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Sample records for weighted magnetic resonance

  1. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: mvmfonte@uol.com.br; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Reed, Umbertina Conti [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2008-11-15

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  2. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the prostate transition zone: histopathological validation using magnetic resonance-guided biopsy specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, C.M.A.; Vos, E.K.; Bomers, J.G.R.; Barentsz, J.O.; Kaa, C.A. van de; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the differentiation of transition zone cancer from non-cancerous transition zone with and without prostatitis and for the differentiation of tran

  3. Role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical value of diffusion-weight- ed imaging (DWI) for the diagnosis of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC) by comparing the diagnostic sensitivity of DWI and magnetic resonance cholan-giopancreatography (MRCP). METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging examination was performed in 56 patients with suspected EHCC. T1- weighted imaging, T2-weighted imaging, MRCP and DWI sequence, DWI using single-shot spin-echo echoplanar imaging sequence with different b values (100, 300, 500, 800 and 1...

  4. Comparison among T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Modified Dixon Method, and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Measuring Bone Marrow Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An increasing number of studies are utilizing different magnetic resonance (MR methods to quantify bone marrow fat due to its potential role in osteoporosis. Our aim is to compare the measurements of bone marrow fat among T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, modified Dixon method (also called fat fraction MRI (FFMRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. Methods. Contiguous MRI scans were acquired in 27 Caucasian postmenopausal women with a modified Dixon method (i.e., FFMRI. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT of T1-weighted MRI and bone marrow fat fraction of the L3 vertebra and femoral necks were quantified using SliceOmatic and Matlab. MRS was also acquired at the L3 vertebra. Results. Correlation among the three MR methods measured bone marrow fat fraction and BMAT ranges from 0.78 to 0.88 in the L3 vertebra. Correlation between BMAT measured by T1-weighted MRI and bone marrow fat fraction measured by modified FFMRI is 0.86 in femoral necks. Conclusion. There are good correlations among T1-weighted MRI, FFMRI, and MRS for bone marrow fat quantification. The inhomogeneous distribution of bone marrow fat, the threshold segmentation of the T1-weighted MRI, and the ambiguity of the FFMRI may partially explain the difference among the three methods.

  5. Femur rotation and patellofemoral joint kinematics: a weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Souza, Richard B; Draper, Christie E; Fredericson, Michael; Powers, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    ...) and pain-free controls using weight-bearing kinematic magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, it has been recognized that patellofemoral malalignment may be the result of femoral motion as opposed to patella motion...

  6. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to predict response of hepatocellular carcinoma to chemoembolization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johnathan; C; Chung; Neel; K; Naik; Robert; J; Lewandowski; Mary; F; Mulcahy; Laura; M; Kulik; Kent; T; Sato; Robert; K; Ryu; Riad; Salem; Andrew; C; Larson; Reed; A; Omary

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether intra-procedural diffusion- weighted magnetic resonance imaging can predict response of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during trans- catheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). METHODS: Sixteen patients (15 male), aged 59 ±11 years (range: 42-81 years) underwent a total of 21 separate treatments for unresectable HCC in a hybrid magnetic resonance/interventional radiology suite. Ana- tomical imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (b = 0, 500 s/mm2) were performed on a 1.5-T unit. ...

  7. Diagnosis of pericardial cysts using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging: A case series

    OpenAIRE

    Mousavi Negareh; Czarnecki Andrew; Zeglinski Matthew; Du Joe; Sud Maneesh; Walker Jonathon R; Raja Asam; Jassal Davinder S; Kirkpatrick Iain DC

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Congenital pericardial cysts are benign lesions that arise from the pericardium during embryonic development. The diagnosis is based on typical imaging features, but atypical locations and signal magnetic resonance imaging sequences make it difficult to exclude other lesions. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a novel method that can be used to differentiate tissues based on their restriction to proton diffusion. Its use in differentiating pericardial cysts...

  8. Diagnosis of pericardial cysts using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousavi Negareh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Congenital pericardial cysts are benign lesions that arise from the pericardium during embryonic development. The diagnosis is based on typical imaging features, but atypical locations and signal magnetic resonance imaging sequences make it difficult to exclude other lesions. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a novel method that can be used to differentiate tissues based on their restriction to proton diffusion. Its use in differentiating pericardial cysts from other pericardial lesions has not yet been described. Case presentation We present three cases (a 51-year-old Caucasian woman, a 66-year-old Caucasian woman and a 77-year-old Caucasian woman with pericardial cysts evaluated with diffusion-weighted imaging using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Each lesion demonstrated a high apparent diffusion coefficient similar to that of free water. Conclusion This case series is the first attempt to investigate the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pericardial cysts. Diffusion-weighted imaging may be a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool for pericardial cysts when conventional imaging findings are inconclusive.

  9. Tumor microvascular changes in antiangiogenic treatment : Assessment by magnetic resonance contrast media of different molecular weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turetschek, K; Preda, A; Novikov, [No Value; Brasch, RC; Weinmann, HJ; Wunderbaldinger, P; Roberts, TPL

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To test magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media of different molecular weights (MWs) for their potential to characterize noninvasively microvascular changes in an experimental tumor treatment model. Materials and Methods: MD-MBA-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was

  10. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rhombencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatipoglu, H.G.; Onbasioglu Gurbuz, M.; Sakman, B.; Yuksel, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    We present diffusion-weighted imaging findings of a case of rhombencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes. It is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The diagnosis is difficult by clinical findings only. In this report, we aim to draw attention to the role of conventional and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature with apparent diffusion coefficient values of diseased brain parenchyma.

  11. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the ulnar nerve in cubital tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iba, K; Wada, T; Tamakawa, M; Aoki, M; Yamashita, T

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted images based on magnetic resonance reveal the microstructure of tissues by monitoring the random movement of water molecules. In this study, we investigated whether this new technique could visualize pathologic lesions on ulnar nerve in cubital tunnel. Six elbows in six healthy males without any symptoms and eleven elbows in ten patients with cubital tunnel syndrome underwent on diffusion-weighted MRI. No signal from the ulnar nerve was detected in normal subjects. Diffusion-weighted MRI revealed positive signals from the ulnar nerve in all of the eleven elbows with cubital tunnel syndrome. In contrast, conventional T2W-MRI revealed high signal intensity in eight elbows and low signal intensity in three elbows. Three elbows with low signal MRI showed normal nerve conduction velocity of the ulnar nerve. Diffusion-weighted MRI appears to be an attractive technique for diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome in its early stages which show normal electrophysiological and conventional MRI studies.

  12. Improving CT-guided transthoracic biopsy of mediastinal lesions by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; TyngI, Chiang Cheng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard, E-mail: marcosduarte500@gmail.com [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Benveniste, Marcelo Felipe Kuperman; Odisio, Bruno Calazans [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Objectives: to evaluate the preliminary results obtained using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient for planning computed tomography-guided biopsies of selected mediastinal lesions. Methods: eight patients with mediastinal lesions suspicious for malignancy were referred for computed tomography-guided biopsy. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient measurement were performed to assist in biopsy planning with diffusion/computed tomography fused images. We selected mediastinal lesions that could provide discordant diagnoses depending on the biopsy site, including large heterogeneous masses, lesions associated with lung atelectasis or consolidation, lesions involving large mediastinal vessels and lesions for which the results of biopsy using other methods and histopathological examination were divergent from the clinical and radiological suspicion. Results: in all cases, the biopsy needle was successfully directed to areas of higher signal intensity on diffusion weighted sequences and the lowest apparent diffusion coefficient within the lesion (mean, 0.8 [range, 0.6–1.1]610{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), suggesting high cellularity. All biopsies provided adequate material for specific histopathological diagnoses of four lymphomas, two sarcomas and two thymoma s. Conclusion: functional imaging tools, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient, are promising for implementation in noninvasive and imaging-guided procedures. However, additional studies are needed to confirm that mediastinal biopsy can be improved with these techniques. (author)

  13. Nanoparticle-Based Systems for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Derong; Liu, Fuyao; Ma, Lina; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents play a vital role in diagnosing diseases, demand for new MRI contrast agents, with an enhanced sensitivity and advanced functionalities, is very high. During the past decade, various inorganic nanoparticles have been used as MRI contrast agents due to their unique properties, such as large surface area, easy surface functionalization, excellent contrasting effect, and other size-dependent properties. This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of nanoparticle-based T1-weighted MRI contrast agents. The chemical synthesis of the nanoparticle-based contrast agents and their potential applications were discussed and summarized. In addition, the recent development in nanoparticle-based multimodal contrast agents including T1-weighted MRI/computed X-ray tomography (CT) and T1-weighted MRI/optical were also described, since nanoparticles may curtail the shortcomings of single mode contrast agents in diagnostic and clinical settings by synergistically incorporating functionality. PMID:23698781

  14. Signs of patellar chondromalacia on sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Smet, A.A.; Monu, J.U.; Fisher, D.R. (Univ. of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Dept. of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)); Keene, J.S.; Graf, B.K. (Univ. of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-02-01

    We incidentally noted distinctive high signal defects or fissures in the patellar articular cartilage on sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images in 4 patients. At subsequent arthroscopy all 4 patients were found to have patellar chondromalacia. To determine the reliabilty of these signs, we retrospectively evaluated, in a blinded manner, sagittal T2-weighted MR images of the knee in 75 patients who were undergoing arthroscopic assessment of their patellar articular cartilage. We indentified high signal defects of fissures in the patellar cartilage of 5 patients. Patellar chondromalacia was noted at arthroscopy in all 5 patients. Arthroscopy demonstrated patellar chondromalacia in an additional 21 patients with normal MR images. We conclude that high signal defects or fissures on sagittal T2-weighted images are usefull signs of patellar chondromalacia. This single imaging sequence will, however, detect only a small number of the cartilage lesions that may be present. (orig.).

  15. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: protocol optimization, interpretation, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Savannah C; McDonald, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) has shown promise for improving the positive predictive value of breast MR imaging for detection of breast cancer, evaluating tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and as a noncontrast alternative to MR imaging in screening for breast cancer. However, data quality varies widely. Before implementing DWI into clinical practice, one must understand the pertinent technical considerations and current evidence regarding clinical applications of breast DWI. This article provides an overview of basic principles of DWI, optimization of breast DWI protocols, imaging features of benign and malignant breast lesions, promising clinical applications, and potential future directions.

  17. Novel diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y.F.; Chang, F.C.; Hu, H.H.; Hsu, L.C. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China). Depts. of Internal Medicine and Radiology, and Neurological Inst.

    2006-12-15

    This report presents a rare case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis initially presenting with mental impairment and rapidly progressing to coma without any history of malignancy. In addition to highlighting the diagnostic difficulties, the linear high signal intensity along the cortex on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was identified accidentally. High signal change in the corresponding areas was also noted on unenhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, which may be a novel method of diagnosing leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, which should be studied further.

  18. Abnormalities on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with transient ischemic attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Tomomi; Shibagaki, Yasuro [Ushiku Aiwa General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Iwata, Makoto [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    We studied abnormalities on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA). Out of 18 consecutive TIA patients, 9 patients had relevant focal abnormalities on DWI. Among TIA patients, six patients were associated with atrial fibrillation (Af), and all of these patients had focal abnormalities on DWI as well. TIA patients with Af had significantly more frequent focal abnormalities on DWI than those without Af (p=0.009; Fisher's exact probability test). In addition, the duration of TIA symptoms was not related to the presence of focal abnormalities on DWI. These results indicate that embolic mechanism may cause focal abnormalities on DWI. DWI was more sensitive to detect responsible ischemic lesions in these patients than T2-weighted image or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image. (author)

  19. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Cancer Biomarker: Consensus and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar R. Padhani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available On May 3, 2008, a National Cancer Institute (NCI-sponsored open consensus conference was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, during the 2008 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Meeting. Approximately 100 experts and stakeholders summarized the current understanding of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI and reached consensus on the use of DW-MRI as a cancer imaging biomarker. DW-MRI should be tested as an imaging biomarker in the context of well-defined clinical trials, by adding DW-MRI to existing NCI-sponsored trials, particularly those with tissue sampling or survival indicators. Where possible, DW-MRI measurements should be compared with histologic indices including cellularity and tissue response. There is a need for tissue equivalent diffusivity phantoms; meanwhile, simple fluid-filled phantoms should be used. Monoexponential assessments of apparent diffusion coefficient values should use two b values (> 100 and between 500 and 1000 mm2/sec depending on the application. Free breathing with multiple acquisitions is superior to complex gating techniques. Baseline patient reproducibility studies should be part of study designs. Both region of interest and histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient measurements should be obtained. Standards for measurement, analysis, and display are needed. Annotated data from validation studies (along with outcome measures should be made publicly available. Magnetic resonance imaging vendors should be engaged in this process. The NCI should establish a task force of experts (physicists, radiologists, and oncologists to plan, organize technical aspects, and conduct pilot trials. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network infrastructure may be suitable for these purposes. There is an extraordinary opportunity for DW-MRI to evolve into a clinically valuable imaging tool, potentially important for drug development.

  20. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  1. Myocardial area at risk and salvage measured by T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance: reproducibility and comparison of two T2-weighted protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Vejlstrup, Niels; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2011-01-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides a means to measure myocardial area at risk (AAR) and salvage. Several T2-weighted CMR sequences are in use, but there is no consensus in terms of which sequence to be the preferred. Therefore, the aim...

  2. Recurrence and metastasis of lung cancer demonstrate decreased diffusion on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Katsuo; Sagawa, Motoyasu; Motomo, Nozomu; Ueno, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Makoto; Machida, Yuichiro; Maeda, Sumiko; Matoba, Munetaka; Tonami, Hisao; Ueda, Yoshimichi; Sakuma, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is reported to be useful for detecting malignant lesions. The purpose of this study is to clarify characteristics of imaging, detection rate and sensitivity of DWI for recurrence or metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 36 lung cancer patients with recurrence or metastasis were enrolled in this study. While 16 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), 17 underwent MRI and CT, and 3 underwent MRI and PET-CT. Each recurrence or metastasis showed decreased diffusion, which was easily recognized in DWI. The detection rate for recurrence or metastasis was 100% (36/36) in DWI, 89% (17/19) in PET-CT and 82% (27/33) in CT. Detection rate of DWI was significantly higher than that of CT (p=0.0244) but not significantly higher than that of PET-CT (p=0.22). When the optimal cutoff value of the apparent diffusion coefficient value was set as 1.70?10-3 mm2/sec, the sensitivity of DWI for diagnosing recurrence or metastasis of lung cancer was 95.6%. DWI is useful for detection of recurrence and metastasis of lung cancer.

  3. Fahr disease: use of susceptibility-weighted imaging for diagnostic dilemma with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Neslin; Solak, Aynur; Genc, Berhan; Kulu, Ugur

    2015-08-01

    Fahr disease (FD) is a well-defined rare neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by idiopathic bilateral symmetric extensive striopallidodentate calcifications. The patients may present with diverse manifestations, most commonly movement disorder, cognitive impairment, and ataxia. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be critical for accurate diagnosis because it is difficult to reliably identify calcifications by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a relatively new 3D gradient-echo (GE) MR sequence with special phase and magnitude processing. SWI phase images can recognize calcifications definitively with higher sensitivity compared to other MRI sequences. In this article, we present two cases of FD with different manifestations and neuroimaging in different age groups and genders, which were diagnosed by SWI and confirmed with CT, and we discuss the contribution of SWI in the diagnosis of FD. In conclusion, we suggest integrating SWI with MRI protocol to identify calcifications in suspicion of neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Cerebral Effects of Targeted Temperature Management Methods Assessed by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grejs, Anders Morten; Gjedsted, Jakob; Pedersen, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this randomized porcine study was to compare surface targeted temperature management (TTM) to endovascular TTM evaluated by cerebral diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and by intracerebral/intramuscular microdialysis. It is well...... known that alteration in the temperature affects ADC, but the relationship between cerebral ADC values and the cooling method per se has not been established. Eighteen anesthetized 60-kg female swine were hemodynamically and intracerebrally monitored and subsequently subjected to a baseline MRI...... a significantly lower median ADC than endovascular cooling: 714 (634; 804) × 10(-6) mm(2)/s versus 866 (828; 927) × 10(-6) mm(2)/s, (p edema and these low values could not be explained solely by the temperature effect per se...

  5. Susceptibility weighted imaging: a new tool in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India); Kesavadas, C. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)], E-mail: chandkesav@yahoo.com; Thomas, B.; Gupta, A.K.; Thamburaj, K.; Kapilamoorthy, T. Raman [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)

    2009-01-15

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) technique that is exquisitely sensitive to paramagnetic substances, such as deoxygenated blood, blood products, iron, and calcium. This sequence allows detection of haemorrhage as early as 6 h and can reliably detect acute intracerebral parenchymal, as well as subarachnoid haemorrhage. It detects early haemorrhagic transformation within an infarct and provides insight into the cerebral haemodynamics following stroke. It helps in the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. It also has applications in the work-up of stroke patients. The sequence helps in detecting microbleeds in various conditions, such as vasculitis, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy, subacute infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL), amyloid angiopathy, and Binswanger's disease. The sequence also aids in the diagnosis of vascular malformations and perinatal cerebrovascular injuries. This review briefly illustrates the utility of this MR technique in various aspects of stroke diagnosis and management.

  6. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, Giancarlo; Caivano, Rocchina; Rago, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Lotumolo, Antonella; Rabasco, Paola; Villonio, Antonio; Gioioso, Matilde; Mastrangelo, Pietro; Barchetti, Flavio; Panebianco, Valeria; Macarini, Luca; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Cammarota, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of a multiparametric 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study using diffusion-weighted images (DWI) for the assessment of prostate cancer before and after radiotherapy (RT). A total of 34 patients, who received a histologic diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, underwent MRI examination before and after local RT for the assessment of response to treatment. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated and compared. Before RT, DWI shows pathologic restriction of signal, while after RT pathologic restriction of signal was reduced or disappeared. The ADC values were significantly increased after therapy (p<0.05). The use of DWI with ADC measurements may be an imaging biomarker in the assessment of prostate cancer.

  7. Temporally asymmetric diffusion weighting gradients in nuclear magnetic resonance: odd moments, drums, and the k/q relationship

    CERN Document Server

    Stieltjes, Frederik Bernd Laun Wolfhard Semmler Bram

    2010-01-01

    Temporally asymmetric gradient profiles in nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion experiments are investigated using modified Stejskal-Tanner gradients. Three novel findings are presented. 1. The phase of the diffusion-weighted signal contains information about the confining geometry. This information can be extracted from the 'diffusion-weighted phase'. 2. In the motional narrowing regime, it is possible to exactly determine the confining boundary in closed domains. 3. Diffusion-weighting gradients can act like imaging gradients.

  8. Stability of polyelectrolyte-coated iron nanoparticles for T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Andrew J.; Dolan, Ciaran; Cheong, Soshan; Herman, David A. J.; Naysmith, Briar; Zong, Fangrong; Galvosas, Petrik; Farrand, Kathryn J.; Hermans, Ian F.; Brimble, Margaret; Williams, David E.; Jin, Jianyong; Tilley, Richard D.

    2017-10-01

    Iron nanoparticles are highly-effective magnetic nanoparticles for T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the stability of their magnetic properties is dependent on good protection of the iron core from oxidation in aqueous media. Here we report the synthesis of custom-synthesized phosphonate-grafted polyelectrolytes (PolyM3) of various chain lengths, for efficient coating of iron nanoparticles with a native iron oxide shell. The size of the nanoparticle-polyelectrolyte assemblies was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, while surface attachment was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Low cytotoxicity was observed for each of the nanoparticle-polyelectrolyte (;Fe-PolyM3;) assemblies, with good cell viability (>80%) remaining up to 100 μg mL-1 Fe in HeLa cells. When applied in T2-weighted MRI, corresponding T2 relaxivities (r2) of the Fe-PolyM3 assemblies were found to be dependent on the chain length of the polyelectrolyte. A significant increase in contrast was observed when polyelectrolyte chain length was increased from 6 to 65 repeating units, implying a critical chain length required for stabilization of the α-Fe nanoparticle core.

  9. Prediction of Malignancy in Breast Tumors Using Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    amplifier [18] Turner R. Gradient coil design: a review of methods. Magn parameters: Reson Imaging 1993:11:902 20. [19] Parker RS, Zupancic 1, Pirs J...use of a quadrupole coil for NMR spin-echo diffusion studies. J Magn Reson 1974;16:342- 7. [22] Zupancic I. Pirs J. Coils producing a magnetic field

  10. Lumbar stenosis rates in symptomatic patients using weight-bearing and recumbent magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, John W; Martin, J Chad; Wheeler, Greg R; Storey, Benjamin B; Mick, Gregory E; Richardson, Gay B; Herder, Stephanie L; Gyarteng-Dakwa, Kwadwo

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of lumbar stenosis detected via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with symptomatic foraminal stenosis, lateral recess stenosis, or central stenosis. A retrospective review was performed on 1983 MRI scans from a 2-year period on 1486 symptomatic patients. Of these patients, 761 were scanned in the recumbent position using low-field (0.3 T, Airis II; Hitachi, Twinsburg, Ohio) MRI, and 725 were scanned in an upright sitting position using midfield (0.6 T) open Upright MRI (Fonar Corp, Melville, NY). In total, 986 serial scans (recumbent) and 997 serial scans (weight-bearing) were performed. Of scans performed in the recumbent position, stenoses were identified in 382 scans (38.8%), central stenosis in 119 scans (12%), lateral recess stenosis in 91 scans (9.2%), and foraminal stenosis in 327 scans (33.2%). Of scans performed in a weight-bearing position, stenoses were identified in 565 scans (56.7%), central stenosis in 136 scans (13.6%), lateral recess stenosis in 206 scans (20.7%), and foraminal stenosis in 524 scans (52.6%). The stenosis rates as indicated by MRI interpretation ranged between 38.5% (recumbent) and 56.7% (weight-bearing). These rates are higher than those reported in the medical literature for asymptomatic patients. Further study is needed to determine whether weight-bearing, compared with recumbent, MRI better informs the clinician in the diagnosis of spinal stenosis. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Updates in advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the evaluation of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hebert; Alberto; Vargas; Edward; Malnor; Lawrence; Yousef; Mazaheri; Evis; Sala

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging(DWMRI) is considered part of the standard imaging protocol for the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer.It has been proven valuable as a functional tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostate cancer beyond anatomical MRI sequences such as T2-weighted imaging. This review discusses ongoing controversies in DW-MRI acquisition, including the optimal number of b-values to be used for prostate DWI, and summarizes the current literature on the use of advanced DWMRI techniques. These include intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, which better accounts for the nonmono-exponential behavior of the apparent diffusion coefficient as a function of b-value and the influence of perfusion at low b-values. Another technique is diffusion kurtosis imaging(DKI). Metrics from DKI reflect excess kurtosis of tissues, representing its deviation from Gaussian diffusion behavior. Preliminary results suggest that DKI findings may have more value than findings from conventional DW-MRI for the assessment of prostate cancer.

  12. Combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for the assessment of in vivo knee joint kinematics under full weight-bearing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hares, Ghaith; Eschweiler, Jörg; Radermacher, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    The development of detailed and specific knowledge on the biomechanical behavior of loaded knee structures has received increased attention in recent years. Stress magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been introduced in previous work to study knee kinematics under load conditions. Previous studies captured the knee movement either in atypical loading supine positions, or in upright positions with help of inclined supporting backrests being insufficient for movement capture under full-body weight-bearing conditions. In this work, we used a combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for measurement and assessment in knee kinematics under full-body weight-bearing in single legged stance. The proposed method is based on registration of high-resolution static magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in supine position with low-resolution data, quasi-static upright-magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in loaded positions for different degrees of knee flexion. The proposed method was applied for the measurement of tibiofemoral kinematics in 10 healthy volunteers. The combined magnetic resonance imaging approach allows the non-invasive measurement of knee kinematics in single legged stance and under physiological loading conditions. We believe that this method can provide enhanced understanding of the loaded knee kinematics. © IMechE 2015.

  13. A finite difference method with periodic boundary conditions for simulations of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments in tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Greg; Harkins, Kevin D; Secomb, Timothy W; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Trouard, Theodore P

    2012-02-21

    A new finite difference (FD) method for calculating the time evolution of complex transverse magnetization in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy experiments is described that incorporates periodic boundary conditions. The new FD method relaxes restrictions on the allowable time step size employed in modeling which can significantly reduce computation time for simulations of large physical extent and allow for more complex, physiologically relevant, geometries to be simulated.

  14. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies...

  15. Assessment of Activity of Crohn Disease by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-hua; Sun, Can-hui; Mao, Ren; Zhang, Zhong-wei; Jiang, Xiao-song; Pui, Margaret H.; Chen, Min-hu; Li, Zi-ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the diagnostic efficacy of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for evaluating inflammatory activity in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). A total of 47 CD patients underwent MR enterography (MRE) and DWI using 3 b values of 50, 400, and 800 s/mm.2 Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of inflamed and normal bowel wall were calculated. The conventional MRE findings and DWI signal intensities were qualitatively scored from 0 to 3. The correlation between Crohn disease activity index (CDAI) and both ADCs and magnetic resonance imaging scores was analyzed. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CD activity. Of the 47 patients, 25 were active CD (CDAI≥150) and 22 were inactive (CDAI<150). Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MRE + DWI scores of active CD were significantly higher than that of inactive CD (both P < 0.001). Apparent diffusion coefficients in inflamed segments of active CD were lower than that of inactive CD (P < 0.001). The DWI scores (r = 0.74, P < 0.001), ADCs (r = −0.71, P < 0.001), MRE scores (r = 0.54, P < 0.001), and MRE + DWI scores (r = 0.66, P < 0.001) were all correlated with CDAI. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristics curves for ADCs, DWI scores, MRE scores, and MRE + DWI scores ranged from 0.83 to 0.98. The threshold ADC value of 1.17 × 10−3 mm2/s allowed differentiation of active from inactive CD with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and ADC correlated with CD activity, and had excellent diagnostic accuracy for differentiating active from inactive CD. PMID:26512584

  16. Semi-automatic segmentation of myocardium at risk in T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjögren Jane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has been shown to be a promising technique for determination of ischemic myocardium, referred to as myocardium at risk (MaR, after an acute coronary event. Quantification of MaR in T2-weighted CMR has been proposed to be performed by manual delineation or the threshold methods of two standard deviations from remote (2SD, full width half maximum intensity (FWHM or Otsu. However, manual delineation is subjective and threshold methods have inherent limitations related to threshold definition and lack of a priori information about cardiac anatomy and physiology. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an automatic segmentation algorithm for quantification of MaR using anatomical a priori information. Methods Forty-seven patients with first-time acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction underwent T2-weighted CMR within 1 week after admission. Endocardial and epicardial borders of the left ventricle, as well as the hyper enhanced MaR regions were manually delineated by experienced observers and used as reference method. A new automatic segmentation algorithm, called Segment MaR, defines the MaR region as the continuous region most probable of being MaR, by estimating the intensities of normal myocardium and MaR with an expectation maximization algorithm and restricting the MaR region by an a priori model of the maximal extent for the user defined culprit artery. The segmentation by Segment MaR was compared against inter observer variability of manual delineation and the threshold methods of 2SD, FWHM and Otsu. Results MaR was 32.9 ± 10.9% of left ventricular mass (LVM when assessed by the reference observer and 31.0 ± 8.8% of LVM assessed by Segment MaR. The bias and correlation was, -1.9 ± 6.4% of LVM, R = 0.81 (p Conclusions There is a good agreement between automatic Segment MaR and manually assessed MaR in T2-weighted CMR. Thus, the proposed algorithm seems to be a

  17. [Contrast in static images in clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Part 2: Sequences for various contrast weightings and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, F

    2013-08-01

    The second part of this educational article focuses on sequence techniques in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and on suitable parameter sets for different contrast weightings. The content is based on the recently published part 1 of this educational article providing a survey on tissue properties relevant for most important contrast mechanisms. Characteristics of contrast weightings are presented in exemplary images recorded from healthy volunteers. Typical clinical applications of the most commonly used contrast weightings are described and discussed. Sequences for the following contrast weightings are included: proton density (density of hydrogen in small mobile molecules), relaxation times T1 and T2, chemical shift (water and fat), effects of magnetic susceptibility, restricted diffusion of water molecules and magnetization transfer between macromolecules and water molecules.

  18. A longitudinal study of patients with cirrhosis treated with L-ornithine L-aspartate, examined with magnetization transfer, diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Vijay P.B.; McPhail, Mark J W; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Crossey, Mary M E; Fitzpatrick, Julie A.; Southern, Louise; Saxby, Brian K.; Cook, Nicola A.; Cox, I. Jane; Waldman, Adam D.; Dhanjal, Novraj S.; Bak-Bol, Aluel; Williams, Roger; Morgan, Marsha Y; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is associated with structural, metabolic and functional changes in the brain discernible by use of a variety of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques. The changes in patients with minimal HE are less well documented. Twenty-two patients with well-compensated cirrhosis, seven of whom had minimal HE, were examined with cerebral 3 Tesla MR techniques, including T1- and T2-weighted, magnetization transfer and diffusion-weighted imaging and proton mag...

  19. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detects recurrent isolated vertigo caused by cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Li; Luo, Man; Li, Jiaoxing; Li, Weidong; Sheng, Wenli

    2015-06-01

    The etiology of isolated vertigo has been a substantial diagnostic challenge for both neurologists and otolaryngologists. This study was designed to detect recurrent isolated vertigo due to cerebral hypoperfusion using perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PWI). We recruited isolated vertigo patients whose clinical condition was suspected to be caused by hypodynamics of the brain; these individuals formed the case group. We generated two additional groups: a negative group composed of vertigo patients whose symptoms were caused by problems associated with the ear and a healthy control group. Each subject underwent PWI, and seven regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and mean transit time (MTT) were obtained from each ROI. We further calculated the absolute difference of relative parameter values between two mirrored ROIs. The significant difference in the relative MTT from the mirrored cerebellar ROI (|rMTTleft-right|) of the case group was larger than those from the negative and healthy control groups (p = 0.026 and p = 0.038, respectively). Signal differences in |rrCBVleft-right| and |rrCBFleft-right| were not found among the three groups. In summary, disequilibrium in the rMTT of the bilateral cerebellum in the case group implied that hypoperfusion of the posterior circulation could trigger recurrent isolated vertigo and could be shown efficiently using PWI.

  20. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen; Diffusionsgewichtete Magnetresonanztomographie des Abdomens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid-Tannwald, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Zech, C.J. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) provides qualitative and quantitative information of tissue cellularity and the integrity of cellular membranes. Since DW-MRI can be performed without ionizing radiation exposure and contrast media application, DW-MRI is a particularly attractive tool for patients with allergies for gadolinium-based contrast agents or renal failure. Recent technical developments have made DW-MRI a robust and feasible technique for abdominal imaging. DW-MRI provides information on the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions and can also visualize treatment effects and early changes in chronic liver disease. In addition DW-MRI is a promising tool for the detection of inflammatory changes in patients with Crohn's disease. (orig.) [German] Die diffusionsgewichtete (DW-)MRT ermoeglicht die Erfassung qualitativer und quantitativer Informationen bzgl. der Gewebezellularitaet und Membranintegritaet. Die DW-MRT ist insbesondere bei Patienten mit einer Allergie gegen gadoliniumhaltige Kontrastmittel oder eingeschraenkter Nierenfunktion attraktiv, da ihr Einsatz nicht mit Strahlenexposition oder Kontrastmittelgabe verbunden ist. Durch technische Weiterentwicklungen ist die robuste Anwendung der DW-MRI in der Bildgebung des Abdomens seit einiger Zeit moeglich geworden. In der Leberdiagnostik lassen sich Zusatzinformationen zur Detektion und Charakterisierung von Leberlaesionen gewinnen, aber auch Therapieerfolge dokumentieren und fruehe chronische Leberveraenderungen visualisieren. Neben ihrer Rolle bei hepatologischen und onkologischen Fragestellungen erscheint der Einsatz der DW-MRT zudem bei entzuendlichen Fragestellungen wie dem Morbus Crohn sehr viel versprechend. (orig.)

  1. Evaluating transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for primary hepatic cancer by magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wei-jun; ZHANG Liang; OUYANG Yus-hu; WANG Li-gang; WU Pei-hong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Hepatic cancer is associated with very high mortality and morbidity,and the world's highest morbidity and mortality rates for this malignant tumor are found in China.Each year,the number of people who die of hepatic cancer in China amounts for 53% of the world total.1 Although resection is the first-choice treatment for hepatic cancer,only 20%-30% of patients have the opportunity to undergo resection.2 Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a typical intervention therapy.Its advantages include minimal trauma,precise efficacy,and ease of administration.Consequently,it has become a widely used first-line treatment for patients who cannot undergo resection.Effective treatment planning and follow-up require an imaging method for evaluation of tumor response and detection of tumor recurrence.The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)quantitative technique in identifying the composition of tissue after TACE,detecting remnant tumor after TACE,and detecting the sensitivity and specificity for recurrence by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  2. Signal changes in cortical laminar necrosis - evidence from susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Santhosh, Kannath; Thomas, Bejoy; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman; Bodhey, Narendra; Pendharker, Hima; Patro, Satyanarayana [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India)

    2009-05-15

    Two types of infarcts can be identified depending on the circumstances leading to its generation-infarcts with pannecrosis and infarcts with selective neuronal loss. Cortical laminar necrosis (CLN) can occur due to various etiologies of which infarctions and hypoxia are the commonest. Infarction results in pannecrosis whereas hypoxia and incomplete infarction result in selective neuronal loss with the presence of viable cells, glial proliferations, and deposition of paramagnetic substances. We investigated patients with CLN with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), a technique highly sensitive to even traces of paramagnetic agents or hemorrhagic components. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients diagnosed with CLN as per standard criterion. Demographic characteristics and etiologies were recorded. Findings in magnetic resonance images including SWI were analyzed. We identified 11 patients with CLN, six males and five females with age range of 4-64 years. Etiologies included hypoxia in two patients and infarction in the nine patients. SWI detected diffuse linear hypointensities along the gyral margins in CLN due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Linear dot like hypointensities were identified in one patient with infarction. CLN due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy display linear gyral hypointensities and basal ganglia hypointensities that are identifiable in SWI and may represent mineralization. This might be related to iron transport across the surviving neurons from basal ganglia to the cortex, which is not possible in complete infarction. SWI may be helpful in understanding the pathophysiological aspects of CLN due to complete infarction and hypoxia. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance susceptibility weighted imaging in detecting intracranial calcification and hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen-zhen; QI Jian-pin; ZHAN Chuan-jia; SHU Hong-ge; ZHANG Lin; WANG Cheng-yuan; XIA Li-ming; HU Jun-wu; FENG Ding-yi

    2008-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is better than routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting intracranial calcification. This study aimed to assess the value of MR susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in the detection and differentiation of intracranial calcification and hemorrhage.Methods Enrolled in this study were 35 patients including 13 cases of calcification demonstrated by CT and 22 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage. MR sequences used in all the subjects included axial T1WI, T2WI and SWI. The phase shift (PS) of calcification and hemorrhage on SWI was calculated and their signal features on corrected phase images were compared. The sensitivity of T1WI, T2WI and SWI in detecting intracranial calcification and hemorrhage was analyzed statistically.Results The detection rate of SWI for cranial calcification was 98.2%, significantly higher than that of T1 Wl and T2WI. It was not significantly different from that of CT (P >0.05). There were 49 hemorrhagic lesions at different stages detected n SWI, 30 on T2WI and 18 on T1WI. The average PS of calcification and hemorrhage was +0.734han routine MRI in detecting micro-hemorrhage, SWI may play an important role in differentiating cerebral diseases associated with calcification or hemorrhage.

  4. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with partial status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Bonini, Francesca; Fattouch, Jinane; Mari, Francesco; Petrucci, Simona; Carnì, Marco; Tinelli, Emanuele; Pantano, Patrizia; Bastianello, Stefano; Maraviglia, Bruno; Manfredi, Mario; Prencipe, Massimiliano; Giallonardo, Anna T

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is used to detect changes in the distribution of water molecules in regions affected by various pathologies. Like other conditions, ictal epileptic activity, such as status epilepticus (SE), can cause regional vasogenic/cytotoxic edema that reflects hemodynamic and metabolic changes. This study describes the electroclinical and neuroimaging findings in 10 patients with partial SE whose DWI evaluation disclosed periictal changes related to sustained epileptic activity. In this retrospective study we selected 10 patients with partial SE of different etiologies (six acute symptomatic SE; four with previous epilepsy and concomitant precipitating factors) who underwent video-EEG (electroencephalography) monitoring and a DWI study during the periictal phase. We analyzed ictal electroclinical features and DWI changes in the acute phase and during the follow-up period. DWI images revealed significant signal alterations in different brain regions depending on the location of ictal activity. DWI changes were highly concordant with the electroclinical findings in all 10 patients. As the SE resolved and the clinical conditions improved, DWI follow-up showed that the signal alterations gradually disappeared, thereby documenting their close relationship with ictal activity. This study confirms the usefulness of DWI imaging in clinical practice for a more accurate definition of the hemodynamic/metabolic changes occurring during sustained epileptic activity.

  5. Intensity of prolactinoma on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: towards another gender difference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreutz, Julie [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Radiology, Liege (Belgium); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service d' Imagerie Medicale, Liege (Belgium); Vroonen, Laurent; Petrossians, Patrick; Rostomyan, Liliya; Beckers, Albert [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Endocrinology, Liege (Belgium); Cattin, Francoise [University Hospital Besancon, Department of Radiology, Besancon (France); Thiry, Albert [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Pathology, Liege (Belgium); Tshibanda, Luaba [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Radiology, Liege (Belgium); Bonneville, Jean-Francois [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Radiology, Liege (Belgium); University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Endocrinology, Liege (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    Clinical presentations of prolactinomas are quite different between genders. In comparison with women's prolactinoma, those in men showed predominance of large tumors with high prolactin (PRL) levels. This preponderance could be attributed to a greater proliferative potential of the tumors. Differences in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal at diagnosis have not been yet clearly evaluated. We conduct a retrospective study comparing MRI signal intensity (SI) on T2-weighted images (T2-WI) between 41 men and 41 women to investigate whether or not men prolactinoma present specific features. In addition to the size of the adenoma and PRL levels (P < 0001), prolactinomas in men also exhibit differences from those in women in signal on T2-WI on MRI (P < 0001). Women's prolactinomas are mostly of high SI on T2-WI while men's prolactinomas exhibit a more heterogeneous pattern of SI on T2-WI. Prolactinomas presenting with low SI on T2-WI are almost exclusively encountered in men. Presence of T2-WI hypointensities in pituitary adenoma can be predictive of a different subtype of prolactinoma almost encountered in men and possibly translate the presence of spherical amyloid deposits, in agreement with the literature. (orig.)

  6. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Patients with and without Communicating Hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasel, C.; Gentzsch, S.; Heimberger, K. [Cerebrovascular Imaging Workgroup of the Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Medical Univ. Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-09-15

    Background: Recent concepts about cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation in communicating hydrocephalus (CoHy), which is also termed 'restricted arterial pulsation hydrocephalus,' suggest reduced arterial pulsations of subarachnoid vessels with a smaller amount of CSF shifted in subarachnoid spaces during the early systole. The postulated restriction of subarachnoid arterial pulsations in CoHy should induce a smaller motion artifact and reduced local stream effects in CSF in magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Purpose: To investigate the maximum diffusivity in CSF in patients with and without CoHy using DWI. Material and Methods: 12 patients without CSF circulation disturbances and six cases with proven CoHy were assessed. Diffusion was measured in six non collinear directions without triggering the arterial pulse wave (scan time 6:45 min, voxel size 2x2x2 mm). Due to expected artifacts, the calculated maximum diffusivity was called apparent diffusivity. Regional high and low apparent diffusivity was assessed in CSF spaces on newly created 3D CSF motion maps. Results: Patients with regular CSF circulation exhibited high apparent diffusivity in CSF in basal subarachnoid spaces, whereas apparent diffusivity was low there in patients with CoHy. Conclusion: DWI opens a feasible approach to study CSF motion in the neurocranium. Restricted arterial pulsations seem to be involved in CoHy.

  7. Eu, Gd-Codoped Yttria Nanoprobes for Optical and T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaev, Timur Sh; Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Han, Dong-Wook; Choo, Ki Seok; Jeon, Ung Bae; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Yeom, Jeong A.; Kim, Hyung-Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2017-01-01

    Nanoprobes with multimodal functionality have attracted significant interest recently because of their potential applications in nanomedicine. This paper reports the successful development of lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes for potential applications in optical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The morphology, structural, and optical properties of these nanoprobes were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), and photoluminescence (PL). The cytotoxicity test showed that the prepared lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes have good biocompatibility. The obvious contrast enhancement in the T1-weighted MR images suggested that these nanoprobes can be used as a positive contrast agent in MRI. In addition, the clear fluorescence images of the L-929 cells incubated with the nanoprobes highlight their potential for optical imaging. Overall, these results suggest that prepared lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes can be used for simultaneous optical and MR imaging. PMID:28336868

  8. Eu, Gd-Codoped Yttria Nanoprobes for Optical and T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur Sh Atabaev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanoprobes with multimodal functionality have attracted significant interest recently because of their potential applications in nanomedicine. This paper reports the successful development of lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes for potential applications in optical and magnetic resonance (MR imaging. The morphology, structural, and optical properties of these nanoprobes were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX, and photoluminescence (PL. The cytotoxicity test showed that the prepared lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes have good biocompatibility. The obvious contrast enhancement in the T1-weighted MR images suggested that these nanoprobes can be used as a positive contrast agent in MRI. In addition, the clear fluorescence images of the L-929 cells incubated with the nanoprobes highlight their potential for optical imaging. Overall, these results suggest that prepared lanthanide-doped Y2O3 nanoprobes can be used for simultaneous optical and MR imaging.

