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Sample records for weight-losing cancer patients

  1. Inter-relationships between single carbon units' metabolism and resting energy expenditure in weight-losing patients with small cell lung cancer. Effects of methionine supply and chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, H; Hansen, O P; Simonsen, L

    1994-01-01

    The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance, a signifi......The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance...

  2. Inter-relationships between single carbon units' metabolism and resting energy expenditure in weight-losing patients with small cell lung cancer. Effects of methionine supply and chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, H; Hansen, O P; Simonsen, L

    1994-01-01

    The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance, a signifi...

  3. Supportive treatment in weight-losing cancer patients due to the additive adverse effects of radiation treatment and/or chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkurt, E.; Tunali, C. [Cukurova University Medical Faculty, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Balcali-Adana (Turkey); Erkisi, M. [Cukurova University Medical Faculty, Dept. of Medical Oncology (Turkey)

    2000-12-01

    The reversal of anorexia and weight loss especially in patients with advanced cancer suffering from radiation treatment (RT) -related complications and debilitated further during RT would be a welcome relief. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of supportive treatment with megestrol acetate (MA) in the weight-losing cancer patients increasingly experiencing anorexia, smell, taste, and weight loss due to the additive adverse effects of RT plus or minus chemotherapy and how MA changes the additive role of the severity of RT reactions on such patients. >From June 1997 to October 1998, 100 eligible patients were enrolled on a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Of the 100 patients, 46 received MA during RT and 4 after the end of the RT, and 50 received placebo for 3 months. Subjective parameters were assessed by a brief questionnaire form based on scoring from 1 to 5, according to the degree of the loss or change for each parameter of malnutrition, appetite, taste and smell developed by the researchers. At the end of the study a statistically significant weight gain was achieved in the patient group receiving MA compared to the placebo group (+ 3 to + 5 kg versus -3.7 to -5.9 kg, p=0.000). Significant improvements were seen in performance status (p=0.000), appetite (p=0.000), malnutrition (p=0.000), loss of taste (p=0.000) and smell qualities (p=0.02) in the MA group compared to the placebo group. In the MA group there was no statistically significant difference related to the weight changes according to the grade of either the acute or late RT effects (p=0.65 and 0.07, respectively). Whereas, in the placebo group a statistically significant additive effect of the acute and late RT effects was detected on weight loss (p=0.008 and 0.007, respectively). It was observed no side-effects of MA in a 3-month time follow-up. The use of MA 480 mg/day during RT was effective in reversing anorexia and weight loss in spite of the acute RT effects

  4. Inter-relationships between single carbon units' metabolism and resting energy expenditure in weight-losing patients with small cell lung cancer. Effects of methionine supply and chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, H; Hansen, O P; Simonsen, L

    1994-01-01

    The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance......, a significant decrease of FIGLU excretion was observed in the patients after oral administration of DL-methionine for 4 days. The elevated FIGLU excretion was positively correlated to weight loss prior to diagnosis and negatively correlated to serum albumin at time of diagnosis. After 3 months of combination...... chemotherapy, FIGLU excretion was reduced in all patients except 1, who had progressive disease. Despite the elevated FIGLU excretions, all patients had normal blood folate levels. The resting energy expenditure (REE) was recorded in 7 patients, and a significant, positive correlation was observed between...

  5. Effect of Weight Losing on the Improving Clinical Statement of Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Alireza; Rad, Zahra Abbaspour; Sajedi, Behnam; Heydari, Amir Hossein; Akbarieh, Samira; Jafari, Behzad

    2017-11-01

    Osteoarthritis causes severe pain and disability in joints, one of the most prevalent involved joints is the knee joint. There are several therapeutics ways to control pain and disability, but almost none of them are definite treatment. In this article, we tried to reveal the effect of weight loss on improving symptoms of knee osteoarthritis as an effective and permanent therapeutic approach. We chose 62 patients with grade 1-2 (mild to moderate) knee osteoarthritis and divided them equally into case and control groups. Patients should not had used NSAIDs at least for 6 months before study initiation. Symptoms severity was measured by WOMAC and VAS questionnaires before and after 3 months follow up. Weight and BMI were recorded too. Case group was suggested to have weight loss diet of less fat and carbohydrates and control group did not have any limitation. Comparison of variables' average of case and control groups was not logistically meaningful at the initiation and after the end of the study. But there was a meaningful correlation between variables' changes and lifestyle change in both groups, especially in WOMAC and VAS scores. All variables in case group had statistically meaningful differences between their amounts at the beginning and after the end of the study, on the contrary of the control group. In the comparison of our study with similar studies in the world. We deduced that weight loss can improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis even in short time weight loss diet (3 months). ZUMS.REC.1394.94. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  6. Evaluation of effect of acarbose consumption on weight losing in non-diabetic overweight or obese patients in Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Nakhaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High prevalence of obesity and the importance of this issue as a risk factor for chronic diseases such as severe cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer necessitate the need for treatment. The aim of this study was the evaluation of acarbose effect on the weight loss in non diabetic overweight or obese patients in Kerman. Materials and Methods: A double blind randomized controlled clinical trial was performed on 66 patients with the body mass index (BMI between 25 and 35 kg/m2. Patients were divided in treatment and control groups using the randomization. The treatment group took 100 mg acarbose 3 times a day for 20 weeks in combination with the low calorie diet and exercise. Control group was given placebo, low calorie diet, and exercise. BMI was measured after 20 weeks. The analyses were carried out using t test and repeated measured ANOVA. Results: Patients in acarbose and placebo group had a non significant difference in BMI at baseline. Reducing in weight was considered in every month in both groups, but this reduction was higher in the treatment group. At the 5th month, the difference of BMI in the treatment group was significantly lower than the placebo group (2.31 ± 0.6 vs. 0.76 ± 0.6 kg/m2, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Acarbose, especially in combination with the low calorie diet and exercise, seems to lose weight effectively in obese and overweight patients in communities that have a high carbohydrate intake (like Persian diet.

  7. Weight losing, antihyperlipidemic and cardioprotective effects of the alkaloid fraction of Hunteria umbellata seed extract on normal and triton-induced hyperlipidemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adejuwon Adewale Adeneye

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: Overall, results of this study showed that repeated oral treatments with 25 and 50 mg/kg/day of alkaloid fraction of H. umbellata elicited weight losing, antihyperlipidemic and cardioprotective effects in triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats that were mediated via de novo cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition.

  8. A systematic review of health-related quality of life instruments in patients with cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelwright, Sally; Darlington, Anne-Sophie; Hopkinson, Jane B; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; White, Alice; Johnson, Colin D

    2013-09-01

    Assessing the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of cancer patients with cachexia is particularly important because treatments for cachexia are currently aimed at palliation and treatment efficacy must be measured in ways other than survival. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate HRQOL assessment in cancer patients with cachexia. Using guidance from the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, relevant databases were searched from January 1980 to January 2012 with terms relating to cancer, cachexia and HRQOL for papers including adult cancer patients with cachexia or documented weight loss at baseline. We found one cachexia-specific instrument, the Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy, but the tool has not been fully validated, does not cover all the relevant domains and the consensus-based standards for the selection of health status measurement instruments checklist highlighted a number of weaknesses in the methodological quality of the validation study. Sixty-seven studies assessed HRQOL in cachectic or weight-losing cancer patients. Most used generic cancer HRQOL instruments, limiting the amount of useful information they provide. A modified version of the Efficace minimum data checklist demonstrated that the quality of reporting on HRQOL tool use was inadequate in many of the studies. A negative relationship between HRQOL and weight loss was found in 23 of the 27 studies which directly examined this. There is a pressing need for a well-designed HRQOL tool for use with this patient group in both clinical trials and clinical practice.

  9. Adipose tissue volume is decreased in recently diagnosed cancer patients with cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustsson, Thorhallur; Wikrantz, Pal; Rydén, Mikael; Brismar, Torkel; Isaksson, Bengt

    2012-09-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with cancer develop cachexia. The aim of the present study was to determine if there were differences in the amount of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues at the time of the diagnosis among patients with cancer cachexia (CC), patients with cancer and a stable weight (WS), and patients with cancer and weight loss because of gastrointestinal obstruction (GO). Patients with recently diagnosed cancer were divided into the CC, WS, and GO groups. Body composition was determined by bioimpedance. Basal metabolic rate and energy expenditure were estimated by indirect calorimetry. Visceral and subcutaneous white adipose tissues (WATs) were quantified by the segmentation of a 10-mm-thick computed tomographic slice obtained through the central part of the third lumbar vertebra. The body mass index and body fat were decreased in the CC and GO groups compared with the WS group, but there were no significant differences between the two weight-losing groups. Lean body mass, total body water, and energy expenditure were similar among the groups. The visceral WAT volume was decreased in the CC but not in the GO group compared with the WS group (P new information regarding the WAT distribution in CC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Depression in Cancer Patients

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    Beyhan Bag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not enough to consider treatment and care depression in the oncology that is the most common psychiatric illness in cancer patient affects of cancer treatment and the patient`s quality of life negatively, which is determined through researches in the field. With development of psycho-oncology it has been demonstrated to establish an important link between the cancer patient`s treatment as well as psycho-social support for the patient and psychiatric treatment and care for the if it is needed. With this connection between them it has been proposed to use of bio-psycho-social-model in cancer patient to improve their care. To achieve this goal, it is expected from medical personnel to realize patients psychosocial need und if he/she has a psychiatric disorders or syndromes. For the medical personnel that work in oncology services, it is inevitable to organize in order to raise the awareness of depression in the cancer patients. In the present study, it is focused on raising the awareness of depression in cancer patient for the medical personnel. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 186-198

  11. Sexuality in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walbroehl, G S

    1985-01-01

    The sexual concerns of patients with cancer may be overlooked during the acute stage of illness. Both the general stress of hospitalization and the specific threat of surgery can affect sexuality. Breast cancer and cancer of the reproductive organs cause the most concern, although other tumors can be as devastating. "Ostomies" and limb amputations raise special questions, and radiation therapy affects sexual and reproductive function. Underlying depression has a profound effect.

  12. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancel Submit Search The CDC Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... this page: About CDC.gov . Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients Patients and Caregivers Prepare: Watch Out for Fever ...

  13. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  14. Rehabilitation of cancer patients.

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    Pandey M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available With the developments in cancer treatment, more and more patients are surviving their disease. However, very little emphasis is being placed to rehabilitate these cancer survivors. Ignorance, social structure, stigma attached in seeking psychological help, and poor communication skills of oncology staff all contribute to poor rehabilitative efforts. The priority of governmental agencies and health efforts to fight rampant communicable diseases, malnutrition, maternal health, and the frequent natural calamities, puts rehabilitation movements in the back seat. Treatment and prevention of disability and its rehabilitation requires comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. There is an urgent need to promote physical and psychological rehabilitation.

  15. Denial in cancer patients.

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    Kreitler, S

    1999-01-01

    Denial is a basic mechanism for coping with stressful themes, common in healthy and sick individuals. This article deals with the role and functions of denial in cancer, reviewing empirical studies about the effects of denial on cancer prevention, screening, undergoing tests for early detection, delay in seeking medical attention and getting treatment, complying with medical instructions, and coping with the disease in different stages. Special sections are devoted to the possible role of denial as a risk factor for cancer, the effects of denial on disease course and survival, and the relation of denial to immunocompetence. Major conclusions are that denial may have a positive effect when applied in the first phase of coping, after diagnosis, because it reduces anxiety. This holds also for the terminal stage. The negative effects of denial are that it may interfere with getting treatment (e.g., delay in going to the doctor, not showing up for follow-ups, noncompliance), may disrupt the process of assimilating the stressful event, may affect adversely interpersonal relations, and constitutes a cumulative stressor depressing even immunocompetence. The use of denial varies with the severity of the situation, the patient's personality, and his or her familial and cultural background. A large body of research examined the hypothesis that a tendency toward denial could be one of the risk factors for cancer. Despite evidence supporting the occurrence of denial as a correlate of cancer, a lot of research is necessary to clarify the role of denial in general and of anger specifically as a factor affecting the occurrence of cancer and the course of disease and survival.

  16. Cancer patients' evaluation of communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how communication with health care staff is perceived by Danish cancer patients and to characterise those patients who report problems in communication.......The aims of this study were to assess how communication with health care staff is perceived by Danish cancer patients and to characterise those patients who report problems in communication....

  17. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  18. Daily physical-rest activities in relation to nutritional state, metabolism, and quality of life in cancer patients with progressive cachexia.

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    Fouladiun, Marita; Körner, Ulla; Gunnebo, Lena; Sixt-Ammilon, Petra; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Lundholm, Kent

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate daily physical-rest activities in cancer patients losing weight in relation to disease progression. Physical activity-rest rhythms were measured (ActiGraph, armband sensor from BodyMedia) in relation to body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), energy metabolism, exercise capacity (walking test), and self-scored quality of life (SF-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) in weight-losing outpatients with systemic cancer (71 +/- 2 years, n = 53). Well-nourished, age-matched, and previously hospitalized non-cancer patients served as controls (74 +/- 4 years, n = 8). Middle-aged healthy individuals were used as reference subjects (49 +/- 5 years, n = 23). Quality of life was globally reduced in patients with cancer (P < 0.01), accompanied by significantly reduced spontaneous physical activity during both weekdays and weekends compared with reference subjects (P < 0.01). Spontaneous physical activity declined over time during follow-up in patients with cancer (P < 0.05). However, overall physical activity and the extent of sleep and bed-rest activities did not differ between patients with cancer and age-matched non-cancer patients. Spontaneous physical activity correlated weakly with maximum exercise capacity in univariate analysis (r = 0.41, P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that spontaneous physical activity was related to weight loss, blood hemoglobin concentration, C-reactive protein, and to subjectively scored items of physical functioning and bodily pain (SF-36; P < 0.05-0.004). Anxiety and depression were not related to spontaneous physical activity. Patient survival was predicted only by weight loss and serum albumin levels (P < 0.01), although there was no such prediction for spontaneous physical activity. Daily physical-rest activities represent variables which probably reflect complex mental physiologic and metabolic interactions. Thus, activity-rest monitoring provides a new dimension in the evaluation of medical and drug

  19. Pain in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, K.C.P.; Besse, K.; Wagemans, M.; Zuurmond, W.; Giezeman, M.J.; Lataster, A.; Mekhail, N.; Burton, A.W.; Kleef, M. van; Huygen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Pain in patients with cancer can be refractory to pharmacological treatment or intolerable side effects of pharmacological treatment may seriously disturb patients' quality of life. Specific interventional pain management techniques can be an effective alternative for those patients. The appropriate

  20. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L

    2014-01-01

    implications of muscle dysfunction in cancer patients. The efficacy of exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate cancer-related muscle dysfunction is also discussed. DESIGN: We identified 194 studies examining muscular outcomes in cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. RESULTS: Muscle...... in oncology practice. Significant progress has been made over the last decade in the field of exercise oncology, indicating that exercise training constitutes a potent modulator of skeletal muscle function in patients with cancer. CONCLUSION: There are clear associations between muscle dysfunction...... dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...

  1. Cachexia among US cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Susan T; Van Doren, Bryce A; Roy, Debosree; Noone, Joshua M; Zacherle, Emily; Blanchette, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition and results in poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess hospitalization incidence, patient characteristics, and medical cost and burden of cancer cachexia in the US. This study used a cross-sectional analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) for 2009. Five cancers reported to have the highest cachexia incidence were assessed. The hospitalization incidence related to cachexia was estimated by cancer type, cost and length of stay were compared, and descriptive statistics were reported for each cancer type, as well as differences being compared between patients with and without cachexia. Risk of inpatient death was higher for patients with cachexia in lung cancer (OR = 1.32; CI = 1.20-1.46) and in all cancers combined (OR = 1.76; CI = 1.67-1.85). The presence of cachexia increased length of stay in lung (IRR = 1.05; CI = 1.03-1.08), Kaposi's sarcoma (IRR = 1.47; CI = 1.14-1.89) and all cancers combined (IRR = 1.09; CI = 1.08-1.10). Additionally, cachectic patients in the composite category had a longer hospitalization stay compared to non-cachectic patients (3-9 days for those with cachexia and 2-7 days for those without cachexia). The cost of inpatient stay was significantly higher in cachexic than non-cachexic lung cancer patients ($13,560 vs $13 190; p Cachexia increases hospitalization costs and length of stay in several cancer types. Identifying the medical burden associated with cancer cachexia will assist in developing an international consensus for recognition and coding by the medical community and ultimately an effective treatment plans for cancer cachexia.

  2. Survival of Sami cancer patients

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    Leena Soininen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30 and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20, indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  3. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality.

  4. Chronic diseases among older cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Deckx, L.D.; Akker, M.A. van der; Metsemakers, J.M.; Knottnerus, A.K.; Schellevis, F.G.; Buntinx, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: With the growing number of older cancer patients, the burden of chronic diseases among older cancer patients will become increasingly important. Chronic diseases often interfere with treatment decisions and prognosis for cancer patients. However, little is known about the occurrence of chronic diseases among older cancer patients. Aim: We aim to examine the frequency of pre-existing and subsequent chronic diseases among cancer patients above age 60 in comparison with non-cancer ...

  5. Bone health in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, R; Body, J J; Aapro, M

    2014-01-01

    There are three distinct areas of cancer management that make bone health in cancer patients of increasing clinical importance. First, bone metastases are common in many solid tumours, notably those arising from the breast, prostate and lung, as well as multiple myeloma, and may cause major...... cancer for many patients resulting in a major reduction in skeletal complications, reduced bone pain and improved quality of life. Secondly, many of the treatments we use to treat cancer patients have effects on reproductive hormones, which are critical for the maintenance of normal bone remodelling....... This endocrine disturbance results in accelerated bone loss and an increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures that can have a significant negative impact on the lives of the rapidly expanding number of long-term cancer survivors. Finally, the bone marrow micro-environment is also intimately involved...

  6. Cancer Patients Caregivers Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela de Araújo Lamino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional study, carried out at the outpatient clinic of an oncology hospital. Data were collected from 88 caregivers of cancer patients using the Caregiver General Comfort Questionnaire (GCQ to assess the caregivers’ comfort. The caregivers’ GCQ score mean was 203.9; better comfort scores was associated with age, care time and current occupation; positive aspects of comfort were related to the fact that caregivers felt loved, to patients’ physical and environmental comfort and to caregivers’ spirituality. 203.9; better comfort scores were associated with age of the caregiver and current occupation; positive aspects of comfort were related to the fact that caregivers felt loved, to patients’ physical and environmental comfort and to caregivers’ spirituality. Caregivers, who didn’t have a paid job or leisure’s activities showed a worse GCQ. The GCQ scale can help to identify factors that interfere in caregivers’ comfort, as well as needs that can be modified through health professionals’ interventions.

  7. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber-Durlacher, Judith E; Brennan, Mike T; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Gibson, Rachel J; Eilers, June G; Waltimo, Tuomas; Bots, Casper P; Michelet, Marisol; Sollecito, Thomas P; Rouleau, Tanya S; Sewnaik, Aniel; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Fliedner, Monica C; Silverman, Sol; Spijkervet, Fred K L

    2012-03-01

    Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools, prevalence, complications, and impact on quality of life in patients with a variety of different cancers, particularly in those treated with curative chemoradiation for head and neck cancer. The literature search was limited to the English language and included both MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE. The search focused on papers reporting dysphagia as a side effect of cancer and cancer therapy. We identified relevant literature through the primary literature search and by articles identified in references. A wide range of assessment tools for dysphagia was identified. Dysphagia is related to a number of factors such as direct impact of the tumor, cancer resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy and to newer therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Concomitant oral complications such as xerostomia may exacerbate subjective dysphagia. Most literature focuses on head and neck cancer, but dysphagia is also common in other types of cancer. Swallowing impairment is a clinically relevant acute and long-term complication in patients with a wide variety of cancers. More prospective studies on the course of dysphagia and impact on quality of life from baseline to long-term follow-up after various treatment modalities, including targeted therapies, are needed.

  8. Cancer patients and mass media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Rajer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUNDNowadays cancer patients tend to be more involved in the medical decision process. Active participation improves health outcomes and patient satisfaction. To participate effectively patients require a huge amount of information, but time limits make it impossible to satisfy all information needs at clinics. We tried to find out which kind of media cancer patients use when searching for information and how often. Lastly, we try to find out how popular the Internet is in this regard.METODSIn this research we invited cancer patients, who had regular clinic examinations at the Oncology Institute between 21st and 25th May in 2012. We carried out a prospective research by anonymous questionnaires. We were investigating which media were used and how often. We analysed results with descriptive statistics, ANOVA, the χ²-Test and the t-test.RESULTS478 of 919 questionnaires distributed among cancer patients were returned. Mean age was 59.9 years. 61 % of responders were female, and the most common level of education was high school (33 %. Most common cancer type was breast cancer (33 %, followed by gastrointestinal and lung cancer. Patients search for information most often on television (81.4% responders, followed by specialized brochures (78%, internet (70.8% and newspapers (67.6%. Patients who do not use media for information searching are older than average (62.5 years vs. 59.9 years; p<0,000.CONCLUSIONSAccording to our results patients search for information most often on television, followed by brochures, internet and newspapers. Older patients less often search for information. This data might help doctors in everyday clinical practice.

  9. Social comparisons in cancer patients

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    Abraham P. Buunk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social comparison refers to relating one ́s own characteristics to those of other individuals. Due to the enhanced degree of physical distress, depression, and uncertainty, cancer patients tend to compare themselves often with other patients, especially when they are high in social comparison orientation, i.e. in the dispositional tendency to compare themselves with others. Downward comparison, i.e. with others who are worse- off, may contribute to the well-being of cancer patients when it is interpreted as a contrast, i.e. when it is emphased how much better-off one is oneself. Nevertheless, cancer patients tend to prefer information about other patients who are better-off, and such upward comparison may improve coping and contribute to well-being. 

  10. Hope in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Turan Kavradim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, which is one of the major health problems leading to despair, uncertainty, pain and suffering, is perceived as a serious and chronic disease. Cancer negatively affects individuals' quality of life due to the physical, psychological, and socio-economic problems. Today, despite inspiring advances in diagnosis and treatment of cancer and increase in survival rates of patients, appearance of physical and psycho-social disorders during cancer course disrupts the adaptation mechanisms of patients and undermines expectations for the future. Most of the time in clinical practice, clinicians focus on physical assessments and treatment planning of cancer patients primarily, ignoring social, psychological, economic and cultural factors related with the disease. This approach definitely influences patients' hope levels and their effective dealing with the disease. The aim of this article is to guide medical staff and increase awareness about the concept of hope in patients with cancer. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 154-164

  11. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Barbosa de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib, corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  12. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade, E-mail: wolney@cardiol.br [Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares da Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  13. Personality traits in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhal, Nazim Serdar; Demirhan, Salih; Satici, Celal; Cinar, Caner; Kinar, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the personality traits of cancer patients in different treatment settings, and to correlate the demographics with the personality features. A total of 237 patients referred either to Marmara University School of Medicine (MUSM) Oncology Outpatient Unit or to the private office of the faculty between March 10th and April 22nd, 2010 were enrolled in the study. The Big Five Mini Test was used to evaluate the 40 personality traits of the patients. The study group consisted of 98 males (41.35%) and 139 females (58.65%) with a mean age of 51. Out of the 237, 73.9% had an educational level beyond the junior high school, and 47.3% of all patients reported a positive family history for cancer. A significant difference in terms of reconcilability, extraversion, and responsibility was observed between patients admitting to the university outpatient clinic and the private office (pcancer, age and marital status showed no relevance to their characters. No discordance was observed between the self-analysis of the patient and the patient's relatives. Patients with cancer are typically highly reconcilable and responsible, moderately stable, open and extraverted.

