriate grooving angle can reduce residual stress. While welding, weldment in restrained condition will lead to a larger residual stress. Also, a residual stress will arise from the restraint position. The ultimate residual stress of weldment is determined by material yield strength at equilibrium temperature. The higher the yield strength at equilibrium temperature, the higher the material residual stress. Because of its larger thermal conductivity, aluminum alloy test specimens have small temperature differential. Therefore, the residual tensile stress of all materials is lower than their yield strength.

  20. The influence of distance between heat sources in hybrid welded plate on fusion zone geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Piekarska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerical analysis into temperature field in hybrid laser-arc welding process with motion of liquid material taken intoaccount are presented in this study. On the basis of obtained results the influence of the distance between the arc foot point and the laserbeam focal point on the shape and size of fusion zone in hybrid butt welded plate. Temperature field was calculated on the basis ofsolution of transient heat transfer equation. The solution of Navier-Stokes equation allowed for simulation of fluid flow in the fusion zone.Fuzzy solidification front was assumed in calculations with linear approximation of solid fraction in solid-liquid region where liquidmaterial flow through porous medium is taken into consideration. Numerical solution algorithms were developed for three-dimensionalproblem. Established numerical model of hybrid welding process takes into account different electric arc and laser beam heat sourcespower distributions.

  1. Modelling the Heating Process in Simultaneous Laser Transmission Welding of Semicrystalline Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hopmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser transmission welding is an established joining process for thermoplastics. A close-to-reality simulation of the heating process would improve the understanding of the process, facilitate and shorten the process installation, and provide a significant contribution to the computer aided component design. For these reasons a thermal simulation model for simultaneous welding was developed which supports determining the size of the heat affected zone (HAZ. The determination of the intensity profile of the laser beam after the penetration of the laser transparent semicrystalline thermoplastic is decisive for the simulation. For the determination of the intensity profile two measurement systems are presented and compared. The calculated size of the HAZ shows a high concordance to the dimensions of the HAZ found using light microscopy. However, the calculated temperatures exceed the indicated decomposition temperatures of the particular thermoplastics. For the recording of the real temperatures during the welding process a measuring system is presented and discussed.

  2. Influence of Heat Input on Martensite Formation and Impact Property of Ferritic-Austenitic Dissimilar Weld Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mukherjee; T.K. Pal

    2012-01-01

    The effect of heat input on martensite formation and impact properties of gas metal arc welded modified ferritic stainless steel (409M) sheets (as received) with thickness of 4 mm was described in detail in this work. The welded joints were prepared under three heat input conditions, i.e. 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 kJ/mm using two different austenitic filler wires (308L and 316L) and shielding gas composition of Ar + 5% CO2. The welded joints were evaluated by microstructure and charpy impact toughness. The dependence of weld metal microstructure on heat input and filler wires were determined by dilution calculation, Creq/Nieq ratio, stacking fault energy (SFE), optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the microstructure as well as impact property of weld metal was significantly affected by the heat input and filler wire. Weld metals prepared by high heat input exhibited higher amount of martensite laths and toughness compared with those prepared by medium and low heat inputs, which was true for both the filler wires. Furthermore, 308L weld metals in general provided higher amount of martensite laths and toughness than 316L weld metals.

  3. NUMERICAL MODELING OF HEAT TRANSFER AND FLUID FLOW IN KEYHOLE PLASMA ARC WELDING OF DISSIMILAR STEEL JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Daha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of temperature profiles and weld pool geometry during dissimilar welding between 2205 duplex stainless steel and A36 low carbon steel using keyhole plasma arc welding has been simulated using a three dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model. An adaptive heat source is proposed as a heat source model for performing a non-linear transient thermal analysis, based on the configuration feature of keyhole plasma arc welds. Temperature profiles and solidified weld pool geometry are presented for three different welding heat input. The reversed bugle shape parameters (width of fusion zone at both top and bottom surfaces of the weld pool geometry features for a dissimilar 2205–A36 weld joint are summarized to successfully explain the observations. The model was also applied to keyhole plasma welding of 6.8 mm thick similar 2205 duplex stainless steel joint for validation. The simulation results were compared with independently obtained experimental data and good agreements have been obtained.

  4. FEM Simulation of Dissimilar Aluminum Titanium Fiber Laser Welding Using 2D and 3D Gaussian Heat Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia D’Ostuni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available For a dissimilar laser weld, the model of the heat source is a paramount boundary condition for the prediction of the thermal phenomena, which occur during the welding cycle. In this paper, both two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D Gaussian heat sources were studied for the thermal analysis of the fiber laser welding of titanium and aluminum dissimilar butt joint. The models were calibrated comparing the fusion zone of the experiment with that of the numerical model. The actual temperature during the welding cycle was registered by a thermocouple and used for validation of the numerical model. When it came to calculate the fusion zone dimensions in the transversal section, the 2D heat source showed more accurate results. The 3D heat source provided better results for the simulated weld pool and cooling rate.

  5. Effects of surface treatments of galvanized steels on projection welding procedure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏; 王宸煜

    2003-01-01

    A group of projection welding experiments and joints tension-shear tests are carried out for cold-rolled steel sheets, galvanized steel sheets (GSS) without treatment, GSS with phosphating and GSS with surface greasing, respectively. The experimental results are regressively analyzed on the computers, then the projection welded joint tension-shear strength curve and the perfect welding currents range of each material are obtained. The results show that surface treatments of galvanized steels have effects on their spot weldabilities. Among the four kinds of materials, GSS with surface greasing have the worst spot weldability, for they need higher welding current and have a narrow welding current range.

  6. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  7. 热处理对含缺陷X60高频电阻焊钢管组织及焊缝冲击性能的影响%Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and impact property of X60 high frequency resistance welded pipe with defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵金兰; 刘迎来; 王长安; 聂向晖; 王高峰; 杨凤兰

    2016-01-01

    Microstructure and impact property of X60 high frequency resistance welded pipe with gray spot before and after heat treatment were observed and analyzed by microscopic analysis, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrum analysis. The results show that after heating at 920℃ for 30 min and then cooling in air, large size inclusions in the gray spot differentiate or decompose gradually, and disperse in the matrix, which makes gray spot and banded structure reduce. Meanwhile, the impact fracture morphology is changed from cleavage to dimples, and the impact property of weld seam improve greatly.%采用显微分析、扫描电镜分析及能谱分析研究了含灰斑高频电阻焊X60钢管热处理前后的组织及焊缝冲击性能。结果表明:经920℃加热保温30 min空冷后,灰斑中大块夹杂物分化或分解逐渐脱溶析出,弥散分布于基体中,灰斑和带状组织得以减轻;同时冲击断口形貌由解理转为韧窝形貌,焊缝冲击性能明显提高。

  8. 49 CFR 179.201-5 - Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance....201-5 Postweld heat treatment and corrosion resistance. (a) Tanks and attachments welded directly... tested to demonstrate that they possess the corrosion resistance specified in § 179.200-7(d), Footnote...

  9. Hot-cracking studies of Inconel 718 weld- heat-affected zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. G.

    1969-01-01

    Hot ductility tests, gas-tungsten-arc fillerless fusion tests, and circle patch-weld-restraint tests were conducted on Inconel 718 to better understand and correlate the weldability /resistance to hot cracking/ of the alloy. A correlation of the test results with composition, heat-treat condition, grain size, and microstructure was made.

  10. Special welding features in the manufacture of large-scale heat exchangers for the petrochemical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeutigam, M.; Huppertz, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    It is the object of the present paper to describe the manufacture of very large heat exchangers developed and constructed in order to minimize energy losses. A few special welding features have been dealt with in detail. Constructional details, such as the choice of materials and the anti-vibration precautions, bring the article to a close.

  11. Plasma diagnostics approach to welding heat source/molten pool interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, J.F.; McIlwain, M.E.; Isaacson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic techniques show that weld fusion zone profile and loss of metal vapors from the molten pool are strongly dependent on both the intensity and distribution of the heat source. These plasma properties, are functions of cathode vertex angle and thermal conductivity of the shielding gas, especially near the anode.

  12. Influence of heat input on weld bead geometry using duplex stainless steel wire electrode on low alloy steel specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Ajit Mondal; Manas Kumar Saha; Ritesh Hazra; Santanu Das

    2016-01-01

    Gas metal arc welding cladding becomes a popular surfacing technique in many modern industries as it enhances effectively corrosion resistance property and wear resistance property of structural members. Quality of weld cladding may be enhanced by controlling process parameters. If bead formation is found acceptable, cladding is also expected to be good. Weld bead characteristics are often assessed by bead geometry, and it is mainly influenced by heat input. In this paper, duplex stainless st...

  13. The effect of welding line heat-affected-zone on the formability of tube hydroforming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChiuHuang, Cheng-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-En; Lee, Ping-Kun

    2016-08-01

    Tube hydroforming has been used as a lightweight design approach to reduce CO2 emission for the automotive industry. For the high strength steel tube, the strength and quality of the welding line is very important for a successful tube hydroforming process. This paper aims to investigate the effect of the welding line's strength and the width of the heat-affected zone on the tube thinning during the hydroforming process. The simulation results show that both factors play an important role on the thickness distribution during the tube expansion.

  14. Microstructural investigation of the heat-affected zone of simulated welded joint of P91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vuherer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the process of testing real components exposed to elevated temperature, it is not possible to neglect cracks. The most significant cracks can be induced by welding, which is applied for joining of structural components. Pressure equipment in service is also exposed to high pressure and high stresses. Materials for their manufacturing are designed to resist high stress at elevated temperature, and to meet requirements regarding creep resistance. The objective of this study is to investigate microstructure of different regions of the heat affected zone in T/P91 steels by using thermal simulation instead of welding.

  15. Experimental and simulation study on the microstructure of TA15 titanium alloy laser beam welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Peng, Qingyu; Wei, Yanhong; Ou, Wenmin

    2017-09-01

    Laser beam welding technique offers obvious advantages over other fusion welding processes in terms of joining titanium alloy. The microstructure of welded seam and heat affected zone resulted from diverse welding speeds and laser powers were investigated after simulating welding heat treatment. The analysis of the thermal transport properties successfully explained the morphology. Optimal process parameters were obtained. The simulation results were consistent with the corresponding experimental observations.

  16. Influence of Surface Pre-treatments on Laser Welding of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Amaya, J. M.; Amaya-Vázquez, M. R.; González-Rovira, L.; Botana-Galvin, M.; Botana, F. J.

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, Ti6Al4V samples have been welded under conduction regime by means of a high power diode laser. The main objective of the work has been to determine the actual influence of the surface pre-treatments on the laser welding process. Thus, six different pre-treatments were applied to Ti6Al4V samples before performing bead-on-plate and butt welding treatments. The depth, width, microstructure, and microhardness of the different weld zones were deeply analyzed. Grinding, sandblasting, and chemical cleaning pre-treatments lead to welds with the highest depth values, presenting high joint strengths. Treatments based on the application of dark coatings generate welds with lower penetration and worse mechanical properties, specially the graphite-based coating.

  17. Effect of heat input on microstructure and properties of welded joint in magnesium alloy AZ31B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎明; 苗玉刚; 宋刚; 梁国俐

    2004-01-01

    Using the optical microscope, tensile test machine and micro-hardness meter, the effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties in fusion welding joints of AZ31B wrought alloys was investigated systematically, the mechanism on joint properties losing was analyzed, and a valid method to improve joint properties of the magnesium alloy fusion welding was explored. The results show that the heat input has an obvious effect on the microstructure and properties. Under the condition of penetration, with the heat input decreasing, the crystal grain in the weld and heat-affected zone (HAZ) becomes fine, the width of HAZ becomes obviously narrow, and the molding of the weld is improved, so the tensile strength and elongation are increased and the hardness of joints is improved. When the heat input reaches 60 J/mm, the high quality joints can be gained.

  18. A study on heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding on a rotation affected zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Woong [Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Soeul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    In recent years, as interest in environmental protection and energy conservation rose, technological development for lightweight efficiency of transport equipment, such as aircrafts, railcars, automobiles and vessels, have been briskly proceeding. This has led to an expansion of the application of lightweight alloys such as aluminum and magnesium. For the welding of these lightweight alloys, friction stir welding has been in development by many researchers. Heat-flow analysis of friction stir welding is one such research. The flow and energy equation is solved using the computational fluid dynamic commercial program 'Fluent'. In this study, a rotation affected zone concept is imposed. The rotation affected zone is a constant volume. In this volume, flow is rotated the same as the tool rotation speed and so plastic dissipation occurs. Through this simulation, the temperature distribution results are calculated and the simulation results are compared with the experimental results.

  19. Experimental and Simulation Studies on Cold Welding Sealing Process of Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Shengle; Huang, Jinlong; Yan, Yuying; Zeng, Zhixin

    2017-03-01

    Sealing quality strongly affects heat pipe performance, but few studies focus on the process of heat pipe sealing. Cold welding sealing technology based on a stamping process is applied for heat pipe sealing. The bonding mechanism of the cold welding sealing process (CWSP) is investigated and compared with the experimental results obtained from the bonding interface analysis. An orthogonal experiment is conducted to observe the effects of various parameters, including the sealing gap, sealing length, sealing diameter, and sealing velocity on bonding strength. A method with the utilization of saturated vapor pressure inside a copper tube is proposed to evaluate bonding strength. A corresponding finite element model is developed to investigate the effects of sealing gap and sealing velocity on plastic deformation during the cold welding process. Effects of various parameters on the bonding strength are determined and it is found that the sealing gap is the most critical factor and that the sealing velocity contributes the least effect. The best parameter combination (A 1 B 3 C 1 D 3, with a 0.5 mm sealing gap, 6 mm sealing length, 3.8 mm sealing diameter, and 50 mm/s sealing velocity) is derived within the experimental parameters. Plastic deformation results derived from the finite element model are consistent with those from the experiment. The instruction for the CWSP of heat pipes and the design of sealing dies of heat pipes are provided.

  20. Infrared thermography for monitoring heat generation in a linear friction welding process of Ti6Al4V alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio, L.; Liberini, M.; Campanella, D.; Astarita, A.; Esposito, S.; Boccardi, S.; Meola, C.

    2017-03-01

    The increasing use of titanium alloys in a wider range of applications requires the development of new techniques and processes capable to decrease production costs and manufacturing times. In this regard welding and other joining techniques play an important role. Today, solid state friction joining processes, such as friction stir welding, friction spot welding, inertia friction welding, continuous-drive friction welding and linear friction welding (LFW), represent promising methods for part manufacturing. They allow for joining at temperature essentially below the melting point of the base materials being joined, without the addition of filler metal. However, the knowledge of temperature is essential to understand and model the phenomena involved in metal welding. A global measured value represents only a clue of the heat generation during the process; while, a deep understanding of welding thermal aspects requires temperature field measurement. This paper is focused on the use of infrared thermography applied to the linear friction welding process of Ti6Al4V alloy. The attention is concentrated on thermal field that develops on the outer wall of the two parts to be joined (i.e. heat generated in the friction zone), and on the maximum temperature that characterizes the process before and after the flash formation.

  1. Microstructure and Fracture Morphology in the Welding Zone of T91 Heat-resisting Steel Used in Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Microstructure performance in the welding zone of T91 heat-resistant steel under the condition of TIG welding wasresearched by means of metallography, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Experimentalresults indicated that microstructure of T91 weld metal was austenite + a little amount of δ ferrite when using TGS-9cb filler wire. Substructure inside the austenite grain was crypto-crystal lath martensite, on which some Cr23C6blocky carbides were distributed. The maximum hardness (HRC44) in the welding zone is near the fusion zone. Thereexisted no obvious softening zone in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). For T91 steel tube of φ63 mmx5 mm, whenincreasing welding heat input (E) from 4.8 kJ/cm to 12.5 kJ/cm, fracture morphology in the fusion zone and theHAZ changed from dimple fracture into quasi-cleavage fracture (QC). Controlling the welding heat input of about9.8 kJ/cm is suitable in the welding of T91 heat-resistant steel.

  2. Mechanical properties of TIG and EB weld joints of F82H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Takanori, E-mail: hirose.takanori@jaea.go.jp; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Nakajima, Motoki; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Narrow groove TIG minimized volume of F82H weld. • Mechanical properties of TIG and EB welds of F82H have been characterized. • Post weld heat treatment successfully moderate the toughness of weld metal without softening the base metal. - Abstract: This work investigates mechanical properties of weld joints of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H and effects of post weld heat treatment on the welds. Vickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact tests were conducted on F82H weld joints prepared using tungsten-inert-gas and electron beam after various heat treatments. Although narrow groove tungsten-inert-gas welding reduced volume of weld bead, significant embrittlement was observed in a heat affected zone transformed due to heat input. Post weld heat treatment above 993 K successfully moderated the brittle transformed region. The hardness of the brittle region strongly depends on the heat treatment temperature. Meanwhile, strength of base metal was slightly reduced by the treatment at temperature ranging from 993 to 1053 K. Moreover, softening due to double welding was observed only in the weld metal, but negligible in base metal.

  3. Heat Transfer Modeling of an Annular On-Line Spray Water Cooling Process for Electric-Resistance-Welded Steel Pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zejun; Han, Huiquan; Ren, Wei; Huang, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    On-line spray water cooling (OSWC) of electric-resistance-welded (ERW) steel pipes can replace the conventional off-line heat treatment process and become an important and critical procedure. The OSWC process improves production efficiency, decreases costs, and enhances the mechanical properties of ERW steel pipe, especially the impact properties of the weld joint. In this paper, an annular OSWC process is investigated based on an experimental simulation platform that can obtain precise real-time measurements of the temperature of the pipe, the water pressure and flux, etc. The effects of the modes of annular spray water cooling and related cooling parameters on the mechanical properties of the pipe are investigated. The temperature evolutions of the inner and outer walls of the pipe are measured during the spray water cooling process, and the uniformity of mechanical properties along the circumferential and longitudinal directions is investigated. A heat transfer coefficient model of spray water cooling is developed based on measured temperature data in conjunction with simulation using the finite element method. Industrial tests prove the validity of the heat transfer model of a steel pipe undergoing spray water cooling. The research results can provide a basis for the industrial application of the OSWC process in the production of ERW steel pipes.

  4. Heat Transfer Modeling of an Annular On-Line Spray Water Cooling Process for Electric-Resistance-Welded Steel Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zejun; Han, Huiquan; Ren, Wei; Huang, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    On-line spray water cooling (OSWC) of electric-resistance-welded (ERW) steel pipes can replace the conventional off-line heat treatment process and become an important and critical procedure. The OSWC process improves production efficiency, decreases costs, and enhances the mechanical properties of ERW steel pipe, especially the impact properties of the weld joint. In this paper, an annular OSWC process is investigated based on an experimental simulation platform that can obtain precise real-time measurements of the temperature of the pipe, the water pressure and flux, etc. The effects of the modes of annular spray water cooling and related cooling parameters on the mechanical properties of the pipe are investigated. The temperature evolutions of the inner and outer walls of the pipe are measured during the spray water cooling process, and the uniformity of mechanical properties along the circumferential and longitudinal directions is investigated. A heat transfer coefficient model of spray water cooling is developed based on measured temperature data in conjunction with simulation using the finite element method. Industrial tests prove the validity of the heat transfer model of a steel pipe undergoing spray water cooling. The research results can provide a basis for the industrial application of the OSWC process in the production of ERW steel pipes. PMID:26201073

  5. Optimization of Resistance Spot Weld Condition for Single Lap Joint of Hot Stamped 22MnB5 by Taking Heating Temperature and Heating Time into Consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Seok; Kim, Byung Min; Park, Geun Hwan [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Woo Seung [Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, optimization of the process parameters of the resistance spot welding of a sheet of aluminum-coated boron alloyed steel, 22MnB5, used in hot stamping has been performed by a Taguchi method to increase the strength of the weld joint. The process parameters selected were current, electrode force, and weld time. The heating temperature and heating time of 22MnB5 are considered to be noise factors. It was known that the variation in the thickness of the intermetallic compound layer between the aluminum-coated layer and the substrate, which influences on the formation of nugget, was generated due to the difference of diffusion reaction according to heating conditions. From the results of spot weld experiment, the optimum weld condition was determined to be when the current, electrode force, and weld time were 8kA, 4kN, and 18 cycles, respectively. The result of a test performed to verify the optimized weld condition showed that the tensile strength of the weld joint was over 32kN, which is considerably higher than the required strength, i.e., 23kN.

  6. Diffusion Welding of Compact Heat Exchangers for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis Clark; Ron Mizia; Dr. Michael V. Glazoff; Mr. Michael W. Patterson

    2012-06-01

    The next-­-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is designed to be a flexible source of energy, producing various mixes of electrical energy and process heat (for example, for hydrogen generation) on demand. Compact heat exchangers provide an attractive way to move energy from the helium primary reactor coolant to process heat uses. For process heat efficiency, reactor outlet temperatures of 750-­-900°C are desirable. There are minor but deleterious components in the primary coolant; the number of alloys that can handle this environment is small. The present work concentrates on Alloys 800H and 617.

  7. Influence of heat input on weld bead geometry using duplex stainless steel wire electrode on low alloy steel specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Mondal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas metal arc welding cladding becomes a popular surfacing technique in many modern industries as it enhances effectively corrosion resistance property and wear resistance property of structural members. Quality of weld cladding may be enhanced by controlling process parameters. If bead formation is found acceptable, cladding is also expected to be good. Weld bead characteristics are often assessed by bead geometry, and it is mainly influenced by heat input. In this paper, duplex stainless steel E2209 T01 is deposited on E250 low alloy steel specimens with 100% CO2 gas as shielding medium with different heats. Weld bead width, height of reinforcement and depth of penetration are measured. Regression analysis is done on the basis of experimental data. Results reveal that within the range of bead-on-plate welding experiments done, parameters of welding geometry are on the whole linearly related with heat input. A condition corresponding to 0.744 kJ/mm heat input is recommended to be used for weld cladding in practice.

  8. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filacchioni, G. E-mail: gianni.filacchioni@casaccia.enea.it; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  9. Heat-affected zone liquation crack on resistance spot welded TWIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, InSung [Automotive Production Development Division, Hyundai Motor Company (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeong-Do, E-mail: ypark@deu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the heat affected zone (HAZ) liquation crack and segregation behavior of the resistance spot welded twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel have been reported. Cracks appeared in the post-welded joints that originated at the partially melted zone (PMZ) and propagated from the PMZ through the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the base metal (BM). The crack length and crack opening widths were observed increasing with heat input; and the welding current was identified to be the most influencing parameter for crack formation. Cracks appeared at the PMZ when nugget diameter reached at 4.50 mm or above; and the liquation cracks were found to occur along two sides of the notch tip in the sheet direction rather than in the electrode direction. Cracks were backfilled with the liquid films which has lamellar structure and supposed to be the eutectic constituent. Co-segregation of alloy elements such as, C and Mn were detected on the liquid films by electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) line scanning and element map which suggests that the liquid film was enrich of Mn and C. The eutectic constituent was identified by analyzing the calculated phase diagram along with thermal temperature history of finite element simulation. Preliminary experimental results showed that cracks have less/no significant effect on the static cross-tensile strength (CTS) and the tensile-shear strength (TSS). In addition, possible ways to avoid cracking were discussed. - Highlights: • The HAZ liquation crack during resistance spot welding of TWIP steel was examined. • Cracks were completely backfilled and healed with divorced eutectic secondary phase. • Co-segregation of C and Mn was detected in the cracked zone. • Heat input was the most influencing factor to initiate liquation crack. • Cracks have less/no significant effect on static tensile properties.

  10. [Arc spectrum diagnostic and heat coupling mechanism analysis of double wire pulsed MIG welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-qiang; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-jun; Zheng, Kai; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A double wire pulsed MIG welding test system was built in the present paper, in order to analyze the heat-coupling mechanism of double wire pulsed MIG welding, and study are temperature field. Spectroscopic technique was used in diagnostic analysis of the are, plasma radiation was collected by using hollow probe method to obtain the arc plasma optical signal The electron temperature of double wire pulsed MIG welding arc plasma was calculated by using Boltzmann diagram method, the electron temperature distribution was obtained, a comprehensive analysis of the arc was conducted combined with the high speed camera technology and acquisition means of electricity signal. The innovation of this paper is the combination of high-speed camera image information of are and optical signal of arc plasma to analyze the coupling mechanism for dual arc, and a more intuitive analysis for are temperature field was conducted. The test results showed that a push-pull output was achieved and droplet transfer mode was a drop in a pulse in the welding process; Two arcs attracted each other under the action of a magnetic field, and shifted to the center of the arc in welding process, so a new heat center was formed at the geometric center of the double arc, and flowing up phenomenon occurred on the arc; Dual arc electronic temperature showed an inverted V-shaped distribution overall, and at the geometric center of the double arc, the arc electron temperature at 3 mm off the workpiece surface was the highest, which was 16,887.66 K, about 4,900 K higher than the lowest temperature 11,963.63 K.

  11. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Laser Welded Si-Al TRIP-Type Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with issues related to laser welding of Si-Al type TRIP steels with Nb and Ti microadditions. The tests of laser welding of thermomechanically rolled sheet sections were carried out using keyhole welding and a solid-state laser. The tests carried out for various values of heat input were followed by macro- and microscopic metallographic investigations as well as by microhardness measurements of welded areas. A detailed microstructural analysis was carried out in the penetration area and in various areas of the heat affected zone (HAZ. Special attention was paid to the influence of cooling conditions on the stabilisation of retained austenite, the most characteristic structural component of TRIP steels. The tests made it possible to determine the maximum value of heat input preventing the excessive grain growth in HAZ and to identify the areas of the greatest hardness reaching 520 HV0.1.

  12. 29 CFR 1917.152 - Welding, cutting and heating (hot work) 12 (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating (hot work) 12 (See also Â..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.152 Welding... Captain of the Port if welding or other hot work is to be carried out at a facility where...

  13. Weld Decay Recovery by Laser Beam Surfacing of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welded Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Isao, MASUMOTO; Takeshi, SHINODA; Toshimasa, HIRATE; Nagoya University, currently at Gifu Vocational Training College; Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University; Nagoya University, currently at Toshiba Co. Ltd.

    1990-01-01

    This study is an attempt to improve corrosion resistance by laser beam surface treatment. AISI 304 type stainless steel welds were surface treated by laser and the effectivenesses of various treatment conditions were evaluated by acidic corrosion tests and metallurgical observation. It was found that laser treatment changed the morphology of carbide precipitates in the heat affected zone of AISI 304 austenitic steel MIG welded joints, and that it is possible to effect revovery from weld decay...

  14. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam- 603 102 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  15. On the modelling of steel thermo-mechanical and metallurgical behaviour. Application to welding and heat treatment process; Sur la modelisation du comportement thermomecanique et metallurgique des aciers. Application au procede de soudage et de traitements thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinh, N.T

    2008-06-15

    The aim of this research is the prediction of residual stresses and strains in submarine nuclear reactor vessels after a welding operation. In the first part, the author briefly describes the various welding processes, their thermal, metallurgical and mechanical consequences, and gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of computerized modelling of welding. Then, he gives a detailed description of the various proposed models of the thermo-mechanical and metallurgical behaviours of steels. The influence of different phenomena such as plasticity, visco-plasticity, and transformation induced plasticity on the mechanical behaviour of the blend is analysed according to a sequential approach: the behaviour of each metallurgical phase is elastoplastic with linear kinetic cold working, then elasto-viscoplastic. A combined model is presented in which the ferrite phase behaviour is elastoplastic and the austenite behaviour is elasto-viscoplastic. The proposed models are then validated by two computer simulations performed with the COMSOL Multiphysics code. These simulations are simulating two tests which are representative of the phenomena met during a welding operation.

  16. Modeling the Material Flow and Heat Transfer in Reverse Dual-Rotation Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Wu, C. S.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    Reverse dual-rotation friction stir welding (RDR-FSW) is a novel modification of conventional friction stir welding (FSW) process. During the RDR-FSW process, the tool pin and the assisted shoulder are separated and rotate with opposite direction independently, so that there are two material flows with reverse direction. The material flow and heat transfer in RDR-FSW have significant effects on the microstructure and properties of the weld joint. A 3D model is developed to quantitatively analyze the effects of the separated tool pin and the assisted shoulder which rotate in reverse direction on the material flow and heat transfer during RDR-FSW process. Numerical simulation is conducted to predict the temperature profile, material flow field, streamlines, strain rate, and viscosity distributions near the tool. The calculated results show that as the rotation speed of the tool pin increases, the temperature near the tool gets higher, the zone with higher temperature expands, and approximately symmetric temperature distribution is obtained near the tool. Along the workpiece thickness direction, the calculated material flow velocity and its layer thickness near the tool get lowered because the effect of the shoulder is weakened as the distance away from the top surface increases. The model is validated by comparing the predicted values of peak temperature at some typical locations with the experimentally measured ones.

  17. Segregation behavior of phosphorus in the heat-affected zone of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after simulated thermal aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Miyahara, Yuichi; Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    The segregation behavior of phosphorus (P) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after step cooling was investigated with atom probe tomography. At grain/packet boundaries, the final P segregation level consisted of non-equilibrium segregation that occurred during cooling after welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and equilibrium segregation that occurred during step cooling. In both processes, higher P coverage was observed in the coarse-grained and intercritically reheated coarse-grained HAZ than in the fine-grained HAZ and base material. The cooling after welding and PWHT seemed to have a pronounced impact on P segregation in the subsequent aging process. In addition, P segregation also occurred at the precipitate/matrix interfaces of cementite, Mo2C and Al-Si rich precipitates. The evolution of P coverage at these two types of sites suggested increasing risks of embrittlement with an increase in aging time.

  18. Numerical simulation of friction stir welding (FSW): Prediction of the heat affect zone using a softening model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, R. M. F.; Carlone, P.; Valente, R. A. F.; Teixeira-Dias, F.; Palazzo, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    In this work a numerical model is proposed to simulate Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process in AA2024-T3 plates. This model included a softening model that account for the temperature history and the hardness distribution on a welded plate can thus be predicted. The validation of the model was performed using experimental measurements of the hardness in the plate cross-section. There is an acceptable prediction of the material softening in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) using the adopted model.