  9. Monitoring ankylosing spondylitis therapy by dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspersic, Natasa [University Medical Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sersa, Igor [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jevtic, Vladimir [Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tomsic, Matija; Praprotnik, Sonja [University Medical Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-02-15

    The effects of different therapies on enthesitis/osteitis in active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim was to assess the role of quantitative MRI in the evaluation of AS treatment efficacy. Thirty patients with active spondylitis or bilateral sacroilitis were selected and followed up for 1 year. Ten of the patients were treated only with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 10 patients additionally received at baseline an intravenous pulse of glucocorticoids and 10 patients were treated with regular infusions of infliximab. Disease activity was measured according to clinical instruments and laboratory tests. For each patient, one selected inflamed lesion was followed from baseline through control visits quantitatively by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and by dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCEI) with evaluation of the enhancement factor (f{sub enh}) and enhancement gradient (g{sub enh}). Clinical and quantitative MRI parameters diminished significantly with regression of the inflammatory activity. The improvement in AS was most pronounced in patients treated with infliximab; after 12 months the ADC diminished from an average of 1.31 to 0.88 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, f{sub enh} from 1.85 to 0.60, and g{sub enh} from 3.09 to 1.40 %/s. Diffusion-weighted imaging and DCEI were shown to be effective in quantifying changes in inflammation in skeletal lesions during the treatment of AS, and could therefore be convenient for assessing treatment efficacy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time DWI was used to evaluate the activity of skeletal inflammation in rheumatic diseases such as AS. (orig.)

  10. Transient Splenial Lesion of Corpus Callosum Associated with Antiepileptic Drug: Conventional and Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakyemez, B.; Erdogan, C.; Yildirim, N.; Gokalp, G.; Parlak, M. [Uludag Univ. Medical School, Bursa (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Transient focal lesions of splenium of corpus callosum can be seen as a component of many central nervous system diseases, including antiepileptic drug toxicity. The conventional magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the disease are characteristic and include ovoid lesions with high signal intensity at T2-weighted MRI. Limited information exists about the diffusion-weighted MRI characteristics of these lesions vanishing completely after a period of time. We examined the conventional, FLAIR, and diffusion-weighted MR images of a patient complaining of depressive mood and anxiety disorder after 1 year receiving antiepileptic medication.

  11. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Dongsu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Glide-Hurst, Carri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Hu, Yanle, E-mail: Hu.Yanle@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  12. Value of 3 Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for assessing liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalavrentios, Lavrentios; Sinakos, Emmanouil; Chourmouzi, Danai; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Drevelegas, Konstantinos; Constantinides, Manos; Drevelegas, Antonios; Talwalkar, Jayant; Akriviadis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the new generation 3 Tesla technology, and especially diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in predicting liver fibrosis. The aim of our pilot study was to assess the clinical performance of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of liver parenchyma for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). 18 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD underwent DWI with 3 Tesla MRI. DWI was performed with single-shot echo-planar technique at b values of 0-500 and 0-1000 s/mm(2). ADC was measured in four locations in the liver and the mean ADC value was used for analysis. Staging of fibrosis was performed according to the METAVIR system. The median age of patients was 52 years (range 23-73). The distribution of patients in different fibrosis stages was: 0 (n=1), 1 (n=7), 2 (n=1), 3 (n=5), 4 (n=4). Fibrosis stage was poorly associated with ADC at b value of 0-500 s/mm(2) (r= -0.30, P=0.27). However it was significantly associated with ADC at b value of 0-1000 s/mm(2) (r= -0.57, P=0.01). For this b value (0-1000 s/mm(2)) the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.93 for fibrosis stage ≥3 and the optimal ADC cut-off value was 1.16 ×10(-3) mm(2)/s. 3 Tesla DWI can possibly predict the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

  13. Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Bone Tumors: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Pekcevik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study aims to determine whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC can help differentiate benign and malignant bone tumors. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 to February 2013, we prospectively included 26 patients. Of these 15 patients were male and 11 were female; ranging in age from 8 to 76 years (mean age, 34.5 years. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR imaging was obtained with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence using a 1.5T MR scanner. We grouped malignant lesions as primary, secondary, and primary tumor with chondroid matrix. The minimum ADC was measured in the tumors and mean minimum ADC values were selected for statistical analysis. ADC values were compared between malignant and benign tumors using the Mann-Whitney U-test and receiver operating curve analysis were done to determine optimal cut-off values. Results: The mean ADC values from the area with lowest ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were 1.99 ± 0.57 × 10−3 mm 2 /s and 1.02 ± 1.0 × 10−3 mm 2 /s, respectively. The mean minimum ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were statistically different (P = 0.029. With cut-off value of 1.37 (10−3 mm 2 /s, sensitivity was 77.8% and specificity was 82.4%, for distinguishing benign and malignant lesion. Benign and secondary malignant tumors showed statistically significant difference (P = 0.002. There was some overlap in ADC values between benign and malignant tumors. The mean minimum ADC values of benign and malignant chondroid tumors were high. Giant cell tumor, non-ossifying fibroma and fibrous dysplasia showed lower ADC values. Conclusion: Although there is some overlap, ADC values of benign and malignant bone tumors seem to be different. Further studies with larger patient groups are needed to find an optimal cut-off ADC value.

  14. Diffusion-weighted perinatal postmortem magnetic resonance imaging as a marker of postmortem interval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, Imaging and Biophysics, London (United Kingdom); Price, Gemma C. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Carmichael, David W. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Imaging and Biophysics, London (United Kingdom); Jones, Rod; Norman, Wendy; Taylor, Andrew M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate perinatal body organ apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values at postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMR) in order to evaluate postmortem changes. Postmortem diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the thorax and abdomen were performed with diffusion gradient values b = 0, 500, and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} on 15 foetal and childhood cases (mean 33.3 ± 7.8 weeks gestation) compared to 44 live infants (mean age 75.5 ± 53.4 days). Mean ADC values were calculated from regions of interest (ROIs) for the lungs, liver, spleen and renal cortex, compared to normative live infantile body ADC values of similar gestational age. Mean ADC values were significantly lower in postmortem cases than in normal controls for liver (0.88 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s ± SD 0.39 vs. 1.13 ± 0.13; p < 0.05) and renal cortex (0.85 ± 0.26 vs. 1.19 ± 0.13; p < 0.05) but not spleen or muscle. Mean lung ADC values were significantly higher than normal controls (1.06 ± 0.18 vs. 0 ± 0; p < 0.001), and there was a significant correlation between postmortem interval and lung ADC (R{sup 2} = 0.55). Lung PMMR ADC values are related to postmortem interval, making them a potential marker of time since death. Further research is needed to understand the organ-specific changes which occur in the postmortem period. (orig.)

  15. Sandwich sign of Borrmann type 4 gastric cancer on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng, E-mail: zxp@bjcancer.org [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Tang, Lei; Sun, Ying-Shi [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Li, Zi-Yu; Ji, Jia-Fu [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Li, Xiao-Ting [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Liu, Yi-Qiang [Department of Pathology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Wu, Qi [Department of Endoscopy, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To assess the appearance of Borrmann type 4 (BT-4) gastric cancer on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and to investigate the potential of qualitative and quantitative DW images analysis to differentiate BT-4 gastric cancer from poorly distended normal stomach wall. Materials and methods: DWI was performed on 23 patients with BT-4 gastric cancer and 23 healthy volunteers. The signal characteristics and correlated histopathological basis of the cancers on DWI were investigated. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of cancer were compared between DWI and T1WI/T2WI{sub .} The thickness and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of cancer and normal stomach wall were compared. Results: All of the gastric cancers displayed hyperintensity compared to the nearby normal gastric wall on DWI. A three-layer sandwich sign that demonstrated high signal intensity in the inner and outer layer, and low signal intensity in the intermediate layer was observed in 69.6% of cancers on DWI. The low signal intensity represents the muscularis propria through the comparison with pathology, and it is postulated that scattering distribution of the cancer cells in this layer causes less damage and subsequently less restriction of water movement, which causes the low signal intensity on DWI. The CNR obtained with DWI was higher than that with T1WI and T2WI (P < 0.001). The mean ADC value of BT-4 gastric cancer was significantly lower than the poorly distended normal stomach wall (1.12 ± 0.23 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 1.93 ± 0.22 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, P < 0.01). Conclusion: DWI can highlight the signals of BT-4 gastric cancer which may present a characteristic three-layer sandwich sign, and ADC values are helpful in the discrimination of gastric cancer from poorly distended stomach wall.

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus-related encephalitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Arim; Suh, Sang-il; Seol, Hae-Young [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gyu-Ri; Lee, Nam-Joon [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Baik-Lin [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen causing acute respiratory infection in children. Herein, we describe the incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of RSV-related encephalitis, a major neurological complication of RSV infection. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging findings of the patients over the past 7 years who are admitted to our medical center and are tested positive for RSV-RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. In total, 3,856 patients were diagnosed with RSV bronchiolitis, and 28 of them underwent brain MRI for the evaluation of neurologic symptoms; 8 of these 28 patients had positive imaging findings. Five of these 8 patients were excluded because of non-RSV-related pathologies, such as subdural hemorrhage, brain volume loss due to status epilepticus, periventricular leukomalacia, preexisting ventriculomegaly, and hypoxic brain injury. The incidence of RSV-related encephalitis was as follows: 3/3,856 (0.08 %) of the patients are positive for RSV RNA, 3/28 (10.7 %) of the patient underwent brain MRI for neurological symptom, and 3/8 (37.5 %) of patients revealed abnormal MR findings. The imaging findings were suggestive of patterns of rhombenmesencephalitis, encephalitis with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and limbic encephalitis. They demonstrated no diffusion abnormality on diffusion-weighted image and symptom improvement on the follow-up study. Encephalitis with RSV bronchiolitis occurs rarely. However, on brain MRI performed upon suspicion of neurologic involvement, RSV encephalitis is not infrequently observed among the abnormal MR findings and may mimic other viral and limbic encephalitis. Physicians should be aware of this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and neurologic care of RSV-positive patients. (orig.)

  17. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of an Intramedullary Epidermoid Cyst with Dorsal Dermal Sinus Tract in a Toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Fazio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose and manage a rare case of a symptomatic thoracic intramedullary congenital epidermoid cyst with associated dermal sinus in a girl. Congenital intramedullary epidermoid cysts with associated dermal sinuses are very rare occurrences and seldom present symptomatically in very young children. We present a case of a 32-month old with a draining dimpled skin lesion. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated an intramedullary epidermoid with a dorsal dermal sinus tract opening to the skin surface which was confirmed surgically. The patient was treated with debulking to prevent recurrent infection and progression of neurological symptoms. This case demonstrates the use of diffuse-weighted MRI to assist in the diagnosis and surgical management of an atypical presentation of a rare developmental abnormality, which is not well documented in the pediatric radiological literature. Failure to diagnosis may have significant neurological permanent debilitating consequences.

  18. Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Early Diagnosis of Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nuri Sener

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A newborn baby girl developed seizures right after birth. On the fourth day, the baby was examined using diffusion sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and diagnosed to have neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Laboratory findings confirmed the diagnosis. This is the first case of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD where diffusion MRI sequence helped in the diagnosis. We find association of NALD with seizures at birth is an extremely rare occurrence, and so far, only one case has been mentioned in the literature.

  19. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  20. T2-weighted four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with result-driven phase sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Czito, Brian G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Bashir, Mustafa R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: T2-weighted MRI provides excellent tumor-to-tissue contrast for target volume delineation in radiation therapy treatment planning. This study aims at developing a novel T2-weighted retrospective four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) phase sorting technique for imaging organ/tumor respiratory motion. Methods: A 2D fast T2-weighted half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo MR sequence was used for image acquisition of 4D-MRI, with a frame rate of 2–3 frames/s. Respiratory motion was measured using an external breathing monitoring device. A phase sorting method was developed to sort the images by their corresponding respiratory phases. Besides, a result-driven strategy was applied to effectively utilize redundant images in the case when multiple images were allocated to a bin. This strategy, selecting the image with minimal amplitude error, will generate the most representative 4D-MRI. Since we are using a different image acquisition mode for 4D imaging (the sequential image acquisition scheme) with the conventionally used cine or helical image acquisition scheme, the 4D dataset sufficient condition was not obviously and directly predictable. An important challenge of the proposed technique was to determine the number of repeated scans (N{sub R}) required to obtain sufficient phase information at each slice position. To tackle this challenge, the authors first conducted computer simulations using real-time position management respiratory signals of the 29 cancer patients under an IRB-approved retrospective study to derive the relationships between N{sub R} and the following factors: number of slices (N{sub S}), number of 4D-MRI respiratory bins (N{sub B}), and starting phase at image acquisition (P{sub 0}). To validate the authors’ technique, 4D-MRI acquisition and reconstruction were simulated on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom using simulation derived parameters. Twelve healthy volunteers were involved

  1. Functional multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys using blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannarini, Gianluca; Kessler, Thomas M; Roth, Beat; Vermathen, Peter; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2014-08-01

    Little data are available on noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging based assessment of renal function during upper urinary tract obstruction. We determined whether functional multiparametric kidney magnetic resonance imaging could monitor the treatment response in cases of acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction. Between January 2008 and January 2010, 18 patients with acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction due to calculi were prospectively enrolled to undergo kidney magnetic resonance imaging with conventional, blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences upon emergency hospital admission and after release of obstruction. We assessed functional imaging parameters of obstructed and contralateral unobstructed kidneys derived from blood oxygen level dependent (apparent spin relaxation rate) and diffusion-weighted (total apparent diffusion coefficient, pure diffusion coefficient and perfusion fraction) sequences during acute upper urinary tract obstruction and after its release. During acute obstruction the apparent spin relaxation rate and perfusion fraction were lower in the cortex (p=0.020 and 0.031) and medulla (p=0.012 and 0.190, respectively) of obstructed kidneys compared to contralateral unobstructed kidneys. After obstruction release the apparent spin relaxation rate and perfusion fraction increased in the cortex (p=0.016 and 0.004) and medulla (p=0.071 and 0.044, respectively) of formerly obstructed kidneys to values similar to those in contralateral kidneys. Total apparent diffusion coefficient and pure diffusion coefficient values did not significantly differ between obstructed and contralateral unobstructed kidneys during or after obstruction. In our patients with acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction due to calculi functional kidney magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences enabled us to monitor pathophysiological changes in obstructed kidneys during

  2. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Sheng; ZHOU Kang-rong; ZHAO Wei-dong; PENG Wei-jun; TANG Feng; MAO Jian

    2005-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of diffuse hepatic lesions in early stage is a tough task at any time for clinical conventional imaging Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (MR DWI) can detect the changes of tissue structure at molecular level This study was designed to determine the value of DWI in the diagnosis of diffuse liver lesions in early stage.Methods Diffuse liver lesions were induced by diethylnitrosamine in 42 rats of test group. Fourteen rats in control group were fed with pure water. Dynamic changes of MR DWI were observed every week in both groups during the early stage of diffuse liver lesions (1 to 12 weeks after drug administration in the test group). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of liver parenchyma in different stages and pathologic changes were analyzed.Results The process of diffuse hepatic lesions in the test group was classified into three stages according to pathological changes, namely hepatitis, hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. No obvious morphological changes were shown by conventional imaging in both groups during this stage. But MR DWI demonstrated heterogeneous signal changes in early stage of hepatic cirrhosis in the test group. No significant change of ADC values was found in the control group between different weeks (P>0.05). The ADC values of the test group declined from the fifth week, and after the tenth week the ADC values were significantly different between the test and control groups at gradient factor (b) value 300 sec/mm2 (P<0.05). At b value 600 and 1000 sec/mm2, significant difference was seen between the two groups from the sixth week onward. The range of ADC value of the groups was (1.7-0.9)±(0.40-0.04) mm2/sec (b=600) and (1.38-0.75)±(0.07-0.35) mm2/sec (b=1000), respectively. Dominant pathological changes included swelled hepatocytes within 1 to 4 weeks after the administration of diethylnitrosamine in the test group, hyperplasia of fibrous tissues in 5-8 weeks and formation of cirrhotic nodules in 9

  3. Clinical Value of Whole-body Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Weighted Imaging on Detection of Malignant Metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Li; Zhen-sheng Liu; Xian-mao Du; Ling He; Jian Chen; Wei Wang; Fei Sun; Fang Du; Zhi-gang Luo; Zhen-long Xue; Yi Zhao; Chang-wu Zhou

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the value of whole-body diffusion weighted imaging (WB-DWI) on detection of malignant metastasis.Methods Forty-six patients with malignant tumors underwent WB-DWI examinations between April 2007 and August 2007 in our hospital. Before WB-DWI examination, the primary cancers of all the patients were confirmed by pathology, and the TNM-stage was assessed with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). WB-DWl was performed using short TI inversion recovery echo-planar imaging (STIR-EPI) sequence. Abnormal high signal intensities on WB-DWI were considered as metastases. The results of WB-DWI were compared with other imaging modalities. For the assessment of the diagnostic capability of WB-DWl, WB-DWI were compared with CT for demonstrating mediastinal lymph node metastases and lung metastases, and with conventional MRI for demonstrating metastases in other locations.Results WB-DWI demonstrated 143 focuses, 14 of which were diagnosed to he benign lesions in routine imaging. The number of bone metastases depicted on WB-DWI and routine imaging was 85 and 86; lymph node metastases was 17 and 18; liver metastases was 14 and 14; lung metastases was 4 and 8; and brain metastases was 6 and 8, respectively. WB-DWI failed to detect 12 metastatic lesions including 3 osteoplastic bone metastases, 4 lung metastases, 3 mediastinal lymph node metastases, and 2 brain metastases. Four metastatic lesions including 2 deltopectoral lymph nodes and 2 rib metastases were detected with WB-DWI alone, all of which evolved greatly during clinical follow-up for more than 6 months. WB-DWI had higher detection rates for metastatic lesions in liver, bone, and lymph nodes than those in lung and brain (X2=30, P<0.001).Conclusions WB-DWI could detect most of metastatic lesions that were diagnosed with conventional MRI and CT. The limitations of WB-DWI might be had high false-positive rate and low efficiency in detecting mediastinal lymph node, brain, and

  4. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koçyiğit, Ali, E-mail: alkoc@yahoo.com [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey); Bayram, Recep [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey); Yüksel, Selçuk [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Denizli (Turkey); Yılmaz, İsmail; Karabulut, Nevzat [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) which obtain from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), is a quantitative parameter representing the renal function and parenchymal damage in some renal disorders. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether renal tissue alterations associated with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) can be displayed by DWI. The secondary aim was to assess how ADC values change with age in kidneys with and without VUR. Materials and methods: This prospective study included 46 patients (8 boys, 38 girls; mean age 7.3 ± 4.2; range 1–15 years) with VUR and 54 control subjects (21 boys, 33 girls; mean age 7.7 ± 5.2; range 1–17 years). All subjects underwent DWI of the kidneys using b value of 600 s/mm{sup 2} in addition to MR urography. The ADC values of 71 kidneys with VUR were compared with those of 81 kidneys without VUR. Results: The mean ADC values were (1.93 ± 0.36) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.97 ± 0.24) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.83 ± 0.37) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.98 ± 0.20) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s and (2.08 ± 0.42) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s in normal kidneys, and in those with grade 1, grade 2, grade 3 and grade 4 VUR, respectively. There was no significant difference in ADC values between kidneys with and without VUR. There was a significant positive correlation between the age and ADC values both in kidneys with and without VUR (r = 0.79, p < 0.001 and r = 0.82; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: DWI does not reveal probable parenchymal alterations in reflux nephropathy. ADC values increase with age during childhood not only in normal kidneys but also in kidneys with VUR.

  5. Texture features on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: new potential biomarkers for prostate cancer aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, A.; Mazzetti, S.; Giannini, V.; Russo, F.; Bollito, E.; Porpiglia, F.; Stasi, M.; Regge, D.

    2015-04-01

    To explore contrast (C) and homogeneity (H) gray-level co-occurrence matrix texture features on T2-weighted (T2w) Magnetic Resonance (MR) images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for predicting prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness, and to compare them with traditional ADC metrics for differentiating low- from intermediate/high-grade PCas. The local Ethics Committee approved this prospective study of 93 patients (median age, 65 years), who underwent 1.5 T multiparametric endorectal MR imaging before prostatectomy. Clinically significant (volume ≥0.5 ml) peripheral tumours were outlined on histological sections, contoured on T2w and ADC images, and their pathological Gleason Score (pGS) was recorded. C, H, and traditional ADC metrics (mean, median, 10th and 25th percentile) were calculated on the largest lesion slice, and correlated with the pGS through the Spearman correlation coefficient. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) assessed how parameters differentiate pGS = 6 from pGS ≥ 7. The dataset included 49 clinically significant PCas with a balanced distribution of pGS. The Spearman ρ and AUC values on ADC were: -0.489, 0.823 (mean) -0.522, 0.821 (median) -0.569, 0.854 (10th percentile) -0.556, 0.854 (25th percentile) -0.386, 0.871 (C); 0.533, 0.923 (H); while on T2w they were: -0.654, 0.945 (C); 0.645, 0.962 (H). AUC of H on ADC and T2w, and C on T2w were significantly higher than that of the mean ADC (p = 0.05). H and C calculated on T2w images outperform ADC parameters in correlating with pGS and differentiating low- from intermediate/high-risk PCas, supporting the role of T2w MR imaging in assessing PCa biological aggressiveness.

  6. Positional pelvic organ prolapse (POP) evaluation using open, weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Boris; Stothers, Lynn; Lazare, Darren; Macnab, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is completed in the supine position. Open magnetic resonance imaging (MRO) uses vertical magnets, allowing imaging in a variety of upright postures. This pilot study used MRO to evaluate the change of prolapse in different positions compared to non-prolapsed images. In total, 11 women (6 POP, 5 controls) aged 24 to 65 years had 12 MRO images (midline sagittal pelvic line) consecutively when supine, sitting and standing with a full and empty bladder. Lengths between the lowest point of the bladder to the pubococcygeal (PC) and pubopromontoreal (PP) lines in each image were compared, and the ratio of bladder area under the PC and PP lines to the total bladder area. Significant elongation between the PC line and lowest point of the bladder was evident in subjects with POP comparing supine and standing images (p = 0.03), but not controls (p = 0.07). Similarly, this axis was significantly longer in cystocele subjects versus controls only in the standing position. Bladder area under the PC line was significantly increased between supine and standing positions only among subjects with cystocele (p bearing on the staging of POP. Imaging patients when sitting and standing identified that significant changes occur in the maximal descent of the bladder.

  7. Altered hepatic gluconeogenesis during L-alanine infusion in weight-losing lung cancer patients as observed by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and turnover measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Leij-Halfwerk (Susanne); J.W.O. van den Berg (Willem); P.E. Sijens; M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); P.C. Dagnelie (Pieter); J.H.P. Wilson (Paul)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractProfound alterations in host metabolism in lung cancer patients with weight loss have been reported, including elevated phosphomonoesters (PMEs) as detected by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In healthy subjects, infusion of L-alanine induced sign

  8. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly ePursey

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests specific food related behaviours contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they: used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n=26, healthy weight compared to obese participants (n=17, and weight loss interventions (n=12. High calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n=36, however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post- weight loss revealed small areas of convergence of activation across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory and learning such as the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus and precuneus.Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight and weight loss populations. Future studies require standardisation of dietetic variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies.

  9. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Endometrial Cancer: Differentiation from Benign Endometrial Lesions and Preoperative Assessment of Myometrial Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, M.; Matsuzaki, K.; Nishitani, H. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan))

    2009-10-15

    Background: Uterine endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy, and benign endometrial hyperplasia or polyps should be differentiated from endometrial cancer. In evaluating endometrial cancer on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the assessment of the depth of myometrial invasion is important because it closely correlates with the patient's prognosis. Purpose: To verify the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) to distinguish benign and malignant endometrial lesions, and to evaluate myometrial invasion of endometrial cancer. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven endometrial lesions including 45 cancers and 22 benign lesions (hyperplasia and polyps) were evaluated by DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement. The staging accuracies of DWI and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in the assessment of myometrial invasion were evaluated in 33 patients with endometrial cancer. Results: The ADC values (x10-3 mm2/s) in cancer and benign lesions were 0.84+-0.19 and 1.58+-0.36, respectively (P<0.01). The staging accuracy (superficial or deep myometrial invasion) was 94% for DWI and 88% for gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. Coexisting adenomyosis and infiltrative myometrial invasion caused staging errors on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images, whereas DWI could demonstrate the tumor extent correctly. Conclusion: DWI provides helpful information in evaluating benign and malignant endometrial lesions.

  10. Sequential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Intramedullary Spinal Cord Abscess including Diffusion Weighted Image: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Jae Eun; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Cho, Bum Sang; Jeon, Min Hee; Kang, Min Ho [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscess (ISCA) is a rare infection of the central nervous system. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, including the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings, of ISCA in a 78-year-old man. The initial conventional MRI of the thoracic spine demonstrated a subtle enhancing nodule accompanied by significant edema. On the follow-up MRI after seven days, the nodule appeared as a ring-enhancing nodule. The non-enhancing central portion of the nodule appeared hyperintense on DWI with a decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value on the ADC map. We performed myelotomy and surgical drainage, and thick, yellowish pus was drained

  11. Diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction using diffusion-weighted imaging by low field (0.2 T) magnetic resonance image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, Tohru; Sasamori, Yumiko; Takahashi, Hachisaburou; Mikami, Juniti; Ishii, Yuuko; Okada, Kinya; Shirafuji, Naoko; Kashiwakura, Takeshi [Takahashi Neurosurgical Hospital, Sapporo (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to confirm the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging using low field (0.2 T) magnetic resonance image (MRI). Acute cerebral infarctions in 51 patients were examined on diffusion-weighted imaging using low field MRI within 48 hours after clinical symptoms. Diffusion-weighted imaging was examined using line scan method. Twenty-four cases were cortical infarction, and twenty-two cases were perforating infarction. In five cases out of 51 cases, ischemic regions were not detected as abnormal high signal intensity area on diffusion-weighted imaging. Four cases of no abnormal detection were transient ischemic attack, and the other one was a perforating infarction. The earliest detection time in cortical infarction cases was 1 hour and 20 minutes. On the other hand, the earliest detection time in perforating infarction cases was 3 hours. Detective ability for acute cerebral infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging by low field MRI was depending on both size and lesion of infarction. That is to say, either small size or brain stem infarction was hard to detect. Thin slice and vertical slice examination for the infarction may improve to diagnose in low field MRI. Our conclusion is acute cerebral infarction was able to be diagnosed on diffusion-weighted imaging by low field as well as high field MRI. (author)

  12. Automatic Mapping Extraction from Multiecho T2-Star Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images for Improving Morphological Evaluations in Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaode Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapping extraction is useful in medical image analysis. Similarity coefficient mapping (SCM replaced signal response to time course in tissue similarity mapping with signal response to TE changes in multiecho T2-star weighted magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agent. Since different tissues are with different sensitivities to reference signals, a new algorithm is proposed by adding a sensitivity index to SCM. It generates two mappings. One measures relative signal strength (SSM and the other depicts fluctuation magnitude (FMM. Meanwhile, the new method is adaptive to generate a proper reference signal by maximizing the sum of contrast index (CI from SSM and FMM without manual delineation. Based on four groups of images from multiecho T2-star weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the capacity of SSM and FMM in enhancing image contrast and morphological evaluation is validated. Average contrast improvement index (CII of SSM is 1.57, 1.38, 1.34, and 1.41. Average CII of FMM is 2.42, 2.30, 2.24, and 2.35. Visual analysis of regions of interest demonstrates that SSM and FMM show better morphological structures than original images, T2-star mapping and SCM. These extracted mappings can be further applied in information fusion, signal investigation, and tissue segmentation.

  13. T2*-Weighted and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Differentiation of Cerebral Fat Embolism From Diffuse Axonal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutman, Aaron M; Rapp, Elliot J; Hippe, Daniel S; Vu, Baoanh; Mossa-Basha, Mahmud

    2017-07-13

    This study differentiates cerebral fat embolism (CFE) and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Consecutive CFE and DAI cases were retrospectively selected. Hemorrhages were characterized by number, size/shape, and distribution, whereas DWI lesions by pattern. The number of hemorrhages was compared using the Mann-Whitney test with adjustment for multiple comparisons, whereas DWI abnormality was compared using Fisher exact test. Seven CFE and 20 DAI patients were included. Cerebral fat embolism had significantly more hemorrhages than DAI (mean, 670 ± 407 vs 136 ± 87; P = 0.01), particularly in the frontal (P = 0.025), parietal (P = 0.002), and occipital lobes (P = 0.01), the corpus callosum (P = 0.01), and cerebellum (P = 0.01). Cerebral fat embolism microhemorrhages were punctate/round, whereas DAI hemorrhages were small/medium sized (P CFE had confluent abnormalities (P CFE from DAI. Cerebral fat embolism demonstrates more hemorrhages. Larger or linear hemorrhages favor DAI. Diffuse confluent diffusion restriction favors CFE, whereas few scattered foci favor DAI.

  14. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursey, Kirrilly M.; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J.; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E.; Burrows, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies. PMID:25988110

  15. Neural responses to visual food cues according to weight status: a systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursey, Kirrilly M; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E; Burrows, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of focal hepatic lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Jie Sun; Xian-Yue Quan; Fan-Heng Huang; Yi-Kai Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the quantitative analysis of diffusionweighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) in differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions.METHODS: DWMRI was performed in 149 hepatic lesions, including hepatocellular carcinoma (34 cases),hepatic metastases (37 cases), cavernous hemangioma (42 cases), hepatic cyst (36 cases). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were evaluated using four different b values in different sequences. The ratio of ADC values of lesion/liver in hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic metastases was also calculated.RESULTS: The mean ADC values of hepatic lesions were as follows: hepatocellular carcinoma (0.95 ± 0.11) × 10-3 mm2/s, hepatic metastasis (1.13 ± 0.21)× 10-3 mm2/s, cavernous hemangioma (1.86±0.36)×10-3 mm2/s,hepatic cyst(3.14±0.31)×10-3 mm2/s. The ratio of ADC values in lesion/liver in hepatocellular carcinoma was 0.91 ±0.11, being significantly different from that in hepatic metastasis (1.21 ± 0.18, P< 0.05).CONCLUSION: ADC values and quantitative analysis of focal hepatic lesions are of significant values in differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions.

  17. Chemical design of nanoprobes for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kang Peng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which offers a number of advantages such as unlimited tissue penetration, zero ionizing radiation, and a noninvasive nature, has received considerable attention over the past two decades as a technique for clinical diagnosis. To improve imaging sensitivity, contrast agents have been employed to accelerate the relaxation rate of water molecules and thus to increase the contrast between specific tissues or organs of interest. However, conventional contrast agents such as Gd3+-based T1 complexes and iron oxide nanoparticle-based T2 contrast agents have been proven to have adverse effects. The former may cause fatal nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF and difficulty in metabolism, while the latter is less sensitive due to the background interference. Also, their development has been well documented. Therefore, the orientation of this review will be geared toward the newly developed nanoparticulate agents that serve as better alternatives. In this regard, the recent advances on various nanostructured Mn/Fe-based T1 contrast agents seem to fit these categories. As they reveal longer circulation half-life and better biocompatibility, they have demonstrated themselves as a promising T1 candidate for MRI. The focus of this review will be on the preparation and fabrication of T1 contrast agents that contain mainly paramagnetic manganese and iron ions, with special attention being paid to the growth mechanism. Additional emphasis is also put on their progressive development in an aim to overcome the drawbacks of classical iron oxide nanoparticle-based T2 and Gd3+-based T1 contrast agents. Representative applications in vitro and in vivo will be presented for this new generation of contrast agents. The pros and cons of each case are also briefly summarized.

  18. Coronal Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Kidney: Agreement with Axial Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Imaging in Terms of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yi Wang; Jia Wang; Ye-Huan Tang; Hui-Yi Ye; Lin Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:Coronal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values have gradually become applied (following conventional axial DW-MRI) in the renal analysis.To explore whether data obtained using coronal DW-MRI are comparable with those derived using axial DW-MRI,this preliminary study sought to assess the agreement in renal ADC values between coronal DW-MRI and axial DW-MRI.Methods:Thirty-four healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study; written consents were obtained.All subjects underwent respiratory-triggered axial and coronal DW-MRI using a 1.5-MR system with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm2.The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the two DW-MRI sequences were measured and statistically compared using the paired t-test.The extent of agreement of ADC values of the upper pole,mid-pole,and lower pole of the kidney; the mean ADC values of the left kidney and right kidney; and the mean ADC values of the bilateral kidneys were evaluated via calculation of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) or Bland-Altman method between the two DW-MRI sequences.Results:The SNR of coronal DW-MR images was statistically inferior to that of axial DW-MR images (P < 0.001).The ICCs of the ADC values of each region of interest,and the mean ADC values of bilateral kidneys,between the two sequences,were greater than 0.5,and the mean ADCs of the bilateral kidneys demonstrated the highest ICC (0.869; 95% confidence interval:0.739-0.935).In addition,94.1% (32/34),94.1% (32/34),and 97.1% (31/34) of the ADC bias was inside the limits of agreement in terms of the mean ADC values of the left kidneys,right kidneys,and bilateral kidneys when coronal and axial DWI-MRI were compared.Conclusions:ADC values derived using coronal DW-MRI exhibited moderate-to-good agreement to those of axial DW-MRI,rendering the former an additional useful DW-MRI method,and causing the ADC values derived using the two types of DW-MRI to be comparable.

  19. The role of dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the female pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Evis, E-mail: es220@radiol.cam.ac.uk [University Department of Radiology, Box 218, Level 5, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Rockall, Andrea, E-mail: Andrea.Rockall@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7ED (United Kingdom); Rangarajan, Deepa, E-mail: rdrangarajan@googlemail.com [Department of Radiology, Box 218, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A., E-mail: rahel.kubik@ksb.ch [Institute of Radiology, Department of Medical Services, Kantonsspital Baden Im Ergel, CH-5404 Baden (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    Functional imaging by means of dynamic multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is now part of the standard imaging protocols for evaluation of the female pelvis. DCE-MRI and DW-MRI are important MR imaging techniques which enable the radiologist to move from morphological to functional assessment of diseases of the female pelvis. This is mainly due to the limitations of morphologic imaging, particularly in lesion characterization, accurate lymph node staging, assessment of tumour response and inability to differentiate post-treatment changes from tumour recurrence. DCE-MRI improves the accuracy of T2WI in staging of endometrial cancer. It also helps differentiate tumour recurrence from radiation fibrosis in patients with cervical cancer. DCE-MRI improves characterization of cystic adnexal lesions and detection of small peritoneal implants in patients with ovarian cancer. DW-MRI is valuable in preoperative staging of patients with endometrial and cervical cancer, especially in detection of extra-uterine disease. It does increase reader's confidence for detection of recurrent disease in gynaecological malignancies and improves detection of small peritoneal implants in patients with ovarian cancer. In this review article we give an overview of both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI techniques, concentrating on their main clinical application in the female pelvis, and present a practical approach of the added value of these techniques according to the main pathological conditions, highlighting the pearls and pitfalls of each technique.

  20. 7T T₂*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals cortical phase differences between early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooden, Sanneke; Doan, Nhat Trung; Versluis, Maarten J; Goos, Jeroen D C; Webb, Andrew G; Oleksik, Ania M; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Weverling-Rynsburger, Annelies W E; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Reiber, Johan H C; van Buchem, Mark A; Milles, Julien; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore regional iron-related differences in the cerebral cortex, indicative of Alzheimer's disease pathology, between early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD, LOAD, respectively) patients using 7T magnetic resonance phase images. High-resolution T2(∗)-weighted scans were acquired in 12 EOAD patients and 17 LOAD patients with mild to moderate disease and 27 healthy elderly control subjects. Lobar peak-to-peak phase shifts and regional mean phase contrasts were computed. An increased peak-to-peak phase shift was found for all lobar regions in EOAD patients compared with LOAD patients (p iron accumulation, possibly related to an increased amyloid deposition, in specific cortical regions as compared with LOAD patients.

  1. Consistency between magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted images and pathological findings in a hyperacute cerebral infarction rabbit model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingwu Lou; Zengyan Li; Weidong Hu; Yi Fan; Xiurong Wang; Guangfu Yang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Because magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging is sensitive to water molecule movement,it has particular advantages for early diagnosis of cerebral infarction.However,the relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient changes with ischemia time,particularly relative apparent diffusion coefficient and tissue pathological changes remains controversial.OBJECTIVE:To explore the correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient changes and pathologic changes in hyperacute cerebral infarction.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A randomized,controlled,animal experiment of neuroimaging.The study was performed at the Laboratory of Radiology Department,Longgang Central Hospital of Shenzhen from October 2007 to October 2008.MATERIALS:Magnetic resonance scanner was purchased from Philips Medical Systems,Best,the Netherlands.METHODS:A total of 42 healthy,adult,New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned into sham-operation,ischemia 0.5-,1-,2-,3-,4-,and 6-hour groups,with six animals in each group.Local cerebral ischemia model was established by right middle cerebral artery occlusion,and cranial MRI scanning and pathologic observation were performed,respectively,at 0.5,1,2,3,4,and 6 hours following ischemia.The middle cerebral artery of sham-operation group was only exposed,but not occluded.Images at the above-mentioned time points were also collected.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Apparent diffusion coefficient and relative apparent diffusion coefficient values of abnormal signal on diffusion-weighted imaging were calculated and compared with pathological changes in the ischemic region.RESULTS:No abnormal diffusion-weighted imaging signals or pathological changes were observed in the sham-operation group.Abnormal signal intensity on diffusion-weighted imaging was first observed in the 0.5-hour group.Apparent diffusion coefficient and relative apparent diffusion coefficient values decreased in all middle cerebral artery occlusion rabbits and reached lowest levels at 3 hours

  2. [Susceptibility weighted magnetic resonance sequences "SWAN, SWI and VenoBOLD": technical aspects and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodel, J; Rodallec, M; Gerber, S; Blanc, R; Maraval, A; Caron, S; Tyvaert, L; Zuber, M; Zins, M

    2012-05-01

    Susceptibility-weighted MR sequences, T2 star weighted angiography (SWAN, General Electric), Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI, Siemens) and venous blood oxygen level dependant (VenoBOLD, Philips) are 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence that provide a high sensitivity for the detection of blood degradation products, calcifications, and iron deposits. For all these sequences, an appropriate echo time allows for the visualization of susceptibility differences between adjacent tissues. However, each of these sequences presents a specific technical background. The purpose of this review was to describe 1/the technical aspects of SWAN, VenoBOLD and SWI sequences, 2/the differences observed in term of contrast within the images, 3/the key imaging findings in neuroimaging using susceptibility-weighted MR sequences.

  3. Image quality and cancer visibility of T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the prostate at 7 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, E.K.; Lagemaat, M.W.; Barentsz, J.O.; Fuetterer, J.J.; Zamecnik, P.; Roozen, H.; Maas, M.C. [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, P.O. box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Orzada, S.; Bitz, A.K. [Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Scheenen, T.W.J. [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, P.O. box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    To assess the image quality of T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and the visibility of prostate cancer at 7 Tesla (T). Seventeen prostate cancer patients underwent T2w imaging at 7T with only an external transmit/receive array coil. Three radiologists independently scored images for image quality, visibility of anatomical structures, and presence of artefacts. Krippendorff's alpha and weighted kappa statistics were used to assess inter-observer agreement. Visibility of prostate cancer lesions was assessed by directly linking the T2w images to the confirmed location of prostate cancer on histopathology. T2w imaging at 7T was achievable with 'satisfactory' (3/5) to 'good' (4/5) quality. Visibility of anatomical structures was predominantly scored as 'satisfactory' (3/5) and 'good' (4/5). If artefacts were present, they were mostly motion artefacts and, to a lesser extent, aliasing artefacts and noise. Krippendorff's analysis revealed an α = 0.44 between three readers for the overall image quality scores. Clinically significant cancer lesions in both peripheral zone and transition zone were visible at 7T. T2w imaging with satisfactory to good quality can be routinely acquired, and cancer lesions were visible in patients with prostate cancer at 7T using only an external transmit/receive body array coil. (orig.)

  4. A Systematic Review of Non-Echo Planar Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detection of Primary and Postoperative Cholesteatoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Egmond, Sylvia L; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Aarts, Mark C J

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic value of non-echo planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for primary and recurrent/residual (postoperative) cholesteatoma in adults (≥18 years) after canal wall up surgery. DATA SOURCES: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed,

  5. Tensor Based Representation and Analysis of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmpoutis, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    Cartesian tensor bases have been widely used to model spherical functions. In medical imaging, tensors of various orders can approximate the diffusivity function at each voxel of a diffusion-weighted MRI data set. This approximation produces tensor-valued datasets that contain information about the underlying local structure of the scanned tissue.…

  6. A knee brace alters patella position in patellofemoral osteoarthritis: a study using weight bearing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, M J; Guney, H; Reeves, N D; Bailey, D; Doslikova, K; Maganaris, C N; Hodgson, R; Felson, D T

    2016-12-01

    To assess using weight bearing magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs), whether a patellar brace altered patellar position and alignment in patellofemoral joint (PFJ) osteoarthritis (OA). Subjects age 40-70 years old with symptomatic and a radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) evidence of PFJOA. Weight bearing knee MRIs with and without a patellar brace were obtained using an upright open 0.25 T scanner (G-Scan, Easote Biomedica, Italy). Five aspects of patellar position were measured: mediolateral alignment by the bisect offset index, angulation by patellar tilt, patellar height by patellar height ratio (patellar length/patellar tendon length), lateral patellofemoral (PF) contact area and finally a measurement of PF bony separation of the lateral patellar facet and the adjacent surface on the femoral trochlea (Fig. 1). Thirty participants were recruited (mean age 57 SD 27.8; body mass index (BMI) 27.8 SD 4.2); 17 were females. Four patients had non-usable data. Main analysis used paired t tests comparing within subject patellar position with and without brace. For bisect offset index, patellar tilt and patellar height ratio there were no significant differences between the brace and no brace conditions. However, the brace increased lateral facet contact area (P = .04) and decreased lateral PF separation (P = .03). A patellar brace alters patellar position and increases contact area between the patella and femoral trochlea. These changes would lower contact stress at the PFJ. Such changes in patella position in weight bearing provide a possible biomechanical explanation for the success of the PFJ brace in clinical trials on PFJOA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Effect of weight loss on magnetic resonance imaging estimation of liver fat and volume in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Niraj S; Doycheva, Iliana; Peterson, Michael R; Hooker, Jonathan; Kisselva, Tatiana; Schnabl, Bernd; Seki, Ekihiro; Sirlin, Claude B; Loomba, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about how weight loss affects magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liver fat and volume or liver histology in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We measured changes in liver fat and liver volume associated with weight loss by using an advanced MRI method. We analyzed data collected from a previous randomized controlled trial in which 43 adult patients with biopsy-proven NASH underwent clinical evaluation, biochemical tests, and MRI and liver biopsy analyses at the start of the study and after 24 weeks. We compared data between patients who did and did not have at least 5% decrease in body mass index (BMI) during the study period. Ten of 43 patients had at least a 5% decrease in BMI during the study period. These patients had a significant decrease in liver fat, which was based on MRI proton density fat fraction estimates (18.3% ± 7.6% to 13.6% ± 13.6%, P = .03), a relative 25.5% reduction. They also had a significant decrease in liver volume (5.3%). However, no significant changes in levels of alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase were observed with weight loss. Thirty-three patients without at least 5% decrease in BMI had insignificant increases in estimated liver fat fraction and liver volume. A reduction in BMI of at least 5% is associated with significant decrease in liver fat and volume in patients with biopsy-proven NASH. These data should be considered in assessing effect size in studies of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or obesity that use MRI-estimated liver fat and volume as end points. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preoperative CT versus diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael P; Løgager, Vibeke B; Skjoldbye, Bjørn;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world and liver metastases are seen in up to 19% of patients with colorectal cancers. Detection of liver metastases is not only vital for sufficient treatment and survival, but also for a better estimation of prognosis....... The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion weighted MRI of the liver as part of a combined MR evaluation of patients with rectal cancers and compare it with the standard preoperative evaluation of the liver with CT. Methods. Consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal cancers were....... The current standard preoperative evaluation with CT-scan results in disadvantages like missed metastases and futile operations. We recommend that patients with rectal cancer, who are scheduled for MR of the rectum, should have a DWMR of the liver performed at the same time....