  14. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Brennan, M.T.; Verdonck- de Leeuw, I.M.; Gibson, R.J.; Eilers, J.G.; Waltimo, T.; Bots, C.P.; Michelet, M.; Sollecito, T.P.; Rouleau, T.S.; Sewnaik, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Fliedner, M.C.; Silverman, S.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools,

  15. Pegfilgrastim in pediatric cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poele , te Esther; Kamps, WA; Tamminga, RYJ; Leew, JA; Postma, A; de Bont, ESJM

    2005-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a major dose-limiting side effect of intensive chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recently, pegfilgrastim (a product with a long half-life, resulting in once-per-cycle dosage) was introduced to prevent neutropenia in adults. The authors report 32 episodes of

  16. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Brennan, Mike T.; Leeuw, Irma M. Verdonck-de; Gibson, Rachel J.; Eilers, June G.; Waltimo, Tuomas; Bots, Casper P.; Michelet, Marisol; Sollecito, Thomas P.; Rouleau, Tanya S.; Sewnaik, Aniel; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Fliedner, Monica C.; Silverman, Sol; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.

    Purpose Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools,

  17. Chronic diseases among older cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckx, L.D.; Akker, M.A. van der; Metsemakers, J.M.; Knottnerus, A.K.; Schellevis, F.G.; Buntinx, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: With the growing number of older cancer patients, the burden of chronic diseases among older cancer patients will become increasingly important. Chronic diseases often interfere with treatment decisions and prognosis for cancer patients. However, little is known about the occurrence of

  18. Advocacy groups for breast cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, M.; Batt, S

    1995-01-01

    Breast cancer patient advocacy groups emerged in the 1990s to support and empower women with breast cancer. Women with cancer and oncologists tend to have divergent perspectives on how breast cancer prevention should be defined and what the priorities for research should be. As their American counterparts have done, breast cancer patient advocates in Canada are seeking greater participation in decision making with respect to research. To date they have had more input into research policy deci...

  19. Iron deficiency in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Augusto Naoum

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anemia is a frequent complication in cancer patients, both at diagnosis and during treatment, with a multifactorial etiology in most cases. Iron deficiency is among the most common causes of anemia in this setting and can develop in nearly half of patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Surprisingly, this fact is usually neglected by the attending physician in a way that proper and prompt investigation of the iron status is either not performed or postponed. In cancer patients, functional iron deficiency is the predominant mechanism, in which iron availability is reduced due to disease or the therapy-related inflammatory process. Hence, serum ferritin is not reliable in detecting iron deficiency in this setting, whereas transferrin saturation seems more appropriate for this purpose. Besides, lack of bioavailable iron can be further worsened by the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents that increase iron utilization in the bone marrow. Iron deficiency can cause anemia or worsen pre-existing anemia, leading to a decline in performance status and adherence to treatment, with possible implications in clinical outcome. Due to its frequency and importance, treatment of this condition is already recommended in many specialty guidelines and should be performed preferably with intravenous iron. The evidences regarding the efficacy of this treatment are solid, with response gain when combined with erythropoiesis stimulating agents and significant increments in hemoglobin as monotherapy. Among intravenous iron formulations, slow release preparations present more favorable pharmacological characteristics and efficacy in cancer patients.

  20. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fatigue Among Older Advanced Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Wen-Hao; Yeh, En-Tien; Chen, Hong-Wen; Wu, Meng-Hao; Lai, Yuen-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fatigue among older patients and cancer patients is often reported in the literatures. However, relatively few studies can conclude whether fatigue happens more frequently in older patients with advanced cancer. We designed our study to examine the prevalence and features of fatigue among older advanced cancer patients in Taiwan. Methods: Because self-reporting from patients is the most effective method to measure fatigue, the instrument of International Classification of Disea...

  2. Oral complications in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  3. Microbial dysbiosis in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sobhani, Iradj; Tap, Julien; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Roperch, Jean P; Letulle, Sophie; Langella, Philippe; Corthier, Gérard; Tran Van Nhieu, Jeanne; Furet, Jean P

    2011-01-01

    The composition of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to health status. The aim was to analyze the microbiota of normal and colon cancer patients in order to establish cancer-related dysbiosis...

  4. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  5. Iron deficiency in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoum, Flávio Augusto

    Anemia is a frequent complication in cancer patients, both at diagnosis and during treatment, with a multifactorial etiology in most cases. Iron deficiency is among the most common causes of anemia in this setting and can develop in nearly half of patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Surprisingly, this fact is usually neglected by the attending physician in a way that proper and prompt investigation of the iron status is either not performed or postponed. In cancer patients, functional iron deficiency is the predominant mechanism, in which iron availability is reduced due to disease or the therapy-related inflammatory process. Hence, serum ferritin is not reliable in detecting iron deficiency in this setting, whereas transferrin saturation seems more appropriate for this purpose. Besides, lack of bioavailable iron can be further worsened by the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents that increase iron utilization in the bone marrow. Iron deficiency can cause anemia or worsen pre-existing anemia, leading to a decline in performance status and adherence to treatment, with possible implications in clinical outcome. Due to its frequency and importance, treatment of this condition is already recommended in many specialty guidelines and should be performed preferably with intravenous iron. The evidences regarding the efficacy of this treatment are solid, with response gain when combined with erythropoiesis stimulating agents and significant increments in hemoglobin as monotherapy. Among intravenous iron formulations, slow release preparations present more favorable pharmacological characteristics and efficacy in cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Adverse events in hospitalised cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haukland, Ellinor; von Plessen, Christian; Nieder, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients with cancer are often treated by many healthcare providers, receive complex and potentially toxic treatments that can increase the risk for iatrogenic harm. The aim of this study is to investigate whether hospitalised cancer patients are at higher risk of adverse events (AEs......) compared to a general hospital population. Material and methods: A total of 6720 patient records were retrospectively reviewed comparing AEs in hospitalised cancer patients to a general hospital population in Norway, using the IHI Global Trigger Tool method. Results: 24.2 percent of admissions for cancer...... patients had an AE compared to 17.4% of admissions of other patients (pcancer patients did not have a higher rate of AEs per 1000 patient days compared to other patients, 37.1 vs. 36.0 (p¼.65, rr 0.94, 95% CI 0.90–1.18). No particular cancer category is at higher...

  7. Psychiatric Problems in Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munevver Tunel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a physical disorder with concurrent mental and social components. During cancer, the feelings of fear, hopelessness, guilt, helplessness, abandonment perceived as a crisis leading to destruction in the suffering person. Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among cancer patients is approximately 50% and most of disorders are related with the occurrence of cancer and cancer treatment. Majority of patients present with major depression, adjustment disorder, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, suicidial ideation, and delirium. Treatment of psychiatric disorders and cancer therapy should be conducted along with special consideration of drug interactions. This article reviews the adaptation process experienced by individuals during diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, it psychological effects, resulting psychiatric comorbidites and their treatments. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(3.000: 189-219

  8. Staphylococcal Blood Stream Infections in Cancer Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer Patients. Dear Sir,. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of the blood stream infections (BSI) due to their immune-compromised status, repeated ... Table 1: Details of the Staphylococci isolated from BSI. Staphylococcal isolates. Number. (%). Number of methicillin resistant isolates (%). Number of patients who.

  9. Analysis of Maryland cancer patient participation in National Cancer Institute-supported cancer treatment clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquet, Claudia R; Ellison, Gary L; Mishra, Shiraz I

    2009-05-01

    We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI's Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved.

  10. Pregnancy and abortion in breast cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in pregnancy is by itself not an indication for abortion. We document the case histories of 2 patients with breast cancer (recurrent or advanced) who elected to carry pregnancies to term. Pregnancy concurrent with or subsequent to breast cancer is not associated with a worse prognosis than would be observed ...

  11. Exercise for Cancer Patients; Guidelines and Precautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winningham, Maryl L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Research and clinical observation indicate that exercise is a promising restorative technique for cancer patients. Guidelines for designing an exercise program are offered, including considerations for initial screening and ongoing monitoring of patients. (Author/MT)

  12. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gordana Ristevska-Dimitrоvska; Petar Stefanovski; Snezhana Smichkoska; Marija Raleva; Beti Dejanova

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A significant number of breast cancer patients, during their life with the diagnosis, experience emotional distress in the form of depression and anxiety. Psychological resilience is the ability of a person to protect his/her mental health when faced with adverse circumstances such as the cancer diagnosis. This study aims to assess the resilience in breast cancer patients and to explore whether depression affects the resilience. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred eighteen (218) ...

  13. Haemorheological Changes in African Breast Cancer Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    ABSTRACT. Several Studies have indicated the existence of thrombo-embolic complications in cancer patients and that this ... There were significant differences between the controls and breast cancer patients in all the parameters measured. (p<0.05). .... the previous work of Trosseau2 which suggested an evidence of ...

  14. Taste and smell changes in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJpma, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cancer often experience changes in taste and smell perception during chemotherapy. The aim of this dissertation was to investigate taste and smell changes and short- and long-term effects of chemotherapy in a homogeneous population of testicular cancer patients treated with

  15. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  16. Lung Cancer in the Older Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Julie A; Zinner, Ralph G; Unger, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Cancers of the lung and bronchus are the leading cause of cancer deaths in men and women in the United States, and two-thirds of new lung cancer cases are diagnosed in patients over age 65. There are few dedicated clinical trials in the elderly, leading to both undertreatment and overtreatment biases. Even fit older adults experience age-related decline in physiologic reserve, and additional issues of polypharmacy, geriatric syndromes, and inadequate social support are not uncommon, leading to disparities in treatment and survival. This review discusses the challenges in balancing benefits and harms in management of lung cancer in elderly patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient navigation and the American Cancer Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, Angelina

    2013-05-01

    To review the evolution, implementation, and development of the American Cancer Society's Navigator program. American Cancer Society reports and published articles The American Cancer Society has a long history of supporting the growth and development of navigation, from provision of funding for Dr Freeman's pilot program, to developing a program that includes training, policy development, and research. The Society continues to play a key role in providing leadership to advance patient navigation as a means to improve patients' access to care, movement through the health care system while furthering patient centered care, patients' quality of life and eliminating health outcome disparities. With the American Cancer Society navigation model, navigators are trained to meet with patients, identify barriers to care, and work with institutional health care teams to support patients and assist staff with aspects of care that can be managed by non-medical personnel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Why Cancer Patients Seek Islamic Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhami, Norhasmilia; Muhamad, Mazanah Bt; Krauss, Steven Eric

    2016-10-01

    Islamic healing is frequently referred to as the treatment of choice by many Muslim cancer patients in Malaysia. Despite its widespread use, there is limited information relating to patients' healing preferences. With rising cancer rates in the country, this issue has become a concern to public health policy makers. The purpose of this study was to understand why cancer patients seek Islamic healing. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 18 cancer patients. The findings indicate three main reasons: (1) recommendations from family, friends and doctors; (2) belief in Islamic healing and (3) the perceived ineffectiveness and dissatisfaction with conventional treatments. Islamic healing will likely continue to be popular complementary cancer treatment in Malaysia as it is grounded in strong cultural and religious beliefs.

  19. Psychosocial Intervention In Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potočníková Jana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide for males, and the fifth most common cancer overall. Using of autogenic training could reduce the influence of ADT and raise quality of prostate cancer patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of autogenic training in patients with prostate cancer. Patients were divided to experimental and control group. Experimental group participated in fourteen weeks long autogenic training program. Control group performed usual daily activities. Every subject of research performed input and output diagnostics which monitored psychical states of patients by psychological standardized tests - Differential questionnaire of depression (DDF and Questionnaire of anxiety (STAI X1. Our data showed autogenic training program significant improved depressions symptoms and anxiety in experimental research group (p ≤ 0.05, however there was no main change of depression symptoms and anxiety values for control group (p = n.s..

  20. Survival of ovarian cancer patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen McKinnon; Noer, Mette Calundann; Sperling, Cecilie Dyg

    2016-01-01

    linked via the patients' personal identification number and the analyses included data on cancer stage, age, survival, surgery status and comorbidity. The computed outcome measures were age-adjusted mortality rates and age-adjusted overall and relative survival rates for one and five years. RESULTS: We......BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate, especially in Denmark where mortality rates have been reported higher than in adjacent countries with similar demographics. This study therefore examined recent survival and mortality among Danish ovarian cancer patients over an 18-year study...... period. METHODS: This nationwide registry-based observational study used data from the Danish Gynecology Cancer Database, Danish Pathology Registry, and Danish National Patient Registry. All patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 were included in the study. The data sources were...

  1. Prognostic factors in young ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klar, M; Hasenburg, A; Hasanov, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We evaluated in a large study meta-database of prospectively randomised phase III trials the prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients 40 years of age with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: A total of 5055 patients...... epithelial ovarian cancer, excellent performance status, who had received complete macroscopic upfront cytoreduction and ≥5 chemotherapy cycles. RESULTS: For patients

  2. [Touching cancer: shiatsu as complementary treatment to support cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argash, Oz; Caspi, Opher

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the interest of cancer patients in receiving complementary medicine therapies as supportive measures to cure the disease. In response, medical units that combine conventional and complementary medicine (integrative medicine) have been established in leading cancer centers worldwide. In Israel, a special integrative medicine unit that combines mind-body, Chinese medicine, nutrition, herbs, supplements, and manual therapies (such as shiatsu) before, during and after conventional anti-cancer therapies has been established as an integral part of the Davidoff Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2006. Shiatsu represents a group of manual therapeutic techniques, including acupressure. Shiatsu offers cancer patients a non-pharmacologic method to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life throughout the course of illness. Research indicates that acupressure is relatively effective and safe for common cancer-related symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and insomnia. In our experience, shiatsu is also relatively effective and safe for other common symptoms such as fatigue, muscular pain and body image dissatisfaction. Yet, insufficient evidence exists to delineate the best means by which shiatsu and other manual therapies could or should be integrated into routine cancer care. The purpose of the present paper is to describe what is currently known about this topic in order to support decision-making that is based on facts, rather than on myths and misconceptions. We call for more research that examines the effectiveness and safety of shiatsu and other manual therapies in the care of cancer patients.

  3. Cancer patients and characteristics of pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenberg, U.; Paul, T. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Feuersenger, A. [Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Goyen, M. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Kroeger, K. [Department of Angiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany)], E-mail: knut.kroeger@uk-essen.de

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To check the hypothesis that cancer patients suffer from extended pulmonary embolism (PE) more frequently than patients without cancer we analysed PEs proved by computed tomography (CT)-imaging. Patients and methods: One hundred and fifty consecutive CT scans at the University Hospital of Essen from March 2002 until December 2004 which proved a definite case of pulmonary embolism were retrospectively reviewed (79 men, 71 women; mean age 57 {+-} 15 years). Underlying disease and blood parameters were included (haemoglobin, haematocrit, fibrinogen and total protein, if determined within 48 h before the CT scans). Results: Patients with malignant disease were older (59 {+-} 12 years vs. 54 {+-} 19 years, p = 0.05) and tend to have a higher rate of central PEs (52% vs. 34%, p = 0.08) than patients without malignancies. The odds of a central PE in cancer patients was about twice as high as in patients without a malignant disease (Odds ratio: 2.08, 95%-confidence interval: 1.06-4.10; age-adjusted Odds ratio 1.88, 95%-confidence interval: 0.92-3.84). Additional adjustment for the clinical information dyspnoea, inhospital patient and clinically expected PE did not deteriorate the odds. Thrombus density determined in patients with central PE only shows a trend towards a lower density in patients with malignant disease (52 {+-} 13 HE vs. 45 {+-} 15 HE, p = 0.13). There is no statistical evidence that thrombus density is related to one of the blood parameters or even blood density measured in the pulmonary artery. Conclusion: Although this is a retrospective study including a small number of patients it shows that cancer patients are at a higher risk for central PE than patients without cancer. Characteristics of the intrapulmonal thrombus in cancer and non-cancer patients seem to be different.

  4. Understanding male cancer patients' barriers to participating in cancer rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handberg, C; Lomborg, K; Nielsen, C V; Oliffe, J L; Midtgaard, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to describe male cancer survivors' barriers towards participation in cancer rehabilitation as a means to guiding future targeted men's cancer rehabilitation. Symbolic Interactionism along with the interpretive descriptive methodology guided the study of 35 male cancer survivors representing seven cancer types. Data were generated through a 5-month fieldwork study comprising participant observations, semi-structured individual interviews and informal conversations. The analyses revealed two overarching findings shedding light on male cancer survivors' barriers to rehabilitation: 'Fear of losing control' and 'Striving for normality'. While 'Fear of losing control' signified what the men believed rehabilitation would invoke: 'Reduced manliness', 'Sympathy and dependency' and 'Confrontation with death', 'Striving for normality' was based on what the men believed rehabilitation would hinder: 'Autonomy and purpose', 'Solidarity and fellowship' and 'Forget and move on'. This study of male cancer survivors' and cancer rehabilitation documents how masculine ideals may constitute barriers for participation in rehabilitation and provides insights about why men are underrepresented in rehabilitation. The findings can guide practice to develop research-based rehabilitation approaches focused on preserving control and normality. Further empirical evidence is needed to: (1) explore the conduct of health professionals' towards male cancer patients and (2) address gender inequalities in cancer rehabilitation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  6. [Spiritual care model for terminal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ju-Fen; Lin, Ya-Ching; Huang, Pai-Ho; Wei, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Jia-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Providing spiritual care to patients with advanced cancer may improve the quality of life of these patients and help them experience a good death. Cancer patients are eager for additional spiritual care and for a sense of peace at the end of their life. However, spirituality is an abstract concept. The literature on spiritual care focuses primarily on elaborations of spirituality theory. Thus, first-line medical care professionals lack clear guidelines for managing the spiritual needs of terminal cancer patients. The purposes of this article were to: 1) introduce a spiritual care model based on the concept of repair and recovery of relationships that addresses the relationship between the self and God, others, id, and objects and 2) set out a four-step strategy for this model that consists of understanding, empathizing, guiding, and growing. This article provides operational guidelines for the spiritual care of terminal cancer patients.

  7. Sleep Dysfunction in Patients with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Lavinia; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Opinion statement Sleep complaints are common in cancer patients. Insomnia is particularly a concern in this population. Although pharmacotherapy is the most prescribed treatment for sleep disturbances, there is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for insomnia in all patients, including those with cancer. CBT for insomnia is a flexible treatment, tailored to the needs of a specific patient, and focusing on behavioral and psychologic skills that foster better sleep and lower anxiety. Many cancer patients with insomnia may be hesitant to use drugs for their sleep treatment because they are already overwhelmed by the chemical and pharmacologic treatments they are prescribed for the cancer; thus, CBT may become the treatment of choice for insomnia in these patients. PMID:17716597

  8. [Metabolic emergencies in critically ill cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namendys-Silva, Silvio A; Hernández-Garay, Marisol; García-Guillén, Francisco J; Correa-García, Paulina; Herrera Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-11-01

    Severe metabolic alterations frequently occur in critically ill cancer patients; hypercalcemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, tumor lysis syndrome, metabolic complications of renal failure and lactic acidosis. Cancer patients with metabolic emergencies should be treated in a medical oncology department or an intensive care unit. Most metabolic emergencies can be treated properly when they are identified early. The clinician should consider that the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients depends on their primary disease, comorbidities and organ failure. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Long Term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis With earlier cancer diagnosis among older cancer patients, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have long lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose and properly manage the long term toxicities of cancer treatment, in order to maintain quality of life of older cancer survivors PMID:26614861

  10. Nutrition in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Varkey, Prashanth; Tang, Wen-Ruay; Tan, Ngian Chye

    2010-01-01

    Anorexia and cachexia frequently complicate the late stages of malignancy and can be a prominent feature of early disease. The resulting weight loss significantly affects the morbidity and mortality of the cancer patient. A fundamental understanding of nutrition and the pathophysiology of cancer cachexia will aid in diligent treatment decisions to achieve optimal results. The pathophysiology of cancer cachexia is discussed, together with methods of nutritional assessment, nutritional requirem...

  11. Perioperative nutrition support in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2012-10-01

    Malnutrition and weight loss negatively affect outcomes in surgical cancer patients. Decades of research have sought to identify the most appropriate use of nutrition support in these patients. National and international guidelines help to direct clinicians' use of nutrition support in surgical patients, but a number of specific issues concerning the use of nutrition support continue to evolve. This review focuses on 5 key issues related to perioperative nutrition support in cancer patients: (1) Which perioperative cancer patients should receive nutrition support? (2) How can the nutrition status and requirements of these patients be optimally assessed? (3) What is the optimal route of administration (parenteral nutrition vs enteral nutrition) and composition of nutrition support in this setting? (4) When should feedings be initiated? (5) What is the role of glycemic control in these patients?

  12. A Model for Counselling Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevne, Ronna F.; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl L.; Williamson, F. Helen A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a model for counseling cancer patients that integrates the unique features of the cancer experience within a basic counseling framework. It combines a nine-step problem-solving approach with a biopsychosocial perspective, placing greater emphasis on the person than the problem. Utilizes innovative questioning techniques and strategies.…

  13. Antioxidant status in canine cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Plavec Tanja; Nemec-Svete Alenka; Butinar J.; Tozon Nataša; Prezelj Marija; Kandel Bettina; Kessler M

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the antioxidant status in canine cancer patients. Patients with multicentric lymphoma, oral fibrosarcoma, mast cell tumor, malignant melanoma, appendicular osteosarcoma, nasal tumors and peripheral ameloblastoma were selected. Each group consisted of 6 patients. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and enzyme antioxidants: glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured in serum and whole blood, respectively,...

  14. Port-a-caths in cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-01-01

    Jan 1, 1990 ... Abstract We report on 91 patients with cancer who under- went the insertion of89 venous and 4 hepatic arte- rial, implanted vascular ports (port-a-caths) for periods of up to 33 Illonths (total 1 525 patient-. ITlOnths). There were 1 fatal, 9 serious and 8 Illinor. cOlnplications in 18 patients which are described.

  15. History of Depression in Lung Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iachina, M; Brønserud, M M; Jakobsen, E

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the influence of a history of depression in the process of diagnostic evaluation and the choice of treatment in lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on all patients with non-small cell lung cancer who were registered in 2008-2014; in total, 27 234 patients....... To estimate the effect of depression on the diagnostic process and the choice of treatment in lung cancer we fitted a logistic regression model and a Cox regression model adjusting for age, gender, resection and stage. RESULTS: Depression in a patient's anamnesis had no significant effect on the delay...... that patients with a history of periodic depression need special attention when diagnosed with lung cancer....

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Soylu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the structured but flexible psychosocial interventions that could be applied to patients with cancer. In many studies the positive effects of cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing psychological morbidity and improving the quality of life of cancer patients have been shown. In this article, the contents and techniques of adapted cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with cancer and its effectiveness in commonly seen psychiatric disorders have been reviewed. The aim of this article is to contribute positively to physicians and nurses in Turkey for early detection of psychological distress and referral to the therapist that would clearly increase the quality of life of cancer patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(3.000: 257-270

  17. Most Breast Cancer Patients Have Help Choosing Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167104.html Most Breast Cancer Patients Have Help Choosing Treatments Support system can be ... cancer don't go it alone. Many breast cancer patients depend on family and friends to help them ...

  18. Management of Malnutrition in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yu-juan; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien; Lee, Jang-Ming; Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition in patients with esophageal cancer is estimated to be as high as 78.9%. Malnutrition in esophageal cancer is significantly correlated with an increased risk of treatment toxicity and postoperative complications. It is therefore important to maintain an optimal nutritional status, particularly during the course of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This article aims to review the mechanism, evaluation, and management strategies of malnutrition for patients with esophage...