  19. Improvement of bonding properties of laser transmission welded, dissimilar thermoplastics by plasma surface treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.; Sooriyapiragasam, S.; Behm, H.; Dahlmann, R. [Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV), RWTH Aachen University, Pontstrasse 49, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    Compared to different welding methods such as ultrasonic welding, laser transmission welding is a relatively new technology to join thermoplastic parts. The most significant advantages over other methods are the contactless energy input which can be controlled very precisely and the low mechanical loads on the welded parts. Therefore, laser transmission welding is used in various areas of application, for example in medical technology or for assembling headlights in the automotive sector. However, there are several challenges in welding dissimilar thermoplastics. This may be due to different melting points on the one hand and different polarities on the other hand. So far these problems are faced with the intermediate layer technique. In this process a layer bonding together the two components is placed between the components. This means that an additional step in the production is needed to apply the extra layer. To avoid this additional step, different ways of joining dissimilar thermoplastics are investigated. In this regard, the improvement in the weldability of the dissimilar thermoplastics polyamide 6 (PA 6) and polypropylene (PP) by means of plasma surface modification and contour welding is examined. To evaluate the influence of the plasma surface modification process on the subsequent welding process of the two dissimilar materials, the treatment time as well as the storage time between treatment and welding are varied. The treatment time in pulsed micro wave excited oxygen plasmas with an electron density of about 1x10{sup 17} m{sup −3} is varied from 0.5 s to 120 s and the time between treatment and welding is varied from a few minutes up to a week. As reference, parts being made of the same polymer (PP and PA 6) are welded and tested. For the evaluation of the results of the welding experiments, short-time tensile tests are used to determine the bond strength. Without plasma treatment the described combination of PA 6/PP cannot be welded with

  20. 1Cr5Mo珠光体耐热钢管的三种不同工艺研究%Research in three different welding technology of 1Cr5Mo pearlitic heat-resistant steel pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亮; 李宪臣; 刘海河

    2011-01-01

    Describes the three different welding technologies of applied to the steel currently by analyzing the weldability of Cr5Mo steel.It can be proposed that welding with the same materials as much as possible in order to avoid joints early failure in the operation and reduce welding cost when it has the availability of post weld heat treatment conditions and case of large-scale welding by comparing the performance differences of welded joints obtained and the implementation features with the three welding technology.If in the absence of heat treatment conditions or less maintenance in the field.it is also can be welded with different materials. However,we recommend using the new low-Cr high manganese AR617 weld rod to weld Cr5Mo so as to ensure that it will not low ductile fracture in the joints, the weld rod has excellent welding technology .Through joints sampling observation in the production practices and 44 000 hours service,performance is stable,fully meet the production requirements,the welding technology conditions is relatively simple.%通过分析1Cr5Mo钢的焊接性,介绍了当前应用于该钢种的三种不同的焊接工艺方法.通过比较三种焊接工艺方法所获得焊接接头性能差异和特点,提出在具备焊后热处理条件和大规模施焊情况下应尽可能采用同质材料进行焊接,以避免接头在运行中出现早期失效,降低焊接成本.在不具备热处理条件或现场维修量少的情况下,也可采用异质材料进行焊接.但是,为保证接头在长期高温运行下不出现低韧性脆性断裂,建议采用新型低铬高锰型AR617焊条焊接1Cr5Mo,该焊条焊接工艺性能优良,通过生产实践和对服役44000 h的接头取样观察,使用性能稳定,完全满足生产要求,其焊接工艺条件相对简单.

  1. Finite Element Analysis of the Polyethylene Pipe Heating during Welding with a Heating Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Tută

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the results of a study based on the finite element method applied to end-to-end polyethylene pipe welding. In the experiment we used the ANSYS 6.1 finite element program that succeeds to accurately capture many common physical phenomena.

  2. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  3. Numerical simulation of deep cryogenic treatment electrode tip temperature for spot welding aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhisheng; Hu Minying; Liu Cuirong

    2006-01-01

    Deep cryogenic treatment technology of electrodes is put forward to improve electrode life of resistance spot welding of aluminum alloy LF2. Deep cryogenic treatment makes electrode life for spot welding aluminum alloy improve. The specific resistivity of the deep cryogenic treatment electrodes is tested and experimental results show that specific resistivity is decreased sharply. The temperature field and the influence of deep cryogenic treatment on the electrode tip temperature during spot welding aluminium alloy is studied by numerical simulation method with the software ANSYS. The axisymmetric finite element model of mechanical, thermal and electrical coupled analysis of spot welding process is developed. The numerical simulation results show that the influence of deep cryogenic treatment on electrode tip temperature is very large.

  4. Study on laser welded heat-affected zone in new ultralow carbon bainitic steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhao; Wuzhu Chen; Xudong Zhang; Jiguo Shan

    2007-01-01

    800 MPa grade ultralow carbon bainitic (NULCB) steel is the recently developed new generation steel, which was produced by thermo mechanical controlled processing & relaxation-precipitation controlling transformation (TMCP&RPC) technique. The microstructure and the mechanical properties of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in NULCB steel under laser welding conditions were investigated by using a Gleeble-1500 thermal simulator. The experimental results indicate that the simplex microstructure in the HAZ is granular bainite that consists of bainite-ferrite (BF) lath and M-A constituent when the cooling time from 800 to 500°C (t8/5) is 0.3-30 s, and the M-A constituent consists of twinned martensite and residual austenite. As t8/5 increases, the hardness and tensile strength of HAZ decreases, but they are higher than that of the base metal, indicating the absence of softened zone after laser welding. The impact toughness of HAZ increases at first and then decreases when tw increases. The impact energy of HAZ is much higher than that of the base metal when t8/5 is between 3 and 15 s. It indicates that excellent low temperature toughness can be obtained under appropriate laser welding conditions.

  5. An analytical model of heat generation for eccentric cylindrical pin in friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ramadan Shaaban Essa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model for heat generation for eccentric cylindrical pin in friction stir welding was developed that utilizes a new factor based on the tool pin eccentricity. The proposed analytical expression is a modification of previous analytical models from the literature, which is verified and well matches with the model developed by previous researchers. Results of plunge force and peak temperature were used to validate the current proposed model. The cylindrical tool pin with eccentricities of 0, 0.2, and 0.8 mm were used to weld two types of aluminum alloys; a low deformation resistant AA1050-H12, and a relatively high deformation resistant AA5754-H24 alloy. The FSW was performed at constant tool rotation speed of 600 rpm and different welding speeds of 100, 300, and 500 mm/min. Experimental results implied that less temperature is generated using eccentric cylindrical pin than cylindrical pin without eccentricity under the given set of FSW process conditions. Furthermore, numerical simulation results show that increasing the pin eccentricity leads to decrease in peak temperature.

  6. Possibility of Inducing Compressive Residual Stresses in Welded Joints of SS400 Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Since the welded constructions produce easily stress corrosion cracking (SCC) or fatigue disruption in corrosive medium or under ripple load, two methods inducing compressive stress on structural surfaces by anti-welding-heating treatment (AWHT) and explosion treatment (ET) are presented. The results show that they are good ways to resisting SCC on the welded SS400 steel or other components.

  7. The Effect of Ultrasonic Peening Treatment on Fatigue Performance of Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic peening treatment (UPT as a method of severe plastic deformation was used to treat cruciform welded joints of Q345 steel. The application of UPT achieves material surface nanocrystallization of the peening zone, reduces stress concentration, and produces residual compressive stresses at the welded toe. Micro-structure, hardness, stress relief, S-N curve, and the fatigue fracture mechanism of cruciform welded joint of Q345 steel, both before and after UPT, were analyzed in detail. The main results show that: stress concentration and residual tensile stress are the main reasons to reduce fatigue strength of cruciform welded joints. The fatigue life of cruciform welded joints is improved for surface hardening, compressive stress, and grain refinement by UPT. Residual compressive stress caused by UPT is released with the increase of fatigue life. A very significant fatigue strength improvement happens when UPT is replenished repeatedly after a certain number of cycles.

  8. Impact properties of electron beam welds of V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 and CEA-J57

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsisar, Valentyn, E-mail: valentyn_tsisar@ipm.lviv.ua [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Physical–Mechanical Institute of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (PhMI NASU), 5 Naukova Street, 79601 Lviv (Ukraine); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Material Process Technology (IAM-WPT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz, 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Le Flem, Marion [CEA, DEN, DMN, SRMA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Yeliseyeva, Olga [Physical–Mechanical Institute of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (PhMI NASU), 5 Naukova Street, 79601 Lviv (Ukraine); Konys, Jürgen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Material Process Technology (IAM-WPT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz, 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Electron beam welding was applied for V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 and CEA-J57. • Weld metal showed superior impact properties in comparison with base metal. • Expected shift in DBTT to higher temperatures does not take place. - Abstract: The Charpy impact properties and microstructure of bead-on-plate electron beam welds of V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 (NH-2) and CEA-J57 (J57) were investigated. Weld metal of both grades demonstrated increase in hardness (HV{sub 100} ∼ 180) in comparison with base metal (HV{sub 100} ∼ 135) due to decomposition of Ti–C,O,N precipitates followed by the solid-solution hardening of V-matrix with oxygen. Hardness decreases gradually from the weld metal through the heat affected zone toward the base metal indicating partial decomposition of precipitation bands from the side of heat affected zone directly adjoining weld metal. The latter consists of columnar crystallites (grains) possessing with inner dendritic structure and elongated from the center of weld belt in the direction of heat removal. Thickness of weld metal does not exceed 1 mm while heat affected zone is about 3 mm thick. Absorbed energies of weld metal are superior in comparison with base metal for both grades (NH-2 and J57) while the fracture mode is mainly ductile in the temperature range of impact test from 17 to −196 °C.

  9. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of a API 5CT J55 Pipeline Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soria-Aguilar Ma. de Jesús

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of two different post-weld heat treatment cycles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded API 5CT J55 steels were investigated in the present work. Experiments were carried out based on a Taguchi experimental design. Ortogonal arrays (L9 of Taguchi and statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed to determine the impact of the heat treatment parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of experimental steel. From the results of ANOVA, there were obtained the empirical equations for optimizing the heat treating conditions that lead to the best mechanical properties.

  10. MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF DEEP CROGENIC TREATMENT ELECTRODES FOR SPOT WELDING HOT DIP GALVANIZED STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhisheng; Liu Cuirong; Wang Jiuhai; Shan Ping; Hu Shengsun; Lian Jinrui

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure and elements distribution of the deep cryogenic treatment electrodes and non-cryogenic treatment electrodes for spot welding hot dip galvanized steel are observed by a scanning electrical microscope. The grain sizes, the resistivity and the hardness of the electrodes before and after deep cryogenic treatment are measured by X-ray diffraction, the DC double arms bridge and the Brinell hardness testing unit respectively. The spot welding process performance of hot dip galvanized steel plate is tested and the relationship between microstructure and physical properties of deep cryogenic treatment electrodes is analyzed. The experimental results show that deep cryogenic treatment makes Cr, Zr in deep cryogenic treatment electrodes emanate dispersedly and makes the grain of deep cryogenic treatment electrodes smaller than non-cryogenic treatment ones so that the electrical conductivity and the thermal conductivity of deep cryogenic treatment electrodes are improved very much, which make spot welding process performance of the hot dip galvanized steel be improved.

  11. Thermal Aging Effects on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consists of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, is now being widely used as the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing material for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its mechanical property, thermal expansion coefficient, and corrosion resistance. The heat affected zone (HAZ) on Alloy 600 which is formed by welding process is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al. crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions [3]. And according to Z.P. Lu et al. CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. To predict the life time of components, there is a model which can calculate the effective degradation years (EDYs) of the material as a function of operating temperature. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects the hardness of dissimilar metal weld from the fusion boundary to Alloy 600 base metal and the residual strain at Alloy 600 heat affected zone. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. The hardness, measured by Vickers hardness tester, peaked near the fusion boundary between Alloy 182 and Alloy 600, and it decreases as the picked point goes to Alloy 600 base metal. Even though the formation of precipitate such as Cr carbide, thermal aging doesn't affect the value and the tendency of hardness because of reduced residual stress. According to kernel average misorientation mapping, residual strain decreases when the material thermally aged. And finally, in 30 years simulated specimen, the high residual strain almost disappears. Therefore, the influence of residual strain on primary water stress corrosion cracking can be diminished when the material undergoes thermal aging.

  12. Inertia Friction Welding Dissimilar Nickel-Based Superalloys Alloy 720Li to IN718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z. W.; Li, H. Y.; Preuss, M.; Karadge, M.; Bowen, P.; Bray, S.; Baxter, G.

    2007-07-01

    This article describes a comprehensive microstructural characterization of an inertia friction welded joint between nickel-based superalloys 720Li and IN718. The investigation has been carried out on both as-welded and postweld heat-treated conditions. The detailed metallographic analysis has enabled the relation of hardness profiles across inertia-welded alloy 720Li to IN718 and morphological changes of the precipitates present. The work demonstrates that inertia friction welding (IFW) 720Li to IN718 results in a weld free of micropores and microcracks and no significant chemical migration across the weld line. However, substantial differences in terms of grain structure and precipitation phase distribution variations are observed on each side of the dissimilar weld. The high γ‧ volume fraction alloy 720Li exhibits a wider heat-affected zone than the mainly γ‧‧ strengthened IN718. Alloy 720Li displays only a small hardness trough near the weld line in the as-welded condition due to the depletion of γ‧, while γ″-strengthened IN718 shows a soft precipitation-free weld region. Postweld heat treatment (PWHT) of the dissimilar weld at 760 °C, a typical annealing temperature for alloy 720Li, results in an overmatch of the heat-affected zone in both sides of the weld. The comparison of the as-welded and postweld heat-treated condition also reveals that IN718 is in an overaged condition after the stress relief treatment.

  13. Generated forces and heat during the critical stages of friction stir welding and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Sadiq Aziz; Tahir, Abd Salam Md; Izamshah, R. [University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Malacca (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    The solid-state behavior of friction stir welding process results in violent mechanical forces that should be mitigated, if not eliminated. Plunging and dwell time are the two critical stages of this welding process in terms of the generated forces and the related heat. In this study, several combinations of pre-decided penetration speeds, rotational speeds, tool designs, and dwell time periods were used to investigate these two critical stages. Moreover, a coupled-field thermal-structural finite element model was developed to validate the experimental results and the induced stresses. The experimental results revealed the relatively large changes in force and temperature during the first two stages compared with those during the translational tool movement stage. An important procedure to mitigate the undesired forces was then suggested. The model prediction of temperature values and their distribution were in good agreement with the experimental prediction. Therefore, the thermal history of this non-uniform heat distribution was used to estimate the induced thermal stresses. Despite the 37% increase in these stresses when 40 s dwell time was used instead of 5 s, these stresses showed no effect on the axial force values because of the soft material incidence and stir effects.

  14. Heat input effect on the microstructural transformation and mechanical properties in GTAW welds of a 409L ferritic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado, Jorge A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Welds without filler metal and welds using a conventional austenitic stainless steel filler metal (ER308L were performed to join a ferritic stainless steel with Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW. Welding parameters were adjusted to obtain three different heat input values. Microstructure reveals the presence of coarse ferritic matrix and martensite laths in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ. Dilution between filler and base metal was correlated with the presence of austenite, martensite and ferrite in the weld metal. Weld thermal cycles were measured to correlate the microstructural transformation in the HAZ. Microhardness measurements (maps and profiles allow to identify the different zones of the welded joints (weld metal, HAZ, and base metal. Comparing the base metal with the weld metal and the HAZ, a hardness increment (~172 HV0.5 to ~350 HV0.5 and ~310 HV0.5, respectively was observed, which has been attributed to the martensite formation. Tensile strength of the welded joints without filler metal increased moderately with respect to base metal. In contrast, ductility was approximately 25% higher than base metal, which provided a toughness improvement of the welded joints.Se llevaron a cabo soldaduras sin material de aporte y empleando un electrodo convencional (ER308L para unir un acero inoxidable ferrítico, empleando el proceso de soldadura de arco con electrodo de tungsteno (GTAW. Los parámetros de soldadura fueron ajustados para obtener tres valores diferentes de calor de aporte. La microestructura revela la presencia de una matriz ferrítica gruesa y placas de martensita en la Zona Afectada por el Calor (ZAC. La dilución entre el metal base y de aporte fue correlacionada con la presencia de austenita, martensita y ferrita en el metal de soldadura. Los ciclos térmicos de la soldadura fueron medidos para correlacionar la transformación microestrutural en la ZAC. Mediciones de microdureza (mapas y perfiles, permitieron identificar las

  15. Corrosion resistance of the welded AISI 316L after various surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Liptáková

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this work is to monitor the surface treatment impact on the corrosion resistance of the welded stainless steel AISI 316L to local corrosion forms. The excellent corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel is caused by the existence of stable, thin and well adhering passive layer which quality is strongly influenced by welding. Therefore surface treatment of stainless steel is very important with regard to its local corrosion susceptibility Surfaces of welded stainless steel were treated by various mechanical methods (grinding, garnet blasting. Surface properties were studied by SEM, corrosion resistance was evaluated after exposition tests in chlorides environment using weight and metalographic analysis. The experimental outcomes confirmed that the mechanical finishing has a significant effect on the corrosion behavior of welded stainless steel AISI 316L.

  16. Modelling of ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT of welded joints and its effect on fatigue strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.L. Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT is a remarkable post-weld technique applying mechanical impacts in combination with ultrasound into the welded joints. In the present work, a 3D simulation method including welding simulation, numerical modelling of UIT-process and an evaluation of fatigue crack growth has been developed. In the FE model, the actual treatment conditions and local mechanical characteristics due to acoustic softening are set as input parameters. The plastic deformation and compressive stress layer are found to be more pronounced when acoustic softening takes place. The predicted internal residual stress distributions of welded joint before and after UIT are compared with experimental results, showing a fairly good agreement with each other. Finally, simulated results of fatigue crack growth in various residual stress fields are well compared with test results, so that the proposed model may provide an effective tool to simulate UIT-process in engineering structures.

  17. Microstructure characterization of heat affected zone after welding in Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, K., E-mail: sawada.kota@nims.go.jp [Materials Reliability Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hara, T. [Surface Physics and Structure Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Tabuchi, M.; Kimura, K. [Materials Reliability Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Kubushiro, K. [IHI Corporation, 1, Shin-nakahara-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The microstructure of the heat affected zone after welding was investigated in Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel, using TEM and STEM-EDX. The microstructure of thin foil was observed at the fusion line, and at the positions of 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, 2.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 3.5 mm to the base metal side of the fusion line. Martensite structure with very fine lath and high dislocation density was confirmed at all positions. Twins with a twin plane of (112) were locally observed at all positions. Elemental mapping was obtained for all positions by means of STEM-EDX. Inclusions of mainly Si were formed at the fusion line but not at the other positions. No precipitates could be detected at the fusion line or at the position of 0.5 mm. On the other hand, MX particles were observed at the positions of 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, 2.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 3.5 mm even after welding. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles were also confirmed at the positions of 2.0 mm, 2.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 3.5 mm. Very fine equiaxed grains were locally observed at the positions of 2.0 mm and 2.5 mm. The Cr content of the equiaxed grains was about 12 mass%, although the martensite area included about 8 mass% Cr. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nonequilibrium microstructure of heat affected zone was observed after welding in Mod.9Cr–1Mo steel. • Inclusions containing Si were detected at the fusion line. • Undissolved M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and MX particles were confirmed in heat affected zone. • Twins with a twin plane of (112) were locally observed at all positions. • Very fine ferrite grains with high Cr content were observed in fine grained heat affected zone.

  18. The influence of heat treatment on properties of three-metal explosion joint: AlMg-Al-Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Samardžić

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The procedure of welding by explosion is as technical optimal solution of ship-shell parts joining frequently used in shipbuilding industry at transition three-metal joint: AlMg4.5-Al-St.52-3 working out. The investigations of mechanical and metallographic properties of joints, exposed on heat treatment at different temperatures levels, are performed. The results of mechanical and metallographic examinations of transition joints at elevated temperatures, direct on its use below 300 °C. The additional melting welding working out is in closeness of explosion- welded joint allowed.

  19. 焊后热处理对马氏体时效不锈钢焊接组织和性能的影响%Effect of post weld heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of stainless maraging steel weldments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郜晓溪; 刘海园; 王渊博; 孟凡岩; 安健

    2012-01-01

    研究了0Cr13Ni7MoTi马氏体时效不锈钢在不同焊接功率下的激光熔焊组织形貌及焊后热处理对焊接接头组织、硬度分布及拉伸性能的影响.结果表明,焊接接头分为熔合区、热影响区和母材3个区域.根据不同功率的焊接接头各区域及熔合区上下部凸起尺寸特征,2000 W和2500W的激光焊接工艺较为合理.选取2500W的焊接接头在420~480℃之间分别进行2 ~3h的时效处理,420~460℃时效处理后焊接接头各区域组织与焊后组织无明显变化,经480℃时效后,在原奥氏体晶界处形成少量回复奥氏体.经过时效处理的焊接接头的硬度和屈服强度均较未处理时有所提高,经过460℃×3 h时效处理的硬度最高,达到490~500 HV,屈服强度提高了67.3%.%The microstructure, hardness distribution and tensile properties of 0Cr13Ni7MoTi stainless maraging steel laser weldments were investigated after different post welding heat treatments. The results show that the microstructure across the weldment consists of three regions, namely fusion zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal zone. According to the features of weldments, 2000 W and 2500 W are appropriate laser powers. The microstructure of weldments after aging at temperatures ranging from 420 ℃ to 460 ℃ changed little under optical microscope, however, as the aging temperature increases to 480 ℃, a litter amount of reverted austenite formed on the prior austenite grain boundary. The microhardness and yield strength of weldments after aging is higher than those without heat treatment, the highest microhardness across the weldment increases to 490 -500 HV, and the yield strength increases by 67. 3% after 460 ℃×3 h aging treatment.

  20. Studies on thermo-elastic heating of horns used in ultrasonic plastic welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopa Rani, M; Prakasan, K; Rudramoorthy, R

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic welding horn is half wavelength section or tool used to focus the ultrasonic vibrations to the components being welded. The horn is designed in such a way that it maximizes the amplitude of the sound wave passing through it. The ends of the horn represent the displacement anti-nodes and the center the 'node' of the wave. As the horns perform 20,000 cycles of expansion and contraction per second, they are highly stressed at the nodes and are heated owing to thermo-elastic effects. Considerable temperature rise may be observed in the horn, at the nodal region when working at high amplitudes indicating high stress levels leading to failure of horns due to cyclic loading. The limits for amplitude must therefore be evaluated for the safe working of the horn. Horns made of different materials have different thermo-elastic behaviors and hence different temperatures at the nodes and antinodes. This temperature field can be used as a control mechanism for setting the amplitude/weld parameters. Safe stress levels can be predicted using modal and harmonic analyses followed by a stress analysis to study the effect of cyclic loads. These are achieved using 'Ansys'. The maximum amplitude level obtained from the stress analysis is used as input for 'Comsol' to predict the temperature field. The actual temperature developed in the horn during operation is measured using infrared camera and compared with the simulated temperature. From experiments, it is observed that horn made of titanium had the lowest temperature rise at the critical region and can be expected to operate at amplitudes up to 77 μm without suffering failure due to cyclic loading. The method of predicting thermo-elastic stresses and temperature may be adopted by the industry for operating the horn within the safe stress limits thereby extending the life of the horn.

  1. Identification of plasticity model parameters of the heat-affected zone in resistance spot welded martensitic boron steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eller, Tom; Greve, L; Andres, M.T.; Medricky, M; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Duflou, J.; Leacock, A.; Micari, F.; Hagenah, H.

    2015-01-01

    A material model is developed that predicts the plastic behaviour of fully hardened 22MnB5 base material and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) material found around its corresponding resistance spot welds (RSWs). Main focus will be on an accurate representation of strain fields up to high strains, which

  2. Identification of plasticity model parameters of the heat-affected zone in resistance spot welded martensitic boron steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eller, Tom; Greve, L; Andres, M.T.; Medricky, M; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Merklein, M.

    2014-01-01

    A material model is developed that predicts the plastic behavior of fully hardened 22MnB5 base material and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) material found around its corresponding resistance spot welds (RSWs). Main focus will be on an accurate representation of strain fields up to high strains, which

  3. Structure and properties of joints produced by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, E. V.; Dorodnikov, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of the effect of ultrasound on explosion welded materials. It has been established that simultaneous treatment with ultrasonic vibrations and explosion welding of the materials to be welded has a significant effect on the structure and properties of the heat-affected zone of formed joints.

  4. Creation of Ultrasonic Equipment for Strengthening and Relaxation Treatment of the Welded Constructions in Carriage Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prykhodko, V.I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New modification of portable ultrasonic equipment with power output of 0,8 kW with the digital management is developed for strengthening and relaxation treatment of surface of metallic hardware. A set of such devices is produced; the designer documentations on an ultrasonic generator and impact instrument with a piezoceramic transducer are prepared. Preparation of technology of ultrasonic impact treatment for welded constructions is accomplished. Conducted comparative tests on the effects of different types of treatment and applied materials of welded constructions on fatigue durability showed the expediency of ultrasonic impact treatment for the prolongation of operation life of wares.

  5. Microstructural Aspects in FSW and TIG Welding of Cast ZE41A Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Astarita, Antonello; Rubino, Felice; Pasquino, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, magnesium ZE41A alloy plates were butt joined through friction stir welding (FSW) and Tungsten Inert Gas welding processes. Process-induced microstructures were investigated by optical and SEM observations, EDX microanalysis and microhardness measurements. The effect of a post-welded T5 heat treatment on FSW joints was also assessed. Sound joints were produced by means of both techniques. Different elemental distributions and grain sizes were found, whereas microhardness profiles reflect microstructural changes. Post-welding heat treatment did not induce significant alterations in elemental distribution. The FSW-treated joint showed a more homogeneous hardness profile than the as-welded FSW joint.

  6. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  7. The influence of heat treatment by annealing on clad plates residual stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of applied clad procedure as well as heat treatment by annealing (650 °C/2h on level and nature of residual stresses was researched. Three clad procedures are used i.e. hot rolling, submerged arc welding (SAW with strip electrode and explosion welding. The relaxed deformation measurement on clad plate surfaces was performed by applying centre-hole drilling method using special measuring electrical resistance strain gauges (rosettes. After performed measuring, size and nature of residual stresses were determined using analytical method. Depending of residual stresses on depth of drilled blind-hole is studied.

  8. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOVACEVIC, Ilija; DJELOSEVIC, Mirko; TEPIC, Goran; MILISAVLJEVIC, Stevan

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW) technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established...

  9. Strength and microstructure of 2091 Al-Li alloy TIG welded joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of TIG welding joints of 2091 Al-Li alloy were investigated both in as-welded and different postweld heat treatment condition. The results show that solution strengthening played an important role in the as-welded condition, though the precipitation strengthening δ' phase formed already in the as-welded weld metal, but its effect was not apparent due to the lower volume fraction of δ' phase. So the strength coefficient (φ) of the welded joint/base metal was 64%. After artificially aging heat treatment, the precipitation strengthening effect increased much due to the formation of more δ' phase and s' phase. Its φ value was increased up to 89%. The highest strength of the welded joints was obtained after solid solution and then artificially aged heat treatment. Due to the proper size of precipitation strengthening phases and their well distribution, the φ value was increased up to 98%.

  10. Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Voigt

    2004-10-15

    Heat treatment practices used by steel foundries have been carefully studied as part of comprehensive heat treatment procedure development trials. These studies highlight the relationships between critical heat treatment process control parameters and heat treatment success. Foundry heat treatment trials to develop heat treatment procedure qualification have shed light on the relationship between heat treatment theory and current practices. Furnace load time-temperature profiles in steel foundries exhibit significant differences depending on heat treatment equipment, furnace loading practice, and furnace maintenance. Time-temperature profiles of the furnace control thermocouples can be very different from the time-temperature profiles observed at the center of casting loads in the furnace. Typical austenitrization temperatures and holding times used by steel foundries far exceed what is required for transformation to austenite. Quenching and hardenability concepts were also investigated. Heat treatment procedure qualification (HTPQ) schema to demonstrate heat treatment success and to pre-qualify other alloys and section sizes requiring lesser hardenability have been developed. Tempering success is dependent on both tempering time and temperature. As such, furnace temperature uniformity and control of furnace loading during tempering is critical to obtain the desired mechanical properties. The ramp-up time in the furnace prior to the establishment of steady state heat treatment conditions contributes to the extent of heat treatment performed. This influence of ramp-up to temperature during tempering has been quantified.

  11. Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification for Steel Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariol Charles; Nicholas Deskevich; Vipin Varkey; Robert Voigt; Angela Wollenburg

    2004-04-29

    Heat treatment practices used by steel foundries have been carefully studied as part of comprehensive heat treatment procedure qualification development trials. These studies highlight the relationships between critical heat treatment process control parameters and heat treatment success. Foundry heat treatment trials to develop heat treatment procedure qualifications have shed light on the relationship between heat treatment theory and current practices. Furnace load time-temperature profiles in steel foundries exhibit significant differences depending on heat treatment equipment, furnace loading practice, and furnace maintenance. Time-temperature profiles of furnace control thermocouples can be very different from the time-temperature profiles observed at the center of casting loads in the furnace. Typical austenitization temperatures and holding times used by steel foundries far exceed what is required for transformation to austenite. Quenching and hardenability concepts were also investigated. Heat treatment procedure qualification (HTPQ) schema to demonstrate heat treatment success and to pre-qualify other alloys and section sizes requiring lesser hardenability have been developed. Tempering success is dependent on both tempering time and temperature. As such, furnace temperature uniformity and control of furnace loading during tempering is critical to obtain the desired mechanical properties. The ramp-up time in the furnace prior to the establishment of steady state heat treatment conditions contributes to the extent of heat treatment performed. This influence of ramp-up to temperature during tempering has been quantified.

  12. 29 CFR 1919.80 - Heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.80 Section 1919.80 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.80 Heat treatment. (a) Wherever heat treatment of any loose gear is recommended by the manufacturer, it shall be carried out...

  13. 29 CFR 1919.36 - Heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.36 Section 1919.36 Labor Regulations...) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.36 Heat treatment. (a) The annealing of wrought iron gear required by this part shall...

  14. Characterization of mechanical properties in the heat affected zones of alloy 82/182 dissimilar metal weld joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Weon [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Sunchon National Univ., Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents the characteristics of mechanical properties within the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of dissimilar metal weld between SA508 Gr.1a and F316 Stainless Steel (SS) with Alloy 82/182 filler metal. Tensile tests were performed using small-size specimens taken from the HAZ regions close to both fusion lines of weld, and the micro-structures were examined using Optical Microscope (OM) and Transmission Microscope (TEM). The results showed that significant gradients of the Yield Stress (YS), Ultimate Tensile Stress (UTS), and elongations were observed within the HAZ of SA508 Gr.1a. This was attributed to the different microstructures within the HAZ. In the HAZ of F316 SS, however, the welding effect dominated the YS and elongation rather than UTS, and TEM micrographs conformed the strengthening in the HAZ of F316 SS was associated with a dislocation-induced strain hardening.

  15. Laser welding in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  16. Effect of weld heat input on toughness and structure of HAZ of a new super-high strength steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wang Juan; Li Yajiang; Liu Peng

    2003-04-01

    Fracture morphology and fine structure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of HQ130 super-high strength steel are studied by means of SEM, TEM and electron diffraction technique. Test results indicated that the structure of HAZ of HQ130 steel was mainly lath martensite (ML), in which there were a lot of dislocations in the sub-structure inside ML lath, the dislocation density was about (0.3 ∼ 0.9) × 1012/cm2. No obvious twin was observed in the HAZ under the condition of normal weld heat input. By controlling weld heat input ($E \\leq$ 20 kJ/cm), the impact toughness in the HAZ can be assured.