  9. The Application of Diffusion- and Perfusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis and Therapy of Acute Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Han

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI and PWI was applied for stroke diagnose in 120 acute (<48 h ischemic stroke patients. At hyperacute (<6 h stage, it is difficult to find out the infarction zone in conventional T1 or T2 image, but it is easy in DWI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map; when at 3–6-hour stage it is also easy in PWI, cerebral blood flow (CBF map, cerebral blood volume (CBV map, and mean transit time (MTT map; at acute (6–48 h stage, DWI or PWI is more sensitive than conventional T1 or T2 image too. Combining DWI with ADC, acute and chronic infarction can be distinguished. Besides, penumbra which should be developed in meaning was used as an indication or to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. There were two cases (<1.5 h that broke the model of penumbra because abnormity was found in DWI but not that in PWI, finally they recovered without any sequela.

  10. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of insignificant prostate cancer in potential candidates for active surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Heon; Jeong, Jae Yong; Lee, Sin Woo; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Jeon, Seong Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    To investigate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) could help improve the prediction of insignificant prostate cancer in candidates for active surveillance (AS). Enrolled in this retrospective study were 287 AS candidates who underwent DW-MRI before radical prostatectomy. Patients were stratified into two groups; Group A consisted of patients with no visible tumour or a suspected tumour ADC value > 0.830 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec and Group B consisted of patients with a suspected tumour ADC value < 0.830 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec. We compared pathological outcomes in each group. Group A had 243 (84.7 %) patients and Group B had 44 (15.3 %) patients. The proportion of organ-confined Gleason ≤ 6 disease and insignificant prostate cancer was significantly higher in Group A than Group B (61.3 % vs. 38.6 %, p = 0.005 and 47.7 % vs. 25.0 %, p = 0.005, respectively). On multivariate analysis, a high ADC value was the independent predictor of organ-confined Gleason ≤ 6 disease and insignificant prostate cancer (odds ratio = 2.43, p = 0.011 and odds ratio = 2.74, p = 0.009, respectively). Tumour ADC values may be a useful marker for predicting insignificant prostate cancer in candidates for AS. (orig.)

  11. An Early Continuous Experimental Study on Magnetic Resonance Diffusion-weighted Image of Focal Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The chronological and spatial rules of changes during focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in different brain regions with magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in a model of occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO) and the development of cytotoxic edema in acute phase were explored. Fifteen healthy S-D rats with MCA occluded by thread-emboli were randomly divided into three groups. 15 min after the operation, the serial imaging was scanned on DWI for the three groups. The relative mean signal intensity (RMSI) of the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, lateral cauda-putamen, medial cauda-putamen and the volume of regions of hyperintense signal on DWI were calculated. After the last DWI scanning, T2 WI was performed for the three groups. After 15min ischemia, the rats was presented hyperintense signals on DWI. The regions of hyperintense signal were enlarged with prolonging ischemia time. The regions of hyperintense signal were back to normal after 60 min reperfusion with a small part remaining to show hyperintense signal. The RMSIs of parietal lobe and lateral cauda-putamen were higher than that of the frontal lobe and medial cauda-putamen both in ischemia phase and recanalization phase. The three groups werenormal on T2WI imaging. DWI had good sensitivity to acute cerebral ischemia, which was used to study the chronological and spatial rules of development of early cell edema in ischemia regions.

  12. Added value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of pancreatic fluid collection infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borens, Bruno [Polyclinique Santa Maria, Nice (France); Arvanitakis, Marianna; Eisendrath, Pierre; Toussaint, Emmanuel; Deviere, Jacques [Erasme Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Brussels (Belgium); Absil, Julie; Matos, Celso; Bali, Maria Antonietta [Erasme Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); El Bouchaibi, Said [Epicura, Ath (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of infection in pancreatic fluid collections (PFC). Forty-patients with PFC requiring endoscopic-transmural drainage underwent conventional-MR and DW-MR imaging (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) before endoscopy. MR images were divided into two sets (set1, conventional-MR; set2, conventional-MR, DW-MR and ADC maps) and randomized. Two independent readers performed qualitative and quantitative (apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC) image analysis. Bacteriological analysis of PFC content was the gold standard. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV) and accuracy were calculated for the two sets for both readers. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were drawn to assess quantitative DW-MR imaging diagnostic performance. For both readers, sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV and accuracy for infected PFCs were higher for set2 (P >.05). ADC were lower in infected versus non-infected PFCs (P ≤.031). Minimum ADC cut-off: 1,090 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for reader 1 and 1,012 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for reader 2 (sensitivity and specificity 67 % and 96 % for both readers). Qualitative information provided by DW-MR may help to assess PFCs infection. Infected PFCs show significantly lower ADCs compared to non-infected ones. (orig.)

  13. 3D segmentation of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Eltes, Peter E.; Del Rio, Luis; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-12-01

    Computational medicine aims at employing personalised computational models in diagnosis and treatment planning. The use of such models to help physicians in finding the best treatment for low back pain (LBP) is becoming popular. One of the challenges of creating such models is to derive patient-specific anatomical and tissue models of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs), as a prior step. This article presents a segmentation scheme that obtains accurate results irrespective of the degree of IVD degeneration, including pathological discs with protrusion or herniation. The segmentation algorithm, employing a novel feature selector, iteratively deforms an initial shape, which is projected into a statistical shape model space at first and then, into a B-Spline space to improve accuracy. The method was tested on a MR dataset of 59 patients suffering from LBP. The images follow a standard T2-weighted protocol in coronal and sagittal acquisitions. These two image volumes were fused in order to overcome large inter-slice spacing. The agreement between expert-delineated structures, used here as gold-standard, and our automatic segmentation was evaluated using Dice Similarity Index and surface-to-surface distances, obtaining a mean error of 0.68 mm in the annulus segmentation and 1.88 mm in the nucleus, which are the best results with respect to the image resolution in the current literature.

  14. [Utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in severe focal traumatic brain injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Valderrey, F; Muñiz-Montes, J R; López-García, J A; Villegas-Del Ojo, J; Málaga-Gil, J; Galván-García, R

    2013-01-01

    To describe the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in a series of severe traumatic brain injuries, their clinical and outcome features, and possible implications. A descriptive, observational case-series study was carried out. Patients with severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) admitted to the ICU were subjected to MRI study using a 1.5 T scanner. Diffusion-weighted images (DWMR) were obtained using the following echo-planar pulse sequence: TR 10000 ms, TE 126.9 ms, with b values 1000 s/mm2 in the three spatial dimensions. Combining the three sets of images, an isotropic image conforming a map of the mean ADCs was obtained. DWMR was performed in 23 patients with severe TBI admitted to the ICU between 2001 and 2004. In the MR images we selected 26 regions of interest (ROIs) where ADC was recorded. We observed a clear increase in diffusion in non-treated space-occupying lesions versus other types of injuries and the normal values. A poorer outcome was recorded in patients with lower ADC values. Mean ADC in the lesions was greater than the normal values and greater in contusions than in other types of injuries, as an expression of extracellular edema. ADCs were decreased in patients with a poor outcome, suggesting an association between ischemia and the patient prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Carotid plaque signal differences among four kinds of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques: A histopathological correlation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Ayumi; Narumi, Shinsuke; Ohba, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Mao; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke [Iwate Medical University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Morioka (Japan); Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Hitomi, Jiro [Iwate Medical University, Department of Anatomy, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Several magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used to examine atherosclerotic plaque of carotid arteries; however, the best technique for visualizing intraplaque characteristics has yet to be determined. Here, we directly compared four kinds of T1-weighted (T1W) imaging techniques with pathological findings in patients with carotid stenosis. A total of 31 patients who were candidates for carotid endarterectomy were prospectively examined using a 1.5-T MRI scanner, which produced four kinds of T1W images, including non-gated spin echo (SE), cardiac-gated black-blood (BB) fast-SE (FSE), magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (MPRAGE), and source image of three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (SI-MRA). The signal intensity of the carotid plaque was manually measured, and the contrast ratio (CR) against the adjacent muscle was calculated. CRs from the four imaging techniques were compared to each other and correlated with histopathological specimens. CRs of the carotid plaques mainly containing fibrous tissue, lipid/necrosis, and hemorrhage were significantly different with little overlaps (range: 0.92-1.15, 1.22-1.52, and 1.55-2.30, respectively) on non-gated SE. However, BB-FSE showed remarkable overlaps among the three groups (0.89-1.10, 1.07-1.23, and 1.01-1.42, respectively). MPRAGE could discriminate fibrous plaques from hemorrhagic plaques but not from lipid/necrosis-rich plaques: (0.77-1.07, 1.45-2.43, and 0.85-1.42, respectively). SI-MRA showed the same tendencies (1.01-1.39, 1.45-2.57, and 1.12-1.39, respectively). Among T1W MR imaging techniques, non-gated SE images can more accurately characterize intraplaque components in patients who underwent CEA when compared with cardiac-gated BB-FSE, MPRAGE, and SI-MRA images. (orig.)

  16. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus ‎thrombosis using T2*-weighted ‎gradient echo magnetic resonance ‎imaging sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Bidar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences.Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE imaging, -weighted turbo SE (TSE, fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR, -weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI. MR venography (MRV images were obtained as the golden standard.Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in -weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. -weighted GRE sequences were superior to -weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis.Conclusion: -weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

  17. Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an aggressive tumour variant unrecognized on T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieda, Nicola; Coffey, Niamh; Al-Dandan, Omran; Shabana, Wael [The University of Ottawa, Department of Medical Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Gulavita, Previn; Flood, Trevor A. [The University of Ottawa, Department of Anatomical Pathology, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DCa) is an aggressive variant. The purpose of this study was to determine if T2 signal intensity (SI) differs from conventional adenocarcinoma (CCa). A retrospective study of patients who underwent preoperative MRI and prostatectomy between 2009 and 2012 was performed. T2 SI ratios (SIR) for tumour (T) to obturator internus muscle (M) and normal peripheral zone (PZ) were compared. Two radiologists evaluated the central gland/PZ to detect tumours and compared diagnostic accuracy. T2 SIR for DCa were 3.60 (T/M), 0.66 (T/PZ); 2.68 (T/M), 0.47 (T/PZ) for Gleason 9; 2.50 (T/M), 0.47 (T/PZ) for Gleason 7/8 and 3.95 (T/M), 0.73 (T/PZ) for Gleason 6 tumours. There was a difference in T2 T/M and T/PZ SIR between DCa and Gleason 9 (p = 0.003, p = 0.004) and Gleason 7/8 (p = 0.006, p = 0.002), but no difference in SIR between DCa and Gleason 6 tumours. The sensitivity for tumour detection was 0-27 % for DCa, 64-82 % for Gleason 9, 44-88 % for Gleason 7-8 and 0-20 % for Gleason 6. There was a difference in the sensitivity of detecting Gleason 9 and 7/8 tumours when compared to DCa (p = 0.004, p = 0.001). DCa resembles Gleason score 6 tumour at T2-weighted MRI, which underestimates tumour grade and renders the tumour occult. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging in the characterization of pancreatic mucinous cystic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatima, Z. [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimokato, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi 409-3898 (Japan); Ichikawa, T., E-mail: ichikawa@yamanashi.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimokato, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi 409-3898 (Japan); Motosugi, U.; Muhi, A.; Sano, K.; Sou, H. [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimokato, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi 409-3898 (Japan); Haradome, H. [Department of Radiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kiryu, S. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Araki, T. [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimokato, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi 409-3898 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the utility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), including apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement, in order to differentiate mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) from intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas. Materials and methods: Fifty cases of IPMN with a total of 62 lesions, and eight cases of MCN, were retrospectively selected for the study. The cases of IPMN were selected using multimodality clinical or histopathological criteria, while all MCN lesions were histopathologically proven. DWI was carried out using b values of 500 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. Visual assessment was performed by two radiologists who used two categories (low-iso or high signal intensity). ADC values of the lesions were also calculated. Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney U test were used for statistical analysis. Results: All IPMN lesions demonstrated low-iso signal intensities compared with the pancreatic parenchyma on DWI. Two of the MCN lesions demonstrated low-iso signal intensities, and six lesions demonstrated high signal intensities. The ADC values for IPMNs (mean 2.9 {+-} 0.024 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) were significantly higher than those for MCNs (mean 2.1 {+-} 0.30 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). ROC analysis showed an optimal cut-off value of 2.4 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for differentiating between the two types of lesions, providing a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 88%. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that ADC values in mucinous cystic lesions of the pancreas can be advantageous for their characterization into IPMN and MCN.

  19. Diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke based on time-to-peak and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Eguchi, Tsuneyoshi; Sora, Shigeo; Izumi, Masafumi; Hiyama, Hirofumi [Kameda General Hospital, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan); Ueki, Keisuke [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-07-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of the hemodynamics of the brain is essential for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. This study investigated whether time-to-peak and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are useful for predicting the course of stroke. Fourteen patients with non-lacunar acute ischemic stroke underwent emergent MR imaging within 24 hours from the onset followed by cerebral angiography and xenon-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Serial CT was obtained to monitor changes in the size and nature of the infarct. Volumes of the abnormal lesions demonstrated on time-to-peak (V{sub T}) or diffusion-weighted (V{sub D}) images were measured, and the ratio of V{sub T} to V{sub D} was calculated. Based on this ratio, patients were classified into three groups: Group 1 (V{sub T}/V{sub D} 0.5-1.5, n=9), Group 2 (V{sub T}/V{sub D}>1.5, n=3), and Group 3 (V{sub T}/V{sub D}<0.5, n=2). The size of the infarct detected as a low-density area on serial CT scans did not change significantly throughout the course in Group 1 patients, but showed enlargement in all three patients in Group 2. Two patients in Group 3 had major trunk occlusion followed by spontaneous reperfusion, and both developed hemorrhagic transformation. Our study showed that classification of ischemic stroke based on the V{sub T}/V{sub D} ratio was predictive of the time course of the infarct, and may be useful in selecting the initial therapeutic procedure immediately after the onset of stroke. (author)

  20. Perianal Fistula With and Without Abscess: Assessment of Fistula Activity Using Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Selim; Olgun, Deniz Cebi; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Tutar, Onur; Samanci, Cesur; Dikici, Suleyman; Simsek, Osman; Rafiee, Babak; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Mihmanli, Ismail

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly accurate for the depiction of both the primary tract of fistula and abscesses, in patients with perianal disease. In addition, MRI can be used to evaluate the activity of fistulas, which is a significant factor for determining the therapeutic strategy. This study aimed to determine the usefulness of diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI for assessing activity and visibility of perianal fistula. Fifty-three patients with 56 perianal fistulas were included in the current retrospective study. The T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and DWMRI were performed and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of fistulas were measured. Fistulas were classified into two groups: only perianal fistulas and fistulas accompanied by abscess. Fistulas were also classified into two groups, based on clinical findings: positive inflammatory activity (PIA) and negative inflammatory activity (NIA). Mean ADC value (mm(2)/s) of PIA group was significantly lower than that of NIA group, regarding lesions in patients with abscess-associated fistulas (1.371 × 10(-3) ± 0.168 × 10(-3) vs. 1.586 × 10(-3) ± 0.136 × 10(-3); P = 0.036). No statistically significant difference was found in mean ADC values between PIA and NIA groups, in patients with only perianal fistulas (P = 0.507). Perianal fistula visibility was greater with combined evaluation of T2WI and DWMRI than with T2WI, for two reviewers (P = 0.046 and P = 0.014). The DWMRI is a useful technique for evaluating activity of fistulas with abscess. Perianal fistula visibility is greater with combined T2WI and DWMRI than T2WI alone.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  2. Are hepatic and soleus lipid content, assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy, associated with low birth weight or insulin resistance in a rural Indian population of healthy young men?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, R. S.; Grunnet, L. G.; Thomas, N.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To assess young healthy men from rural India, who had normal or low birth weights, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the potential differences in ectopic fat storage between birth weight groups, and to determine if ectopic fat storage was associated with insulin resistance...... weight were not observed to have ectopic fat storage in the liver or muscle, and the amount of liver and muscle fat was unrelated to insulin resistance. Older age and/or an urban affluent lifestyle may be required to show a potential role of ectopic fat storage on insulin resistance in Indian people...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ...

  6. Monitoring the Progression of Renal Fibrosis by T2-weighted Signal Intensity and Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cisplatin induced Rat Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Huan Wu; Hui-Ru Jia; Yi Zhang; Le Liu; Dong-Bo Xu; Hao-Ran Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background:Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI),with the applying of intravoxel incoherent motion model,has showed promising results in obtaining additional information about microperfusion and tubular flow associated with morphologic changes in chronic kidney diseases.The study aims to evaluate the potential of T2-weighted signal intensity (SI) and DWI with mono-and bi-exponential models to reflect the serial changes on cisplatin (CP) induced rat renal fibrosis models.Methods:Magnetic resonance exams were performed prior to and 2nd day,4th day,6th day,8th day,2nd week,3rd week and 4th week after CP injection at a 3.0T with an animal coil.Besides T2-weighted images (T2WI),DWI of 13 b values from 0 to 1500 s/mm2 was acquired.Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC),fluid fraction f,pure diffusivity D and pseudodiffusivity D* values were calculated.The regions of interest were placed on cortex (CO),outer stripe of the outer medulla (OM) and inner stripe of the outer medulla (OM),parameters were measured and compared among different time points.Five rats were scarified at each time point for pathological examination.Results:OM revealed remarkable hyperintense and broadened before it became an obscure thread,while CO demonstrated moderate hyperintense and IM didn't show significant change on T2WI.On all three stripes,ADC values decreased firstly then kept increasing since the 4th day;f values decreased on all stripes; D values had a tendency to increase with fluctuations but the changes didn't achieve statistical significance; D* values increased at the 2nd day then tended to be steady thereafter.Pathological findings revealed tubules epitheliums swelling followed by inflammation cells infiltration,interstitial fibrosis was observed since the 2nd week.Conclusions:All of T2-weighted SI,ADC,and biexponential models parameters vary during fibrotic process; biexponential model is superior to monoexponential model in separating changes of microperfusion together with tubular flow

  7. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of lung lesions: repeatability of the apparent diffusion coefficient measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardin, L.; Douglas, N.H.M.; Collins, D.J.; Giles, S.L.; O' Flynn, E.A.M.; Orton, M.; DeSouza, N.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    To establish repeatability of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) acquired from free-breathing diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in malignant lung lesions and investigate effects of lesion size, location and respiratory motion. Thirty-six malignant lung lesions (eight patients) were examined twice (1- to 5-h interval) using T1-weighted, T2-weighted and axial single-shot echo-planar DW-MRI (b = 100, 500, 800 s/mm{sup 2}) during free-breathing. Regions of interest around target lesions on computed b = 800 s/mm{sup 2} images by two independent observers yielded ADC values from maps (pixel-by-pixel fitting using all b values and a mono-exponential decay model). Intra- and inter-observer repeatability was assessed per lesion, per patient and by lesion size (> or <2 cm) or location. ADCs were similar between observers (mean ± SD, 1.15 ± 0.28 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, observer 1; 1.15 ± 0.29 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, observer 2). Intra-observer coefficients of variation of the mean [median] ADC per lesion and per patient were 11 % [11.4 %], 5.7 % [5.7 %] for observer 1 and 9.2 % [9.5 %], 3.9 % [4.7 %] for observer 2 respectively; inter-observer values were 8.9 % [9.3 %] (per lesion) and 3.0 % [3.7 %] (per patient). Inter-observer coefficient of variation (CoV) was greater for lesions <2 cm (n = 20) compared with >2 cm (n = 16) (10.8 % vs 6.5 % ADC{sub mean}, 11.3 % vs 6.7 % ADC{sub median}) and for mid (n = 14) vs apical (n = 9) or lower zone (n = 13) lesions (13.9 %, 2.7 %, 3.8 % respectively ADC{sub mean}; 14.2 %, 2.8 %, 4.7 % respectively ADC{sub median}). Free-breathing DW-MRI of whole lung achieves good intra- and inter-observer repeatability of ADC measurements in malignant lung tumours. (orig.)

  8. Topographic distribution and characteristics of normal gastric regional lymph nodes on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yun; Hedgire, Sandeep S; Liao, Gang; Lv, Fajin; Li, Yongmei; Li, Qi; Wang, Ziwei

    2016-02-01

    Current lack of recognition of normal gastric regional lymph nodes (GRLNs) and inherent defect of morphological imaging limit the accuracy of preoperative nodal (N) staging of gastric cancer. To map the distribution of normal GRLNs and evaluating the characteristics of GRLNs with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in healthy population. Forty-nine enrolled healthy volunteers were divided into two age groups and underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DWI examinations. The characteristics of GRLNs in 14 regional stations, including short axis diameter (SD), short-to-long axis diameter ratio (SLR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), were recorded and compared between age groups and among different stations. The normal GRLNs were mainly distributed in station 7 in both age groups, followed by stations 3, 8, and 9. The SLR was lower in the young group than in the old group (P = 0.034) while SD, SNR, CNR, and ADC were significantly higher in the young group compared to the old group, P = 0.045, 0.041, 0.037, and 0.042, respectively. SD was different among stations in both age groups (P = 0.002, 0.001), especially bigger in station 8, and the SNRs and CNRs of stations 8 and 9 were relatively high in the old group (P = 0.031, 0.035), while there was no difference in ADC value. Better understanding of the appearances of normal GRLNs on conventional MRI and DWI may help to build more appropriate imaging criteria for GRLN assessment in gastric cancer. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  9. Comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and diffusion-weighted imaging for differentiating benign and malignant liver lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennedige, Tiffany P.; Hallinan, James Thomas Patrick Decourcy; Teo, Lynette Li San [National University Hospital, National University Health System, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Leung, Fiona P. [National University Hospital, National University Health System, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); South West Radiology, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Iyer, Sridhar; Chang, Stephen; Madhavan, Krishna Kumar [National University Health System, Department of Surgery, Singapore (Singapore); Wang, Gang [National University Hospital, National University Health System, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); University of Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Wee, Aileen [National University Hospital, National University Health System, Department of Pathology, Singapore (Singapore); Venkatesh, Sudhakar K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Comparison of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for differentiating malignant and benign focal liver lesions (FLLs). Seventy-nine subjects with 124 FLLs (44 benign and 80 malignant) underwent both MRE and DWI. MRE was performed with a modified gradient-echo sequence and DWI with a free breathing technique (b = 0.500). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and stiffness maps were generated. FLL mean stiffness and ADC values were obtained by placing regions of interest over the FLLs on stiffness and ADC maps. The accuracy of MRE and DWI for differentiation of benign and malignant FLL was compared using receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. There was a significant negative correlation between stiffness and ADC (r = -0.54, p < 0.0001) of FLLs. Malignant FLLs had significantly higher mean stiffness (7.9kPa vs. 3.1kPa, p < 0.001) and lower mean ADC (129 vs. 200 x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s, p < 0.001) than benign FLLs. The sensitivity/specificity/positive predictive value/negative predictive value for differentiating malignant from benign FLLs with MRE (cut-off, >4.54kPa) and DWI (cut-off, <151 x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were 96.3/95.5/97.5/93.3 % (p < 0.001) and 85/81.8/88.3/75 % (p < 0.001), respectively. ROC analysis showed significantly higher accuracy for MRE than DWI (0.986 vs. 0.82, p = 0.0016). MRE is significantly more accurate than DWI for differentiating benign and malignant FLLs. (orig.)

  10. Utility and limitations of 3-Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for differentiation of renal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevcenco, S., E-mail: sabina.sevcenco@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Urology, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Heinz-Peer, G., E-mail: gertraud.heinz-peer@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Ponhold, L., E-mail: lothar.ponhold@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Javor, D., E-mail: domagoj.javor@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kuehhas, F.E., E-mail: frenklin.kuehhas@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Urology, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Klingler, H.C., E-mail: christoph.klingler@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Urology, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Remzi, M., E-mail: mesut.remzi@gmx.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Urology, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Weibl, P., E-mail: peter.weibl@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Urology, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Shariat, S.F., E-mail: sfshariat@gmail.com [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Urology, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Baltzer, P.A., E-mail: pascal.baltzer@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Dept. of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    Objective: To investigate utility and limitations of 3-Tesla diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differentiation of benign versus malignant renal lesions and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) subtypes. Materials and methods: Sixty patients with 71 renal lesions underwent 3 Tesla DW-MRI of the kidney before diagnostic tissue confirmation. The images were retrospectively evaluated blinded to histology. Single-shot echo-planar imaging was used as the DW imaging technique. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured and compared with histopathological characteristics. Results: There were 54 malignant and 17 benign lesions, 46 lesions being small renal masses ≤4 cm. Papillary RCC lesions had lower ADC values (p = 0.029) than other RCC subtypes (clear cell or chromophobe). Diagnostic accuracy of DW-MRI for differentiation of papillary from non-papillary RCC was 70.3% resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 64.3% (95% CI, 35.1–87.2) and 77.1 (95% CI, 59.9–89.6%). Accuracy increased to 83.7% in small renal masses (≤4 cm diameter) and sensitivity and specificity were 75.0% and 88.5%, respectively. The ADC values did not differ significantly between benign and malignant renal lesions (p = 0.45). Conclusions: DW-MRI seems to distinguish between papillary and other subtypes of RCCs especially in small renal masses but could not differentiate between benign and malignant renal lesions. Therefore, the use of DW-MRI for preoperative differentiation of renal lesions is limited.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  12. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the normal endometrium: temporal and spatial variations of the apparent diffusion coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasa, Francesca; Montemezzi, Stefania [Dept. of Radiology, San Bonifacio Hospital, Verona (Italy)], e-mail: francescafornasa@libero.it

    2012-06-15

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is increasingly used in the diagnosis of endometrial disease. No complete knowledge, however, exists yet of the influence of physiology on the endometrial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values on which DWI is based. Purpose: To establish whether the ADC values measured with DWI in the endometrium of healthy reproductive-aged women significantly vary from the early proliferative to the periovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle and between the fundus and the isthmus of the uterus. Material and Methods: In 17 women the endometrial ADC values measured on the fifth menstrual day, both at the fundus and at the isthmus of the uterus, were compared to the values obtained on the 14th day before the subsequent cycle. In 81 women (menstrual day: fifth through 21st) the endometrial ADC values measured at the fundus were compared to the values obtained at the isthmus of the uterus. All examinations were performed with a 1.5 T magnet (b values: 0 and 800 mm/s{sup 2}). The results were analyzed by means of Student's t-test per paired data. Results: The endometrial ADC values measured on the fifth day of the menstrual cycle were lower than those obtained in the periovulatory phase both at the fundus (mean 0.923 vs. 1.256 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/s) and at the isthmus (mean 1.297 vs. 1.529 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/s) of the uterus. The endometrial ADC values measured at the fundus of the uterus were lower than those obtained at the isthmus (mean 1.132 vs. 1.420 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/s) through the menstrual cycle. All these differences were highly significant (P < 0.001) at statistical analysis. Conclusion: Physiological variations occurring in endometrial ADC values of healthy women should be considered by the radiologists when interpreting DWI examinations in patients with endometrial disease.

  13. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion weighted imaging findings of medulloblastoma in 3.0T MRI A retrospective analysis of 17 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangyao Wu; Haopeng Pang; Prasanna Ghimire; Guobing Liu

    2012-01-01

    1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion weighted imaging features of the cerebellar vermis in 17 medulloblastoma patients were retrospectively analyzed, and 17 healthy volunteers were selected as controls. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that in all 17 medulloblastoma patients, N-acetyl aspartate and creatine peaks were significantly decreased, the choline peak was significantly increased, and there was evidence of a myo-inositol peak. Further, 11 patients showed a low taurine peak at 3.4 ppm, five patients showed a lipid peak at 0.9–1.3 ppm, and three patients showed a negative lactic acid peak at 1.33 ppm. Compared with the control group, the ratios of N-acetyl aspartate/choline and N-acetyl aspartate/creatine were significantly decreased, and the ratio of choline/creatine was increased, in medulloblastoma patients. Diffusion weighted imaging displayed hyperintensity and decreased apparent diffusion coefficient in medulloblastoma patients. These findings indicate that 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion weighted imaging are useful for qualitative diagnosis of medulloblastoma.

  14. Myocardial area at risk after ST-elevation myocardial infarction measured with the late gadolinium enhancement after scar remodeling and T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the myocardial area at risk (AAR) measured by the endocardial surface area (ESA) method on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) when applied after scar remodeling (3 months after index infarction) compared to T2-weighted CMR imaging. One hundred...... and sixty nine patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention, underwent one CMR within 1 week after index treatment to determine the AAR with T2-weighted imaging and a second scan 3 months after to measure AAR with the ESA method...

  15. Myocardial area at risk after ST-elevation myocardial infarction measured with the late gadolinium enhancement after scar remodeling and T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the myocardial area at risk (AAR) measured by the endocardial surface area (ESA) method on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) when applied after scar remodeling (3 months after index infarction) compared to T2-weighted CMR imaging. One hundred...... and sixty nine patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention, underwent one CMR within 1 week after index treatment to determine the AAR with T2-weighted imaging and a second scan 3 months after to measure AAR with the ESA method...

  16. Use of T1-weighted/T2-weighted magnetic resonance ratio to elucidate changes due to amyloid β accumulation in cognitively normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Yasuno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ratio of signal intensity in T1-weighted (T1w and T2-weighted (T2w magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was recently proposed to enhance the sensitivity of detecting changes in disease-related signal intensity. The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of T1w/T2w image ratios as an easily accessible biomarker for amyloid beta (Aβ accumulation. We performed the T1w/T2w analysis in cognitively normal elderly individuals. We applied [11C] Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB-PET to the same individuals, and Aβ deposition was quantified by its binding potential (PiB-BPND. The subjects were divided into low and high PiB-BPND groups, and group differences in regional T1w/T2w values were evaluated. In the regions where we found a significant group difference, we conducted a correlation analysis between regional T1w/T2w values and PiB-BPND. Subjects with high global cortical PiB-BPND showed a significantly higher regional T1w/T2w ratio in the frontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. We found a significant positive relationship between the regional T1w/T2w ratio and Aβ accumulation. Moreover, with a T1w/T2w ratio of 0.55 in the medial frontal regions, we correctly discriminated subjects with high PiB-BPND from the entire subject population with a sensitivity of 84.6% and specificity of 80.0%. Our results indicate that early Aβ-induced pathological changes can be detected using the T1w/T2w ratio on MRI. We believe that the T1w/T2w ratio is a prospective stable biological marker of early Aβ accumulation in cognitively normal individuals. The availability of such an accessible marker would improve the efficiency of clinical trials focusing on the initial disease stages by reducing the number of subjects who require screening by Aβ-PET scan or lumbar puncture.

  17. Diagnostic value and relative weight of sequence-specific magnetic resonance features in characterizing clinically significant prostate cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagonneau, Tristan; Cros, Fanny; Bratan, Flavie; Roche, Laurent; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Ruffion, Alain; Crouzet, Sébastien; Colombel, Marc; Rabilloud, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the diagnostic weight of sequence-specific magnetic resonance features in characterizing clinically significant prostate cancers (csPCa). Materials and methods We used a prospective database of 262 patients who underwent T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging before prostatectomy. For each lesion, two independent readers (R1, R2) prospectively defined nine features: shape, volume (V_Max), signal abnormality on each pulse sequence, number of pulse sequences with a marked (S_Max) and non-visible (S_Min) abnormality, likelihood of extracapsular extension (ECE) and PSA density (dPSA). Overall likelihood of malignancy was assessed using a 5-level Likert score. Features were evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). csPCa was defined as Gleason ≥7 cancer (csPCa-A), Gleason ≥7(4+3) cancer (csPCa-B) or Gleason ≥7 cancer with histological extraprostatic extension (csPCa-C), Results For csPCa-A, the Signal1 model (S_Max+S_Min) provided the best combination of signal-related variables, for both readers. The performance was improved by adding V_Max, ECE and/or dPSA, but not shape. All models performed better with DCE findings than without. When moving from csPCa-A to csPCa-B and csPCa-C definitions, the added value of V_Max, dPSA and ECE increased as compared to signal-related variables, and the added value of DCE decreased. For R1, the best models were Signal1+ECE+dPSA (AUC = 0,805 [95%CI:0,757–0,866]), Signal1+V_Max+dPSA (AUC = 0.823 [95%CI:0.760–0.893]) and Signal1+ECE+dPSA [AUC = 0.840 (95%CI:0.774–0.907)] for csPCa-A, csPCA-B and csPCA-C respectively. The AUCs of the corresponding Likert scores were 0.844 [95%CI:0.806–0.877, p = 0.11], 0.841 [95%CI:0.799–0.876, p = 0.52]) and 0.849 [95%CI:0.811–0.884, p = 0.49], respectively. For R2, the best models were Signal1+V_Max+dPSA (AUC = 0,790 [95%CI:0,731–0,857]), Signal1+V_Max (AUC = 0.813 [95%CI:0.746–0

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  1. Assessment of Liver Fibrosis with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Different b-values in Chronic Viral Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocakoc, Ercan; Bakan, Ayse Ahsen; Poyrazoglu, Orhan Kursat; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Gul, Yeliz; Cicekci, Mehtap; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and to compare the reliability of different b-values in detecting and identifying significant liver fibrosis. There were 44 patients with chronic viral hepatitis (CVH) in the study group and 30 healthy participants in the control group. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) was performed before the liver biopsy in patients with CVH. The values of ADC were measured with 3 different b-values (100, 600, 1,000 s/mm2). In addition, liver fibrosis was classified using the modified Ishak scoring system. Liver fibrosis stages and ADC values were compared using areas under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The study group's mean ADC value was not statistically significantly different from the control group's mean ADC value at b = 100 s/mm2 (3.69 ± 0.5 × 10-3 vs. 3.7 ± 0.3 × 10-3 mm2/s) and b = 600 s/mm2 (2.40 ± 0.3 × 10-3 vs. 2.5 ± 0.5 × 10-3 mm2/s). However, the study group's mean ADC value (0.99 ± 0.3 × 10-3 mm2/s) was significantly lower than that of the control group (1.2 ± 0.1 × 10-3 mm2/s) at b = 1,000 s/mm2. With b = 1,000 s/mm2 and the cutoff ADC value of 0.0011 mm2/s for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis, the mean area under the ROC curve was 0.702 ± 0.07 (p = 0.0015). For b = 1,000 s/mm2 and the cutoff ADC value of 0.0011 mm2/s to diagnose significant liver fibrosis (Ishak score = 3), the mean area under the ROC curve was 0.759 ± 0.07 (p = 0.0001). Measurement of ADC values by DWI was effective in detecting liver fibrosis and accurately identifying significant liver fibrosis when a b-value of 1,000 s/mm2 was used. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Acute pyelonephritis in transplanted kidneys: can diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging be useful for diagnosis and follow-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faletti, Riccardo; Cassinis, Maria Carla; Gatti, Marco; Giglio, Jacopo; Guarnaccia, Carla; Messina, Marina; Bergamasco, Laura; Fonio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    To assess reliability of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in the management of acute pyelonephritis (APN) foci in transplanted kidneys. In the 2012-2014 period, 24 kidney-transplanted patients underwent MR screening for clinical suspicion of APN. Two readers independently analyzed all images, establishing presence and location of APN foci. The 22 patients who were positive at the MR exam constituted the study population. For each patient the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured in the APN foci and in three sites of the healthy parenchyma (case-control comparison). The data were matched to the laboratory measurements for white blood cell, C-reactive protein, and serum creatinine. Forty-six APN foci were found in 22/24 patients. At the acute stage, the difference in ADC between healthy parenchyma and APN foci was significant (2.06 ± 0.16 vs. 1.43 ± 0.32 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s; p < 0.0001). The performance of ADC as APN indicator was tested by the receiving operating characteristics (ROC) curve: the area under curve AUC = 0.99 witnessed an excellent discriminatory ability, with threshold APN/normal parenchyma 1.9 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s. At the 1-month follow-up 43/46 APN foci were no longer visible, with ADC values significantly higher than at the acute stage; all laboratory data were physiological, with WBC significantly reduced from the acute phase (5.2 ± 1.6 × 10(9)/L vs. 10.6 ± 4.8 × 10(9)/L; p < 0.0001). The other 3 patients underwent further therapy and exams, including a third MR. DW-MRI with ADC measurement seems to be a reliable tool in diagnosing and monitoring APN foci in transplanted kidneys, with clinical impact on patient management.

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  4. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  5. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. (Univ. of Kanazawa School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  6. Physiological Background of Differences in Quantitative Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Between Acute Malignant and Benign Vertebral Body Fractures: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient With Quantitative Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using the 2-Compartment Exchange Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Biffar, Andreas; Schmidt, Gerwin; Sourbron, Steven; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vertebral bone marrow of benign and malignant fractures is related to the volume of the interstitial space, determined with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with acute benign (n = 24) and malignant (n = 19) vertebral body fractures were examined at 1.5 T. A diffusion-weighted single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequence (b = 100 to 600 s/mm) and DCE turbo-FLASH sequence were evaluated. Regions of interest were manually selected for each fracture. Apparent diffusion coefficient was determined with a monoexponential decay model. The DCE magnetic resonance imaging concentration-time curves were analyzed using a 2-compartment tracer-kinetic model. Apparent diffusion coefficient showed a significant positive correlation with interstitial volume in the whole study population (Pearson r = 0.66, P correlation between ADC and the permeability-surface area product could be observed when analyzing the whole study population (Spearman rs = 0.40, P = 0.008), but not when separately examining the subgroups. Plasma flow showed a significant correlation with ADC in benign fractures (Pearson r = 0.23, P = 0.03). Plasma volume did not show significant correlations with ADC. The results support the hypothesis that the ADC of a lesion is inversely correlated to its cellularity. This explains previous observations that ADC is reduced in more malignant lesions.

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  8. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to remain perfectly still and follow breath-holding instructions while the images are being recorded. If you ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  13. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  19. Postmortem Study of Validation of Low Signal on Fat-Suppressed T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as Marker of Lipid Core in Middle Cerebral Artery Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Jie; Zhao, Hai-Lu; Niu, Chun-Bo; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Yun; Wong, Ka-Sing; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— High signal on T1-weighted fat-suppressed images in middle cerebral artery plaques on ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging was verified to be intraplaque hemorrhage histologically. However, the underlying plaque component of low signal on T1-weighted fat-suppressed images (LST1) has never been explored. Based on our experience, we hypothesized that LST1 might indicate the presence of lipid core within intracranial plaques. Methods— 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the postmortem brains to scan the cross sections of bilateral middle cerebral arteries. Then middle cerebral artery specimens were removed for histology processing. LST1 presence was identified on magnetic resonance images, and lipid core areas were measured on the corresponding histology sections. Results— Total 76 middle cerebral artery locations were included for analysis. LST1 showed a high specificity (96.9%; 95% confidence interval, 82.0%–99.8%) but a low sensitivity (38.6%; 95% confidence interval, 24.7%–54.5%) for detecting lipid core of all areas. However, the sensitivity increased markedly (81.2%; 95% confidence interval, 53.7%–95.0%) when only lipid cores of area ≥0.80 mm2 were included. Mean lipid core area was 5× larger in those with presence of LST1 than in those without (1.63±1.18 mm2 versus 0.32±0.31 mm2; P=0.003). Conclusions— LST1 is a promising imaging biomarker of identifying intraplaque lipid core, which may be useful to distinguish intracranial atherosclerotic disease from other intracranial vasculopathies and to assess plaque vulnerability for risk stratification of patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease. In vivo clinical studies are required to explore the correlation between LST1 and clinical outcomes of patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27462119

  20. Noise-Compensated, Bias-Corrected Diffusion Weighted Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging via a Stochastically Fully-Connected Joint Conditional Random Field Model

    CERN Document Server

    Boroomand, Ameneh; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is a powerful tool in imaging-based prostate cancer (PCa) screening and detection. Endorectal coils are commonly used in DW-MRI to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acquisition, at the expense of significant intensity inhomogeneities (bias field) that worsens as we move away from the endorectal coil. The presence of bias field can have a significant negative impact on the accuracy of different image analysis tasks, as well as the accuracy of PCa tumor localization, thus leading to increased inter- and intra-observer variability. The previously proposed bias field correction methods often suffer from undesired noise amplification that can reduce the image quality of the resulting bias-corrected DW-MRI data. Here, we propose a unified data reconstruction approach that enables joint compensation of bias field as well as data noise in diffusion weighted endorectal magnetic resonance (DW-EMR) imaging. The proposed noise-compensated, bias-corrected...