  19. Management of Malnutrition in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Juan Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of malnutrition in patients with esophageal cancer is estimated to be as high as 78.9%. Malnutrition in esophageal cancer is significantly correlated with an increased risk of treatment toxicity and postoperative complications. It is therefore important to maintain an optimal nutritional status, particularly during the course of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This article aims to review the mechanism, evaluation, and management strategies of malnutrition for patients with esophageal cancer. The optimal management strategy involved both non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. We hope that by increasing awareness among professionals, early detection and timely intervention could lead to improved care.

  20. ESPEN guidelines on nutrition in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, Jann; Bachmann, Patrick; Baracos, Vickie; Barthelemy, Nicole; Bertz, Hartmut; Bozzetti, Federico; Fearon, Ken; Hütterer, Elisabeth; Isenring, Elizabeth; Kaasa, Stein; Krznaric, Zeljko; Laird, Barry; Larsson, Maria; Laviano, Alessandro; Mühlebach, Stefan; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Oldervoll, Line; Ravasco, Paula; Solheim, Tora; Strasser, Florian; de van der Schueren, Marian; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2017-02-01

    Cancers are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the number of new cases is expected to rise significantly over the next decades. At the same time, all types of cancer treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and pharmacological therapies are improving in sophistication, precision and in the power to target specific characteristics of individual cancers. Thus, while many cancers may still not be cured they may be converted to chronic diseases. All of these treatments, however, are impeded or precluded by the frequent development of malnutrition and metabolic derangements in cancer patients, induced by the tumor or by its treatment. These evidence-based guidelines were developed to translate current best evidence and expert opinion into recommendations for multi-disciplinary teams responsible for identification, prevention, and treatment of reversible elements of malnutrition in adult cancer patients. The guidelines were commissioned and financially supported by ESPEN and by the European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAAC), an EU level initiative. Members of the guideline group were selected by ESPEN to include a range of professions and fields of expertise. We searched for meta-analyses, systematic reviews and comparative studies based on clinical questions according to the PICO format. The evidence was evaluated and merged to develop clinical recommendations using the GRADE method. Due to the deficits in the available evidence, relevant still open questions were listed and should be addressed by future studies. Malnutrition and a loss of muscle mass are frequent in cancer patients and have a negative effect on clinical outcome. They may be driven by inadequate food intake, decreased physical activity and catabolic metabolic derangements. To screen for, prevent, assess in detail, monitor and treat malnutrition standard operating procedures, responsibilities and a quality control process should be established at each

  1. Hyperthyroidism in patients with thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Kumar, Gaurav; Guner, Karen; Kaddour, Hesham

    2016-06-01

    We present a retrospective case series of patients with hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. Our goal was to look at their clinical characteristics and outcomes to determine which patients would require further investigation. We reviewed the case notes of all patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of thyroid cancer and biochemical evidence of hyperthyroidism who had been treated at a thyroid cancer center from January 2006 through October 2013. During that time, 66 patients had been diagnosed with thyroid cancer. Of these, 8 patients (12%)-all women, aged 29 to 87 years (mean: 55.6; median: 50.5)-had biochemical evidence of hyperthyroidism. Among these 8 patients, 4 had an autonomously functioning toxic nodule (AFTN), 3 were diagnosed with Graves disease, and 1 had a toxic multinodular goiter. Five patients had suspicious features on preoperative ultrasonography. All 8 patients were diagnosed with the papillary type of thyroid carcinoma. The mean size of the tumor in the 4 patients with AFTN was significantly larger than it was in those with Graves disease (42.3 ± 23.8 mm vs. 3.8 ± 1.6; p = 0.04). The 3 patients with Graves disease all had incidentally found papillary microcarcinoma. Between these two groups, the patients with AFTN had a poorer prognosis; 2 of them had extracapsular invasion and lymph node metastasis, and another died of her disease. We found that the incidence of hyperthyroidism in thyroid cancer patients was relatively high (12%). In contrast to what has previously been reported in the literature, patients with AFTN seem to have more aggressive disease and poorer outcomes than do patients with Graves disease. Any suspicious nodule associated with hyperthyroidism should be evaluated carefully.

  2. Care in the perception of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Henriques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being a cancer patient is a unique and singular. The cancer disease associated with pain and suffering is a challenging process for the sufferer, for whom have around or for those caring for the sick. Pain, considered the 5 th vital sign, is often identified as the main complaint of our patients suffering from cancer. We dare to say that to explore the essence of the care provided by nurses and primary health care to cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time found in his home and family, we would be helping to build a know -how by itself, with positive externalities for patients, families, professionals and nursing itself. Methods: Ask "What does Care for Nurses and primary health care for cancer patients with prolonged pain in time for your family?" we may lead the cornerstone of our problems, by studying quantitative nature using a questionnaire and a significance level of care. Results: the average age is 59.27 years, mostly women, 51% are married and in 29.8% of studies has only completed the first cycle of education. The majority of cancer patients who participated in this study share a room with a relative. In regard to aspects of their pain, cancer patients referred to 47.1% of cases, that their pain started weeks ago and 38.5% even refers to the pain persists for months. The pain felt by these patients is not the severe type, in 68.3% of cases, and has an average intensity of 5, although we have 25% of these patients with pain greater than a 6.75. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of nurses who provide care at primary health reveals an alpha of 0.8857 and 0.9025 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time they are at home shows an alpha of 0.6672and 0.7374 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer family patients with prolonged pain shows an alpha of 0.6712 and an alpha standardized 0

  3. Cancer patients' coping styles and doctor-patient communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, L. M.; Visser, M. R.; van Zuuren, F. J.; Rietbroek, R. C.; Lammes, F. B.; de Haes, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Monitoring and blunting styles have become relevant concepts regarding their potential impact on patients' and doctors' behaviors. The present study aimed at investigating the relation between cancer patients' coping styles and doctor-patient communication and global affect. Coping styles were

  4. Bone health in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñana, B; Cózar, J M; Alcaraz, A; Morote, J; Gómez-Veiga, F J; Solsona, E; Rodríguez-Antolín, A; Carballido, J

    2014-12-01

    In patients with prostate cancer, bone health is compromised by advanced age at diagnosis, androgen suppression treatments and the developmentofbone metastases. In this paper the medical literature is reviewed in order to update the state of the art on their incidence, prevention and management. A literature review about bone involvement in patients with prostate cancer in different clinical settings is performed. Decreased bone mineral density is higher in patients diagnosed of prostate cancer before starting treatment than in healthy men with the same age. During the first year of treatment, a severe loss bone density is reported due to androgen suppression therapy. From then on, loss bone density seems to slow down, persisting at long-term. It is important to know the starting point and the dynamics of loss bone in order to prevent its progression. The skeletal events have an important impact on quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. Both Denosumab and Zoledronic Acid have proven effective in reducing loss bone. The prevention and management of bone involvement in patients with prostate cancer is critical to quality of life in these patients and requires an individualized approach. Before starting a prolonged androgen deprivation, baseline risk of fracture should be evaluated in order to adopt the proper protective measures. In patients with metastases, early treatments reducing the risk of bone events should be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Sporadic Colorectal Cancer and Primary Cancers of Other Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yu Kan

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients often neglect the possibility of secondary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer death in Taiwan. It is important to be aware of the clinical characteristics of double cancer in CRC patients for early diagnosis and treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 1,031 CRC patients who underwent surgical treatment at the Department of Surgery of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2004. Among these patients, CRC was accompanied by cancer of other organs in 17 patients (1.65%, either synchronously or metachronously. Therefore, we describe our experience regarding the location of CRC, the clinical symptoms and signs of these patients, the TNM stage, histology, phase, association with other malignancies, interval between cancers and clinical outcomes. Of the 17 patients in whom CRC was accompanied by primary cancer of other organs, there were four synchronous and 13 metachronous multiple cancer patients. Our patient group comprised six men and 11 women with ages ranging from 47 to 88 years (median age, 66 years. The most common location of CRC was the sigmoid colon. Six gastric cancers (35.2% and six breast cancers (35.2% were associated with primary CRC. The remaining six second primary cancers were one lung cancer, one thyroid cancer, one cervical cancer, one ovarian cancer, one skin cancer, and one urinary bladder cancer. Of the 13 metachronous multiple cancer patients, eight patients developed subsequent CRC after primary cancers of other organs, whereas two patients developed a subsequent second primary cancer after CRC. The intervals between the development of metachronous multiple cancers ranged from 2 to 19 years. In this retrospective analysis, breast and gastric cancer patients were at increased risk of developing subsequent secondary CRC. Careful attention should always be paid to the possibility of secondary CRC in treating these cancer patients. Cancer

  6. Biomarkers of depression in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehn, Christian Friedrich; Kuehnhardt, Dagmar; Bartholomae, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Sebastian; Krebs, Michael; Regierer, Anne Constanze; Schmid, Peter; Possinger, Kurt; Flath, Bernd Christian

    2006-12-01

    Inflammation and perturbation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function appears to play a putative role in the etiology of depression. Patients with metastatic cancer demonstrate elevated prevalence rates for depression. The objective of the current study was to illustrate the efficacy of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and HPA axis function as adjuncts to support the diagnosis of depression in cancer patients. Plasma concentrations of IL-6 and cortisol were measured in 114 cancer patients with and without depression. The relative diurnal variation of cortisol (cortisol VAR), expressed as a percentage, was calculated. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed. Depression was associated with increased plasma concentrations of IL-6 (18.7 pg/mL vs. 2.7 pg/mL; P < .001) and higher cortisol concentrations at 8 AM and 8 PM. The relative cortisol VAR (11.7% vs. 60.6%, respectively; P < .001) was found to be decreased in cancer patients with depression, indicating a disturbed circadian function of the HPA axis. As a biomarker of depression, IL-6 yielded at a cutoff value of 10.6 pg/mL, a sensitivity of 79%, and a specificity of 87% (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.86; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.78-0.94), whereas cortisol VAR demonstrated a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 88% (AUC = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74-0.97) at a cutoff value of 33.5%. Depression is associated with increased plasma IL-6 concentrations in patients with cancer. These patients demonstrate a dysfunction of the HPA-axis, characterized by a decreased diurnal variation of cortisol. The high sensitivity and specificity of these parameters biomarkers of depression make IL-6 and cortisol VAR helpful tools in the diagnosis of depression in patients with cancer. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  7. Trismus release in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Shieh, Shyh-Jou; Lee, Jing-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Trismus is a common problem among oral cancer patients. This report aimed to study the inciting factors of trismus and to find out the rationale of trismus release. Between 1996 and 2008, 61 oral cancer patients with retrievable records of interincisor distance (IID) were analyzed by retrospective chart review. The IID decreased from 31.4 (12.4) to 24.9 (12.0) mm in 36 patients undergoing cancer ablation only (P = 0.001). Other variables prompting trismus include buccal cancer (P = 0.017), radiotherapy (P = 0.008), and recurrence (P = 0.001). In contrast, the IID improved from 11.7 (7.1) to 22.7 (11.9) mm in 25 patients receiving cancer ablative and trismus releasing surgeries (P = 0.000). The improvement fared better in individuals with IID less than 15 mm than the others (P = 0.037). In conclusion, involvement of buccal region, ablative surgery, radiotherapy, and recurrence are provocative factors of trismus. Patients with IID less than 15 mm will benefit from releasing surgery significantly. Others may better be handled with conservative managements firstly, and enrolled as candidates of surgical release only until the patients entertained a 28-month period of disease-free interval, by which time the risk of recurrence would be markedly reduced.

  8. Dental implications in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoda-Francolí, Jaume; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Araceli; Pérez-García, Silvia; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2011-07-01

    A study is made of the dental implications of oral cancer, with a view to avoiding the complications that appear once oncological treatment is started. The study comprised a total of 22 patients diagnosed with oral cancer according to clinical and histological criteria in the Service of Maxillofacial Surgery (Dental Clinic of the University of Barcelona, Spain) during the period 1996-2005, and posteriorly treated in different hospital centers in Barcelona. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with oral cancer in our Service, the present study finally analyzed the 12 subjects who reported for the dental controls. As regards the remaining 10 patients, 5 had died and 5 could not be located; these subjects were thus excluded from the analysis. All of the smokers had abandoned the habit. The most common tumor location was the lateral margin of the tongue. None of the patients visited the dentist regularly before the diagnosis of oral cancer. T1N0M0 was the most common tumor stage. Surgery was carried out in 50% of the cases, while 8.4% of the patients received radiotherapy and 41.6% underwent surgery with postoperative radiotherapy. In turn, 66.6% of the patients reported treatment sequelae such as dysgeusia, xerostomia or speech difficulties, and one patient suffered osteoradionecrosis. Forty-one percent of the patients did not undergo regular dental controls after cancer treatment. As regards oral and dental health, 16.6% presented caries, and 50% had active periodontal disease. Protocols are available for preventing the complications of oral cancer treatment, and thus for improving patient quality of life. However, important shortcomings in the application of such protocols on the part of the public health authorities make it difficult to reach these objectives.

  9. Kelp use in patients with thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jennifer E; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Hammer, Kallista; Gupta-Lawrence, Rebecca L; Lee, Stephanie L

    2014-05-01

    To report on the incidence and use of kelp among patients with thyroid cancer. Data were collected using a web-based online anonymous survey under Institutional Review Board approval from Boston University. This report is based on 27 responses from subjects with thyroid cancer who use kelp. Demographic factors and complementary and alternative use were included. Respondents were primarily over age 40, white, female and have at least a high school education. The top five modalities were multivitamins, special diets, herbal supplements, prayer for health reasons and herbal tea. Only one patient reported perceiving a particular modality had a negative effect on treatment. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was more often perceived as being used to aid their thyroid cancer treatment than to help with symptoms. On average, respondents who use kelp also use at least 11 additional CAM modalities. Only 1/2 of respondents who use kelp reported telling their physicians about their CAM use, and nearly 1/3 of respondents reported their CAM use was neither known, prescribed nor asked about by their physicians. In comparison to both national surveys of the general US population and patients with thyroid cancer, kelp users with thyroid cancer use at least twice the number of additional CAM therapies and report their use far less often. Physicians who treat patients with thyroid cancer should be aware of these data to further assist in their assessment and care.

  10. Fertility preservation in young cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Revel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of advances in treatment, almost 80% of children and adolescents who receive a diagnosis of cancer become long-term survivors. The increased survival rate of children and adolescents with cancer has resulted in a major interest in the long-term effects of cancer treatment on the possibility for future fertility. Currently established methods for the preservation of fertility are available only for pubertal males and females. Pubertal male cancer patients should be encouraged to freeze numerous sperm samples even when sperm count and motility are poor. In these cases, intracytoplasmic sperm injection is a powerful technique compared with intrauterine insemination since thawed sperm samples with poor parameters can produce relatively high fertilization rates resulting in normal pregnancies and deliveries. Married pubertal women should be proposed ovulation induction, follicular aspiration, and fertilization with husband sperm. Single women could benefit from vitrification of oocytes. This requires a delay of about 3 weeks in the commencement of chemotherapy to enable follicular growth. Fertility preservation for prepubertal patients is more of a problem. Young girls could be offered cryopreservation of gametes in the gonadal tissue. Cryopreservation of testicular tissue was suggested for fertility preservation for young boys, but this method is totally experimental and not currently offered. Discussing future fertility is part of the consultation of young female and male patients facing potentially gonadotoxic cancer therapy. It is the role of reproductive specialists to create various options in their laboratory to preserve fertility potential of cancer patients.

  11. [Systemic cancer treatment in geriatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, J

    2015-12-01

    Functional health issues and the ability to autonomously participate in social life play a more pronounced role for geriatric patients than the mere prolongation of life. Quality-adjusted life years reflect the relation of health and life span. Comorbidities and functional or cognitive impairment represent independent predictors for the overall survival of geriatric patients. This must be kept in mind when planning systemic cancer treatment. All forms of cancer-specific therapy should evaluate whether the patient can truly benefit taking into consideration geriatric aspects. This particularly demands a great deal of palliative chemotherapy. When curation is no longer possible, a cancer-specific treatment must not lead to therapy-related symptoms. Clear communication of the aims of therapy is indispensable. In addition to routine urooncologic data, other relevant information must be inquired in advance of cancer-specific treatment in order to identify those functionally or cognitively impaired patients who may not benefit from systemic cancer treatment. A precise indication with respect of age-dependent physiological changes and a clear prioritization of symptoms outline the approach for systemic cancer-specific treatment.

  12. Myofacial trigger points in advanced cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Hasuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation.We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points.

  13. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristevska-Dimitrovska, Gordana; Stefanovski, Petar; Smichkoska, Snezhana; Raleva, Marija; Dejanova, Beti

    2015-12-15

    A significant number of breast cancer patients, during their life with the diagnosis, experience emotional distress in the form of depression and anxiety. Psychological resilience is the ability of a person to protect his/her mental health when faced with adverse circumstances such as the cancer diagnosis. This study aims to assess the resilience in breast cancer patients and to explore whether depression affects the resilience. Two hundred eighteen (218) women, treated for early breast cancer responded to Connor - Davidson Resilience Scale and Hospital Depression and Anxiety Scale, in order to assess the level of psychological resilience and the level of depression. There is a significant negative correlation between depression and resilience in our sample (r = - 0.562, p resilience. There is no statistically significant correlation between the ages of the participants; time passed since diagnosis, cancer stage and resilience levels. This study shows that patients who are less depressed have higher levels of resilience and that psychological resilience may independently contribute to lower levels of depression among breast cancer patients. The level of psychological resilience may be a protective factor for depression and psychological distress.

  14. Symptom attributions in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Hvidberg, Line; Pedersen, Anette Fischer

    2015-01-01

    Størstedelen af kolorektal cancere opdages gennem patienters symptomatiske henvendelse i almen praksis. Man ved dog ikke meget om, hvordan patienter selv oplever deres symptomer. Formålet med studiet var, at undersøge om symptom attributioner er associeret med hvilket symptom man oplevede før...

  15. MANAGEMENT OF CANCER IN PATIENTS WITH HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owing to the effects of HIV on haemopoiesis and immune function, HIV infection of patients with cancer poses management difficulties for both the physician managing .... chemotherapy. In addition, the obvious susceptibility to infection is synergistic with the immune suppression of cytotoxic therapy. The HIV-positive patient ...

  16. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Ristevska-Dimitrоvska

    2015-11-01

    CONCLUSION: This study shows that patients who are less depressed have higher levels of resilience and that psychological resilience may independently contribute to lower levels of depression among breast cancer patients. The level of psychological resilience may be a protective factor for depression and psychological distress.

  17. How Exercise Can Benefit Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musanti, Rita

    2016-12-01

    Thirty years ago, the first article on exercise for patients with cancer appeared in the cancer research literature. The time from that first article to the present has included oncology nurses taking the lead in investigations related to exercise and cancer-related symptoms, most notably cancer-related fatigue (CRF). The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has been instrumental in publishing much of the research on exercise and cancer and continues in that tradition by issuing this supplement to the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing. In addition, ONS has facilitated the translation of research findings to practicing oncology nurses by convening meetings, participating in expert opinion consensus groups, and disseminating evidence through Putting Evidence Into Practice resources.

  18. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...... that PET/MRI in oncology will prove to become a valuable addition to PET/CT in diagnosing, tailoring and monitoring cancer therapy in selected patient populations.......Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...

  19. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...... that PET/MRI in oncology will prove to become a valuable addition to PET/CT in diagnosing, tailoring and monitoring cancer therapy in selected patient populations....

  20. Helping families of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel

    2005-07-01

    To discuss the impact of cancer on families of patients with cancer. National reports on caregiving and research articles related to cancer and families. Family caregivers are the bedrock of chronic care in the United States. They provide an enormous amount of unpaid care that is often invisible. Cancer can affect the emotional, social, physical, and spiritual well-being of family members. Family intervention research can have a positive effect on patient and family caregiver outcomes. More intervention research with families is needed that is theoretically based, uses randomized clinical trial designs, and uses instruments that are sensitive to intervention effects. Although family intervention research is limited, descriptive and exploratory research has identified protective factors and risk factors that need to be addressed in clinical practice.

  1. Nutritional support strategies for malnourished cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E

    2005-01-01

    A large body of evidence exists, which demonstrates the importance of nutritional support in cancer. The nutritional needs of patients with cancer may differ from those of the healthy population due to hypermetabolism, impaired organ function, increased nutrient losses and therapy-related malnutrition. Patients with cancer often have increased requirements for both macro- and micronutrients due to long periods of undernutrition prior to diagnosis. The aim of nutritional support should be the prevention or reversal of malnutrition, and this should be initiated as early as possible to improve outcomes. Oral supplementation is a simple, non-invasive method of increasing the nutrient intake of those patients who are unable to meet nutritional requirements, despite dietary counselling. Enteral tube feeding is indicated for patients who are unable to meet their nutritional needs by oral intake alone, and has been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Novel approaches in oral supplementation include the use of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a compound under investigation for its role in preventing and treating cancer-associated malnutrition. Individual studies suggest that EPA attenuates cancer-associated wasting and improves immune function. In addition, it has been shown to have anti-tumour effects and improve clinical outcomes. However, results are not consistent for all patient groups and further research is required.

  2. Gastric cancer surgery in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretschel, Stephen; Estevez-Schwarz, Lope; Hünerbein, Michael; Schneider, Ulrike; Schlag, Peter M

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the value of individual risk-adapted therapy in geriatric patients, we performed a consecutive analysis of 363 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for gastric cancer. All patients underwent extensive preoperative workup to assess surgical risk. The following criteria were evaluated in 3 age groups (75 years): comorbidity, tumor characteristics, type of resection, postoperative morbidity and mortality, recurrence rate, overall survival, and disease-free survival. There was an increased rate of comorbidity in the higher age groups (51% vs 76% vs 83%; PPatient selection and risk-adapted surgery in elderly patients can result in acceptable therapeutic results comparable to younger patients. Limited surgery in elderly gastric cancer patients with high comorbidity does not necessarily compromise oncological outcome.

  3. Communicating with head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrory, Arlene

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is only 3 to 5% of all the cancers in the United States. The disease causes major changes in the appearance and functional ability of patients. To explore how caregivers communicate with head and neck cancer patients who have impaired communication abilities from the disease and from treatment. A qualitative grounded theory approach was used. Thirty-nine caregivers of head and neck cancer patients were recruited from three east coast academic-affiliated hospitals with dedicated head and neck cancer units. Each person was interviewed, while being audiotaped for 1 1/2 hours. Open-ended questions were used to elicit comprehensive responses to the issues and concerns most important to care for these patients. The tapes were transcribed and inputted using Ethnograph v.5. The analysis of the interviews used grounded theory methods. Methods to ensure rigor and trustworthiness were incorporated into the design. The results of the data collection revealed the majority of participants were women age 47 (average). For most, their beginning and highest education was the baccalaureate degree. The entire sample averaged 23 years in their profession and a more than 15.1 years caring for head and neck cancer patients. The sample represented caregivers from primarily the inpatient setting, but also included clinic, administrative, research and education. The results of the data analysis revealed engaging and distancing behaviors based the caregivers' level of comfort. The central topic was communication impairment. The core category was "Reading the Patient". The strategies used to identify problems, and meet the needs of the patients were "Giving Voice", "Being There", "Giving Control", "Saving Face", "Normalizing", "Relieving Pain", and "Giving Hope". A hypothesis emerged from the analysis of the interviews. Successfully meeting the physical and psychosocial needs of head and neck cancer patients requires an intensive effort and the use of creative methods of

  4. Colorectal Cancer Treatment in Older Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sanoff, Hanna K.; Goldberg, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    The burden of colorectal cancer (CRC) morbidity and mortality falls largely on the elderly, who make up more than 70% of CRC patients. Recent evidence from pooled analyses suggests that both adjuvant and palliative chemotherapy are as efficacious in fit older patients as in younger patients. Although severe hematologic toxicity is increased in older age groups treated with chemotherapy, this does not appear to increase the risk of other severe adverse events. Little evidence is available to g...