  17. Effect of Heat Input on Fume Generation and Joint Properties of Gas Metal Arc Welded Austenitic Stainless Steel%Effect of Heat Input on Fume Generation and Joint Properties of Gas Metal Arc Welded Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K Srinivasan; V Balasubramanian

    2011-01-01

    The effect of heat input on fume and their compositions during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 316 stainless steel plates are investigated. Fume generation rate (FGR) and fume percentage were determined by ANSI/AWS F1.2 methods. Particle characterization was performed with SEM-XEDS and XRF analysis to reveal the particle morphology and chemical composition of the fume particles. The SEM analysis reveals the morphology of particles having three distinct shapes namely spherical, irregular, and agglomerated. Spherical particles were the most abundant type of individual particle. All the fume particle size falls in the range of less than 100 nm. Mechanical properties (strength, hardness and toughness) and microstructural analysis of the weld deposits were evaluated. It is found that heat input of 1.15 kJ/mm is beneficial to weld stainless steel by GMAW process due to lower level of welding fume emissions and superior mechanical properties of the joints.

  18. Corrosion resistance of «tube – tubesheet» weld joint obtained by friction welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIZVANOV Rif Garifovich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are widely applied for implementation of various processes at ventures of fuel and energy complex. Cost of production and reliability of heat exchangers of this type is to a wide extent determined by corresponding characteristics of tube bundle, «tube – tubesheet» is its typical joint in particular when welding operations are used in order to attach tubes to tubesheet in addition to expansion. When manufacturing such equipment of heat-resistant chrome-bearing or chromium-molybdenum steels including steel 15H5M, the process of fixed joint manufacturing gets significantly more complicated and costly due to the necessity to use thermal treatment before, during and after welding (this problem is particularly applicable for manufacturing of large-size equipment. One of the options to exclude thermal treatment from manufacturing process is to use «non-arc» welding methods – laser welding, explosion welding as well as friction welding. Use of each of the welding methods mentioned above during production of heat-exchange equipment has its process challenges and peculiarities. This article gives a comparative analysis of weld structure and distribution of electrode potentials of welded joints and parent metal of the joints simulating welding of tube to tubesheet of steel 15H5M using the following welding methods: shielded manual arc welding, tungsten-arc inert-gas welding and friction welding. Comparative analysis of macro- and microstructures of specific zones of the studied welded joints showed that the joints produced by arc welding methods do not exhibit evident inhomogeneity of the structure after application of thermal treatment which is explained by the correctness of thermal treatment. Joints obtained via friction welding are characterized by structural inhomogeneity of the welded joint zone metal microstructure. The ultra-fine-grained structure obtained as a result of friction welding makes it possible to

  19. Metallurgical transformations of high strength low alloys steels 450 EMZ type II in the heat affected zone during multipass submerged arc welding; Proceso metalurgicos de aceros microaleados de alta resistencia 450 EMZ tipo II en la zona afectada termicamente debido al efecto mulipasada en soldaduras por arco sumergido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Palma, R.; Suarez-Bermejo, J. C.; Vicario, F. J.; Munoz, A.

    2006-07-01

    A considerable number of crack tip opening displacement tests in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welds. performed in accordance with standards BS 5762 and EEMUA, are rejected since the crack is not inside the coarse grain region at 0.5 mm from the fusion border, as well as the quantity of the crack length in percentage, that the crack goes through the inter critical region instead of in the grain coarse region as it would correspond. This circumstance make advisable to carry out a metallographic study of he inter critical zone in the HAZ as well as the corresponding tests, in order analyze the inter critical region brittleness reasons. The study is performed on a HSLA 75 mm thick panel 450 EMZ type II, welded under a SAW process with heat input and welded parameters controlled, without any post weld heat treatment. (Author)

  20. Numerical Simulation on Interfacial Creep Failure of Dissimilar Metal Welded Joint between HR3C and T91 Heat-Resistant Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jianqiang; TANG Yi; ZHANG Guodong; ZHAO Xuan; GUO Jialin; LUO Chuanhong

    2016-01-01

    The maximum principal stress, von Mises equivalent stress, equivalent creep strain, stress triaxiality in dissimilar metal welded joints between austenitic (HR3C) and martensitic heat-resistant steel (T91) are simulated by FEM at 873 K and under inner pressure of 42.26 MPa. The results show that the maximum principal stress and von Mises equivalent stress are quite high in the vicinity of weld/T91 interface, creep cavities are easy to form and expand in the weld/T91 interface. There are two peaks of equivalent creep strains in welded joint, and the maximum equivalent creep strain is in the place 27-32 mm away from the weld/T91 interface, and there exists creep constrain region in the vicinity of weld/T91 interface. The high stress triaxiality peak is located exactly at the weld/T91 interface. Accordingly, the weld/T91 interface is the weakest site of welded joint. Therefore, using stress triaxiality to describe creep cavity nucleation and expansion and crack development is reasonable for the dissimilar metal welded joint between austenitic and martensitic steel.

  1. The effects of fillet formation on the strength of braze pressure welded joint with high frequency induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzumura, A.; Inagaki, Y.; Ikeshoji, T.T.; Yamazaki, T. [Graduate School of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating had been invented as the new joining method for bonding general steel pipes for on-site piping without danger of fire and the dispersion in joint properties due to welder's skill. In the BPW, brazing filler is interlaid between the mating surfaces to be joined. The filler melts by heating up to joining temperature, then the welding pressure discharges it from the joining interface. At the same time, the base metals are pressure-welded to each other, and that the discharged liquid filler forms fillets around the joining area. The fillets have the effects both on relaxing the stress concentration at the joint and on increasing the joining area, which contributes to the strengthening of joint. And the pressure is comparatively low, so the deformation of joint is little. In this paper, in order to investigate the effects of fillet on strengthening the joint, the stress state around the joint area and the degree of the effect of stress concentration relaxation were analyzed by finite element analysis. So it was revealed that the fillets reduced the stress concentration and separated the maximum stress site from the edge of the joining interface. Experimentally, the fillet formation was confirmed around the BPW joining area and that BPW joint had the superior tensile strength to brazed or pressure-welded joints by tensile test of joints. (orig.)

  2. Effects of Aging Treatment on Laser-Welded Mg-Rare Earth Alloy NZ30K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Dai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-rare earth alloys have received extensive attention due to their attractive mechanical properties resulting from high density of precipitation. The precipitation sequence in laser-welded Mg-3Nd-0.2Zn-0.4Zr (NZ30K alloy during aging treatment at 200°C and 225°C has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results indicate that the tensile strength of laser-welded NZ30K can be improved significantly after aging treatment at 200°C for 8 h. It is found that the precipitation in laser-welded NZ30K alloy follows the sequence of supersaturated solid solution → β′′(DO19 → β′(fcc.

  3. Thermo-mechanical process for treatment of welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, R K

    1980-03-01

    Benefits from thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) of austenitic stainless steel weldments, analogous to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of castings, most likely result from compressive plastic deformation, enhanced diffusion, and/or increased dislocation density. TMP improves ultrasonic inspectability of austenitic stainless steel welds owing to: conversion of cast dendrites into equiaxed austenitic grains, reduction in size and number of stringers and inclusions, and reduction of delta ferrite content. TMP induces structural homogenization and healing of void-type defects and thus contributes to an increase in elongation, impact strength, and fracture toughness as well as a significant reduction in data scatter for these properties. An optimum temperature for TMP or HIP of welds is one which causes negligible grain growth and an acceptable reduction in yield strength, and permits healing of porosity.

  4. Characterization of 2.25Cr1Mo welded ferritic steel plate by using diffractometric and ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernuschi, F.; Ghia, S. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy); Albertini, G.; Ceretti, M.; Rustichelli, F. [Ancona Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Medica; Castelnuovo, A.; Depero, L. [Univ. degli studi, Brescia.Fac. di ingegneria, dip. di ingegneria meccanica (Italy); Giamboni, S.; Gori, M. [Centro Elettrotecnico Sperimentale Italiano (CESI), Milan (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    Four different techniques (X-ray and neutron diffraction, ultrasonic birefringence and incremental hole drilling method) were applied for evaluating residual stress in a butt-welded ferritic steel palte. Measurements were carried out both before and after welding. Effects of post-welding heat treatment is also considered. A comparison between results obtained by using four different techniques is done.

  5. Distribution of tensile property and microstructure in friction stir weld of 6063 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki

    2001-12-01

    Dominant microstructural factors governing the global tensile properties of a friction-stir-welded joint of 6063 aluminum were examined by estimating distribution of local tensile properties corresponding to local microstructure and hardness. Yield and ultimate tensile strengths of the as-welded weld were significantly lower than those of the base material. Postweld aging and postweld solution heat-treatment and aging (SHTA) restored the strengths of the weld to the levels of the base material. Elongation was found to increase with increasing strength. Hardness tests showed that the as-welded weld was soft around the weld center and that the aged weld and the SHTA weld had relatively homogeneous distributions of high hardness. Hardness profiles of the welds were explained by precipitate distributions and precipitation sequences during the postweld heat treatments. The strengths of the welds were related to each minimum hardness value. In a weld having a heterogeneous hardness profile, the fracture occurred in the region with minimum hardness. When a weld had a homogeneous hardness profile, its fracture site depended on both crystallographic-orientation distribution of the matrix grains and strain tensor of the imposed deformation, i.e., it fractured in the region with a minimum average Taylor factor.

  6. The relationship between the super plasticity of laser welding joint of titanium alloy and hydrogen treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zean; Cheng, Donghai; Jiang, Xunyan; Hu, Dean; Chen, Yiping

    2017-06-01

    The superplastic deformation uniformity of laser welded joint of TC4 titanium alloy is improved by hydrogen treatment. The non-uniform deformation coefficient K was introduced to quantification ally characterize the non-uniform deformation. The results show when the content of hydrogen exceeds 0.29%, the super plasticity of the titanium alloy welded plate decreases with the increase of the hydrogen content. The decrease of the shrinkage of the base material is larger than that of the weld section with the increase of hydrogen content. The K can be used to describe the non-uniform deformation of the weld and the base material during the superplastic deformation of laser welded joint of the TC4. The K value increases with increaseing hydrogen content, increaseing deformation temperature and decreaseing strain rate. The K value reaches the maximum of 0.84 with hydrogen content of 1.299%, deformation temperature of 920 °C, strain rate of 10-4S-1.

  7. Growth kinetics of Al–Fe intermetallic compounds during annealing treatment of friction stir lap welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movahedi, M., E-mail: m_movahedi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H., E-mail: kokabi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyed Reihani, S.M., E-mail: reihani@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi, H., E-mail: hossein.najafi@epfl.ch [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics (ICMP), EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Farzadfar, S.A., E-mail: seyed-amir.farzadfar@mail.mcgill.ca [McGill University, Department of Materials Engineering, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada); Cheng, W.J., E-mail: d9603505@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, C.J., E-mail: cjwang@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we explored the growth kinetics of the Al–Fe intermetallic (IM) layer at the joint interface of the St-12/Al-5083 friction stir lap welds during post-weld annealing treatment at 350, 400 and 450 °C for 30 to 180 min. Optical microscope (OM), field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were employed to investigate the structure of the weld zone. The thickness and composition of the IM layers were evaluated using image analysis system and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), respectively. Moreover, kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis was performed to evaluate the level of stored energy in the as-welded state. The results showed that the growth kinetics of the IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. Presence of the IM compounds as well as high stored energy near the joint interface of the as-welded sample was recognized to be the origin of the observed deviation from the parabolic diffusion law. - Highlights: • This work provided a new insight into growth kinetics of Al–Fe IM thickness. • The growth kinetics of IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. • IM near the joint interface was the origin of deviation from the parabolic law. • High stored energy at joint interface was origin of deviation from parabolic law.

  8. Creep properties and simulation of weld repaired low alloy heat resistant CrMo and Mo steels at 540 deg C. Sub project 1 - Ex-serviced parent metal and virgin weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld; Weilin Zang

    2006-10-15

    Many existing power generating and process plants, where low alloy heat resistant CrMo(V) steels are extensively used for critical components, have exceeded their design lifetime of usually 100,000 hours. Assessment of residual lifetime and extension of economic life by weld repair have become increasingly important and attractive. This project aims at i) performing weld repair and determining the degree of mismatching, ii) evaluating the creep properties of weld repairs, iii) analysing creep behaviour of weld repair and providing necessary data for further reliable simulations of weld repair creep behaviour in long term service, and iv), simulating and assessing lifetime and creep damage evolution of weld repair. Weld repair using 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 consumables has been carried out in a service-exposed 10 CrMo 9 10 pipe. Creep specimens have been extracted from the service-exposed 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal (PM), from the virgin 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal (WM), from the virgin 13 CrMo 4 4 WM as well as from the virgin 15 Mo 3 WM. Iso-thermal uniaxial creep tests have been performed at 540 deg C in air. Pre- and post-metallography are carried out on the selected samples. FEM simulations using obtained creep data are executed. Pre-test metallography shows normal and acceptable weld repairs at given welding conditions. Creep tests demonstrate that the virgin 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 WMs have apparently longer creep lifetime than the service-exposed CrMo 9 10 PM at higher stresses than 110 MPa. Among the weld metals, the longest creep lifetime is found in 10 CrMo 9 10. Higher creep strength and lower creep strain rate in the weld metals indicate an overmatch weld. At 95 MPa, however, lifetime of 13 CrMo 4 4 WM is surprisingly short (factors which may shorten lifetime are discussed and one more test will start to verify creep strength at low stress) and tests are still running for other two weld metals. More results regarding low stress

  9. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate and Fracture Resistance of Heat Affected Zone of Stainless Steel Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Min U; Jang, Chang Heui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sun Young [Korea Laboratory Engineering System, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jun Seog [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In nuclear power plants, the automated narrow gap welding (NGW) technique has been widely used in joining stainless steel pipes in primary coolant system. As the primary system pipes are subjected to various transients during plant operation, cracks could initiate and propagate that would cause accidents. To prevent the cracking from developing into sudden failure in the primary system, leak-before-break (LBB) design concept has been developed and applied to many nuclear power plants. Meanwhile, to apply the LBB design, mechanical properties of the structural materials of piping systems should be evaluated, especially at weld zone and heat affected zone (HAZ), because mechanical properties within those regions show considerable scatter and spatial differences. In this study, fatigue crack grow rate (FCGR) and fracture resistance of base metal, weld zone, and HAZ of type 316L stainless steel narrow gap welds were performed at plant operating temperature (315 .deg. C) and room temperature. In particular, FCGR and fracture resistance of HAZ were evaluated in detail and compared to those of base metal

  10. Mitigating Abnormal Grain Growth for Friction Stir Welded Al-Li 2195 Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Russell, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Formability and abnormal grain growth (AGG) are the two major issues that have been encountered for Al alloy spun formed dome development using friction stir welded blanks. Material properties that have significant influence on the formability include forming range and strain hardening exponent. In this study, tensile tests were performed for two 2195 friction stir weld parameter sets at 400 F to study the effects of post weld anneal on the forming range and strain hardening exponent. It was found that the formability can be enhanced by applying a newly developed post weld anneal to heat treat the friction stir welded panels. This new post weld anneal leads to a higher forming range and much improved strain hardening exponent. AGG in the weld nugget is known to cause a significant reduction of ductility and fracture toughness. This study also investigated how AGG may be influenced by the heating rate to the solution heat treatment temperature. After post-weld annealing, friction stir welds were strained to 15% and 39% by compression at 400 F before they were subjected to SHT at 950 F for 1 hour. Salt bath SHT is very effective in reducing the grain size as it helps arrest the onset of AGG and promote normal recrystallization and grain growth. However, heat treating a 18 ft dome using a salt bath is not practical. Efforts are continuing at Marshall Space Flight Center to identify the welding parameters and heat treating parameters that can help mitigate the AGG in the friction stir welds.

  11. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija KOVACEVIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Presented are the basic analytical formulations for the definition of temperature fields. Analysis of influential parameters of welding FSW technology at the zone of the weld material and mechanical properties of the realized joint was performed. Influential welding parameters were defined based on tool geometry, technological parameters of processing and the axial load of tool. Specific problems with the FSW process are related to gaps (holes left behind by a tool at the end of the process and inflexibility of welding regarding the degree of variation of material thickness. Numerical simulation of process welding FSW proceeding was carried out on the example of Aluminum Alloy (AA 2219 using the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL (Transient Thermal software package. The defined was the temperature field in the welding process at specified time intervals.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10022

  12. Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    used parametrically for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar...regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional...projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification boundaries. In addition, the present study uses

  13. Electromagnetic experiment to map in situ water in heated welded tuff: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1987-03-16

    An experiment was conducted in Tunnel Complex G at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate geotomography as a possible candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Alterant tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for a vertical and a horizontal plane. After the 1 kilowatt heater was turned on, the tomographs indicated a rapid and strong drying adjacent to the heater. Moisture loss was not symmetric about the heater, but seemed to be strongly influenced by heterogeneity in the rock mass. The linear character of many tomographic features and their spatial correlation with fractures mapped in boreholes are evidence that drying was most rapid along some fractures. When the heater was turned off, an increase in moisture content occurred around the heater and along the dry fractures. However, this process is much slower and the magnitude of the moisture increase much smaller than the changes observed during heating of the rock. The interpretation of the tomographs is preliminary until they can be processed without the restrictive assumption of straight ray paths for the signals through the highly heterogeneous rock mass. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Coil Welding Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  15. Effects of heat input on the microstructure and toughness of the 8 MnMoNi 5 5 shape-welded nuclear steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Karl; Datta, Ratan; Zimmermann, Horst

    2005-04-01

    A weld metal well proven in the German nuclear industry served as the basis for the certification of a shape-welded steel to be used as base material for manufacture of nuclear primary components. The outstanding properties of this steel are attributed to the extremely fine-grained and stable primary microstructure. Subsequent reheating cycles caused by neighbouring weld beads do neither lead to coarsened brittle structures in the heat-affected zone nor to increase in hardness and decrease in toughness, as is the case with wrought steel materials. One of the largest new reactor vessel design amongst today's advanced reactor projects is considered to be particularly suitable for the use of shape-welded parts in place of forgings. In addition the need for design and development of new shape-welded steel grades for other new generation reactor projects is emphasized, in which the experience gained with this research could make a contribution.

  16. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  17. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  18. Effect of Welding Heat Input on Microstructure and Texture of Inconel 625 Weld Overlay Studied Using the Electron Backscatter Diffraction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Suk; Lee, Hae-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The grain size and the texture of three specimens prepared at different heat inputs were determined using optical microscopy and the electron backscatter diffraction method of scanning electron microscopy. Each specimen was equally divided into fusion line zone (FLZ), columnar dendrite zone (CDZ), and surface zone (SZ), according to the location of the weld. Fine dendrites were observed in the FLZ, coarse dendrites in the CDZ, and dendrites grew perpendicular to the FLZ and CDZ. As the heat input increased, the melted zone in the vicinity of the FLZ widened due to the higher Fe content. A lower image quality value was observed for the FLZ compared to the other zones. The results of grain size measurement in each zone showed that the grain size of the SZ became larger as the heat input increased. From the inverse pole figure (IPF) map in the normal direction (ND) and the rolling direction (RD), as the heat input increased, a specific orientation was formed. However, a dominant [001] direction was observed in the RD IPF map.

  19. Strength Evaluation of Heat Affected Zone in Electron Beam Welded ARAA for HCCR TBM in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J. S.; Kim, S. K.; Jin, H. G.; Lee, E. H.; Lee, D. W. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) has been developed for ITER, and Korean reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel, called advanced reduced activation alloy (ARAA), has also been developed for a structural material of the HCCR TBM. One case of limited optimized electron beam (EB) welding conditions was selected based on previous work, and the weldability of an EB weld was evaluated for TBM fabrication. The micro-hardness was measured from the base to the weld region, and the microstructures were also observed. A small punch (SP) test considering the HAZ was carried out at room and high (550 .deg. C) temperatures. The empirical mechanical properties of HAZ in the EB weld were evaluated, and the fracture behavior was investigated after the SP test. The SP results show that the estimated yield and tensile strength of the HAZ were higher than the base metal at both temperatures. Korean RAFM steel, ARAA, was developed as a TBM structural material. Using one of the program alloys in ARAA (F206), one case of a limited optimized EB welding condition was selected based on previous works, and the weldability of an EB weld using the SP test was evaluated for TBM fabrication at room and high (550 .deg. C) temperatures. From a micro-Vickers hardness evaluation, the HAZ gave the highest values compared with the other regions. The irregular grain boundaries in the HAZ were observed, but its width was narrower than the TIG weld from the previous results. The optimized welding methods such as the TIG, EB, and laser weld, and the welding procedure considering the PWHT are being established, and the weldability evaluation is also progressing according to the development of the ARAA for the fusion material application in Korea.

  20. Weld heat-affected zone in Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Part 1: Computer simulation of the effect of weld variables on the thermal cycles in the HAZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, A.K. [Naval Dockyard, Bombay (India). Naval Chemical and Metallurgical Lab.; Kulkarni, S.D.; Gopinathan, V. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Bombay (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering; Krishnan, R. [Gas Turbine Research Establishment, Bangalore (India)

    1995-09-01

    The weld thermal cycles encountered in the HAZ of titanium alloys have been characterized using modified Rosenthal equations. The results are shown in the form of axonometric plots depicting the effect of two weld variables keeping the other variables fixed. Computer simulation results show that the heat input and the plate thickness are the major variables affecting the thermal cycles in the HAZ. The effects of changes in welding speed are reflecting in the variation in the heat input. The electrode radius has minimal effect and can be termed as the minor variable. Preheat or interpass temperatures have an intermediate effect. An increase in electrode radius or decrease in plate thickness requires large apparent displacement of the heat source above the plate surface to be incorporated in the analytical solutions. The melt pool width increases sharply with an increase in the heat input (a/v) or a decrease in plate thickness (d); however, preheat temperature (T{sub 0}) has negligible effect. The effect of weld variables on the effective heat input is also similar. The t{sub 8/5} parameter increases sharply with reducing plate thickness or increasing heat input.

  1. XRD and TEM analysis of microstructure in the welding zone of 9Cr–1Mo–V–Nb heat-resisting steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li Yajiang; Wang Juan; Zhou Bing; Feng Tao

    2002-06-01

    Under the condition of tungsten inert gas shielded welding (TIG) + shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) technology, the microstructure in the welding zone of 9Cr–1Mo–V–Nb (P91) heat-resisting steel is studied by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The test results indicate that when the weld heat input () of TIG is 8.5 ∼ 11.7 kJ/cm and the weld heat input of SMAW is 13.3 ∼ 21.0 kJ/cm, the microstructure in the weld metal is composed of austenite and a little amount of ferrite. The substructure of austenite is crypto–crystal martensite, which included angle. There are some spot precipitates in the martensite base. TEM analysis indicates that the fine structure in the heat-affected zone is lath martensite. There are some carbides (lattice constant, 1.064 nm) at the boundary of grain as well as inside the grain, most of which are Cr23C6 and a little amount of (Fe, Me)23C6.

  2. 29 CFR 1919.16 - Heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Heat treatment. 1919.16 Section 1919.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.16 Heat treatment. (a) All chains...

  3. Thermal treatments effect on the austenite-ferrite equilibrium in a duplex stainless steel weld beads; Effet des traitements thermiques sur l equilibre austenite - ferrite dans un cordon de soudure en acier inoxydable duplex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkessa, Brahim; Badji, Riad; Bettahar, Kheireddine; Maza, Halim [Division de la Metallurgie et Mecanique. Centre de Recherche Scientifique et Technique en Soudage et Controle. B.P 64, Route de Dely Ibrahim, Cheraga, Alger (Algeria)

    2006-07-01

    Heat treatments in the temperature range between 800 to 1200 C, with a keeping at high temperature of 60 min, followed by a water quenching at 20 C, have been carried out on austeno-ferritic stainless steel welds (of type SAF 2205-UNS S31803). The heat treatments carried out at temperatures below 1000 C have modified the structure of the duplex stainless steel 2205 in inducing the formation of precipitates, identified by X-ray diffraction as being the intermetallic compound {sigma} and the chromium carbides M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The treatments applied to temperatures superior to 1000 C shift the {delta}-{gamma} equilibrium towards the {delta} phase. Indeed, the increase of the ferrite rate with the treatment temperature is approximately linear. The ferrite rates are higher in the heat-affected zone, which has been submitted to a ferritizing due to the welding thermal effects. (O.M.)

  4. Advances in the heat treatment of steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Kim, J.I.; Syn, C.K.

    1978-06-01

    A number of important recent advances in the processing of steels have resulted from the sophisticated uses of heat treatment to tailor the microstructure of the steels so that desirable properties are established. These new heat treatments often involve the tempering or annealing of the steel to accompish a partial or complete reversion from martensite to austenite. The influence of these reversion heat treatments on the product microstructure and its properties may be systematically discussed in terms of the heat treating temperature in relation to the phase diagram. From this perspective, four characteristic heat treatments are defined: (1) normal tempering, (2) inter-critical tempering, (3) intercritical annealing, and (4) austenite reversion. The reactions occurring during each of these treatments are described and the nature and properties of typical product microstructures discussed, with specific reference to new commercial or laboratory steels having useful and exceptional properties.

  5. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vargas-Arista

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughness and critical crack length, and a transgranular brittle final fracture with an area fraction of dimple zones connecting cleavage facets. A fractographic analysis proved that as the normalizing time increased the crack length decreased. The increase in the river patterns on the fatigue crack propagation in zone II was also evidenced and final brittle fracture because of transgranular quasicleavage was observed. Larger grains induced a deterioration of the fatigue resistance of the HAZ.

  6. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  7. Numerical modeling of two-dimensional heat-transfer and temperature-based calibration using simulated annealing optimization method: Application to gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelić Mišo B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation models of welding processes allow us to predict influence of welding parameters on the temperature field during welding and by means of temperature field and the influence to the weld geometry and microstructure. This article presents a numerical, finite-difference based model of heat transfer during welding of thin sheets. Unfortunately, accuracy of the model depends on many parameters, which cannot be accurately prescribed. In order to solve this problem, we have used simulated annealing optimization method in combination with presented numerical model. This way, we were able to determine uncertain values of heat source parameters, arc efficiency, emissivity and enhanced conductivity. The calibration procedure was made using thermocouple measurements of temperatures during welding for P355GH steel. The obtained results were used as input for simulation run. The results of simulation showed that represented calibration procedure could significantly improve reliability of heat transfer model. [National CEEPUS Office of Czech Republic (project CIII-HR-0108-07-1314 and to the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Serbia (project TR37020

  8. Infrared-Controlled Welding of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, R.; Finnell, S. E.; Decker, H. J.; Hodor, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed apparatus for welding large arrays of solar cells to flexible circuit substrates would sense infrared emission from welding spot. Emission would provide feedback for control of welding heat. Welding platform containing optical fibers moves upward through slots in movable holding fixture to contact solar cells. Fibers pick up infrared radiation from weld area.

  9. WOOD MODIFICATION BY HEAT TREATMENT: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M. Esteves

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Wood heat treatment has increased significantly in the last few years and is still growing as an industrial process to improve some wood properties. The first studies on heat treatment investigated mainly equilibrium mois-ture, dimensional stability, durability and mechanical properties. Mass loss, wettability, wood color, and chemical transformations have been subsequently extensively studied, while recent works focus on quality control, modeling, and study the reasons for the improvements. This review explains the recent interest on the heat treatment of wood and synthesizes the major publications on this subject on wood properties, chemical changes, wood uses, and quality control.

  10. Laser-welded V-Cr-Ti alloys: Microstructural and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Smith, D.L.; Sanders, P.G.; Leong, K.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    A systematic study has been initiated to examine the use of lasers to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the laser-welded materials. In addition, several post-welding heat treatments are being applied to the welded samples to evaluate their benefits, if any, to the structure and properties of the weldments. Hardness measurements are made across the welded regions of different samples to evaluate differences in the characteristics of various weldments.

  11. Heat transfer and fluid flow during keyhole mode laser welding of tantalum, Ti 6Al 4V, 304L stainless steel and vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, R.; Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.; Roy, T. Deb

    2007-09-01

    Because of the complexity of several simultaneous physical processes, most heat transfer models of keyhole mode laser welding require some simplifications to make the calculations tractable. The simplifications often limit the applicability of each model to the specific materials systems for which the model is developed. In this work, a rigorous, yet computationally efficient, keyhole model is developed and tested on tantalum, Ti-6Al-4V, 304L stainless steel and vanadium. Unlike previous models, this one combines an existing model to calculate keyhole shape and size with numerical fluid flow and heat transfer calculations in the weld pool. The calculations of the keyhole profile involved a point-by-point heat balance at the keyhole walls considering multiple reflections of the laser beam in the vapour cavity. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are then solved in three dimensions assuming that the temperatures at the keyhole wall reach the boiling point of the different metals or alloys. A turbulence model based on Prandtl's mixing length hypothesis was used to estimate the effective viscosity and thermal conductivity in the liquid region. The calculated weld cross-sections agreed well with the experimental results for each metal and alloy system examined here. In each case, the weld pool geometry was affected by the thermal diffusivity, absorption coefficient, and the melting and boiling points, among the various physical properties of the alloy. The model was also used to better understand solidification phenomena and calculate the solidification parameters at the trailing edge of the weld pool. These calculations indicate that the solidification structure became less dendritic and coarser with decreasing weld velocities over the range of speeds investigated in this study. Overall, the keyhole weld model provides satisfactory simulations of the weld geometries and solidification sub-structures for diverse engineering metals and alloys.

  12. Microstructural refinement of weld fusion zones in {alpha}-{beta} titanium alloys using pulsed current welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaresan, S.; Janaki Ram, G.D. [Indian Inst. of Technol., Chennai (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering; Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Defence Metallurgical Research Lab., Hyderabad (India)

    1999-04-01

    Pulsing of the welding current is one approach for refining the fusion zone grain structure in {alpha}-{beta} titanium alloy welds. This paper reports work in which gas tungsten-arc welds were produced in two {alpha}-{beta} titanium alloys under a variety of conditions including direct current (d.c.) pulsing and alternating current (a.c.) pulsing. The results show that, while d.c. pulsing did also refine the weld metal {beta} grain structure, the effect of a.c. pulsing was much greater. Current pulsing enhances fluid flow, reduces temperature gradients and causes a continual change in the weld pool size and shape. These effects, which are believed to be responsible for refining the solidification structure, are much stronger in a.c. pulsing than in d.c. pulsing. The observed grain refinement was shown to result in an appreciable increase in fusion zone tensile ductility. Post-weld heat treatment improved ductility both in pulsed and unpulsed welds, but pulsed welds showed greater tensile elongation even in the heat treated condition. (orig.) 27 refs.

  13. Design aspects of high strength steel welded structures improved by high frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Halid Can

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral study is concerned with the fatigue strength of welded steel structures which are improved by high frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) treatment. A comprehensive evaluation of 417 HFMI test data obtained from the literature and 24 HFMI fatigue data tested as a part of this work are studied. According to the statistical analyses an S-N slope of five (5) is proposed. A yield strength correction procedure which relates the material yield strength (fy) to fatigue is presented and ver...