  1. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  2. Bone marrow response in treated patients with Gaucher disease: evaluation by T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and correlation with reduction in liver and spleen volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terk, M.R. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; LAC/USC Imaging Science Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dardashti, S. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Liebman, H.A. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Purpose. To determine whether T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images can demonstrate response in the marrow of patients with type 1 Gaucher disease treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and to determine whether a relationship exists between liver and spleen volume reductions and visible marrow changes.Patients. Forty-two patients with type 1 Gaucher disease were evaluated on at least two occasions. Thirty-two patients received ERT. Of these patients, 15 had a baseline examination prior to the initiation of ERT. The remaining 10 patients did not receive ERT.Design. T1-weighted and gradient recalled echo (GRE) coronal images of the femurs and hips were obtained. Concurrently, liver and spleen volumes were determined using contiguous breath-hold axial gradient-echo images. T1-weighted images of the hips and femurs were evaluated to determine change or lack of change in the yellow marrow.Results. Of the 32 patients receiving ERT, 14 (44%) demonstrated increased signal on T1-weighted images suggesting an increase in the amount of yellow marrow. If only the 15 patients with a baseline examination were considered, the response rate to ERT was 67%. Using Student's t-test a highly significant correlation (P<0.005) was found between marrow response and reduction in liver and spleen volume.Conclusions. Marrow changes in patients receiving ERT can be detected by T1-weighted images. This response correlated with reductions in visceral volumes (P<0.0005). (orig.)

  3. Mucocele-like lesions of the sphenoid sinus with hypointense foci on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Social Insurance Central General Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kikuchi, S. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Univ. Branch Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    Lesions limited to the sphenoid sinus are relatively rare, and are obscure with respect to symptoms and physical findings. The differential diagnosis of isolated sphenoid sinus disease includes bacterial sinusitis, fungal infection, granulomatous inflammation, mucocele, and tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide information that closely reflects the composition of the tissues, sometimes permitting differentiation between pathologically distinct lesions showing similar density by computed tomography. We describe two cases involving mucocele-like lesions of the sphenoid sinus where preoperative MRI revealed a focus of hypointensity within the lesions. In both patients the sphenoid sinus was opened by a transnasal endoscopic approach, and diseased tissue corresponding to the hypointense area was removed under direct endoscopic vision. Histopathological diagnosis revealed colonies of Aspergillus in one case and necrotic granulation tissue without fungus in the other. We concluded that MRI is a crucial part of preoperative evaluation and that the transnasal endoscopic approach represents a safe and effective method for treating nonmalignant isolated sphenoid sinus disease. (orig.)

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging versus positron emission tomography/computed tomography for early response assessment of liver metastases to Y90-radioembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabasch, Alexandra; Kraemer, Nils A; Ciritsis, Alexander; Hansen, Nienke L; Lierfeld, Marco; Heinzel, Alexander; Trautwein, Christian; Neumann, Ulf; Kuhl, Christiane K

    2015-06-01

    Patients with hepatic metastases who are candidates for Y90-radioembolization (Y90-RE) usually have advanced tumor stages with involvement of both liver lobes. Per current guidelines, these patients have usually undergone several cycles of potentially hepatotoxic systemic chemotherapy before Y90-RE is at all considered, requiring split (lobar) treatment sessions to reduce hepatic toxicity. Assessing response to Y90-RE early, that is, already after the first lobar session, would be helpful to avoid an ineffective and potentially hepatotoxic second lobar treatment. We investigated the accuracy with which diffusion- weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can provide this information. An institutional review board-approved prospective intraindividual comparison trial on 35 patients who underwent fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and DWI-MRI within 6 weeks before and 6 weeks after Y90-RE to treat secondary-progressive liver metastases from solid cancers (20 colorectal, 13 breast, 2 other) was performed. An increase of minimal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin) or decrease of maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) by at least 30% was regarded as positive response. Long-term clinical and imaging follow-up was used to distinguish true- from false-response classifications. On the basis of long-term follow-up, 23 (66%) of 35 patients responded to the Y90 treatment. No significant changes of metastases size or contrast enhancement were observable on pretreatment versus posttreatment CT or magnetic resonance images.However, overall SUVmax decreased from 8.0 ± 3.9 to 5.5 ± 2.2 (P magnetic resonance imaging appears superior to PET/CT for early response assessment in patients with hepatic metastases of common solid tumors. It may be used in between lobar treatment sessions to guide further management of patients who undergo Y90-RE for hepatic metastases.

  5. Differentiating laryngeal carcinomas from precursor lesions by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Sheng Shang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI has been introduced in head and neck cancers. Due to limitations in the performance of laryngeal DWI, including the complex anatomical structure of the larynx leading to susceptibility effects, the value of DWI in differentiating benign from malignant laryngeal lesions has largely been ignored. We assessed whether a threshold for the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC was useful in differentiating preoperative laryngeal carcinomas from precursor lesions by turbo spin-echo (TSE DWI and 3.0-T magnetic resonance. METHODS: We evaluated DWI and the ADC value in 33 pathologically proven laryngeal carcinomas and 17 precancerous lesions. RESULTS: The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 81.8%, 64.7%, 76.0% by laryngostroboscopy, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of conventional magnetic resonance imaging were 90.9%, 76.5%, 86.0%, respectively. Qualitative DWI analysis produced sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 100.0, 88.2, and 96.0%, respectively. The ADC values were lower for patients with laryngeal carcinoma (mean 1.195±0.32×10(-3 mm(2/s versus those with laryngeal precancerous lesions (mean 1.780±0.32×10(-3 mm(2/s; P<0.001. ROC analysis showed that the area under the curve was 0.956 and the optimum threshold for the ADC was 1.455×10(-3 mm(2/s, resulting in a sensitivity of 94.1%, a specificity of 90.9%, and an accuracy of 92.9%. CONCLUSIONS: Despite some limitations, including the small number of laryngeal carcinomas included, DWI may detect changes in tumor size and shape before they are visible by laryngostroboscopy. The ADC values were lower for patients with laryngeal carcinoma than for those with laryngeal precancerous lesions. The proposed cutoff for the ADC may help distinguish laryngeal carcinomas from laryngeal precancerous lesions.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  7. 2D segmentation of intervertebral discs and its degree of degeneration from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, José Maria; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-03-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a disorder suffered by a large population around the world. A key factor causing this illness is Intervertebral Disc (IVD) degeneration, whose early diagnosis could help in preventing this widespread condition. Clinicians base their diagnosis on visual inspection of 2D slices of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, which is subject to large interobserver variability. In this work, an automatic classification method is presented, which provides the Pfirrmann degree of degeneration from a mid-sagittal MR slice. The proposed method utilizes Active Contour Models, with a new geometrical energy, to achieve an initial segmentation, which is further improved using fuzzy C-means. Then, IVDs are classified according to their degree of degeneration. This classification is attained by employing Adaboost on five specific features: the mean and the variance of the probability map of the nucleus using two different approaches and the eccentricity of the fitting ellipse to the contour of the IVD. The classification method was evaluated using a cohort of 150 intervertebral discs assessed by three experts, resulting in a mean specificity (93%) and sensitivity (83%) similar to the one provided by every expert with respect to the most voted value. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated using the Dice Similarity Index (DSI) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the point-to-contour distance. The mean DSI ± 2 standard deviation was 91:7% ±5:6%, the mean RMSE was 0:82mm and the 95 percentile was 1:36mm. These results were found accurate when compared to the state-of-the-art.

  8. Effects of upright weight bearing and the knee flexion angle on patellofemoral indices using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with patellofemoral instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Christoph; Fleischer, Benjamin; Rase, Marten; Schumacher, Thees; Ettinger, Max; Ostermeier, Sven; Smith, Tomas

    2017-08-01

    This study analysed the effects of upright weight bearing and the knee flexion angle on patellofemoral indices, determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in patients with patellofemoral instability (PI). Healthy volunteers (control group, n = 9) and PI patients (PI group, n = 16) were scanned in an open-configuration MRI scanner during upright weight bearing and supine non-weight bearing positions at full extension (0° flexion) and at 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Patellofemoral indices included the Insall-Salvati Index, Caton-Deschamp Index, and Patellotrochlear Index (PTI) to determine patellar height and the patellar tilt angle (PTA), bisect offset (BO), and the tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance to assess patellar rotation and translation with respect to the femur and alignment of the extensor mechanism. A significant interaction effect of weight bearing by flexion angle was observed for the PTI, PTA, and BO for subjects with PI. At full extension, post hoc pairwise comparisons revealed a significant effect of weight bearing on the indices, with increased patellar height and increased PTA and BO in the PI group. Except for the BO, no such changes were seen in the control group. Independent of weight bearing, flexing the knee caused the PTA, BO, and TT-TG distance to be significantly reduced. Upright weight bearing and the knee flexion angle affected patellofemoral MRI indices in PI patients, with significantly increased values at full extension. The observations of this study provide a caution to be considered by professionals when treating PI patients. These patients should be evaluated clinically and radiographically at full extension and various flexion angles in context with quadriceps engagement. Explorative case-control study, Level III.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  11. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  13. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  14. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  15. A semi-automated method for non-invasive internal organ weight estimation by post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging in fetuses, newborns and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayyil, Sudhin [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.thayyil@ich.ucl.ac.uk; Schievano, Silvia [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Robertson, Nicola J. [EGA UCL Institute for Women' s Health, University College London (United Kingdom); Jones, Rodney [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Chitty, Lyn S. [EGA UCL Institute for Women' s Health, University College London (United Kingdom); Clinical Molecular Genetics Unit, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Histopathology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allows minimally invasive autopsy, especially when consent is declined for traditional autopsy. Estimation of individual visceral organ weights is an important component of traditional autopsy. Objective: To examine whether a semi-automated can be used for non-invasive internal organ weight measurement using post-mortem MR imaging in fetuses, newborns and children. Methods: Phase 1: In vitro scanning of 36 animal organs (heart, liver, kidneys) was performed to check the accuracy of volume reconstruction methodology. Real volumes were measured by water displacement method. Phase 2: Sixty-five whole body post-mortem MR scans were performed in fetuses (n = 30), newborns (n = 5) and children (n = 30) at 1.5 T using a 3D TSE T2-weighted sequence. These data were analysed offline using the image processing software Mimics 11.0. Results: Phase 1: Mean difference (S.D.) between estimated and actual volumes were -0.3 (1.5) ml for kidney, -0.7 (1.3) ml for heart, -1.7 (3.6) ml for liver in animal experiments. Phase 2: In fetuses, newborns and children mean differences between estimated and actual weights (S.D.) were -0.6 (4.9) g for liver, -5.1 (1.2) g for spleen, -0.3 (0.6) g for adrenals, 0.4 (1.6) g for thymus, 0.9 (2.5) g for heart, -0.7 (2.4) g for kidneys and 2.7 (14) g for lungs. Excellent co-correlation was noted for estimated and actual weights (r{sup 2} = 0.99, p < 0.001). Accuracy was lower when fetuses were less than 20 weeks or less than 300 g. Conclusion: Rapid, accurate and reproducible estimation of solid internal organ weights is feasible using the semi-automated 3D volume reconstruction method.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles ... Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  19. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  1. Magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyendecker, John R; Gianini, John W

    2009-07-01

    Excellent contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation make magnetic resonance urography (MRU) a promising technique for noninvasively evaluating the entire urinary tract. While MRU currently lags behind CT urography (CTU) in spatial resolution and efficiency, new hardware and sequence developments have contributed to a resurgence of interest in MRU techniques. By combining unenhanced sequences with multiphase contrast-enhanced and excretory phase imaging, a comprehensive assessment of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and surrounding structures is possible with image quality rivaling that obtained with other techniques. At the same time, formidable challenges remain to be overcome and further clinical validation is necessary before MRU can replace other forms of urography. In this article, we demonstrate the current potential of MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations and current status of this evolving technique.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  4. Plantar fascia evaluation with a dedicated magnetic resonance scanner in weight-bearing position: our experience in patients with plantar fasciitis and in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutera, R; Iovane, A; Sorrentino, F; Candela, F; Mularo, V; La Tona, G; Midiri, M

    2010-03-01

    This study assessed the usefulness of upright weight-bearing examination of the ankle/hind foot performed with a dedicated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner in the evaluation of the plantar fascia in healthy volunteers and in patients with clinical evidence of plantar fasciitis. Between January and March 2009, 20 patients with clinical evidence of plantar fasciitis (group A) and a similar number of healthy volunteers (group B) underwent MR imaging of the ankle/hind foot in the upright weight-bearing and conventional supine position. A 0.25-Tesla MR scanner (G-Scan, Esaote SpA, Genoa, Italy) was used with a dedicated receiving coil for the ankle/hind foot. Three radiologists, blinded to patients' history and clinical findings, assessed in consensus morphological and dimensional changes and signal intensity alterations on images acquired in both positions, in different sequences and in different planes. In group A, MR imaging confirmed the diagnosis in 15/20 cases; in 4/15 cases, a partial tear of the plantar fascia was identified in the upright weight-bearing position alone. In the remaining 5/20 cases in group A and in all cases in group B, the plantar fascia showed no abnormal signal intensity. Because of the increased stretching of the plantar fascia, in all cases in group A and B, thickness in the proximal third was significantly reduced (pbearing compared with the supine position. Imaging the ankle/hind foot in the upright weight-bearing position with a dedicated MR scanner and a dedicated coil might enable the identification of partial tears of the plantar fascia, which could be overlooked in the supine position.

  5. Feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis on 1.0-T open-bore MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barendregt, Anouk M.; Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Amiras, Dimitri [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Radiology Department, St. Mary' s Hospital, Paddington, London (United Kingdom); Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of non-invasive diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the knee of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and, further, to analyze the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) levels to distinguish synovium from effusion. Standard magnetic resonance imaging of the knee including post-contrast imaging was obtained in eight patients (mean age, 12 years 8 months, five females) using an open-bore magnetic resonance imaging system (1.0 T). In addition, axially acquired echo-planar DWI datasets (b-values 0, 50, and 600) were prospectively obtained and the diffusion images were post-processed into ADC{sub 50-600} maps. Two independent observers selected a region of interest (ROI) for both synovium and effusion using aligned post-contrast images as landmarks. Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare ADC synovium and ADC effusion. DWI was successfully obtained in all patients. When data of both observers was combined, ADC synovium was lower than ADC effusion in the ROI in seven out of eight patients (median, 1.92 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 2.40 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, p = 0.006, respectively). Similar results were obtained when the two observers were analyzed separately (observer 1: p = 0.006, observer 2: p = 0.04). In this pilot study, on a patient-friendly 1.0-T open-bore MRI, we demonstrated that DWI may potentially be a feasible non-invasive imaging technique in children with JIA. We could differentiate synovium from effusion in seven out of eight patients based on the ADC of synovium and effusion. However, to select synovium and effusion on DWI, post-contrast images were still a necessity. (orig.)

  6. Relationship between Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Frontoinsular Gray Matter and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Very Low Birth Weight Children at the Age of 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Durlak

    Full Text Available Very low birth weight is associated with long term neurodevelopmental complications. Macroscopic brain abnormalities in prematurity survivors have been investigated in several studies. However, there is limited data regarding local cerebral metabolic status and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relationship between proton magnetic resonance spectra in basal ganglia, frontal white matter and frontoinsular gray matter, neurodevelopmental outcomes assessed with the Leiter scale and the Developmental Test of Visual Perception and selected socioeconomic variables in a cohort of very low birth weight children at the age of four. Children were divided in three groups based on the severity of neurodevelopmental impairment. There were no differences in spectroscopy in basal ganglia and frontal white matter between the groups. Lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA, choline (Cho and myoinositol (mI were observed in the frontoinsular cortex of the left hemisphere in children with neurodevelopmental impairment compared to children with normal neurodevelopmental outcomes. Higher parental education, daycare attendance and breastfeeding after birth were associated with more favorable neurodevelopmental prognosis, whereas rural residence was more prevalent in children with moderate and severe impairment. Our study demonstrates the role of long term neurometabolic disruption in the left frontoinsular cortex and selected socioeconomic variables in determination of neurodevelopmental prognosis in prematurity survivors.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Shinya; Nobata, Koji; Shima, Tsuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing a perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is poor with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We recently reported that a high signal-intensity area is usually found on fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI in the joint space between the articular disc and cartilage surface in joints in which the disc is displaced. A discrete image with an area of high signal-intensity in the middle of the articular disc may indicate perforation or rupture. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of diagnosis of a perforated articular disc by fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI with that of arthroscopy. We studied 50 joints in 50 patients with closed lock of the TMJ who were examined with MRI and then by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope. The agreement between the two methods of diagnosis was assessed using the κ coefficient. Evidence of perforation of the disc on MRI and arthroscopically was found in the same 7 joints; there was complete concordance (κ=1.00, pfat-saturated MRI was therefore the same as that by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  9. Performance of sampling density-weighted and postfiltered density-adapted projection reconstruction in sodium magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M

    2013-02-01

    Sampling density-weighted apodization projection reconstruction sequences are evaluated for three-dimensional radial imaging. The readout gradients of the sampling density-weighted apodization sequence are designed such that the locally averaged sampling density matches a Hamming filter function. This technique is compared with density-adapted projection reconstruction with nonfiltered and postfiltered image reconstruction. Sampling density-weighted apodization theoretically allows for a 1.28-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio compared with postfiltered density-adapted projection reconstruction sequences, if T(2)* decay is negligible compared with the readout duration T(RO). Simulations of the point-spread functions are performed for monoexponential and biexponential decay to investigate the effects of T(2)* decay on the performance of the different sequences. Postfiltered density-adapted projection reconstruction performs superior to sampling density-weighted apodization for large T(RO)/T(2)* ratios [>1.36 (monoexponential decay); >0.35 (biexponential decay with T(2s)*/T(2f)* = 10)], if signal-to-noise ratio of point-like objects is considered. In conclusion, it depends on the readout parameters, the T(2)* relaxation times, and the dimensions of the subject which of both sequences is most suitable. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Magnetic single-walled carbon nanotubes as efficient drug delivery nanocarriers in breast cancer murine model: noninvasive monitoring using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as sensitive imaging biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Faraj A

    2014-12-01

    inhibition following DOX-loaded SWCNTs injection. Magnetic tagging of SWCNTs was found to produce significant discrepancies in apparent diffusion coefficient values providing a higher contrast to detect treatment-induced variations as noninvasive imaging biomarker. In addition, it allowed their sensitive noninvasive diagnosis using susceptibility-weighted MRI and their magnetic targeting using an externally applied magnet.Conclusion: Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of DOX delivered through antibody-conjugated magnetic SWCNTs was achieved. Further, the superiority of apparent diffusion coefficient measurements using diffusion-weighted MRI was found to be a sensitive imaging biomarker for assessment of treatment-induced changes. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, drug delivery systems, magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted MRI, breast cancer, nanomedicine

  11. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging measurements of optic nerve sheath diameter in dogs with and without presumed intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Peter V; Fletcher, Daniel J; Cooley, Stacy D; Rosenblatt, Alana J; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a cause of cerebral ischemia and neurologic deficits in dogs. Goals of this retrospective study were to test interobserver agreement for MRI measurements of optic nerve sheath diameter and associations between optic nerve sheath diameter, signalment data, and presumed intracranial hypertension status in a cohort of dogs. A veterinary radiologist interpreted scans of 100 dogs and dogs were assigned to groups based on presence or absence of at least two MRI characteristics of presumed intracranial hypertension. Two observers who were unaware of group status independently measured optic nerve diameter from transverse T2-weighted sequences. Mean optic nerve sheath diameter for all dogs was 3 mm (1-4 mm). The mean difference between observers was 0.3 mm (limits of agreement, -0.4 and 1.0 mm). There was no correlation between optic nerve sheath diameter and age for either observer (r = -0.06 to 0.00) but a moderate positive correlation was observed between optic nerve sheath diameter and body weight for both observers (r = 0.70-0.76). The 22 dogs with presumed intracranial hypertension weighed less than the 78 dogs without (P = 0.02) and were more often female (P = 0.04). Dogs with presumed intracranial hypertension had a larger ratio of optic nerve sheath diameter to body weight for each observer-side pair (P = 0.01-0.04) than dogs without. Findings indicated that the ratio of MRI optic nerve sheath diameter relative to body weight may be a repeatable predictor of intracranial hypertension in dogs.

  12. Evaluation of low signal intensity in the posterior disc attachment of the temporomandibular joint on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Masatoshi; Echigo, Seishi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Dentistry; Kumagai, Masahiro; Takahashi, Tetsu; Nagai, Hirokazu; Kochi, Shoko

    1996-04-01

    The posterior disc attachment (PA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has relatively high signal intensity on T1-weighted or proton density-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sometimes, however, low signal intensity of the PA is observed in patients with chronic disc displacement. On the basis of previous histopathological studies, the areas of low signal intensity in the PA may be consistent with pseudodisc formation associated with fibrous metaplasia of the PA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between MR signal intensity of the PA and MRI findings, including the degree of disc displacement, disc reduction, disc shape, bone change, and condylar translation, as well as clinical findings, including the duration of symptoms, joint pain, and range of motion. The study was based on MRI of 216 TMJ in 184 patients with anterior disc displacement. The sagittal closed-mouth T1-weighted SE images were used to determine the presence or absence of low signal intensity in the PA. Low signal intensity in the PA was seen in 33 joints in 32 patients (15.3%). The incidence of low signal intensity was significantly higher in males (27.8%) than in females (12.8%). No statistical difference was found between anterior disc displacement with reduction (10.5%), anterior disc displacement without reduction (21.5%), and anterior disc displacement without reduction with osteoarthrosis (14.3%). Low signal intensity in the PA was seen only in moderate or severe disc displacement. Low signal intensity in the PA was not associated with specific clinical or MRI findings except for the degree of disc displacement. In conclusion, low signal intensity in the PA is directly correlated with disc displacement, and there was no apparent correlation with clinical findings. Low signal intensity of the PA is not necessarily related to adaptation of the joint in disc displacement. (author).

  13. Improved Performance in Differentiating Benign from Malignant Sinonasal Tumors Using Diffusion-weighted Combined with Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Differentiating benign from malignant sinonsal lesions is essential for treatment planning as well as determining the patient′s prognosis, but the differentiation is often difficult in clinical practice. The study aimed to determine whether the combination of diffusion-weighted (DW and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI can improve the performance in differentiating benign from malignant sinonasal tumors. Methods: This retrospective study included 197 consecutive patients with sinonasal tumors (116 malignant tumors and 81 benign tumors. All patients underwent both DW and DCE-MRI in a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner. Two different settings of b values (0,700 and 0,1000 s/mm 2 and two different strategies of region of interest (ROI including whole slice (WS and partial slice (PS were used to calculate apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs. A DW parameter with WS ADCs b0,1000 and two DCE-MRI parameters (time intensity curve [TIC] and time to peak enhancement [Tpeak] were finally combined to use in differentiating the benign from the malignant tumors in this study. Results: The mean ADCs of malignant sinonasal tumors (WS ADCs b0,1000 = 1.084 × 10−3 mm 2 /s were significantly lower than those of benign tumors (WS ADCs b0,1000 = 1.617 × 10−3 mm 2 /s, P < 0.001. The accuracy using WS ADCs b0,1000 alone was 83.7% in differentiating the benign from the malignant tumors (85.3% sensitivity, 81.2% specificity, 86.4% positive predictive value [PPV], and 79.5% negative predictive value [NPV]. The accuracy using DCE with Tpeak and TIC alone was 72.1% (69.1% sensitivity, 74.1% specificity, 77.5% PPV, and 65.1% NPV. Using DW-MRI parameter was superior than using DCE parameters in differentiation between benign and malignant sinonasal tumors (P < 0.001. The accuracy was 87.3% (90.5% sensitivity, 82.7% specificity, 88.2% PPV, and 85.9% NPV using DW-MRI combined with DCE-MRI, which was superior than that using DCE

  14. Characteristics of liver on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging: Dynamic and image pathological investigation in rabbit liver VX-2 tumor model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Hong Yuan; En-Hua Xiao; Jian-Bin Liu; Zhong He; Ke Jin; Cong Ma; Jun Xiang; Jian-Hun Xiao; Wei-Jian Chen

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate dynamical and image pathological characteristics of the liver on magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the rabbit VX-2 tumor model.METHODS: Forty New Zealand rabbits were included in the study and VX-2 tumor piece was implanted intrahepatically. Fifteen animals received two intrahepatic implantations while 25 had one intrahepatical implantation. DWI, T1-and T2-weighted of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were carried out on the 7th and the 14th d after implantation and DWI was conducted, respectively on the 21th d. Ten VX-2 tumor samples were studied pathologically.RESULTS: The rate of lump detected by DWI, T1WI and T2WI was 78.7%,10.7% and 53.5% (χ2= 32.61, P<0.001) on the 7th d after implantation and 95.8%,54.3% and 82.9% (χ2= 21.50, P<0.001) on the 14th d. The signal of most VX-2 tumors on DWI was uniform and it was equal on the map of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The signal of VX tumors did not decrease on the 7th d after implantation, most of them slowly growing during the week following implantation without significant cell dying within the tumor. VX-2 tumors grew increasingly within 14 d after implantation but the signal of most VX-2 tumors on DWI or on the map of ADC was uniform or uneven and ADC of VX tumors decreased obscurely or slightly because tumor necrosis was still not obvious. On the 21th d after implantation, the signal of most VX-2 tumors on DWI or on the map of ADC was uneven because tumor necrosis was evident and ADC of VX-2 tumor necrotic areas decreased. The areas of viable cells in VX-2 tumors manifested a high signal on DWI and a low signal on the map of ADC. The areas of dead cells or necrosis in VX-2 tumors manifested low signals on DWI and low, equal or high signals on the map of ADC but they manifested high signals on DWI and on the map of ADC at the same time when the areas of necrotic tumor became liquefied or cystic. The border of tumors on DWI appeared gradually distinct and

  15. Pediatric magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard A; Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a powerful clinical tool that fuses anatomic information with functional data in a single test without the use of ionizing radiation. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects, as well as common clinical applications with an emphasis on the evaluation of hydronephrosis. A fluid challenge is an essential part of our MRU protocol and enables the definition of compensated or decompensated kidneys within the spectrum of hydronephrosis. This classification may have prognostic implications when surgery is being considered. In addition, underlying uropathy can be identified on the anatomical scans and renal scarring can be seen on both the anatomical and dynamic scans. MRU can identify and categorize dysmorphic kidneys in vivo and may provide insight into congenital abnormalities seen in conjunction with vesicoureteric reflux. MRU is still in its infancy and as the technique develops and becomes widely available, it seems likely that it will supplant renal scintigraphy in the evaluation of renal tract disorders in children. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  18. Assessment of Myocardial Fibrosis in Mice Using a T2*-Weighted 3D Radial Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan J van Nierop

    Full Text Available Myocardial fibrosis is a common hallmark of many diseases of the heart. Late gadolinium enhanced MRI is a powerful tool to image replacement fibrosis after myocardial infarction (MI. Interstitial fibrosis can be assessed indirectly from an extracellular volume fraction measurement using contrast-enhanced T1 mapping. Detection of short T2* species resulting from fibrotic tissue may provide an attractive non-contrast-enhanced alternative to directly visualize the presence of both replacement and interstitial fibrosis.To goal of this paper was to explore the use of a T2*-weighted radial sequence for the visualization of fibrosis in mouse heart.C57BL/6 mice were studied with MI (n = 20, replacement fibrosis, transverse aortic constriction (TAC (n = 18, diffuse fibrosis, and as control (n = 10. 3D center-out radial T2*-weighted images with varying TE were acquired in vivo and ex vivo (TE = 21 μs-4 ms. Ex vivo T2*-weighted signal decay with TE was analyzed using a 3-component model. Subtraction of short- and long-TE images was used to highlight fibrotic tissue with short T2*. The presence of fibrosis was validated using histology and correlated to MRI findings.Detailed ex vivo T2*-weighted signal analysis revealed a fast (T2*fast, slow (T2*slow and lipid (T2*lipid pool. T2*fast remained essentially constant. Infarct T2*slow decreased significantly, while a moderate decrease was observed in remote tissue in post-MI hearts and in TAC hearts. T2*slow correlated with the presence of diffuse fibrosis in TAC hearts (r = 0.82, P = 0.01. Ex vivo and in vivo subtraction images depicted a positive contrast in the infarct co-localizing with the scar. Infarct volumes from histology and subtraction images linearly correlated (r = 0.94, P<0.001. Region-of-interest analysis in the in vivo post-MI and TAC hearts revealed significant T2* shortening due to fibrosis, in agreement with the ex vivo results. However, in vivo contrast on subtraction images was rather poor

  19. Hippocampal Microbleed on a Post-Mortem T2*-Weighted Gradient-Echo 7.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. De Reuck

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present post-mortem study of a brain from an Alzheimer patient showed on a T2*-weighted gradient-echo 7.0-T MRI of a coronal brain section a hyposignal in the hippocampus, suggesting a microbleed. On the corresponding histological examination, only iron deposits around the granular cellular layer and in blood vessel walls of the hippocampus were observed without evidence of a bleeding. This case report illustrates that the detection of microbleeds on MRI has to be interpreted with caution.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metallic objects from being attracted by the powerful magnet of the MR system, you will typically receive ... teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i.e., transdermal patch) that contains ...

  1. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  2. Extent of myocardium at risk for left anterior descending artery, right coronary artery, and left circumflex artery occlusion depicted by contrast-enhanced steady state free precession and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordlund, David; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background - Contrast-enhanced steady state free precession (CE-SSFP) and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) have been clinically validated to estimate myocardium at risk (MaR) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance while using myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed...... in polar plots, and expected overlap was found between right coronary artery and left circumflex artery. Detailed regional data are presented for use in software algorithms as a priori information on the extent of MaR. Conclusions - For the first time, cardiovascular magnetic resonance has been used...

  3. Liver steatosis (LS) evaluated through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging liver enzymes in morbid obesity; effect of weight loss obtained with intragastric balloon gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folini, Laura; Veronelli, Annamaria; Benetti, Alberto; Pozzato, Carlo; Cappelletti, Marco; Masci, Enzo; Micheletto, Giancarlo; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in morbid obesity clinical and metabolic effects related to weight loss on liver steatosis (LS), measured through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and liver enzymes. Forty obese subjects (8 M/32 W; BMI 42.8 ± 7.12 kg/m(2), mean ± SD) were evaluated for LS through ultrasound (US-LS), chemical-shift MRI (MRI-LS), liver enzymes [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)], anthropometric parameters [weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC)], lipids, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), oral glucose tolerance test, and body composition [fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) at bio-impedance analysis (BIA)]. Anthropometric measures, MRI-LS, BIA, and biochemical parameters were reevaluated 6 months later in 18 subjects undergoing restrictive bariatric approach, i.e., intragastric balloon (BIB, n = 13) or gastric banding (LAGB, n = 5), and in 13 subjects receiving hypocaloric diet. At baseline, US-LS correlates only with MRI-LS, and the latter correlates with ALT, AST, and GGT. After 6 months, subjects undergoing BIB or LAGB had significant changes of BMI, weight, WC, ALT, AST, GGT, ALP, HbA1c, insulin, HOMA-IR, FM, FFM, and MRI-LS. Diet-treated obese subjects had no significant change of any parameter under study; change of BMI, fat mass, and fat-free mass was significantly greater in LAGB/BIB subjects than in diet-treated subjects. Change of MRI-LS showed a significant correlation with changes in weight, BMI, WC, GGT, ALP, and basal MRI-LS. Significant weight loss after BIB or LAGB is associated with decrease in chemical-shift MRI-LS and with reduction in liver enzymes; chemical-shift MRI and liver enzymes allow monitoring of LS in follow-up studies.

  4. Differentiation of hemangioblastomas from pilocytic astrocytomas using 3-T magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging and MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, D.J.; Xing, Z.; Zeng, Z.; Cao, D.R. [First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Department of Radiology, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Shang, X.Y. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Medicine and the Moores UCSD Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hemangioblastomas and pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) present similar imaging features on conventional MR imaging, making differential diagnosis a challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI) and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in the differentiation of hemangioblastomas and PAs. A 3.0-T MR imaging unit was used to perform DSC-PWI and conventional MR imaging on 14 patients with hemangioblastomas and 22 patients with PAs. Four patients with hemangioblastomas and 10 PA patients also underwent proton MR spectroscopy. Parameters of relative peak height (rPH) and relative percentage of signal intensity recovery (rPSR) were acquired by DSC-PWI and variables of N-acetylaspasrtate (NAA)/creatine (Cr), choline (Cho)/Cr, and lactate-lipid (Lac-Lip)/Cr by MR spectroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of all analyzed parameters at respective cutoff values were determined. Higher rPH but lower rPSR values were detected in hemangioblastomas compared to PAs. The NAA/Cr ratio was significantly lower in hemangioblastomas compared with PAs. The threshold values ≥3.2 for rPH provide sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values of 85.7, 95.5, 92.3, and 91.3 %, respectively, for differentiating hemangioblastomas from PAs. The optimal threshold values were ≤0.9 for rPSR and ≤1.5 for NAA/Cr ratios in tumor. Significantly higher rPH and lower NAA/Cr were seen in patients with hemangioblastomas when compared with PA patients, suggesting that DSC-PWI and proton MR spectroscopy are helpful in the characterization and differentiation of these two types of tumors. (orig.)

  5. Preoperative CT versus diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with rectal cancer; a prospective randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Achiam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world and liver metastases are seen in up to 19% of patients with colorectal cancers. Detection of liver metastases is not only vital for sufficient treatment and survival, but also for a better estimation of prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion weighted MRI of the liver as part of a combined MR evaluation of patients with rectal cancers and compare it with the standard preoperative evaluation of the liver with CT.Methods. Consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal cancers were asked to participate in the study. Preoperative CT and diffusion weighted MR (DWMR were compared to contrast enhanced laparoscopic ultrasound (CELUS.Results. A total of 35 patients were included, 15 patients in Group-1 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and 20 patients in Group-2 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and DWMR of the liver. Compared with CELUS, the per-patient sensitivity/specificity was 50/100% for CT, and for DWMR: 100/94% and 100/100% for Reader 1 and 2, respectively. The per-lesion sensitivity of CT and DWMR were 17% and 89%, respectively compared with CELUS. Furthermore, one patient had non-resectable metastases after DWMR despite being diagnosed with resectable metastases after CT. Another patient was diagnosed with multiple liver metastases during CELUS, despite a negative CT-scan.Discussion. DWMR is feasible for preoperative evaluation of liver metastases. The current standard preoperative evaluation with CT-scan results in disadvantages like missed metastases and futile operations. We recommend that patients with rectal cancer, who are scheduled for MR of the rectum, should have a DWMR of the liver performed at the same time.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... the area being scanned include: Metallic spinal rod Plates, pins, screws, or metal mesh used to repair ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ... Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ... for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  18. The Diagnostic Value of Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis in Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma by Using Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to compare diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI with computed tomography perfusion (CTP for preoperative detection of metastases to lymph nodes (LNs in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Methods. Between May 2010 and April 2012, 30 patients with head and neck SCC underwent preoperative DWI and CTP. Two radiologists measured apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values and CTP parameters independently. Surgery and histopathologic examinations were performed on all patients. Results. On DWI, 65 LNs were detected in 30 patients. The mean ADC value of metastatic nodes was lower than benign nodes and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. On CTP images, the mean value in metastatic nodes of blood flow (BF and blood volume (BV was higher than that in benign nodes, and mean transit time (MTT in metastatic nodes was lower than that in benign nodes. There were significant differences in BF and MTT values between metastatic and benign LNs (P<0.05. There were significant differences between the AUCs of DWI and CTP (Z=4.612, P<0.001. Conclusion. DWI with ADC value measurements may be more accurate than CTP for the preoperative diagnosis of cervical LN metastases.

  19. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reflects activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 during focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-juan Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT is a unique protein family that binds to DNA, coupled with tyrosine phosphorylation signaling pathways, acting as a transcriptional regulator to mediate a variety of biological effects. Cerebral ischemia and reperfusion can activate STATs signaling pathway, but no studies have confirmed whether STAT activation can be verified by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI in rats after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Here, we established a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia injury using the modified Longa method. DWI revealed hyperintensity in parts of the left hemisphere before reperfusion and a low apparent diffusion coefficient. STAT3 protein expression showed no significant change after reperfusion, but phosphorylated STAT3 expression began to increase after 30 minutes of reperfusion and peaked at 24 hours. Pearson correlation analysis showed that STAT3 activation was correlated positively with the relative apparent diffusion coefficient and negatively with the DWI abnormal signal area. These results indicate that DWI is a reliable representation of the infarct area and reflects STAT phosphorylation in rat brain following focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

  20. Evaluation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced harmonic ultrasonography in detection and location of prostate transition-zone cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Chen, J-J; Zhou, Y-C; Huang, M-M; Zhang, X-R; Miao, H-D

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the value of contrast-enhanced harmonic ultrasonography (CEHU), diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and CEHU plus DW-MRI for the diagnosis of prostate transition-zone (TZ) cancer. In total, 31 TZ cancers in 28 patients and 25 peripheral zone (PZ) cancers in 21 patients without a TZ cancer were evaluated. All patients underwent DW-MRI and CEHU followed by radical prostatectomy. Predictors for the diagnosis of prostate cancer were evaluated in three protocols (CEHU, DW-MRI, CEHU plus DW-MRI). Statistical analysis of the differences between these protocols and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were carried out. CEHU plus DW-MRI had a significantly higher sensitivity, accuracy and negative-predictive value (90.3%, 73.2% and 81.3%, respectively) for TZ cancer than either method alone. The area under the ROC curve values were 0.659, 0.679 and 0.712 for CEHU, DW-MRI, and CEHU plus DW-MRI, respectively. In conclusion, CEHU plus DW-MRI might be a useful protocol for the detection and location of TZ cancer.

  1. Evaluation of Possible Prognostic Factors of Fulminant Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, F.Y.; Aslan, H.; Coskun, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may be a rapidly progressive disease with different clinical outcomes. Purpose: To investigate the radiological findings of fulminant ADEM on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, and to correlate these findings with clinical outcome. Material and Methods: Initial and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in eight patients were retrospectively evaluated for distribution of lesions on FLAIR images and presence of hemorrhage or contrast enhancement. DWI of the patients was evaluated as to cytotoxic versus vasogenic edema. The clinical records were analyzed, and MRI results and clinical outcome were correlated. Results: Four of the eight patients died, three had full recovery, and one had residual cortical blindness. The distribution of the hyperintense lesions on FLAIR sequence was as follows: frontal (37.5%), parietal (50%), temporal (37.5%), occipital (62.5%), basal ganglia (50%), pons (37.5%), mesencephalon (37.5%), and cerebellum (50%). Three of the patients who died had brainstem involvement. Two patients had a cytotoxic edema, one of whom died, and the other developed cortical blindness. Six patients had vasogenic edema: three of these patients had a rapid progression to coma and died; three of them recovered. Conclusion: DWI is not always helpful for evaluating the evolution or predicting the outcome of ADEM. However, extension of the lesions, particularly brainstem involvement, may have an influence on the prognosis.

  2. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  3. Dialectical multispectral classification of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images as an alternative to apparent diffusion coefficients maps to perform anatomical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, W P; Assis, F M; Souza, R E; Santos Filho, P B; Lima Neto, F B

    2009-09-01

    Multispectral image analysis is a relatively promising field of research with applications in several areas, such as medical imaging and satellite monitoring. A considerable number of current methods of analysis are based on parametric statistics. Alternatively, some methods in computational intelligence are inspired by biology and other sciences. Here we claim that philosophy can be also considered as a source of inspiration. This work proposes the objective dialectical method (ODM): a method for classification based on the philosophy of praxis. ODM is instrumental in assembling evolvable mathematical tools to analyze multispectral images. In the case study described in this paper, multispectral images are composed of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The results are compared to ground-truth images produced by polynomial networks using a morphological similarity index. The classification results are used to improve the usual analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient map. Such results proved that gray and white matter can be distinguished in DW-MR multispectral analysis and, consequently, DW-MR images can also be used to furnish anatomical information.

  4. Development of Computerized Scheme for Adjustment of Display Grayscale in Brain Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Harakawa, Tetsumi; Doi, Kunio

    We developed a computerized scheme for proper adjustment of display grayscale in brain diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI) with acute ischemic stroke by using thalamic signal intensity on concurrent images (b0 image). In our computerized scheme, the gray level of b0 image was first normalized, and the brain region was segmented using thresholding and labeling techniques. The lateral inclination in b0 image was then corrected semi-automatically by rotating and shifting. Each of the thalamic positions was determined by using the coordinate information in the brain region. The average signal intensity of the thalamus was measured on the region of interest (ROI) selected, and the thalamus in one side with the low signal intensity was selected. The display grayscale in DWI was finally adjusted by using the signal intensity of the selected thalamus. The thalamus positions in all cases were confirmed to be included in the thalamic outline. In 30 training cases, the average error between the thalamic signal intensity obtained from the manual selection and the computerized scheme were 1.8%±1.5, and in 30 testing cases, 1.3%±1.2. Our computerized scheme has a potential in the determination of the display grayscale of brain DWI, and would be useful to radiologists in decision-making for radiological diagnosis.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging of bone marrow in healthy individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillengass, Jens (Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dept. of Hematology, Oncology and Rheumatology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)), e-mail: j.hillengass@dkfz.de; Stieltjes, Bram (Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)); Baeuerle, Tobias (Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)) (and others)

    2011-04-15

    Background: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) displays microcirculation and permeability by application of contrast-media and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a tool for quantification of cellularity in the investigated area. Recently published examples cover breast cancer, CNS tumors, head and neck cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, prostate cancer as well as hematologic malignancies. Purpose: To investigated the influence of age, sex, and localization of the investigated region on findings of DCE-MRI and DWI. Material and Methods: DCE-MRI-parameters amplitude A and exchange rate constant kep as well as the DWI-parameter ADC of the bone marrow of the lumbar vertebral column of 30 healthy individuals covering the typical range of age of tumor patients were evaluated. ADC was calculated using b=0 and a maximal b value of either 400 or 750 s/mm2. Results: Amplitude A of DCE-MRI decreased with age (P = 0.01) and amplitude A, exchange rate constant kep as well as ADC based on b = 400 s/mm2 and b = 750 s/mm2, respectively, decreased significantly from the first to the fifth lumbar vertebra with P = 0.02, P = 0.05, P = 0.003, and P = 0.002, respectively. Conclusion: Quantitative parameters of functional imaging techniques in bone marrow are influenced by the age of the examined individual and the anatomical location of the investigated region

  6. Assessing Response to Radiation Therapy Treatment of Bone Metastases: Short-Term Followup of Radiation Therapy Treatment of Bone Metastases with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Cappabianca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the usefulness of diffusion-weighted (DW Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI in monitoring bone metastases response to radiation therapy in 15 oligometastatic patients. For each metastasis, both mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC changes and high b-value DW metastasis/muscle signal intensity ratio (SIR variations were evaluated at 30 ± 5 days and 60 ± 7 days after the end of treatment. On baseline DW-MRI, all bone metastases were hyperintense and had signal intensities higher than normal bone marrow on calculated ADC maps. At follow-up evaluations, 4 patterns of response were identified: (I decreased high b-value DW SIR associated with increased mean ADC (83.3% of cases; (II increased mean ADC with no change of high b-value DW SIR (10% of cases; (III decreased both high b-value DW SIR and mean ADC (3.3% of cases; (IV a reduction in mean ADC associated with an increase in high b-value DW SIR compared to pretreatment values (3.3% of cases. Patterns (I and (II suggested a good response to therapy; pattern (III was classified as indeterminate, while pattern (IV was suggestive of disease progression. This pattern approach may represent a useful tool in the differentiation between treatment-induced necrosis and highly cellular residual tumor.