  5. Survival analysis of patients with interval cancer undergoing gastric cancer screening by endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, Chisato; Shabana, Michiko; Okamoto, Mikizo; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kishimoto, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Interval cancer is a key factor that influences the effectiveness of a cancer screening program. To evaluate the impact of interval cancer on the effectiveness of endoscopic screening, the survival rates of patients with interval cancer were analyzed. We performed gastric cancer-specific and all-causes survival analyses of patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group and radiographic screening group using the Kaplan-Meier method. Since the screening interval was 1 year, interval cancer was defined as gastric cancer detected within 1 year after a negative result. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to investigate the risk factors associated with gastric cancer-specific and all-causes death. A total of 1,493 gastric cancer patients (endoscopic screening group: n = 347; radiographic screening group: n = 166; outpatient group: n = 980) were identified from the Tottori Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The gastric cancer-specific survival rates were higher in the endoscopic screening group than in the radiographic screening group and the outpatients group. In the endoscopic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer and the patients with interval cancer were nearly equal (P = 0.869). In the radiographic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer was higher than that of the patients with interval cancer (P = 0.009). For gastric cancer-specific death, the hazard ratio of interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group was 0.216 for gastric cancer death (95%CI: 0.054-0.868) compared with the outpatient group. The survival rate and the risk of gastric cancer death among the patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer were not significantly different in the annual endoscopic screening. These results suggest the potential of endoscopic screening in reducing

  6. Patients' preference to hear cancer diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arbabi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bad news disclosure is one of the complex communication tasks of the physicians. Bad news is defined as:" any news that adversely and seriously affects an individual's view of his or her future". Recent studies indicate that the patients' and physicians' attitudes toward disclosure of bad news have been changed since few years ago. The evidence of breaking bad news is also different across different cultures. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the patients' prospect about breaking bad news and to provide a clinical guidance for Iranian patients and those patients in countries with a similar cultural background.A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted on a sample of 200 cancer patients at a cancer institute in Tehran. The patients' demographic characteristics and their attitudes toward the manner of disclosing the diagnosis were registered in a research based questionnaire.In this study, 165 patients (82.5% claimed to be aware of the diagnosis; however, only 121 patients (73% were aware of the actual diagnosis of their disease. Most patients tended to know the diagnosis (n = 186, 93% and accepted patient as the first person to be informed (n = 151, 75.5% by their physician (n = 174, 87%. The preference of being alone or with a family member when exposed to bad news was almost the same. Most patients (n = 169, 84.5% believed that physicians should consult the patients to make treatment decisions. Treatment options (n = 140, 70% and life expectancy (n = 121, 60.5% were the most desirable topics to be discussed. Most patients (n = 144, 72% agreed upon allowing them to express their emotional feelings.According to the patients' preferences about being fully informed about the diagnosis, it is suggested that the disclosure of cancer diagnosis be done by a physician and in the presence of a family member. It is also recommended that physicians consult the patients about treatment options.

  7. Characteristics and outcome of spontaneous bacterial meningitis in patients with cancer compared to patients without cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomar, Virginia; Benito, Natividad; López-Contreras, Joaquin; Coll, Pere; Gurguí, Mercedes; Domingo, Pere

    2017-05-01

    In cancer patients, who are frequently immunocompromised, bacterial meningitis (BM) can be a severe complication, with a different presentation, etiology, and course, compared to patients without cancer. Our objective is to compare the characteristics and outcomes of BM in patients with and without cancer. A single-center, prospective observational cohort study, conducted between 1982 and 2012, in a tertiary university hospital in Barcelona (Spain). The main outcome measure is in-hospital mortality. We evaluated 659 episodes of BM; 97 (15%) had active cancer. Patients with malignancies were older (median 63 (interquartile range [IQR] 24) vs 52 [IQR 42] years, P meningitis triad (35% vs 50%, P = .05), fever (91% vs 96%, P = .03), neck stiffness (58% vs 78%, P meningitis was the commonest cause of BM (29%) and was more frequent in cancer than noncancer (8%, P meningitis was much less frequent (4% vs 36%, P meningitis and cancer are older and have more subtle clinical manifestations than patients without cancer. Listeria monocytogenes is the predominant pathogen and mortality is higher in cancer patients.

  8. The Long-term Outcomes of Sibutramine Effectiveness on Weight (LOSE Weight) study: evaluating the role of drug therapy within a weight management program in a group-model health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Julie A; Raebel, Marsha A; Conner, Douglas A; Lanty, Frances A; Vogel, Erin A; Gay, Elizabeth C; Merenich, John A

    2004-06-01

    To assess the benefit of sibutramine hydrochloride monohydrate within a weight management program. Prospective randomized controlled trial in a health maintenance organization. Obese patients (n = 588) starting a weight management program were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to participate in the program alone or to participate in the program and receive sibutramine for 12 months. Outcome measures were change in weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage body fat, serum lipids, serum glucose, and blood pressure. At baseline, there was a younger age and higher weight, BMI, and waist circumference in the drug group. There was more degenerative joint disease in the nondrug group. The mean weight loss at 6 months was 6.8 kg (95% confidence interval [CI], -7.4 to -6.1 kg) in the drug group vs 3.1 kg (95% CI, -3.8 to -2.4 kg) (P managed care setting, the effectiveness and safety of sibutramine were similar to those observed in randomized, double-blind clinical efficacy trials.

  9. Meaning in life of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erci, Behice

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate meaning in life and its predictors in Turkish patients with cancer. A convenience sample of 182 patients with cancer at a Turkish university hospital completed a structured questionnaire including demographic characteristics, disease/treatment characteristics, symptom level, and the meaning in life scale for patients with cancer in 2007. The researcher visited the oncology clinic five work days in every week and conducted interviews with the patients. In analysis of the data, correlation, t-tests, Kruskal-Wallis variance and regression analysis were used. In this study, the mean score of the total meaning in life showed that the patients tended to be undecided concerning meaning in life. Education level, age, and diagnosis duration of the independent variables were effective predictors of meaning in life. Together the independent variables explained 24.3% of the variance of the purpose subscale, 26.2% of the variance of the coherence subscale, 14% of the variance of the choice/responsibleness subscale, and 44.1% of the total variance of the goal seeking subscale. Overall the independent variables explained 19.8% of the total variance of the total meaning in life. The results in this study should increase the awareness of cancer care professionals about a range of the meaning in life and may help them to target particular patient groups for detail support interventions.

  10. [Cancer treatment for patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Asao

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a disease associated with aging. In Japan, the rate of aging is estimated to be over 25%. Further, the prevalence of dementia also increases with age, and cancer patients with dementia are becoming more common. Dementia is a progressive condition characterized by impairment in memory and at least one other cognitive domain(language, praxis, gnosis, or executive function), as well as a compromised ability to perform daily functions. Impairment of short-term memory and executive function in particular are associated with an increased risk for functional decline and mortality. Assessment of cognitive function is necessary to ensure that cancer patients can provide informed consent and understand the risks, benefits, and alternatives of therapeutic treatment. The health care team needs to ascertain whether patients have the mental capacity for cancer treatment, will comply with the treatment schedule, and will understand when to seek help. Elderly cancer patients undergoing treatment need to be assessed for vulnerability with the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA).

  11. Usefulness of mirtazapine in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Pasquini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The rate of depression in the general population is estimated as high as 15% and is at least two to three times more common in patients with cancer. Due to the complexity and constraints of cancer care, depression is often under-recognised and under-treated. Antidepressants are the most commonly used medications, however among cancer patients there are few randomised trials comparing antidepressants to placebo. Mirtazapine is an effective antidepressant with unique and special mechanism of action characterised by high response and remission rates, relatively early onset of action and favourable side-effect profile. Several studies reported that mirtazapine has a receptor-binding profile that may be suitable for use in controlling appetite loss and nausea of cancer patients. We conducted a review of the literature on the use of mirtazapine in cancer patients. We evaluated the effectiveness of mirtazapine for the management of depressive and anxiety symptoms and for several distressing symptoms such as pain, nausea, appetite loss, and sleep disturbances.

  12. Platelet transfusion for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Craig H; DomBourian, Melkon G; Millward, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is a critical and often necessary aspect of managing cancer. Low platelet counts frequently lead to bleeding complications; however, the drugs used to combat malignancy commonly lead to decreased production and destruction of the very cell whose function is essential to stop bleeding. The transfusion of allogeneic platelet products helps to promote hemostasis, but alloimmunization may make it difficult to manage other complications associated with cancer. The literature relating to platelet transfusion in patients with cancer was reviewed. Platelet storage, dosing, transfusion indications, and transfusion response are essential topics for health care professionals to understand because many patients with cancer will require platelet transfusions during the course of treatment. The workup and differentiation of non-immune-mediated compared with immune-mediated platelet refractoriness are vital because platelet management is different between types of refractoriness. A combination of appropriate utilization of platelet inventory and laboratory testing coupled with communication between those caring for patients with cancer and those providing blood products is essential for effective patient care.

  13. Psychosocial issues in the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, N; Ganju, Aruna; Mirnics, Z S; Varga, P P

    2009-10-15

    Systematic review of the literature. To identify psychosocial issues affecting patients with a diagnosis of a spinal column or cord tumor. Using the keywords "cancer communication," "psychosocial care," "cancer patient," and "spine cancer patient," a review of the English literature was performed on Medline, EMBASE, and PsycInfo, a database of the psychology and psychiatry literature in the United States. The relevant articles were reviewed; in addition, relevant references from selected articles were searched. The Spine Oncology Study Group, an international panel of spine oncology surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists, identified 2 key questions to be addressed in the course of the systematic review of the literature. Pertinent manuscripts were rated as being of high, moderate, low, or very low quality. Using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation evidence-based review system, the 2 key questions were answered using literature review and expert opinion. 1. Who are the allied health care professionals necessary for the comprehensive care of the spine tumor patient? 2. Does compassionate communication (in giving life altering information) affect outcome? What tools can be used in communication with the spine tumor patient? Systematic review of the 3 databases yielded 228 articles pertaining to the psychosocial care of spine tumor patients; systematic review yielded 326 articles addressing communication in cancer patients. Systematic search of the Medline, EMBASE, and PsycInfo databases failed to identify any articles that specifically addressed the 2 questions of interest in the spine tumor patient population. The literature search identified low and very low quality evidence; 2 randomized controlled studies were identified. Although neither specifically pertained to the spine tumor patient population, these articles were reviewed and graded as low-quality evidence. A multidisciplinary group of allied health care professionals

  14. COPING STRATEGIES IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Gardanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostics of psycho-emotional disorders of patients with malignant diseases of the prostate is not doubt, because timely correction contributes to the shortening of rehabilitation period and restoration of the quality of life of patients after treatment. Detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer for many patients is stressful and causes changes in the affective sphere, and manifests itself in increased levels of anxiety and depression in men. To cope with stress is possible due to the used coping strategies.Purpose. Studying the coping mechanisms in prostate cancer patients.Materials and methods. 56 men treated in FGBU "LRTS" Russian Ministry of Health. The average age was 65.7 ± 6.1 years. The average duration of the disease prostate cancer is 3 ± 2 months. All men were subjected to the standard algorithm for the evaluation of hormonal status, the PSA, taking a history, inspection and physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy of bones of a skeleton. All the patients underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Psychological testing with the use of the method of "Coping test" the scale of reactive and personal anxiety for the differentiated evaluation of anxiety. Results. The most common for prostate cancer revealed constructive coping strategies are "planning solve", "selfcontrol" and "search of social support". According to the scale Spielberg–Hanin a high level of situational anxiety was revealed.Conclusion. According to the results of the research, patients with prostate cancer are likely to use constructive coping strategies, that leads to stabilization of psycho-emotional state of men and promotes more effective adaptation in the terms of stress, that is caused by treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. Financial distress in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Barbaret

    Full Text Available We examined the frequency and severity of financial distress (FD and its association with quality of life (QOL and symptoms among patients with advanced cancer in France.In this cross-sectional study, 143 patients with advanced cancer were enrolled. QOL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer General (FACT-G and symptoms assessed using Edmonton Assessment System (ESAS and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. FD was assessed using a self-rated numeric scale from 0 to 10.Seventy-three (51% patients reported having FD. Patients reported having FD were most likely to be younger (53.8 (16,7SD versus 62 (10.5SD, p<0.001, single (33 (62% versus 40(44%, p = 0.03 and had a breast cancer (26 (36%, p = 0.024. Patients with FD had a lower FACT-G score (59 versus 70, p = 0.005. FD decreased physical (14 versus 18, p = 0.008, emotional (14 versus 16, p = 0.008, social wellbeing (17 versus 19, p = 0.04. Patients with FD had higher HADS-D (8 versus 6 p = 0.007 and HADS-A (9 versus 7, p = 0.009 scores. FD was linked to increased ESAS score (59 (18SD versus 67 (18SD, p = 0.005 and spiritual suffering (22(29SD versus 13(23SD, p = 0.045.The high rate of patient-reported FD was unexpected in our studied population, as the French National Health Insurance covers specific cancer treatments. The FD was associated with a poorer quality of life. Having a systematic assessment, with a simple tool, should lead to future research on interventions that will increase patients' QOL.

  16. EXPRESSING DISTRESS IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Gabriela FELEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative emotions (distress are recognized as part of the psychological profile of patients diagnosed with advanced stage cancer. However, most patients are not accustomed to verbalize feelings towards their physician, and generally towards family and medical care personnel. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the expression of emotions by patients in advanced stages of cancer, respectively the means by which they get to express emotions. To this respect, we identified the most common types of emotions expressed, or metaphors used by patients to describe their emotions and topics that trigger emotions. Words and phrases most commonly used are in relation to: fear, anxiety, depression, guilt, negligence, concern. They are uttered in order to depict the network created between disclosed emotions and topics on health status, symptoms, adverse effects and therapeutic choice, patient privacy, and social and family issues.

  17. Total parenteral nutrition in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2007-12-01

    To report on how the parenteral nutrition of patients with advanced cancer has evolved and on the current status of research and clinical practice in this field. Clinical research has shown that parenteral nutrition may play a role in incurable cancer if patients are expected to die earlier from starvation than from tumour progression. A benefit was recently observed in hypophagic patients requiring supplemental on-demand home parenteral nutrition. There is some doubt that parenteral nutrition plays a palliative role, and data on quality of life are limited. The regimen of parenteral nutrition should be tailored to the needs of the patient, and recent data indicate a reduction in total energy expenditure and water requirements. There is interest in new lipid emulsions enriched with N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are well utilized by tumour-bearing individuals and may reduce the catabolic drive of cachectic patients. Future research is addressed at identifying parameters to help in the selection of aphagic/obstructed patients who may benefit from home parenteral nutrition, the early use of supplemental parenteral nutrition in hypophagic patients and developing a better nutritional formulation of lipid emulsions more appropriate for use in advanced cancer patients.

  18. History of Comorbidities and Survival of Ovarian Cancer Patients, Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minlikeeva, A.N.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Eng, K.H.; Cannioto, R.A.; Friel, G.; Szender, J.B.; Segal, B.; Odunsi, K.; Mayor, P.; Diergaarde, B.; Zsiros, E.; Kelemen, L.E.; Kobel, M.; Steed, H.; Defazio, A.; Jordan, S.J.; Fasching, P.A.; Beckmann, M.W.; Risch, H.A.; Rossing, M.A.; Doherty, J.A.; Chang-Claude, J.; Goodman, M.T.; Dork, T.; Edwards, R.; Modugno, F.; Ness, R.B.; Matsuo, K.; Mizuno, M.; Karlan, B.Y.; Goode, E.L.; Kjaer, S.K.; Hogdall, E.; Schildkraut, J.M.; Terry, K.L.; Cramer, D.W; Bandera, E.V.; Paddock, L.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Sutphen, R.; Anton-Culver, H.; Ziogas, A.; Menon, U.; Gayther, S.A.; Ramus, S.J.; Gentry-Maharaj, A.; Pearce, C.L.; Wu, A.H.; Kupryjanczyk, J.; Jensen, A.; Webb, P.M.; Moysich, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Comorbidities can affect survival of ovarian cancer patients by influencing treatment efficacy. However, little evidence exists on the association between individual concurrent comorbidities and prognosis in ovarian cancer patients.Methods: Among patients diagnosed with invasive ovarian

  19. Kundalini yoga as a support therapy for cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kröneck, Mia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to describe cancer patient’s experience of kundalini yoga and its effect on their internal coping resources. The intention of this study is to put forward kundalini yoga as a support therapy for cancer patients for improving their wellbeing during active cancer treatment. This is a descriptive study. An academic literature review was conducted for cancer, cancer treatment, internal coping resources and yoga as therapy topics. Four voluntary female cancer patients (...

  20. What do cancer patients' spouses know about the patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitchik, S; Kreitler, S; Rapoport, Y; Algor, R

    1992-10-01

    A large body of research shows that social support in general and of family members in particular plays an important role in determining cancer patients' quality of life. We assumed that the spouse's information about how the patient experiences the situation determines the spouse's ability to help. The present study was designed to examine how much the spouse knows about the attitudes and experiences of their husband or wife who is a cancer patient, and whether this knowledge depends on the questions' structure, disease duration, its severity, or level of patient's information about the disease and prognosis. A questionnaire with multiple-choice and open-ended questions assessing 13 domains (e.g., fears and worries concerning health, functioning in the family, and anxiety) was administered to patients and their partners. Subjects were 55 head-and-neck cancer patients, 40 men and 15 women, with disease stages I to IV, grade of tumors G1 to G3-4, and disease duration of 0.5 to 21 years. The results showed that correspondence between the patients' and their spouses' responses was very low, and was not affected by the structure of the questions or the disease's duration and severity. Correspondence was high only in patients informed about their disease. In the discussion, it was pointed out that when the patient is informed, communication channels in the family are opened and this brings about an increase in the spouses's information about the patient and hence in the spouse's ability to provide the patient the needed social support as a psychotherapeutic agent and a friend. The cancer nurse may play a crucial role in instituting the patient-spouse dialogue.

  1. Physicians' influence on breast cancer patient compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostev, Karel; Waehlert, Lilia; Jockwig, Achim; Jockwig, Barbara; Hadji, Peyman

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there have been major advances in the treatment of breast cancer. However, taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Thus far, no database-based studies have been published in German-speaking countries empirically examining the influence of the physician on the compliance of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate, quantify, and critically discuss the effect treating physicians have on the compliance of their breast cancer patients. Patients with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who started therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) between January 2001 and December 2011 were selected from the representative IMS Disease Analyzer database and analyzed with regard to their compliance. Practices were grouped into two categories concerning the compliance of all treated patients. A regression model showed that a breast cancer patient who is treated in a practice with a trend toward poor compliance has a nearly 60% higher risk for treatment discontinuation than would be the case in a practice with good compliance. It shows how important it is to motivate physicians to strive toward good compliance rates.

  2. Physicians’ influence on breast cancer patient compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostev, Karel; Waehlert, Lilia; Jockwig, Achim; Jockwig, Barbara; Hadji, Peyman

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there have been major advances in the treatment of breast cancer. However, taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Thus far, no database-based studies have been published in German-speaking countries empirically examining the influence of the physician on the compliance of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate, quantify, and critically discuss the effect treating physicians have on the compliance of their breast cancer patients. Patients with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who started therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) between January 2001 and December 2011 were selected from the representative IMS Disease Analyzer database and analyzed with regard to their compliance. Practices were grouped into two categories concerning the compliance of all treated patients. A regression model showed that a breast cancer patient who is treated in a practice with a trend toward poor compliance has a nearly 60% higher risk for treatment discontinuation than would be the case in a practice with good compliance. It shows how important it is to motivate physicians to strive toward good compliance rates. PMID:24454275

  3. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  4. Cachexia in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandavadivelan, Poorna; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2016-03-01

    Oesophageal cancer is a debilitating disease with a poor prognosis, and weight loss owing to malnutrition prevails in the majority of patients. Cachexia, a multifactorial syndrome characterized by the loss of fat and skeletal muscle mass and systemic inflammation arising from complex host-tumour interactions is a major contributor to malnutrition, which is a determinant of tolerance to treatment and survival. In patients with oesophageal cancer, cachexia is further compounded by eating difficulties owing to the stage and location of the tumour, and the effects of neoadjuvant therapy. Treatment with curative intent involves exceptionally extensive and invasive surgery, and the subsequent anatomical changes often lead to eating difficulties and severe postoperative malnutrition. Thus, screening for cachexia by means of percentage weight loss and BMI during the cancer trajectory and survivorship periods is imperative. Additionally, markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), dysphagia and appetite loss should be assessed at diagnosis. Routine assessments of body composition are also necessary in patients with oesophageal cancer to enable assessment of skeletal muscle loss, which might be masked by sarcopenic obesity in these patients. A need exists for clinical trials examining the effectiveness of therapeutic and physical-activity-based interventions in mitigating muscle loss and counteracting cachexia in these patients.

  5. Lung cancer patients frequently visit the emergency room for cancer-related and -unrelated issues

    OpenAIRE

    KOTAJIMA, FUTOSHI; KOBAYASHI, KUNIHIKO; SAKAGUCHI, HIROZO; NEMOTO, MANABU

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer patients visit the emergency room (ER) for cancer-related and -unrelated reasons more often compared to patients with other types of cancer. This results in increased admissions and deaths in the ER. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the characteristics of lung cancer patients visiting the ER in order to optimize the utilization of emergency medical services and improve the patients’ quality of life. Lung cancer patients visiting the ER of a single institution over a 2-ye...

  6. Anxiety in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolva, Elissa; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William; Brescia, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Context Anxiety in terminal cancer is linked to diminished quality of life, yet overall it is poorly understood with regard to prevalence and relationship to other aspects of psychological distress. Objectives This study examines anxiety in terminally ill cancer patients, including the prevalence of anxiety symptoms, the relationship between anxiety and depression, differences in anxiety between participants receiving inpatient palliative care and those receiving outpatient care, and characteristics that distinguish highly anxious from less anxious patients. Methods Participants were 194 patients with terminal cancer. Approximately half (n = 103) were receiving inpatient care in a palliative care facility and half (n = 91) were receiving outpatient care in a tertiary care cancer center. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression, and was administered along with measures of hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and social support. Results Moderately elevated anxiety symptoms were found in 18.6% of participants (n = 36) and 12.4% (n = 24) had clinically significant anxiety symptoms. Level of anxiety did not differ between the two treatment settings. However, participants receiving palliative care reported significantly higher levels of depression and desire for hastened death. A multivariate prediction model indicated that belief in an afterlife, social support, and anxiolytic and antidepressant use were unique, significant predictors of anxiety. Conclusion Severity of anxiety symptoms did not differ between the study sites, suggesting that anxiety may differ from depression and desire for hastened death in the course that it takes over the duration of terminal cancer. PMID:21565460

  7. Patient Beliefs About Colon Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, John W; Levy, Barcey T; Daly, Jeanette; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-03-01

    Only about half of eligible individuals undergo colon cancer screening. We have limited knowledge about the patient beliefs that adversely affect screening decisions and about which beliefs might be amenable to change through education. As part of a clinical trial, 641 rural Iowans, aged 52 to 79 years, reported their beliefs about colon cancer screening in response to a mailed questionnaire. Consenting subjects were randomized into four groups, which were distinguished by four levels of increasingly intensive efforts to promote screening. Two of the groups received mailed educational materials and completed a follow-up questionnaire, which allowed us to determine whether their beliefs about screening changed following the education. We also completed a factor analysis to identify underlying (latent) factors that might explain the responses to 33 questions about readiness, attitudes, and perceived barriers related to colon cancer screening. The strongest predictors of a patient's stated readiness to be screened were a physician's recommendation to be screened (1 point difference on 10-point Likert scale, 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.5 to 1.6 point difference), a family history of colon cancer (0.85-point Likert scale difference, 95 % CI, 0.1 to 1.6), and a belief that health-care decisions should be mostly left to physicians rather than patients (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.21, P colon cancer screening.