  14. Characteristics of laser beam welds of age-hardenable 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2003-03-01

    Laser beam welding is attractive for joining age-hardenable aluminum alloys, because its low over-all heat input results in a narrow weld heat affected zone (HAZ), where softening caused by dissolution of age precipitates occurs. In the present work, 1mm-thick 6061-T6 aluminum alloy plates were welded using a 2.5 kW CO2 laser and it was experimentally proved that the width of the softened region in the laser beam weld was less than 1/7 that of a TIG weld. Moreover the hardness in the softened region of the laser beam weld was found to be almost fully recovered to the base metal hardness by applying a post-weld aging treatment at 443 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing unlike the TIG weld. These results characterize the advantage of laser beam welding in joining of the age-hardenable aluminum alloy as compared with the conventional arc welding. The hardness distributions in the HAZ were theoretically evaluated based on kinetic equations describing the dissolution of hardening β' (Mg2Si) precipitates and the precipitation of non-hardening β' (Mg2Si) precipitates during the weld thermal cycles to quantitatively prove above mentioned advantageous characteristics of laser beam welding.

  15. 46 CFR 56.85-5 - Heating and cooling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heating and cooling method. 56.85-5 Section 56.85-5... APPURTENANCES Heat Treatment of Welds § 56.85-5 Heating and cooling method. Heat treatment may be accomplished by a suitable heating method that will provide the desired heating and cooling rates, the...

  16. Effect of welding conditions on transformation and properties of heat-affected zones in LWR (light-water reactor) vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, C.D.; Mohammed, S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Welding Research and Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    The continuous cooling transformation behavior (CCT) and isothermal transformation (IT) behavior were determined for SA-508 and SA-533 materials for conditions pertaining to standard heat treatment and for the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The resulting diagrams help to select welding conditions that produce the most favorable microconstituent for the development of optimum postweld heat treatment (PWHT) toughness levels. In the case of SA-508 and SA-533, martensite responds more favorably to PWHT than does bainite. Bainite is to be avoided for the optimum toughness characteristics of the HAZ. The reheat cracking tendency for both steels was evaluated by metallographic studies of simulated HAZ structures subjected to PWHT cycles and simultaneous restraint. Both SA-533, Grade B, Class 1, and SA-508, Class 2, cracked intergranularly. The stress rupture parameter (the product of the stress for a rupture life of 10 min and the corresponding reduction of area) calculated for both steels showed that SA-508, Class 2, was more susceptible to reheat cracking than SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Cold cracking tests (Battelle Test and University of Tennessee modified hydrogen susceptibility test) indicated that a higher preheat temperature is required for SA-508, Class 2, to avoid cracking than is required for SA-533, Grade B, Class 1. Further, the Hydrogen Susceptibility Test showed that SA-508, Class 2, is more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than is SA-533, Grade B, Class 1.

  17. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  18. IIW recommendations for the HFMI treatment for improving the fatigue strength of welded joints

    CERN Document Server

    Marquis, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    This book of recommendations presents an overview of High Frequency Mechanical Impact (HFMI) techniques existing today in the market and their proper procedures, quality assurance measures and documentation. Due to differences in HFMI tools and the wide variety of potential applications, certain details of proper treatments and quantitative quality control measures are presented generally. An example of procedure specification as a quality assurance measure is given in the Appendix. Moreover, the book presents procedures for the fatigue life assessment of HFMI-improved welded joints based on nominal stress, structural hot spot stress and effective notch stress. It also considers the extra benefit that has been experimentally observed for HFMI-treated high-strength steels. The recommendations offer proposals on the effect of loading conditions like high mean stress fatigue cycles, variable amplitude loading and large amplitude/low cycle fatigue cycles. Special considerations for low stress concentration welded...

  19. Investigations into the microstructure-toughness relation in high frequency induction welded pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, O. E.; Thibaux, P.; Liebeherr, M. [ArcelorMittal Global RnD Ghent, Zelzate, (Belgium); Yan, P.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H. [Material Science and Mettalurgy, University of Cambridge, (United Kingdom); Quidord, D. [ArcelorMittal Commercial FCE, Fos-sur-Mer, (France)

    2010-07-01

    High frequency induction is frequently used in the production of longitudinally welded pipes for gas transmission but there is some concern about the lower toughness of the weld metal. The HFI welds require in-line post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) to ensure better weld properties. This study investigated the effect of the high frequency induction (HFI) welding process and in-line post-weld heat treatment on weld properties. Tests were performed on HFI welded X65 pipes with a diameter of 24''. Mechanical properties of the pipes were evaluated using Charpy impact (V-notch) and tensile tests before and after PWHT. The EBSD technique was used to study the microtexture and grain structure of the welds. The results showed that the toughness of the bond line after PWHT was sufficiently high, but it is still lower than that of the base material. The coarse crystallographic grain size at the junction of the welds was found to be one of the main reasons for the low toughness.

  20. Welding state of art for Eurofer 97 application to Tritium Blanket Module for ITER Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, P. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DM2S/DIR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Janin, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP/Gerailp), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Eurofer weldability must be established for data base assessment and TBM manufacturing support. Electron Beam, Hybrid (Laser combined with MIG/MAG), Laser and Narrow Gap TIG processes have been carried out on Eurofer samples from 0.5 mm to 40 mm. Electron Beam produces very narrow fusion zone width, in the range of 3 to 4 mm, that yields brittle joints with (5-ferrite. This process is considered only for low penetration depth (cooling plates). The other processes produce similar results, with attenuation or enhanced effects, depending on cooling rates and weld penetration depth. Pre- and post-heating have been applied on hybrid and laser welds. High hardness values, increasing brittleness and softening effects in the Heat Affected Zone are observed for each welding configuration that could signal creep problems. The Fusion Zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the Heat Affected Zones, martensite grains are observed with M23C6 carbide precipitation. Delta ferrite has been observed only in Electron Beam welds, due to very high cooling rate during the solidification phase, related to strong enhanced weld shape. Eurofer filler wire with optimized chemical composition is developed for producing welds with good properties. To restore properties after welding, PWHT seems is necessary and several treatments including one at 750 deg. C for 2 hours have been performed. Also tries is a re-austenisation treatment of 10 h at 1050 deg. C. affecting order to improve results, pre- and post-heating has been applied. The heating produced by the resistive heater was too low, and new welding tests are planned at higher temperatures (400 deg. C). However, the pre- and post-heating at higher temperatures will complicate manufacturing of TBM clamping For penetration depths below 10 mm, laser process is the reference method and TIG second. Distortion level performed by laser process is acceptable for manufacturing

  1. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Bead-on-plate and butt welds were previously performed to depths of about 4 mm with a 6-kW CO{sub 2} laser on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys. These welds were made at a speed of 0.042 m/s using argon purging at a flow rate of 2.8 m{sup 3}/s. The purge was distributed with a diffuser nozzle aimed just behind the laser beam during the welding operation. The fusion zones of welds made under these conditions consisted of very fine, needle-shaped grains and were also harder than the bulk metal (230-270 dph, compared to {approx}180 dph for the bulk metal). A limited number of impact tests showed that the as-welded ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) was above room temperature, but heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h in vacuum reduced the DBTT to <{minus}25{degrees}C. Activities during this reporting period focused on improvements in the purging system and determination of the effect of welding speed on welds. A 2-kW continuous YAG laser at Lumonics Corp. in Livonia, MI, was used to make 34 test welds for this study.

  2. Weld Bead Size, Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Zirconium Alloys Joints Welded by Pulsed Laser Spot Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chuang; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang; Peng, Genchen; Wang, Xian

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser spot welding of intersection points of zirconium alloys straps was performed. Weld bead size, microstructure and the corrosion behavior of weld bead were investigated. With the increasing laser peak power or number of shots, the weld width of the beads increased, the protrusion decreased and the dimple increased with further increase in heat input. The fusion zone consisted of a mixture of αZr and residual βZr phases. After annealing treatment, βNb and Zr(Fe, Nb)2 second phase particles were precipitated inter- and intragranular of αZr grains adequately. The oxide thickness of annealed weld bead was about 3.90 μm, decreased by about 18.1% relative to the 4.76 μm of as-welded specimen corroded at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 20 days. The corrosion resistance of annealed specimen was better than that of as-welded specimen, since the second phase particles exerted better corrosion resistance, and the content of Nb in βZr and the fraction of βZr decreased after the annealing treatment.

  3. Hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choong-Nyeon

    2000-12-01

    This study introduces the hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials and its applicability for practical use. This treatment is somewhat different from normal heat treatment because of the interaction between metal atoms and hydrogen. Since hydrogen can be removed very fast by pumping it out the hydrogen-induced new lattice phase which can not be obtained without hydrogen can be preserved in a meta-stable state. A thermodynamic interpretation of the hydrogen heat treatment established previously was reformulated for graphical and analytical methods and applied to Pd-Pt-H and Pd-Ag-H alloy systems and a fair correlation between the calculation and experimental results was shown. The feasibility of applying the thermodynamic interpretation to intermetallic compounds-hydrogen systems was also discussed.

  4. Transformation of coals at the heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.A. Aipshtein; V.I. Minaev; O.V. Barabanova; V.A. Novikova [Moscow State University of Mining (MSMU), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    The coals (from Kuznetsk and Donetsk basins) were selected with the following criteria: a) different rank; b) different genetic types. The substantial and chemical compositions of the coals were determined. Experimental works on coal heat treatment were carried out at temperatures 423K, 473K, 523K, 573K and different times of processing in the conditions excluding oxidation of coals. It was shown, that the prevailing contribution of destruction or cross-linking in the general process of coal transformation at the heat treatment depends on temperature and time of thermal treatment. It was shown that the depth and direction of coals transformations at the heat treatment essentially depended on the genetic type of coals. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Effects of heating and cooling rate on transformation behaviors in weld heat affected zone of low carbon steel; Teitanso koban no yosetsu netsu eikyobu no hentai kyodo ni oyobosu kanetsu reikyaku sokudo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanetsuki, Y.; Katsumata, M. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1998-01-25

    Discussions were given on effects of welding heat cycles on transformation behaviors in a weld heat affected zone (HAZ). Test pieces are low-carbon fine ferrite pearlite organization steel sheets, which have been treated with a thermomechanical control process (TMCP). The heat cycling was experimented at a maximum temperature of 1350 degC by using a high-frequency heating coil, heating rates from 0.15 to 200 degC/s, cooling rates from 10 to 80 degC/s at an elevated temperature region (higher than 900 degC), and transformation regions (lower than 900 degC) from 0.5 to 6 degC. A transformation curve in actual welding heat cycling was interpreted from these results. Shear-type inverse transformation (from ferrite to austenite) occurs in a rate region corresponding to the heating rate realized during welding. Austenite containing internal stress and a lower structure formed by this inverse transformation accelerates transformation into grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and acerous ferrite (AF). On the other hand, slow cooling in the elevated temperature region releases the internal stress, restores the lower structure, and suppresses the GBF and AF transformation. The GBF tends to precipitate pearlite in adjacent regions and deteriorates the HAZ tenacity. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Influence of pin structure on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded AA 6063 (AlMgSi 0.5) aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayer, S.; Ceyhun, V. [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, AA 6063 (AlMgSi0.5) Aluminum alloy plates were welded by a solid state welding procedure, friction stir welding (FSW). The influence of pin structure on the microstructure of the weld region and the mechanical properties of the joints were studied. It has been seen that the helical structure on pinscrew has an effective role on the formation of a zigzag line in the weld region. While rather long and uninterrupted zigzag lines in the weld region are obtained when right helical pinscrew is used, left helical pinscrew gave rise to shorter zigzag lines. While the zigzag line has no effect on the mechanical properties of the as-welded joint, heat treatment after the welding (PWHT) procedure seriously affects the strength of the joint due to the zigzag line formed in the weld region. The mechanical strength decreases with right helical pinscrew in PWHT, whereas, left helical pinscrew causes an increase in mechanical strength. (orig.)

  7. Influence of the post-weld surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel 1.4062

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemann, P.; Müller, C.; Baumann, O.; Modersohn, W.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    The duplex stainless steel 1.4062 (X2CrNiN22-2) is used as alternative material to austenitic stainless steels in the construction industry. The corrosion resistance of welded seams is influenced by the base material, the weld filler material, the welding process and also by the final surface treatment. The scale layer next to the weld seam can be removed by grinding, pickling, electro-polished or blasting depending on the application and the requested corrosion resistance. Blasted surfaces are often used in industrial practice due to the easier and cheaper manufacturing process compared to pickled or electro-polished surfaces. Furthermore blasting with corundum-grain is more effective than blasting with glass-beads which also lower the process costs. In recent years, stainless steel surfaces showed an unusually high susceptibility to pitting corrosion after grinding with corundum. For this reason, it is now also questioned critically whether the corrosion resistance is influenced by the applied blasting agent. This question was specifically investigated by comparing grinded, pickled, corundum-grain- and glass-bead-blasted welding seams. Results of the SEM analyses of the blasting agents and the blasted surfaces will be presented and correlated with the different performed corrosion tests (potential measurement, KorroPad-test and pitting potential) on welding seams with different surface treatments.

  8. Simulation of temperature field during direct-electrified heating for linear friction welded joint%线性摩擦焊接头通电热处理的温度场模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文亚; 吴辉

    2012-01-01

    The heat treatment of TC4 alloy linear friction welded joint by direct-electrified heating was simulated using the ABAQUS software.The temperature fields with different currents and the temperature variation at the characteristic points were obtained and analyzed.In order to verify the exactness of the calculation,electric heat treatment was conducted under the power supply of spot welding machine.During heat treatment,the variation of surface temperature was measured via infrared thermodetector.Comparing the calculations with experiments,it is found that the calculation results are in good agreement with the experiments,which means that the model can accurately predict the temperature field during electric heat treatment and provide basis for choosing reasonable parameters of electric heat treatment.%基于电流生热理论,使用ABAQUS软件对TC4钛合金线性摩擦焊接头的直接通电热处理过程进行了模拟,得出了不同电流下温度场的分布云图以及特征点的温度变化曲线。为验证模拟的准确性,在电阻点焊机电源下对线性摩擦焊接头进行了通电热处理,并运用红外设备对热处理过程中接头表面温度场进行了测量。通过模拟与试验对比,发现二者吻合性较好,说明该模型可正确预测通电热处理温度场,为合理选取通电热处理参数提供理论依据。

  9. Effect of electron beam welding on the microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Øien, Vegard

    2014-01-01

    The effect of electron beam welding on the precipitation strengthened Ni-base superalloys Inconel 718 and Custom Age 625 PLUS have been investigated. Solidification of the weld metal in these alloys terminates in a eutectic formation of γ/Laves in the interdendritic constituents. The formation is associated with the strong segregation behavior of the alloying element Nb during solidification. Post-weld heat treatments in the form of solution annealing and age hardening are normally used to di...

  10. Welding repair of a dissimilar weld and respective consequences for other German plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brummer, G. [High Energy Weapons (United States); Dauwel, W.; Wesseling, U. [Framatome ANP GmbH-NBTT, Erlangen (Germany); Ilg, U. [EnBW, Milano (Italy); Lauer, P.; Widera, M. [E.ON Kernkraft (Germany); Wachter, O. [RWE Power (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    During a regular refueling outage in a German nuclear power plant in year 2000, additional non-destructive examinations have been performed on request of the Authority, to fulfill some recommendations of the independent experts with regard to the retrospective application of the Basic Safety Concept for the ferritic main coolant piping of this plant. During these inspections, indications were found in a dissimilar weld between one of the fifteen MCL (main coolant lines) nozzles and the ECC (emergency core cooling) system piping. By means of on-site metallography and laboratory investigations on three boat samples taken from this weld, it could be shown that the indications were due to hot cracking in the surface layer of the weld. In the course of these investigations, at three locations at the circumference of the weld, dis-bonding defects were found between the ferritic base metal of the nozzle and the austenitic weld butter, which has been applied to join the nozzle to the austenitic safe-end. According to the results of the extensive investigations, the dis-bonding occurred during the manufacturing process after stress-relief heat-treatment of the buttering during the welding of the austenitic safe-end to the butter material. There was no evidence for any crack growth during operation of the plant. Due to the large size of the boat-samples, a weld repair was mandatory. This repair has been performed using the so-called temper-bead technique as specified in the ASME Code, without subsequent stress relief heat treatment, using an advanced automatic orbital TIG welding process. The welding has been successfully performed without the need of further repair work. For those dissimilar welds, all other plants, except one, had used Inconel welding material for buttering the ferritic nozzle instead of stainless steel welding metal. For metallurgical reasons, dis-bonding along the fusion line for Inconel buttered dissimilar welds is unlikely to occur. Nevertheless all

  11. Evaluation of crack arrest fracture toughness of parent plate, weld metal and heat affected zone of BIS 812 EMA ship plate steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, I. A.

    1993-10-01

    The steel chosen for the pressure hull of the Collins class submarine has undergone evaluation to compare the crack arrest fracture toughness, K(Ia), of the parent plate with that of weld metal and heat affected zone. The tests were conducted over a range of subzero temperatures on specimens slightly outside the ASTM standard test method specimen configuration. Shallow face grooved specimens were used to vary the propagating crack velocity from that of non face grooved specimens and determine if K(Ia), is sensitive to changes in crack velocity. The weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ), and parent plate were assessed to determine if the welding process had a deleterious effect on the crack arrest properties of this particular steel. Tests on each of these regions revealed that, for the combination of parent plate, welding procedure and consumables, no adverse effect on crack arrest properties was encountered. Crack arrest fracture toughness of the weld metal and HAZ was superior to that of the parent plate at comparable temperatures.

  12. Cast functional accessories for heat treatment furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Drotlew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The study gives examples of the cast functional accessories operating in furnaces for the heat treatment of metals and alloys. The describeddesign solutions of castings and their respective assemblies are used for charge preparation and handling. They were put in systematicorder depending on furnace design and the technological purpose of heat treatment. Basic grades of austenitic cast steel, used for castings of this type, were enumerated, and examples of general guidelines formulated for their use were stated. The functional accessories described in this study were designed and made by the Foundry Research Laboratory of West Pomeranian University of Technology.

  13. 49 CFR 179.500-6 - Heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heat treatment. 179.500-6 Section 179.500-6...-6 Heat treatment. (a) Each necked-down tank shall be uniformly heat treated. Heat treatment shall... treatment of alternate steels shall be approved. All scale shall be removed from outside of tank to...

  14. 49 CFR 179.220-11 - Postweld heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postweld heat treatment. 179.220-11 Section 179... Postweld heat treatment. (a) Postweld heat treatment of the inner container is not a specification requirement. (b) Postweld heat treatment of the cylindrical portions of the outer shell to which the...

  15. Electron microscopy and microanalysis of steel weld joints after long time exposures at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandová, D.; Kasl, J.; Rek, A.

    2010-02-01

    The structural changes of three trial weld joints of creep resistant modified 9Cr-1Mo steels and low alloyed chromium steel after post-weld heat treatment and long-term creep tests were investigated. Smooth cross-weld specimens ruptured in different zones of the weld joints as a result of different structural changes taking place during creep exposures. The microstructure of the weld joint is heterogeneous and consequently microstructural development can be different in the weld metal, the heat affected zone, and the base material. Precipitation reactions, nucleation and growth of some particles and dissolution of others, affect the strengthening of the matrix, recovery at high temperatures, and the resulting creep resistance. Therefore, a detailed study of secondary phase's development in individual zones of weld joints can elucidate mechanism of cracks propagation in specific regions and the causes of creep failure. Type I and II fractures in the weld metal and Type IV fractures in the fine prior austenite grain heat affected zones occurred after creep tests at temperatures ranging from 525 to 625 °C and under stresses from 40 to 240 MPa. An extended metallographic study of the weld joints was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive and wave-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were prepared from individual weld joint regions and quantitative evaluation of dislocation substructure and particles of secondary phases has been performed.

  16. Local Laser Heat Treatments of Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Hietala, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.

    In this work UHS structural and abrasion resistant (AR) steels were heat treated with a single 4 kW Yb: YAG-laser beam. Aim of the softening heat treatments was to enhance the formability locally with minimized strength lose. 1.8 mm thick B24CR boron steel was used for hardening tests. Study presents the possibilities and limitations in laser processing showing that a single laser beam is suitable for heat treating of sheets through the whole cross-section up to the thickness of 6 mm. In the case of the 6 mm thick sheets, the achieved maximum temperature in the cross-section varies as a function of the depth. Consequently, the microstructure and mechanical properties differ between the surfaces and the center of the cross-section (layered microstructure). For better understanding, all layers were tested in tensile tests. The 10 mm thick sheet was heat treated separately on the both surfaces by heating to a lower temperature range to produce a shallow tempered layer. The tensile and bendability tests as well as hardness measurements indicated that laser heat treatment can be used to highly improve the bendability locally without significant strength losses. Laser process has been optimized by transverse scanning movement and with a simple FE-model.

  17. Creep properties and simulation of weld repaired low alloy heat resistant CrMo and Mo steels at 540 deg C. Sub-project 2 - Ex-serviced 2.25Cr1M0 weld metal and cross weld repairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld; Feilitzen, Carl von

    2007-12-15

    Weld repair has been carried out in an ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 pipe by using 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 consumables. Application of current welding procedure and consumables results in an over matched weld repair. This is verified by both creep tests and the creep simulations at even lower stresses than tested. Creep specimens have been extracted from ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal (PM) and weld metal (WM), from virgin 10 CrMo 9 10 WM, from virgin 13 CrMo 4 4 WM, and from virgin 15 Mo 3 WM. In addition, cross weld specimens including weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal have been taken from the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 weld joint, and from three weld repairs. In total, there are nine test series. The sequence of creep lifetime at 540 deg C at given stresses is; virgin 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal > virgin 15 Mo 3 weld metal approx virgin 13 CrMo 4 4 weld metal approx ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal >> ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal > ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 cross weld approx 10 CrMo 9 10 cross weld repair approx 13 CrMo 4 4 cross weld repair approx and 15 Mo 3 cross weld repair. All the series show good creep ductility. The ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal shows a creep lifetime about one order of magnitude shorter than that for both the virgin parent metal and the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal, independent of stresses. Differences in creep lifetime among the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 cross weld and other cross weld repairs are negligible, simply because rupture always occurred in the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal, approximately 10 mm from HAZ, for all the cross welds. Necking is frequently observed in the ex-serviced 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal at the opposite side of the fracture. Creep damage to a large and a small extend is found adjacent to the fracture and at the necking area, respectively. Other parts of the weld joint like weld metal and HAZ are damage-free, independent of stress, weld metal and

  18. Waste Water Treatment after Removal of Thermic Oxides from Stainless Steel Welding Joints

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This work describes chemical methods of removal of thermic oxides from stainless steel welding joints, as well as waste water treatment. Thermal oxides were removed from the stainless steel surface using chemical and electrochemical procedures. A pickling paste that contains HNO3 and HF in different ratios was used for chemical cleansing of thermal oxides (A, B, and C). Electrochemical removal was done using an apparatus Magic Cleaner, and as electrolyte a solution H2SO4+H3PO4 was used. Conce...

  19. Research for Multiple-electrode Submerged Arc Welding Process with Low Heat Input%低热输入多丝埋弧焊工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宏; 田鹏; 宗秋丽; 刘振伟; 纪鹏蕊

    2016-01-01

    研究开发出了一种新型高强度、 大壁厚UOE钢管埋弧焊工艺.该工艺采用小直径焊丝作为多丝焊的前丝(第1丝),将焊接热输入降低25%,细化了热影响区原始奥氏体的晶粒尺寸,从而提高了API X65钢级大壁厚管线钢管焊缝热影响区的韧性.试验结果表明,该工艺可以实现焊接接头完全焊透,同时具有充足的熔敷金属,达到了与传统方法相同的熔深.通过超声波和射线检测,焊缝均未发现未焊透、 夹渣等焊接缺陷,焊缝形貌良好.%It developed a new submerged arc welding (SAW) process for high-strength and heavy wall thickness UOE pipes. A new SAW process which can reduce heat input of 25% due to its high deposition rate and deep penetration is performed with multiple electrode SAW using small diameter welding wire on lead electrode. The results show that improvement of heat affected zone(HAZ) toughness in seam welding on API X65 heavy wall linepipe and refinement of prior austenite grain size in HAZ was achieved in order to reduce its heat input by the new process. This process can achieve full penetration of welded joint, has plenty of deposited metal, which can obtain the same penetration as the traditional method. By ultrasonic and X-ray testing, not found defects in weld such as lack of penetration, slag and so on, the weld appearance is good.

  20. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow during double-sided laser beam welding of T-joints for aluminum aircraft fuselage panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibin; Tao, Wang; Li, Liqun; Chen, Yanbin; Shi, Chunyuan

    2017-06-01

    In comparison with conventional laser beam welding, double-sided laser beam welding has two laser heat sources simultaneously and symmetrically loaded from both sides makes it to be a more complicated coupled heat transport and fluid flow process. In this work, in order to understand the heat transfer and fluid flow, a three-dimensional model was developed and validated with the experimental results. The temperature field, fluid flow field, and keyhole characteristic were calculated using the developed model by FLUENT software. Calculated results indicated that the temperature and fluid flow fields were bilateral symmetry along the stringer center, and the molten pool maximum length was located near the keyhole intersection position. The skin side had higher temperature and faster cooling speed. Several characteristic flow patterns in the weld pool cross section, including the vortexes flows near the keyhole opening position, the convection flows above the keyhole intersection location, the regularity downward flows at the molten pool bottom. And in the lengthwise section, a distinct vortex flow below the keyhole, and the liquid metal behind the keyhole first flowed to near the molten pool maximum length location and then to the molten pool surface. Perpendicular to and along welding direction the keyhole liquid metal flowed to the weld molten pool surface and around the keyhole, respectively. The special temperature fields and fluid flow patterns were closely related to the effects of the double sides' laser energy coupling and enhancement. The calculated weld pool geometry basically in good agreement with the experimental results indicated that the developed model was validity and reasonable.

  1. Thermal Aging Effects on Residual Stress and Residual Strain Distribution on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Junhyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consisting of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, has been widely used as a joining material of the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its good mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance. Residual tensile stress is mainly nominated as a cause of SCC in light water reactors by IAEA report. So, to relax the residual stress, post-weld heat treatment is required after manufacturing process such as welding. However, thermal treatment has a great effect on the microstructure and the chromium depletion profile on Alloy 600, so called sensitization. By this reason, HAZ on Alloy 600 is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al., Crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions. And according to Z.P. Lu et al., CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. There are some methods to measure the exact value of residual stress on the material surface. The most common way is X-ray diffraction method (XRD). The principle of XRD is based on lattice strains and depends on the changes in the spacing of the atomic planes in material. And there is a computer simulation method to estimate residual stress distribution which is called ANSYS. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects residual stress and residual strain distribution of Alloy 600 HAZ. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. According to preceding researches and this study, both the relaxation of residual stress and the change of residual strain follow as similar way, spreading out from concentrated region. The result of Vickers micro-hardness tester shows that tensile residual stresses are distributed broadly on the material aged by 15 years. Therefore, HT400{sub Y}15 material is weakest state for PWSCC. The

  2. Effects of Induction Heat Bending and Heat Treatment on the Boric Acid Corrosion of Low Alloy Steel Pipe for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Kim, Young-Sik [Andong National University, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun-Young; Park, Heung-Bae [KEPCO EandC, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi-Ho; Shin, Min-Chul [Sungil SIM Co. Ltd, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In many plants, including nuclear power plants, pipelines are composed of numerous fittings such as elbows. When plants use these fittings, welding points need to be increased, and the number of inspections also then increases. As an alternative to welding, the pipe bending process forms bent pipe by applying strain at low or high temperatures. This work investigates how heat treatment affects on the boric acid corrosion of ASME SA335 Gr. P22 caused by the induction heat bending process. Microstructure analysis and immersion corrosion tests were performed. It was shown that every area of the induction heat bent pipe exhibited a high corrosion rate in the boric acid corrosion test. This behavior was due to the enrichment of phosphorous in the ferrite phase, which occurred during the induction heat bending process. This caused the ferrite phase to act as a corrosion initiation site. However, when re-heat treatment was applied after the bending process, it enhanced corrosion resistance. It was proved that this resistance was closely related to the degree of the phosphorus segregation in the ferrite phase.

  3. Microstructure and fatigue crack growth behaviour of electron beam welding in 30CrMnSiNi2A steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈芙蓉; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 张莉; 刘方军; 陈刚

    2003-01-01

    The effects of two post-weld heat treatment processes on the microstructure and fatigue properties of the electron beam welded joints of 30CrMnSiNi2A steel were studied. Electron beam local post-weld heat treatment (EBLPWHT), in a vacuum chamber, immediately after welding and a traditional furnace whole post-weld heat treatment (FWPWHT) were accepted. The experimental results show that, after EBLPWHT, the main microstructure of weld is changed from coarse acicular martensite into lath martensite, and base metal is changed from ferrite and perlite into upper bainite and residual austenite, however the microstructures of different zones of joints in FWPWHT conditions are tempered sorbite. The fatigue crack growth rate da/dN of welds and base metal are not obviously changed among EBLPWHT, FWPWHT test and as-welded (AW) test, as the mechanical properties of materials have a certain but not large effect on the da/dN of welded joints. The resistance to near threshold fatigue crack growth data of welded joints can be largely improved by EBLPWHT and it is related to microstructure and crack closure effect.

  4. In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-07

    Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

  5. Empleo de explosivos en el alivio de tensiones residuales de la zona de influencia térmica de uniones soldadas Use of explosives in the reduction of residual stresses in the heated zone of welded unions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Garcia-Jacomino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available En el trabajo es estudiado el efecto del tratamiento con explosivos sobre las tensiones residuales de uniones soldadas de aceros al carbono. Se analizan dos modos de disposición de la carga explosiva (disposición lineal y disposición sinusoidal. Como resultado se obtiene que el tratamiento con explosivo por cualquiera de los dos métodos de colocación de carga ofrece un alivio de tensiones en el entorno de 50 - 60 %, demostrándose así la viabilidad del método para aumentar la fiabilidad de las uniones soldadas. Se concluye también que la disposición sinusoidal resulta más ventajosa al requerir de menor cantidad de carga explosiva.In this paper, the effect of explosive charges as a method to reduce the residual stresses in the heated zone of welded unions was studied. A comparative analysis of two geometries of the explosive charge applied on welded unions was made: linear and sinusoidal. The comparative results obtained before and after the explosive treatment demonstrate its effectiveness by the reduction of the residual stresses. Residual stress reduction ranged in the order of 50 and 60%, confirming that explosive treatment offers a viable solution to extend the life of the welded unions.

  6. Precipitation of Niobium Boride Phases at the Base Metal/Weld Metal Interface in Dissimilar Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Výrostková, Anna; Kepič, Ján; Homolová, Viera; Falat, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the analysis of failure mechanism in the heat affected zone is described in dissimilar weld joints between advanced martensitic steel T92 and Ni-base weld metal. The joints were treated with two different post-weld heat treatments and tested. For the creep, tensile, and Charpy impact tests, the samples with interfacially located notch were used. Moreover long term aging at 625 °C was applied before the tensile and notch toughness tests. Decohesion fractures ran along carbides at the T92 BM/WM interfaces in case of the modified PWHT, whereas type IV cracking was the prevailing failure mechanism after the classical PWHT in the creep test. In the notch tensile and Charpy impact tests, with the notch at T92 base metal/weld metal interface, fractures ran along the interface with a hard phase on the fracture surface along with the ductile dimple and brittle quasi-cleavage fracture. The phase identified as niobium boride (either NbB and/or Nb3B2) was produced during welding at the end of the solidification process. It was found in the welds regardless of the post-weld heat treatment and long-term aging.