  7. Preoperative ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of 63 uterine tumors having high signal intensity upon T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Ryo; Kashima, Katsunori; Asatani, Mina; Nishino, Koji; Nishikawa, Nobumichi; Sekine, Masayuki; Serikawa, Takehiro; Enomoto, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    The differential diagnosis between uterine sarcoma and benign leiomyoma is difficult when made only by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); it usually requires an additional preoperative diagnostic procedure. We report our results using ultrasound-guided needle biopsy for these types of uterine tumors. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy was performed on 63 patients with uterine smooth muscle tumors suspected of malignancy by MRI. We compared the results of presurgical biopsy against the postsurgical pathology of the tumor. Among 63 patients with a high signal intensity of the uterine tumor on T2-weighted MRI (1 case was undetermined), 12 cases (19.3%) were diagnosed by the needle biopsy as malignant, and 51 cases (80.6%) were benign. Among the 12 diagnosed as malignant tumors, 11 had surgery performed, and one was treated with chemotherapy. Among the 51 patients diagnosed with a benign tumor, 27 had surgery performed, and 24 were put on a wait-and-see clinical follow-up schedule. One of the 27 surgical patients with a benign tumor had a postsurgical diagnosis of a low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma. In the 38 cases where surgery was performed, we found the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values of the needle biopsy were 91.7%, 100%, 100%, and 96.2%, respectively. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy may be a reliable preoperative diagnostic procedure for uterine tumors with suspected malignancy.

  8. Visual discrimination among patients with depression and schizophrenia and healthy individuals using semiquantitative color-coded fast spin-echo T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke; Narumi, Shinsuke [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Shibata, Eri; Ohtsuka, Kotaro; Endoh, Jin; Sakai, Akio [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Morioka (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Fast spin-echo (FSE) T1-weighted (T1W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T, which is sensitive to neuromelanin-related contrast, can quantitatively detect signal alterations in the locus ceruleus (LC) and the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) of depressive and schizophrenic patients; however, its qualitative diagnostic performance remains unknown. We investigated whether visual interpretation of semiquantitative color maps can be used for discriminating between depressive and schizophrenic patients and healthy individuals. We retrospectively examined 23 patients with major depression, 23 patients with schizophrenia, and 23 age-matched healthy controls by using a FSE-T1W MRI technique. Semiquantitative color maps of sections through the LC and SNc were visually interpreted by nine raters using a continuous confidence rating scale for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The area under the ROC curve (Az), which reflects the performance in differentiating between depressive patients and controls, was 0.88, and the sensitivity and specificity at the maximum likelihood were 76% and 83%, respectively. In contrast, the Az value, sensitivity, and specificity values between schizophrenics and controls and between depressives and schizophrenics were 0.66 and 0.69, 42% and 48%, and 82% and 84%, respectively. Semiquantitative, color-coded FSE-T1W MRI at 3T can be used for visually differentiating depressive patients from healthy individuals with a substantially high likelihood, but this technique cannot be applied to distinguish schizophrenic patients from the other two groups. (orig.)

  9. New Magnetic Resonance Imaging Index for Renal Fibrosis Assessment: A Comparison between Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and T1 Mapping with Histological Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedli, I.; Crowe, L. A.; Berchtold, L.; Moll, S.; Hadaya, K.; de Perrot, T.; Vesin, C.; Martin, P.-Y.; de Seigneux, S.; Vallée, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    A need exists to noninvasively assess renal interstitial fibrosis, a common process to all kidney diseases and predictive of renal prognosis. In this translational study, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T1 mapping and a new segmented Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) technique, for Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC), were first compared to renal fibrosis in two well-controlled animal models to assess detection limits. Validation against biopsy was then performed in 33 kidney allograft recipients (KARs). Predictive MRI indices, ΔT1 and ΔADC (defined as the cortico-medullary differences), were compared to histology. In rats, both T1 and ADC correlated well with fibrosis and inflammation showing a difference between normal and diseased kidneys. In KARs, MRI indices were not sensitive to interstitial inflammation. By contrast, ΔADC outperformed ΔT1 with a stronger negative correlation to fibrosis (R2 = 0.64 against R2 = 0.29 p < 0.001). ΔADC tends to negative values in KARs harboring cortical fibrosis of more than 40%. Using a discriminant analysis method, the ΔADC, as a marker to detect such level of fibrosis or higher, led to a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 71%, respectively. This new index has potential for noninvasive assessment of fibrosis in the clinical setting. PMID:27439482

  10. Temporal and spatial characteristics of the area at risk investigated using computed tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Pals, Jesper; Hammer-Hansen, Sophia; Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    the AAR. We investigated the presence of a lateral perfusion gradient within the AAR and validated CMR measures of AAR against three independent reference standards of high quality. METHODS AND RESULTS: Computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging, microsphere blood flow analysis, T1-weighted 3T CMR...... and fluorescent microparticle pathology were used to investigate the AAR in a canine model (n = 10) of ischaemia and reperfusion. AAR size by CMR correlated well with CT (R(2) = 0.80), microsphere blood flow (R(2) = 0.80), and pathology (R(2) = 0.74) with good limits of agreement [-0.79 ± 4.02% of the left...... ventricular mass (LVM) vs. CT; -1.49 ± 4.04% LVM vs. blood flow and -1.01 ± 4.18% LVM vs. pathology]. The lateral portion of the AAR had higher perfusion than the core of the AAR by CT perfusion imaging (40.7 ± 11.8 vs. 25.2 ± 17.7 Hounsfield units, P = 0.0008) and microsphere blood flow (0.11 ± 0.04 vs. 0...

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Growth Plates around the Knees of Adolescent Soccer Players by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zmago Krajnc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate growth plates around the knees in adolescent soccer players utilizing the diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI. Methods. The knees and adjacent growth plates of eleven 14-year-old male soccer players were evaluated by MRI before (end of season’s summer break and after two months of intense soccer training. MRI evaluation was conducted in coronal plane by PD-FSE and DWI. All images were screened for any major pathological changes. Later, central growth plate surface area (CGPSA was measured and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values were calculated in two most central coronal slices divided into four regions: distal femur medial (DFM, distal femur lateral (DFL, proximal tibia medial (PTM, and proximal tibia lateral (PTL. Results. No gross pathology was diagnosed on MRI. CGPSA was not significantly reduced: DFM 278 versus 272, DFL 265 versus 261, PTM 193 versus 192, and PTL 214 versus 210. ADC decrease was statistically significant only for PTM: DFM 1.27 versus 1.22, DFL 1.37 versus 1.34, PTM 1.13 versus 1.03 (p=0.003, and PTL 1.28 versus 1.22. Conclusions. DWI measurements indicate increased cellularity in growth plates around knees in footballers most prominent in PTM after intense training. No detectable differences on a standard PD-FSE sequence were observed.

  12. The existence of biexponential signal decay in magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging appears to be independent of compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Attila; Bogner, Peter; Meric, Philippe; Correze, Jean-Loup; Berente, Zoltan; Pál, József; Gallyas, Ferenc; Doczi, Tamas; Gillet, Brigitte; Beloeil, Jean-Claude

    2004-02-01

    It is generally believed that the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes measured by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in brain pathologies are related to alterations in the water compartments. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of compartmentalization in DWI via biexponential analysis of the signal decay due to diffusion. DWI experiments were performed on mouse brain over an extended range of b-values (up to 10,000 mm(-2) s) under intact, global ischemic, and cold-injury conditions. DWI was additionally applied to centrifuged human erythrocyte samples with a negligible extracellular space. Biexponential signal decay was found to occur in the cortex of the intact mouse brain. During global ischemia, in addition to a drop in the ADC in both components, a shift from the volume fraction of the rapidly diffusing component to the slowly diffusing one was observed. In cold injury, the biexponential signal decay was still present despite the electron-microscopically validated disintegration of the membranes. The biexponential function was also applicable for fitting of the data obtained on erythrocyte samples. The results suggest that compartmentalization is not an essential feature of biexponential decay in diffusion experiments. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  14. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  16. Dynamic measurement of patello-femoral joint alignment using weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Silvia; La Marra, Alice; Arrigoni, Francesco; Necozione, Stefano; Splendiani, Alessandra; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Barile, Antonio; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Aim of our work was to compare standard and weight-bearing WB-MRI to define their contribution in unmasking patello-femoral (PF) maltracking and to define what measurement of patellar alignment is the most reliable. We prospectively collected 95 non consecutive patients, clinically divided into 2 groups: group A (the control group), including 20 patients (negative for patellar maltracking), and group B including 75 patients (positive for patellar maltracking). The patients underwent a dedicated 0.25 T MRI, in supine and WB position, with knee flexion of 12-15°. The following measurements were performed: Insall-Salvati index (IS), lateral patellar displacement (LPD), lateral patello-femoral angle (LPA) and lateral patellar tilt (LPT). Quantitative and qualitative statistical analyses were performed to compare the results obtained before and after WB-MRI. Measurements were subsequently performed on both groups. Group A patients showed no statistically significant variations at all measurements both on standard and WB-MRI. On the basis of measurements made on standard MRI, group B patients were divided into group B1 (23 patients) (negative or positive at 1 measurement) and group B2 (52 patients) (positive at 2 or more measurements). After WB-MRI, group B1 patients were divided into group B1a (6 patients), in case they remained positive at 0/1 measurement, and group B1b (17 patients), in case they became positive at 2 or more measurements. All group B2 patients confirmed to be positive at 2 or more measurements at WB-MRI. Quantitative statistical analysis showed that LPT and LPA were the most reproducible and clinically useful measurements. Qualitative statistical analysis performed on standard and WB-MRI demonstrated that LPT was the best predictive measurement. This study demonstrates both the high diagnostic value of WB-MRI in unmasking PF-maltracking and the best predictive value of LPT measurement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preoperative assessment of motor cortex and pyramidal tracts in central cavernoma employing functional and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller-Hartmann, Walter; Krings, Timo; Coenen, Volker A; Mayfrank, Lothar; Weidemann, Jürgen; Kränzlein, Heidi; Thron, Armin

    2002-11-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) combines anatomic with functional information and has therefore been widely used for preoperative planning of patients with mass lesions affecting functionally important brain regions. However, the courses of functionally important fiber tracts are not visualized. We therefore propose to combine fMRI with diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) that allows visualization of large fiber tracts and to implement this data in a neuronavigation system. DWI was successfully performed at a field strength of 1.5 Tesla, employing a spin-echo sequence with gradient sensitivity in six noncollinear directions to visualize the course of the pyramidal tracts, and was combined with echo-planar T2* fMRI during a hand motor task in a patient with central cavernoma. Fusion of both data sets allowed visualization of the displacement of both the primary sensorimotor area (M1) and its large descending fiber tracts. Intraoperatively, these data were used to aid in neuronavigation. Confirmation was obtained by intraoperative electrical stimulation. Postoperative MRI revealed an undisrupted pyramidal tract in the neurologically intact patient. The combination of fMRI with DWI allows for assessment of functionally important cortical areas and additional visualization of large fiber tracts. Information about the orientation of fiber tracts in normal appearing white matter in patients with tumors within the cortical motor system cannot be obtained by other functional or conventional imaging methods and is vital for reducing operative morbidity as the information about functional cortex. This technique might, therefore, have the prospect of guiding neurosurgical interventions, especially when linked to a neuronavigation system.

  18. Whole-brain three-dimensional T2-weighted BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Jones, Craig K

    2014-12-01

    A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. It uses a T2-preparation module to induce blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, followed by a single-shot three-dimensional (3D) fast gradient-echo readout with short echo time (TE). It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the "dead time" due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed "3D T2prep-GRE," was implemented at 7 Tesla (T) with a typical spatial (2.5 × 2.5 × 2.5 mm(3) ) and temporal (TR = 2.3 s) resolution for functional MRI (fMRI) and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Decrease in the cortical intensity on T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with aging in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imon, Yukari; Murata, Yoshio; Kajima, Toshio; Nakamura, Shigenobu [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamaguchi, Shinya

    1997-03-01

    We reported previously that Low T{sub 2} intensity areas (LIAs) are more common in patients with central nervous system (CNS) diseases than in those with no such diseases, and that the occurrence of LIAs increases with aging. To determine a relationship between the intensity changes and aging, we investigated the intensity of the cerebral cortex in 26 normal Japanese individuals. Measurements of brain MRIs were performed with a Signa Advantage apparatus at 1.5 tesla. T{sub 2}-weighted images were obtained using the spin-echo pulse sequences. On our laboratory console, we measured signal intensities in the regions of interest in the prefrontal, motor, sensory, parietal, temporal, or occipital cortex, and in the frontal white matter. To remove the effect of the system gain settings on signal intensity, that of cerebrospinal fluid was used as reference according to the method of Pujol et al. The average intensity in the temporal and prefrontal cortices was the highest, followed in order by the parietal, sensory, motor, and occipital cortices. The intensity in the temporal and parietal cortices decreased significantly with aging, and that in the motor and sensory cortices had a tendency to decrease with aging. The intensity in the motor and sensory cortices of the elderly subjects and that in the occipital cortex throughout all ages were lower than that in the prefrontal white matter, which would result in the appearance of LIAs. The average intensity of each cerebral cortex was inversely related to the non-heme iron content previously reported. It is likely that the difference in intensity among the cortices reflects variations of the non-heme iron content, and that the change in intensity with aging could be due to the increase in such cortical senile changes as that of microglia, astroglia, and senile plaques, which contain iron or iron-related proteins. The temporal cortex is most susceptible to senile changes. (K.H.)

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: correlation with clinical course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheolkyu [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Chang, YoungHee; Kim, SangYun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a fatal disease with variable clinical courses. The presence or absence of basal ganglia (BG) involvement has been reported to be associated with clinical course. We investigated the association of clinical course of sCJD with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) as well as BG involvement at early stage. DWI and single voxel proton MRS were performed in 14 patients with sCJD during the initial diagnostic workup. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and metabolites were measured in medial occipitoparietal cortices where large hyperintense DWI lesions were found in all patients. The presence or absence of BG involvement, ADC, N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) ratios, and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were correlated with disease duration (i.e., the time from the symptom onset to death). The disease duration ranged from 2 to 31 months (median, 16). Hyperintense DWI lesions were observed bilaterally in both cortices and basal ganglia in eight patients and in cortices alone in six patients. Patients with BG involvement had shorter disease duration (median, 6.8 versus 20.5; p = 0.039) than those without and lower NAA/Cr ratios (median, 1.41 versus 2.03; p = 0.001). ADC and Cho/Cr ratios were not significantly different between the patients with BG involvement and those without. By multiple regression analysis, NAA/Cr ratios had the greatest correlation with the disease duration (p = 0.029). The disease duration of sCJD was variable. NAA/Cr ratios of the affected brain at the early stage of sCJD can be used as a useful parameter in predicting the clinical course. (orig.)

  1. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of breast lesions: the influence of different fat-suppression techniques on quantitative measurements and their reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muertz, P.; Tsesarskiy, M.; Kowal, A.; Traeber, F.; Willinek, W.A.; Leutner, C.C.; Schmiedel, A.; Schild, H.H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different fat-suppression techniques on quantitative measurements and their reproducibility when applied to diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of breast lesions. Twenty-five patients with different types of breast lesions were examined on a clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Two diffusion-weighted sequences with different fat-suppression methods were applied: one with spectral presaturation by inversion recovery (SPIR), and one with short-TI inversion recovery (STIR). The acquisition of both sequence variants was repeated with modified shim volume. Lesion-to-background contrast (LBC), apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) ADC(0,1000) and ADC(50,1000), and their coefficients of variation (CV) were determined. In four patients, the image quality of DWI with SPIR was insufficient. In the other 21 patients, 46 regions of interest (ROI), including 11 malignant and 35 benign lesions, were analysed. The LBC, ADC(0,1000) and ADC(50,1000) values, which did not differ between initial and repeated measurements, were significantly higher for STIR than for SPIR. The mean CV improved from 10.8 % to 4.0 % (P = 0.0047) for LBC, from 6.3 % to 2.9 % (P = 0.0041) for ADC(0,1000), and from 6.3 % to 2.6 % (P = 0.0049) for ADC(50,1000). For STIR compared to SPIR fat suppression, improved lesion conspicuity, higher ADC values, and better measurement reproducibility were found in breast DWI. circle Quality of fat suppression influences quantitative DWI breast lesion measurements. circle In breast DWI, STIR fat suppression worked more reliably than SPIR. (orig.)

  2. Altered carotid plaque signal among different repetition times on T1-weighted magnetic resonance plaque imaging with self-navigated radial-scan technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumi, Shinsuke; Ohba, Hideki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Ohura, Kazumasa; Ono, Ayumi; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Hitomi, Jiro [Iwate Medical University, Department of Anatomy, Morioka (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging for carotid arteries is usually performed by using an electrocardiograph (ECG)-gating technique to eliminate pulsation-related artifacts, which can affect the plaque signals because of varied repetition time (TR) among patients. Hence, we investigated whether differences in TR causes signal alterations of the carotid plaque by using a non-gated plaque imaging technique. We prospectively examined 19 patients with carotid stenosis by using a T1-weighted self-navigated radial-scan technique with TRs of 500, 700, and 900 ms. The signal intensity of the carotid plaque was measured, and the contrast ratio (CR) relative to the adjacent muscle was calculated. CRs of the carotid plaques were 1.39 {+-} 0.39, 1.29 {+-} 0.29, and 1.23 {+-} 0.24 with TRs of 500, 700, and 900 ms, respectively, and were significantly different. Among the plaques, those with a hyperintensity signal (CR > 1.5) and moderate-intensity signal (CR 1.2-1.5) at 500 ms showed a TR-dependent signal decrease (hyperintensity plaques, 1.82 {+-} 0.26; 1.61 {+-} 0.19; and 1.48 {+-} 0.17; moderate-intensity plaques, 1.33 {+-} 0.08; 1.26 {+-} 0.08; and 1.19 {+-} 0.07), while those with an isointensity signal (CR < 1.2) remained unchanged regardless of TR (0.96 {+-} 0.12, 0.96 {+-} 0.11, and 0.97 {+-} 0.13). The signal intensity of the carotid plaque on T1-weighted imaging significantly varies among different TRs and tends to decrease with longer TR. MR plaque imaging with short and constant TR settings that the ECG-gating method cannot realize would be preferable for evaluating plaque characteristics. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of different magnetic resonance cholangiography techniques in living liver donors including Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kinner

    Full Text Available Preoperative evaluation of potential living liver donors (PLLDs includes the assessment of the biliary anatomy to avoid postoperative complications. Aim of this study was to compare T2-weighted (T2w and Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted (T1w magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC techniques in the evaluation of PLLDs.30 PLLDs underwent MRC on a 1.5 T Magnetom Avanto (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany using (A 2D T2w HASTE (Half Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo fat saturated (fs in axial plane, (B 2D T2w HASTE fs thick slices in coronal plane, (C free breathing 3D T2w TSE (turbo spin echo RESTORE (high-resolution navigator corrected plus (D maximum intensity projections (MIPs, (E T2w SPACE (sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions plus (F MIPs and (G T2w TSE BLADE as well as Gd-EOB-DTPA T1w images without (G and with (H inversion recovery. Contrast enhanced CT cholangiography served as reference imaging modality. Two independent reviewers evaluated the biliary tract anatomy on a 5-point scale subjectively and objectively. Data sets were compared using a Mann-Whitney-U-test. Kappa values were also calculated.Source images and maximum intensity projections of 3D T2w TSE sequences (RESTORE and SPACE proved to be best for subjective and objective evaluation directly followed by 2D HASTE sequences. Interobserver variabilities were good to excellent (k = 0.622-0.804.3D T2w sequences are essential for preoperative biliary tract evaluation in potential living liver donors. Furthermore, our results underline the value of different MRCP sequence types for the evaluation of the biliary anatomy in PLLDs including Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1w MRC.

  4. Comparison of dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance image in staging and grading of carcinoma bladder with histopathological correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetika Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bladder cancer is the second most common neoplasm of the urinary tract worldwide. Dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI has been introduced in clinical MRI protocols of bladder cancer because of its accuracy in staging and grading. Aim: To evaluate and compare accuracy of Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE and Diffusion weighted (DW MRI for preoperative T staging of urinary bladder cancer and find correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC and maximum enhancement with histological grade. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with bladder cancer were included in study. All patients underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI on a 1.5-T scanner with a phased-array pelvic coil. MR images were evaluated and assigned a stage which was compared with the histolopathological staging. ADC value and maximum enhancement curve were used based on previous studies. Subsequently histological grade was compared with MR characteristics. Results: The extent of agreement between the radiologic staging and histopathological staging was relatively greater with the DW-MRI (κ=0.669 than DCE-MRI (κ=0.619. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy are maximum and similar for stage T4 tumors in both DCEMRI (100.0, 96.2 and 96.7 and DW-MRI (100.0, 96.2 and 96.7 while minimum for stage T2 tumors - DCEMRI (83.3, 72.2, and 76.7 and DWI-MRI (91.7, 72.2, and 80. Conclusion: MRI is an effective tool for determining T stage and histological grade of urinary bladder cancers. Stage T2a and T2b can be differentiated only by DCE-MRI. Results were more accurate when both ADC and DCE-MRI were used together and hence a combined approach is suggested.

  5. Comparison of [{sup 11}C]choline Positron Emission Tomography With T2- and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Delineating Malignant Intraprostatic Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe H. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lim Joon, Daryl [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Davis, Ian D. [Monash University Eastern Health Clinical School, Victoria (Australia); Lee, Sze Ting [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Hiew, Chee-Yan; Esler, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Gong, Sylvia J. [Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Wada, Morikatsu [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Clouston, David [Tissupath, Mt Waverley, Victoria (Australia); O' Sullivan, Richard [Healthcare Imaging, Epworth Hospital, Victoria (Australia); Goh, Yin P. [Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Health, Victoria (Australia); Bolton, Damien [Department of Urology, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Royal Marsden Hospital, National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography (CHOL-PET) with that of the combination of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (T2W/DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for delineating malignant intraprostatic lesions (IPLs) for guiding focal therapies and to investigate factors predicting the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Methods and Materials: This study included 21 patients who underwent CHOL-PET and T2W/DW MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. Two observers manually delineated IPL contours for each scan, and automatic IPL contours were generated on CHOL-PET based on varying proportions of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV). IPLs identified on prostatectomy specimens defined reference standard contours. The imaging-based contours were compared with the reference standard contours using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and sensitivity and specificity values. Factors that could potentially predict the DSC of the best contouring method were analyzed using linear models. Results: The best automatic contouring method, 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV{sub 60}) , had similar correlations (DSC: 0.59) with the manual PET contours (DSC: 0.52, P=.127) and significantly better correlations than the manual MRI contours (DSC: 0.37, P<.001). The sensitivity and specificity values were 72% and 71% for SUV{sub 60}; 53% and 86% for PET manual contouring; and 28% and 92% for MRI manual contouring. The tumor volume and transition zone pattern could independently predict the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Conclusions: CHOL-PET is superior to the combination of T2W/DW MRI for delineating IPLs. The accuracy of CHOL-PET is insufficient for gland-sparing focal therapies but may be accurate enough for focal boost therapies. The transition zone pattern is a new classification that may predict how well CHOL-PET delineates IPLs.

  6. Differentiation between simple cyst and hepatic hemangioma utilizing T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with gradient-echo (b-FFE) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burim, Carolina Valente; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: scoposl@uol.com.br; Pecci Neto, Luiz; Torlai, Fabiola Goda; Tiferes, Dario Ariel [Laboratorio Fleury, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Medicina Diagnostica

    2008-11-15

    Objective: to establish the role of MRI T2-weighted sequences in the differentiation between simple cysts and hepatic hemangiomas. Materials and methods: a double-blinded, prospective, observational, cross sectional study evaluated 52 patients with 91 hepatic lesions (34 simple cysts and 57 hemangiomas) submitted to abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. The combined analysis of all sequences was considered as the golden-standard. TSE sequences with long echo trains and b-FFE sequences were subjectively analyzed by two independent observers for differentiating cysts from hemangiomas. The kappa test ({kappa}) was utilized in the analysis of the methods accuracy and inter- and intra-observer agreement (p < 0.05{sup *}). Results: cysts and hemangiomas dimensions ranged respectively between 0.5 and 6.5 cm (mean 1.89 cm), and 0.8 and 11 cm (mean = 2.62 cm). The analysis of the sequences with long-TE and the golden-standard demonstrated a non-statistically significant agreement (k: 0.00-0.10). The agreement between the evaluation of the b-FFE sequence and the golden-standard ranged from substantial ({kappa}: 0.62-0.71) to almost perfect ({kappa}: 0.86) for both observers. The inter- and intra-observer agreement for the b-FFE sequence ranged from substantial ({kappa}: 0.62-0.70) to almost perfect ({kappa}: 0.85-0.91). Conclusion: T2-weighted images acquired with the b-FFE technique present a high accuracy and reproducibility in the differentiation between cysts and hepatic hemangiomas. (author)

  7. Monitoring of VX2 tumor growth in rabbit liver using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Jo-Chi; Mac, Ka-Wai; Chang, Chiung-Yun; Wu, Yu-Chiuan; Hsiao, Chia-Chi; Chen, Po-Chou

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the VX2 tumor growth in rabbit liver using T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Five New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were implanted with VX2 cell suspension in liver. Afterwards, MRI was performed 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after tumor implantation. A 1.5T clinical MRI scanner was used to perform scans. After 3-plane localizer, T1 weighted imaging (T1WI), T2WI, and DCE-MRI using a three-dimensional gradient echo pulse sequence was performed. After 4 pre-contrast images were acquired, each rabbit was injected i.v. with 0.1 mmol/kg Dotarem. The total scan time after Dotarem administration was 30 minutes. All acquired images were analyzed using ImageJ software. Several regions of interest were selected from the rims of tumor, liver, and muscle. The enhancement ratio (ER) was calculated by dividing the MR signal after Dotarem injection to the MR signal before Dotarem injection. The maximum ER (ER_max) value of tumor for each rabbit was observed right after the Dotarem injection. The T2W MR signal intensities (T2W_SI) and the ER_max values obtained 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after tumor implantation were analyzed with a linear regression algorithm. Both T2W_SI and ER_max of tumors increased with time. The changes for T2W_SI and ER_max of tumors between 7 and 28 days after tumor implantation were 32.66% and 18.14%, respectively. T2W_SI is more sensitive than ER_max for monitoring the growth of VX2 tumor in a rabbit liver model.

  8. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in planning the osseous resection margins of bony tumours in the proximal femur: based on coronal T1-weighted versus STIR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Stevenson, Jonathan; Mangham, Charles; Cribb, Gillian; Cool, Paul [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Oncology, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Assessment of the extent of tumours using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the basis for bone resection in limb-salvage surgery. We aimed to compare the accuracy of T1-weighted MRI and STIR sequences in measuring the extent of proximal femoral tumours, using the macroscopic specimens as the gold standard for comparison. We compared single coronal T1-weighted with STIR sequences in 34 proximal femoral tumours, using bivalved resected macroscopic tumours for comparison. After randomisation, four observers measured longitudinal osseous tumour extent using MRI and specimen photographs on two separate occasions, 3 weeks apart. There were 25 metastatic tumours, 8 chondrosarcomas and 1 myeloma. Eight patients presented with pathological fractures. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for comparison of T1 with macroscopic tumours was 0.91 (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 0.83 to 0.96) for all observers and 0.90 (95 % CI: 0.81 to 0.95) for STIR images. This difference was not statistically significant, and T1 and STIR sequence measurements had similar precision and accuracy. Bland-Altman plots showed T1-weighted imaging to be unbiased, whereas STIR sequences were biased and had systematic error. Moreover, STIR measurements overestimated tumour size by 6.4 mm (95 % CI: -26.9 to 39.7 mm) and 2 patients were outliers. T1 measurements were closer to the macroscopic measurements with a mean difference of 1.3 mm (95 % CI: -28.9 mm to 31.5 mm), with 3 patients falling outside of this. The variance was greater for STIR measurements. This difference between T1 and STIR measurements was statistically significant (p = 0.000003). The intra-observer reliability between separate measurements for MRI and specimen photographs achieved interclass correlation coefficients of 0.97, 0.96 and 0.95 (T1, STIR and macroscopic tumour respectively). T1 had greater interobserver correlation than for STIR and macroscopic tumour measurements (0.88 vs 0.85 and 0.85 respectively). These

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of mesenteric small bowel tumours with Magnetic Resonance-enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amzallag-Bellenger, Elisa; Nguyen, Truong Luong Francis; Amara, Nedjoua; Hoeffel, Christine [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Radiology, Reims Cedex (France); Hopital Robert Debre, Pole d' imagerie, Department of Radiology, Cedex Reims (France); Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Barbe, Coralie [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Statistics, Reims Cedex (France); Hopital Robert Debre, Pole d' imagerie, Department of Radiology, Cedex Reims (France)

    2014-11-15

    To retrospectively investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for detecting mesenteric small bowel tumours (MSBTs) via MR-enterography. MR-enterographies of 98 patients with suspected MSBTs were blindly analyzed by two independent readers for the presence of MSBTs. Four imaging sets including ''standard'' (Haste and TrueFisp), ''standard + DWI,'' ''standard + gadolinium-enhanced'' and ''standard + DWI + gadolinium-enhanced'' were reviewed. Diagnostic performance of different readings were compared with McNemar's test. Twenty-nine MSBTs were pathologically confirmed. For R1 (junior radiologist) sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for the detection of MSBTs via standard MRI were 52 % [95 % CI: 34 %-70 %] (15/29), 94 % [95 % CI: 89 %-100 %] (65/69), 79 % [95 % CI: 61 %-97 %] (15/19), 82 % [95 % CI: 74 %-91 %] (65/79) and 82 % [95 % CI: 74 %-89 %] (80/98), respectively. For R2 (senior radiologist) they were 76 % [95 % CI: 60 %-91 %] (22/29), 96 % [95 % CI: 91-100 %] (66/69), 88 % [95 % CI: 75 %-100 %] (22/25), 90 % [95 % CI: 84 %-97 %] (66/73) and 90 % [95 % CI: 84 %-96 %] (88/98), respectively. Adding DWI they were 72 % [95 % CI: 56 %-89 %] (21/29), 91 % [95 % CI: 85 %-98 %] (63/69), 78 % [95 % CI: 62 %-94 %] (21/27), 89 % [95 % CI: 81 %-96 %] (63/71) and 87 % [95 % CI: 80 %-94 %] (85/98) for R1 and 79 % [95 % CI: 65 %-94 %] (23/29), 97 % [95 % CI: 93 %-100 %] (67/69), 92 % [95 % CI: 81 %-100 %] (23/25), 92 % [95 % CI: 86 %-98 %] (67/73) and 92 % [95 % CI: 86 %-97 %] (90/98) for R2. Sensitivities for tumour detection were higher after adding DWI to standard MRI, although only for R1 was this significant (P = 0.03). Adding DWI to standard + gadolinium-enhanced MRI did not significantly increase MR performance. DWI improves MSBT detection via MR-enterography compared to standard unenhanced MR-enterography, especially for unexperienced readers. (orig.)

  10. Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Predicting Sensitivity to Chemoradiotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Soichiro [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Koga, Fumitaka, E-mail: f-koga.uro@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Shuichiro [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, Chikako; Tanaka, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Ochanomizu Surugadai Clinic, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Hajime; Komai, Yoshinobu; Saito, Kazutaka; Masuda, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In chemoradiation (CRT)-based bladder-sparing approaches for muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), patients who respond favorably to induction CRT enjoy the benefits of bladder preservation, whereas nonresponders do not. Thus, accurate prediction of CRT sensitivity would optimize patient selection for bladder-sparing protocols. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is a functional imaging technique that quantifies the diffusion of water molecules in a noninvasive manner. We investigated whether DW-MRI predicts CRT sensitivity of MIBC. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 23 MIBC patients (cT2/T3 = 7/16) who underwent induction CRT consisting of radiotherapy to the small pelvis (40 Gy) with two cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/day for 5 days), followed by partial or radical cystectomy. All patients underwent DW-MRI before the initiation of treatment. Associations of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values with CRT sensitivity were analyzed. The proliferative potential of MIBC was also assessed by analyzing the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in pretherapeutic biopsy specimens. Results: Thirteen patients (57%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR) to CRT. These CRT-sensitive MIBCs showed significantly lower ADC values (median, 0.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; range, 0.43-0.77) than CRT-resistant (no pCR) MIBCs (median, 0.84 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; range, 0.69-1.09; p = 0.0003). Multivariate analysis identified ADC value as the only significant and independent predictor of CRT sensitivity (p < 0.0001; odds ratio per 0.001 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s increase, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08). With a cutoff ADC value at 0.74 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, sensitivity/specificity/accuracy in predicting CRT sensitivity was 92/90/91%. Ki-67 LI was significantly higher in CRT-sensitive MIBCs (p = 0.0005) and significantly and inversely correlated with ADC values ({rho} = -0.67, p = 0

  11. Characteristics and pathological mechanism on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging after chemoembolization in rabbit liver VX-2 tumor model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate dynamic characteristics and pathological mechanism of signal in rabbit VX-2 tumor model on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) after chemoembolization.METHODS: Forty New Zealand rabbits were included in the study and forty-seven rabbit VX-2 tumor models were raised by implanting directly and intrahepatically after abdominal cavity opened. Forty VX-2 tumor models from them were divided into four groups. DWI was performed periodically and respectively for each group after chemoembolization. All VX-2 tumor samples of each group were studied by pathology. The distinction of VX-2tumors on DWI was assessed by their apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. The statistical significance between different time groups, different area groups or different b-value groups was calculated by using SPSS12.0 software.RESULTS: Under b-value of 100 s/mm2, ADC values were lowest at 16 h after chemoembolization in area of VX-2 tumor periphery, central, and normal liver parenchyma around tumor, but turned to increase with further elongation of chemoembolization treatment. The distinction of ADC between different time groups was significant respectively (F = 7.325, P < 0.001; F = 2.496,P < 0.048; F = 6.856, P < 0.001). Cellular edema in the area of VX-2 tumor periphery or normal liver parenchyma around tumor, increased quickly in sixteen h after chemoembolization but, from the 16th h to the 48th h, cellular edema in the area of normal liver parenchyma around tumor decreased gradually and that in the area of VX-2 tumor periphery decreased lightly at, and then increased continually. After chemoembolization, Cellular necrosis in the area of VX-2 tumor periphery was more significantly high than that before chemoembolization. The areas of dead cells in VX-2 tumors manifested low signal and high ADC value, while the areas of viable cells manifested high signal and low ADC value.CONCLUSION: DWI is able to detect and differentiate tumor necrotic areas from viable

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  13. Use of magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, L T; Frager, D; Subramanium, A; Lowe, F C

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a new technique that uses heavily weighted T2 coronal images with fat suppression pulse. Urine appears white on MRU, resembling an intravenous urogram (IVU). Contrast agents are not necessary. This study describes the use of MRU in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with hematuria. One hundred six patients with microscopic or gross hematuria and 6 normal volunteers underwent MRU between 1992 and 1995. A modified, heavily weighted T2 technique with intravenous administration of furosemide and ureteral compression was used. Thirty-two patients had other imaging techniques as well for comparison. MRU provided high-resolution images in almost all cases; 73 (69%) had a normal MRU. Significant findings in the 33 patients with abnormalities included renal cysts in 17 (51%), renal cell carcinoma in 6 (18%), transitional cell carcinoma in 5 (15%), ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 3 (9%), and stones causing obstruction in 6 (18%). Five patients with renal failure also had good visualization of the entire urinary tract. MRU was comparable to other imaging modalities except in identifying nonobstructing calculi. MRU provides an alternative to conventional imaging of the urinary tract, especially in those patients who have contraindications to ionizing radiation and contrast agents. Improvements in resolution, technique, and cost have to be addressed before it can be used regularly in urologic practice.

  14. Magnetic resonance images of hematospermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Norio; Miki, Kenta; Kato, Nobuki; Furuta, Nozomu; Ohishi, Yukihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kondo, Naoya; Tashiro, Kazuya

    1998-12-01

    We performed MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in the pelvic region of 70 cases with hematospermia and conducted a study on the abnormal MRI findings to which hematospermia could be attributed. We conducted a study on the morphological anomaly and change in the signal intensity in the prostate gland and of the seminal vesicle as well as on the presence or absence of dilation in the plexus venous surrounding the deferent duct or the prostate gland out of the abnormal MRI findings. As for the seminal vesicle, the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in higher intensity than the prostate gland in T1 weighted images were diagnosed as having hemorrhagic focus and the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in low intensity both in T1 and T2 weighted images were diagnosed as having fibrosis caused by chronic inflammation. Abnormal MRI findings were seen in 40 out of the 70 cases (57%). Anomaly in the prostate gland was indicated in 6 (9%) cases. Abnormality in the seminal vesicle was indicated in 30 cases (43%) including hemorrhage of seminal vesicle in 25 cases, chronic inflammation in five cases and cyst of seminal vesicle in one case. In conducting an examination of the patients with hematospermia, MRI is the nonivasive and reproducible method and it is possible to identify the hemorrhagic region. Therefore, MRI is thought to be useful to identify the causal organs of hematospermia. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, G.; Scialfa, G.; Biondi, A.; Landoni, L.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres.

  16. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  18. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J.N.; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  19. EVALUATION OF CIRRHOTIC LIVER WITH PERFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING: A PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN ANIMAL MODELS WITH HALF-LIVER CIRRHOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-han Yang; Xiao-hua Ye; Ye Tan; Min Zhang; Ming-zhu Zhou; Jing-xia Xie; Min Chen; Cheng Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of cirrhotic liver.Methods With a 4F catheter,1% diluted carbon tetrachloride (1 ml/kg) was selectively injected into right or left hepatic artery of 12 dogs fortnightly.The half liver into which carbon tetrachloride was injected was called as study side (SS),while the other half liver without carbon tetrachloride injection was called as study control side (SCS).Conventional and perfusion-weighted MRI were performed in every 4 weeks.Via a 4F catheter,5ml gadolinium diethylentriamine pentaaceti acid (Gd-DTPA) dilution was injected into superior mesenteric artery at the 5th scan.The signal intensity-time curves of SS,SCS,and portal vein were completed in MR workstation.The maximal relative signal increase (MRSI),peak time (tp),and slope of the curves were measured.Results On conventional MR images,no abnormalities of externality and signal intensity were observed in both SS and SCS of liver at each stage.The mean tp,MRSI,and slope of intensity-time curves in normal liver were 10.56 seconds,1.01,and 10.23 arbitrary unit (au)/s,respectively.Three parameters of curves didn't show obvious change in SCS of liver at every stage.Abnormal perfusion curves occurred in SS of liver at the 12th week after the 1st injection.The abnormality of perfusion curve in SS was more and more serious as the times of injection increased.The mean tp,MRSI,and slope intensity-time curves in SS of liver were 19.45 seconds,0.43,and 3.60 au/s respectively at the 24th week.Conclusion Perfusion-weighted imaging can potentially provide information about portal perfusion of hepatic parenchyma,and to some degree,reflect the severity of cirrhosis.

  20. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance in Lymphoma: Comparison With 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and With the Addition of Magnetic Resonance Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudo, Chiara; Raderer, Markus; Karanikas, Georgios; Weber, Michael; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Dolak, Werner; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Mayerhoefer, Marius E

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) (with and without diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]) to F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT), with regard to the assessment of nodal and extranodal involvement, in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, without restriction to FDG-avid subytpes. Patients with histologically proven lymphoma were enrolled in this prospective, institutional review board-approved study. After a single F-FDG injection, patients consecutively underwent F-FDG PET[Fraction Slash]CT and F-FDG PET/MR on the same day for staging or restaging. Three sets of images were analyzed separately: F-FDG PET/CT, F-FDG PET/MR without DWI, and F-FDG PET/MR with DWI. Region-based agreement and examination-based sensitivity and specificity were calculated for F-FDG PET/CT, F-FDG PET/MR without DWI, and F-FDG PET/MR DWI. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean) on F-FDG PET/CT and F-FDG PET/MR were compared and correlated with minimum and mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCmin, ADCmean). Thirty-four patients with a total of 40 examinations were included. Examination-based sensitivities for F-FDG PET/CT, F-FDG PET/MR, and F-FDG PET/MR DWI were 82.1%, 85.7%, and 100%, respectively; specificities were 100% for all 3 techniques; and accuracies were 87.5%, 90%, and 100%, respectively. F-FDG PET/CT was false negative in 5 of 40 examinations (all with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma), and F-FDG PET/MR (without DWI) was false negative in 4 of 40 examinations. Region-based percentages of agreement were 99% (κ, 0.95) between F-FDG PET/MR DWI and F-FDG PET/CT, 99.2% (κ, 0.96) between F-FDG PET/MR and F-FDG PET/CT, and 99.4% (κ, 0.97) between F-FDG PET/MR DWI and F-FDG PET/MR. There was a strong correlation between F-FDG PET/CT and F-FDG PET/MR for SUVmax (r = 0.83) and SUVmean (r = 0.81) but no significant correlation between ADCmin and SUVmax

  1. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  2. Quantification of synovitis in the cranio-cervical region: Dynamic contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis-A feasibility follow up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeromel, M., E-mail: miran.jeromel@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, Department for Neuroradiology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Zaloska cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jevtic, V., E-mail: vladimir.jevtic@mf.uni-lj.si [Medical Faculty Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, 1104 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sersa, I., E-mail: igor.sersa@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ambrozic, A., E-mail: ales.ambrozic@mf.uni-lj.si [Department of Rheumatology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Vodnikova 62, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tomsic, M., E-mail: matija.tomsic@kclj.si [Department of Rheumatology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Vodnikova 62, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To test the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCEI) and diffusion weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying synovitis of the cranio-cervical (C-C) region in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and neck pain at the beginning and at a six month follow up. Methods: 27 patients with duration of RA of less than 24 months and neck pain were studied with standard qualitative MRI evaluation and two quantitative MRI methods (DCEI and DWI) at the level of atlantoaxial joints. Rate of early enhancement (REE), enhancement gradient (Genh) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were extracted from DCEI and DWI data. MRI was coupled with clinical assessment and radiographic imaging. Results: Using standard qualitative MRI evaluation, unequivocal active synovitis (grade 2 or 3 contrast enhancement) was proved in 16 (59%) patients at baseline and 14 (54%) at follow up. DCEI and DWI measurements confirmed active synovitis in 25 (93%) patients at baseline and 24 (92%) at follow up. Average REE, Genh and ADC values decreased during follow up, however the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Both qualitative and quantitative MRI methods confirmed active inflammatory disease in the C-C region following therapy although all clinical criteria showed signs of improvement of the peripheral disease. Conclusions: The study proved the feasibility of DCEI and DWI MRI for quantifying synovitis of the C-C region in patients with early RA and neck pain. Both techniques can be used as additional method for evaluation of synovitis of the C-C region in RA.