  8. Exercise barriers in Korean colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong-Woo; Chung, Jae Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Junga; Park, Ji-Hye; Kim, Dong-Il; Jones, Lee W; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2014-01-01

    To identify barriers to exercise in Korean colorectal cancer patients and survivors, and to analyze differences in exercise barriers by age, gender, treatment status, and physical activity level. A total of 427 colorectal cancer patients and survivors from different stages and medical status completed a self-administered questionnaire that surveyed their barriers to exercise and exercise participation. The greatest perceived exercise barriers for the sampled population as a whole were fatigue, low level of physical fitness, and poor health. Those under 60-years old reported lack of time (p=0.008), whereas those over 60 reported low level of physical fitness (p=0.014) as greater exercise barriers than their counterparts. Women reported fatigue as a greater barrier than men (pACSM guidelines, cancer-related exercise barriers were additionally reported (p<0.001), compared to those who were. Our study suggests that fatigue, low level of physical fitness, and poor health are most reported exercise barriers for Korean colorectal cancer survivors and there are differences in exercise barriers by age, sex, treatment status, and physical activity level. Therefore, support for cancer patients should be provided considering these variables to increase exercise participation.

  9. New resilience instrument for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zeng Jie; Liang, Mu Zi; Li, Peng Fei; Sun, Zhe; Chen, Peng; Hu, Guang Yun; Yu, Yuan Liang; Wang, Shu Ni; Qiu, Hong Zhong

    2017-11-08

    Resilience is an important concept in the cancer literature and is a salient indicator of cancer survivorship. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a new resilience instrument that is specific to patients with cancer diagnosis (RS-SC) in Mainland China. First, a resilience framework was constructed for patients with cancer diagnosis. Second, items were formulated based on the framework to reflect different aspects of resilience. Third, two rounds of expert panel discussion were performed to select important and relevant items. Finally, two cross-sectional studies were conducted to evaluate the psychometric properties of this instrument. Fifty-one items were generated based on the resilience framework and the final 25-item RS-SC resulted in a five-factor solution including Generic Elements, Benefit Finding, Support and Coping, Hope for the Future and Meaning for Existence, accounting for 64.72% of the variance. The Cronbach's α of the RS-SC was 0.825 and the test-retest reliability was 0.874. The RS-SC is a brief and specific self-report resilience instrument for Chinese patients with cancer and shows sound psychometric properties in this study. The RS-SC has potential applications in both clinical practice and research with strength-based resiliency interventions.

  10. Fertility preservation in young patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virender Suhag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can arise as a consequence of treatment of oncological conditions. The parallel and continued improvement in both the management of oncology and fertility cases in recent times has brought to the forefront the potential for fertility preservation in patients being treated for cancer. Many survivors will maintain their reproductive potential after the successful completion of treatment for cancer. However total body irradiation, radiation to the gonads, and certain high dose chemotherapy regimens can place women at risk for acute ovarian failure or premature menopause and men at risk for temporary or permanent azoospermia. Providing information about risk of infertility and possible interventions to maintain reproductive potential are critical for the adolescent and young adult population at the time of diagnosis. There are established means of preserving fertility before cancer treatment; specifically, sperm cryopreservation for men and in vitro fertilization and embryo cryopreservation for women. Several innovative techniques are being actively investigated, including oocyte and ovarian follicle cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, and in vitro follicle maturation, which may expand the number of fertility preservation choices for young cancer patients. Fertility preservation may also require some modification of cancer therapy; thus, patients' wishes regarding future fertility and available fertility preservation alternatives should be discussed before initiation of therapy.

  11. Patient Delay in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Hansen, Rikke P; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Blødning fra endetarmen ses normalt som et alarmsymptom på kolorektalkræft. Alligevel vælger mange patienter at lade være med at opsøge lægen. Denne artikel ser nærmere på sammenhængen mellem et alarmsymptom (rektal blødning), forsinkelser i patientforløbet og tanker om kræft. Resultaterne viser,...

  12. Exercise effects on mood in breast cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and statistics reveal that the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer in South Africa is increasing. As such, medical practitioners will treat an increasing number of breast cancer patients. Although increasingly effective treatments improve patient survival ...

  13. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Palacios

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods: The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012 were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results: There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%, and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2, with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9 years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7% patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5% had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232, the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397, and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0% and 23 (38.3% cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3% cases with advanced stages (III and IV at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%, chemotherapy 14 (24.1%, surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%, radiotherapy 7 (12.1%, surgery 4 (6.9%, and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%. Forty-six (76.7% patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%. Conclusions: The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis

  14. Exercise rehabilitation in patients with cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoski, Susan G.; Eves, Neil D.; Douglas, Pamela S.; Jones, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that patients with cancer have considerable impairments in cardiorespiratory fitness, which is likely to be a result of the direct toxic effects of anticancer therapy as well as the indirect consequences secondary to therapy (for example, deconditioning). This reduced cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with heightened symptoms, functional dependence, and possibly with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Current understanding of the complex interaction between the effects of the tumour and cancer-associated therapies on the organ components that govern cardiorespiratory fitness, and the effects of exercise training on these parameters is limited; further research will be critical for further progress of exercise-based rehabilitation in the oncology setting. We assess the current evidence regarding the level, mechanisms, and clinical importance of diminished cardiorespiratory fitness in patients with cancer. The efficacy and adaptations to exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate dysfunction in conjunction with exercise prescription considerations for clinical use are also discussed. PMID:22392097

  15. Thrombosis and bleeding in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Vicuna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that thrombosis and bleeding are two major complications seen in cancer patients. Recent advances in both basic and clinical observations have enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of both phenomena. In this article, the significance of thrombotic complications is reviewed first. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the present day concept of thrombogenesis in cancer based on Virchow’s original triad of aberrant blood flow, loss of vascular integrity and altered blood components. While most cancer patients experience bleeding at some time during the course of their illness, there are special situations that increase bleeding diathesis. These include thrombocytopenia, endothelial injury, acquired hemophilia and adverse effects of drugs. Recognition of these factors will assit in the adoption of appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures.

  16. Serum and tissue leptin in lung cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiang; Ma, Yao; Zhou, Qilong; He, Jie; Peng, Bo; Liu, Sitong; Yan, Zhipeng; Yang, Xin; Fan, Hong

    2017-03-21

    Many studies have found that leptin is involved in tumorigenesis and the progression of lung cancer. However, these studies were inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the role of leptin in the patients with lung cancer. A systematic literature search in the several databases and on commercial Internet search engines was carried out to identify studies published up to July 8, 2016. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to investigate the effect sizes. Finally, 21 eligible articles were included in the current meta-analysis. Overall, there is no relationship between levels of serum leptin and lung cancer. However, a subgroup analysis in high-study quality group found a weak association between serum leptin concentrations and lung cancer in Chinese (SMD=0.77, P=0.035). Additionally, the meta-analysis indicates that the serum leptin levels were lower in the weight-losing group than in the sustained weight group (SMD=-0.80, P=0.001). Further, there was evidence of a significant association between expression levels of leptin protein in tissue and lung cancer (OR=7.35, Pleptin may be involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer and tumor metastasis, especially among Chinese. However, the leptin may not appear to play an important role in cancer cachexia development.

  17. Palliative care for the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reville, Barbara; Axelrod, David; Maury, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    Palliation of symptoms to optimize QOL is the foundation of cancer care regardless of stage of disease or level of anticancer treatment. Patients commonly experience pain, constipation, nausea, vomiting, dyspnea, fatigue, and delirium. Many valid clinical tools are available to the primary care clinician to screen for symptoms, assess severity, measure treatment response, and elicit the patient's subjective symptom experience. Although there is limited evidence regarding the relative efficacy of symptom interventions from randomized controlled trials, clinical practice guidelines are available.

  18. Parenteral nutrition in the elderly cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrevall, Ylva

    2015-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition may be considered when oral intake and/or enteral nutrition are not sufficient to maintain nutritional status and the patient is likely to die sooner from starvation than from the cancer. A detailed assessment should be made prior to the decision about whether parenteral nutrition should be started. A follow up plan should be documented with objective and patient centred treatment goals as well as specific time points for evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hot flushes in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mom, CH; Buijs, C; Willemse, PHB; Mourits, MJE; de Vries, EGE

    Objective : A literature search was conducted to gather information concerning the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to hot flushes, their prevelence and severity in breast cancer patients, their influence on quality of life, and the best therapeutic option. Methods: Relevant studies in English

  20. [Treatment of elderly patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaschburg, B.; Pedersen, A.; Tuxen, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    The latest investigations have been searched in order to present new guidelines for the treatment of elderly patients with primary breast cancer. It is concluded that breast-conserving surgery should be offered as well as the sentinel node technique. Axillary lymph node dissection is not necessary...

  1. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Medications that Weaken Your Immune System Outbreaks Rhizopus Investigation CDC at Work Global Fungal Diseases Cryptococcal ... January 25, 2017 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic ...

  2. Multidimensional fatigue and its correlates in hospitalised advanced cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echteld, M.A.; Passchier, J.; Teunissen, S.; Claessen, S.; Wit, R. de; Rijt, C.C.D. van der

    2007-01-01

    Although fatigue is a multidimensional concept, multidimensional fatigue is rarely investigated in hospitalised cancer patients. We determined the levels and correlates of multidimensional fatigue in 100 advanced cancer patients admitted for symptom control. Fatigue dimensions were general fatigue

  3. Primary Patient-Derived Cancer Cells and Their Potential for Personalized Cancer Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Kodack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalized cancer therapy is based on a patient’s tumor lineage, histopathology, expression analyses, and/or tumor DNA or RNA analysis. Here, we aim to develop an in vitro functional assay of a patient’s living cancer cells that could complement these approaches. We present methods for developing cell cultures from tumor biopsies and identify the types of samples and culture conditions associated with higher efficiency of model establishment. Toward the application of patient-derived cell cultures for personalized care, we established an immunofluorescence-based functional assay that quantifies cancer cell responses to targeted therapy in mixed cell cultures. Assaying patient-derived lung cancer cultures with this method showed promise in modeling patient response for diagnostic use. This platform should allow for the development of co-clinical trial studies to prospectively test the value of drug profiling on tumor-biopsy-derived cultures to direct patient care.

  4. Inadequate Nutritional Status of Hospitalized Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In oncology practice, nutrition and also metabolic activity are essential to support the nutritional status and prevent malignant cachexia. It is important to evaluate the patients and plan the maneuvers at the start of the therapy. The primary objective of the study is to define the nutritional status of hospitalized patients and the factors affecting it in order to define the most susceptible patients and maneuvers for better nutritional support. Methods: Patients hospitalized in oncology clinic for therapy were evaluated for food intake and nutritional status through structured interviews. The clinical properties, medical therapies, elements of nutritional support were noted and predictors of inadequate nutritional status (INS were analyzed. Results: Four hundred twenty three patients, between 16-82 years old (median: 52 were evaluated. Nearly half of the patients (185, 43% reported a better appetite at home than in hospital and declared that hospitalization is an important cause of loss of appetite (140/185, 75.6%. Presence of nausea/vomiting (N/V, depression, age less than 65 and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were associated with increased risk of INS in hospitalized cancer patients. On the contrary, steroid medication showed a positive impact on nutritional status of cancer patients. Conclusion: N/V, younger age, presence of depression and NSAIDs medication were associated with INS in hospitalized cancer patients. Clinicians should pay more attention to this group of patients. In addition, unnecessary hospitalizations and medications that may disturb oral intake must be avoided. Corticosteroids are important tools for managing anorexia and INS.

  5. Prognosis of lung cancer patients with a past history of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Aritoshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Aokage, Keiju; Mimae, Takahiro; Nagai, Kanji; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Okada, Morihito

    2014-11-01

    The prognosis in lung cancer patients with a prior history of extrapulmonary cancer is controversial. In the current multicenter joint research in Japan, we focused on the relationship between a history of colorectal cancer and its prognostic impact in patients with subsequent lung cancer. Between 2000 and 2013, we designed a retrospective multicenter study at three institutes in Japan to evaluate the prognostic factors in lung cancer patients with a previous surgery for colorectal cancer. The cohorts consisted of 123/4431 lung cancer patients with/without a previous history of surgery for colorectal cancer. The median follow-up period was 6.1 years after lung cancer surgery. The 5-year overall survival in lung cancer patients with/without colorectal cancer was not significantly different, regardless of the stage of lung cancer (overall: 71.3 versus 74.7%, P = 0.1426; Stage I lung cancer: 83.3 versus 84.8%, P = 0.3779; Stage II or more lung cancer: 47.7 versus 54.4%, P = 0.1445). Based on multivariate Cox regression analysis in 4554 lung cancer patients, a past history of colorectal cancer was not a significant prognostic factor (P = 0.5335). Among the 123 lung cancer patients with colorectal cancer, age and absence of adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer were significant prognostic factors based on multivariate analysis (P = 0.0001 and 0.0236). Furthermore, there was no difference in the overall survival of lung cancer patients according to the stage of colorectal cancer (Stage I: 74.7%; Stage II/III: 66.5%, P = 0.7239). A history of antecedent colorectal cancer did not contribute to the prognosis in patients with subsequent lung cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Analysis of Maryland Cancer Patient Participation in NCI Supported Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Ellison, Gary L.; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and countylevel socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Patients and Methods Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2,240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. Results For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved. PMID:19711497

  7. Assessment of fatigue in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    Increased recognition of the problem of fatigue in cancer patients can be attributed, in part, to the development of measures that have provided researchers with the tools necessary for quantifying and characterizing fatigue and exploring its etiology and treatment. Although a consensus regarding the definition of fatigue is lacking, there is general agreement that it is a subjective and multidimensional phenomenon whose assessment requires the use of self-report methods. Consistent with this view, several multidimensional measures of fatigue have been developed and validated for use with cancer patients. These measures differ considerably in their format and content and, as with the definition of fatigue, there is no consensus at the present time regarding the dimensional structure of fatigue. In addition to measuring fatigue on a continuum along one or more dimensions, it may also be possible to assess a clinical syndrome of cancer-related fatigue. Criteria for assessing fatigue in this manner have been proposed and are currently undergoing evaluation. Despite the progress that has been made, there are several important unresolved issues in the assessment of fatigue in cancer patients. These include how to distinguish fatigue from depression, how to use self-reports of fatigue in clinical decision-making, how to capture temporal changes in fatigue, and how best to address the continuing lack of consensus regarding the conceptualization and measurement of fatigue.

  8. Classification of neuropathic pain in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunelli, Cinzia; Bennett, Michael I; Kaasa, Stein

    2014-01-01

    and on the relevance of patient-reported outcome (PRO) descriptors for the screening of NP in this population. An international group of 42 experts was invited to participate in a consensus process through a modified 2-round Internet-based Delphi survey. Relevant topics investigated were: peculiarities of NP...... was found on the statement "the pathophysiology of NP due to cancer can be different from non-cancer NP" (MED=9, IQR=2). Satisfactory consensus was reached for the first 3 NeuPSIG criteria (pain distribution, history, and sensory findings; MEDs⩾8, IQRs⩽3), but not for the fourth one (diagnostic test...

  9. Fungal agents isolated from cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Gasca, M A; Argüero Licea, B; Pliego Castañeda, A; García Tena, S

    1998-01-01

    With the aim to know the frequency of mycotic agents in patients with different types of cancer, samples were obtained from 81 patients from the Hospital de Oncología, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, IMSS from May 1995 through May 1996. In a conventional grouping seven (7) ambulatory patients were found in early stages, twenty seven (27) occasionally hospitalized patients were found in intermediate stage and forty seven (47) hospitalized patients in terminal stage of cancer. The different samples were processed through routine mycologycal methods and the following fungi species were isolated and identified: fifty four strains (58%) of Candida albicans followed by eleven strains (11.8%) of Candida tropicalis, six strains (6.45%) of Candida parapsilosis, five strains (5.37%) of Candida krusei, four strains (4.3%) of Candida humicola and five strains (5.37%) of Rodothorula rubra. From medical devices like catheter tips, drainage catheters (Pen rouse, Foley) and gallbladder catheters; four (4) strains of C. albicans, three (3) strains of Rodothorula rubra and two (2) strains of Aspergillus sp were isolated. Of the Candida non albicans it was relevant to find C. krusei more frequently than Rodothorula rubra, Aspergillus sp and Penicillum sp. The frequency of the presence of fungi increases commensurately to the advancement of the clincal stage of the cancer.

  10. Spiritual Care for Cancer Patients in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memaryan, Nadereh; Jolfaei, Atefeh Ghanbari; Ghaempanah, Zeinab; Shirvani, Armin; Vand, Hoda Doos Ali; Ghahari, Shahrbanoo; Bolhari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a return to spirituality is a major coping response in cancer patients so that therapists can adopt a holistic approach by addressing spirituality in their patient care. The present study was conducted to develop a guideline in the spiritual field for healthcare providers who serve cancer patients in Iran. Relevant statements were extracted from scientific documents that through study questions were reviewed and modified by a consensus panel. The statements were arranged in six areas, including spiritual needs assessment, spiritual care candidates, the main components of spiritual care, spiritual care providers, the settings of spiritual care and the resources and facilities for spiritual care. In addition to the development and preparation of these guidelines, health policy-makers should also seek to motivate and train health service providers to offer these services and facilitate their provision and help with widespread implementation.

  11. Spiritual Care Communication in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Billitteri, Jacob; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-12-01

    To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. Literature review. Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies. Spirituality is recognized as an essential component of quality care. Spiritual conversations can increase patients' satisfaction with care and improve well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Assessment of nutritional status in patients with primary lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermiti Ben Abdallah, Fatma; Ben Saïd, Hanène; Chamkhi, Najiba; Ferchichi, Marwa; Chtourou, Amel; Taktak, Sofia; Ben Kheder, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Malnutrition is a common problem among patients with cancer, affecting up to 85% of patients with certain cancers and represents a risk factor for poor prognosis. aim: evaluate nutritional status in patients with lung cancer before and during treatment using nutritional risk index. it's a prospective study conducted in pneumology IV department in Abderahman Mami hospital, from January to May 2011. 30 male patients with a lung cancer were included. Nutritional status was assessed before and during treatment based on anthropometric measures, biological markers and nutritional risk index (NRI). Mean age of patients was 58 ± 12 years, ranging from 19 to 82 years. 29 patients had non small cell lung cancer and one patient had small cell cancer. Malnutrition was noted in 14 patients (47%) before treatment according to the NRI. It was noted in 23 patients (77%) after three cycles of chemotherapy with severe malnutrition in 8 patients. Relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the NRI was linear, but NRI tends to evaluate more objectively risk of malnutrition in patients with lung cancer. Nutritional assessment in patient with lung cancer should be performed systematically, early and repeatedly. Several markers can be used such as BMI and NRI. Nutritional support will reduce morbidity and improve quality of life in patients with lung cancer.

  13. [Breast cancer in young patient in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znati, K; Bennis, S; Abbass, F; Akasbi, Y; Chbani, L; Elfatemi, H; Harmouch, T; Amarti, A

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer occurring in young women is rare with epidemiological, diagnostic and prognostic characteristics of their own. It is more often linked to genetic predisposition and especially correlated with a lower survival and higher rates of recidivism. The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiological, clinicopathological, biological and evolutionary characteristics. It is a retrospective study concerning 74 patients aged 35 and younger, in whom a diagnosis of invasive breast cancer was made between September 2004 and December 2009. Incidence of breast cancer in women aged under 35 in our series was 18.6%, mean age was 30.62years and five patients (6.75%) had a family history of breast cancer. The mean tumor size was 3.9±2.6cm; 45.4% of tumors were locally advanced. It was an infiltrating ductal carcinoma of grade III of Scarff-Bloom and Richardson (SBR) in 45.7% cases and half the time it was accompanied by an axillary lymph node involvement. Negative hormone receptor (HR-) was found in only 28.7% of cases and 13 cases overexpressed Her2. Eighteen percent of the tumors were classified as triple negative. The overall survival at 3years was 87.8%. The incidence of breast cancer in young Moroccan patients is high. In our context, it is distinguished by a delayed diagnosis explaining the advanced stage at diagnosis. Biological characteristics are often more aggressive, including high histological grade, lack of hormone receptors and the higher rate of triple negative tumours significantly reducing treatment options. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. Hazard function for cancer patients and cancer cell dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horová, Ivana; Pospísil, Zdenek; Zelinka, Jirí

    2009-06-07

    The aim of the paper is to develop a procedure for an estimate of an analytical form of a hazard function for cancer patients. Although a deterministic approach based on cancer cell population dynamics yields the analytical expression, it depends on several parameters which should be estimated. On the other hand, a kernel estimate is an effective nonparametric method for estimating hazard functions. This method provides the pointwise estimate of the hazard function. Our procedure consists of two steps: in the first step we find the kernel estimate of the hazard function and in the second step the parameters in the deterministic model are obtained by the least squares method. A simulation study with different types of censorship is carried out and the developed procedure is applied to real data.

  15. Why Breast Cancer Patients Seek Traditional Healers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazanah Muhamad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional healing is a common practice in low and middle income countries such as Malaysia. Eighty percent of Malaysians consult traditional healers or “bomoh” at some time in their life for health-related issues. The purpose of our study was to explore why breast cancer patients visit traditional healers. This is a qualitative study utilizing in-depth interviews with 11 cancer survivors who sought both traditional and Western medicine. The findings revealed the following reasons for which patients seek traditional healers: (1 recommendation from family and friends, (2 sanction from family, (3 perceived benefit and compatibility, (4 healer credibility, and (5 reservation with Western medicine and system delay. These factors work together and are strongly influenced by the Malaysian cultural context. The issue with the Western health system is common in a developing country with limited health facilities.

  16. Appropriateness of Parenteral Nutrition Usage in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu-Lin; Lee, Chun-Sung; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Chao, Chien-Ming; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the indication appropriateness of parenteral nutrition (PN) administration in cancer patients. Between December 2013 and August 2014, all cancer patients who received PN (including total PN and Kabiven) in a regional hospital of Southern Taiwan were included in this retrospective study. A total of 107 cancer patients received PN. Among them, colorectal cancer was the most common type of cancer (n = 45, 42.1%), followed by gastric cancer, head and neck cancer, and esophageal cancer. After evaluation of the appropriateness of PN administration, 88 (82.2%) PN episodes were considered appropriate and unavoidable, 4 (3.7%) as appropriate and avoidable but 15 (14.1%) as inappropriate. In conclusion, PN could be inappropriately used by some oncologic physicians. Physicians and nutrition support team specialists should carefully evaluate the indication of PN administration for cancer patients to obey the generally acknowledged usage rule.