  7. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure.

  8. The Influence of Weld Metal Alloying Additions to Extend the Heat Input Range for the Submerged Arc Welding of High Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-16

    in the weld metal is planned to be two fold. First, the for- mation of niobium carbide precipitates is expected to reduce the amount of free carbon...and niobium carbide ) in the matrix and more uniform mechanical proper- ties are anticipated. Second, The combination of two kinds of precipitates...produced by a consumables manufacturer) will be used to generate welds for mechanical and impact toughness data. Additionally, the e-copper and niobium

  9. Structure and Properties of `Steel 08kp + ChNMSh Iron' Bimetal Obtained by Explosion Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, I. V.

    2017-05-01

    The structure of a bimetal from structural steel 08kp and low-alloy iron ChNMSh obtained by explosion welding is studied. The effect of different heat treatments on the structure and properties of the bimetal is determined, and expedient modes of heat treatment for reliving the internal stresses in the zone of joining, which do not worsen the operating properties of the welded materials, are suggested.

  10. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour of gas tungsten arc welds of maraging steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. MADHUSUDHAN REDDY; K. SRINIVASA RAO

    2015-01-01

    Superior properties of maraging steels make them suitable for the fabrication of components used for military applications like missile covering, rocket motor casing and ship hulls. Welding is the main process for fabrication of these components, while the maraging steels can be fusion welded using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. All these fabricated components require longer storage life and a major problem in welds is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The present study is aimed at studying the SCC behaviour of MDN 250 (18%Ni) steel and its welds with respect to microstructural changes. In the present study, 5.2 mm thick sheets made of MDN 250 steel in the solution annealed condition was welded using GTAW process. Post-weld heat treatments of direct ageing (480 ?C for 3 h), solutionizing (815 ?C for 1 h) followed by ageing and homogenizing (1150 ?C for 1 h) followed by ageing were carried out. A mixture of martensite and austenite was observed in the microstructure of the fusion zone of solutionized and direct aged welds and only martensite in as-welded condition. Homogenization and ageing treatment have eliminated reverted austenite and elemental segregation. Homogenized welds also exhibited a marginal improvement in the corrosion resistance compared to those in the as-welded, solutionized and aged condition. Constant load SCC test data clearly revealed that the failure time of homogenized weld is much longer compared to other post weld treatments, and the homogenization treatment is recommended to improve the SCC life of GTA welds of MDN 250 Maraging steel.

  11. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour of gas tungsten arc welds of maraging steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Madhusudhan Reddy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior properties of maraging steels make them suitable for the fabrication of components used for military applications like missile covering, rocket motor casing and ship hulls. Welding is the main process for fabrication of these components, while the maraging steels can be fusion welded using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. All these fabricated components require longer storage life and a major problem in welds is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC. The present study is aimed at studying the SCC behaviour of MDN 250 (18% Ni steel and its welds with respect to microstructural changes. In the present study, 5.2 mm thick sheets made of MDN 250 steel in the solution annealed condition was welded using GTAW process. Post-weld heat treatments of direct ageing (480 °C for 3 h, solutionizing (815 °C for 1 h followed by ageing and homogenizing (1150 °C for 1 h followed by ageing were carried out. A mixture of martensite and austenite was observed in the microstructure of the fusion zone of solutionized and direct aged welds and only martensite in as-welded condition. Homogenization and ageing treatment have eliminated reverted austenite and elemental segregation. Homogenized welds also exhibited a marginal improvement in the corrosion resistance compared to those in the as-welded, solutionized and aged condition. Constant load SCC test data clearly revealed that the failure time of homogenized weld is much longer compared to other post weld treatments, and the homogenization treatment is recommended to improve the SCC life of GTA welds of MDN 250 Maraging steel.

  12. Thermal Recovery of Plastic Deformation in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Dongxiao [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Yu, Xinghua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhang, Wei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Crooker, Paul [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); David, Stan A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-05-23

    Stainless steel has been widely used in challenging environments typical to nuclear power plant structures, due its excellent corrosion resistance. Nickel filler metals containing high chromium concentration, including Alloy 82/182, are used for joining stainless steel to carbon steel components to achieve similar high resistance to stress corrosion cracking. However, the joint usually experience weld metal stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which affects the safety and structural integrity of light water nuclear reactor systems. A primary driving force for SCC is the high tensile residual stress in these welds. Due to large dimension of pressure vessel and limitations in the field, non-destructive residual stress measurement is difficult. As a result, finite element modeling has been the de facto method to evaluate the weld residual stresses. Recent studies on this subject from researchers worldwide report different residual stress value in the weldments [5]. The discrepancy is due to the fact that most of investigations ignore or underestimate the thermal recovery in the heat-affect zone or reheated region in the weld. In this paper, the effect of heat treatment on thermal recovery and microhardness is investigated for materials used in dissimilar metal joint. It is found that high equivalent plastic strains are predominately accumulated in the buttering layer, the root pass, and the heat affected zone, which experience multiple welding thermal cycles. The final cap passes, experiencing only one or two welding thermal cycles, exhibit less plastic strain accumulation. Moreover, the experimental residual plastic strains are compared with those predicted using an existing weld thermo-mechanical model with two different strain hardening rules. The importance of considering the dynamic strain hardening recovery due to high temperature exposure in welding is discussed for the accurate simulation of weld residual stresses and plastic strains. In conclsuion, the

  13. The effect of electron beam welding on the creep rupture properties of a Nb-Zr-C alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.; Titran, R. H.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    Creep rupture tests of electron beam welded PWC-11 sheet were conducted at 1350 K. Full penetration, single pass welds were oriented transverse to the testing direction in 1 mm thick sheet. With this orientation, stress was imposed equally on the base metal, weld metal, and heat-affected zone. Tests were conducted in both the postweld annealed and aged conditions. Unwelded specimens with similar heat treatments were tested for comparative purposes. It was found that the weld region is stronger than the base metal for both the annealed and aged conditions and that the PWC-11 material is stronger in the annealed condition than in the aged condition.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical property in heat affected zone (HAZ in F82H jointed with SUS316L by fiber laser welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical property in heat affected zone (HAZ between F82H and SUS316L jointed by 4 kW fiber laser welding at different parameters such as laser scan rate and beam position. OM/FE-SEM observation, EPMA analysis and nano-indentation hardness test were utilized to characterize the microstructure and evaluate the mechanical property. Results show that the HAZ width is dependent on the welding condition. The precipitation of M23C6 particle in HAZ is found to be closely related to the distance from WM/HAZ interface. Decrease in Cr and C concentration in M23C6 depended on the welding condition; the decrease was relatively milder in the case of shifting the beam position to SUS side. Furthermore, the rapid increment in nano-indentation hardness, i.e. ≈2500 MPa, at HAZ/F82H interface was observed regardless of welding parameters. The temperatures at HAZ/F82H interface were estimated from Cr and C concentration change of M23C6 by EPMA. It was revealed that the temperature of HAZ/F82H interface increased with increasing HAZ width, and that the presence of over-tempered HAZ (THAZ region is confirmed only in the specimens welded right on the F82H/SUS interface (no-shift at the laser scan rate of 3 m/min.

  15. Development of Technology and Equipment of the Automated Laser Welding for Manufacturing Heat Exchanger Details of Marine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelyagin, V.D.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the developed automated laser welding technology for flat tubes of copper-nickel alloys laser welding complex technological equipment, which can be applied on the enterprises of machine building, aerospace, shipbuilding and automobile industries, was designed and created. To control the integrity of welded flat tubes a technique, which consists in testing sample pressure and finding defective sections by laser interferometry in the automated mode, was developed. Specialized welding head was designed and manufactured for the industrial use of the developed laser welding technology.

  16. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  17. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  18. E-beam welding characteristic of the ARAA steel for the KO HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jae Sung; Kim, Suk-Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To develop the next generation technologies, the one of the important objects of ITER project is to investigate the heat extraction from the blanket module in a fusion reactor and tritium extraction experiments. Korea has decided to test a helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) in the ITER. The HCCR TBM is composed of four sub-modules and a back manipulator (BM). And each sub-module is composed of a first wall (FW), a breeding box with s even-layer breeding zone (BZ), and side walls (SW) with the cooling path. In addition, Korea is being developed and evaluated advanced reduced activation alloy (ARAA) material as the HCCR TBM structure. In this study, two thickness of ARAA plates, 8 and 13 mm, were carried out by electron beam (E-beam) weld to optimize the welding procedure considering weld speed and current, and investigated the variations in the weld bead width, an amount of dross, and the weld depth in both ARAA plates to optimize the fabrication procedure. Moreover, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions were also carried out considering a different temperature and a cooling time. The micro-hardness measurements and Charpy Impact test in Base, heat affected zone (HAZ), and weld metal (WM) were carried out on E-beam welded joints after PWHT. The microstructural observation in the E-beam weld joints was also analyzed before and after PWHT condition. The purpose of this study is to find the optimized Ebeam weld condition, and analyze the mechanical properties and the influence of microstructure by Ebeam weld of ARAA materials. To optimize the E-beam welding procedure from ARAA material, two kinds of ARAA plates, 8 and 13 mm, were prepared and carried out E-beam weld considering the weld speed and the current, and investigated the variations in the weld bead width, an amount of dross, and the weld depth. Based on the results 1200 mm/min of welding speed and 65 mA current in 8 mm thickness and 110 mA weld current in 13 mm thickness in

  19. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  20. Heat Treatment of the Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo; Beom; Eom; Seongwoo; Yoo; Jinchae; Kim; Hokyung; Kim; Un-Chul; Paek; Byeong; Ha; Lee

    2003-01-01

    We report heat treatment of the photonic crystal fiber. As the temperature was increased, the transmission of the photonic crystal fiber was increased, unlike conventional single mode fiber. The transmission increase at short wavelength region was larger than long wavelength region for the various temperatures. After crystallization of the silica glass, the spectra of the photonic crystal fiber were just decreased at all wavelength regions, but, in case of the single mode fiber, the absorption in visibl...

  1. The Effect of Ultrasonic Impact Treatment on the Fatigue Resistance of Friction Stir Welded Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodopoulos, C. A.; Pantelakis, Sp. G.; Papadopoulos, M. P.

    2009-12-01

    In this work, the results of an experimental study for assessing the effects of Ultrasonic Impact Treatment on the fatigue resistance of Friction Stir Welded aluminum alloy panels are presented. Although the significant compressive residual stress introduced on the material by ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) was expected to cause retardation in the crack growth rate, this was only noted at low initial Δ Κ values. At high Δ Κ values, the effect of UIT practically diminishes. The phenomenon was attributed to the relaxation/redistribution of the residual stresses with fatigue damage. This provides an alarming situation where damage tolerance design relies on models where only the initial residual stress profile is taken into account without knowledge of the potential re-distribution of the residual stresses caused by the fatigue damage accumulation. The findings of this work also indicate that any FCG tests performed can only be considered as case-specific and conclusions can only be drawn for the case studied.

  2. Evaluating the Heat Pump Alternative for Heating Enclosed Wastewater Treatment Facilities in Cold Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    AD-A1uG 385 COLD RE61ONS RESEARCH AND ENGINEERING LAS HANOVER NH F/e 13/1 EVALUATING THE HEAT PUMP ALTERNATIVE FOR HEATING ENCLOSED WASTE--ETC(U) NAT...1982Enginee Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory Evaluating the heat pump alternative for heating enclosed wastewater treatment facilities in...COVERED EVALUATING; THlE HEAT PUMP ALTERNATIVE FOR HEATING ENCLOSED WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACI~IITIES IN COLD REGIONS 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7

  3. Experimental and simulation studies on laser conduction welding of AA5083 aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, M. J.; Lamas, M. I.; Yáñez, A.; Sánchez-Amaya, J. M.; Boukha, Z.; Botana, F. J.

    In this paper, a three-dimensional numerical model was developed to study laser welding in an aluminium alloy (AA5083). The CFD model was used to solve the governing equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy, so as to obtain the morphology, velocity field and temperature field of the melted zone in steady state. The predicted dimensions of the weld pool agreed well with experimental results obtained on laser conduction welding with a (CW) high power diode laser. The study allowed to determine the effect of different surface treatment (sandblasting, black painting) on the laser absorptivity of the alloy and analyze the heat transfer mechanism within the weld pool.

  4. High-cycle Fatigue Properties of Alloy718 Base Metal and Electron Beam Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Nagashima, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Hideshi; Ogata, Toshio; Nagao, Naoki

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Alloy 718 plate and its electron beam (EB) welded joint were investigated at 293 K and 77 K under uniaxial loading. At 293 K, the high-cycle fatigue strength of the EB welded joint with the post heat treatment exhibited somewhat lower values than that of the base metal. The fatigue strengths of both samples basically increased at 77 K. However, in longer life region, the EB welded joint fractured from a blow hole formed in the welded zone, resulting in almost the same fatigue strength at 107 cycles as that at 293 K.

  5. Welding Metallurgy and Processing Issues for Joining of Power Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienert, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, Patrick T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    Weldability issues with the pertinent alloys have been reviewed and preliminary results of our work on Haynes 25 have been presented. Further results on the mechanical properties and metallography on the EB welds are imminent. Hot-ductility experiments will commence within a few weeks. Aging studies on the effects of heat treatment using the Gleeble are also planned. MST-6 has extensive background in the welding metallurgy of the pertinent alloys. We also have considerable experience with the various welding processes to be used.

  6. Study of fatigue behavior of longitudinal welded pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, P.; Dia, V.; Istrate, B.; Hrituleac, G.; Hrituleac, I.; Munteanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    During transport and storage of the various fluids, welded pipes are subjected to cyclic loading due to pressure fluctuations that often exceed the prescribed values for normal operation. These cyclic loading can significantly reduce the life of the pipes; as a result the design should be based on the fatigue strength not only on static resistance. In general the fatigue strength of pipes is dependent by strength, pipe geometry and surface quality. In case of the electric longitudinal welded pipes, the fatigue strength is significantly limited by concentration of residual stress and the size of existing defects in the weld seam. This paper presents the fatigue behaviour of the electric welded pipes by high frequency, under conditions that simulate real operating conditions pipes. Fatigue testing was performed on welded pipes made of micro alloyed carbon steels. Some of these pipes were previously subjected to a heat treatment of normalization, in order to also determine the influence of heat treatment on the fatigue strength of welded pipes. To determine and correlate the different factors affecting the fatigue strength, welded pipes were also subjected to various tests: tensile tests, impact tests, measurement of micro hardness, microstructural analysis by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Numerical simulation of the Iiquating behavior of niobium carbide in heat-affected-zone during welding of a superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Shaoqing; LI Xiaohong

    2007-01-01

    In order to predict the propensity of a superalloy to beat-affected-zone (HAZ) liquation cracking, Visual FOR-TRAN procedures were developed based on a heat transfer and mass diffusion model and the constitutional liquation of precipitate (NbC) at grain boundaries was simulated numeri-cally. The results show that with the increase in the rate of welding thermal cycle, the solid dissolution of precipitate prior to liquation decreases and the thickness of liquid film produced by constitutional liquation increases. Higher heating rate inhi-bits the further melting of adjacent matrix and the solidification of liquid by liquid-to-7 mode in the subsequent thermal cycle.As a result, the residual liquid film still maintains a great thick-ness at the moment when temperature is down to the euteetic point, which will promote HAZ micro-fissuring. Finally, hot ductility tests on a low-expansion superalloy were performed to verify indirectly the conclusions drawn from the numerical simulation.

  8. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  9. Comparison between hybrid laser-MIG welding and MIG welding for the invar36 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Li, Yubo; Ou, Wenmin; Yu, Fengyi; Chen, Jie; Wei, Yanhong

    2016-11-01

    The invar36 alloy is suitable to produce mold of composite materials structure because it has similar thermal expansion coefficient with composite materials. In the present paper, the MIG welding and laser-MIG hybrid welding methods are compared to get the more appropriate method to overcome the poor weldability of invar36 alloy. According to the analysis of the experimental and simulated results, it has been proved that the Gauss and cone combined heat source model can characterize the laser-MIG hybrid welding heat source well. The total welding time of MIG welding is 8 times that of hybrid laser-MIG welding. The welding material consumption of MIG welding is about 4 times that of hybrid laser-MIG welding. The stress and deformation simulation indicate that the peak value of deformation during MIG welding is 3 times larger than that of hybrid laser-MIG welding.

  10. The effect of postproduction heat treatment on γ-TiAl alloys produced by the GTAW-based additive manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yan; Cuiuri, Dominic; Li, Huijun; Pan, Zengxi, E-mail: zengxi@uow.edu.au; Shen, Chen

    2016-03-07

    Postproduction heat treatments were carried out on additively manufactured γ-TiAl alloys that were produced by using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of both as-fabricated and heat-treated specimens were investigated to assess the effect of different heat treatment conditions, by using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Neutron Diffraction and tensile tests. The results indicated that heat treatment promotes the formation of the γ phase in the majority region after heat treatment at 1200 °C for 24 h, while a fully lamellar structure was formed in the near-substrate zone. The response to heat treatment at 1060 °C/24 h was markedly different, producing a fine lamellar structure with differing sizes in the majority region and near-substrate zone. These various microstructural characteristics determined the mechanical properties of the heat-treated samples. The heat-treated samples at 1200 °C/24 h exhibited lower UTS and microhardness values but higher ductility than the as-fabricated samples without heat treatment, while the 1060 °C/24 h heat treatment resulted in higher UTS and microhardness values but lower ductility. Due to the homogenous microstructure in the majority region after each postproduction heat treatment, the tensile properties were similar for both the build direction (Z) and travel direction (Y), thereby minimising the anisotropy that is exhibited by the as-fabricated alloy prior to heat treatment.

  11. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  12. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  13. An Analysis of the Weldability of Ductile Cast Iron Using Inconel 625 for the Root Weld and Electrodes Coated in 97.6% Nickel for the Filler Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the weldability of ductile cast iron when the root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG welding process employing an Inconel 625 source rod, and when the filler welds are applied with electrodes coated with 97.6% Ni. The welds were performed on ductile cast iron specimen test plates sized 300 mm × 90 mm × 10 mm with edges tapered at angles of 60°. The plates were subjected to two heat treatments. This article analyzes the influence on weldability of the various types of electrodes and the effect of preheat treatments. Finally, a microstructure analysis is made of the material next to the weld in the metal-weld interface and in the weld itself. The microstructure produced is correlated with the strength of the welds. We treat an alloy with 97.6% Ni, which prevents the formation of carbides. With a heat treatment at 900 °C and 97.6% Ni, there is a dissolution of all carbides, forming nodules in ferritic matrix graphite.

  14. Prefabricated modular district heating station is available rapidly. Welded transfer station DSP Midi; Vorgefertigte, modulare Fernwaermestation ist schnell verfuegbar. Geschweisste Uebergabestation DSP Midi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Joern [Danfoss GmbH, Hamburg (Germany). District Energy Div.

    2012-03-15

    Danfoss GmbH (Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany) has developed a modular, standardized approach for welded district heating stations. The prefabricated transfer stations with a capacity up to 250 kW can be supplied in a compact frame. These stations have short delivery times and are extremely flexible: DSP MIDI systems have a modular design and adapters. Thus, DSP MIDI systems cover about 90 % of the technical connection requirements in Germany.

  15. Treatment of welding electrode manufacturing plant wastewater using coagulation/flocculation-nanofiltration as a hybrid process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Golestani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available High water consumption and water scarcity make industrial wastewater reuse necessary, especially in those industries characterized by polluted effluents such as welding electrode manufacturing industries. The present paper investigates the coupling of coagulation-flocculation with nanofiltration (NF to recycle water and reuse it in the process. First, the effect of different concentrations of a mixture of alum (Al2(SO43.18H2O and ferric chloride (FeCl3 on the pretreatment process was closely studied. Then the NF process was applied for complementary treatment. The NF results show that, by increasing both flow rate and transmembrane pressure (TMP, permeate flux is increased. The NF results also show that the COD value decreases below 2 mg/l, TDS rejection approaches 82%, turbidity decreases below 1 NTU and the hardness is lower than the factory constraint (100 mg/l as CaCO3, allowing the reuse of the treated wastewater in the process.

  16. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A., E-mail: eak@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Andrey I., E-mail: dmitr@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G., E-mail: sp@ms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  17. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.

    2015-10-01

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  18. Residual stress reduction in beam welded joints by means of stress redistribution using defocused electron or laser beams; Eigenspannungsreduktion in strahlgeschweissten Naehten mittels Spannungsumlagerung durch den Einsatz defokussierter Elektronen- bzw. Laserstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelle, Florian

    2013-08-01

    Among the multiple advantages of beam welding processes the high longitudinal residual stresses in beam welds ranging till the local yield stress are one disadvantage. These high stresses can influence the service life of the welded components. The residual stresses in other welding processes exist in an equal high level but primarily in the transverse direction to the weld. To mitigate the high residual stresses a couple of methods were developed for these welding processes in the last decades. However these methods need large contact surfaces next to the welds for the installation of matched heating and cooling elements and other additional equipment. Furthermore, the previous developed stress mitigating processes offer a low efficiency for the small beam welds. The stress reduction by using the welding source after the welding process for a remote heat treatment of the welded components afford a flexible tool for the stress mitigation in beam welds. This method does not need any additional equipment and it is applicable for complex welding and component geometries. During this post welding heat treatment the material next to the weld is heated by the defocused electron or by the defocused laser beam, respectively, to temperatures of some hundreds degree Celsius. Hereby low plastic deformations in these regions are generated. While cooling down due to the thermal shrinkage the material between the weld and the heat treated region is compressed in longitudinal direction to the weld. This intermediate material zone constrained the shrinkage of the weld while cooling down from the melting temperature and leads to the high longitudinal residual stresses in the weld. In consequence of the compression of this intermediate zones by the heat treated zones the resistance to the shrinkage of the weld is lowered and the longitudinal stresses in the weld are reduced. In the process the quantity of the stress reduction is controlled by the selection of the process parameters

  19. Laser-welded V-Cr-Ti alloys: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Smith, D.L.; Xu, Z.; Leong, K.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    A systematic study has been in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to examine the use of YaG or CO{sub 2} lasers to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the laser-welded materials. In addition, several postwelding heat treatments are being applied to the welded samples to evaluate their benefits, if any, to the structure and properties of the weldments. Hardness measurements are made across the welded regions of different samples to evaluate differences in the characteristics of various weldments. Several weldments were used to fabricate specimens for four-point bend tests. Several additional weldments were made with a YaG laser; here, the emphasis was on determining the optimal weld parameters to achieve deep penetration in the welds. A preliminary assessment was then made of the weldments on the basis of microstructure, hardness profiles, and defects.

  20. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  1. The Development of Welded Plate Heat Exchanger with Tube Plates%焊接式板式换热器带管板片的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国庆; 王頠; 杨刚

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyse the heat transfer effect of welded plate heat exchangers more intuitively,and to improve the heat transfer efficiency,this article tends to developed a welded plate heat exchanger with a tube plate. After the application of the tube plate,it can help to measure the temperature distribution between the plates in the flow channel and the related data of the medium in the heat transfer process. Through the analysis of measured data,it is aim to optimize the combination form of the product flow process,and to give a guidance in heat transfer scheme with reasonable selections.%为更加直观的分析焊接式板式换热器的换热效果并提高其换热效率,研制了一种焊接式板式换热器带管板片。带管板片在焊接式板式换热器中应用后,可协助测量换热器在换热过程中板间流道的温度分布情况和介质的相关数据,通过对测量数据的分析,以期达到优化产品流程组合形式,为合理选择换热方案起指导作用。

  2. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looi, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion a

  3. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looi, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion

  4. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  5. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  6. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behaviors of GTA-Additive Manufactured 2219-Al After an Especial Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. Y.; Fan, C. L.; Lin, S. B.; Yang, C. L.; Dong, B. L.

    2017-03-01

    2219-Al parts were produced by gas tungsten arc-additive manufacturing and sequentially processed by an especial heat treatment. In order to investigate the effects of heat treatment on its mechanical properties, multiple tests were conducted. Hardness tests were carried out on part scale and layer scale along with tensile tests which were performed on welding and building directions. Results show that compared to conventional casting + T6 2219-Al, the current deposit + T6 2219-Al exhibits satisfying properties with regard to strength but unsatisfying results in plasticity. Additionally, anisotropy is significant. Fractures were observed and the cracks' propagating paths in both directional specimens are described. The effects of heat treatment on the cracks' initiation and propagation were also investigated. Ultimately, a revised formula was developed to calculate the strength of the deposit + T6 2219-Al. The aforementioned formula, which takes into consideration the belt-like porosities-distributing feature, can scientifically describe the anisotropic properties in the material.

  7. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Microstructure and Toughness in Simulated CGHAZ of 800 MPa-Grade Steel for Hydropower Penstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingfeng Ding

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine the appropriate welding heat input for simulated coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ of 800 MPa-grade steel used in hydropower penstocks, the microstructural evolution, hardness, and 50% fraction appearance transition temperature (50% FATT were investigated. The results indicated that when the cooling rate (heat input is reduced (increased, the impact toughness at −20 °C and hardness of the simulated CGHAZ decreased. When the heat input increased from 18 to 81 kJ/cm, the 50% FATT increased from −80 °C to −11 °C. At 18 kJ/cm, the microstructures consisted of lath bainite and granular bainite, but lath bainite decreased with increasing heat input. The increase in the 50% FATT was attributed mainly to an increase in the austenite grain size and effective grain size, and a decrease in lath bainite and the fraction of HAGBs (misorientation: ≥15°.

  8. Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Carlson, Kent

    2011-07-22

    Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting's overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions

  9. Thermomechanical Modelling of Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a generic programme for analysis, optimization and development of resistance spot and projection welding. The programme includes an electrical model determining electric current and voltage distribution as well as heat generation, a thermal model calculating heat...

  10. [Treatment of syphilis with malaria or heat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhave, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    Until the end of the Second World War, syphilis was a common sexually transmitted infection. This stigmatising infectious disease caused mental decline, paralysis and eventually death. The history of syphilis was given public attention because of 'malaria therapy', which had been applied from the First World War onwards in patients with paralytic dementia. In 1917, the Austrian physician Julius Wagner-Jauregg (1857-1940) induced fever in these patients by infecting them with malaria parasites; in 1927, he received the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the healing properties of malarial fever. One source, not cited anywhere, is an interview that the American bacteriologist and science writer/medical journalist Paul de Kruif conducted with Wagner-Jauregg in 1930. The reporting of this meeting, and De Kruif's later involvement in the mechanical heat treatment of patients with syphilis, form the inspiration for this article. When penicillin became available, both treatments became obsolete.

  11. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process

  12. Influence of induction hardening parameters on the GS30Mn5 weld properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examines parameters of post-weld heat treatment on the test specimens made of cast steel GS30Mn5. The welding is performed with shielded metal arc welding (SMAW process. The aim is to obtain the surface without illicit cracks, with hardness ranging from 320 up to 400 HB. After induction heating, the specimens are cooled alternately with air and water. Decreased speed of quenching results in avoiding the occurrence of illicit splashes, while the hardness is maintained within the prescribed limits.

  13. Mechanical Characteristics of 9% Ni Steel Welded Joint for Lng Storage Tank at Cryogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Shim, Kyu-Taek; Kim, Young-Kyun

    To confirm the safety performance of LNG storage tank, the change in fatigue crack growth rate and fracture toughness within X-grooved weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of newly developed 9% Ni steel, which was SMAW welded, was investigated. These materials were produced by QT (quenching, tempering) heat treatment. The weld metal specimens were prepared by taking the same weld procedure applied in actual inner shell of LNG storage tank. All tests were performed in the temperature ranging from R.T. and -162°C. The fatigue crack growth behavior was carried out using CT specimen. Investigation has been carried out to study the influence of temperature and weld effect on fatigue crack growth behavior. Also, Fracture surfaces after tests were observe by scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  14. Model of a laser heated plasma interacting with walls arising in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tix, C.; Simon, G.

    1994-07-01

    In laser welding with laser intensities of approximately 1011 W/m2, a hole, called a keyhole, is formed in the material. In this keyhole a plasma is detected, which is characterized by high pressure as well as being influenced by the boundary of the keyhole. Experimental data on plasma parameters are rare and difficult to obtain [W. Sokolowski, G. Herziger, and E. Beyer, in High Power Lasers and Laser Machining Technology, edited by A. Quenzer, SPIE Proc. Vol. 1132 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1989), pp. 288-295]. In a previous paper [C. Tix and G. Simon, J. Phys. D 26, 2066 (1993)] we considered just a simple plasma model without excited states and with constant ion-neutral-atom temperature. Therefore we neglected radiative transport of excitations and underestimated the ion-neutral-atom temperature and the ionization rate. Here we extend our previous model for a continuous CO2 laser and iron and take into account radiative transfer of excitations and a variable ion-neutral-atom temperature. We consider singly charged ions, electrons, and three excitation states of neutral atoms. The plasma is divided in plasma bulk, presheath, and sheath. The transport equations are solved with boundary conditions mainly determined through the appearance of walls. Some effort is made to clarify the energy transport mechanism from the laser beam into the material. Dependent on the incident laser power, the mean electron temperature and density are obtained to be 1.0-1.3 eV and 2.5×1023-3×1023 m-3. Radiative transport of excitations does not contribute significantly to the energy transport.

  15. Effects of welding wire composition and welding process on the weld metal toughness of submerged arc welded pipeline steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-liang Ren; Fu-ren Xiao; Peng Tian; Xu Wang; Bo Liao

    2009-01-01

    The effects of alloying elements in welding wires and submerged arc welding process on the microstructures and low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals have been investigated.The results indicate that the optimal contents of alloying elements in welding wires can improve the low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals because the proentectoid ferrite and bainite formations can be suppressed,and the fraction of acicular ferrite increases.However,the contents of alloying elements need to vary along with the welding heat input.With the increase in welding heat input,the contents of alloying elements in welding wires need to be increased accordingly.The microstructures mainly consisting of acicular ferrite can be obtained in weld metals after four-wire submerged arc welding using the wires with a low carbon content and appropriate contents of Mn,Mo,Ti-B,Cu,Ni,and RE,resulting in the high low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals.

  16. Efficacy of heat treatment for disinfestation of concrete grain silos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field experiments were conducted in 2007 and 2008 to evaluate heat treatment for disinfestations of empty concrete elevator silos. A Mobile Heat Treatment Unit was used to introduce heat into silos to attain target conditions of 50°C for at least 6 h. Ventilated plastic containers with a capacity of...

  17. Effect of Laser Welding Parameters on Formation of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work experimental trials of welding of NiTi flat plates with 2.0 mm thickness were conducted using a 4.5 kW continuous wave (CW Nd:YAG laser. The influences of laser output power, welding speed, defocus amount and side-blow shielding gas flow rate on the morphology, welding depth and width, and quality of the welded seam were investigated. Meanwhile, the effects of heat input on the mechanical and functional properties of welded joints were studied. The results show that laser welding can take better formation in NiTi alloys. The matching curves with laser power and welding speed affecting different formation of welds were experimentally acquired, which can provide references for laser welding and engineering application of NiTi alloy. The heat input has obvious effects on the ultimate tensile strength (UTS and shape memory behavior of the welded joints.