  3. Comparison of computed tomographic urography, magnetic resonance urography and the combination of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guang-Yu; Lu, Qing; Wu, Lian-Ming; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xiao-Xi; Xu, Jian-Rong

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the performance of computed tomographic urography (CTU), static-fluid magnetic resonance urography (static-fluid MRU) and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Between January 2010 and June 2011, patients with suspected UUT cancer underwent CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI (b=1000s/mm(2)) within a 1-week period. The diagnostic performances of CTU, static-fluid MRU and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI for upper urinary tract cancer were prospectively evaluated. The ureteroscopic and histopathologic findings were compared with the imaging findings. Compared to static-fluid MRU alone (sensitivity: 76/75%, reader 1/reader 2), combining DWI with MRI can increase the sensitivity (sensitivity: 84/84%, p=0.031/p=0.016) of upper urinary tract cancer diagnosis. CTU had greater sensitivity (95/94%) and accuracy (92/91%) than both static-fluid MRU (sensitivity: pMRU with DWI (sensitivity: p=0.023/p=0.039 and accuracy: 87/85%, p=0.042/p=0.049) for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancers. Compared with CTU alone, CTU with DWI did not significantly increase sensitivity, specificity or accuracy. However, the diagnostic confidence was improved when the combined technique was used (p=0.031/p=0.024). Moreover, there was no significant change in sensitivity, specificity, accuracy or diagnostic confidence when static-fluid MRU was used in combination with CTU and DWI. Although there is a potential role for static-fluid MRU and static-fluid MRU with DWI in urinary tract imaging, CTU is still the better choice for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Combining DWI with CTU can help improve confidence in upper urinary tract cancer diagnoses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Attempts to Improve Absolute Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow in Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Simplified T1-Weighted Steady-State Cerebral Blood Volume Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirestam, R.; Knutsson, L.; Risberg, J.; Boerjesson, S.; Larsson, E.M.; Gustafson, L.; Passant, U.; Staahlberg, F. [Depts. of Medical Radiation Physics, Diagnostic Radiology, Psychiatry, and Psychogeriatrics, Lund Univ, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Background: Attempts to retrieve absolute values of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) have typically resulted in overestimations. Purpose: To improve DSC-MRI CBF estimates by calibrating the DSC-MRI-based cerebral blood volume (CBV) with a corresponding T1-weighted (T1W) steady-state (ss) CBV estimate. Material and Methods: 17 volunteers were investigated by DSC-MRI and 133Xe SPECT. Steady-state CBV calculation, assuming no water exchange, was accomplished using signal values from blood and tissue, before and after contrast agent, obtained by T1W spin-echo imaging. Using steady-state and DSC-MRI CBV estimates, a calibration factor K = CBV(ss)/CBV(DSC) was obtained for each individual. Average whole-brain CBF(DSC) was calculated, and the corrected MRI-based CBF estimate was given by CBF(ss) = KxCBF(DSC). Results: Average whole-brain SPECT CBF was 40.1{+-}6.9 ml/min 100 g, while the corresponding uncorrected DSC-MRI-based value was 69.2{+-}13.8 ml/mi 100 g. After correction with the calibration factor, a CBF(ss) of 42.7{+-}14.0 ml/min 100 g was obtained. The linear fit to CBF(ss)-versus-CBF(SPECT) data was close to proportionality (R = 0.52). Conclusion: Calibration by steady-state CBV reduced the population average CBF to a reasonable level, and a modest linear correlation with the reference 133Xe SPECT technique was observed. Possible explanations for the limited accuracy are, for example, large-vessel partial-volume effects, low post-contrast signal enhancement in T1W images, and water-exchange effects.

  5. Diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of sub-coracoacromial spurs causing subacromial impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik; Armbruster, Marco [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Bender, Yi-Na; Walter, Thula; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ockert, Ben [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Shoulder and Elbow Service, Munich (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate the potential of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging (SWMR) for the detection of sub-coracoacromial spurs in patients with clinically suspected subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS), compared to standard MR-sequences and radiographs. Forty-four patients with suspected SAIS were included. All patients underwent radiography, standard MRI of the shoulder and SWMR. Radiograph-based identification of sub-coracoacromial spurs served as goldstandard. Radiographs identified twenty-three spurs in twenty-three patients. Twenty-one patients without spur formation served as reference group. Detection rate, sensitivity/specificity and interobserver-agreements were calculated. Linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between size measurements on radiographs and MRI. Detection rates for spurs on standard MRI and SWMR were 47.8 % and 91.3 % compared to radiography (p<0.001). SWMR demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.7 % (CI=0.92-1) and a specificity of 91.3 % (CI=0.788-1) for the identification of spurs. Standard MR-sequences achieved a sensitivity of 47.8 % (CI=0.185-0.775) and a specificity of 80.8 % (CI=0.642-0.978). Size measurements between SWMR and radiography showed a good correlation (R{sup 2}=0.75;p<0.0001), while overestimating lesion size (5.7±1.2 mm; 4.3±1.3 mm;p<0.0001). Interobserver-agreement for spurs was high on SWMR (R{sup 2}=0.74;p<0.0001), but low on standard MRI (R{sup 2}=0.24;p<0.0001). SWMR allows a reliable detection of sub-coracoacromial spur formation in patients with SAIS and is superior to standard MR-sequences using radiography as goldstandard. (orig.)

  6. A Systematic Review of Non-Echo Planar Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detection of Primary and Postoperative Cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, Sylvia L; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Aarts, Mark C J

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of non-echo planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for primary and recurrent/residual (postoperative) cholesteatoma in adults (≥18 years) after canal wall up surgery. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane up to October 22, 2014. All studies investigating non-echo planar DW-MRI for primary and postoperative cholesteatoma were selected and critically appraised for relevance and validity. In total, 779 unique articles were identified, of which 23 articles were included for critical appraisal. Seven articles met our criteria for relevance and validity for postoperative cholesteatoma. Four studies were additionally included for subgroup analysis of primary cases only. Ranges of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value yielded 43%-92%, 58%-100%, 50%-100% and 64%-100%, respectively. Results for primary subgroup analysis were 83%-100%, 50%-100%, 85%-100%, and 50%-100%, respectively. Results for subgroup analysis for only postoperative cases yielded 80%-82%, 90%-100%, 96%-100%, 64%-85%, respectively. Despite a higher prevalence of cholesteatoma in the primary cases, there was no clinical difference in added value of DW-MRI between primary and postoperative cases. We found a high predictive value of non-echo planar DW-MRI for the detection of primary and postoperative cholesteatoma. Given the moderate quality of evidence, we strongly recommend both the use of non-echo planar DW-MRI scans for the follow-up after cholesteatoma surgery, and when the correct diagnosis is questioned in primary preoperative cases. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging of normal-appearing white matter in children and young adults with tuberous sclerosis complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulrajah, Sahayini; Ertan, Gulhan; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Jordan, Lori [Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Khaykin, Elizabeth [Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Department of Mental Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Izbudak, Izlem [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) frequently present with neurocognitive deficits which may be related to impaired white matter maturation. The purposes of our study were (a) to evaluate the white matter maturation in children and young adults with TSC by comparing the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) with age-matched healthy controls and (b) to determine the association of NAWM-ADC values with the severity of neurological symptoms in TSC patients. Twenty-three TSC patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion-weighted imaging between January 2000 and January 2009 were studied. ADC values of NAWM were measured in the frontal, parietal, occipital lobes, and in the pons. ADC data were compared with age-matched normative data derived from healthy controls. Patients were neurologically scored by a pediatric neurologist. Two-sample t tests and linear regression were conducted using STATA software. ADC values of NAWM were higher in TSC patients compared with healthy controls; the increase, however, only reached statistical significance in the frontal white matter and pons in the age group between 96 and 144 months and in the right parietal and occipital white matter in the age group above 144 months. There was no significant change in neurological severity score per unit increase in ADC measurement. ADC values of NAWM appear increased in TSC patients. The abnormal ADC values suggest that myelination may be delayed/impaired in TSC patients, which could explain global neurocognitive deficits. Larger prospective studies, including diffusion tensor imaging, are necessary to validate our results. (orig.)

  8. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging - a new instrument in the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jacob's disease; Diffusjonsvektet magnetisk resonanstomografi - nytt i diagnostikken av Creutzfeldt-Jakobs sykdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romi, Fredrik; Smivoll, Alf Inge; Moerk, Sverre; Tysnes, Ole-Bjoern

    2000-07-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jacob's disease (CID) is characterised by rapidly progressive dementia, ataxia, myoclonus and several other neurological deficits. It generally affects older adults and occurs in sporadic, genetic and iatrogenic forms. Death occurs usually within one year after onset of the disease. The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, neuro physiological and radiological findings and confirmed by post mortal histopathology. During the last two years several cases of CID have been reported with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MR) abnormalities represented by increased signal intensity indicating reduced diffusion in basal ganglia and/or cortex cerebric. These abnormalities seem to be characteristic of CID. We report a case of CID in a 54 year old woman who developed vertigo, nystagmus, ataxia, myoclonus and dementia over a period of eight months. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed increased signal intensity in corpus striatum and gyrus conguli. The diagnosis was post mortally confirmed with histopathology. (Author) 7 figs., 15 refs.

  9. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  10. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging: ischemic and traumatic injury of the central nervous system; Diffusionsgewichtete MRI: ischaemische und traumatische Verletzungen des Zentralnervensystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Sorensen, A.G. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States). MGH-NMR Center; Hawighorst, H.; Benoit, C.H. [Swiss Paraplegic Center Nottwil (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology

    2001-12-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) represents a recent development that extends imaging from the depiction of the neuroanatomy into the field of functional and physiologic processes. DWI measures a fundamentally different physiologic parameter than conventional MRI. Image contrast is related to differences in the microscopic motion (diffusion) of water molecules within brain tissue rather than a change in total tissue water. Consequently, DWI can reveal pathology where conventional T1- and T2-weighted MR images are negative. DWI has clinically proven its value in the assessment of acute cerebral stroke and trauma by showing cerebral injury early due to its ability to discriminate between lesions with cytotoxic edema (decreased diffusion) from lesions with vasogenic edema (increased diffusion). Full tensor DWI allows to calculate a variety of functional maps, the most widely used maps include maps of apparent diffusion coefficients and isotropic diffusion. In addition maps of anisotropic diffusion can be calculated which are believed to give information about the integrity and location of fiber tracts. This functional-anatomical information will most probably play an increasingly important role in the early detection of primary and secondary tissue injury from various reasons and could guide and validate current and future neuroprotective treatments. (orig.) [German] Die diffusionsgewichtete Magnetresonanz Tomografie (DWI) stellt ein neues Verfahren dar, welches die Bildgebung von der einfachen Darstellung der Neuroanatomie um das Feld der funktionalen und physiologischen Prozesse erweitert. Im Gegensatz zur konventionellen MRT misst die DWI einen vollkommen anderen physiologischen Parameter. Der Bildkontrast haengt von Unterschieden in der Mikrobewegung (Diffusion) der Wassermolekuele im Hirngewebe ab. Daher kann die DWI pathologische Prozesse aufzeichnen, wo konventionelle T1- und T2-gewichtete MR Bilder unauffaellig bleiben. In der klinischen

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  12. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  13. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamentals and principles of MRI, its capabilities and various techniques of application. Appropriate background for MRI is provided, including basic nuclear magnetic phenomena, modifications required for imaging, the current state of clinical knowledge and a survey of the future potential for in vivo MRI.

  16. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this is the case, you will be given instructions for your child about not eating or drinking several hours prior ... MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging ( ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  3. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance ... allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  10. A diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging-based study of transcervical carotid stenting with flow reversal versus transfemoral filter protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Ignacio; Orgaz, Antonio; Flores, Ángel; Gil, Jose; Rodríguez, Rubén; Peinado, Javier; Criado, Enrique; Doblas, Manuel

    2012-12-01

    Transfemoral carotid artery stenting (CAS) has been associated with a high incidence of embolic phenomena and silent brain infarction. The goal of this study was to compare the incidence of new ischemic cerebral lesions on diffusion-perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences after transcervical CAS performed with carotid flow reversal vs stenting via transfemoral approach with distal filter protection. During a 26-month period, 64 consecutive patients diagnosed with significant carotid stenosis by ultrasound imaging were assigned to transcervical CAS with carotid flow reversal or a transfemoral approach with a distal filter. The Rankin stroke scale was administered by an independent neurologist, and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) studies were performed ≤24 hours before and ≤24 to 48 hours after the procedure. DW-MRI studies were compared by two neuroradiologists not involved in the study and blinded for time, clinical status, and treatment option. Hyperintense DW-MRI signals found after the procedure were interpreted as postoperative ischemic infarcts. All patients were assessed at 1, 6, and 12 months after the intervention. The distribution of demographic and pathologic variables was similar in both groups. All procedures were technically successful, with a mean carotid flow reversal time of 22 minutes. Twenty-one (70%) and 23 patients (69.69%) were symptomatic in the transcervical and transfemoral groups, respectively (P=.869). After intervention, new postprocedural DW-MRI ischemic infarcts were found in four transcervical (12.9%) and in 11 transfemoral (33.3%) patients (P=.03), without new neurologic symptoms. No major adverse events occurred at 30 days after the intervention. All patients remained neurologically intact, without an increase in stroke scale scoring. All stents remained patent, and all patients remained stroke-free during follow-up. In multivariate analysis, age (relative risk [RR], 1.022; Pfilter. The transcervical approach with

  11. Assessing the Early Response of Advanced Cervical Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Using Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging:A Pilot Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Chun Wang; Dao-Yu Hu; Xue-Mei Hu; Ya-Qi Shen; Xiao-Yan Meng; Hao Tang; Zhen Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model has shown promising results for providing both diffusion and perfusion information in cervical cancer;however,its use to predict and monitor the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in cervical cancer is relatively rare.The study aimed to evaluate the use of DWI with IVIM and monoexponential models to predict and monitor the efficacy of NACT in cervical cancer.Methods:Forty-two patients with primary cervical cancer underwent magnetic resonance exams at 3 time points (pre-NACT,3 weeks after the first NACT cycle,and 3 weeks after the second NACT cycle).The response to treatment was determined according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors 3 weeks after the second NACT treatment,and the subjects were classified as two groups:responders and nonresponders groups.The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC),true diffusion coefficient (D),perfusion-related pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*),and perfusion fraction (f) values were determined.The differences in IVIM-derived variables and ADC between the different groups at the different time points were calculated using an independent samples t-test.Results:The D and ADC values were all significantly higher for the responders than for the nonresponders at all 3 time points,but no significant differences were observed in the D* and f values.An analysis of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated that a D value threshold <0.93 × 10-3 mm2/s and an ADC threshold <1.11 × 10-3 mm2/s could differentiate responders from nonresponders at pre-NACT time point,yielding area under the curve (AUC) of which were 0.771 and 0.806,respectively.The ROC indicated that the AUCs of D and ADC at the 3 weeks after the first NACT cycle and 3 weeks after the second NACT cycle were 0.823,0.763,and 0.787,0.794,respectively.The AUC values of D and ADC at these 3 time points were not significantly different (P =0

  12. Comparison of computed tomographic urography, magnetic resonance urography and the combination of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guang-yu; Lu, Qing; Wu, Lian-ming [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Zhang, Jin [Department of Urinary Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Chen, Xiao-xi [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Xu, Jian-rong, E-mail: renjixujr@163.com [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of computed tomographic urography (CTU), static-fluid magnetic resonance urography (static-fluid MRU) and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Material and Methods: Between January 2010 and June 2011, patients with suspected UUT cancer underwent CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) within a 1-week period. The diagnostic performances of CTU, static-fluid MRU and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI for upper urinary tract cancer were prospectively evaluated. The ureteroscopic and histopathologic findings were compared with the imaging findings. Results: Compared to static-fluid MRU alone (sensitivity: 76/75%, reader 1/reader 2), combining DWI with MRI can increase the sensitivity (sensitivity: 84/84%, p = 0.031/p = 0.016) of upper urinary tract cancer diagnosis. CTU had greater sensitivity (95/94%) and accuracy (92/91%) than both static-fluid MRU (sensitivity: p < 0.001/p < 0.001 and accuracy: 83/81%, p = 0.001/p < 0.001) and static-fluid MRU with DWI (sensitivity: p = 0.023/p = 0.039 and accuracy: 87/85%, p = 0.042/p = 0.049) for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancers. Compared with CTU alone, CTU with DWI did not significantly increase sensitivity, specificity or accuracy. However, the diagnostic confidence was improved when the combined technique was used (p = 0.031/p = 0.024). Moreover, there was no significant change in sensitivity, specificity, accuracy or diagnostic confidence when static-fluid MRU was used in combination with CTU and DWI. Conclusion: Although there is a potential role for static-fluid MRU and static-fluid MRU with DWI in urinary tract imaging, CTU is still the better choice for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Combining DWI with CTU can help improve confidence in upper urinary tract cancer diagnoses.

  13. Liver metastases from colorectal cancer treated with conventional and antiangiogenetic chemotherapy: evaluation with liver computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzidei, Michele; Napoli, Alessandro; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Cartocci, Gaia; Saba, Luca; Menichini, Guendalina; Cavallo Marincola, Beatrice; Marincola, Beatrice Cavallo; Marotta, Eugenio; Di Mare, Luisa; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine whether perfusion computed tomography (CT-p) and magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (MR-DWI) can allow evaluation of the effects of chemotherapy combined with antiangiogenetic treatment on liver metastases in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and to determine if changes in CT-p and MR-DWI correlate with the response to therapy as assessed by conventional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Eighteen patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer underwent CT-p and MR-DWI before and 6 months after chemotherapy and antiangiogenetic treatment. Lesions were classified according to RECIST criteria (complete response [CR], partial response [PR], stable disease [SD], and progressive disease) and calculations of CT-p parameters including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), capillary permeability (CP), and MR-DWI apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were performed; RECIST, CT-p, and MR-DWI measurements at baseline and follow-up were tested for statistically significant differences using the paired-samples t test. Baseline and follow-up perfusion parameters of the lesions were also compared on the basis of therapy response assessed by RECIST criteria using independent-samples t test. P < 0.05 was considered indicative of a statistically significant difference for all statistical test. Six patients (6/18; 33.3%) were classified as PR (), and the remaining 12 (12/18; 66.7%) were classified as SD. On a per-lesion basis, 2 (2/32; 6.3%) cannot be identified at follow-up, 6 (6/32; 18.8%) showed a decrease in size of more than 30%, and 24 (24/32; 75%) were substantially stable in size. No cases of progressive disease were demonstrated at follow-up. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated between PR, CR, and SD lesions for BF (P = 0.19), BV (P = 0.14), and ADC (P = 0.68) measurements, whereas CP was significantly higher in CR and PR lesions (P = 0.038). Considering

  14. Diagnostic value of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for detection of primary and metastatic malignancies: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: lllb146@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Li, Qiong [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Nie, Wei [Department of Respiratory Disease, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu, Shiyuan, E-mail: lsy20112077@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (WB-DWI) technique in detection of primary and metastatic malignancies compared with that of whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (WB-PET/CT). Materials and methods: Search Pubmed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library database from January 1984 to July 2013 for studies comparing WB-DWI with WB-PET/CT for detection of primary and metastatic malignancies. Methodological quality was assessed by the quality assessment of diagnostic studies (QUADAS) instrument. Sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and areas under the summary receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated. Potential threshold effect, heterogeneity and publication bias were investigated. Result: Thirteen eligible studies were included, with a total of 1067 patients. There was no significant threshold effect. WB-DWI had a similar AUC (0.966 (95% CI, 0.940–0.992) versus 0.984 (95% CI, 0.965–0.999)) with WB-PET/CT. No significant difference was detected between AUC of WB-DWI and WB-PET/CT. WB-DWI had a pooled sensitivity of 0.897 (95% CI, 0.876–0.916) and a pooled specificity of 0.954 (95% CI, 0.944–0.962). WB-PET/CT had a pooled sensitivity of 0.895 (95% CI, 0.865–0.920) and a pooled specificity of 0.975 (95% CI, 0.966–0.981). Heterogeneity was found to stem primarily from data type (per lesion versus per patient), MR sequence (DWIBS only and DWIBS with other sequence), and primary lesion type (single type and multiple type). The Deeks's funnel plots suggested the absence of publication bias. Conclusion: WB-DWI has similar, good diagnostic performance for the detection of primary and metastatic malignancies compared with WB-PET/CT. DWIBS with other MR sequences could further improve the diagnostic performance. More high-quality studies regarding comparison of WB-DWI and WB

  15. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of septic sacroiliitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, K. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Saifuddin, A. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Coral, A. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Butt, W.P. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-01

    Five cases of septic sacroiliitis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are presented. Imaging was performed between 2 and 14 days after onset of symptoms and consisted of varying combinations of coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), axial T2-weighted spin echo (SE), and coronal and axial pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted SE scans. Abnormalities included demonstration of sacroiliac joint effusions, bone oedema and adjacent inflammation as high signal on STIR and T2-weighted SE scans, and identification of abscesses in two cases as rim-enhancing lesions anterior to the joint on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted SE scans. The role of MRI and other forms of imaging in septic sacroiliitis is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  18. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  19. Decoding suprathreshold stochastic resonance with optimal weights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liyan, E-mail: xuliyan@qdu.edu.cn [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Vladusich, Tony [Computational and Theoretical Neuroscience Laboratory, Institute for Telecommunications Research, School of Information Technology and Mathematical Sciences, University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Duan, Fabing [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Gunn, Lachlan J.; Abbott, Derek [Centre for Biomedical Engineering (CBME) and School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); McDonnell, Mark D. [Computational and Theoretical Neuroscience Laboratory, Institute for Telecommunications Research, School of Information Technology and Mathematical Sciences, University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Centre for Biomedical Engineering (CBME) and School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2015-10-09

    We investigate an array of stochastic quantizers for converting an analog input signal into a discrete output in the context of suprathreshold stochastic resonance. A new optimal weighted decoding is considered for different threshold level distributions. We show that for particular noise levels and choices of the threshold levels optimally weighting the quantizer responses provides a reduced mean square error in comparison with the original unweighted array. However, there are also many parameter regions where the original array provides near optimal performance, and when this occurs, it offers a much simpler approach than optimally weighting each quantizer's response. - Highlights: • A weighted summing array of independently noisy binary comparators is investigated. • We present an optimal linearly weighted decoding scheme for combining the comparator responses. • We solve for the optimal weights by applying least squares regression to simulated data. • We find that the MSE distortion of weighting before summation is superior to unweighted summation of comparator responses. • For some parameter regions, the decrease in MSE distortion due to weighting is negligible.

  20. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  1. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  2. Unusual Presentation of Popliteal Cyst on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Popliteal cyst commonly presents as an ellipsoid mass with uniform low signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Here, we describe a popliteal cyst with unusual appearance on magnetic resonance imaging, including heterogeneous intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Arthroscopic cyst decompression revealed that the cyst was filled with necrotic synovial villi, indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthroscopic enlargement of unidirectional valvular slits with synovectomy was useful for the final diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  4. Technical aspects of magnetic resonance imaging in parathyroid gland lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmingsson, A.; Ericsson, A.; Ljunghall, S.; Juhlin, C.; Jung, B.; Rastad, J.; Thuomas, K.A.; Akerstroem, G.

    Two patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were examined before parathyroid surgery with magnetic resonance imaging at 0.35 telsa in order to analyse optimal methods of visualization. Two large parathyroid glands in the neck had long transverse relaxation times which rendered them clearly visible in T2-weighted images as structures of a signal intensity higher than that of the surrounding. Large parathyroid lesions may thus be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging provided proper examination parameters are employed.

  5. Magnetic resonance methods in fetal neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailath-Pokorny, M; Kasprian, G; Mitter, C; Schöpf, V; Nemec, U; Prayer, D

    2012-10-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established clinical adjunct for the in-vivo evaluation of human brain development. Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied with MRI from the 18th week of gestation to term and relies primarily on T2-weighted sequences. Recently diffusion-weighted sequences have gained importance in the structural assessment of the fetal brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides quantitative information about water motion and tissue microstructure and has applications for both developmental and destructive brain processes. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques, such as spectroscopy, might be used to demonstrate metabolites that are involved in brain maturation, though their development is still in the early stages. Using fetal MRI in addition to prenatal ultrasound, morphological, metabolic, and functional assessment of the fetus can be achieved. The latter is not only based on observation of fetal movements as an indirect sign of activity of the fetal brain but also on direct visualization of fetal brain activity, adding a new component to fetal neurology. This article provides an overview of the MRI methods used for fetal neurologic evaluation, focusing on normal and abnormal early brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  7. Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João Lopes; Pina, João Magalhães; João, Raquel; Fialho, Joana; Carmo, Sandra; Leal, Cecília; Bilhim, Tiago; Marques, Rui Mateus; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 weighted-imaging and at least two functional techniques, which include dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy. Although the combined use of a pelvic phased-array and an endorectal coil is considered the state-of-the-art for magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of prostate cancer, endorectal coil is only absolute mandatory for magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Sensitivity and specificity levels in cancer detection and localization have been improving with functional technique implementation, compared to T2 weighted-imaging alone. It has been particularly useful to evaluate patients with abnormal PSA and negative biopsy. Moreover, the information added by the functional techniques may correlate to cancer aggressiveness and therefore be useful to select patients for focal radiotherapy, prostate sparing surgery, focal ablative therapy and active surveillance. However, more studies are needed to compare the functional techniques and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This article reviews the basic principles of prostatic mp-magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing its role on detection, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer.

  8. Feasibility of 3.0 T diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery of rats with complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging is a sensitive way to reflect axonal necrosis and degeneration, glial cell regeneration and demyelination following spinal cord injury, and to display microstructure changes in the spinal cord in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging technology is a sensitive method to diagnose spinal cord injury fiber tractography visualizes the white matter fibers, and directly displays the structural integrity and resultant damage of the fiber bundle. At present, diffusion tensor imaging is restricted to brain examinations, and is rarely applied in the evaluation of spinal cord injury. This study aimed to explore the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and the feasibility of diffusion tensor tractography in the evaluation of complete spinal cord injury in rats. The results showed that the average combined scores were obviously decreased after spinal cord transection in rats, and then began to increase over time. The fractional anisotropy scores after spinal cord transection in rats were significantly lower than those in normal rats (P <0.05 the apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly increased compared with the normal group (P < 0.05. Following spinal cord transection, fractional anisotropy scores were negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient values (r = -0.856, P < 0.01, and positively correlated with the average combined scores (r = 0.943, P < 0.01, while apparent diffusion coefficient values had a negative correlation with the average combined scores (r = -0.949, P < 0.01. Experimental findings suggest that, as a non-invasive examination, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging can provide qualitative and quantitative information about spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy score and apparent diffusion coefficient have a good correlation with the average combined scores, which reflect functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  9. Feasibility of 3.0 T diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery of rats with complete spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duo Zhang; Xiao-hui Li; Xu Zhai; Xi-jing He

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is a sensitive way to reflect axonal necrosis and degeneration, glial cell regeneration and demyelination following spinal cord injury, and to display microstructure changes in the spinal cordin vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging technology is a sensitive method to diagnose spinal cord injury; ifber tractography visualizes the white matter ifbers, and directly displays the structural integrity and resultant damage of the ifber bundle. At present, diffusion tensor imaging is restricted to brain examinations, and is rarely applied in the evaluation of spinal cord injury. This study aimed to explore the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefifcient of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and the feasibility of diffusion tensor tractography in the evaluation of complete spinal cord injury in rats. The results showed that the average combined scores were obviously decreased after spinal cord transection in rats, and then began to increase over time. The fractional anisotropy scores after spinal cord transection in rats were signiifcantly lower than those in normal rats (P < 0.05); the apparent diffusion coefifcient was signiifcantly increased compared with the normal group (P < 0.05). Following spinal cord transection, fractional anisotropy scores were negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefifcient values (r = –0.856,P < 0.01), and positively correlated with the average combined scores (r= 0.943,P < 0.01), while apparent diffusion coefifcient values had a negative correlation with the average combined scores (r = –0.949,P < 0.01). Experimental ifndings suggest that, as a non-invasive examination, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging can provide qualita-tive and quantitative information about spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy score and apparent diffusion coefifcient have a good correlation with the average combined scores, which relfect functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  10. T2-weighted hypointense lesions within prostate gland: Differential diagnosis using wash-in rate parameter on the basis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging-Hystopatology correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Anna Lia, E-mail: alvalentini@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Gui, Benedetta, E-mail: bgui@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Cina, Alessandro, E-mail: acina@sirm.org [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Pinto, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.pinto@libero.it [Department of Surgical Sciences, Institute of Urology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Totaro, Angelo, E-mail: dr.atotaro@gmail.com [Department of Surgical Sciences, Institute of Urology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Pierconti, Francesco, E-mail: francescopierconti@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Pathology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Bassi, Pier Francesco, E-mail: bassipf@gmail.com [Department of Surgical Sciences, Institute of Urology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo, E-mail: lbonomo@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Background and aims: Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance improves prostate cancer detection. The aims of this paper are to verify whether wash-in-rate parameter (speed of contrast uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance) can help to differentiate prostate cancer from non-neoplastic T2-weighted hypointense lesions within prostate gland and to assess a cut-off for prostate cancer diagnosis. Methods: Prospective, monocentric, multi-departmental study. Thirty consecutive patients underwent T2-weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance, and re-biopsy. T2-weighted hypointense lesions, >5 mm in size, were noted. Lesions were assessed as cancerous (showing mass effect, or no defined margin within transitional zone) and non cancerous (no mass effect) and were compared with histopathology by 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 tables. Wash-in-rate of each lesion was calculated and was correlated with histopathology. Student's t-test was adopted to assess significant differences. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to identify the best cut-off for wash-in-rate in detecting prostate cancer. Results: At re-biopsy, cancer was proven in 43% of patients. On T2-weighted MRI, 111 hypointense lesions {>=}5 mm in size were found. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of T2-weighted MRI were 80% ({+-}12.4 CI 95%), 74.6% ({+-}10.1 CI 95%), and 76.5% ({+-}7.9 CI 95%), respectively. Mean WR was 5.8 {+-} 1.9/s for PCa zones and 2.96 {+-} 1.44/s for non-PCa zones (p < 0.00000001). At ROC analysis, the best area under curve (AUC) for wash-in-rate parameter was associated to 4.2/s threshold with 82.5% sensitivity (CI {+-} 7.07), 97.2% specificity (CI {+-} 4.99) and 91.2% accuracy (CI {+-} 5.27). Eighteen false positive lesions on T2-weighted MRI showed low wash-in-rate values suggesting non-cancer lesions, while in 5/8 false negative cases high wash-in-rate values correctly suggested prostate cancer. Nine lesions with surgically proven

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  12. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of brain diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging comparison with 1.5 T and 3.0 T units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    DWI of biological effects are independent of magnetic field strength in various regions. High field strength, however, does affect the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and artifacts of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) images, which ultimately will influence the quantitative of diffusion imaging . In this study, the effects of field strength on DWI are reviewed. The effects of the diseases also are discussed. Comparing DWI in cerebellum, WM, GM, Hyperacute region measurements both as a function of field strength (1.5 T and 3.0 T). Overall, the SNR of the DWI roughly doubled going from 1.5 T to 3.0 T. In summary, DWI studies at 3.0 T is provided significantly improved DWI measurements relative to studies at 1.5 T.

  13. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.H.; Nathanson, J.A.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.; Lownie, S.P.

    1995-06-01

    In order to demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the brain in patients with clinical brain death, high-field MRI was performed on 5 patients using conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted imaging. The study showed MRI exhibited similar features for all of the patients, features which were not found in MRI of comatose patients who were not clinically brain dead. It was stated that up to now the most important limitation in MRI of patients with suspected brain death has been the extreme difficulty of moving them out of the intensive care setting. If this problem can be overcome, and it appears possible with with the advent of MRI-compatible ventilators and noninvasive monitoring, MRI could become an excellent alternative for confirming clinical diagnosis of brain death for such patients. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buff, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, C. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); MacMathuana, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gilligan, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ennis, J.T. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  16. Rotational characteristics in the resonance state of the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetic bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morii, Y.; Sukedai, M. [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Ohashi, S., E-mail: ohashi@kansai-u.ac.jp [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The hybrid magnetic bearing has been developed. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller. Influence of the vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state is large. The resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system. The hybrid magnetic bearing using permanent magnets and the high-Tc bulk superconductor (HTSC) has been developed. Repulsive force of the permanent magnet is introduced to increase the load weight of the magnetic bearing. Effect of the hybrid system has been shown. In this paper, influence of the hybrid system on the dynamic characteristics of the rotor is studied. The rotational characteristics in the mechanical resonance state are studied, and the equivalent magnetic spring coefficient is estimated from the experimental results of the load weight. The resonance frequency is measured by the rotation experiments. The rotor achieves stable levitation even in the resonance state. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller than that of the lateral force generated by the repulsive force between the two permanent magnets at the smaller air gap. Thus influence of the lateral vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state becomes larger at a smaller air gap. The equivalent magnetic spring coefficient becomes also small, and the resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in parasinus mucocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Watanabe, Yoshihiro (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-07-01

    We evaluated the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 9 cases of parasinus mucocele. The series included frontal mucocele 1 case, frontal and anterior ethmoidal mucocele 3 cases, anterior mucocele 2 cases, posterior ethmoidal mucocele 2 cases, and maxillary mucocele 1 case. MRI was performed with proton density P (300), inversion recovery IR (1000, 350), and spin echo SE (1000, 60/90) with 0.1 tesla resistive conducting system, or with T/sub 1/-weighted SE (440, 40), IR (1500, 500) and T/sub 2/-weighted SE (1500, 500) with 0.5 tesla superconducting system. We obtained images of variable intensities when employing P, IR and T/sub 1/-weighted SE imaging. It was possible to differentiate mucocele from normal orbital tissue by comparison with T/sub 2/-weighted imaging. All the 9 cases manifested a high intensity of T/sub 2/-weighted images. The findings were suggestive of a possibility to verify the content to parasinus cysts by MRI findings. (author).

  18. Interleaving Gradient Magnetic Field Method for Diffusion Weighted Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Song; ZU Zhong-Liang; BAO Shang-Lian

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy(DWS)has considerable potential in clinical and research applications.However.it is seldom implemented in conventional magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)scanners due to the strict hardware requirements.We propose an interleaving gradient magnetic field(IGMF)method based on point resolved spectroscopy(PRESS).Four interlaced powerful diffusion sensitive gradient magnetic fields are positioned around the two πrefocusing rf pulses in the PRESS sequence.This method utilizes the interval time in the PRESS pulse sequence,doubles the duration time of the diffusion sensitive gradient magnetic field and decreases the detrimental effect of the induced eddy current.The results of theoretical analysis and experimental observation demonstrate that the IGMF method is suitable for conventional MRI scanners.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee [Koear Advanced Institute of Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-02-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected.

  20. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis value of magnetic resonance imaging in autoimmune pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪建华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnosis and differential diagnosis value of multi-sequences magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)in autoimmune pancreatitis(AIP).Methods The MRI data of twelve AIP patients were retrospectively analyzed.The sequences of MRI included T1-weighted imaging,T2-weighted imaging,magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography(MRCP),diffusionweighted imaging(DWI)and dynamic enhancement ima-

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  2. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  3. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Poddubny, Alexander N; Raaijmakers, AJE; van den Berg, CAT; Kozachenko, Alexander V; Dubrovina, Irina A; Melchakova, Irina V; Kivshar, Yuri S; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    It is revealed that the unique properties of ultrathin metasurface resonators can improve magnetic resonance imaging dramatically. A metasurface formed when an array of metallic wires is placed inside a scanner under the studied object and a substantial enhancement of the radio-frequency magnetic

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  7. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  8. Meduloblastoma: correlação entre ressonância magnética convencional, difusão e espectroscopia de prótons Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Vieira de Melo da Fonte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Correlacionar os achados de ressonância magnética convencional, difusão e espectroscopia de prótons nos meduloblastomas, e compará-los aos dados da literatura. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Análise retrospectiva de exames de ressonância magnética pré-operatórios de nove pacientes na faixa pediátrica com diagnóstico histológico de meduloblastoma (oito desmoplásicos e um de células gigantes. Foram considerados dados demográficos e características do tumor como localização, característica morfológica, intensidade de sinal, realce, disseminação e achados na difusão e espectroscopia. RESULTADOS: Na maioria dos casos os tumores apresentaram epicentro no vermis cerebelar (77,8%, sendo predominantemente sólido (88,9%, com hipossinal nas seqüências ponderadas em T1 e iso/hipersinal nas seqüências ponderadas em T2 e FLAIR, realce heterogêneo (100%, sinais de disseminação/extensão tumoral (77,8% e restrição à movimentação das moléculas de água (100%. A espectroscopia de prótons pela técnica STEAM (n = 6 demonstrou redução da relação Naa/Cr (83,3% e aumento de Co/Cr (100% e mI/Cr (66,7%, e pela técnica PRESS (n = 7 evidenciou pico de lactato (57,1%. CONCLUSÃO: O conjunto dos achados macroscópicos obtidos pela ressonância magnética, somado às características bioquímicas dos meduloblastomas, têm sido úteis na tentativa de diferenciação entre os principais tumores da fossa posterior.OBJECTIVE: To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics

  9. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cervical Lymphadenopathy: Report of Three Cases of Patients with Bartonella henselae Infection Mimicking Malignant Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenzel, D.; Gaa, J.; Rummeny, E. J.; Holzapfel, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)); Duetsch, S.; Fauser, C. (Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)); Slotta-Huspenina, J. (Dept. of Pathology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany))

    2009-10-15

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is a potential technique for differentiation between benign and malignant lymph nodes. However, lymphadenopathy caused by Bartonella henselae infection shows low ADC values in diffusion weighted MRI as typically seen in malignant disease.

  10. Gluconeogenesis, liver energy metabolism and weight loss in lung cancer : dynamic studies using stable isotope tracers and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Leij-Halfwerk (Susanne)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWeight loss is a major problem in many types of cancer and is associated with reduced quality of life and a poor prognosis. Weight loss can also interfere with potentially curable treatment [41,561. Many uncertainties remain about the mechanisms underlying weight loss in patients with ca

  11. Gluconeogenesis, liver energy metabolism and weight loss in lung cancer : dynamic studies using stable isotope tracers and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Leij-Halfwerk (Susanne)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWeight loss is a major problem in many types of cancer and is associated with reduced quality of life and a poor prognosis. Weight loss can also interfere with potentially curable treatment [41,561. Many uncertainties remain about the mechanisms underlying weight loss in patients with

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinig, J.W.; Doppmann, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the adrenals was performed on 50 subjects: 5 normal volunteers, 6 Cushing patients with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, 14 patients with adrenal adenomas, 3 with adrenal carcinomas, 15 with pheochromocytomas and 7 with metastatic disease to the adrenal. The normal and hyperplastic adrenal glands were imaged in all cases. Using the signal intensity of the adrenals on a T2 weighted image, various forms of adrenal pathology could be differentiated. A ratio of signal intensity of the adrenal mass to the liver was utilized and allowed the differentitaion of adrenal adenomas from adrenal carcinomas, pheochromocytomas and metastases. Using the same ratio, metastases could be distinguished from pheochromocytomas as well. MRI appears to be particularly valuable in distinguishing clinically silent adrenal metastases from nonfunctioning adrenal adenomas.

  13. Magnetic resonance urography by virtual reality modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Navid; Sangild, Thomas; Terkildsen, Søren Vorre; Deding, Dorthe; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a 3D visualization of the urinary tract by a novel virtual reality approach, and to evaluate the usefulness of this method for papillary classification as compared with 2D urogram obtained by maximum intensity projection (MIP). In one healthy pig, magnetic resonance urography was performed using a T1-weighted 3D gradient echo pulse sequence. Post-processing was performed by means of an MIP algorithm and by using 3D virtual reality modelling, followed by manual classification of papillae as being either simple or compound. The 2D MIP urogram demonstrated 6 simple and 6 compound papillae, whereas the 3D urogram demonstrated 5 simple and 7 compound papillae. In both urograms, some papillae were unsuccessfully classified. The possibility of using virtual reality devices allowed 3D rotation and offered additional diagnostic information. However, further studies should reveal its feasibility in diseased kidneys.

  14. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging using different b-value combinations for the evaluation of treatment results after volumetric MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikink, Marlijne E.; Voogt, Marianne J.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Nijenhuis, Robbert J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keserci, Bilgin [Samsung Medical Center, High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Philips Healthcare, Advanced Science and Development, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-sun [Samsung Medical Center, High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Medical Center, Sunkyunkwan University, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vincken, Koen L.; Bartels, Lambertus W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess the value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping using different b-value combinations for treatment evaluation after magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) of uterine fibroids. Fifty-six patients with 67 uterine fibroids were treated with volumetric MR-HIFU. Pre-treatment and post-treatment images were obtained using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1WI) and DWI using b = 0, 200, 400, 600, 800 s/mm{sup 2}. ADC maps were generated using subsets of b-values to investigate the effects of tissue ablation on water diffusion and perfusion in fibroids treated with MR-HIFU. Four combinations of b-values were used: (1) all b-values; (2) b = 0, 200 s/mm{sup 2}; (3) b = 400, 600, 800 s/mm{sup 2}; and (4) b = 0, 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Using the lowest b-values (0 and 200 s/mm{sup 2}), the mean ADC value in the ablated tissue reduced significantly (p < 0.001) compared with baseline. Calculating the ADC value with the highest b-values (400, 600, 800 s/mm{sup 2}), the ADC increased significantly (p < 0.001) post-treatment. ADC maps calculated with the lowest b-values resulted in the best visual agreement of non-perfused fibroid tissue detected on CE images. Other b-value combinations and normal myometrium showed no difference in ADC after MR-HIFU treatment. A decrease in contrast agent uptake within the ablated region on CE-T1WI was correlated to a significantly decreased ADC when b = 0 and 200 s/mm{sup 2} were used. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Tomography of tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M. (Montreal Neurological Inst., Quebec (Canada))

    1983-10-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography.