  17. Family Caregivers for Cancer Patients in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Warunee Meecharoen; Northouse, Laurel L; Yupapin Sirapo-ngam; Supreeda Monkong

    2013-01-01

    This integrative review was conducted to describe findings from Thai studies concerning family caregivers for cancer patients. Twenty-three studies that were published from 1994 to 2009 were considered. There were 15 quantitative studies and 8 qualitative studies. The stress and coping model developed by Lazarus and Folkman was the most popular theory that was used to guide the studies. The variables that were explored...

  18. Psychological and physical effects of pain on cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of pain and its psychological and physical effects on cancer patients. Method: We ... Sixty-eight (32.4%) subjects had breast cancer, 59 (28.1%) had cervical cancer, 40 (19.0%) had colon/rectal cancer while the remaining ..... physical treatments like radiotherapy and surgery. Sexual.

  19. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  20. THYROID HORMONE PROFILE IN EARLY BREAST CANCER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renija Valiya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumour in women worldwide. The relationship between breast cancer and thyroid disease is a controversy. Many of the studies showed hypothyroidism as the commonly found thyroid abnormality in breast cancer. [1] There is considerable evidence for an increased risk of thyroid and breast cancer in patients with iodine deficiency. This ability of iodine to reduce the risk of breast cancer is attributed to the ability of iodine and its compounds to induce apoptosis so that appropriate cell death occurs. Instead, in the absence of optimum level of iodine in the body the transformed cells continue to grow and divide resulting in cancer. AIMS 1. To find out the association of thyroid hormones and breast cancer in early breast cancer patients. 2. To find out the association of thyroid peroxidase antibodies in early breast cancer patients. Settings Cases: 82 breast cancer patients in early stage who attended the breast clinic. Controls: 82 age matched controls (Between 25-80 years. Design: Case control study. MATERIALS AND METHOD In this study, investigated for thyroid function test (T3, T4, TSH and thyroid peroxide antibody level in 82 early breast cancer patients. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS SPSS 16. RESULTS Statistically significant low T4 and high TSH in breast cancer patients, along with elevated thyroid peroxidase antibody. CONCLUSION Compared to hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism was found to be clinically significant in breast cancer patients

  1. Renal Cancer Patients with Unknown Ethnicity in Cancer Registry Data: Comparisons to Patients with Known Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Butts, Elizabeth; Rockswold, Paul D; Shriver, Craig D; Zhu, Kangmin

    2015-01-01

    Information on ethnicity is important for health disparity research and health service planning. However, information on ethnicity is often incomplete in large routine databases such as cancer registries. This study aimed to compare survival status and other characteristics between cancer patients with and without information on Hispanic ethnicity in cancer registry data. The study included 2,426 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosed between 1988 and 2004 and identified from the US Department of Defense (DoD)'s Automated Central Tumor Registry (ACTUR) database. There were 1,353 non-Hispanic patients, 134 Hispanic patients, and 939 patients with unknown ethnicity. Patients were followed through death, date of last contact, or censored on December 31, 2007. Patients with unknown ethnicity exhibited significantly shorter survival than non-Hispanic or Hispanic patients (Log Rank P ethnicity, patients with unknown ethnicity were more likely to have advanced tumor stage at diagnosis and more likely to have missing information on tumor grade, size, and some demographic characteristics. After adjustment for demographic, tumor and treatment variables, patients with unknown ethnicity still exhibited significantly higher mortality than non-Hispanic patients (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69; 95% CI, 1.48-1.92), while Hispanic patients were not different from non-Hispanic patients (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.71-1.28). The shorter survival in the unknown ethnicity group was consistently observed in subgroups by age, race, stage, grade, and surgical treatment, suggesting factors other than those investigated in the current study may play a role in the survival differences between patients with and without information on Hispanic ethnicity. The poor survival of patients with unknown ethnicity in ACTUR warrants further research to elucidate missing mechanisms. Improvement in collection of data by reaching out for more engagement of patients, clinicians and registrars and

  2. Incidence of colorectal cancer in young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FÁBIO GUILHERME C. M. DE CAMPOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC is traditionally diagnosed after de sixth decade of life, although a small percentage of cases are diagnosed in patients under 40 years of age, and incidence is increasing. There exists a great volume of controversy regarding clinical outcome of young patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC when compared to elder counterparts. Our aims were to evaluate the rate of CRC in young patients, to review the pertaining literature and to discuss outcomes and clinical prognosis. A retrospective review involving patients with CRC was undertaken, focusing on age at diagnosis. The information extracted from this literature review showed a trend towards a decreased incidence in older people with an opposite effect among adolescents and young adults. Moreover, biological aggressiveness in young adults diagnosed with CRC has not been fully recognized, although it is usually diagnosed later and in association with adverse histological features. Besides that, these features don't affect outcome. These apparent increase in CRC incidence among young patients during the last decades raises the need for a greater suspicious when evaluating common symptoms in this group. Thus, educational programs should widespread information for both population and physicians to improve prevention and early diagnosis results.

  3. Gastric varicella: two cases in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta María Sastre-Lozano

    Full Text Available Gastric involvement with the varicella-zoster virus is an uncommon clinical condition where early suspicion and diagnosis are important to prevent the consequences deriving from its high morbidity and mortality, which in immunocompromised patients oscillate between 9% and 41% according to the various series. Two cases of gastric involvement with the varicella-zoster virus (VZV in two patients with blood cancer are reported below. Gastric lesions are usually preceded by typical papulovesicular skin lesions. When gastric involvement is the first symptom of the disease its diagnosis and management may be delayed, which may entail severe consequences for immunocompromised patients. It is therefore that we suggest its inclusion in the algorithm for immunocompromised patients with abdominal pain and ulcer-like endoscopic lesions.

  4. Depression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlo, Mohammad G; Al Ahwal, Mahmoud S

    2013-04-01

    Patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) experience psychological stress due to the diagnosis and the physical and social changes brought on by the illness, increasing the risk of depressive disorder. Depression causes tremendous disability and adds to the suffering that patients must already endure. It is known to alter immune and endocrine functions that affect vulnerability to CRC, its course over time, and its response to treatment. We review the prevalence of depressive symptoms and disorders worldwide and in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), focusing on patients with medical illness and those with CRC, in particular. We examine how often depression is diagnosed, how it is treated, and its likely course over time, and review the effects of depression on functional disability, longevity, and immune functions. Finally, we discuss research needs and make recommendations on highest priority research studies to advance our understanding of depressive disorder in CRC patients in KSA.

  5. Coping with cancer : The perspective of patients' relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagedoorn, Mariet; Kreicbergs, Ulrika; Appel, Charlotte

    Cancer affects not only patients but also their loved ones. Material and methods. This paper presents a selective, narrative review of psychosocial consequences of cancer and its treatment for relatives of patients, including parents and siblings of children with cancer, children of parents with

  6. Assessment of drug induced genotoxicity in gastric cancer patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of drug induced genotoxicity in gastric cancer patients. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Blood samples were collected from gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with the cytotoxic drugs epirubicin, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, and 100 controls from recognized cancer hospitals under the ...

  7. Serum protein fingerprint of patients with gastric cancer by SELDI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... be used to screen significant proteins of differential expression in the serum of gastric cancer patients. These different proteins could be specific biomarkers of the patients with gastric cancer in the serum and have the potential .... hepatocellular carcinoma (Paradis et al., 2005), naso- pharyngeal cancer ...

  8. Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the QoL in cancer patients with solid tumors and at the different chemotherapy cycles (CT). Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 200 cancer patients were included. With some modification, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QoL ...

  9. Chest Radiography in Management of Breast Cancer Patients in a

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this study was to determine the role of abdominal ultrasound and chest radiography in detection of liver and lung metastasis in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Methods: This was a descriptive cross sectional study in which 103 new breast cancer patients attending Ocean Road Cancer ...

  10. Family Caregivers for Cancer Patients in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warunee Meecharoen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This integrative review was conducted to describe findings from Thai studies concerning family caregivers for cancer patients. Twenty-three studies that were published from 1994 to 2009 were considered. There were 15 quantitative studies and 8 qualitative studies. The stress and coping model developed by Lazarus and Folkman was the most popular theory that was used to guide the studies. The variables that were explored in the quantitative studies consisted of social support, stress, coping, caregiver burden, quality of life (QOL, and others. The qualitative findings revealed that there were several themes such as the following: the meaning of being family caregivers for cancer patients, the meaning of care, the experiences of caregivers, and the problems and needs of family caregivers in the Thai context. The evidence from the 23 studies reviewed showed that the state of knowledge of cancer caregivers in the Thai context is at an early stage compared with the state of knowledge in Western countries. More research needs to be done to explore the concepts related to negative and positive outcomes of caregiving.

  11. Survival analysis of patients with interval cancer undergoing gastric cancer screening by endoscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisato Hamashima

    Full Text Available Interval cancer is a key factor that influences the effectiveness of a cancer screening program. To evaluate the impact of interval cancer on the effectiveness of endoscopic screening, the survival rates of patients with interval cancer were analyzed.We performed gastric cancer-specific and all-causes survival analyses of patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group and radiographic screening group using the Kaplan-Meier method. Since the screening interval was 1 year, interval cancer was defined as gastric cancer detected within 1 year after a negative result. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to investigate the risk factors associated with gastric cancer-specific and all-causes death.A total of 1,493 gastric cancer patients (endoscopic screening group: n = 347; radiographic screening group: n = 166; outpatient group: n = 980 were identified from the Tottori Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The gastric cancer-specific survival rates were higher in the endoscopic screening group than in the radiographic screening group and the outpatients group. In the endoscopic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer and the patients with interval cancer were nearly equal (P = 0.869. In the radiographic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer was higher than that of the patients with interval cancer (P = 0.009. For gastric cancer-specific death, the hazard ratio of interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group was 0.216 for gastric cancer death (95%CI: 0.054-0.868 compared with the outpatient group.The survival rate and the risk of gastric cancer death among the patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer were not significantly different in the annual endoscopic screening. These results suggest the potential of endoscopic screening in

  12. Latina Breast Cancer Patients and Their Informal Support System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayes-Bautista, David

    2001-01-01

    ... consisting of Latina cancer patients, their spouses/significant others and family/friends. Participants are drawn from the Breast Cancer Treatment fund, which provides payment for services for uninsured women. Findings...

  13. Nutrition support in surgical patients with colorectal cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang Chen Bao-Lin Liu Bin Shang Ai-Shan Chen Shi-Qing Liu Wei Sun Hong-Zhuan Yin Jian-Qiao Yin Qi su

    2011-01-01

    ...: A total of 202 consecutive surgical patients admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of colon cancer or rectal cancer from January 2010 to July 2010, meeting the requirements of Nutrition Risk...

  14. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  15. Transitoriness in cancer patients: a cross-sectional survey of lung and gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, Maya; Pandian, Vinciya; Choti, Michael A; Stotsky, Eden; Herman, Joseph M; Khan, Yasmin; Libonati, Carol; Pawlik, Timothy M; Schulick, Richard D; Belcher, Anne E

    2010-02-01

    Despite earlier diagnosis and advancements in treatment, cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world (13% of all deaths according to the World Health Organization) among men and women. Cancer accounts for approximately 20% of the deaths in the USA every year. Here, we report the findings from a cross-sectional survey of psychosocial factors in lung and gastrointestinal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to explore the associations among transitoriness, uncertainty, and locus of control (LOC) with quality of life. Transitoriness is defined as a person's confrontation with life's finitude due to a cancer diagnosis. A total of 126 patients with lung or gastrointestinal cancer completed eight self-reporting questionnaires addressing demographics, spiritual perspective, symptom burden, transitoriness, uncertainty, LOC, and quality of life. Transitoriness, uncertainty, and LOC were significantly associated with one another (r = 0.3267, p = 0.0002/r = 0.1994, p = 0.0252, respectively). LOC/belief in chance has a significant inverse relationship with patients' quality of life (r = -0.2505, p = 0.0047). Transitoriness, uncertainty, and LOC were found to have a significant inverse relationship with patients' quality of life (transitoriness state: r = -0.5363, p = 0.0000/trait: r = -0.4629, p = 0.0000/uncertainty: r = -0.4929, p = 0.0000/internal LOC: r = 0.1759, p = 0.0489/chance LOC: r = -0.2505, p = 0.0047). Transitoriness, uncertainty, and LOC are important concepts as they adversely influence patients' quality of life. Incorporating this finding into the care of cancer patients may provide them with the support they need to cope with treatment and maintenance of a positive quality of life.

  16. Candidaemia and cancer: patients are not all the same

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeiros Lidia

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the studies about invasive Candida infections in cancer patients have focused on haematological patients. The aim of this study was to provide information about risk factors for candidaemia in patients with solid tumours. Methods Retrospective cohort study. During a 9-year period (1995–2003 we reviewed all cases of candidaemia that affected cancer patients in Santa Casa Complexo Hospitalar, Brazil. Results During the period of study, 210 patients had the diagnosis of candidaemia in our medical centre, and 83 of these patients had cancer (39.5%. The majority of patients with cancer had solid tumours (77.1%, mostly in the alimentary tract. Most of solid cancers were non-metastatic (71.9%. Major diagnoses in patients with haematological neoplasia were acute leukaemia (n = 13, high grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 5 and Hodgkin's disease (n = 1. Non-Candida albicans species caused 57.8% of the episodes of candidaemia in patients with cancer, mainly in patients with haematological malignancies (p = 0.034. Neutropenia and treatment with corticosteroids were more frequent in the haematological group, in comparison with patients with solid tumours. Only 22.2% of patients with solid tumours were neutropenic before candidaemia. Nonetheless, the presence of ileus and the use of anaerobicides were independent risk factors for candidaemia in patients with solid cancers. The overall mortality in cancer patients with candidaemia was 49.4%. We then compared 2 groups of adult patients with candidaemia. The first was composed of non-neutropenic patients with solid tumours, and the second group included patients without cancer. We found that central venous catheters and gastrointestinal surgery were independently associated with candidaemia in patients with solid tumour. Conclusion Cancer patients with candidaemia seem to have very different predisposing factors to acquire the infection when stratified according to baseline diseases

  17. Documented allergies of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernecky, C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and quantify the types of allergies that occur in patients with cancer. The study sample consisted of computer-generated pharmacy records of 4510 inpatients from two oncology inpatient units over a 1-year period from a large urban hospital in the USA. Compliance with computer entry was monitored in order to ensure data accuracy. Results of the study indicate that the percentages of stated allergies for persons with cancer might be higher than those for overall populations. The top four medication allergies were penicillin, sulpha, codeine and contrast media. The top four food allergies were milk, eggs, chocolate and strawberries and the top four environmental allergies were bee stings, chemical sprays, dust and mould.

  18. Behandlingsresultater hos patienter med cancer i papilla Vateri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sune; Bendixen, Morten; Fristrup, Claus Wilki

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of the papilla of Vater is a relatively rare disease. It is difficult to separate from other periampullary tumours at the time of diagnosis. Recent studies have shown that patients with cancer of the papilla tend survive longer than patients with pancreatic cancer and cancers of biliary...... and duodenal origin. The aim of this study was to compare our results with those reported in the international literature....

  19. Validity of utilities of patients with esophageal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalmeier, P.F.M.; Boer, A.G.E.M. de; Sprangers, M.A.G.; Haes, J.C.J.M. de; Lanschot, J.J.B. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The convergent validity between utility assessment methods was assessed. METHODS: Investigated were patients with esophageal cancer treated surgically with curative intent. Patients were interviewed in a period from 3 to 12 months after surgical resection. Patients evaluated their actual

  20. Pain Management Skills for Minority Breast Cancer Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Backonja, Miroslav

    2002-01-01

    .... Despite improvements in cancer care for patients with early stage disease, a large number of patients will still develop metastatic disease, and mortality rates for these patients remain relatively constant...

  1. [Resilience in cancer patients and related nursing interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ya-Lan; Wen, Chien-Hui; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Chen, Chin-Mi

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is a critical health problem in Taiwan. The range of physical, psychological, social, and existential stressors associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment can cause significant distress in cancer patients and survivors. The focus of cancer research has broadened in the past decade from the disease itself to factors that can have a positive influence on the health and life quality of cancer patients. However, few studies have explored how patients adapt and become resilient to the life challenges of their disease. This article introduces the concept of resilience and its influence factors. We analyze study findings and introduce four nursing interventions that have been used to nurture resilience in cancer patients. The authors hope findings help strengthen nurse competencies in order to enhance cancer patient quality of care.

  2. High Posttransplant Cancer Incidence in Renal Transplanted Patients With Pretransplant Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Vivan; Lorant, Tomas; Döhler, Bernd; Tufveson, Gunnar; Enblad, Gunilla

    2017-06-01

    Patients with previous cancer have increasingly been accepted for renal transplantation. Posttransplant cancer risk and survival rates of these patients are unknown. Our objective was to assess the risk of posttransplant cancer in this patient group. In this retrospective, nested case-control study, we assessed the outcome of all (n = 95) renal transplanted patients with pretransplant cancer diagnoses in the Uppsala-Örebro region, Sweden. The control group was obtained from the Collaborative Transplant Study registry and included European patients without pretransplant cancer. The other control group comprised the entire renal transplanted population in Uppsala. Development of recurrent cancer, de novo cancer, and patient survival were determined. Patients with pretransplant cancer showed higher incidence of posttransplant cancers and shorter survival compared with the control groups (P cancer treatments and favorable prognoses, almost half of the patients experienced a posttransplant cancer. These observations do not justify abstaining from transplanting all patients with previous malignancies, because more than 50% of the patients survive 10 years posttransplantation. A careful oncological surveillance pretransplant as well as posttransplant is recommended.

  3. Work functioning trajectories in cancer patients : Results from the longitudinal Work Life after Cancer (WOLICA) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorland, Heleen F; Abma, Femke I; Roelen, Corné A M; Stewart, Roy E; Amick, Benjamin C; Ranchor, Adelita V; Bültmann, Ute

    2017-01-01

    More than 60% of cancer patients are able to work after cancer diagnosis. However, little is known about their functioning at work. Therefore, the aims of this study were to (1) identify work functioning trajectories in the year following return to work (RTW) in cancer patients and (2) examine

  4. Time trends in axilla management among early breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondos, Adam; Jansen, Lina; Heil, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined time trends in axilla management among patients with early breast cancer in European clinical settings. Material and methods EUROCANPlatform partners, including population-based and cancer center-specific registries, provided routinely available clinical cancer registry data...... for a comparative study of axillary management trends among patients with first non-metastatic breast cancer who were not selected for neoadjuvant therapy during the last decade. We used an additional short questionnaire to compare clinical care patterns in 2014. Results Patients treated in cancer centers were...

  5. Statin use and mortality among ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdoodt, Freija; Hansen, Merete Kjaer; Kjaer, Susanne K.

    2017-01-01

    Statin use has been suggested to improve prognosis in cancer patients, however, for ovarian cancer, the evidence is sparse. From the Danish Cancer Registry, we identified patients aged 30-84 years with a histologically verified first diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer between 2000 and 2013......-cause or ovarian cancer-specific mortality. Among 4,419 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, post-diagnostic statin use was not statistically significantly associated with all-cause (HR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.78-1.04) or ovarian cancer-specific mortality (HR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.76-1.08). There was little evidence...... of a dose-response relationship and the neutral associations persisted in sensitivity analyses. In women with endometrioid or clear cell tumour histology, cancer-specific mortality was reduced by 30-40% among statin users compared to non-users, however the analyses were limited by small numbers...

  6. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  7. Bladder cancer in cancer patients: population-based estimates from a large Swedish study

    OpenAIRE

    Bermejo, J Lorenzo; Sundquist, J; Hemminki, K

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study quantified the risk of urinary bladder neoplasms in cancer patients taking into account the age at first diagnosis, the gender of the patients and the lead time between diagnoses. Methods: We used standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) to compare the incidence of bladder tumours in 967?767 cancer patients with the incidence rate in the general Swedish population. A total of 3324 male and 1560 female patients developed bladder tumours at least 1 year after first cancer dia...

  8. Recall in Older Cancer Patients: Measuring Memory for Medical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. Design and…

  9. Recall in older cancer patients: Measuring memory for medical information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; van Weert, J.; van der Meulen, N.; van Dulmen, S.; Heeren, T.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient

  10. Recall in older cancer patients: measuring memory for medical information.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J. van; Meulen, N. van der; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, T.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient

  11. Hypercalcaemia in patients with breast cancer: Patterns and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the patterns of use of bisphosphonate therapies for hypercalcaemia in breast cancer patients, and their outcomes. Methods: A retrospective chart review study of breast cancer patients hospitalised between 2009 and. 2014 at Penang Hospital, a public tertiary hospital in Malaysia was conducted. Patients ...

  12. The Role of Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandhi, Mithil B.; Desai, Kush R.; Ryu, Robert K.; Lewandowski, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer induces a hypercoagulable state and renders patients susceptible to venous thromboembolism. While anticoagulation remains the mainstay of treatment, many of these patients require placement of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, often due to a contraindication to or failure of anticoagulation. In this article, the available data on IVC filter usage in cancer patients will be reviewed. PMID:27247473

  13. Hypercalcaemia in patients with breast cancer: Patterns and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypercalcaemia in patients with breast cancer: Patterns and treatment outcomes among in-patients in a Malaysian tertiary healthcare facility. ... Methods: A retrospective chart review study of breast cancer patients hospitalised between 2009 and 2014 at Penang Hospital, a public tertiary hospital in Malaysia was conducted.

  14. Adjuvant treatment delay in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damila Cristina Trufelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary Background: to evaluate if time between surgery and the first adjuvant treatment (chemotherapy, radiotherapy or hormone therapy in patients with breast cancer is a risk factor for lower overall survival (OS. Method: data from a five-year retrospective cohort study of all women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at an academic oncology service were collected and analyzed. Results: three hundred forty-eight consecutive women were included. Time between surgery and the first adjuvant treatment was a risk factor for shorter overall survival (HR=1.3, 95CI 1.06-1.71, p=0.015, along with negative estrogen receptor, the presence of lymphovascular invasion and greater tumor size. A delay longer than 4 months between surgery and the first adjuvant treatment was also associated with shorter overall survival (cumulative survival of 80.9% for delays ≤ 4 months vs. 72.6% for delays > 4 months; p=0.041, log rank test. Conclusion: each month of delay between surgery and the first adjuvant treatment in women with invasive breast cancer increases the risk of death in 1.3-fold, and this effect is independent of all other well-established risk factors. Based on these results, we recommend further public strategies to decrease this interval.

  15. [Physical activity and exercise recommendations for cancer patients during rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, E M; Baumann, F T; Pfeifer, K

    2014-02-01

    Cancer and its commonly required continuous and intensive medical treatment have a profound and lasting effect on patients' physical, functional, emotional and social wellbeing. In this context the positive comprehensive effects of physical exercise interventions increasingly prove to be promising. The aim of this review is to derive physical exercise recommendations for patients with cancer, especially concerning aerobic and resistance training during rehabilitation, based on the current literature. In a second step the 3 main cancer types breast cancer, prostate cancer and colon cancer and their distinctive features will be addressed briefly. A hierarchic literature research was conducted using the medical information portal Medpilot. The evaluation system of the "European Society of Cardiology" was applied in order to evaluate the evidence and compile evidence-based exercise recommendations for patients with cancer. When summing up the current data, physical exercise proves to be efficient, safe and feasible for patients with cancer. Both aerobic and resistance training have a positive influence on a patient's physical, psychological and social level and should therefore be included in every exercise program. While the evidence for breast cancer and increasingly also for prostate cancer is strong, research in colon cancer, for example, is still sparse. In order to create precise recommendations regarding the ideal exercise type and dose for the different cancer types during various treatment phases further high quality studies are necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Best Practice in Basic Oral Care among Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wanyonyi, Celestine; Suila, Jennibeth

    2015-01-01

    Basic oral care maintains oral cleanliness, reduces the impact of oral microbial flora, prevents infections in the oral cavity, thereby preventing cancer treatment complications. Nurses caring for cancer patients are well situated to perform various roles that affect the patients’ oral health such as identifying patients at risk of developing oral complications, and educating cancer patients about the importance and means of having good oral health throughout their treatment to prevent, ...