  18. Friction stir welding of copper alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shuhua; Liu Meng; Wang Deqing; Xu Zhenyue

    2007-01-01

    Copper plates,brass plates and copper/brass plates were friction stir welded with various parameters. Experimental results show that the microstructure of the weld is characterized by its much finer grains as contrasted with the coarse grains of parent materials and the heat-affected zones are very narrow. The microhardness of the copper weld is a little higher than that of parent plate. The microhardness of brass weld is about 25% higher than that of parent material. The tensile strength of copper joints increases with increasing welding speed in the test range. The range of parameters to obtain good welds for copper is much wider than that for brass. When different materials were welded, the position of copper plate before welding affected the quality of FSW joints. If the copper plate was put on the advancing side of weld, the good quality of weld could be got under proper parameters.

  19. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  20. The effects of maintaining temperature in annealing heat treatment for an FSWed 6061-T6 Al alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Han, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2013-08-01

    The technological development of all kinds of lightweight transportation devices including vehicles, aircraft, ships, etc. has progressed markedly with the demand for energy saving and environmental protection. Aluminum alloy is in the spotlight as it is a suitable environmentally friendly material. However, deformation is a major problem during the welding process because aluminum alloy has a large thermal expansion coefficient. In addition, it is known that its corrosion resistance is excellent; nevertheless, in practice, considerable corrosion is generated and this is a major problem. To solve this problem, the friction stir welding (FSW) technology is applied extensively at various industrial fields as a new welding technique. This method involves a process in which materials are joined by frictional heat and physical force. Therefore, we evaluated improvements in mechanical properties and corrosion resistance through annealing heat treatment after FSW. The electrochemical experiment did not show a significant difference. However, the microstructure observation showed defectless, fine crystal particles, indicating excellent properties at 200-225°C.

  1. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  2. Cast construction elements for heat treatment furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Piekarski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study presents sketches and photos of the cast creep-resistant components used in various types of heat treatment furnaces. The shape of the elements results from the type of the operation carried out in the furnace, while dimensions are adjusted to the size of the furnace working chamber. The castings are mainly made from the high-alloyed, austenitic chromium-nickel or nickel-chromium steel, selecting the grade in accordance with the furnace operating conditions described by the rated temperature, the type and parameters of the applied operating atmosphere, and the charge weight. Typical examples in this family of construction elements are: crucibles, roller tracks, radiant tubes and guides. The majority of castings are produced in sand moulds.

  3. ANALISIS KEKUATAN SAMBUNGAN LAS SMAW ( SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING PADA MARINE PLATE ST 42 AKIBAT FAKTOR CACAT POROSITAS DAN INCOMPLETE PENETRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Pujo Mulyatno

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available At this moment, weld engineering is applied widely in tacking on joints at construction of steel building, especially at ship building. All important in weld engineering is when process tacking on weld metal with steel metal to be one unities. It mean, the strength of metal result by welded must equal to the original metal. Generally, that thing is inaccessible cause by weld defect formed. Result of survey in JMI indicates that often happened problem at weld joint part of construction of hull causing existence of fraction or crack at the division. Because, hull is main part which received many forces, in water compressive force ( hydrostatic and ship attractive force on top of wave ( sagging and or in trough of wave ( hogging . Even, at the moment of ship in full cargo condition or when at dock, ship must can maintain the selfish strength. In the research, will be checked weld defect influence incomplete penetration and porosity formed at SMAW method, evaluated from tensile and compressive strength as the application of force received by ship.from the result, indicates that tensile strength is optimum happened at the normal joint plate without heat treatment about 464, 50 Mpa, while tensile strength is lowest at joint plate condition of heat treatment 6000 C about 351,23 Mpa. for optimal of compressive strength happened at normal joint of plate without heat treatment about 872, 17 N/mm2, while compressive strength is lowest at joint plate condition of heat treatment 3000 C about 684 N/mm2. In this experiment, weld defect of incomplete penetration and porosity is not too effect a weld joint strength caused all to fracture happen in base metal is not it in weld joint or weld metal, however for all weld defect must be minimizes

  4. EFFECT OF HEAT TREATMENT ON THE CHANGE IN COLOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Manh Tuong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Acacia hybrid (Acacia mangium x auriculiformis, a wood species of low dimensional stability which is used almost exclusively for pulp, paper, or as firewood, was heat treated in nitrogen at 210-230 ºC for 2 to 6 hours. The changes in color and anti-swelling efficiency (ASE of wood after heat treatment were determined for the different heat treatment conditions. The results show that heat treatment mainly resulted in the darkening of wood tissues, and heat-treated wood had better dimensional stability than those of the control samples. Chemical modifications of wood components were determined by FT-IR analysis. Spectra indicated that the hydroxyl group content was reduced by increased treatment intensity. This result coincides with the increase in dimensional stability of heat-treated wood. Heat treatment of acacia hybrid wood shows an interesting potential to improve the quality and value for solid wood products from plantation-grown wood species.

  5. Effect of welding thermal cycles on the structure and properties of simulated heat-affected zone areas in X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) steel at a state after 100,000 h of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łomozik, Mirosław, E-mail: miroslaw.lomozik@is.gliwice.pl [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Testing of Materials Weldability and Welded Constructions Department, 44-100 Gliwice, Bł. Czesława 16-18 (Poland); Hernas, Adam, E-mail: adam.hernas@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, 40-019 Katowice, Krasińskiego 8 str. (Poland); Zeman, Marian L., E-mail: marian.zeman@is.gliwice.pl [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Testing of Materials Weldability and Welded Constructions Department, 44-100 Gliwice, Bł. Czesława 16-18 (Poland)

    2015-06-18

    The article presents results of structural tests (light, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy) of X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) creep-resisting steel after approximately 100,000 h of operation. It was ascertained that the parent metal of T91 steel is characterized by the microstructure of tempered martensite with M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitates and few dispersive precipitates of MX-type niobium and vanadium carbonitrides. The most inconvenient change in T91 steel precipitate morphology due to long-term operation is the appearance of the Laves Fe{sub 2}Mo phase which along with M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide particles forms elongated blocks and conglomerates on grain boundaries. The article also presents results of tests related to the effect of simulated welding thermal cycles on selected properties of X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) grade steel at a state after approximately 100,000 h of operation. The tests involved the determination of the chemical composition of the steel tested as well as impact tests, hardness measurements and microscopic metallographic examination (based on light microscopy) of simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) areas for a cooling time (t{sub 8/5}) restricted within a range between 3 s and 120 s, with and without heat treatment. The tests revealed that, among other results, hardness values of simulated HAZ areas in X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) steel do not guarantee cold crack safety of the steel at the state without additional heat treatment. It was also observed that simulated welding thermal cycles of cooling times t{sub 8/5}=3, 12, 60 and 120 s do not significantly affect the toughness and hardness of simulated HAZ areas of the steel tested.

  6. Effect of Zr Addition on the Microstructure and Toughness of Coarse-Grained Heat-Affected Zone with High-Heat Input Welding Thermal Cycle in Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-hao; Yuan, Xiao-guang; Huang, Hong-jun; Zhang, Si

    2017-07-01

    Microstructures and toughness of coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) with high-heat input welding thermal cycle in Zr-containing and Zr-free low-carbon steel were investigated by means of welding thermal cycle simulation. The specimens were subjected to a welding thermal cycle with heat inputs of 100, 400, and 800 kJ cm-1 at peak temperature of 1673 K (1400 °C) using a thermal simulator. The results indicate that excellent impact toughness at the CGHAZ was obtained in Zr-containing steel. The Zr oxide is responsible for AF transformation, providing the nucleation site for the formation AF, promoting the nucleation of AF on the multi-component inclusions. High fraction of acicular ferrite (AF) appears in Zr-containing steel, acting as an obstacle to cleavage propagation due to its high-angle grain boundary. The morphology of M-A constituents plays a key role in impact toughness of CGHAZ. Large M-A constituents with lath form can assist the micro-crack initiation and seriously decrease the crack initiation energy. The relationship of AF transformation and M-A constituents was discussed in detail.

  7. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding

    OpenAIRE

    Torres López, Edwar A.; Ramirez, Antonio J

    2015-01-01

    Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized u...

  8. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam welding of AA5083-H321

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Subbaiah; M Geetha; B Shanmugarajan; S R Koteswara Rao

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding processes to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively reduced the size of the fusion zone and heat affected zone compared to tungsten inert gas welding process. High speed LB welding and fast heating and cooling of LB welding process hinders grain growth compared to TIG welding process. The effect of vapourization of volatile alloying elements is also considered. It seems that magnesium evaporation is relatively less in LB welding compared to TIG welding. Tensile testing of the welded joints revealed that LB welding results in superior mechanical properties. It is concluded that LB welding process is more suitable to join AA5083-H321.

  9. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  10. Global and local characteristics of an autogenous single pass electron beam weld in thick gage UNS S41500 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarafan, S., E-mail: Sheida.Sarafan.1@ens.etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada); National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Wanjara, P., E-mail: priti.wanjara@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Gholipour, J., E-mail: Javad.gholipour@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Aerospace, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada); Champliaud, H., E-mail: henri.champliaud@etsmtl.ca [École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Electron beam welding of UNS S41500, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel utilized in hydroelectric turbine manufacturing, was investigated by applying a single pass autogenous process to penetrate a section thickness of 72 mm without preheating. In the as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions, the evolution in microhardness and microstructure across the weldments, as well as the global and local tensile properties, were evaluated. In the as-welded condition, assessment of the microhardness and the associated microstructure across the welds led to the identification of six regions, including the fusion zone, four heat affected zones and the base metal; each of these regions consisted of different phase constituents, such as tempered martensite, untempered martensite, delta ferrite and retained austenite. Post-weld heat treatment, undertaken to temper the untempered martensite in the as-welded microstructure, was effective in homogenizing the hardness across the weldment. The mechanical response of the welds, determined through tensile testing at room temperature with an automated non-contact three-dimensional deformation measurement system, indicated that the global tensile properties in the as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions met the acceptance criteria in the ASME Section IX standard. Also, evaluation of the local tensile properties in the fusion and heat affected zones of the as-welded samples allowed a more comprehensive understanding of the strength and ductility associated with the different microstructures in the “composite” nature of the weldment. Fractographic analysis demonstrated dimpled features on the tensile fracture surfaces and failure was associated with debonding between the martensitic matrix and the secondary phases (such as delta ferrite and retained austenite) that resulted in the formation, growth and coalescence of voids into a macroscale crack.

  11. The influence of electric ARC activation on the speed of heating and the structure of metal in welds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Savytsky Oleksandr M; Savytsky Mychailo M; Bajić Darko R; Shkrabalyuk Yuriy M; Vuherer Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    .... It is confirmed that ATIG and AMIG methods, depending on metal thickness, single pass weldability and chemical composition of activating flux, enable the reduction of welding energy by 2-6 times when...

  12. Explosive welding method for manufacturing ITER-grade 316L(N)/CuCrZr hollow structural member

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Rui, E-mail: mr9980@163.com [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Wang, Yaohua [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Wu, Jihong [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Duan, Mianjun [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Develop a new explosive welding method to fabricate the cooling channel of FW. • Utilize effective energy model to accurately calculate optimal welding parameters. • Provide an efficient way for manufacturing high-ductility hollow structural member. - Abstract: In this study, a new explosive welding method provided an effective way for manufacturing ITER-grade 316L(N)/CuCrZr hollow structural member. The welding parameters (stand-off distance and explosion rate) were calculated respectively using equivalent frontal collision wave model and effective energy model. The welded samples were subject to two step heat treatment cycles (solution annealing and aging). Optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to analyze the microstructure of bonding interface. The mechanical properties of the welded samples were evaluated through microhardness test and tensile test. Moreover, the sealing property of the welded specimens was measured through helium leak test. Microstructural analysis showed that the welded sample using effective energy model had an ideal wavy interface. The results of microhardness test revealed an increase in hardness for both sides near to the bonding interface. And the hardening phenomenon of interface region disappeared after the solution annealing. SEM observation indicated that the samples with the post heat treatments exhibited a ductile fracture with dimple features after tensile test. After the specimens undergo aging strengthening, there was an obvious increase in the strength for all specimens. The helium leak test results have proven that the welded specimens are soundness.

  13. Microstructural analysis as the indicator for suitability of weld repairing of the heat resistant Cr - Ni steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odanović, Z.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallurgical evaluation was performed on a fractured column tube of the reformer furnace in an ammonia plant. The tubes were manufactured from centrifugally cast heat resistant steel HK 40. Optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM were used for microstructural and fracture analysis. For composition determination of the microconstituents energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDS was used. To evaluate mechanical properties, hardness and microhardness measurements were performed. Investigations based on the microstructural features with the idea to indicate suitability of weld repair of the column were performed in this study. It was observed that the crack initiation, caused by oxidation/corrosion and thermal stresses induced by temperature gradient, appeared in the inner side of the tube wall and propagation occurred along grain boundaries. The results clearly showed the presence of an irregular microstructure which contributed to crack propagation through the tube wall. An occurrence of precipitated needle-shaped carbides/carbonitrides and brittle σ phase was also identified in the microstructure. Results of the microstructural and fracture analysis clearly indicate that reformer furnace columns made of heat resistant steel HK 40 were unsuitable for weld repair.

    La evaluación metalúrgica se realizó en un tubo de columna con fracturas, que es parte del horno reformador en una planta de amoníaco. Estos tubos son fundidos centrífugamente y fabricados en acero resistente al calor, de tipo HK- 40. Para el análisis microestructural de la fractura se ha utilizado microscopía óptica y electrónica de barrido (SEM. La composición de los micro-constituyentes se determinó por espectrometría de rayos X de energía dispersiva (EDS. Las propiedades mecánicas se evaluaron mediante mediciones de microdureza Vickers. Las investigaciones en este estudio se han llevado a cabo con el fin de demostrar la idoneidad de reparación por

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of a weld simulated X70 heat affected zone under H{sub 2} pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvaro, A., E-mail: antonio.alvaro@ntnu.no [Department of Engineering Design and Materials, NTNU, 7456 Trondheim (Norway); Olden, V. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, 7456 Trondheim (Norway); Macadre, A. [Kyushu University, WPI-I2CNER (World Premier Institute – International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research) (Japan); Akselsen, Odd Magne [Department of Engineering Design and Materials, NTNU, 7456 Trondheim (Norway); SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, 7456 Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-03-01

    The present paper deals with hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility of a weld thermal simulated heat affected zone of X70 structural steel in high pressure hydrogen gas at 20 °C. Fracture mechanics Single Edge Notched Tension tests at various hydrogen pressures (0.1, 0.6, 10 and 40 MPa H{sub 2}) have been carried out. The HE susceptibility was quantified through the measurement of the fracture toughness K{sub Q} and J (the effect of hydrogen pressure was addressed through linear load increase conditions till failure was obtained). The results show that hydrogen causes a strong decrease in the fracture toughness with increasing hydrogen pressure. The critical hydrogen pressure for the onset of HE was observed to fall between 0.1 MPa and 0.6 MPa. These results were supported by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) investigations of the fracture surfaces which showed a clear shift in the fracture mode at 0.6 MPa H{sub 2}. Moreover, constant load tests were carried out in order to investigate the influence of hydrogen exposure time. The results imply that fracture always occurs within 8 h and that longer time to failure is related to stronger toughness reduction. This effect is more pronounced for test at 40 MPa than at 0.6 MPa hydrogen pressure levels. 3D Finite Element calculations of hydrogen diffusion have been performed and the results are discussed in relation to the experiments, in order to attempt to identify the hydrogen populations (diffusible or trapped) which act predominantly on the embrittlement of the material.

  15. Prolegomena to the Study of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The literature contains many approaches toward modeling of the friction stir welding (FSW) process with varying treatments of the weld metal properties. It is worthwhile to consider certain fundamental features of the process before attempting to interpret FSW phenomena: Because of the unique character of metal deformation (as opposed to, say, viscous deformation) a velocity "discontinuity" or shear surface occurs in FSW and determines much of the character of the welding mechanism. A shear surface may not always produce a sound bond. Balancing mechanical power input against conduction and convection heat losses yields a relation, a "temperature index", between spindle speed and travel speed to maintain constant weld temperature. But many process features are only weakly dependent upon temperature. Thus, unlike modeling of metal forming processes, it may be that modeling the FSW process independently of the material conditions has some merit.

  16. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  17. Heat Treatment of Die and Mould Oriented Concurrent Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiong; ZHANG Hong-bing; RUAN Xue-yu; LUO Zhong-hua; ZHANG Yan

    2006-01-01

    Many disadvantages exist in the traditional die design method which belongs to serial pattern. It is well known that heat treatment is highly important to the dies. A new idea of concurrent design for heat treatment process of die and mould was developed in order to overcome the existent shortcomings of heat treatment process. Heat treatment CAD/CAE was integrated with concurrent circumstance and the relevant model was built. These investigations can remarkably improve efficiency, reduce cost and ensure quality of R and D for products.

  18. Development of methodology for measurements of residual stresses in welded joint based on displacement of points in a coordinated table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Veras Siqueira Filho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses in a welded joint of ASTM A131 grade AH32 steel was measured either by the X-ray diffraction or by displacements of referenced points measured on a coordinate measuring machine before and after heat treatment. For all tests, the welding was performed with Shielded Metal Arc Welding, vertical-up position, by a certified welder. After welding, some specimens were subjected to marking, made through small holes evenly spaced and mapped on a coordinate measuring machine. After labeling, the samples were subjected to heat treatment at temperatures nearby recrystallization. After heat treatment, the samples were subjected to new measurements by coordinate measuring machine to evaluate the displacements of the points produced by the recrystallization. In parallel, residual stress measurements were made by XRD for validation of this new methodology. The results obtained either by X-ray or by coordinate measuring machine showed a good correlation between the two measurement methodologies employed.

  19. Welding fumes - assessment of gas treatment equipment; Fumees de soudage - evaluation des equipements de traitement des gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsteau, St. [Institut National de Recherche et de Securite (INRS), 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-03-15

    Arc welding produces pollutant particle and gas emissions. Whilst many studies have permitted analysis of the particle phase composition, improvement of its collection and assessment of its filtration efficiency, there has been little research into gas emission treatment. However, purification equipment manufacturers now incorporate an active charcoal stage for this purpose. INRS has conducted a study to establish a state-of-the-art review of proposed gas purification solutions and assess their performance characteristics. Analysis of the supplier offer revealed that only carbon adsorbents are currently offered; Tests performed on two media and on representative equipment showed that adsorbent implementation was in fact unsuited to the gaseous pollutants emitted by welding processes. (authors)

  20. The influence of heat treatment on properties of three-metal explosion joint: AlMg-Al-Steel

    OpenAIRE

    I. Samardžić; Mateša, B.; I. Kladarić

    2011-01-01

    The procedure of welding by explosion is as technical optimal solution of ship-shell parts joining frequently used in shipbuilding industry at transition three-metal joint: AlMg4.5-Al-St.52-3 working out. The investigations of mechanical and metallographic properties of joints, exposed on heat treatment at different temperatures levels, are performed. The results of mechanical and metallographic examinations of transition joints at elevated temperatures, direct on its use below 300 °C. The ad...

  1. Cryogenic heat treatment — a review of the current state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Amini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The deep cryogenic heat treatment is an old and effective heat treatment, performed on steels and cast irons to improve the wear resistance and hardness. This process includes cooling down to the liquid nitrogen temperature, holding the samples at that temperature and heating at the room temperature. The benefits of this process are significant on the ferrous materials, but recently some studies focused on other nonferrous materials. This study attempts to clarify the different behavior of some materials subjected to the deep cryogenic heat treatment, as well as explaining the common theories about the effect of the cryogenic heat treatment on these materials. Results showed that polymers exhibit different behavior regarding to their crystallinity, however the magnesium alloys, titanium alloys and tungsten carbide show a noticeable improvement after the deep cryogenic heat treatment due to their crystal structure.

  2. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Z.L., E-mail: zhilihuhit@163.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China); Wang, X.S. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Pang, Q. [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wuhan Donghu University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L. [Hubei Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Automobile Parts, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming.

  3. Enhancing the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes by acid treatment, air oxidization and heat treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chensha Li; Baoyou Zhang; Xingjuan Chen; Xiaoqing Hu; Ji Liang

    2005-01-01

    Three approaches of treating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including acid treatment, air oxidization and heat treatment at high temperature were studied to enhance the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes. High temperature heat-treatment elevates the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes. Acid treatment removes parts of amorphous carbonaceous matter through its oxidization effect.Air oxidization disperses carbon nanotubes and amorphous carbonaceous matter. The treatment of combining acid treatment with heat-treatment further elevates the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes comparing with acid treatment or heat-treatment. The combination of the three treatments creates the thorough effects of enhancing the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes.

  4. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  5. Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties of TIG and A-TIG Welded Joints of Lean Duplex Stainless Steel S82441 / 1.4662

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brytan Z.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of pitting corrosion resistance of TIG (autogenous and with filler metal and A-TIG welded lean duplex stainless steel S82441/1.4662 evaluated according to ASTM G48 method, where autogenous TIG welding process was applied using different amounts of heat input and shielding gases like pure Ar and Ar+N2 and Ar+He mixtures. The results of pitting corrosion resistance of the welded joints of lean duplex stainless steel S82441 were studied in as weld conditions and after different mechanical surface finish treatments. The results of the critical pitting temperature (CPT determined according to ASTM G48 at temperatures of 15, 25 and 35°C were presented. Three different surface treatment after welding were applied: etching, milling, brushing + etching. The influence of post weld surface treatment was studied in respect to the pitting corrosion resistance, basing on CPT temperature.

  6. Characterization of microstructure of HAZs in as-welded and service condition of P91 pipe weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, C.; Giri, A.; Mahapatra, M. M.; Kumar, P.

    2017-01-01

    Steels 9-12% Cr, having the high creep rupture strength are advocated for the modern low polluting thermal power plants. In the present investigation, the P91 pipe weldments have been characterized for microstructural responses in as-welded, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and ageing conditions. The PWHT of welded samples were carried out at 760 °C for time of 2 h and ageing at 760 °C for 720 h and 1440 h, respectively. The effect of time has been studied on precipitates size, distribution of precipitates and grain sizes present in various zones of P91 steel weldments. The impact toughness and hardness variation of heat affected zone (HAZ) have also been studied in as-welded condition as well as at different heat treatment condition. A significant change was observed in grain size and precipitates size after each heat treatment condition. The maximum impact toughness of HAZ was obtained after PWHT at 760 °C for 2 h. The main phase observed in weld fusion zone in as-welded, PWHT and ageing conditions were M23C6, MX, M7C3, Fe-rich M3C and M2C. The unwanted Z-phase (NbCrN) was also noticed in weld fusion zone after ageing of 1440 h.

  7. Effect Of Heat Treatment On The Corrosion Resistance Of Aluminized Steel Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żaba K.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of corrosion resistance of heat treated aluminized steel strips. Products coated by Al-10Si alloy are used among others in a manufacturing process of welded pipes as the elements of the car exhaust systems, working in high temperatures and different environments (eg. wet, salty. The strips and tubes high performance requirements are applied to stability, thickness and roughness of Al-Si coating, adhesion and corrosion resistance. Tubes working in elements of exhaust systems in a wide range of temperatures are exposed to the effects of many aggressive factors, such as salty snow mud. It was therefore decided to carry out research on the impact of corrosion on the environmental influence on heat treated aluminized steel strips. The heat treatment was carried out temperatures in the range 250-700°C for 30, 180, 1440 minutes. Then the coatings was subjected to cyclic impact of snow mud. Total duration of treatment was 12 months and it was divided into three stages of four months and at the end of each stage was made the assessment of factor of corrosion. The results are presented in the form of macroscopic, microscopic (using a scanning electron microscope observations and the degree and type of rusty coating.

  8. PECULIAR FEATURES OF ELECTROLYTIC-PLASMA HEATING DURING ELECTROCHEMICAL HEAT-TREATMENT OF STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Alekseev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-physical peculiar features of  anode electrolytic-plasma heating applied for heat and chemical heat-treatment have been investigated in the paper. The paper presents  results of the investigations pertaining  to influence of the operating voltage on current density, temperature and heating rate, heating power and  changes in heat portion passing to the anode. Peculiar features of layer formation which are hardened  by electrolytic-plasma carburizing  have been presented in the paper.

  9. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  10. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  11. What makes an electric welding arc perform its required function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correy, T.B.

    1982-09-01

    The physics of direct current and alternating current welding arcs, the heat transfer of direct current welding arcs, the characteristics of dc welding and ac welding power supplies and recommendations for the procurement and maintenance of precision power supplies are discussed. (LCL)

  12. Effect of laser characteristics on the weld shape and properties of penetration laser weld of BT20 titanium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俐; 巩水利; 姚伟; 胡伦骥

    2004-01-01

    The laser beam welding of BT20 titanium alloy was conducted to investigate the weld shape, microstructures and properties. The full penetration weld characteristics produced by CO2 laser and by YAG laser were compared. The results show that the full penetration weld of YAG laser welding closes to "X" shape, and weld of CO2 laser welding is "nail-head" shape. Those result from special heating mode of laser deep penetration welding. The tension strength of CO2 laser and YAG laser joints equal to that of the base metal, but the former has better ductility. All welds consist mainly of the acicular α phase and a few β phase in microstructure. The dendritic crystal of CO2 laser weld is a little finer than YAG laser weld. According the research CO2 laser is better than YAG laser for welding of BT20 titanium alloy.

  13. Finite element thermal analysis of the fusion welding of a P92 steel pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Yaghi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusion welding is common in steel pipeline construction in fossil-fuel power generation plants. Steel pipes in service carry steam at high temperature and pressure, undergoing creep during years of service; their integrity is critical for the safe operation of a plant. The high-grade martensitic P92 steel is suitable for plant pipes for its enhanced creep strength. P92 steel pipes are usually joined together with a similar weld metal. Martensitic pipes are sometimes joined to austenitic steel pipes using nickel based weld consumables. Welding involves severe thermal cycles, inducing residual stresses in the welded structure, which, without post weld heat treatment (PWHT, can be detrimental to the integrity of the pipes. Welding residual stresses can be numerically simulated by applying the finite element (FE method in Abaqus. The simulation consists of a thermal analysis, determining the temperature history of the FE model, followed by a sequentially-coupled structural analysis, predicting residual stresses from the temperature history.

    In this paper, the FE thermal analysis of the arc welding of a typical P92 pipe is presented. The two parts of the P92 steel pipe are joined together using a dissimilar material, made of Inconel weld consumables, producing a multi-pass butt weld from 36 circumferential weld beads. Following the generation of the FE model, the FE mesh is controlled using Model Change in Abaqus to activate the weld elements for each bead at a time corresponding to weld deposition. The thermal analysis is simulated by applying a distributed heat flux to the model, the accuracy of which is judged by considering the fusion zones in both the parent pipe as well as the deposited weld metal. For realistic fusion zones, the heat flux must be prescribed in the deposited weld pass and also the adjacent pipe elements. The FE thermal results are validated by comparing experimental temperatures measured by five thermocouples on the

  14. Behavior of welds in liquid lead containing 10{sup −6} wt% and 10{sup −8} wt% oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzel, A., E-mail: Annette.heinzel@kit.edu [Karlsruher Insitute of Technologie, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Müller, G.; Weisenburger, A. [Karlsruher Insitute of Technologie, Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Specimens with welded joints of P91 TIG (tungsten inert gas welding), P91 EB (electron beam welding) and frictions stir welding, with P92 (EB), PM2000 (EB) and combination of P91-PM2000 EB were tested 2000 h in stagnant liquid Pb at 550 °C with an oxygen concentration of 10{sup −6} wt% and 10{sup −8} wt%. After exposure at 10{sup −6} wt% all specimens showed an oxide layer on the surface. If the grain size of the welds varies strongly from that of the bulk material like in the friction stir welds, a change in oxide thickness could be observed. Also precipitations which pin the oxide formers or reduce the diffusion rate can lead to thicker oxide layers or a stronger dissolution attack like it was observed on the dissimilar weld P91/PM2000 EB. The specimens have similar microstructures in all regions (weld, heat affected zone and bulk material) and due to a post-weld heat treatment show everywhere the same behavior.

  15. Investigation of anodic oxide coatings on zirconium after heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Maciej [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Dercz, Grzegorz [Institute of Materials Science, University of Silesia, 75 Pułku Piechoty Street 1 A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Suchanek, Katarzyna [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Street 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Simka, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.simka@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Oxide layers prepared via PEO of zirconium were subjected to heat treatment. • Surface characteristics were determined for the obtained oxide coatings. • Heat treatment led to the partial destruction of the anodic oxide layer. • Pitting corrosion resistance of zirconium was improved after the modification. - Abstract: Herein, results of heat treatment of zirconium anodised under plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) conditions at 500–800 °C are presented. The obtained oxide films were investigated by means of SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the zirconium specimens was evaluated in Ringer's solution. A bilayer oxide coatings generated in the course of PEO of zirconium were not observed after the heat treatment. The resulting oxide layers contained a new sublayer located at the metal/oxide interface is suggested to originate from the thermal oxidation of zirconium. The corrosion resistance of the anodised metal was improved after the heat treatment.

  16. Magnetic Pulse Welding Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Jassim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the benefits of using Magnetic Pulse machine which is belong to Non-conventional machine instead of conventional machine. Magnetic Pulse Technology is used for joining dissimilar metals, and for forming and cutting metals. It is a non contact technique. Magnetic field is used to generate impact magnetic pressure for welding and forming the work piece by converted the electrical energy to mechanical energy. It is enable us to design previously not possible by welding dissimilar materials and allowing to welds light and stronger materials together. It can be used to weld metallic with non metallic materials to created mechanical lock on ceramics, polymers, rubbers and composites. It is green process; there is no heat, no radiation, no gas, no smoke and sparks, therefore the emissions are negligible.