  16. Aortic dissection: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparo, E G; Higgins, C B; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R

    1985-05-01

    Fifteen patients with suspected or known aortic dissection were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR). Thirteen of these patients were eventually shown to have dissection. In most instances the diagnosis was established by aortography and/or computed tomography (CT) prior to the MR study. Surgical proof (6/13) and/or aortographic proof (10/13) were available in 11/13 patients with aortic dissection. MR demonstrated the intimal flap and determined whether the dissection was type A or type B. In addition, MR: differentiated between the true and false lumens; determined the origins of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries from the true or false lumen in the cases where the dissection extended into the abdominal aorta (8/12); allowed post-surgical surveillance of the dissection; and identified aortoannular ectasia in the three patients who had Marfan syndrome. In addition to the 13 cases with dissection, there were two cases in whom the diagnosis of dissection was excluded by MR. Our early experience suggests that MR can serve as the initial imaging test in clinically suspected cases of aortic dissection and that the information provided by MR is sufficient to manage many cases. Additionally, MR obviates the use of iodinated contrast media.

  17. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  18. High-resolution heavily T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of the pituitary stalk in children with ectopic neurohypophysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanharawi, Imane El; Tzarouchi, Loukia [Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Cardoen, Liesbeth [Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Martinerie, Laetitia; Leger, Juliane; Carel, Jean-Claude [Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Inserm U1141, DHU PROTECT, Paris (France); Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service d' Endocrinologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Elmaleh-Berges, Monique [Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Inserm U1141, DHU PROTECT, Paris (France); Alison, Marianne [Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Inserm U1141, DHU PROTECT, Paris (France)

    2017-05-15

    In anterior pituitary deficiency, patients with non visible pituitary stalk have more often multiple deficiencies and persistent deficiency than patients with visible pituitary stalk. To compare the diagnostic value of a high-resolution heavily T2-weighted sequence to 1.5-mm-thick unenhanced and contrast-enhanced sagittal T1-weighted sequences to assess the presence of the pituitary stalk in children with ectopic posterior pituitary gland. We retrospectively evaluated the MRI data of 14 children diagnosed with ectopic posterior pituitary gland between 2010 and 2014. We evaluated the presence of a pituitary stalk using a sagittal high-resolution heavily T2-weighted sequence and a 1.5-mm sagittal T1-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence before and after contrast medium administration. A pituitary stalk was present on at least one of the sequences in 10 of the 14 children (71%). T2-weighted sequence depicted the pituitary stalk in all 10 children, whereas the 1.5-mm-thick T1-weighted sequence depicted 2/10 (20%) before contrast injection and 8/10 (80%) after contrast injection (P=0.007). Compared with 1.5-mm-thick contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences, high-resolution heavily T2-weighted sequence demonstrates better sensitivity in detecting the pituitary stalk in children with ectopic posterior pituitary gland, suggesting that contrast injection is unnecessary to assess the presence of a pituitary stalk in this setting. (orig.)

  19. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  20. Characteristics of a Lorentzian to Gaussian transformation function as a weighting function in processing the two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of a drug-phosphatidylcholine vesicles solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    黒田, 義弘; 藤原, 靖弘; 斉藤, 雅子; 新宮, 徹朗

    1988-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of a Lorentzian to Gaussian trans formation function, which has been commonly employed in enhancing the resolution of two-timensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I-131 Therapy Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  3. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- ..... this study, it is important to note that there were distinct differences in the .... Applications of MRS in the. 13. evaluation ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  5. Rotational characteristics in the resonance state of the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morii, Y.; Sukedai, M.; Ohashi, S.

    2011-11-01

    The hybrid magnetic bearing using permanent magnets and the high-Tc bulk superconductor (HTSC) has been developed. Repulsive force of the permanent magnet is introduced to increase the load weight of the magnetic bearing. Effect of the hybrid system has been shown. In this paper, influence of the hybrid system on the dynamic characteristics of the rotor is studied. The rotational characteristics in the mechanical resonance state are studied, and the equivalent magnetic spring coefficient is estimated from the experimental results of the load weight. The resonance frequency is measured by the rotation experiments. The rotor achieves stable levitation even in the resonance state. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller than that of the lateral force generated by the repulsive force between the two permanent magnets at the smaller air gap. Thus influence of the lateral vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state becomes larger at a smaller air gap. The equivalent magnetic spring coefficient becomes also small, and the resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system.

  6. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  7. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  8. Torque-mixing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob; Compton, Shawn; Hiebert, Wayne; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory; Thomson, Douglas; Freeman, Mark

    A universal, mechanical torque method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by induction, a signal proportional to the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured as a pure mechanical torque in broadband, frequency-swept spectroscopy. Comprehensive electron spin resonance of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature are presented to demonstrate the method. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex 3D spin textures.

  9. Renal relevant radiology: renal functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Behzad; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O

    2014-02-01

    Because of its noninvasive nature and provision of quantitative measures of a wide variety of physiologic parameters, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows great potential for research and clinical applications. Over the past decade, application of functional MRI extended beyond detection of cerebral activity, and techniques for abdominal functional MRI evolved. Assessment of renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, interstitial diffusion, and parenchymal oxygenation turned this modality into an essential research and potentially diagnostic tool. Variations in many renal physiologic markers can be detected using functional MRI before morphologic changes become evident in anatomic magnetic resonance images. Moreover, the framework of functional MRI opened a window of opportunity to develop novel pathophysiologic markers. This article reviews applications of some well validated functional MRI techniques, including perfusion, diffusion-weighted imaging, and blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, as well as some emerging new techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography, which might evolve into clinically useful tools.

  10. Adult-to-adult right lobe living donor liver transplantation: Comparison of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with standard T2-weighted magnetic resonance cholangiography for evaluation of donor biliary anatomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perdita Wietzke-Braun; Felix Braun; Dieter Müller; Thomas Lorf; Burckhardt Ringe; Giuliano Ramadori

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare the value of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and standard T2-weighted magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in the evaluation process as adult-to-adult right lobe living donor liver transplantation (LDLTx) demands a successful outcome, and exact knowledge of the biliary tree is implicated to avoid biliary complications,postoperatively.METHODS: After starting the LDLTx program, 18 liver transplant candidates were selected for LDLTx by a stepwise evaluation process. ERC and standard T2-weighted MRC were performed to evaluate the biliary system of the donor liver. The anatomical findings of ERC and MRC mapping were compared usingthe Ohkubo classification.RESULTS: ERC allowed mapping of the whole biliary system in 15/15 (100%) cases, including 14/15 (93.3%)with biliary variants while routine MRC was only accurate in 2/13 (15.4%) cases. MRC was limited in depicting the biliary system proximal of the hepatic bifurcation.Postoperative biliary complications occurred in 2 donors and 8 recipients. Biliary complications were associated with Ohkubo type C, E or G in 6/8 recipients, and 2/3recipients with biliary leak received a graft with multiple (≥2) bile ducts.CONCLUSION: Pretransplant ERC is safe and superior over standard MRC for detection of biliary variations that occur with a high frequency. However, precise knowledge of biliary variants did not reduce the incidence of postoperative biliary complications.

  11. Mn-DPDP enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance cholangiography: usefulness in the diagnosis and roadmap for the treatment of intrahepatic choIedochoIithiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Suk; Kim, Ki Whang; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Ha, Hyun Kwon [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-01

    To assess the preliminary findings of Mn-enhanced T1-weighted MR cholangiography for the evaluation of intrahepatic choledocholithiasis. Seven patients with recurrent pyogenic cholangitis underwent conventional heavily T2-weighted and manganese-enhanced T1-weighted MR cholangiography. For the former, the two reviewers focused on intrahepatic ductal dilatation, calculi, and stricture; and for the latter, ductal enhancement. In seven patients, 13 diseased segments were depicted and intrahepatic bile ductal dilatation was present in all 13 of these in all seven patients. Calculi were present in eight segments in six patients, and stricture in four segments in three patients. Of the 13 diseased segmental ducts, six were seen at manganese-enhanced imaging to be filled with contrast material, suggesting a functioning bile duct. Combined T2-weighted and mangafodipir trisodium-enhanced T1-weighted MR cholangiography provides both anatomic detail and functional detail of the biliary system. Combined MR cholangiography is useful for the evaluation of intrahepatic choledocholithiasis, demonstrating the stricture and function of the segmental ducts involved.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author).

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic periventricular leukomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Nobuaki; Nomura, Junko; Nowatari, Masahiko; Ohta, Takeo; Kamohara, Takashi; Yashiro, Kimio (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    A study was performed to assess the values of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluation and the follow up of patients with cystic periventricular leukomalacia. Ten patients selected for MR imaging were diagnosed as having periventricular cystic lesions based on US scans. The range of gestational ages was 27 to 32 weeks, and the range of birth weights was 927 to 2,046 g. Twenty MR examinations were carried out using a 0.5 T superconducting system (Resona; Yokogawa). On the first MR examinations, taken by 6 months of age, low signal intensity lesions within the periventricular white matter, moderate ventriculomegaly with irregularity of the ventricular wall and delayed myelination were observed. These were the MR findings observed in the subacute stage of PVL. On the second or the third MR examinations, taken after 12 months of age, increased signal intensity in periventricular white matter on T{sub 2} weighted images decreased volume of periventricular white matter and centrum semiovale and the ventriculomagaly with irregularity of ventricular wall were observed. However, progressions of myelination were proved to be not delayed in comparison with age matched controls. These were thought to be the MR findings of late stage of PVL. As the US findings of PVL have good correlation with pathologic changes revealed at autopsy, MR imaging can depict myelination and detect PVL lesion beyond the neonatal period. These observations demonstrate the value of the MR imaging for the follow up of the patients with PVL beyond the time of fontanel closure. (author).

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in retropharyngeal tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekbon, K.; Annell, K.; Traeff, J.; Torhall, J. (Soeder Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-08-01

    Seven consecutive patients with acute retropharyngeal tendinitis underwent plain X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. All seven had marked soft tissue swelling anterior to C1 and C2 on plain X-ray, and soft tissue calcification at this level was present in five of them. On MRI, there was markedly increased signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images in the acute phase and intermediate signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images, anterior to the level of CI and C2, often extending as far down as C6. These changes correlated well with the soft tissue swelling seen on conventional X-ray of the cervical spine. The maximum mid-sagittal thickness of the soft issues was significantly greater in the tendinitis patients than in 12 control subjects free of symptoms from the pharynx or the cervical spine. Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rapidly alleviated symptoms, and at follow-up MRI showed regression or complete restitution of the changes. In conclusion, MRI can visualize the edematous changes in the longus colli muscle and adds useful diagnostic information in suspected cases of acute retropharyngeal tendinitis. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  3. Prognostic value and determinants of a hypointense infarct core in T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance in acute reperfused ST-elevation-myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Ingo; Kubusch, Konrad; Strohm, Oliver; Desch, Steffen; Mikami, Yoko; de Waha, Suzanne; Gutberlet, Matthias; Schuler, Gerhard; Friedrich, Matthias G; Thiele, Holger

    2011-07-01

    A hypointense core of infarcted myocardium in T2-weighted cardiovascular MRI (CMR) has been used as a noninvasive marker for intramyocardial hemorrhage. However, the clinical significance of such findings not yet been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate determinants and prognostic impact of a hypointense infarct core in T2-weighted CMR images, studied in patients after acute, reperfused ST-elevation-myocardial infarction. We analyzed 346 patients with ST-elevation-myocardial infarction undergoing primary angioplasty core in T2-weighted images, and late microvascular obstruction. Patients were categorized into 2 groups defined by the presence or absence of a hypointense core. The primary end point of the study was occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events defined as death, reinfarction, and congestive heart failure within 6 months after infarction. A hypointense core was present in 122 (35%) patients and was associated with larger infarcts, greater amount of microvascular obstruction, less myocardial salvage, and impaired left ventricular function (P core was a strong univariable predictor of major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 2.59; confidence interval, 1.27 to 5.27) and was significantly associated with an increased major adverse cardiovascular events rate (16.4% versus 7.0%, P = 0.006) 6 months after infarction. A hypointense infarct core within the area at risk of reperfused infarcted myocardium in T2-weighted CMR is closely related to infarct size, microvascular obstruction, and impaired left ventricular function, with subsequent adverse clinical outcome.

  4. A mismatch between the abnormalities in diffusion- and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may represent an acute ischemic penumbra with misery perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Masayuki; Okuchi, Kazuo; Iwamura, Asami; Taoka, Toshiaki; Siesjö, Bo K

    2013-11-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has recently attracted attention for its ability to investigate acute stroke pathophysiology. SWI detects an increased ratio of deoxyhemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin in cerebral venous compartments, which can illustrate cerebral misery perfusion with a compensatory increase of oxygen extraction fraction in the hypoperfused brain. In this study we make the first case report of blunt cervical trauma leading to a stroke, demonstrating the disparity between diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and SWI changes, or DWI-SWI mismatch, in the acute ischemic brain. The area of mismatch between a smaller DWI cytotoxic edema and a larger SWI misery perfusion in our patient matured into a complete infarction with time. The DWI-SWI mismatch may signify the presence of an ischemic penumbra, and provide information about viability of the brain tissue at risk of potential infarction if without early reperfusion.

  5. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Diagnosis of Local Recurrences of Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy: Preliminary Evaluation on Twenty-Seven Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Francesco Carbone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI in patients affected by prostatic fossa (PF relapse after radical prostatectomy (RP for prostatic carcinoma (PC. Methods. Twenty-seven patients showing a nodular lesion in the PF at T2-weighted MR imaging after RP, with diagnosis of PC relapse established by biopsy or PSA determinations, were investigated by DWI. Two readers evaluated the DWI results in consensus and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC of the nodules, separately; a mean value was obtained (ADCm. Results. Relapses did not significantly differ in size in respect of postsurgical benign nodules. The DWI qualitative evaluation showed sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, ppv, and npv values, respectively, of 83.3%, 88.9%, 85.2%, 93.7%, and 72.7% (100%, 87.5%, 95.6%, 93.7%, and 100%, for nodules >6 mm. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for ADC evaluation between the two readers was 0.852 (95% CI 0.661–0.935; P=0.0001. The ADCm values for relapses and benign nodules were, respectively, 0.98±0.21×10−3 mm2/sec and 1.24±0.32×10−3 mm2/sec (P=0.006. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, ppv and npv of ADCm were, respectively, 77.8%, 88.9%, 81.8%, 93.3%, and 66.7% (93.3%, 87.5%, 85.4%, 93.3%, and 87.5% for nodules >6 mm. Conclusions. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is a promising tool in the management of a hyperintense nodule detected by T2-weighted sequences. This might have a relevant importance in contouring radiotherapy treatment volumes.

  6. Assessment of the residual tumour of colorectal liver metastases after chemotherapy: diffusion-weighted MR magnetic resonance imaging in the peripheral and entire tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mathilde; Ronot, Maxime; Doblas, Sabrina; Giraudeau, Céline; Van Beers, Bernard; Belghiti, Jacques; Paradis, Valérie; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in detecting residual tumours (RTs) in colorectal liver metastases (CLMs) following chemotherapy, with a focus on tumour periphery. From January 2009-January 2012, 57 patients who underwent liver resection for CLMs with preoperative MRI (MHR, RTs ≤ 10 %), (2) partial histological (PHR, RT = 10-49 %), and (3) no histological (NHR, RT ≥ 50 %). On DWI, regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around the entire tumour and tumour periphery. Apparent diffusion (ADC) and pure diffusion (D) coefficients were calculated using a monoexponential fit, and compared using Kruskal-Wallis test on a lesion-per-lesion analysis. 111 CLMs were included. Fourteen (12.5 %), 42 (38 %) and 55 (49.5 %) CLMs presented a MHR, PHR and NHR, respectively. ADC and D of the peripheral ROIs were significantly higher in the MHR group (P = 0.013/P = 0.013). ADC and D from the entire tumour were not significantly different among the groups (P = 0.220/P = 0.103). In CLM treated with chemotherapy, ADC and D values from the entire tumour are not related to the degree of RT, while peripheral zone diffusion parameters could help identify metastases with MHR. Peripheral ADC and D of CLMs were higher with major pathological responses. Global ADC and D of CLMs were not different according to residual tumour. Diffusion-weighted images of CLM periphery could be an interesting biomarker of MHR. Diffusion-weighted images could be used to help tailor treatment.

  7. Evaluation of the Added Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging to Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Comparison With 68Ga-DOTANOC Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farchione, Alessandra; Rufini, Vittoria; Brizi, Maria Gabriella; Iacovazzo, Donato; Larghi, Alberto; Massara, Roberto Maria; Petrone, Gianluigi; Poscia, Andrea; Treglia, Giorgio; De Marinis, Laura; Giordano, Alessandro; Rindi, Guido; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) evaluation and to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) results. Morphological MRI (T2-weighted [T2-w] + contrast-enhanced [CE] T1-w) and DWI (T2-w + DWI) and Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT in 25 patients/30 pNETs were retrospectively evaluated. Per-patient and per-lesion detection rates (pDR and lDR, respectively) were calculated. Apparent diffusion coefficient values were compared among pNET and surrounding and normal pancreas (control group, 18 patients). Apparent diffusion coefficient and standardized uptake value (SUV) values were compared among different grading and staging groups. No statistically significant differences in PET/CT and MRI session detection rates were found (morphological MRI and DW-MRI, 88% pDR and 87% lDR; combined evaluation, 92% pDR and 90% lDR; Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, 88% pDR and 80% lDR). Consensus reading (morphological/DW-MRI + PET/CT) improved pDR and lDR (100%). Apparent diffusion coefficient mean value was significantly lower compared with surrounding and normal parenchyma (P < 0.01). The apparent diffusion coefficient and SUV values of pNETs among different grading and staging groups were not statistically different. Conventional MRI, DW-MRI + T2-w sequences, and Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT can be alternative tools in pNET detection. Diffusion-weighted MRI could be valuable in patients with clinical suspicion but negative conventional imaging findings. However, the consensus reading of the 3 techniques seems the best approach.

  8. Cervical gross tumor volume dose predicts local control using magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion-weighted imaging-guided high-dose-rate and positron emission tomography/computed tomography-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A; Fowler, Kathryn J; Narra, Vamsi; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W

    2014-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (PD100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of focal vertebral bone marrow lesions: initial experience of the differentiation of nodular hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow from malignant lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sunghoon; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Kim, Jae Ho [Ajou University School of Medicine, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Ajou University Medical Center, Musculoskeletal Imaging Laboratory, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Nam-Su [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jinwoo [Philips Healthcare, Department of Clinical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Young [Ajou University Medical Center, Regional Clinical Trial Center, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the ability of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters to differentiate nodular hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow (HHBM) from malignant vertebral bone marrow lesions (VBMLs). A total of 33 patients with 58 VBMLs, including 9 nodular HHBM lesions, 39 bone metastases, and 10 myelomas, were retrospectively assessed. All diagnoses were confirmed either pathologically or via image assessment. IVIM diffusion-weighted MRI with 11 b values (from 0 to 800 s/mm{sup 2}) were obtained using a 3.0-T MR imager. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), pure diffusion coefficient (D), perfusion fraction (f), and pseudodiffusion coefficient (D*) were calculated. ADC and IVIM parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic performances of ADC, D, f, and D* in terms of VBML characterization. The diagnostic performance of morphological MR sequences was also assessed for comparison. The ADC and D values of nodular HHBM were significantly lower than those of malignant VBML (both p values < 0.001), whereas the f value was significantly higher (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in D* between the two groups (p = 0.688). On ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for D was 1.000, which was significantly larger than that for ADC (AUC = 0.902). Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MRI can be used to differentiate between nodular HHBM and malignant VBML. The D value was significantly lower for nodular HHBM, and afforded a better diagnostic performance than the ADC, f, and D* values in terms of such differentiation. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  11. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  12. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ai-hong; CHEN Li; LI Yong-jie; ZHANG Guo-jun; LI Kun-cheng; WANG Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT) is a rare benign neoplasm of the central nervous system affecting young people. A correct preoperative diagnosis is helpful for planning surgical strategies and improving prognosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize DNTs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to analyze the value of these two techniques in the diagnosis of DNTs.Methods MR images of 13 patients with DNTs were reviewed retrospectively; and five of the patients also underwent MRS. Tumors were confirmed by surgery. The distribution, extension and signal features of the lesions were assessed,and the MRS results were analyzed.Results All tumors were supratentorial. The cortex was the main area involved, with nine tumors located in the temporal lobe, three in the frontal lobe, and one on the boundary between the temporal and occipital lobes. All cases had decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. On fluid attenuated inversion recovery weighted images, the hyperintense "ring sign" and internal septation of the lesion were seen in 9 cases. Eight tumors had well-demarcated borders. Peritumoral edema or mass effect was absent in all cases. A contrast enhancement examination was performed in 9 cases. Contrast enhancement was absent in five cases, and four cases showed significant enhancement. The MRS showed a low N-acetylaspartate peak and a lack of elevated choline-containing component (Cho) or Cho-Cr ratio (Cho/Cr) in five patients.Conclusions The MRI findings of DNTs were stereotypical. The combination of MRI and MRS techniques were helpful in making a correct presurgical diagnosis.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Susceptibility Weighted Imaging of Intracranial Calcification%颅内钙化灶的磁敏感加权成像

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红军; 黄飚; 张水兴; 杨万群; 梁长虹

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the manifestation of intracranial calcification on susceptibility weighted images, and evaluate the value of susceptibility weighted imaging in detecting intracranial calcification. Materials and Methods 34 calcification foci identified by CT in 9 patients were enrolled in this study,including 2 oligodendrogliomas, 1 astrocytoma,2 cavemomas,2 brain cysticercosis and 2 cases with agnogenic calcifications. All patients underwent susceptibility weighted imaging and SWI reconstruction images and corrected phase images were acquired through postprocessing, then the signal intensity of calcification on SWI reconstruction images and corrected phase images were observed. Results The size of calcification foci varied from 1 mm to 12 mm, and all calcifications presented as hypointensity on SWI reconstruction images and inhomogeneous hyperintensity signal on corrected phase images. Conclusion Intracranial calcification is detected as hyperintensity on SWI phase images with a sensitivity of 100% ,the spatial resolution of SWI is high and it can detect 1 mmsize calcification. SWI is a useful complementary sequence for the routine MRI in the detection of intracranial calcifications.%目的 探讨颅内钙化灶的磁敏感加权成像(susceptibility-weighted imaging,SWI)表现及其对钙化灶的诊断价值.资料与疗法经CT证实的颅内钙化灶患者9例,其中少突胶质细胞瘤2例,星形细胞瘤1例,海绵状血管瘤2例.腩囊虫病2例,不明原冈钙化2例,共34枚钙化灶(生理性钙化灶11枚).均行SWI并经后处理得到SWI及校正后相位图,观察钙化灶在SWI及相位图上的表现.结果 钙化灶大小1~12 mm,SWI上呈极低信号,相位图均呈不均匀高信号,其形态及大小与CT所见一致.结论 SWl相位图显示颅内钙化灶为高信号,敏感性可达100%,分辨率高,最小可检出1 mm的钙化灶,可弥补MRI常规序列的不足.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  15. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Differential Nongenetic Impact of Birth Weight Versus Third-Trimester Growth Velocity on Glucose Metabolism and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abdominal Obesity in Young Healthy Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilgaard, Kasper; Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb; Grunnet, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Context: Low birth weight is associated with type 2 diabetes, which to some extent may be mediated via abdominal adiposity and insulin resistance. Fetal growth velocity is high during the third trimester, constituting a potential critical window for organ programming. Intra-pair differences among......-pair differences in young healthy twins.Methods: Fifty-eight healthy twins (42 monozygotic/16 dizygotic) aged 18-24 yr participated. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Whole-body fat was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, whereas abdominal visceral and sc fat...... growth velocity during third trimester was not associated with adult visceral or sc fat accumulation. Interestingly, third-trimester growth was associated with insulin action in a paradoxical inverse manner.Conclusions: Abdominal adiposity including accumulation of both sc and visceral fat may constitute...

  17. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the initial characterization of non-fatty soft tissue tumors: correlation between T2 signal intensity and ADC values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto [Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, CHU Nancy, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Gay, Frederique; Blum, Alain [Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, CHU Nancy, Nancy (France); Chen, Bailiang; Felblinger, Jacques [Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Zins, Marie [University Versailles St-Quentin, Versailles (France); Inserm, Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Villejuif (France); Sirveaux, Francois [Centre Chirurgical Emile Galle, Service de Chirurgie Traumatologique et Orthopedique, Nancy (France)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the performance of quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) correlated with T2 signal in differentiating non-fatty benign from malignant tumors. A total of 76 patients with a histologically confirmed non-fatty soft tissue tumors (46 benign and 30 malignant) were prospectively included in this ethics committee approved study. All patients signed an informed consent and underwent MRI with DWI with two b values (0 and 600). ADC values from the solid components of these tumors were obtained and were correlated with the lesion's signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences. ADC values were obtained from adjacent normal muscle to allow calculation of tumor/muscle ADC ratios. There were 58 hyperintense and 18 iso or hypointense lesions. All hypointense lesions were benign. The mean ADC values for benign and malignant tumors were 1.47 ± 0.54 x 10{sup -3} and 1.17 ± 0.38 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s respectively (p < 0.005). The mean ADC ratio in benign iso or hypointense tumors was significantly lower than that of hyperintense ones (0.76 ± 0.21 versus 1.58 ± 0.82 - p < 0.0001). An ADC ratio lower than 0.915 was highly specific for malignancy (96.4 %), whereas an ADC ratio higher than 1.32 was highly sensitive for benign lesions (90 %). ADC analysis can be useful in the initial characterization of T2 hyperintense non-fatty soft tissue masses, although this technique alone is not likely to change patient management. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance findings in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using a spin echo magnetization transfer sequence: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCHA ANTÔNIO JOSÉ DA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the magnetic resonance (MR findings of five patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS using a spin-echo sequence with an additional magnetization transfer (MT pulse on T1-weighted images (T1 SE/MT. These findings were absent in the control group and consisted of hyperintensity of the corticospinal tract. Moreover we discuss the principles and the use of this fast but simple MR technique in the diagnosis of ALS

  19. Diffusion and Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging:Fundamentals and Advances

    CERN Document Server

    Assili, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized as a powerful imaging modality to evaluate the structure and function of various organs in the human body,such as the brain. Additionally, diffusion and perfusion MR imaging have been increasingly used in neurovascular clinical applications. In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the mobility of water molecules is explored in order to obtain information about the microscopic behavior of the tissues. In contrast, perfusion weighted imaging uses tracers to exploit hemodynamic status, which enables researchers and clinicians to consider this imaging modality as an early biomarker of certain brain diseases. In this review, the fundamentals of physics for diffusion and perfusion MR imaging both of which are highly sensitive to microenvironmental alterations at the cellular level as well as their application in the treatment of aging, Alzheimer's disease, brain tumors and cerebral ischemic injury were discussed.

  20. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Paulo C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br; Santos, Judes G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Skeff Neto, K. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil); Cuyper, Marcel de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2005-05-15

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  1. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

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  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... of the body being studied. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... is positioned around the head. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

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    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

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  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate infections assess blood flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

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  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

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  13. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  14. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  15. Changes in susceptibility signs on serial T2*-weighted single-shot echo-planar gradient-echo images in acute embolic infarction: comparison with recanalization status on 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Yuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Kinoshita, Fumiko [Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels - Akita, Department of Radiology, Akita (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    The present study compares changes in susceptibility signs on follow-up single-shot echo-planar gradient-echo T2*-weighted images (GRE-EPI) with vascular status on follow-up magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in acute embolic infarction. Twenty consecutive patients with acute embolic infarction repeatedly underwent MR imaging including GRE-EPI and MRA using a 1.5-T MR superconducting system. All patients underwent initial MR examination within 24 h of onset and follow-up MR imaging within 1 month after onset. Changes in susceptibility signs on follow-up GRE-EPI were compatible with vascular status on follow-up MRA in 19 of the 20 patients. Susceptibility signs disappeared with complete recanalization in 13 patients, migrated with partial recanalization in 3, did not change together with the absence of recanalization in 2, and became extended together with the absence of recanalization in 1. Cerebral hemorrhage obscured susceptibility signs in the one remaining patient. Susceptibility signs on follow-up GRE-EPI can reflect changes in an acute embolus, such as recanalization or migration, in this study. Serial GRE-EPI in acute embolism complements the diagnostic certainty of MRA by directly detecting an embolus as a susceptibility sign. (orig.)

  16. Scaled signal intensity of uterine fibroids based on T2-weighted MR images: a potential objective method to determine the suitability for magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun [CHA University, Comprehensive Gynecologic Cancer Center, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang-Wook [CHA University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Sungnam-si, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Sokolov, Amit [InSightec Ltd., Haifa (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is a non-invasive method to treat uterine fibroids. To help determine the patient suitability for MRgFUS, we propose a new objective measure: the scaled signal intensity (SSI) of uterine fibroids in T2 weighted MR images (T2WI). Forty three uterine fibroids in 40 premenopausal women were included in this retrospective study. SSI of each fibroid was measured from the screening T2WI by standardizing its mean signal intensity to a 0-100 scale, using reference intensities of rectus abdominis muscle (0) and subcutaneous fat (100). Correlation between the SSI and the non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio (a measure for treatment success) was calculated. Pre-treatment SSI showed a significant inverse-correlation with post treatment NPV ratio (p < 0.05). When dichotomizing NPV ratio at 45 %, the optimal cut off value of the SSI was found to be 16.0. A fibroid with SSI value 16.0 or less can be expected to have optimal responses. The SSI of uterine fibroids in T2WI can be suggested as an objective parameter to help in patient selection for MRgFUS. (orig.)

  17. Short-term effect of erythropoietin on brain lesions and aquaporin-4 expression in a hypoxic-ischemic neonatal rat model assessed by magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Olivier; Villega, Frédéric; Pieter Konsman, Jan; Sanchez, Stéphane; Raffard, Gérard; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Chateil, Jean-François; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2010-08-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is an endogenous cytokine that regulates hematopoiesis and is widely used to treat anemia. In addition, it has recently increased interest in the neurosciences since the new concept of Epo as a neuroprotective agent has emerged. The potential protective effect of human recombinant Epo (r-hu-Epo) on a hypoxic-ischemic (HI) pup rat model was studied. Cerebral HI was obtained by permanent left carotid artery ligature of pups followed by a 2-h hypoxia. Three hours after carotid occlusion, brain lesions were assessed by magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging. Intraperitoneal administration of r-hu-Epo (30,000 U/kg dose) limited both the HI-induced brain lesion area and the decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the lesion. To identify potential mechanisms underlying the effects of Epo, immunohistochemical detection of caspase-3 and water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4) were performed. No early apoptosis was detected, but up-regulation of AQP4 expression was observed in HI pups that received r-hu-Epo compared with HI animals without treatment. This study demonstrates an early neuroprotective effect of Epo with regard to brain lesion area and ADC values. One possible mechanism of Epo for decreasing brain edema and cellular swelling could be a better clearance of water excess in brain tissue, a process possibly mediated by AQP4.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic entheses - a systematic comparison between short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted, contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klang, Eyal; Aharoni, Dvora; Rimon, Uri; Eshed, Iris [Tel Aviv University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hermann, Kay-Geert [Department of Radiology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Herman, Amir [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Tel Aviv University, The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Shazar, Nachshon [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)

    2014-04-15

    To assess the contribution of contrast material in detecting and evaluating enthesitis of pelvic entheses by MRI. Sixty-seven hip or pelvic 1.5-T MRIs (30:37 male:female, mean age: 53 years) were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of hamstring and gluteus medius (GM) enthesitis by two readers (a resident and an experienced radiologist). Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted pre- and post-contrast (T1+Gd) images were evaluated by each reader at two sessions. A consensus reading of two senior radiologists was regarded as the gold standard. Clinical data was retrieved from patients' referral form and medical files. Cohen's kappa was used for intra- and inter-observer agreement calculation. Diagnostic properties were calculated against the gold standard reading. A total of 228 entheses were evaluated. Gold standard analysis diagnosed 83 (36 %) enthesitis lesions. Intra-reader reliability for the experienced reader was significantly (p = 0.0001) higher in the T1+Gd images compared to the STIR images (hamstring: k = 0.84/0.45, GM: k = 0.84/0.47). Sensitivity and specificity increased from 0.74/0.8 to 0.87/0.9 in the STIR images and T1+Gd sequences. Intra-reader reliability for the inexperienced reader was lower (p > 0.05). Evidence showing that contrast material improves the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of detecting enthesitis supports its use in this setting. (orig.)

  19. Early diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging can predict survival in women with locally advanced cancer of the cervix treated with combined chemo-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somoye, Gbolahan; Parkin, David [Ward 42, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Harry, Vanessa [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Semple, Scott [Queen' s Medical Research Institute, Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Plataniotis, George [Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation, Taunton (United Kingdom); Scott, Neil [University of Aberdeen, Section of Population Health, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Fiona J. [University of Cambridge, Radiology Department, Box 218, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    To assess the predictive value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) for survival in women treated for advanced cancer of the cervix with concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Twenty women treated for advanced cancer of the cervix were recruited and followed up for a median of 26 (range <1 to 43) months. They each had DWI performed before treatment, 2 weeks after beginning therapy (midtreatment) and at the end of treatment. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated from regions of interest (ROI). All participants were reviewed for follow-up data. ADC values were compared with mortality status (Mann-Whitney test). Time to progression and overall survival were assessed (Kaplan-Meier survival graphs). There were 14 survivors. The median midtreatment ADC was statistically significantly higher in those alive compared to the non-survivors, 1.55 and 1.36 (x 10{sup -3}/mm{sup 2}/s), respectively, P = 0.02. The median change in ADC 14 days after treatment commencement was significantly higher in the alive group compared to non-survivors, 0.28 and 0.14 (x 10{sup -3}/mm{sup 2}/s), respectively, P = 0.02. There was no evidence of a difference between survivors and non-survivors for pretreatment baseline or post-therapy ADC values. Functional DWI early in the treatment of advanced cancer of the cervix may provide useful information in predicting survival. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of the residual tumour of colorectal liver metastases after chemotherapy: diffusion-weighted MR magnetic resonance imaging in the peripheral and entire tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Mathilde; Doblas, Sabrina; Giraudeau, Celine [Paris Diderot University, INSERM, UMR 1149, Clichy (France); Ronot, Maxime; Van Beers, Bernard; Vilgrain, Valerie [Paris Diderot University, INSERM, UMR 1149, Clichy (France); Radiology Department, Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France); Belghiti, Jacques [Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France); Paradis, Valerie [Pathology Department, Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in detecting residual tumours (RTs) in colorectal liver metastases (CLMs) following chemotherapy, with a focus on tumour periphery. From January 2009-January 2012, 57 patients who underwent liver resection for CLMs with preoperative MRI (<3 months) including DWI were retrospectively included. CLMs were classified into three response groups on pathology: (1) major histological (MHR, RTs ≤ 10 %), (2) partial histological (PHR, RT = 10-49 %), and (3) no histological (NHR, RT ≥ 50 %). On DWI, regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around the entire tumour and tumour periphery. Apparent diffusion (ADC) and pure diffusion (D) coefficients were calculated using a monoexponential fit, and compared using Kruskal-Wallis test on a lesion-per-lesion analysis. 111 CLMs were included. Fourteen (12.5 %), 42 (38 %) and 55 (49.5 %) CLMs presented a MHR, PHR and NHR, respectively. ADC and D of the peripheral ROIs were significantly higher in the MHR group (P = 0.013/P = 0.013). ADC and D from the entire tumour were not significantly different among the groups (P = 0.220/P = 0.103). In CLM treated with chemotherapy, ADC and D values from the entire tumour are not related to the degree of RT, while peripheral zone diffusion parameters could help identify metastases with MHR. (orig.)

  1. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging predicts survival in patients with liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer shortly after selective internal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Simon, Birgit; Luetkens, Julian Alexander; Traeber, Frank; Schmeel, Leonard Christopher; Schild, Hans Heinz; Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Sabet, Amir [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital Saarland, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate whether quantifications of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict overall survival (OS) in patients with liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) following selective internal radiation therapy with {sup 90}Yttrium-microspheres (SIRT). Forty-four patients underwent DWI 19 ± 16 days before and 36 ± 10 days after SIRT. Tumour-size and intratumoral minimal ADC (minADC) values were measured for 132 liver metastases on baseline and follow-up DWI. Optimal functional imaging response to treatment was determined by receiver operating characteristics and defined as ≥22 % increase in post-therapeutic minADC. Survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox-regression comparing various variables with potential impact on OS. Median OS was 8 months. The following parameters were significantly associated with median OS: optimal functional imaging response (18 vs. 5 months; p < 0.001), hepatic tumour burden <50 % (8 vs. 5 months; p = 0.018), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scale <1 (10 vs. 4 months; p = 0.012) and progressive disease according to Response and Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (8 vs. 3 months; p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, optimal functional imaging response and hepatic tumour burden remained independent predictors of OS. Functional imaging response assessment using minADC changes on DWI may predict survival in CRC shortly after SIRT. (orig.)

  2. Aspectos generales de las secuencias de difusión de imagen en resonancia magnética Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: general concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ahualli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La secuencia de difusión en resonancia magnética (RM ha sido aceptada como una técnica útil que determina el movimiento de las moléculas de agua en los tejidos y permite valorar cualitativa y cuantitativamente el coeficiente de difusión. Para comprender cómo funcionan dichas secuencias, es necesario familiarizarse con los principios físicos de la difusión del agua y las bases conceptuales de la técnica. Resulta fundamental conocer los requerimientos específicos acerca del hardware y tiempo de adquisición así como las ventajas, limitaciones y errores de interpretación potenciales de esta novel técnica.Diffusion-weighted imaging has been accepted as a powerful imaging technique. It gives insight into the movement of water molecules in tissue and enables qualitative and quantitative assessment of tissue diffusivity (apparent diffusion coefficient. To fully understand how diffusion MR imaging works, it is helpful to be familiar with the physical principles of water diffusion and the conceptual basis of imaging technique. Knowledge of the technique-specific requirements with regard to hardware and acquisition time, as well as the advantages, limitations, and potential interpretation pitfalls of this novel technique, is especially useful.

  3. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during carbohydrate ingestion suggest that glucose may regulate HT signaling but are potentially confoun...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  5. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  6. Antepartum pelvimetry by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshiba, Hisato; Kikuchi, Noriko; Ogino, Yoshio [Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-09-01

    Evaluation of the pelvis by pelvimetry plays an important role in selecting patients for possible vaginal delivery. However, x-ray pelvimetry involves the disadvantage of fetal exposure to ionizing radiation. The clear advantage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pelvimetry is that this procedure is free from ionizing radiation. Measurements with MRI are as reliable as those with x-ray pelvimetry and the contrast of MRI is even better. MRI shows soft-tissue structures as well as bone. The use of this scanning technique is contraindicated for patients with pacemakers. But, pacemakers are rarely encountered in young pregnant women. In our department, 203 patients underwent antepartum pelvimetry with MRI during the last 5 years. T1-weighted mediosagittal images were used for measurement of the obstetric conjugate (OC) and to determine whether a straight sacrum can be recognized. Data were compared between patients who had undergone cesarean section due to cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) and patients who experienced vaginal delivery. OC and OC-biparietal diameter were significantly different between the two groups. MRI can be further used for the diagnosis of CPD and to select patients for whom planned vaginal delivery is appropriate. (author)

  7. Magnetic Microparticle Aggregation For Viscosity Determination By Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of magnetic resonance (MR) imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did not undergo magnetically induced aggregation, and exhibited time independent values of T2. The rate of T2 change associated with magnetic micro-particle aggregation was used to determine the viscosity of liquid samples, providing a method that can be of particular advantage for determining the viscosity of small volumes of potentially biohazardous samples of blood or blood plasma. PMID:18306403

  8. Non-contrast T1-mapping detects acute myocardial edema with high diagnostic accuracy: a comparison to T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Vanessa M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T2w-CMR is used widely to assess myocardial edema. Quantitative T1-mapping is also sensitive to changes in free water content. We hypothesized that T1-mapping would have a higher diagnostic performance in detecting acute edema than dark-blood and bright-blood T2w-CMR. Methods We investigated 21 controls (55 ± 13 years and 21 patients (61 ± 10 years with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or acute regional myocardial edema without infarction. CMR performed within 7 days included cine, T1-mapping using ShMOLLI, dark-blood T2-STIR, bright-blood ACUT2E and LGE imaging. We analyzed wall motion, myocardial T1 values and T2 signal intensity (SI ratio relative to both skeletal muscle and remote myocardium. Results All patients had acute cardiac symptoms, increased Troponin I (0.15-36.80 ug/L and acute wall motion abnormalities but no LGE. T1 was increased in patient segments with abnormal and normal wall motion compared to controls (1113 ± 94 ms, 1029 ± 59 ms and 944 ± 17 ms, respectively; p  Conclusions Non-contrast T1-mapping using ShMOLLI is a novel method for objectively detecting myocardial edema with a high diagnostic performance. T1-mapping may serve as a complementary technique to T2-weighted imaging for assessing myocardial edema in ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease, such as quantifying area-at-risk and diagnosing myocarditis.