  17. Baseline cognitive functions among elderly patients with localised breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Marie; Giffard, Bénédicte; Noal, Sabine; Rigal, Olivier; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Heutte, Natacha; Lévy, Christelle; Allouache, Djelila; Rieux, Chantal; Le Fel, Johan; Daireaux, Aurélie; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Veyret, Corinne; Barthélémy, Philippe; Longato, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    International audience; PURPOSE: Cognitive deficits (CD) are reported among cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, but may also be observed before treatment. Though elderly patients are expected to be more prone to present age-related CD, poor information is available regarding the impact of cancer and chemotherapy on this population. This study assessed baseline cognitive functions (before adjuvant treatment) in elderly early stage breast cancer (EBC) patients. METHODS: Women >65years-old w...

  18. Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Borchsenius, Julie I Helene; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications following thoracic radiotherapy in patients with cancer are well described. Advancements in surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments have led to an increasing number of cancer survivors and thus an increasing number of patients with long-term side effects...... of their cancer treatments. This article describes the short- and long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following thoracic radiotherapy and further, optimal cardiovascular assessments and diagnostic tools in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients....

  19. Priority Settings in patients with Chronic Diseases and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arreskov, Anne Beiter; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Søndergaard, Jens

    Priority setting in patients with cancer and comorbidities Background and aim As both the cancer incidence and the number of patients diagnosed with chronic diseases are increasing, a growing population of cancer survivors will also deal with comorbid chronic diseases. The period after completed...... cancer treatment, where patients are transitioning to survivorship, might be a vulnerable time. Uncertainty about health status, physical- and emotional symptoms from cancer disease and treatment, and perhaps uncertainty about which doctor to consult, might influence patients’ priorities and attention...... to comorbidities. Some studies show that participation in regular follow-up consultations concerning comorbid chronic diseases and lifestyle are lower among cancer survivors than non-cancer patients. This could be explained by changes in the patient’s priority setting or in the doctor’s priority and attempt...

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastric Adenoma and Gastric Cancer in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Hyun Tak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. To evaluate the incidence of gastric adenoma and gastric cancer in colorectal cancer patients, as well as the clinicopathological features that affect their incidence. Methods. Among patients who underwent surgery after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer between January 2004 and December 2013 at Chungnam National University Hospital, 142 patients who underwent follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were assigned to the patient group. The control group included 426 subjects randomly selected. The patient group was subdivided into two: one that developed gastric adenoma or cancer and one that did not. Clinicopathological characteristics were compared between these groups. Results. In total, 35 (24.6% colorectal cancer patients developed a gastric adenoma or gastric cancer, which was higher than the number in the control group (20 [4.7%] patients; p<0.001. Age, alcohol history, and differentiation of colorectal cancer were associated with higher risks of gastric adenoma or gastric cancer, with odds ratios of 1.062, 6.506, and 5.901, respectively. Conclusions. In colorectal cancer patients, screening with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is important, even if no lesions are noted in the upper gastrointestinal tract at colorectal cancer diagnosis. Endoscopic screening is particularly important with increasing age, history of alcohol consumption, and poor cancer differentiation.

  1. Work functioning trajectories in cancer patients: Results from the longitudinal Work Life after Cancer (WOLICA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, Heleen F; Abma, Femke I; Roelen, Corné A M; Stewart, Roy E; Amick, Benjamin C; Ranchor, Adelita V; Bültmann, Ute

    2017-11-01

    More than 60% of cancer patients are able to work after cancer diagnosis. However, little is known about their functioning at work. Therefore, the aims of this study were to (1) identify work functioning trajectories in the year following return to work (RTW) in cancer patients and (2) examine baseline sociodemographic, health-related and work-related variables associated with work functioning trajectories. This longitudinal cohort study included 384 cancer patients who have returned to work after cancer diagnosis. Work functioning was measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up. Latent class growth modeling (LCGM) was used to identify work functioning trajectories. Associations of baseline variables with work functioning trajectories were examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. LCGM analyses with cancer patients who completed on at least three time points the Work Role Functioning Questionnaire (n = 324) identified three work functioning trajectories: "persistently high" (16% of the sample), "moderate to high" (54%) and "persistently low" work functioning (32%). Cancer patients with persistently high work functioning had less time between diagnosis and RTW and had less often a changed meaning of work, while cancer patients with persistently low work functioning reported more baseline cognitive symptoms compared to cancer patients in the other trajectories. This knowledge has implications for cancer care and guidance of cancer patients at work. © 2017 UICC.

  2. Immunohormonal interactions in patients with vulvar cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Nerodo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A parallel study of some parameters of the endocrine and immune systems was conducted in 120 patients with vulvar cancer prior to treatment.Most patients were found to have impaired immunogenesis: the reduced count and function of T and B lymphocytes, decreased natu- ral killer cells, suppressed macrophageal transformation of monocytes, higher percentage of immunocomplexes, insufficient production of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgM, IgG, which was induced by the elevated level of cortisol in its slower metabolism at the periphery, reduced function of the pituitary-thyroid system, the balance of sex steroids shifted towards testosterone, a predominance of luteiniz- ing hormone over follicle-stimulating hormone, and inhibited growth hormone production.

  3. Genetic issues in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossland, Victoria Sahadevan; Stroop, Jennifer B; Schwartz, Robin C; Kurtzman, Scott H

    2009-01-01

    Screening for genetic abnormalities is a relatively complex task requiring detailed training and knowledge. Analysis of a person's genetic makeup has implications not only for that individual but also for their progenitors, offspring, siblings, and spouses. There are potential insurance, employment, and other risks regarding disclosure of this information. With proper training, surgeons or nurses with advanced skills can be qualified to conduct this type of initial analysis. Geneticists may be the ideal professionals to counsel patients. In this article, we explore these and other issues. The goal is to provide the surgeon with the information needed to identify patients at risk for carrying identifiable mutations that might lead to the development of breast cancer.

  4. INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. V. Grigoryevskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC annually afflicts 63–65 thousand people in Russia and 1.04 million worldwide, which amounts to 12.8% of all notified cases of neoplasms. In LC patients, infectious complications are characterized by a severe course; destruction foci, decay cavities, and abscess may form.All give rise to difficulties in making a diagnosis and in choosing a treatment policy. Infections caused by P. aeruginosa, A. baumanii, bacteria of the family Enterobacteriacae, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp present the greatest problem in inpatients with LC. The early diagnosis of infectiouscomplications and the use of adequate schemes of antibiotic prevention and therapy promote a reduction in mortality from infection in this categoryof patients and expand the possibilities of their specific antitumor treatment.

  5. Anticipatory grief in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottensen, Dory

    2010-02-01

    Patients and their loved ones often experience anticipatory grief when learning of a diagnosis of advanced or terminal cancer. Anticipatory grief can be a response to threats of loss of ability to function independently, loss of identity, and changes in role definition, which underlie fear of death. Dealing with multiple losses is a primary task that the dying patient must face. When an oncologist delivers bad news, the patient and family members often hear the same discussion through different filters, which can lead to conflict and dysfunction. By providing a supportive and safe environment, oncology nurses can help patients and their loved ones understand that their feelings are common and are experienced by others in similar situations and assist them with developing coping strategies and in redefining their roles within the family and in the outside world. In addition, an important goal at this time is to help the patients reframe "hope" realistically so they may have the opportunity for personal growth as well as reconciliation of primary relationships toward the end of life.

  6. Familial colorectal cancer: Patient assessment, surveillance and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, R P; Gryfe, R; Winter, D C

    2017-02-01

    Germline mutations account for 5-10% of colorectal cancer. Most mutations are autosomal dominant with high penetrance and affected patients benefit greatly from appropriate treatment. This review presents the current knowledge regarding familial colorectal cancer and provides practical information based on international guidelines and the best available evidence regarding patient assessment, surveillance and surgical management. Surgeons are often the first point of contact and frequently, the main provider of care for families with cancer syndromes or patients with familial cancer. Patients with a polyposis phenotype should undergo appropriate genetic testing. In non-polyposis patients with a cancer diagnosis, tumor testing for Lynch syndrome can guide the use of genetic testing. In patients without a personal history of cancer or polyposis, a carefully obtained family history with testing of available tumor tissue or of a living relative affected by colorectal cancer informs the need for genetic testing. Surveillance and surgical management should be planned following thorough assessment of familial cancer risk. Evidence exists to provide guidance as to the surveillance strategies required, the specific indications of genetic testing and the appropriate timing of operative intervention. A carefully obtained family history with selective genetic testing should inform surveillance and surgical management in patients who have a genetic predisposition for the development of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  7. Hair iron and other minerals' level in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Nam-Seok; Kim, Sang-Man; Jung, Yong-Sik; Kim, Kwang-Min

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about hair minerals in cancer patients, and serum iron level has been shown to be elevated in breast cancer patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate hair iron and hair minerals' level related to hair iron in breast cancer patients compared to controls. We compared hair mineral analysis data of 40 breast cancer subjects with age and body mass index-matched normal control data (n = 144) by cross-sectional analysis. All breast cancer patients were newly diagnosed at one Breast Cancer Center in Ajou University and had their hair cut before anti-cancer chemotherapy, and the normal controls (without breast cancer) also had their hair cut for various reasons in out-patient clinics of the Department of Family Practice and Community Health. Breast cancer patients had low calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese, and zinc, whereas they had high arsenic, sodium, and potassium compared with the normal control. The hair iron level was positively correlated with hair calcium (r = 0.761, P arsenic (r = -0.537, P breast cancer patients compared to normal controls. Especially, hair iron level was significantly reduced and associated with hair calcium and manganese levels.

  8. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iúri Amorim de Santana

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer among men in Brazil. Recently, several studies have hypothesized a relationship between PCa and metabolic syndrome (MS. The aim here was to identify an association between MS and PCa. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, Fundação de Beneficência Hospital de Cirurgia (FBHC and Universidade Federal de Sergipe. METHODS: Laboratory and anthropometric parameters were compared between PCa patients (n = 16 and controls (n = 16. RESULTS: The PCa patients showed significantly greater frequency of MS than did the controls (p = 0.034. Serum glucose was higher and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was lower than in the controls, although without significant differences. There were significant differences in blood pressure (p = 0.029 and waist-to-hip ratio (p = 0.004. Pearson linear correlation showed a positive association between waist-to-hip ratio and prostate specific antigen (r = 0.584 and p = 0.028. Comparing subgroups with and without MS among the PCa patients, significant differences (p < 0.05 in weight, height, body mass index, hip circumference and lean body mass were observed, thus showing higher central obesity in those with MS. The serum glucose values were also higher in MS patients (p = 0.006, thus demonstrating that insulin resistance has a role in MS physiopathology. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that MS may exert an influence on the development of PCa. However, it would be necessary to expand the investigation field with larger sample sizes and cohorts studied, to test the hypothesis generated in this study.

  9. Breaking bad news in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Konstantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. Materials and Methods: 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Results: Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59% had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90% were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66% had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61% delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83% ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83% used simple words and 54 (91.53% checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97% allowed relatives to determine patient′s knowledge about the disease. Conclusions: There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician′s speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  10. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Hai Ming

    2014-01-01

    ... pressure and stress for not only the patients themselves but also their families and friends. According to the United States Cancer Statistics 2009, the National Program of Cancer Registries, the ten ranking cancers by site in the American population (per 100,000 persons) are prostate (137.7), breast (123.1), lung and bronchus (64.3), colon and rec...

  11. Layers in sorting practices: Sorting out patients with potential cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Naja Holten; Bjørn, Pernille

    2011-01-01

    In the last couple of years, widespread use of standardized cancer pathways has been seen across a range of countries, including Denmark, to improve prognosis of cancer patients. In Denmark, standardized cancer pathways take the form of guidelines prescribing well-defined sequences where steps ar...

  12. Stress and Coping Mechanisms Among Breast Cancer Patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    the leading cause of cancer mortality, representing. 14.1%. In Zambia, it is second to cervical cancer and its incidence is steadily increasing. A diagnosis of cancer regardless of stage is a stressful event impacting on all facets of the patient's life and that of her family caregivers. To minimize the impact, adaptive coping ...

  13. Breast cancer patients' presentation for oncological treatment: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries' breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Methods: Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer ...

  14. Pregnancy and abortion in breast cancer patients: Two case reports ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in pregnancy is by itself not an indication for abortion. We document the case histories of 2 patients with breast cancer (recurrent or advanced) who elected to carry pregnancies to term. Pregnancy concurrent with or subsequent to breast cancer is not associated with a worse prognosis than would be observed ...

  15. Prognostic significance of cancer family history for patients with gastric cancer: a single center experience from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Cai, Hong; Yu, Lin; Huang, Hua; Long, Ziwen; Wang, Yanong

    2016-06-14

    Family history of cancer is a risk factor for gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the prognoses of gastric cancer patients with family history of cancer. A total of 1805 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy from 2000 to 2008 were evaluated. The clinicopathologic parameters and prognoses of gastric cancer patients with a positive family history (PFH) of cancer were compared with those with a negative family history (NFH). Of 1805 patients, 382 (21.2%) patients had a positive family history of cancer. Positive family history of cancer correlated with younger age, more frequent alcohol and tobacco use, worse differentiation, smaller tumor size, and more frequent tumor location in the lower 1/3 of the stomach. The prognoses of patients with a positive family history of cancer were better than that of patients with a negative family history. Family history of cancer independently correlated with better prognosis after curative gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients.

  16. Patients' Experiences With Care for Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Findings From the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Ganz, Patricia A.; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Harrington, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. Patients and Methods For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). Results English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Conclusion Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health. PMID:20713876

  17. Clues to occult cancer in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Jae Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that hidden malignancy could be detected in patients with cryptogenic stroke without active cancer when they showed the distinctive characteristics of cancer-related stroke. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Among 2,562 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, patients with cryptogenic stroke were analyzed and categorized into two groups according to the presence of active cancer: cryptogenic stroke with active cancer (cancer-related stroke, CA-stroke group and without active cancer (CR-stroke group. Patients with active lung cancer without stroke were also recruited for comparison purposes (CA-control. Clinical factors, lesion patterns on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, and laboratory findings were analyzed among groups. A total of 348 patients with cryptogenic stroke were enrolled in this study. Among them, 71 (20.4% patients had active cancer at the time of stroke. The D-dimer levels were significantly higher in patients with CA-stroke than those with CR-stroke or CA-control (both p<0.001. Regarding lesion patterns, patients with CA-stroke mostly had multiple lesions in multiple vascular territories, while more than 80% of patients with CR-stroke had single/multiple lesions in a single vascular territory (P<0.001. D-dimer levels (OR 1.11 per 1 µg/mL increase; 95% CI 1.06-1.15; P<0.001 and DWI lesion patterns (OR 7.13; 95% CI 3.42-14.87; P<0.001 were independently associated with CA-stroke. Workup for hidden malignancy was performed during hospitalization in 10 patients who showed elevated D-dimer levels and multiple infarcts involving multiple vascular territories but had no known cancer, and it revealed hidden malignancies in all the patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with CA-stroke have distinctive D-dimer levels and lesion patterns. These characteristics can serve as clues to occult cancer in patients with cryptogenic stroke.

  18. Experiences of cancer patients in Poland throughout diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, D; Adamczak, M; Wojtyś, P

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have failed to explain why the mortality rate of cancer patients is higher in Poland than other countries in the European Union. We aimed to evaluate the health care system in Poland during the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In this multicentre study, 125 cancer patients treated at 15 centres across Poland participated in focus group interviews in 2014. We identified and assessed crucial elements that affect a patients' experience from the early onset of symptoms, through to diagnosis and treatment. We found that the majority of patients were dissatisfied with the length of time taken to diagnose cancer. Throughout diagnosis, treatment and follow-up, patients reported a lack of communication from health care professionals. While dealings with oncologists and medical staff were viewed favourably, patients felt the cancer centres were not well organised. Patients recommended that having one doctor in charge of an individual's treatment and follow-up would improve patient care and well-being. A late cancer diagnosis may be contributing to the high mortality rate observed in Poland. In the future, new policies should be developed to reduce the time to cancer diagnosis, increase communication with health care professionals and improve the organisation of cancer care for patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Spiritual needs of cancer patients: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamipour, Khadijeh; Rassouli, Maryam; Yaghmaie, Farideh; Zendedel, Kazem; Majd, Hamid Alavi

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of cancer can cause huge spiritual crisis in a person and affect different aspects of life. At this stage, patients have certain spiritual needs. This study was conducted to explain spiritual needs of cancer patients in Iran. In this qualitative study, 18 cancer patients, referred to the Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran were selected using purposive sampling method, and their spiritual needs emerged out of conventional content analysis of interviews conducted with them. From 1850 initial codes, 4 themes (connection, peace, meaning and purpose, and transcendence) were identified that contained categories of social support, normal behavior, inner peace, seeking forgiveness, hope, acceptance of reality, seeking meaning, ending well, change of life meaning, strengthening spiritual belief, communication with God, and prayer. Spiritual needs of cancer patients should be recognized, realized, and considered in care of patients by the medical team. An all-out support of health system policy makers to meet patients' spiritual needs is particularly important.

  20. How to evaluate sexual health in cancer patients : Development of the EORTC sexual health questionnaire for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagele, E.; den Oudsten, B.L.; Greimel, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study is to describe the development of a comprehensive European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) questionnaire to assess sexual health of female and male cancer patients and for cancer survivors. Methods: According to the EORTC guidelines, the

  1. Older female cancer patients: importance, causes, and consequences of undertreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Blagojevic, Stina; Vlastos, Anne-Thérèse; Vlastos, Georges

    2007-05-10

    Despite increased interest in treatment of senior cancer patients, older patients are much too often undertreated. This review aims to present data on treatment practices of older women with breast and gynecologic cancers and on the consequences of undertreatment on patient outcome. We also discuss the reasons and validity of suboptimal care in older patients. Numerous studies have reported suboptimal treatment in older breast and gynecologic cancer patients. Undertreatment displays multiple aspects: from lowered doses of adjuvant chemotherapy to total therapeutic abstention. Undertreatment also concerns palliative care, treatment of pain, and reconstruction. Only few studies have evaluated the consequences of nonstandard approaches on cancer-specific mortality, taking into account other prognostic factors and comorbidities. These studies clearly showed that undertreatment increased disease-specific mortality for breast and ovarian cancers. For other gynecological cancers, data were insufficient to draw conclusions. Objective reasons at the origin of undertreatment were, notably, higher prevalence of comorbidity, lowered life expectancy, absence of data on treatment efficacy in clinical trials, and increased adverse effects of treatment. More subjective reasons were putative lowered benefits of treatment, less aggressive cancers, social marginalization, and physician's beliefs. Undertreatment in older cancer patients is a well-documented phenomenon responsible for preventable cancer deaths. Treatments are still influenced by unclear standards and have to be adapted to the older patient's general health status, but should also offer the best chance of cure.

  2. Psychological resilience contributes to low emotional distress in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jung-Ah; Yoon, Sujung; Lee, Chang-Uk; Chae, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Chul; Song, Kyo-Young; Kim, Tae-Suk

    2013-09-01

    Although a considerable number of cancer patients suffer from emotional distress which may have an impact on their quality of life, it still remains poorly understood which psychosocial factors contribute to individual vulnerabilities to emotional distress of cancer patients. Recently, resilience has been suggested as the capacity to cope with adversities like cancer. In this study, we investigated the relationships between resilience and emotional distress in cancer patients. One hundred fifty-two cancer patients who were consecutively hospitalized for their scheduled treatments at the Seoul St. Mary's Hospital were enrolled and completed the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale to measure resilience and emotional distress. The relationships between the levels of psychological resilience and emotional distress were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Psychological resilience levels were negatively associated with emotional distress after controlling for relevant covariates. The highest quartile of resilience level was associated with a 90% (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.03-0.34, P cancer patients, resilience was also found to be a significant protective factor for emotional distress (adjusted OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.02-0.79, P = 0.02). The present study suggests that psychological resilience may independently contribute to low emotional distress in cancer patients. The relationship between resilience and emotional distress was also significant in the subgroup of metastatic cancer patients. Psychosocial interventions to enhance resilience might provide useful approaches to overcome cancer-related emotional distress.

  3. Patients' experiences with care for lung cancer and colorectal cancer: findings from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Arora, Neeraj K; Kahn, Katherine L; Malin, Jennifer L; Ganz, Patricia A; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C; Kiefe, Catarina I; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M; Weeks, Jane C; Harrington, David P

    2010-09-20

    To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health.

  4. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home...... exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer...

  5. Proportion of gynecologic cancer patients using complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supoken, Amornrat; Chaisrisawatsuk, Thitima; Chumworathayi, Bandit

    2009-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for treatment of cancer and for supportive care of cancer patients must be clearly separated. There is encouraging evidence for CAM in the latter area, such as acupuncture and progressive muscle relaxation for chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, and aromatherapy for decreasing anxiety and increasing quality of life. However, there are limited data about CAM used by gynecologic cancer patients, especially in Thai women. Therefore, the authors aimed to investigate the proportion and types of CAM using in our gynecologic cancer patients. This cross-sectional survey was conducted between October to December, 2008. Totals of 50 admitted and 50 walk-in gynecologic cancer patients 1 month after diagnosis, aged more than 20 years and able to give informed consent, were selected for one-by-one interview by random walking survey. Among the 100 interviewed patients, aged 21-69 (mean=50.12), there were 46 cases of cervical cancers, 35 of ovarian cancers, 18 of endometrial cancers (two of these also had ovarian cancers), 2 of malignant gestational trophoblastic diseases, 1 of vulvar cancer, and 1 liver cancer (in a patient with ovarian cancer). Some 67% (95% CI, 57.8-76.2%) of them used CAM. As diet modifications, 11 used Chinese vegetarian, 8 common vegetarian, 5 Cheewajit, and 1 macrobiotics. Five of them used dietary supplements while colonic detoxification was emplyed in three. As herbal medicines, 27 used Thai herbs, 4 Chinese herbs, and 1 a herbal sauna. Twelve were receiving Thai massage. As exercises, 23 used aerobics and 5 stretching. Interestingly, 62 of them used Buddhist praying while only 3 employed native magic. The three most common forms of CAM used by our gynecologic cancer patients were Buddhist praying (62/67, 92.5%), followed by herbal medicines (27/67, 40.3%) and exercises (25/67, 37.3%).

  6. The Personal Experience of LGBT Patients with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ellen

    2018-02-01

    To capture the perspectives from lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals diagnosed treated for cancer. Four LGBT individuals diagnosed and treated for cancer. Care for the LGBT patient is based on sensitivity and awareness to LGBT issues and concerns. Nurses caring for the LGBT cancer patient provide that care in a context of awareness and sensitivity. The nurse's approach to LGBT patient and family care is based on open communication, establishing trusting relationships and honoring the patient's preferences. Excellent oncology nursing care for LGBT patients is excellent oncology nursing care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Active surveillance strategy for patients with localised prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Active surveillance - an initial observational strategy - offers a tailored management of patients with localised prostate cancer. The aim of the strategy is to appoint patients with potentially lethal prostate cancer to curatively intended treatment, while patients with slowly evolving...... with defined final histopathological findings at radical prostatectomy that was perceived as unacceptable for a continued observational strategy. CONCLUSION: The thesis has demonstrated that active surveillance is feasible and reduces the number of patients undergoing curative intended treatment. However...... in the management of prostate cancer patients on active surveillance is emphasised....