  17. Effects of the heat input in the mechanical integrity of the welding joints welded by GMAW and LBW process in Transformation Induced Plasticity steel (TRIP used in the automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H. López Cortéz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work an Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS sheet of the Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP type currently employed in the automotive sector was welded using a Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW and a CO2 Laser Beam Welding (LBW processes. The mechanical properties of welded tensile specimens including microhardness were determined and the results were related to the exhibited microstructures. It was found that LBW lead to relatively high hardness in the fusion zone (FZ indicating that the resultant microstructure was predominantly martensite. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, a mixture of phases consisting of bainite and ferrite was present. Similar phase mixtures were found in the HAZ and Fusion Zone (FZ of the GMAW samples. The exhibited microstructure did not result in mechanical degradation when the GMAW specimens were tested in tension as all the fractures occurred in the BM. In contrast, the region adjacent to the HAZ of most tensile specimens welded using LBW failed by brittle cleavage. Apparently, in this region tempering effects due to heat dissipation in the LBW process promoted carbide growth and a relatively coarse microstructure. No embrittlement was found that could be associated with the development of martensite.Neste trabalho, uma chapa de aço de alta resistência (AHSS - Advanced High Strength Steel tipo TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity empregado atualmente no setor automotivo foi soldado usando o processo de soldagem a arco com arame solido sob proteção gasosa (GMAW e soldagem com LASER de CO2 (LBW. As propriedades mecânicas das amostras soldadas quanto a tração e microdureza foram determinadas e os resultados foram relacionados com as microestruturas apresentadas. Verificou-se que a solda com LBW chegou a valores realtivamente altos de dureza na zona fundida (ZF, indicando que a microestrutura resultante foi predominantemente de martensita. Na zona termicamente afetadas (ZTA, encontrou-se uma mistura de fases

  18. Failure mechanisms in cobalt welded with a silver–copper filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criss, Everett M., E-mail: ecriss@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Smith, Richard J. [Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire (United Kingdom); Meyers, Marc A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Cobalt silver–copper (Co–AgCu) weldments approximate the stresses and failure mechanisms of beryllium aluminum–silicon (Be–AlSi) welds, which have strategic importance but are hazardous to study. Failure tests of these surrogate Co–AgCu welds, examined in tension and four-point bending, show that residual stresses and post-welding heat treatment have little or no effect on strength, whereas weld quality and geometry are extremely important. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal abundant defects in poor welds, which usually fail through propagation of preexisting cracks. Fracture surfaces show a variety of morphologies, ranging from dimples in the AgCu filler, to cleavage steps in the CoCu peritectic, and suspected intergranular fracture in the cobalt base. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy reveals significant changes in microstructure near the base–filler interface, whereas wavelength dispersive analysis shows high Cu concentrations in this area.. Contrary to finite element predictions, these welds were found to be stronger during face bending than root bending, likely resulting from the increased number of cracks and imperfections in the Co base. These computations correctly predict that weld strength depends on geometry and that welds fail either in the cobalt base, or along the base–filler interface. Crack compliance measurements show that the largest residual stresses are located along this interface. However, these stresses are unlikely to influence failure due to their direction, whereas stresses in the weld root are too small to have observable effects on failure. The strength of Co–AgCu welds depends strongly on geometry, penetration, and weld quality, but little on residual stresses, and this conclusion is tentatively extended to Be–AlSi welds.

  19. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of 9%Cr/CrMoV Dissimilar Steels Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Lu, Fenggui; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xiaojin; Huo, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Advanced 9%Cr steel with good heat resistance and CrMoV with good toughness were chosen as candidate materials to fabricate combined rotor for steam turbine operating at over 620 °C. But the great difference in base metals properties presents a challenge in achieving sound defect-free joint with optimal properties in dissimilar welded rotor. In this paper, appropriate selection of filler metal, welding parameters, and post-weld heat treatment was combined to successfully weld 1100-mm-diameter 9%Cr/CrMoV dissimilar experimental rotor through ultra-narrow gap submerge arc welding. Some properties such as hardness, low-cycle fatigue (LCF), and high-cycle fatigue (HCF) combined with microstructural characterization qualify the integrity of the weld. Microstructural analysis indicated the presence of high-temperature tempered martensite as the phase responsible for the improved properties obtained in the weld. The Coffin-Manson parameters were obtained by fitting the data in LCF test, while the conditional fatigue strength was derived from the HCF test based on S-N curve. Analysis of hardness profile showed that the lowest value occurred at heat-affected zone adjacent to base metal which represents the appropriate location of fracture for the samples after LCF and HCF tests.

  20. Three thermal analysis models for laser, GMAW-P and Iaser+GMAW-P hybrid welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guoxiang; WU Chuansong; QIN Guoliang; WANG Xuyou; LIN Shangyang

    2009-01-01

    The temperature fields and the weld pool geometries for laser + GMA W-P hybrid welding, laser welding and pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P) are numerically simulated in quasi-steady state by using the developed heat source models, respectively. The calculated weld cross-sections of the three types of welding processes agree well with their respective measured results. Through comparison, it is found that the temperature distribution of laser+ GMAW-P hybrid welding possesses the advantages of those in both laser and GMA W-P welding processes so that the improvement of welding productivity and weld quality are ensured.

  1. The Effect of Tool Position for Aluminum and Copper at High Rotational Friction Stir Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Recep Çakır; Sare Çelik

    2015-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. This welding technique allows welding of Aluminum alloys which present difficulties in fusion joining and allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 aluminum alloy and commercially pure copper to increase heat input were produced at high rotation rate (2440 rev/min) with four different pin position (0-1-1.5-2 mm) and three different weld speeds ...

  2. Optimal Heating in Heat-Treatment Process Based on Grey Asynchronous Particle Swarm Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    To ensure plate heating quality and reduce energy consumption in heat-treatment process, optimal heating for plates in a roller hearth furnace was investigated and a new strategy for heating procedure optimization was developed. During solving process, plate temperature forecast model based on heat transfer mechanics was established to calculate plate temperature with the assumed heating procedure. In addition, multi-objective feature of optimal heating was analyzed. And the method, which is composed of asynchronous particle swarm optimization and grey relational analysis, was adopted for solving the multi-objective problem. The developed strategy for optimizing heating has been applied to the mass production. The result indicates that the absolute plate discharging temperature deviation between measured value and target value does not exceed ± 8 ℃, and the relative deviation is less than ± 0.77%.

  3. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  4. Modeling of Bullet Penetration in Explosively Welded Composite Armor Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Carney, Theodore C.

    2006-07-01

    Normal impact of high-speed armor piercing bullet on titanium-steel composite has been investigated using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. The objective is to understand the effects of impact during the ballistic testing of explosively welded armor plates. These plates have significant microstructural differences within the weld region, heat-affected zone and the base metal. The variances result in substantial ductility, hardness and strength differences, important criteria in determining the failure mode, specifically whether it occurs at the joint or within the virgin base metal. Several configurations of composite plates with different material combinations were modeled. The results were used to modify the heat treatment process of explosively welded plates, making them more likely to survive impact.

  5. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  6. IMPROVED MANUFACTURING CANNED "COMPOTE CHERRY" USING COMBINED HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Demirova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the development of new modes of heat sterilization compote cherry using stepwise heating in a stream of hot air and hot water dushevaniem air cooled rotating container. Revealed that the modes provide commercial sterility of finished products, reducing the length of the heat treatment and the quality of the finished product. Are some of the modes of heat sterilization step of cherry compote in a stream of heated air and water dushevaniem air-cooled rotating container.

  7. Analysis of weld seam uniformity through temperature distribution by spatially resolved detector elements in the wavelength range of 0.3μm to 5μm for the detection of structural changing heating and cooling processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempe, B.; Maschke, R.; Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Hartmann, P.

    2016-03-01

    Online process control systems often only detecting temperatures at a local area of the machining point and determining an integrated value. In order to determine the proper welding quality and the absence of defects, such as temperature induced stress cracks, it is necessary to do time and space resolved measurements before, during and after the production process. The system under development consists of a beam splitting unit which divides the electromagnetic radiation of the heated component on two different sensor types. For high temperatures, a sensor is used which is sensitive in the visible spectrum and has a dynamic range of 120dB.1 Thus, very high intensity differences can be displayed and a direct analysis of the temperature profile of the weld spots is possible.2 A second sensor is operating in the wavelength range from 1 micron to 5 microns and allows the determination of temperatures from approximately 200°C.3 At the beginning of a welding process, the heat-up phase of the metal is critical to the resultant weld quality. If a defined temperature range exceeded too fast, the risk of cracking is significantly increased.4 During the welding process the thermal supervision of the central processing location is decisive for a high secure weld. In the border areas as well as in connection of the welding process especially cooling processes are crucial for the homogeneity of the results. In order to obtain sufficiently accurate resolution of the dynamic heating- and cooling-processes, the system can carry out up to 500 frames per second.

  8. Hydrogen Cracking in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of an AISI Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, P.; Unigovski, Ya.; Shneck, R.

    The effects of in situ cathodic charging on the tensile properties and susceptibility to cracking of an AISI type 321 stainless steel, welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, was studied by various treatments. Appearance of delta-ferrite phase in the as-welded steels in our tested conditions was observed with discontinuous grain boundaries (M23C6) and a dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C), which precipitated in the matrix. Shielding gas rates changes the mechanical properties of the welds. Ultimate tensile strength and ductility are increases with the resistance to the environments related the increase of the supplied shielding inert gas rates. Charged specimens, caused mainly in decreases in the ductility of welded specimens. However, more severe decrease in ductility was obtained after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited massive transgranular regions. Both types of specimen demonstrated narrow brittle zones at the sides of the fracture surface and ductile micro-void coalescences in the middle. Ferrite δ was form after welding with high density of dislocation structures and stacking faults formation and the thin stacking fault plates with e-martensite phase were typically found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodical charging process.

  9. Study Of Gear Teeth Distortions Due To Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Khade

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The work aims to study the distortion occurred due to heat treatment on the Gear teeth. The paper studies various causes of distortion control techniques to eliminate distortion which includes changes in design selection of material heat treatment process mainly due to quenching that includes cooling rates quenching mediums fixtures. An experimental study and results conducted for the effects of the distortion on the Gear teeth and to reduce the distortion with certain changes design modification resulting in shape amp size changes phase changes changes in hardness microstructure and residual stresses. It is observed that adequate velocity of quench oil around the component to be heat treated ensures uniform amp desired cooling rate as per heat treatment cycle. Modification in design of baffles achieved the adequate velocity and minimization of distortion. Also Fixtures for holding finished parts or assemblies during heat treatment may be either support or restraint type to control dimensional relations during aging.

  10. New Nomenclatures for Heat Treatments of Additively Manufactured Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Andrew H.; Collins, Peter C.; Williams, James C.

    2017-07-01

    The heat-treatment designations and microstructure nomenclatures for many structural metallic alloys were established for traditional metals processing, such as casting, hot rolling or forging. These terms do not necessarily apply for additively manufactured (i.e., three-dimensionally printed or "3D printed") metallic structures. The heat-treatment terminology for titanium alloys generally implies the heat-treatment temperatures and their sequence relative to a thermomechanical processing step (e.g., forging, rolling). These designations include: β-processing, α + β-processing, β-annealing, duplex annealing and mill annealing. Owing to the absence of a thermomechanical processing step, these traditional designations can pose a problem when titanium alloys are first produced via additive manufacturing, and then heat-treated. This communication proposes new nomenclatures for heat treatments of additively manufactured titanium alloys, and uses the distinct microstructural features to provide a correlation between traditional nomenclature and the proposed nomenclature.

  11. Effect of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of GMA-welded HY-80 steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmusoglu, Senol [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Tuerker, Mehmet [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). ISF - Welding and Joining Inst.; Tosun, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    In this publication, investigations of HY-80 steels joined by gas metal arc welding by using different welding parameters are described. Different samples obtained from the welded joints were subjected to mechanical testing by means of tensile, hardness and impact toughness tests. The tensile test results showed that the strength of weld metal and heat affected zone were higher than of base metal. Similar Charpy impact toughness test results were obtained for weld metal and heat affected zone. Weld metal hardness was almost similar to the base metal hardness, nevertheless, the heat affected zone indicated higher values. The base metal has ferritic-perlitic structure with fine grains. Martensite needles and bainite are seen in the heat affected zone. Weld metal has martensite needles, partial bainite and residual austenite.

  12. Numerical analysis of thermal stresses in welded joint smade of steels X20 and X22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Saša M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress calculation of steam pipeline is presented, focused on the welded joint. Numerical calculation was performed using the finite element method to obtain stress distribution in the welded joint made while replacing the valve chamber. Dissimilar materials were used, namely steel 10CrMoV9-10 according to EN 10216-2 for the valve chamber, the rest of steam pipeline was steel X20, whereas the transition piece material was steel X22. Residual stresses were calculated, in addition to design stresses, indicating critical regions and necessity for post-weld heat treatment.

  13. Cluster banding heat source model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Liguo; Ji Shude; Yang Jianguo; Fang Hongyuan; Li Yafan

    2006-01-01

    Concept of cluster banding heat source model is put forward for the problem of overmany increment steps in the process of numerical simulation of large welding structures, and expression of cluster banding heat source model is deduced based on energy conservation law.Because the expression of cluster banding heat source model deduced is suitable for random weld width, quantitative analysis of welding stress field for large welding structures which have regular welds can be made quickly.

  14. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE DEFORMATION OF RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELD GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The resistance spot welding process is accomplished by forcing huge amounts of current flow from the upper electrode tip through the base metals to the lower electrode tip, or vice versa or in both directions. A weld joint is established between the metal sheets through fusion, resulting in a strong bond between the sheets without occupying additional space. The growth of the weld nugget (bond between sheets is therefore determined from the welding current density; sufficient time for current delivery; reasonable electrode pressing force; and the area provided for current delivery (electrode tip. The welding current and weld time control the root penetration, while the electrode pressing force and electrode tips successfully accomplish the connection during the welding process. Although the welding current and weld time cause the heat generation at the areas concerned (electrode tip area, the electrode tips’ diameter and electrode pressing forces also directly influence the welding process. In this research truncated-electrode deformation and mushrooming effects are observed, which result in the welded areas being inconsistent due to the expulsion. The copper to chromium ratio is varied from the tip to the end of the electrode whilst the welding process is repeated. The welding heat affects the electrode and the electrode itself influences the shape of the weld geometry.

  15. Computer-aided simulation of the heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arola, R.; Martikainen, H.; Virta, J. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Metallurgy Lab.

    1993-12-31

    Computer-aided simulation of the heat treatment of components and charges is examined. Existing programs for the simulation of heat treatment are reviewed. Test simulations including calculation of temperature, phase composition and stresses and strains during heating and cooling are performed with selected programs. The results of the simulations are compared with the results of heat treating experiments. Heat transfer during heating-up varies considerably between different treatments, components of the charge and surfaces of the component. Therefore, heat transfer data defined on the basis of the measurements has to be used in exact simulation instead of literature data. According to the simulation results non-uniform temperature distribution, plastic straining and residual stresses after heating can be formed in an AISI 316 bar heated up at the edge of a charge in a pit furnace. Permanent bending of these bars as a result of heating is not observed. In the oil quenching of a 42CrMo4 cylinder, where martensite and bainite are formed in austenite decomposition, the simulation results (especially amounts of phases and residual stresses) are crucially dependent on the TTT-diagram describing the kinetics of the phase transformations. Several TTT-diagrams for the steel grade are found, leading to different simulation results

  16. Laser Welding of Ultra-Fine Grained Steel SS400

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yun; TIAN Zhi-ling; CHEN Wu-zhu; WANG Cheng; BAO Gang

    2003-01-01

    The effects of laser welding on microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-fine grained steel SS400 were studied. The plasma arc welding and MAG welding were conducted to make a comparison between these weldings and laser welding. The coarse grain heat-affected zone (HAZ) of laser welding was simulated using thermomechanical simulation machine, and the impact toughness was tested. The deep penetration laser welding produces weld of large depth and narrow width. The weld metal and HAZ of laser welding was heated and then cooled rapidly. The prior austenite grain size of coarse grain HAZ is 1/10 of that for arc welding. For laser welding, the toughness of weld metal is higher than that of base metal, and the toughness of the coarse grain HAZ of laser welding is on a level with that of base metal. Matching lower laser power with lower welding speed, the hardening tendency of the weld metal and the coarse grain HAZ can be decreased. There is no softened zone. The tensile strength of welded joint formed by laser is higher than that of base metal. The joint has good bending ductility.

  17. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  18. Heat treatment modelling using strongly continuous semigroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Alaeddin; Abbasi, Ghasem

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, mathematical simulation of bioheat transfer phenomenon within the living tissue is studied using the thermal wave model. Three different sources that have therapeutic applications in laser surgery, cornea laser heating and cancer hyperthermia are used. Spatial and transient heating source, on the skin surface and inside biological body, are considered by using step heating, sinusoidal and constant heating. Mathematical simulations describe a non-Fourier process. Exact solution for the corresponding non-Fourier bioheat transfer model that has time lag in its heat flux is proposed using strongly continuous semigroup theory in conjunction with variational methods. The abstract differential equation, infinitesimal generator and corresponding strongly continuous semigroup are proposed. It is proved that related semigroup is a contraction semigroup and is exponentially stable. Mathematical simulations are done for skin burning and thermal therapy in 10 different models and the related solutions are depicted. Unlike numerical solutions, which suffer from uncertain physical results, proposed analytical solutions do not have unwanted numerical oscillations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Formation Mechanism of Type IV Failure in High Cr Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel-Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Tsukamoto, S.; Shirane, T.; Abe, F.

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of type IV failure has been investigated by using a conventional 9Cr ferritic heat-resistant steel Gr.92. In order to clarify the main cause of type IV failure, different heat treatments were performed on the base metal in order to change the prior austenite grain (PAG) size and precipitate distribution after applying the heat-affected zone (HAZ) simulated thermal cycle at the peak temperature of around A c3 ( A c3 HAZ thermal cycle) and postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The microstructural evolution during the A c3 HAZ thermal cycle and PWHT was investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that M23C6 carbides were scarcely precipitated at the newly formed fine PAG, block, and lath boundaries in A c3 HAZ-simulated Gr.92, because the carbide forming elements such as Cr and C were segregated at the former PAG and block boundaries of the base metal. On the other hand, if all the boundaries were covered by sufficient M23C6 carbides by homogenization of the alloying elements prior to applying the HAZ thermal cycle, the creep strength was much improved even if the fine PAG was formed. From these results, it is concluded that fine-grained microstructure cannot account for the occurrence of type IV failure, and it only has a small effect during long-term creep. The most important factor is the precipitate formation behavior at various boundaries. Without sufficient boundary strengthening by precipitates, the microstructure of A c3 HAZ undergoes severe changes even during PWHT and causes premature failure during creep.

  20. Study on DC welding parameters of Al-alloy shaping based on arc-welding robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Al-alloy arc-welding shaping system based on arc-welding robot is established, and the Al-alloy shaping manufacture is realized with the DC (direct current) gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The research indicates that the metal transfer type of DC GMAW, heat input and the initial temperature of the workpiece greatly affect the Al-alloy shaping based on arc welding robot. On the penetration, the weld width and the reinforcement, the influence of welding parameters is analyzed by generalized regression neural network (GRNN) fitting.

  1. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Sabina Luisa Campanelli; Giuseppe Casalino; Caterina Casavola; Vincenzo Moramarco

    2013-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the we...

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviors in a resistance spot weld nugget under different welding currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.; Jack; HU

    2008-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic behaviors in a resistance spot weld nugget under different welding currents are investigated based on a multiphysics coupled numerical model, which incorporates phase change and variable electrical contact resis-tances at faying surface and electrode-workpiece contact surface. The patterns of the flow field and thermal field at the end of the welding phase under different welding currents are obtained. The evolutions of fluid flow and heat transfer during the whole welding process are also revealed systematically. The analysis results are also compared with a traditional electrothermal coupled model to obtain the quantitative effects of the magnetohydrodynamic behaviors on the resistance spot weld nugget formation.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviors in a resistance spot weld nugget Under different welding currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YongBing; LIN ZhongQin; S. Jack HU; CHEN GuanLong

    2008-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic behaviors in a resistance spot weld nugget under different welding currents are investigated based on a multiphysics coupled numerical model, which incorporates phase change and variable electrical contact resis- tances at faying surface and electrode-workpiece contact surface. The patterns of the flow field and thermal field at the end of the welding phase under different welding currents are obtained. The evolutions of fluid flow and heat transfer during the whole welding process are also revealed systematically. The analysis results are also compared with a traditional electrothermal coupled model to obtain the quantitative effects of the magnetohydrodynamic behaviors on the resistance spot weld nugget formation.

  4. Fundamentals of evaluation and diagnostics of welded structures

    CERN Document Server

    Nedoseka, Anatoliy Yakovlevich

    2012-01-01

    Provides an essential guide to the key principles and problems involved in the analysis of welded structures. This title discusses design issues, key equations and calculations, and the effects of varied heat sources in relation to the temperature field in welding. It goes on to explore welding stresses and strains.$bFundamentals of evaluation and diagnostics of welded structures provides an essential guide to the key principles and problems involved in the analysis of welded structures. Chapter one discusses design issues, key equations and calculations, and the effects of varied heat sources in relation to the temperature field in welding. Chapter two goes on to explore welding stresses and strains. Fracture mechanics and the load-carrying capacity of welded structures are the focus of chapter three. Chapter four considers diagnostics and prediction of the residual life of welded structures, whilst acoustic emission techniques for the analysis of welded structures are reviewed in Chapter five. Finally, chap...

  5. Generic vapor heat treatments to control Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Peter A

    2004-08-01

    Vapor heat treatments were developed against life stages of the mealybug Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Green) (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae). Treatments tested were 47 degrees C for 5-50 min in 5-min increments and 49 degrees C for 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12 min. All tests were conducted with mixed age M. hirsutus on Chinese pea, Pisum sativum L. Treatment at 47 degrees C required 45 min to kill all M. hirsutus, whereas treatment at 49 degrees C required 10 min. The adult female and nymphal stages were the most heat tolerant at 47 degrees C, but the egg stage was the most heat tolerant at 49 degrees C. Use of the vapor heat treatments on other commodities will require achieving or exceeding the proper temperature and duration at all locations on the host where M. hirsutus may reside.

  6. Effect of heat treatment on viability of Taenia hydatigena eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttar, Birpal S; Nelson, Mark L; Busboom, Jan R; Hancock, Dale D; Walsh, Douglas B; Jasmer, Douglas P

    2013-04-01

    Effects of heat treatments on activation and infectivity of Taenia hydatigena eggs were assessed. Eggs containing oncospheres were used for in vitro and in vivo studies to determine the response to 5min of heat treatment, ranging from room temperature (22°C) to 60°C. The study demonstrated 99.47% and 100% reduction in oncosphere activation or infectivity after 5min of heat treatment at 60°C and 57.38°C under in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively. Similar results between the two approaches indicted the appropriateness of the in vitro methods to identify oncosphericidal treatments of practical significance. Similar heat treatments may also be effective against Taenia saginata and help to reduce occurrence of beef cysticercosis.

  7. Study on heat treatment blister of squeeze casting parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Wen-jun; QI Lin; QI Pi-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Heat treatment blister is one of the common defects found in squeeze casting parts, which is related to squeeze mode, process and mold. For direct squeeze-casting parts, solution heat treatment can be performed smoothly as long as oil-based paint is not used and air exhaust is well arranged. For indirect squeeze casting parts,solution heat treatment can also be applied when additional factors are taken into consideration, including well designed internal feeding system and strictly controlled liquid metal filling velocity to prevent from inclusions.

  8. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  9. Residual Stresses in Inertia-Friction-Welded Dissimilar High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, R. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Steuwer, A.; Iqbal, N.; Preuss, M.; Bray, S. E.; Rawson, M.

    2009-09-01

    The welding of dissimilar alloys is seen increasingly as a way forward to improve efficiencies in modern aeroengines, because it allows one to tailor varying material property demands across a component. Dissimilar inertia friction welding (IFW) of two high-strength steels, Aermet 100 and S/CMV, has been identified as a possible joint for rotating gas turbine components and the resulting welds are investigated in this article. In order to understand the impact of the welding process and predict the life expectancy of such structures, a detailed understanding of the residual stress fields present in the welded component is needed. By combining energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction (EDSXRD) and neutron diffraction, it has been possible to map the variations in lattice spacing of the ferritic phase on both sides of two tubular Aermet 100-S/CMV inertia friction welds (as-welded and postweld heat-treated condition) with a wall thickness of 37 mm. Laboratory-based XRD measurements were required to take into account the variation in the strain-free d-spacing across the weld region. It was found that, in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) slightly away from the weld line, residual stress fields showed tensile stresses increasing most dramatically in the hoop direction toward the weld line. Closer to the weld line, in the plastically affected zone, a sharp drop in the residual stresses was observed on both sides, although more dramatically in the S/CMV. In addition to residual stress mapping, synchrotron XRD measurements were carried out to map microstructural changes in thin slices cut from the welds. By studying the diffraction peak asymmetry of the 200- α diffraction peak, it was possible to demonstrate that a martensitic phase transformation in the S/CMV is responsible for the significant stress reduction close to the weld line. The postweld heat treatment (PWHT) chosen to avoid any overaging of the Aermet 100 and to temper the S/CMV martensite resulted in little

  10. Influence of treatment by vibration in residual stress generated in the laser welding of HSLA and IF steels; Influencia do tratamento de vibracao nas tensoes residuais geradas na soldagem a laser de acos ARBL e IF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuvas, T.C.; Fonseca, M.P. Cindra, E-mail: chuvas@vm.uff.b [Universidade Federal Fluminense (PGMEC/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Castello, D.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (DEM/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    The stress relieving treatment by vibration is a new technology under development, which has many advantages over thermal methods. In this work was analyzed the surface residual stress generated in the laser welding of biphasic HSLA and IF steels, both used in the automotive industry. Residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction, by the sen{sup 2} {Psi} method. Residual stresses generated in the welding of the samples were tensile at all points measured. After welding, the samples were submitted to the mechanical vibration treatment. Some samples presented a significant reduction in the stress values. The welded joints were also characterized by optical microscopy. (author)

  11. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed...... as a hybrid CO2-laser and GTAW welding process in 2 mm pure copper sheets. The purpose was to identify maximum welding speeds for the three independent welding processes, i.e. GTAW alone, laser alone and combined processes. After welding, representative welds were quality assesed according to inernational...... norms. The paper describes the results obtained, showing significant productivity improvements and good weld qualities applying laser hybrid welding....

  12. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed...... as a hybrid CO2-laser and GTAW welding process in 2 mm pure copper sheets. The purpose was to identify maximum welding speeds for the three independent welding processes, i.e. GTAW alone, laser alone and combined processes. After welding, representative welds were quality assesed according to inernational...... norms. The paper describes the results obtained, showing significant productivity improvements and good weld qualities applying laser hybrid welding....

  13. Research on Arc Welding Technology of Tube-to-Tube in Sheet Columbium Heat Exchanger%铌制固定管板式换热器换热管与管板的焊接工艺性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛辉; 叶建林; 董斌; 张成

    2012-01-01

    The difficulties of present studies on welding columbium tube to columbium tube sheet were briefly reviewed. Effects of welding parameters on qualities of welding joints were analyzed. The results show that specific welding structures such as slot and expansion joint change the heat conduction boundary condition of welding joints which had positive effects on welding. He-Ar mixed gas, as shielding gas, can improve the arc stiffness, thermal efficiency and penetration.%介绍了铌换热管与管板的焊接难点及在焊接过程中的解决措施.探讨了不同焊接工艺参数对焊接接头质量的影响.结果表明,采用带焊接槽和贴胀的接头结构可以改变接头的导热边界条件,有利于铌换热管与管板的焊接;采用氩气和氦气的混合气体作保护气可以提高电弧挺度、电弧热效率和焊缝熔深.

  14. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.

  15. Local equivalent welding element to predict the welding deformations of plate-type structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Considering the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of welding joint, the residual strain be-haviors of material under constraint and temperature circulation, as well as the activating mechanism of welding process, this paper addresses a new type welding element for numerical simulation of welding deformation, which is called the LEWE (the local equivalent welding element). This element can describe the basic char-acteristics of welded seam: the local position points of inherent strain, the equiva-lent size, the bending radius (or bending angle) from inherent strain, etc. It could be used to predict the welding deformation of plate-type structure. The comparisons between the computed deflection of welded plate and its experiment measurement are present. The results showed that the LEWE possesses a potential to simulate the deformation of welding process high-efficiently and precisely.

  16. Life time assessment and repair of dissimilar metal welds. Part 2; Livslaengdsbedoemning och reparation av blandsvetsskarvar. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Weilin Zang; Vinter Dahl, Kristian; Borggreen, Kjeld; Hald, John

    2007-12-15

    Phase 1 of the project showed that the research on dissimilar metal welds mainly has focussed on those including austenitic stainless steels. In addition, it was found that damage in dissimilar metal welds in Swedish and Danish power plants were frequent. In the present project the common type of dissimilar welds in the Nordic countries were studied; those between heat resistant low alloy steels and martensitic 9-12 % Cr steels. Three trial welds with three different filler materials were fabricated. The parent metals were 2,25Cr1Mo and 12Cr1MoV (X20) steels. The filler materials were 5Cr1Mo, 12Cr1MoV and a Ni-base alloy. One half of each weld was post weld heat treated (PWHT) at 650 deg C and the other half at 750 deg C. Then, a number of heat treatments at 600-660 deg C/1000 h to simulate service exposure for 50,000 to 200,000 h at 540 deg were carried out on test samples from the welds. The samples were studied metallographically, including measurements of hardness profiles and carbon content profiles. Thermodynamical simulations and creep damage simulations of butt welds were performed with data of the trial weld as a starting point. The purpose of the study was to get a throughout understanding of the creep behaviour of dissimilar metal welds, how their groove and fabrication can be improved, how their life time can be prolonged and how dissimilar weld should be non-destructively tested with respect to creep damage. From the results the following results may be drawn: - Carburised and decarburised zones develop during the PWHT. The zones are small with a PWHT at 650 deg C and relatively large at 750 deg C. They appear as measurable zones in the microstructure. 5Cr weld metal gives smaller zones than 12Cr weld metal. With the Ni-base weld metal intermittent decarburised zones could be observed across the wall after PWHT at 750 deg C. - The thermodynamical simulations predicted carburised and decarburised zones with sizes in agreement with corresponding heat

  17. Numerical methods in simulation of resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2015-01-01

    Finite element simulation of resistance welding requires coupling betweenmechanical, thermal and electrical models. This paper presents the numerical models and theircouplings that are utilized in the computer program SORPAS. A mechanical model based onthe irreducible flow formulation is utilized...... a resistance welding point of view, the most essential coupling between the above mentioned models is the heat generation by electrical current due to Joule heating. The interaction between multiple objects is anothercritical feature of the numerical simulation of resistance welding because it influences...

  18. Fabrication and heat treatment of high strength Al-Cu-Mg alloy processed using selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hu; Zhu, Haihong; Nie, Xiaojia; Qi, Ting; Hu, Zhiheng; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    The proposed paper illustrates the fabrication and heat treatment of high strength Al-Cu-Mg alloy produced by selective laser melting (SLM) process. Al-Cu-Mg alloy is one of the heat treatable aluminum alloys regarded as difficult to fusion weld. SLM is an additive manufacturing technique through which components are built by selectively melting powder layers with a focused laser beam. The process is characterized by short laser-powder interaction times and localized high heat input, which leads to steep thermal gradients, rapid solidification and fast cooling. In this research, 3D Al-Cu-Mg parts with relative high density of 99.8% are produced by SLM from gas atomized powders. Room temperature tensile tests reveal a remarkable mechanical behavior: the samples show yield and tensile strengths of about 276 MPa and 402 MPa, respectively, along with fracture strain of 6%. The effect of solution treatment on microstructure and related tensile properties is examined and the results demonstrate that the mechanical behavior of the SLMed Al-Cu-Mg samples can be greatly enhanced through proper heat treatment. After T4 solution treatment at 540°C, under the effect of precipitation strengthening, the tensile strength and the yield strength increase to 532 MPa and 338 MPa, respectively, and the elongation increases to 13%.