  9. Usefulness of perfusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging with signal-intensity curves analysis in the differential diagnosis of sellar and parasellar tumors: Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bladowska, Joanna, E-mail: asia.bladowska@gmail.com [Department of General Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland); Zimny, Anna, E-mail: abernac@wp.pl [Department of General Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland); Guziński, Maciej, E-mail: guziol@wp.pl [Department of General Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland); Hałoń, Agnieszka, E-mail: ahalon2@gmail.com [Department of Pathomorphology and Oncological Cytology, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland); Tabakow, Paweł, E-mail: p.tabakov@wp.pl [Department of Neurosurgery, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland); Czyż, Marcin, E-mail: mt.czyz@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland); Czapiga, Bogdan, E-mail: bogdanczapiga@op.pl [Department of Neurosurgery, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland); Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz, E-mail: jarmund@wp.pl [Department of Neurosurgery, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland); Sąsiadek, Marek J., E-mail: marek.sasiadek@am.wroc.pl [Department of General Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The most common pituitary tumors are adenomas, which however may be mimicked by other tumors that can show a very similar appearance in plain MRI. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of perfusion weighted MR imaging (PWI), including signal-intensity curves analysis in the differential diagnosis of sellar/parasellar tumors. Methods: Forty-one patients with sellar/parasellar tumors (23 macroadenomas, 10 meningiomas, 5 craniopharyngiomas, 1 intrasellar hemangioblastoma, 1 intrasellar prostate cancer metastasis, 1 suprasellar glioma), underwent plain MRI followed by PWI using a 1.5T unit. In each tumor, the mean and maximum values of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), as well as the relative peak height (rPH) and the relative percentage of signal intensity recovery (rPSR) were calculated. Results: The high perfusion tumors were: macroadenomas, meningiomas, squamous-papillary type of craniopharyngiomas, hemangioblastoma, glioma and metastasis. The low perfusion neoplasms included adamantinomatous type of craniopharyngiomas. By comparing adenomas and meningiomas, we found statistically significant differences in the mean and maximum rCBV values (p = 0.026 and p = 0.019, respectively), but not in rPH and rPSR. The maximum rCBV values >7.14 and the mean rCBV values >5.74 with the typical perfusion curve were very suggestive of the diagnosis of meningioma. There were differences between adenomas and other high perfusion tumors in rPH and rPSR values. Conclusions: PWI can provide additional information helpful in differential diagnosis of sellar/parasellar tumors. In our opinion PWI, as an easy to perform and fast technique should be incorporated into the MR protocol of all intracranial neoplasms including sellar/parasellar tumors.

  10. Subjective and objective image qualities: a comparison of sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo and turbo-spin-eco sequences in magnetic resonance imaging of the spine by use of a subjective ranking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, G. [Institut fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Departement Radiologie, Universitaetskliniken, Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland); Mader, I. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Dres. Siems, Grossmann, Bayreuth (Germany); Proske, M. [Klinikum Rosenheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    1998-12-31

    We evaluated the subjective image impression of two different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences by using a subjective ranking system. This ranking system was based on 20 criteria describing several tissue characteristics such as the signal intensity of normal anatomical structures and the changes of signal intensities and shape of lesions as well as artefacts. MR of the vertebral spine was performed in 48 female and 52 male patients (mean age 44.8 years) referred consecutively for investigation of a back problem. Ninety-six pathologies were found in 82 patients. Sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin-echo before and after administration of Gadolinium (Gd-DOTA), and sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo (T2wSE) and Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequences were performed by means of surface coils. Using the subjective ranking system the sagittal T2wSE and sagittal TSE were compared. Both sequences were suitable for identification of normal anatomy and pathologic changes and there was no trend for increased detection of disease by one imaging sequence over the other. We found that sagittal TSE sequences can replace sagittal T2wSE sequences in spinal MR and that artefacts at the cervical and lumbar spine are less frequent using TSE, thus confirming previous studies. In this study, our ranking system reveiled, that there are differences between the subjective judgement of image qualities and objective measurement of SNR. However, this approach may not be helpful to compare two different MR sequences as it is limited to the anatomical area investigated and is time consuming. The subjective image impression, i.e. the quality of images, may not always be represented by physical parameters such as a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), radiologists should try to define influences of image quality also by subjective parameters. (orig.)

  11. 星形细胞肿瘤磁敏感成像与动态对比剂MR灌注加权成像的相关性研究%Correlation between the semiquantitative evaluations of susceptibility-weighted imaging and dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with astrocytic tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘力; 韩彤; 张云亭; 雷静; 郭军; 刘卉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlations between the indexes of susceptibility-weighted imaging( SWI) and those of perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging( PI) in astrocytic tumors before the operation. Methods Ninety-eight patients were performed conventional, contrast MR scan, SWI and PI scan by Siemens 3. 0T magnetic resonance imaging system. Intratumor susceptibility hypo-intensity area ( ITSHIA) in SWI was observed and semiquantitative data were acquired. Maximum relative rCBV values of solid part within the tumor ( rrCBVintramax ) and surrounding area of tumor ( rrCBVperimax ) acquired by PI were calculated. Comparison of the rrCBVintramax and rrCBVperimax in astrocytic tumor of different grade were conducted. The corresponding situation between hot spot of PI and ITSHIA were evaluated and correlation between SWI and PI were compared. Results rrCBVintramax(rs =0. 662,P tumor. The incompletely correspondent between hot spot and ITSHIA may be due to an association with different machismos of PI and SWI.%目的:探讨星形细胞肿瘤磁敏感加权成像( SWI)半量化与动态对比剂增强MR灌注加权成像( PI)的相关性。方法回顾性分析98例经手术病理证实星形细胞肿瘤患者的术前SWI及PI检查资料。测量SWI中肿瘤内磁敏感低信号区( ITSHIA)半量化数据,以及PI中肿瘤内实性部分最大相对脑血流量值( rrCBV瘤内max )和瘤周区最大相对CBV值( rrCBV瘤周max )。应用Kruskal-Wallis H检验比较不同病理分级星形细胞肿瘤间rrCBV瘤内max与rrCBV瘤周max的差异,比较不同级别肿瘤间灌注热点区与ITSHIA形态的对应情况;应用Spearman相关性检验比较不同级别肿瘤间SWI中各半量化指标与PI中rrCBV瘤内max与rrCBV瘤周max的相关性。结果星形细胞肿瘤rrCBV瘤内max值( rs =0.662,P0.05),却低于高级别肿瘤。星形细胞肿瘤的ITSHIA半量化指标与rrCBV瘤内max与rrCBV瘤周max值呈显著线性正相关。星形

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefrova, Jana, E-mail: sefrova@post.cz [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Paluska, Petr [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Belobradek, Zdenek [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brodak, Milos [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Dolezel, Martin [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Prosvic, Petr [Department of Urology, Regional Hospital Nachod, Nachod (Czech Republic); Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hoffmann, Petr [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Louda, Miroslav [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Nejedla, Anna [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  13. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, N. P.; d'Arcy, J. A.; Feiweier, T.; Koh, D.-M.; Leach, M. O.; Collins, D. J.; Orton, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm-2s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm-2s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm-2s at TE  =  80, 100 ms scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms) T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  14. Value of diffusion - weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of bone marrow in vertebral metastases; Wertigkeit der diffusionsgewichteten MRT in der Beurteilung von Knochenmarkveraenderungen bei Wirbelkoerpermetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herneth, A.M.; Philipp, M.; Trattnig, S.; Imhof, H. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Vienna (Austria); Naude, J. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Vienna (Austria); Beichel, R. [Technische Univ., Graz (Austria)

    2000-08-01

    Aim of the study. The aim of the study was the evaluation of the diffusion coefficient (ADC) of vertebral metastasis and regular vertebral bodies with diffusion weighted MRI (DWI). DWI evaluates the tissue-specific molecular diffusion of protons. In tissues with high cell densities (neoplasm) a decreased ADC can be expected due to restricted diffusion according to an exaggerated amount of intra- and intercellular membranes (i.e. diffusion barriers). Methods. In 5 breast cancer patients the ADC of both known vertebral metastases and of adjacent regular vertebral bodies were measured with DWI (1.0 T; Phased-Array-Body-Coil; b: 880 and 440 s/mm{sup 2}). Results. The ADC of regular vertebral bodies (1.3{+-}0.23x10{sup -3} s/mm{sup 2}) was significantly (p<0.0002) higher than in vertebral metastases (0.39{+-}0.11x10{sup -3} s/mm{sup 2}). Conclusions. These data demonstrate that the ADC can be reliably measured in vertebral bodies. The quantitative evaluation of the ADC in vertebral bodies seems to be an objective and comparable parameter for differentiating malign from benign vertebral tissue. (orig.) [German] Ziel. Ziel der Arbeit war die Messung des Diffusionskoeffizienten (ADC) mittels diffusionsgewichteter (DW) MRT in Wirbelkoerpermetastasen und in MR-morphologisch unauffaelligen Wirbelkoerpern. Die DW-MRT misst den fuer ein Gewebe spezifischen ADC, welcher der Eigendiffusion von Wasserstoffmolekuelen entspricht. In zellreichem Tumorgewebe mit zahlreichen intra- und interzellulaeren Membranen (d.h. Diffusionsbarrieren) ist ein niedriger, in zellarmen oder nekrotischem Gewebe, ein hoher ADC zu erwarten. Methode. Bei 5 Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom wurde der ADC von Lendenwirbelkoerpermetastasen sowie von angrenzenden, MR-morphologisch unauffaelligen Wirbelkoerpern ermittelt (1,0 T; Phased-Array-Body-Coil; b: 880 und 440 s/mm{sup 2}). Ergebnisse. Der ADC in MR-morphologisch unauffaelligen Wirbelkoerpern (1,3{+-}0,23x10{sup -3} s/mm{sup 2})war signifikant (p{<=}0

  15. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  16. Reduced field-of -view diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas: Comparison with conventional single-shot echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Jeong Min; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Jang, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Ryu, Ji Kon; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kannengiesser, Stephan [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the image quality (IQ) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of reduced field-of-view (FOV) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of pancreas in comparison with full FOV DWI. In this retrospective study, 2 readers independently performed qualitative analysis of full FOV DWI (FOV, 38 × 38 cm; b-value, 0 and 500 s/mm{sup 2}) and reduced FOV DWI (FOV, 28 × 8.5 cm; b-value, 0 and 400 s/mm{sup 2}). Both procedures were conducted with a two-dimensional spatially selective radiofrequency excitation pulse, in 102 patients with benign or malignant pancreatic diseases (mean size, 27.5 ± 14.4 mm). The study parameters included 1) anatomic structure visualization, 2) lesion conspicuity, 3) artifacts, 4) IQ score, and 5) subjective clinical utility for confirming or excluding initially considered differential diagnosis on conventional imaging. Another reader performed quantitative ADC measurements of focal pancreatic lesions and parenchyma. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare qualitative scores and ADCs between DWI sequences. Mann Whitney U-test was used to compare ADCs between the lesions and parenchyma. On qualitative analysis, reduced FOV DWI showed better anatomic structure visualization (2.76 ± 0.79 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 2.81 ± 0.64 at b = 400 s/mm{sup 2}), lesion conspicuity (3.11 ± 0.99 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 3.15 ± 0.79 at b = 400 s/mm{sup 2}), IQ score (8.51 ± 2.05 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 8.79 ± 1.60 at b = 400 s/mm{sup 2}), and higher clinical utility (3.41 ± 0.64), as compared to full FOV DWI (anatomic structure, 2.18 ± 0.59 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 2.56 ± 0.47 at b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}; lesion conspicuity, 2.55 ± 1.07 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 2.89 ± 0.86 at b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}; IQ score, 7.13 ± 1.83 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 8.17 ± 1.31 at b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}; clinical utility, 3.14 ± 0.70) (p < 0.05). Artifacts were significantly improved on reduced FOV DWI (2.65 ± 0.68) at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} (full FOV DWI, 2.41 ± 0.63) (p

  17. Three-dimensional-fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition and T2-weighted fast spin-echo magnetic resonance sequences on visualization of cranial nerves Ⅲ-Ⅻ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Because of the small diameter and complex anatomic course of the cranial nerves except for the optic nerve,mgeminal nerve,facial nerve,and cochlear and vestibular nerve,other cranial nerves are difficult to be visualized in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning with conventional thickness (5-10 mm).

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapy November 8 is the International Day of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...

  20. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness...

  1. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  2. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  3. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Tortora, Fabio; Baldelli, Roberto; Cocchiara, Francesco; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Sbardella, Emilia; Simeoli, Chiara; Caranci, Ferdinando; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary tumor represents about 10 % of pituitary adenomas and at the time of diagnosis most of them are microadenomas. Transsphenoidal surgery is the first-line treatment of Cushing's disease and accurate localization of the tumor within the gland is essential for selectively removing the lesion and preserving normal pituitary function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the detection of pituitary tumors, but adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenomas are not correctly identified in 30-50 % of cases, because of their size, location, and enhancing characteristics. Several recent studies were performed with the purpose of better localizing the adrenocorticotropin-secreting microadenomas through the use in magnetic resonance imaging of specific sequences, reduced contrast medium dose and high-field technology. Therefore, an improved imaging technique for pituitary disease is mandatory in the suspect of Cushing's disease. The aims of this paper are to present an overview of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease and to provide a magnetic resonance imaging protocol to be followed in case of suspicion adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: physics and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Christopher T; Robson, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the branch of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) whose acquisition methods are adapted to surmount the particular challenges caused by motion of the heart and blood in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging is supremely flexible; it can produce images showing the spatial distribution of diverse tissue characteristics, for example, proton density, T(1), T(2), T(2)(⁎), fat concentration, flow rate, and diffusion parameters. The image contrast may usefully be modified by intravenous infusion of contrast agents. Magnetic resonance imaging permits 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional acquisitions with arbitrary slice orientation. Unfortunately, MRI's flexibility is matched by a remarkable complexity not only in its fundamental principles but also in the optimization of applications in the clinic. This article attempts to demystify the basic principles of CMR and provides a primer on the terminology used in CMR. Complete confidence in the principles of CMR is not essential to use the technology. Nevertheless, knowledge of the principal terminology of MRI is a valuable first step when seeking to understand and apply modern methods in a clinical or research setting. Thus, the article closes with a glossary of terminology and references to high-quality educational resources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  7. Was magnetic resonance imaging scan contraindicated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2010-01-01

    An intravenous drug abuser with a retained needle posed a management problem at a neurosurgical unit, having declined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on safety grounds. However, later, having been assessed by the senior radiologist, she went though the MRI scan safely.

  8. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  9. Biliary ascariasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hashmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old girl presented with features of biliary obstruction. Magnetic resonance cholangi-pancreatography revealed typical linear signals in common bile duct, which appears like Ascaris lumbricoides. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic removal of the worm.

  10. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  13. Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Lara M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications. Carr J. C., Carroll T. J., Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg/New York, 2012. 412 pp. Price $179.00. ISBN 978-1-4419-1685-3 (hardcover). © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in syringomyelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBased on an own material of 19 patients with syringomyelia and on the related literature a survey is given on the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, postoperative evaluation and the dynamics of CSF and cyst fluids, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The following conclusions can be

  15. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  16. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  17. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  18. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  19. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  20. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yumin, E-mail: ymhou@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  1. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  2. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  3. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Afifi

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: MRI DWI offers quick and non-invasive technique to distinct between viable and necrotic tumor areas and helps the diagnosis of residual tumor. Potential effect of treatment can be detected as increase in the diffusion coefficient. We recommend that optimal follow-up after image guided trans-catheter tumor therapy should include DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  5. Prospective comparison of computed tomography, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and [11C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography for preoperative lymph node staging in prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Matthias M; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Retz, Margitta; Nawroth, Roman; Kübler, Hubert; Maurer, Tobias; Thalgott, Mark; Gramer, Bettina M; Weirich, Gregor; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Rummeny, Ernst J; Schwaiger, Markus; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Krause, Bernd; Eiber, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and [(11)C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with computed tomography (CT) for preoperative lymph node (LN) staging in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Between June 2010 and May 2012, CT, DWI and [(11)C]choline PET/CT were performed preoperatively in 33 intermediate- and high-risk PCa patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) and extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) including obturator fossa and internal, external and common iliac fields. Patient- and field-based performance characteristics for all three imaging techniques based on histopathological results are reported. Imaging techniques were compared by means of the area under the curve (AUC). LN metastases were detected in 92 of 1,012 (9%) LNs from 14 of 33 (42%) patients. On patient-based analysis, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for CT were 57, 68 and 64%, respectively, for DWI were 57, 79 and 70%, respectively, and for [(11)C]choline PET/CT were 57, 90 and 76%, respectively. On field-based analysis, these numbers for CT were 47, 94 and 88%, respectively, for DWI were 56, 97 and 92%, respectively, and for [(11)C]choline PET/CT were 62, 96 and 92%, respectively. Neither DWI nor [(11)C]choline PET/CT performed significantly better than CT on pairwise comparison of patient- and field-based results. All three imaging techniques exhibit a rather low sensitivity with less than two thirds of LN metastases being detected on patient- and field-based analysis. Overall diagnostic efficacy did not differ significantly between imaging techniques, whereas distinct performance characteristics, esp. patient-based specificity, were best for [(11)C]choline PET/CT followed by DWI and CT.

  6. Detection of residual head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after (chemo)radiotherapy: a pilot study assessing the value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as an adjunct to PET-CT using (18)F-FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noij, Daniel P; Jagesar, Viresh A; de Graaf, Pim; de Jong, Marcus C; Hoekstra, Otto S; de Bree, Remco; Castelijns, Jonas A

    2017-09-01

    Diagnosing residual malignancy after (chemo)radiotherapy presents a diagnostic challenge because of overlapping symptoms and imaging characteristics. We assessed the added diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with residual fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake at the primary tumor site 3 months after (chemo)radiotherapy. For this retrospective study from January 2010 to June 2012, 22 cases (median patient age of 61 years; range 41-77 years) were included for analysis. Both PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including DWI, were performed as part of the institutional protocol and were qualitatively assessed for the presence of residual malignancy at the primary tumor site. The sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT were 100% and 47%, respectively. For DWI, sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 82%, respectively. When DWI was added to PET-CT with residual (18)F-FDG uptake, and only a positive read on both PET-CT and DWI was considered to be overall positive, sensitivity remained 80% (95% confidence interval [CI] 28%-99%), and specificity was 88% (95% CI 64%-99%). In this pilot study of the selected patients with residual (18)F-FDG uptake at the primary tumor site 3 months after (chemo)radiotherapy, we demonstrated that the addition of DWI to PET-CT has the potential to increase the specificity of the response evaluation with limited decrease in sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective comparison of computed tomography, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography for preoperative lymph node staging in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, Matthias M.; Retz, Margitta; Nawroth, Roman; Kuebler, Hubert; Maurer, Tobias; Thalgott, Mark; Gschwend, Juergen E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Souvatzoglou, Michael; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Gramer, Bettina M.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Eiber, Matthias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Pathology and Pathologic Anatomy, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Rondak, Ina-Christine [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Krause, Bernd [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with computed tomography (CT) for preoperative lymph node (LN) staging in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Between June 2010 and May 2012, CT, DWI and [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT were performed preoperatively in 33 intermediate- and high-risk PCa patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) and extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) including obturator fossa and internal, external and common iliac fields. Patient- and field-based performance characteristics for all three imaging techniques based on histopathological results are reported. Imaging techniques were compared by means of the area under the curve (AUC). LN metastases were detected in 92 of 1,012 (9 %) LNs from 14 of 33 (42 %) patients. On patient-based analysis, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for CT were 57, 68 and 64 %, respectively, for DWI were 57, 79 and 70 %, respectively, and for [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT were 57, 90 and 76 %, respectively. On field-based analysis, these numbers for CT were 47, 94 and 88 %, respectively, for DWI were 56, 97 and 92 %, respectively, and for [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT were 62, 96 and 92 %, respectively. Neither DWI nor [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT performed significantly better than CT on pairwise comparison of patient- and field-based results. All three imaging techniques exhibit a rather low sensitivity with less than two thirds of LN metastases being detected on patient- and field-based analysis. Overall diagnostic efficacy did not differ significantly between imaging techniques, whereas distinct performance characteristics, esp. patient-based specificity, were best for [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT followed by DWI and CT. (orig.)

  8. Clinical Feasibility of Free-Breathing Dynamic T1-Weighted Imaging With Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Combination of Variable Density Sampling and Compressed Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Yu, Mi Hye; Chang, Won; Park, Jin-Young; Nickel, Marcel Dominik; Son, Yohan; Kiefer, Berthold; Lee, Jeong Min

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of free-breathing dynamic T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) using Cartesian sampling, compressed sensing, and iterative reconstruction in gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. A total of 51 patients at high risk of breath-holding failure underwent dynamic T1WI in a free-breathing manner using volumetric interpolated breath-hold (BH) examination with compressed sensing reconstruction (CS-VIBE) and hard gating. Timing, motion artifacts, and image quality were evaluated by 4 radiologists on a 4-point scale. For patients with low image quality scores (XD]) reconstruction was additionally performed and reviewed in the same manner. In addition, in 68.6% (35/51) patients who had previously undergone liver MRI, image quality and motion artifacts on dynamic phases using CS-VIBE were compared with previous BH-T1WIs. In all patients, adequate arterial-phase timing was obtained at least once. Overall image quality of free-breathing T1WI was 3.30 ± 0.59 on precontrast and 2.68 ± 0.70, 2.93 ± 0.65, and 3.30 ± 0.49 on early arterial, late arterial, and portal venous phases, respectively. In 13 patients with lower than average image quality (XD-reconstructed CS-VIBE) significantly reduced motion artifacts (P XD reconstruction showed less motion artifacts and better image quality on precontrast, arterial, and portal venous phases (P < 0.0001-0.013). Volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination with compressed sensing has the potential to provide consistent, motion-corrected free-breathing dynamic T1WI for liver MRI in patients at high risk of breath-holding failure.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging based functional imaging in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Karen A; Gill, Simrandip K; MacPherson, Lesley; Foster, Katharine; Oates, Adam; Peet, Andrew C

    2017-02-01

    Imaging is central to management of solid tumours in children. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard imaging modality for tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs and is increasingly used in the abdomen. It provides excellent structural detail, but imparts limited information about tumour type, aggressiveness, metastatic potential or early treatment response. MRI based functional imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, probe tissue properties to provide clinically important information about metabolites, structure and blood flow. This review describes the role of and evidence behind these functional imaging techniques in paediatric oncology and implications for integrating them into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Subtraction gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance for head and neck imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, G.A.S.; Barker, P.G.; Phelps, P.D. (Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    The subtraction method of Des Plantes was applied to gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (GdMR). Using short acquisition times, T[sub 1] weighted spin echo pulse sequences are made immediately before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium DTPA. The needle is placed in the vein prior to putting the patient into the scanner and is irrigated with saline while the control series is obtained. 42 patients with naso-sinus or skull base tumours have been successfully investigated by this technique and satisfactory subtraction studies are now obtained on all patients other than the claustrophobic. Subtraction GdMR provides the best demonstration of the effects of gadolinium DTPA on the magnetic resonance signal for both normal and abnormal tissues. Tbe signal recorded on the subtraction image is dependent on tissue blood supply and provides a more accurate record of tumour extent than that shown by unsubtracted GdMR scans. (author).

  11. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  12. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and its applicability in veterinary cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, José Manuel de Seiça

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a technique whereby images are created by the manipulation of hydrogen atoms in magnetic fields; it is based on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (MR), which is non-invasive and non-ionising (Constantine, Shan, Flamm, & Sivananthan, 2004). Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) uses the same principle: application of magnetic-field gradients that are adjusted to highlight desired tissue characteristics, producing a variety of sequences that all...

  14. Effect of biological characteristics of different types of uterine fibroids, as assessed with T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, on ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen-Peng; Chen, Jin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effects of the biological characteristics of different types of uterine fibroids, as assessed with T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) ablation. Thirty-five patients with 39 symptomatic uterine fibroids who underwent myomectomy or hysterectomy were enrolled. Before surgery, the uterine fibroids were subdivided into hypo-intense, iso-intense, heterogeneous hyper-intense and homogeneous hyper-intense categories based on signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. Tissue density and moisture content were determined in post-operative samples and normal uterine tissue, the isolated uterine fibroids were subjected to USgHIFU, and the extent of ablation was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and sirius red staining were undertaken to investigate the organizational structure of the uterine fibroids. Estrogen and progesterone receptor expression was assayed via immunohistochemical staining. The mean diameter of uterine fibroids was 6.9 ± 2.8 cm. For all uterine fibroids, the average density and moisture content were 10.7 ± 0.7 mg/mL and 75.7 ± 2.4%, respectively; and for the homogeneous hyper-intense fibroids, 10.3 ± 0.5 mg/mL and 76.6 ± 2.3%. The latter subgroup had lower density and higher moisture content compared with the other subgroups. After USgHIFU treatment, the extent of ablation of the hyper-intense fibroids was 102.7 ± 42.1 mm(2), which was significantly less than those of the hypo-intense and heterogeneous hyper-intense fibroids. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and sirius red staining revealed that the homogeneous hyper-intense fibroids had sparse collagen fibers and abundant cells. Immunohistochemistry results revealed that estrogen and progesterone receptors were highly expressed in the homogeneous hyper-intense fibroids. This study revealed that lower density, higher moisture content, sparse collagen

  15. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  16. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging for stroke diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Rastogi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In stroke, diagnosis and identification of the infarct core and the penumbra is integral to therapeutic determination. With advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technology, stroke visualization has been radically altered. MRI allows for better visualization of factors such as cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, lesion and penumbra size and location, and thrombus identification; these factors help determine which treatments, ranging from tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, anti-platelet therapy, or even surgery, are appropriate. Current stroke diagnosis standards use several MRI modalities in conjunction, with T2- or T2FNx01- weighted MRI to rule out intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA for thrombus identification, and the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI mismatch for penumbral identification and therapeutic determination. However, to better clarify the neurological environment, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI for assessing oxygen saturation and the presence of CMBs as well as additional modalities, such as amide proton transfer (APT imaging for pH mapping, have emerged to offer more insight into anatomical and biological conditions during stroke. Further research has unveiled potential for alternative contrasts to gadolinium for PWI as well, as the contrast has contraindications for patients with renal disease. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs as an exogenous contrast and arterial spin labeling (ASL as an endogenous contrast offer innovative alternatives. Thus, emerging MRI modalities are enhancing the diagnostic capabilities of MRI in stroke and provide more guidance for patient outcome by offering increased accessibility, accuracy, and information.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Cho, Aaron A. [Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Edward, Neeraj J. [University of Cincinnati, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Edward, Deepak P. [King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fajardo, Roman G. [University of California, San Diego, Shiley Eye Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  18. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  19. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus)......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  20. High speed functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, A M

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to October 2001. This thesis documents the implementation and application of a novel high-speed imaging technique, the multi-slice, echo shifted, echo planar imaging technique. This was implemented on the Nottingham 3 T imaging system, for functional magnetic resonance imaging. The technique uses echo shifting over the slices in a multi-slice echo planar imaging acquisition scheme, making the echo time longer than the repetition time per slice. This allows for rapid volumar sampling of the blood oxygen level dependent effect in the human brain. The new high-speed technique was used to investigate the variability of measuring the timing differences between haemodynamic responses, at the same cortical location, to simple cued motor tasks. The technique was also used in an investigation into motor cortex functional connect...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  2. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.;

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper review...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8......Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  3. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  4. Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    It is quite possible to acquire images with an MR scanner without understanding the principles behind it, but choosing the best parameters and methods, and interpreting images and artifacts, requires understanding. This text serves as an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging techniques. It is aimed at beginners in possession of only a minimal level of technical expertise, yet it introduces aspects of MR that are typically considered technically challenging. The notes were written in conn...

  5. Magnetic resonance in diagnosis of ureterocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Humberto do; Hachul, Mauricio; Macedo Junior, Antonio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Div. de Urologia]. E-mail: humbertojr1@aol.com

    2003-05-15

    Ultrasonography is the main non-invasive technique for screening of ureterocele, but presents some difficulties for its diagnosis. Other supplementary diagnostic methods have the disadvantage of being invasive or using ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) has a high sensitivity for diagnosing urinary tract malformations in adults and children. We report one case of ureterocele in a 1-year old child with the purpose of presenting its diagnosis through MR. (author)

  6. "PALPATION BY IMAGING": MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Pei-yi Gao

    2006-01-01

    Elasticity is an important physical property of human tissues.There is a tremendous difference in elasticity between normal and pathological tissues.Noninvasive evaluation of the elasticity of human tissues would be valuable for clinical practice.Magnetic resonance elastography(MRE)is a recently developed noninvasive imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity.This article reviewed the MRE technique and its current status.

  7. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  8. Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors Based On MEMS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; García-Ramírez, Pedro J.; Manjarrez, Elías

    2009-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows the integration of magnetic field sensors with electronic components, which presents important advantages such as small size, light weight, minimum power consumption, low cost, better sensitivity and high resolution. We present a discussion and review of resonant magnetic field sensors based on MEMS technology. In practice, these sensors exploit the Lorentz force in order to detect external magnetic fields through the displacement of resonant structures, which are measured with optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive sensing techniques. From these, the optical sensing presents immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and reduces the read-out electronic complexity. Moreover, piezoresistive sensing requires an easy fabrication process as well as a standard packaging. A description of the operation mechanisms, advantages and drawbacks of each sensor is considered. MEMS magnetic field sensors are a potential alternative for numerous applications, including the automotive industry, military, medical, telecommunications, oceanographic, spatial, and environment science. In addition, future markets will need the development of several sensors on a single chip for measuring different parameters such as the magnetic field, pressure, temperature and acceleration. PMID:22408480

  9. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  10. A Novel Implement Scheme of Diffusion Sensitive Gradient Magnetic Field for Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Weighted Spectroscopy%一种新的用于磁共振扩散加权波谱术的扩散敏感梯度磁场施加方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怀岑; 王翔; 高嵩

    2011-01-01

    目的 提出一种基于PRESS的用于磁共振扩散加权波谱的扩散敏感梯度磁场施加方案.方法 在PRESS序列中的2个π射频脉冲两侧各施加一对交错的扩散敏感梯度磁场.结果 本方案有效减小涡流,利用PRESS序列中2个π射频脉冲之间的时间,延长了扩散梯度磁场脉冲的持续时间.即使在扩散权重较大的情况下,Naa,Cr及Cho的峰仍十分清晰,信噪比满足进一步分析的需要.结论 利用这一方案可以在常规医用磁共振成像设备上实现扩散加权波谱(DWS).%Objective To propose a new diffusion sensitive gradient magnetic field implement scheme basing on point resolved spectroscopy(PRESS) for magnetic resonance diffusion weighted spectroscopy. Methods Two pairs of interleaving pulsed gradient magnetic fields were applied symmetrically around the two π RF pulse in PRESS sequence respectively. Results Through the proposed scheme, the induced eddy currents were minimized, the interval time between the two π RF pulses in PRESS sequence was utilized effectively and the duration time of diffusion sensitive gradient magnetic pulses was increased. Conclusion It is feasible to implement diffusion weighted spectroscopy(DWS) in conventional clinical MRI scanners with this scheme.

  11. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  12. Oxygen challenge magnetic resonance imaging in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Krishna A; Moreton, Fiona C; Santosh, Celestine; Lopez, Rosario; Brennan, David; Schwarzbauer, Christian; Goutcher, Colin; O'Hare, Kevin; Macrae, I Mhairi; Muir, Keith W

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen challenge imaging involves transient hyperoxia applied during deoxyhaemoglobin sensitive (T2*-weighted) magnetic resonance imaging and has the potential to detect changes in brain oxygen extraction. In order to develop optimal practical protocols for oxygen challenge imaging, we investigated the influence of oxygen concentration, cerebral blood flow change, pattern of oxygen administration and field strength on T2*-weighted signal. Eight healthy volunteers underwent multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging including oxygen challenge imaging and arterial spin labelling using two oxygen concentrations (target FiO2 of 100 and 60%) administered consecutively (two-stage challenge) at both 1.5T and 3T. There was a greater signal increase in grey matter compared to white matter during oxygen challenge (p challenge imaging. Reductions in cerebral blood flow did not obscure the T2*-weighted signal increases. In conclusion, the optimal protocol for further study should utilise target FiO2 = 100% during a single oxygen challenge. Imaging at both 1.5T and 3T is clinically feasible.

  13. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motte, Louise de la, E-mail: louise.de.la.motte@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Pedersen, Mads Møller, E-mail: phd@medit.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogt, Katja, E-mail: Vogt@dadlnet.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V., E-mail: Torben.Veith.schroeder@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lonn, Lars, E-mail: lonn.lars@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery and Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r{sub s} 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling.

  14. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haesung Yoon

    Full Text Available Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters.Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1 were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US, 2 were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB 3 underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT, and 4 had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER, maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters.In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of posterior scleritis mimicking choroidal mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman Saatci, A.; Saatci, Isil E-mail: cekirgesaatci@superonline.com; Kocak, Niluefer; Durak, Ismet

    2001-08-01

    We present imaging findings in a case of posterior scleritis, which may mimic tumoral mass lesion resulting in unnecessary enucleation. Magnetic resonance imaging was remarkable for a subretinal mass hypointense on T2 and hyperintense on T1 weighted images. A peripheral rim of hypointensity was noteworthy, suggestive of sclerouveal thickening. There was an ill-defined area of increased T2 signal intensity adjacent to globe at the site of nodular lesion implying an inflammatory process. A linear contrast enhancement was seen within the bulbus oculi which may represent detached retina by exudation or displaced retina due to thickened sclera and choroidal layers. The CSF space around the optic nerve was enlarged.

  16. Fast abdominal magnetic resonance imaging; Schnelle Abdomenbildgebung in der Magnetresonanztomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjan, J.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Riffel, P. [University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal imaging is the driving force that necessitates the development of numerous techniques for accelerated image acquisition in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Today, numerous techniques are available that enable rapid, high spatial resolution acquisition for both T1 and T2 weighted images. These techniques open new opportunities in the detection and classification of numerous pathologies in the abdomen. However, there is still ongoing progress in the development of fast and ultrafast sequences and promising techniques are currently close to clinical application. With these 4D-technologies, MRI is becoming the central imaging modality for dynamic, motion-compensated imaging of the parenchymal abdominal organs such as liver, pancreas and kidney.

  17. Reversible Myelopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Due to Cobalamin Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ju Lee

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Subacute combined degeneration (SCD is known as myelopathy due to vitamin B12 deficiency. SCD always involves the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord, with the neuropathologic change showing vacuolation of the white matter. We describe 2 patients who presented with ataxic gait, impaired proprioception over limbs, and even mental change due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the cervical spine showed increased signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging, and laboratory data showed low serum vitamin B12 level. The 2 patients were treated with vitamin B12 injection intramuscularly. There was clinical improvement after treatment along with normalization of the MRI.

  18. Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis: Magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen A Lone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis (ROCM is a potentially fatal fungal infection that commonly affects diabetic and other immunocompromised patients. Necrotizing and angioinvasive features of this class of pathogenic fungi facilitate spread from sinuses into orbit and brain with devastating consequences like cavernous sinus thrombosis. We describe magnetic resonance, including diffusion weighted imaging findings in a case of micobiologically documented ROCM in a 50-year-old diabetic man. Restricted diffusion was demonstrated in the distribution of infiltrating lesion right from soft issue facial component through left orbit and in the cavernous sinus. Favorable outcome was achieved with surgical debridement and prolonged amphotericin therapy.

  19. Myxoid Adrenocortical Adenoma: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathology correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Un [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Ha, Hong Koo; Park, Won Young [Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    We report a case of a 74-year-old female with myxoid adrenocortical adenoma which showed different magnetic resonance imaging findings compared to those of a typical adrenocortical adenoma. The myxoid change in the adrenocortical adenoma is a rare form of degeneration. It presents a considerable diagnostic challenge to both radiologists and clinicians because it can mimic other adrenal tumor types on imaging. The MRI findings of the presented case included a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images similar to that of fluid and delayed progressive enhancement.

  20. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Finlayson, Sarah; Morrow, Jasper M.; Rodriguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Sinclair, Christopher D. J.; Fischmann, Arne; Thornton, John S.; Knight, Steve; Norbury, Ray; White, Mel; Al‐hajjar, Michal; Carboni, Nicola; Jayawant, Sandeep; Robb, Stephanie A.; Yousry, Tarek A; Beeson, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction In this study we investigated muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). Methods Twenty‐six patients with 9 CMS subtypes and 10 controls were imaged. T1‐weighted (T1w) and short‐tau inversion recovery (STIR) 3‐Tesla MRI images obtained at thigh and calf levels were scored for severity. Results Overall mean the T1w score was increased in GFPT1 and DPAGT1 CMS. T1w scans of the AChR‐deficiency, COLQ, and CHAT subjects were indistinguishable ...

  1. Langevin equation approach to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Jennie M; Kalmykov, Yuri P; Coffey, William T; Kerskens, Christian M

    2009-12-01

    The normal phase diffusion problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is treated by means of the Langevin equation for the phase variable using only the properties of the characteristic function of Gaussian random variables. The calculation may be simply extended to anomalous diffusion using a fractional generalization of the Langevin equation proposed by Lutz [E. Lutz, Phys. Rev. E 64, 051106 (2001)] pertaining to the fractional Brownian motion of a free particle coupled to a fractal heat bath. The results compare favorably with diffusion-weighted experiments acquired in human neuronal tissue using a 3 T MRI scanner.

  2. Tools and methods for teaching magnetic resonance concepts and techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching of MRI methodology can be challenging for teachers as well as students. To support student learning, two graphical simulators for exploration of basic magnetic resonance principles are here introduced. The first implements a simple compass needle analogy implemented for day one of NMR an...... RF interactions, relaxation, weighting, echoes, imaging principles and more. Both simulators run in almost any browser without installation of software, but are also freely available for download. Example uses are documented in a series of short videos available on YouTube....

  3. Filling defect artefacts in magnetic resonance urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girish, G.; Chooi, W.K.; Morcos, S.K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, S5 7AU, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of filling defect artefacts (FDA) in magnetic resonance urography (MRU). Retrospectively, we assessed MRU examinations of 45 patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction (21 men, 24 women; mean age 35 years, age range 18-71 years). The MRU was performed 30 min after intramuscular injection of 20 mg frusemide using heavily T2-weighted fast-spin-echo techniques [axial, thick coronal slab, coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) images] with fat saturation. The images were reviewed by two observers to determine the presence of filling defects and dilatation of pelvicalyceal system and ureters. The filling defects were classified into central, eccentric and complete. Clinical course and plain films were reviewed to determine significance of the detected filling defects. True filling defects were observed in 5 patients (11%) and all due to stones seen on the plain radiograph of the abdomen. Filling defects artefacts (FDAs) were seen in 23 patients (51%; 17 pelvicalyceal system, 17 upper third of ureters, 7 mid ureters and 1 distal ureter). No stones were seen on the plain radiograph of these patients and they had a favourable clinical course for over 24 months. The true filling defects were large in size, eccentric in position and seen in more than one sequence of the MRU examination (axial, n=5; slab, n=5; and MIP, n=4). Four (80%) of the patients with true defects and 21 (91%) of those with FDAs had dilatation of the pelvicalyceal system and ureters. The FDAs were small in size, centrally placed (74%) and always seen in axial images, rarely in slab images (2 cases) and not seen in MIP images. Artefactual filling defects can be seen in MRU examinations. The cause of the FDAs is not fully explained and could be secondary to turbulent and fast flow of the urine. Some of the FDAs seen in the calyces could be due to the tips of the papillae. Awareness of such defects obviates misinterpretation and prevents

  4. Portal biliopathy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Ozdil; Erol, Cengiz; Sahingoz, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is a rare disorder, characterized by biliary ductal and gallbladder wall abnormalities seen in patients with portal hypertension. It most commonly occurs due to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO). The abnormalities consist mainly of bile duct compression, stenoses, fibrotic strictures and dilation of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, as well as gallbladder varices. PB may mimic cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis, or choledocholithiasis. Misdiagnosis can be avoided using appropriate imaging modalities to prevent complications. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) features of three patients with PB. PMID:25216728

  5. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  7. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic...

  8. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  9. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  10. Magnetic resonance in hearing loss and vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ángel MARTÍN-PÉREZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Hearing loss and vertiginous syndrome represent an important part of the otorhinolaryngology clinic. The role of the radiologist plays in their workup become fundamental. Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are essential to guide or give the diagnosis in these cases. Method: After performing a retrospective analysis of 456 MRI studies of patients with these symptoms, we conducted a review of the main pathologies recorded that can cause these symptoms. Results: We classify into vascular disorders and other variants, tumor pathology, malformations and inflammatory pathology; We also describe the most relevant findings on MRI and illustrated with examples of our center.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thyroid and Parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gonzalo-Domínguez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the thyroid and parathyroid pathology is usually achieved with ultrasounds. There are several systems of classification that are internationally accepted in neoplastic disease, such as TIRADS system, and there are well-defined patterns for ultrasound imaging in inflammatory disease. Material and methods: However, there are specific needs that require magnetic resonance imaging. We review the main indications of MRI in the evaluation of thyroid and parathyroid in 64 patients and determine which protocols are more appropriate and which sequences are better for a proper characterization. Results: Then we review the semiology obtained by this technique, making correlation with disease processes affecting these cervical structures.

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  15. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  16. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawnaur, J.M.; Jenkins, J.P.R.; Isherwood, I. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1990-10-01

    Musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis can be mistaken for soft-tissue sarcoma both clinically and on X-ray computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three patients with this condition enabled the correct diagnosis to be made prospectively in two. The appearance on MRI of a heterogeneous mass with well-defined, predominantly peripheral areas of very low signal intensity due to dense fibrous tissue and areas of medium to high signal intensity corresponding to a more cellular stroma should raise the suspicion of musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis. Cellular areas within the tumour showed moderate enhancement after gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid administration. (orig.).

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of rat fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Yo; Kawanishi, Hiroaki (Imamichi Institute for Animal Reproduction, Ibaraki (Japan)); Hasegawa, Kenichi; Otsu, Shinichi

    1993-06-01

    The internal structures of rat fetuses on day 18.0 of pregnancy were studied by magnetic resonance imaging in 1-mm sagittal slices. Each organ was represented as white to gray images different in tone according to the [sup 1]H proton content and the relaxation time. In solid organs, portions with high cell density were seen as white areas and those with low cell density as gray areas. In the tubular organs, the margins were imaged as white and the lumina as gray. (author).

  19. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus [Medical Genetics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.hengstschlaeger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-02-15

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data.

  20. Sciatic neuropathy: findings on magnetic resonance neurography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Simão, Marcelo Novelino; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2017-01-01

    Injuries of the sciatic nerve are common causes of pain and limitation in the lower limbs. Due to its particular anatomy