  19. The Investigation of Structure Heterogeneous Joint Welds in Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubimova Lyudmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding joints of dissimilar steels don’t withstand design life. One of the important causes of premature destructions can be the acceleration of steel structural degradation due to cyclic mechanical and thermal gradients. Two zones of tube from steel 12H18N9T, exhibiting the structural instability at early stages of the decomposition of a supersaturated solid austenite solution, were subjected to investigation. Methods of x-ray spectral and structure analysis, micro hardnessmetry were applied for the research. Made the following conclusions, inside and outside tube wall surfaces of hazardous zones in welding joint have different technological and resource characteristics. The microhardness very sensitive to changes of metal structure and can be regarded as integral characteristic of strength and ductility. The welding processes are responsible for the further fibering of tube wall structure, they impact to the characteristics of hot-resistance and long-term strength due to development of ring cracks in the welding joint of pipeline. The monitoring of microhardness and structural phase conversions can be used for control by changes of mechanical properties in result of post welding and reductive heat treatment of welding joints.

  20. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  1. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling......Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  2. Observations of Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Spot Welds Using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S

    2003-10-29

    Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) measurements are made in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) spot welds. Both the {gamma} {yields} {delta} and {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformations are monitored as a function of time during the rapid spot weld heating and cooling cycles. These observations are then correlated with calculated thermal cycles. Where the peak temperatures are highest ({approx}1342 C), the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to completion, leaving a ferritic microstructure at the end of heating. With lower peak temperatures, the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to only partial completion, resulting in a microstructure containing both transformed and untransformed austenite. Further analyses of the individual diffraction patterns show shifts in the peak positions and peak widths as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, these changes in the peak characteristics are correlated with measured changes in the ferrite volume fraction. Such changes in the peak positions and widths during the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation provide an indication of changes occurring in each phase. These changes in peak properties can be correlated with the diffusion of nitrogen and other substitutional alloying elements, which are recognized as the primary mechanisms for this transformation. Upon cooling, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformation is observed to proceed from both the completely and partially transformed microstructural regions in the TRXRD data. An examination of the resulting microstructures confirms the TRXRD observation as the evidence shows that austenite both nucleates and grows from the ferritic microstructure at locations closest to the fusion zone boundary and grows from untransformed austenite grains at locations further from this boundary.

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructural Changes in Aluminium Bronze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hájek J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to summarise the microstructural changes which take place in aluminium bronzes during heat treatment. Another objective of this study was to map the potential of a certain type of aluminium bronzes for undergoing martensitic transformation. The methods, which were chosen for assessing the results of heat treatment with regard to their availability, included measurement of hardness and observation of microstructure using light and scanning electron microscopy, Additional tools for evaluation of microstructure comprised measurement of microhardness and chemical analysis by EDS. An important part of the experiment is observation of microstructural changes in the Jominy bar during the end-quench test. Upon completing experiments of this kind, one can define the heat treatment conditions necessary for obtaining optimum properties. In addition, the paper presents important findings on how to improve the corrosion resistance of aluminium bronzes by special heat treatment sequences.

  4. Protection of phosphatidylcholine to photosystemⅡ membrane during heat treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Photosystem Ⅱ membrane was reconstituted with phosphatidylcholine (PC) with different kinds of fatty acyl chains and the protection of PC to photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) membrane during heat treatment was investigated using oxygen electrode, variable fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Heat treatment decreased the oxygen evolution rate and the F′v/Fm′ ratio of PSⅡ membrane and influenced CD spectra of PSⅡ membrane, but PC inhibited the effect of heat treatment on the oxygen evolution rate, the F′v/F′m ratio and CD spectra of PSⅡ membrane. The results indicate that PC can protect PSⅡ membrane against heat treatment and the alterations in the unsaturated fatty acid extent in PC can cause the changes of the protection ability.

  5. Effects of Surface Alloying and Laser Beam Treatment on the Microstructure and Wear Behaviour of Surfaces Modified Using Submerged Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regita BENDIKIENE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of surface alloying of cheap plain carbon steel using submerged metal arc technique and subsequent laser beam treatment on the microstructure and wear behaviour of surfaced layers were studied. This method is the cheapest one to obtain high alloyed coatings, because there is no need to apply complex technologies of powder making (metal powder is spread on the surface of base metal or inserted into the flux, it is enough to grind, granulate and blend additional materials. On the other hand, strengthening of superficial layers of alloys by thermal laser radiation is one of the applications of laser. Surface is strengthened by concentrated laser beam focused into teeny area (from section of mm till some mm. Teeny area of metal heat up rapidly and when heat is drain to the inner metal layers giving strengthening effect. Steel surface during this treatment exceeds critical temperatures, if there is a need to strengthen deeper portions of the base metal it is possible even to fuse superficial layer. The results presented in this paper are based on micro-structural and micro-chemical analyses of the surfaced and laser beam treated surfaces and are supported by analyses of the hardness, the wear resistance and resultant microstructures. Due to the usage of waste raw materials a significant improvement (~ 30 % in wear resistance was achieved. The maximum achieved hardness of surfaced layer was 62 HRC, it can be compared with high alloyed conventional steel grade. Wear properties of overlays with additional laser beam treatment showed that weight loss of these layers was ~10 % lower compared with overlays after welding; consequently it is possible to replace high alloyed conventional steel grades forming new surfaces or restoring worn machine elements and tools.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.7621

  6. Effects of Surface Alloying and Laser Beam Treatment on the Microstructure and Wear Behaviour of Surfaces Modified Using Submerged Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regita BENDIKIENE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of surface alloying of cheap plain carbon steel using submerged metal arc technique and subsequent laser beam treatment on the microstructure and wear behaviour of surfaced layers were studied. This method is the cheapest one to obtain high alloyed coatings, because there is no need to apply complex technologies of powder making (metal powder is spread on the surface of base metal or inserted into the flux, it is enough to grind, granulate and blend additional materials. On the other hand, strengthening of superficial layers of alloys by thermal laser radiation is one of the applications of laser. Surface is strengthened by concentrated laser beam focused into teeny area (from section of mm till some mm. Teeny area of metal heat up rapidly and when heat is drain to the inner metal layers giving strengthening effect. Steel surface during this treatment exceeds critical temperatures, if there is a need to strengthen deeper portions of the base metal it is possible even to fuse superficial layer. The results presented in this paper are based on micro-structural and micro-chemical analyses of the surfaced and laser beam treated surfaces and are supported by analyses of the hardness, the wear resistance and resultant microstructures. Due to the usage of waste raw materials a significant improvement (~ 30 % in wear resistance was achieved. The maximum achieved hardness of surfaced layer was 62 HRC, it can be compared with high alloyed conventional steel grade. Wear properties of overlays with additional laser beam treatment showed that weight loss of these layers was ~10 % lower compared with overlays after welding; consequently it is possible to replace high alloyed conventional steel grades forming new surfaces or restoring worn machine elements and tools.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.7621

  7. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  8. Study of Gravity Effects on Titanium Laser Welding in the Vertical Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Baohua; Yuan, Zhang; Pu, Haitao; Li, Haigang; Cheng, Hao; Du, Dong; Shan, Jiguo

    2017-09-08

    To obtain satisfactory welds in positional laser beam welding, it is necessary to know how process parameters will influence the quality of welds in different welding positions. In this study, the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V sheets were laser welded in two vertical welding positions (vertical up and vertical down), and the appearance, porosity, strength, and ductility of the laser joints were evaluated. Results show that undercuts of the vertical up welds were greater than that of vertical down welds, while the porosity contents were much higher in vertical down welds than that in vertical up welds. When welding with a higher heat input, the vertical up welding position resulted in poor weld profiles (undercuts and burn-through holes), whereas the vertical down welding position led to excessive porosity contents in welds. Both severe undercut and excessive porosity were detrimental to the tensile properties of the welds. Weld appearance was improved and porosity contents were reduced by using a lower heat input, achieving better weld quality. Therefore, it is suggested that process parameter settings with relatively high laser powers and welding speeds, which can result in lower heat inputs, are used when laser welding the Ti6Al4V titanium alloys vertically.

  9. The Research of Welding Residual Stress Based Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Bai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding residual stress was caused by local heating during the welding process, tensile residual stress reduce fatigue strength and corrosion resistance, Compressive residual stress decreases stability limit. So it will produce brittle fracture, reduce working life and strength of workpiece; Based on the simulation of welding process with finite element method, calculate the welding temperature field and residual stress, and then measure residual stress in experiments, So as to get the best welding technology and welding parameters, to reduce welding residual stress effective, it has very important significance.

  10. Nucleation and growth of titanium aluminide in an explosion-welded laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Pavlyukova, D. V.; Yartsev, P. S.; Golovin, E. D.

    2012-10-01

    Processes of nucleation and growth of titanium aluminide in a 23-layer aluminum-titanium composite produced by explosion welding have been studied. In the vortex zones of seven upper welds, microvolumes of melted metal whose microhardness is ˜5500 MPa have been revealed, which corresponds to the microhardness of the intermetallic compound Al3Ti. No formation of titanium aluminide in welded junctions that were not subjected to additional heat treatment has been revealed by X-ray diffraction. The holding of the composites at 630°C is accompanied by the formation of interlayers of intermetallic compounds of the Al3Ti type. Intermetallic compounds of two morphological types are formed in the welds. In the regions of vortex zones, compact precipitates of Al3Ti are formed; in the other regions of the welds, intermetallic compounds in the form of a film are precipitated. The intermetallic compounds of the first type grow more rapidly and in final account absorb the precipitates of the film type. The activation of diffusion in the upper junctions that occurs upon heating of the welded composites is favored by the nonequilibrium state of the material caused by the strain hardening of the initial samples. In the welds located deeper than the 13th layer, no signs of the formation of compact intermetallic compounds have been revealed upon the annealing for 5 h and less.

  11. Characterization on strength and toughness of welded joint for Q550 steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jiang Qinglei; Li Yajiang; Wang Juan; Zhang Lei

    2011-02-01

    Q550 high strength steel was welded using gas shielded arc welding and three different welding wires without pre- or post-heat treatments. The paper investigates the influence of welding wire on the microstructure, tensile strength and impact toughness of Q550 steel weld joints. Results showed that the microstructure of the weld metal of joints produced using ER50-6 wire was a mixture of acicular ferrite and grain boundary ferrite including pro-eutectoid ferrite and ferrite side plate. Acicular ferrite was mainly obtained in the weld metal of the joints produced using MK.G60-1 wire. Pro-eutectoid ferrite was present along the boundary of prior austenite. Crack initiation occurred easily at pro-eutectoid ferrite when the joint was subjected to tensile. Tensile strength and impact toughness were promoted with increasing acicular ferrite. Tensile strength of the joint fabricated using MK.G60-1 wire was close to that of base metal. And tensile samples fractured at location of the fusion zone, which had lower toughness and thus became the weak region in the joint. Impact absorbing energy was the highest in the heat affected zone. Fibrous region in fracture surfaces of impact specimens was characterized as transgranular fracture with the mechanism of micro-void coalescence. Acicular ferrite microstructure region corresponded to relatively large dimples while boundary ferrite microstructure corresponded to small dimples.

  12. Microstructure characterization and weldability evaluation of the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) in 310HCbN tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Metallographic evaluation on the Gleeble simulated HAZ samples of 310HCbN tubing material was performed in order to reveal potential degradation in mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The carbide evolutionary process in the HAZ samples was studied. It is indicated that 310HCbN material showed a weld HAZ sensitization tendency that is associated with the formation of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6}.

  13. Effect of Welding Thermal Cycles on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Simulated Heat Affected Zone for a Weldox 1300 Ultra-High Strength Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węglowski M. St.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the investigation of weldability of ultra-high strength steel has been presented. The thermal simulated samples were used to investigate the effect of welding cooling time t8/5 on microstructure and mechanical properties of heat affected zone (HAZ for a Weldox 1300 ultra-high strength steel. In the frame of these investigation the microstructure was studied by light and transmission electron microscopies. Mechanical properties of parent material were analysed by tensile, impact and hardness tests. In details the influence of cooling time in the range of 2,5 ÷ 300 sec. on hardness, impact toughness and microstructure of simulated HAZ was studied by using welding thermal simulation test. The microstructure of ultra-high strength steel is mainly composed of tempered martensite. The results show that the impact toughness and hardness decrease with increase of t8/5 under condition of a single thermal cycle in simulated HAZ. The increase of cooling time to 300 s causes that the microstructure consists of ferrite and bainite mixture. Lower hardness, for t8/5 ≥ 60 s indicated that low risk of cold cracking in HAZ for longer cooling time, exists.

  14. Influence of Strain-Hardened Zones and Intermetallic Layers of Explosion Welded and Heat Treated Al/Cu Laminated Metal Composites on the Evolution of Thermal Conductivity Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy TRYKOV

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study laminated Al/Cu composite was obtained by explosion welding. The effect of strain-hardened zones and the intermetallic layer on thermal conductivity coefficient was investigated. For this purpose the specimens after explosion welding and after subsequent annealing to obtain the intermetallic layer were studied by X-ray methods and means of optical microscopy to determine the phase composition and the width of intermetallic layer. The microhardness tests were carried out to identify the width of the strain-hardened zones and the intermetallic layer. The thermal conductivity coefficient of the composite was experimentally measured to calculate the thermal properties of the strain-hardened zones and intermetallic layer. The width of the strain-hardened zone and the intermetallic layer was 80 μm and 160 μm respectively. The heat conductivity coefficients of the strain-hardened zones and intermetallic layer were 108 W/(m×K and less than 35 W/(m×K respectively. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4602

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Heat Transfer in Loaded Continuous Heat Treatment Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Jin-wu; HUANG Tian-you; PURUSHOTHAMAN Radhakrishnan; WANG Wei-wei; RONG Yi-ming

    2004-01-01

    Continuous furnaces are widely used in the heat treatment of mass-produced parts. However, the heating up process of parts in continuous furnace is still decided by experience. In this paper the heat transfer in the continuous furnace is formulated firstly. The heat balance in each zone is discussed and equations are given. Coupled with the model for heat transfer between workpieces and furnace and the heat transfer in the workload as well presented in the former developed CHT-bf for batch furnaces, a program CHT-cf for continuous furnaces was developed. The model deals with two typical movements of parts: continuous or step by step. The moving speed of parts and load pattern can be optimized based on the calculated temperature distributions and curves, especially, the fastest heated and slowest-heated temperature-distance profiles. A case study is carried out for the heat treatment of a kind of hook-shaped part. The calculated results are analyzed and in good agreement with the measured ones.

  16. Numerical evaluation of multipass welding temperature field in API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nóbrega

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many are the metallurgical changes suffered by materials when subjected to welding thermal cycle, promoting a considerable influence on the welded structures thermo mechanical properties. In project phase, one alternative for evaluating the welding cycle variable, would be the employment of computational methods through simulation. So, this paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field in a multipass welding of API 5L X80 steel used for oil and gas transportation, using the ABAQUS ® software, based on Finite Elements Method (FEM. During the simulation complex phenomena are considerable including: Variation in physical and mechanical properties of materials as a function of temperature, welding speed and the different mechanisms of heat exchange with the environment (convection and radiation were used. These considerations allow a more robust mathematical modeling for the welding process. An analytical heat source proposed by Goldak, to model the heat input in order to characterize the multipass welding through the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process on root and the SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes were used. So, it was possible to evaluate the effect of each welding pass on the welded joint temperature field, through the temperature peaks and cooling rates values during the welding process.

  17. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  18. Three-dimensional finite element analysis for estimation of the weld residual stress in the dissimilar butt weld piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Man Won; Lee, Sung Ho [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Numerous dissimilar metal welds are used to connect carbon steel and stainless steel in nuclear power plants. Recently, some cracks have occurred in the dissimilar metal welds, and welding residual stress is considered as a contributing factor to the cracks. In this study, welding residual stresses in dissimilar butt weld piping were evaluated by the 3-dimensional (3-D) finite element method. Welding residual stresses along the circumference of heat affected zones as well as weld regions were obtained through the analysis, which could not be obtainable with 2-dimensional (2-D) analysis. The differences between 2-D analysis and 3-D analysis are presented in this paper.

  19. Changes in Precipitate Distributions and the Microstructural Evolution of P24/P91 Dissimilar Metal Welds During PWHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Karl E.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Chi, Kuangnan; Barnard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The effect of post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) on the evolution of precipitate phases in dissimilar metal welds made between 9 pct Cr P91 alloy and 2.25 pct Cr T/P24-type weld metal has been investigated. Sections of multi-pass fusion welds were analyzed in their as welded condition and after PWHTs of 2 and 8 hour duration at 1003 K (730 °C). Thin foil specimens and carbon extraction replicas have been examined in transmission electron microscopes in order to identify precipitate phases and substantiate their distributions in close proximity to the fusion line. The findings of these studies confirm that a carbon-depleted region develops in the lower alloyed weld material, adjacent to the weld interface, during thermal processing. A corresponding carbon enriched region is formed, simultaneously, in the coarse grain heat affected zone of the P91 parent alloy. It has been demonstrated that carbon depletion from the weld alloy results in the dissolution of M7C3 and M23C6 chromium carbides. However, micro-alloying additions of vanadium and niobium which are made to both the P24 and P91 alloys facilitate the precipitation of stable, nano-scale, MX carbonitride particles. This work demonstrates that these particles, which are of key importance to the strength of ferritic creep resistant alloys, are retained in carbon-depleted regions. The microstructural stability which is conferred by their retention means that the pernicious effects of recrystallization are largely avoided.

  20. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  1. Degradation Processes of Al-Zn Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding of metal materials belongs to non-demountable joints. Current trend especially in an automotive industry is to join materials with a different melting temperature. Most of all, there are dural profiles with ferrite or austenite steel. The reason for this is the effort to lower the weight of the whole construction and at the same time preserve sufficient mechanical characteristics. However, there is a big risk of different electrical potentials of both of these metals in this type of non-demountable joints. The experimental part of this paper brings evaluation of mechanical-corrosion processes of overlapped joints produced by the CMT (cold metal transfer method. The base material for weld bead is dural sheet AlMg3 and dural sheet with a surface treatment aluzinc DX51D+AZ 150. Material AlSi5 in the form of a wire was used as an additional material for a welding bath. Method CMT was used in order to create a weld bead. Initial analysis of weld bead was done visually using a binocular microscope. Further, a metallographic analysis of weld bead and base material was processed. The aim was to identify the heat affected area around the welded joint. Microhardness of intermetallic aluminium phases was measured, after the identification of intermetallic phases a chemical analysis EDS was processed. Prepared samples underwent corrosion degradation in a salt spray environment in compliance with the norm ČSN EN ISO 9227. Visual and metallographic evaluation of the individual samples was processed after every week of exposition to the salt spray environment. The goal of this experiment was to record the initial impulse of galvanic corrosion which consists in corrosion degradation in the area of welded joint.

  2. Optical fiber temperature sensors: applications in heat treatments for foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Morales, María Elena; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2010-10-01

    Heat treatments are important methods to provide safe foods. Conventional heat treatments involve the application of steam and recently microwave treatments have been studied and applied as they are considered as fast, clean and efficient. Optical fiber sensing is an excellent tool to measure the temperature during microwave treatments. This paper shows the application of optical fiber temperature sensing during the heat treatment of different foods such as vegetables (jalapeño pepper and cilantro), cheese and ostrich meat. Reaching the target temperature, important bacteria were inactivated: Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia coli. Thus, the use of optical fiber sensors has resulted be a useful way to develop protocols to inactivate microorganisms and to propose new methods for food processing.

  3. An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

    2006-12-31

    An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

  4. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behaviour of LMD Produced 2.4682 and Wrought 2.4630 Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Göbel, Marco

    A bearing made of Stellite 31 (2.4682) has to be welded onto a housing of Nimonic 75 (2.4630) by autogenous laser beam welding. The bearing part is produced by laser metal deposition (LMD), the housing consists of wrought sheet metal. An investigation is undertaken in order to study the effect of the anisotropy of the LMD part on the weld quality. Tensile specimens were produced and tested under varying load directions and test temperatures, and application of different weld heat treatments. The fractured specimens were analysed by metallography and fractography. Tensile tests at room temperature show a dependency of the fracture location and the mode of failure on the load direction with respect to the layer direction in conjunction with the heat treatment. At elevated temperature of 750° all specimens broke in the base material of 2.4630 in ductile fracture mode. Strength measured supersedes the values of either of the base materials.

  5. Efficacy of heat treatment for disinfestation of concrete grain silos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opit, G P; Arthur, F H; Bonjour, E L; Jones, C L; Phillips, T W

    2011-08-01

    Field experiments were conducted in 2007 and 2008 to evaluate heat treatment for disinfestations of empty concrete elevator silos. A Mobile Heat Treatment Unit was used to introduce heat into silos to attain target conditions of 50 degrees C for at least 6 h. Ventilated plastic containers with a capacity of 100 g of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., held Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Polyvinyl chloride containers with a capacity of 300 g of wheat held adults of Liposcelis corrodens (Heymons) (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) and Liposcelis decolor (Pearman), which were contained in 35-mm Petri dishes within the grain. Containers were fastened to a rope suspended from the top of the silo at depths of 0 m (just under the top manhole), 10 m, 20 m, and 30 m (silo floor). When the highest temperature achieved was approximately 50 degrees C for 6 h, parental mortality ofR. dominica and T. castaneum, and both psocid species was 98-100%. Progeny production of R. dominica occurred when there was parental survival, but in general R. dominica seemed less impacted by the heat treatment than T. castaneum. There was 100% mortality of L. corrodens at all depths in the heat treatments but only 92.5% mortality for L. decolor, with most survivors located in the bioassay containers at the top of the silo. Results show wheat kernels may have an insulating effect and heat treatment might be more effective when used in conjunction with sanitation and cleaning procedures.

  6. Transient analysis of heat and mass transfer during heat treatment of wood including pressure equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younsi Ramdane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, three-dimensional equations for coupled heat and mass conservation equations for wood are solved to study the transient heat and mass transfer during high thermal treatment of wood. The model is based on Luikov’s approach, including pressure. The model equations are solved numerically by the commercial package FEMLfor the temperature and moisture content histories under different treatment conditions. The simulation of the proposed conjugate problem allows the assessment of the effect of the heat and mass transfer within wood. A parametric study was also carried out to determine the effects of several parameters such as initial moisture content and the sample thickness on the temperature, pressure and moisture content distributions within the samples during heat treatment.

  7. Modelo descritivo do fluxo de calor em soldagem a arco visando o conceito de calor imposto efetivo Descriptive model of the heat flow in arc welding targeting the concept of effective heat input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Scotti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho é propor um modelo global para descrever o fluxo de calor em soldagem a arco, visando o entendimento dos fenômenos relacionados com o fluxo de calor. A tentativa é suprir uma lacuna do conhecimento gerado entre a aplicação de modelos analíticos simplificados (não totalmente realistas e de modelos numéricos (que mascaram a visão física dos fenômenos. Inicia-se propondo uma descrição mais física para a razão da queda de tensão num arco, baseada na geração e perda de calor para se manter o equilíbrio da desionização e reionização, em contraste com a abordagem em que o arco é comparável a um resistor elétrico. Em seguida, se propõe um modelo descritivo da subsistência térmica de um arco, para qualificar as formas de transferência de calor do arco para a chapa. Um segundo modelo descritivo é então proposto para explicar como o calor entra, difunde e sai da chapa durante a soldagem. Finalmente, é discutido como a aplicação destes dois modelos de forma global permite entender que nem todo o fluxo de calor do arco para a chapa vai afetar a velocidade de resfriamento nas regiões do material aquecidas. Culmina-se com a proposta do emprego do termo Calor Imposto Efetivo como meio de evidenciar o parâmetro de calor de importância a ser determinado em soldagem.The objective of the present paper is to propose a global model for describing heat flow in arc welding, aiming the understanding of the phenomena involved. The attempt is to fill out a gap of knowledge which has been generated between the application of simplified analytical models (not totally realistic and numerical models (that disguises the physics of the phenomena. Initially, a physic-oriented description of the reasons for welding arc voltage drop is presented. This description is based on the heat generation and its losses to maintain the balance between deionization and reionization, in contrast to the approach that the arc

  8. Effect of heat treatment on corrosion behavior of duplex coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raghu Ram Mohan Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, duplex WC-Co/NiCrAlY coating is coated onto Ti6Al4V substrate and vacuum heat treatment is employed to investigate the corrosion behavior of heat treated samples as well as Ti6Al4V substrate for comparison. In this duplex coating system, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF process is used to deposit NiCrAlY interlayer with a constant thickness of 200 μm and WC-Co ceramic top layer with varying thickness of 250 μm, 350 μm and 450 μm deposited by Detonation Spray (DS process. Different heat treatment temperatures (600–1150 °C were employed for the coated samples to study the microstructure and the effect on corrosion resistance of the duplex coatings. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried to investigate the corrosion performance of duplex coated heat treated samples and the substrate in Ringer’s solution at 37 °C and prepared the pH to 5.7. The microstructure upon corrosion after heat treatment was characterized by SEM analysis to understand the corrosion behavior. The results disclosed that at all heat treatment temperatures, all the coated samples exhibited better corrosion resistance than the base substrate. However, during 950 °C and 1150 °C heat treatment temperatures, it was observed highest corrosion potential than 600 °C and 800 °C. The 350 μm thickness, coated sample exhibited highest corrosion resistance compared to other two coated samples and the substrate at all heat treatment temperatures.

  9. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  10. Study of issues in difficult-to-weld thick materials by hybrid laser arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar Atabaki, Mehdi

    . The heat and mass transfer and the issues in joining of dissimilar alloys by the hybrid laser/arc welding process (HLAW) were explicitly explained in details. A finite element model was developed to simulate the heat transfer in HLAW of the aluminum alloys. Two double-ellipsoidal heat source models were considered to describe the heat input of the gas metal arc welding and laser welding processes. An experimental procedure was also developed for joining thick advanced high strength steel plates by using the HLAW, by taking into consideration different butt joint configurations. The geometry of the weld groove was optimized according to the requirements of ballistic test, where the length of the softened heat affected zone should be less than 15.9 mm measured from the weld centerline. Since the main issue in HLAW of the AHSS was the formation of the pores, the possible mechanisms of the pores formation and their mitigation methods during the welding process were investigated. Mitigation methods were proposed to reduce the pores inside in the weld area and the influence of each method on the process stability was investigated by an on-line monitoring system of the HLAW process. The groove angle was optimized for the welding process based on the allowed amount of heat input along the TRICLADRTM interface generated by an explosive welding. The weld was fractured in the heat affected zone of the aluminum side in the tensile test. The microharness was shown that the temperature variation caused minor softening in the heat affected zone satisfying the requirement that the width of the softened heat affected zone in the steel side falls within 15.9 mm far away from the weld centerline. The microstructure analysis showed the presence of tempered martensite at the vicinity of the weld area, which it was a cause of softening in the heat affected zone.

  11. Elucidation of phenomena in high-power fiber laser welding and development of prevention procedures of welding defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiji; Kawahito, Yousuke

    2009-02-01

    Fiber lasers have been receiving considerable attention because of their advantages of high power, high beam quality and high efficiency, and are expected as one of the desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In our researches, therefore, the effects of laser powers and their densities on the weld penetration and the formation of sound welds were investigated in welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel, A5052 aluminum alloy or high strength steel plates with four laser beams of about 0.12 to 1 mm in focused spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were observed with high-speed video cameras and X-ray transmission real-time imaging system. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, but on the other hand at low welding speeds deeper-penetration welds could be produced at higher power. Laser-induced plume behavior and its effect on weld penetration, and the mechanisms of spattering, underfilling, porosity and humping were elucidated, sound welds without welding defects could be produced under the improved welding conditions. In addition, importance of the development of focusing optics and the removal of a plume during remote welding will be emphasized in terms of the stable production of constant deep-penetration welds and the reduction in welding defects in high power laser welding.

  12. Influence of the Surface Layer when the CMT Process Is Used for Welding Steel Sheets Treated by Nitrooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Michalec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrooxidation is a non-conventional surface treatment method that can provide significantly improved mechanical properties as well as corrosion resistance. However, the surface layer is a major problem during the welding process, and welding specialists face many problems regarding the weldability of steel sheets. This paper deals with the properties of a nitrooxidized surface layer, and evaluates ways of welding steel sheets treated by nitrooxidation using a Cold Metal Transfer (CMT process. The limited heat input and the controlled metal transfer, which are considered as the main advantage of the CMT process, have a negative impact on weld joint quality. An excessive amount of porosity is observed,probably due to the high content of nitrogen and oxygen in the surface layer of the material and the fast cooling rate of the weld pool.

  13. COLOR CHANGE OF CHINESE FIR THROUGH STEAM-HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Cao,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dark brown wood color is a current trend and widely appreciated by consumers in the furniture and decoration markets. Heat treatment is one of the most effective methods to darken wood’s appearance. The influence of steam-heat treatment on color change of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb. Hook. was investigated within the temperature range from 170 to 230 oC and time from 1 to 5 hours in an air-tight chamber within an atmosphere comprising less than 2 percent oxygen. Saturated steam was used as a heating medium and a shielding gas. The results showed that the chroma difference (△C* decreased gradually, while the color difference (△E* and hue difference (△H* increased with an increase in temperature and length of time. An analysis of variance (ANOVA and a multi-comparison analysis revealed that the treatment temperature plays a more important role in darkening wood color during the process of steam-heat treatment in comparison with the treatment time. The results suggest that a more desirable wood color can be achieved with the technology of steam-heat treatment.

  14. A Comparison of Residual Stress Development in Inertia Friction Welded Fine Grain and Coarse Grain Nickel-Base Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, N.; Rolph, J.; Moat, R.; Hughes, D.; Hofmann, M.; Kelleher, J.; Baxter, G.; Withers, P. J.; Preuss, M.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the base material microstructure on the development of residual stresses across the weld line in inertia friction welds (IFWs) of high-strength nickel-base superalloy RR1000 was studied using neutron diffraction. A comparison was carried out between tubular IFW specimens generated from RR1000 heat treated below (fine grain (FG) structure) and above (coarse grain (CG) structure) the γ'-solvus. Residual stresses were mapped in the as-welded (AW) condition and, after a postweld heat treatment (PWHT), optimized for maximum alloy strength. The highest tensile stresses were generally found in the hoop direction at the weld line near the inner diameter of the tubular-shaped specimens. A comparison between the residual stresses generated in FG and CG RR1000 suggests that the starting microstructure has little influence on the maximum residual stresses generated in the weld even though different levels of energy must be input to achieve a successful weld in each case. The residual stresses in the postweld heat treated samples were about 35 pct less than for the AW condition. Despite the fact that the high-temperature properties of the two parent microstructures are different, no significant differences in terms of stress relief were found between the FG and CG RR1000 IFWs. Since the actual weld microstructures of FG and CG RR1000 inertia welds are very similar, the results suggest that it is the weld microstructure and its associated high-temperature properties rather than the parent material that affects the overall weld stress distribution and its subsequent stress relief.

  15. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  16. Parametric optimisation and microstructural analysis on high power Yb-fibre laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, J.; Chen, L.; Davies, C. M.; Dear, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    In this work thin sheets of Ti-6Al-4V were full penetration welded using a 5 kW fibre laser in order to evaluate the effectiveness of high power fibre laser as a welding processing tool for welding Ti-6Al-4