  8. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  9. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  10. An Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    liver injury may be affected by pre-existing medical problems, ... investigation was a prospective study that was conducted in cancer patients receiving ... study using the patient information format and the written ... Adult (36-50) ..... Last updated.

  11. Drug Xeloda Prolongs Survival for Some Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Xeloda Prolongs Survival for Some Breast Cancer Patients It cut risk of relapse, death by 30 ... tested the drug for a different group of patients. It focused on 910 women whose breast tumors ...

  12. Fear of cancer recurrence and its predictive factors among Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mohajjel Aghdam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Fear of cancer recurrence (FOCR is one of the most important psychological problems among cancer patients. In extensive review of related literature there were no articles on FOCR among Iranian cancer patients. Aim: The aim of present study was to investigation FOCR and its predictive factors among Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study 129 cancer patients participated. For data collection, the demographic checklist and short form of fear of progression questionnaire was used. Logistic regression was used to determine predictive factors of FOCR. Result: Mean score of FOCR among participants was 44.8 and about 50% of them had high level of FOCR. The most important worries of participants were about their family and the future of their children and their lesser worries were about the physical symptoms and fear of physical damage because of cancer treatments. Also, women, breast cancer patient, and patients with lower level of education have more FOCR. Discussion: There is immediate need for supportive care program designed for Iranian cancer patients aimed at decreasing their FOCR. Especially, breast cancer patients and the patient with low educational level need more attention.

  13. Canine cancer patients are included in translational research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Betina; Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias

    2014-01-01

    Cancer bearing dogs represent a unique clinical cancer model with a direct potential for accelerating translation into human patients. A research collaboration between the veterinary and human medical facilities at Copenhagen University and Rigshospitalet has taken offset in this. Canine cancer...... patients are implemented for development of new strategies in molecular imaging and radiotherapy. The obtained results will be used to guide human clinical trials....

  14. Effects of electronic massager on patients with advanced cancer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of our prostate cancer patients also were not left out in the craze for massagers. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the effects of the electronic massager on patients with advanced prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study done in our unit to find out any effects of using the ...

  15. Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Elevated Endothelin-1 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maqsood M. Elahi

    2004-01-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative plasma big ET-1 concentrations may be useful in predicting overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer. Plasma big ET-1 concentrations may be useful in the selection of high-risk, lymph node-negative patients with colorectal cancer for adjuvant therapy.

  16. Detection of serum midkine levels in cancer patients using rabbit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of serum midkine levels in cancer patients using rabbit anti-human midkine monoclonal antibodies. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... The standard curve, precision and recovery rate were tested, respectively, and serum MK concentration of 102 cancers patients and 102 normal individuals were detected using ...

  17. Features of members of a prostate cancer patients' association.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, B.; Fischer, M.; Visser, A.; Garssen, B.; Andel, G. van; Bensing, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: the objective of this study was to compare prostate cancer (PC) patients who are and who are not members of the Dutch Prostate Cancer Patients' Association (PCPA) with respect to demographic, medical and psychosocial characteristics. Methods: using a cross-sectional design, 88

  18. Variations of blood glucose in cancer patients during chemotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the blood glucose (BG) variations in cancer patients during chemotherapy according to tumor types and chemotherapeutic regimens. Materials and Methods: Patients were examined from the Department of Medical Oncology of Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy ...

  19. Neuroticism and reactions to social comparison information among cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, K; Buunk, B; Sanderman, R

    In an experimental study neuroticism was examined as a moderator of breast cancer patients' affective reactions to social comparison information about a fellow patient. Fifty-seven women with breast cancer completed Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire and received social comparison information about

  20. Neuroticism and Reactions to Social Comparison Information among Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Zee, Karen; Buunk, Bram; Sanderman, Robbert

    In an experimental study neuroticism was examined as a moderator of breast cancer patients' affective reactions to social comparison information about a fellow patient. Fifty-seven women with breast cancer completed Eysenck's Personality Questionnaire and received social comparison information about

  1. Impact of marital status on renal cancer patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Wang, Lu; Kabirov, Ildar; Peng, Li; Chen, Guang; Yang, Yinhui; A, Zamyatnin Andrey; Xu, Wanhai

    2017-09-19

    Marital status is an independent prognostic factor for various cancer types. The present study used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to analyze the impact of marital status on renal cancer patient survival outcomes. We identified a total of 62,405 eligible patients (23,800 women and 38,605 men). Overall 5-year renal cancer cause-specific survival (CSS) was 80.3% in the married group, 69.2% in the widowed group, 78.9% in the single group, and 76.5% in the divorced/separated group. The widowed patient group had the highest female/male ratio, more distant metastases, and fewer high-grade (III/IV) tumors. Most widowed patients (90.4%) were elderly (>60 years old). In our study, male renal cancer patients benefited more from marriage than females. We also found that white married patients had better survival outcomes than other white patient groups, but black unmarried and married patients exhibited similar survival outcomes. Our results show that, in general, unmarried patients have higher rates of cancer-specific mortality and highlight the importance of psychological intervention for cancer patients during treatment.

  2. Effect of Multidisciplinary Cancer Conference on Treatment Plan for Patients With Primary Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Ryan C; Subendran, Jhananiee; Jhaveri, Kartik; Thipphavong, Seng; Cummings, Bernard; Brierley, James; Kirsch, Richard; Kennedy, Erin D

    2015-07-01

    Although multidisciplinary cancer conferences have been reported to lead to improved patient outcomes, few studies have reported results of these for rectal cancer. The purpose of this work was to assess the quality of multidisciplinary cancer conferences, the effect of the conference on the initial treatment plan, compliance with the conference treatment recommendations, and clinical outcomes for rectal cancer. This was a prospective, longitudinal study. The study was conducted at a tertiary care academic hospital. Patients with primary rectal cancer were included in this study. The intervention was a rectal cancer-specific multidisciplinary cancer conference. The quality of the multidisciplinary cancer conference was assessed using the Cancer Care Ontario Multidisciplinary Cancer Conference standards score. A change in treatment plan was defined as a change from the initial treatment plan selected by the treating physician to an alternate treatment plan recommended at the conference. Twenty-five multidisciplinary cancer conferences were conducted over a 10-month study period. The Cancer Care Ontario Multidisciplinary Cancer Conference standards score was 7 (from a maximum score of 9). Forty-two patients with primary rectal cancer were presented, and there was a 29% (12/42) change in the initial treatment plan. A total of 42% (5/12) of these changes were attributed to reinterpretation of the MRI findings. There was 100% compliance with the conference treatment recommendations. The circumferential resection margin was positive in 5.5% (2/36). Selection bias may have led to an overestimate of effect, and there is no control group for comparison of clinical outcomes. A high-quality rectal cancer-specific multidisciplinary cancer conference led to a 29% change in the treatment plan for patients with primary rectal cancer, with almost half of these changes attributed to reinterpretation of the magnetic resonance images.

  3. [Palliative care for patients with oesophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, T; Gockel, I; Gönner, U; Schmidberger, H

    2010-12-01

    Palliative therapy for patients with incurable oesophageal cancer necessitates a broad spectrum of different measures to relieve symptoms. Surgical procedures (palliative tumour resections, bypass surgery) are rarely indicated on account of the high morbidity. Preeminent treatment options to eliminate dysphagia and to ensure food passage are endoscopic procedures, in particular, the endoscopically or radiologically guided stent implantation. In case of failure, a percutaneous feeding tube and general palliative measures are required. Furthermore tumour-specific therapies (brachytherapy, radiochemotherapy, chemotherapy) are applied. The choice of the procedure is based on the symptoms, the tumour situation, the patients' general status, and their preferences. If possible, an individual, interdisciplinary treatment concept for each patient should be designed and modified according to the course of the disease. It should be the aim of future studies to elucidate the optimal combination of a merely symptomatic treatment with tumour-specific measures under the aspect of the achievable quality of life. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart ˙ New York.

  4. Second primary cancers in subsites of colon and rectum in patients with previous colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, L.; Lemmens, V.E.; de Hingh, I.H.J.T.; de Vries, E.; Roukema, J.A.; van Leerdam, M.E.; Coebergh, J.W.; Soerjomataram, I.

    Background: Compared with the general population, patients with a previous colorectal cancer are at higher risk for a second colorectal cancer, but detailed risk analysis by subsite is scarce. Objective: Our goal was to investigate the risk of a second cancer in relation to subsite as a basis for

  5. Paraneoplastic erythroderma in a prostate cancer patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momm, F.; Lutterbach, J. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. Clinic Freiburg (Germany); Pflieger, D. [Dept. of Dermatology, Univ. Clinic Freiburg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Background: Erythroderma is an inflammation of the skin, which can be triggered by various diseases as psoriasis, allergies, side effects of medication, infections or malignant tumors. Caused by these various etiologic possibilities patients require extensive diagnostic effort. Patient: We report a case of a 71-year-old man presenting with an erythroderma of unknown etiology. Therapy with corticosteroids was not successful. A complete remission was reached by therapy with cyclosporine A, 350 mg/day. Finally, an increased prostate specific antigene (PSA) value was found and a prostate cancer was diagnosed in the patient. Results: After definitive radiotherapy of the carcinoma (total dose 74 Gy, 5 x 2 Gy/week), the cyclosporine A was displaced without recurrence of erythroderma. Conclusion: In this case, we consider the erythroderma to have been a paraneoplastic effect of the prostate carcinoma. In male patients with erythroderma an early PSA test should be performed. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Erythrodermie ist eine entzuendliche Reaktion der Haut, die durch verschiedene Grunderkrankungen wie Psoriasis, Allergien, Infektionen, Nebenwirkungen von Medikamenten oder paraneoplastisch in Erscheinung treten kann. Wegen dieser vielfachen aetiologischen Moeglichkeiten erfordern Erythrodermiepatienten eine aufwaendige Diagnostik. Patient: Wir berichten ueber einen 71-jaehrigen Patienten mit einer Erythrodermie zunaechst unbekannter Aetiologie. Durch die Gabe von Cyclosporin A in einer Dosis von 350 mg/Tag konnte eine Remission erreicht werden. Schliesslich wurde bei dem Patienten ein erhoehter Wert des prostataspezifischen Antigens (PSA) im Blut gefunden und daraufhin ein Prostatakarzinom diagnostiziert. Ergebnisse: Nach primaerer perkutaner Strahlentherapie des Prostatakarzinoms (Gesamtdosis 74 Gy, 5 x 2 Gy/Woche) konnte das Cyclosporin A abgesetzt werden, ohne dass ein weiterer Schub der Erythrodermie auftrat. Schlussfolgerung: Wir halten die Erythrodermie bei

  6. Dying cancer patients talk about euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliott, Jaklin A; Olver, Ian N

    2008-08-01

    Within developed nations, there is increasing public debate about and apparent endorsement of the appropriateness of euthanasia as an autonomous choice to die in the face of intolerable suffering. Surveys report socio-demographic differences in rates of acceptance of euthanasia, but there is little in-depth analysis of how euthanasia is understood and positioned within the social and moral lives of individuals, particularly those who might be considered suitable candidates-for example, terminally-ill cancer patients. During discussions with 28 such patients in Australia regarding medical decisions at the end of life, euthanasia was raised by 13 patients, with the others specifically asked about it. Twenty-four patients spoke positively of euthanasia, 19 of these voicing some concerns. None identified euthanasia as a currently favoured option. Four were completely against it. Endorsement for euthanasia was in the context of a hypothetical future or for a hypothetical other person, or temporally associated with acute pain. Arguments supporting euthanasia framed the issue as a matter of freedom of choice, as preserving dignity in death, and as curbing intolerable pain and suffering, both of the patient and of those around them. A common analogy featured was that of euthanising a dog. These arguments were typically presented as self-evident justification for euthanasia, construed as an appropriate choice to die, with opposers positioned as morally inferior or ignorant. The difficulties of ensuring 'choice' and the moral connotations of 'choosing to die,' however, worked to problematise the appropriateness of euthanising specific individuals. We recommend further empirical investigation of the moral and social meanings associated with euthanasia.

  7. Factors affecting whether or not cancer patients consider using acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Byeongsang; Eade, Thomas; Kneebone, Andrew; Pavlakis, Nick; Clarke, Stephen; Eslick, Guy; River, Jo; Back, Michael

    2017-04-01

    To explore the factors associated with utilisation of an acupuncture service in a tertiary oncology setting in an Australian public hospital. Cancer patients attending oncology clinics at a university teaching hospital were invited to participate in the evaluation of acupuncture services from June 2014 to May 2015. Patients had a prior diagnosis of cancer (albeit at different stages) and were planning to receive, or were already receiving, systemic and/or radiation cancer treatment. The majority (81%) of participants indicated that they would consider the use of acupuncture during their cancer treatment. The most common reasons given for not considering acupuncture included adequate control of symptoms already with medical treatment, inconvenient clinic timing, and needle phobia. The main reasons given for considering acupuncture use included its perceived capability of reducing fatigue, boosting energy levels, improving immune function, and reducing pain and anxiety. Patients considering acupuncture use also demonstrated significantly higher levels of stress (panxiety and depression (pacupuncture. The findings show that demand for acupuncture by cancer patients is high. A substantial proportion of cancer patients intend to use acupuncture to manage cancer and/or cancer treatment-related symptoms. Discussion with patients about acupuncture and other complementary therapies during the consultation may improve cancer care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Traditional Chinese medicine use among Chinese immigrant cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Jennifer C F; Gany, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) includes both herbal remedies and non-herbal practices. Chinese cancer patients are particularly at high risk for herb-drug interactions. Providers, both primary care physicians and oncologists, frequently do not ask patients about TCM use, which has potentially dangerous consequences. This study describes an assessment of TCM use while undergoing conventional cancer treatment, among a cohort of Chinese immigrant cancer patients in New York City. The Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center assists underserved cancer patients through a patient navigation program, the Cancer Portal Project. Six questions related to TCM are included in the existing Portal Needs Assessment Intake. Mandarin- or Cantonese-speaking Portal patients enrolled between January 2010 and May 2012 were surveyed. One hundred nine Chinese-speaking patients were enrolled in the Portal Project during the study period. Forty-six completed the TCM questions. Ninety-six percent preferred to speak Mandarin, Cantonese, or Fujianese in the healthcare setting. Thirty-nine percent (n = 18) of the 46 participants reported using TCM since being diagnosed with cancer. Nearly all (n = 16) who used TCM reported using herbal medicines. Ten TCM users did not describe sharing their use with Western doctors. Eight (44%) of TCM users reported concurrently using TCM and conventional cancer treatment. Larger scale studies should further explore the concurrent use of TCM and conventional cancer treatment in this unique population. Future research should also address patient-provider communication related to the concurrent use of TCM and cancer treatment. This is also an important area of education for both patients and providers.

  9. Effect of the childhood trauma on the adjustment to cancer in the patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guveli, Hulya; Guveli, Murat Emin; Sen, Fatma; Oflaz, Serap; Gurdal, Necla; Tambas, Makbule; Kucucuk, Seden; Aydıner, Adnan; Ozkan, Mine

    2017-07-01

    Early identification of patients coping poorly is important for compliance with treatment and control of distress. This study aims to investigate the effect of the childhood trauma experience on the type of reaction and adjustment that the person exhibits to the cancer among the patients with breast cancer. This cross-sectional study enrolled 310 patients with breast cancer. The effect of the childhood trauma and the psychological condition on the adjustment to cancer was investigated by assessing the adjustment to cancer, the experiences of childhood trauma and psychological status of the subjects using mental adjustment to cancer scale (MAC), childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ28), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck anxiety inventory (BAI). Majority of the subjects (77.4%) showed positive adjustment to cancer. Fighting spirit (63.9%) was the most commonly seen mechanism of adjustment to cancer. Of the subjects, 54.5% suffered at least one of the childhood trauma types. Among the patients, 47.1% had depression and 58.4% had anxiety. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, emotional neglect and depression, respectively, have an effect on both positive and negative adjustment to cancer. Our study demonstrated that childhood trauma, especially emotional neglect, affects coping and adjustment among the patients with breast cancer. It is necessary to determine the childhood experiences to ensure the development of psychosocial interventions that will increase the adjustment and quality of life after the diagnosis of the cancer.

  10. Evaluating synchronous esophageal cancer in head and neck cancer patients using Lugol dye chromoendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohawiriyakamol, Supparerk; Sunpaweravong, Somkiat; Leelamanit, Vitoon; Pruegsanusak, Kowit; Sinkijcharoenchai, Wattana

    2014-11-01

    Routine screening for esophageal cancer in head and neck cancer patients in Thailand is controversial, because of concerns regarding the screening methods and cost effectiveness. Since Lugol dye chromoendoscopy is an effective technique for early detection of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, the objectives of the present study are to evaluate the synchronous esophageal cancer in head and neck cancer patients and the effectiveness of Lugol dye chromoendoscopy for routine screening. All diagnosed patients with head and neck cancer between September 1, 2009 and June 30, 2011 were enrolled into the study. Both conventional esophagoscopy and Lugol dye chromoendoscopy were done. The incidence of esophageal cancer was calculated. A diagnostic statistical analysis was done to compare the diagnostic properties between conventional esophagoscopy and Lugol dye chromoendoscopy. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to find significant factors associated with esophageal cancer in this study. Eighty-nine head and neck cancer patients were enrolled in this study. The incidence of esophageal cancer in head and neck cancer patients was 12.4% (11/89). Conventional esophagoscopy found a highly suspicious malignant lesion in only six patients, while the Lugol dye chromoendoscopy detected all 11 esophageal cancers. The sensitivity and specificity for conventional esophagoscopy were 54.5% and 100%, respectively, andfor Lugol dye chromoendoscopy were 100% and 70.5%, respectively. The three significant factors that increased the likelihood of synchronous esophageal cancer from univariate analysis were age less than 50 years, presence of dysphagia, and an unstained Lugol dye area ≥10 mm. Howeve, these factors were not statistically significant by multivariate analysis. Lugol dye chromoendoscopy is a promising tool to enhance the diagnosis of esophageal cancer among head and neck cancer patients.

  11. Impact of physiotherapy on patients with advanced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozalevli, Sevgi

    2013-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer have high mortality and high morbidity. Lung cancer-related symptoms and problems such as dyspnea, fatigue, pain, and cachexia that begin in the early phase later result in poor physical functioning, psychosocial, and quality of life status. In addition, advancing age is associated with significant comorbidity. These patients may benefit from multidisciplinary therapy to reduce the perceived severity of dyspnea and fatigue and increase physical functioning and quality of life. Based on management of symptoms and problems such as dyspnea, physical inactivity, cancer-related fatigue, respiratory secretions, pain, and anxiety-depression of these patients, it is thought that physiotherapy techniques can be used on advanced lung cancer patients following a comprehensive evaluation. However, well-designed, prospective, and randomized-controlled trials are needed to prove the efficacy of physiotherapy and pulmonary rehabilitation in general for patients with advanced lung cancer.

  12. Acute limb ischemia in cancer patients: should we surgically intervene?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, Julian S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer patients have an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events. Certain chemotherapeutic agents have also been associated with the development of thrombosis. Reported cases of acute arterial ischemic episodes in cancer patients are rare. METHODS: Patients who underwent surgery for acute limb ischemia associated with malignancy in a university teaching hospital over a 10-year period were identified. Patient demographics, cancer type, chemotherapy use, site of thromboembolism, treatment and outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Four hundred nineteen patients underwent surgical intervention for acute arterial ischemia, 16 of these patients (3.8%) had associated cancer. Commonest cancer sites were the urogenital tract (n = 5) and the lungs (n = 5). Eight patients (50%) had been recently diagnosed with cancer, and four (25%) of these cancers were incidental findings after presentation with acute limb ischemia. Four patients (25%) developed acute ischemia during chemotherapy. The superficial femoral artery was the most frequent site of occlusion (50%), followed by the brachial (18%) and popliteal (12%) arteries. All patients underwent thromboembolectomy, but two (12%) patients subsequently required a bypass procedure. Six patients (37%) had limb loss, and in-patient mortality was 12%. Histology revealed that all occlusions were due to thromboembolism, with no tumor cells identified. At follow-up, 44% of patients were found to be alive after 1 year. CONCLUSION: Cancer and chemotherapy can predispose patients to acute arterial ischemia. Unlike other reports that view this finding as a preterminal event most appropriately treated by palliative measures, in this series, early diagnosis and surgical intervention enabled limb salvage and patient survival.

  13. Outcome of genetic evaluation of patients with kidney cancer referred for suspected hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelly L; Alanee, Shaheen; Glogowski, Emily A; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Klein, Robert; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    To analyze patients with kidney cancer referred for evaluation at a high-volume genetics service at a comprehensive cancer center and identify factors associated with positive tests for hereditary cancer syndromes. A retrospective review of patients referred to the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was performed, and patients with a personal history of kidney cancer were identified. Patient and disease characteristics were reviewed. In all, 4 variables including age at diagnosis of kidney tumor, presence of syndromic manifestations, family history of kidney cancer, and number of primary malignancies were evaluated for association with positive test results in 2 groups: patients tested for renal cell carcinoma syndromes and Lynch syndrome. Guidance for genetic testing strategy in patients with kidney cancer is provided. Between 1999 and 2012, 120 patients with a history of kidney cancer were evaluated by the Clinical Genetics Service. The mean age at kidney cancer diagnosis was 52 years (interquartile range: 42-63), with 57% being women. A family history of kidney cancer was reported by 39 patients (33%). Time between diagnosis of first cancer and genetic consultation was 5 years in the remaining 23%. Overall, 95 patients were tested for genetic abnormalities with 27 (28%) testing positive. Testing for renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-related syndromes was performed on 43 patients, with 13 testing positive (30%). Lynch syndrome testing was positive in 9 patients (32%) after 28 were tested. In RCC-associated syndromes, young age of diagnosis was associated with positive test results. Conversely, syndromic manifestations and increasing number of primary malignancies were associated with positive Lynch testing. The discovery of inherited kidney cancer syndromes has provided a unique opportunity to identify patients at increased risk for cancer. Factors associated with positive genetic testing are unique to different syndromes. These data

  14. Loneliness in patients with cancer: the first year after cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckx, Laura; van den Akker, Marjan; van Driel, Mieke; Bulens, Paul; van Abbema, Doris; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne; Kenis, Cindy; de Jonge, Eric T; Houben, Bert; Buntinx, Frank

    2015-11-01

    We studied the frequency and evolution of social and emotional loneliness in older cancer patients in comparison with younger cancer patients and older people without cancer. We evaluated if changes in common cancer-related and ageing-related problems such as fatigue, cognitive functioning and functional status contributed to the occurrence of loneliness. This study was part of the KLIMOP study (Dutch acronym for project on older cancer patients in Belgium and the Netherlands) and included older (≥70 years) and younger cancer patients (50-69 years) and older people without cancer. Data were collected at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Loneliness was measured with the loneliness scale of De Jong-Gierveld. The relationship between loneliness after 1 year and changes in fatigue, cognitive functioning and functional status was tested in multivariate logistic regression analyses. Data were available for 475 participants. At baseline, older cancer patients were less lonely compared with older people without cancer. After 1 year, the frequency of emotional loneliness had significantly increased for older cancer patients (26-42%, p loneliness also increased for younger cancer patients (25-34%, p = 0.02), but not for older people without cancer (40-38%, p = 0.69). Frequency of social loneliness did not change significantly. People who were persistently fatigued and people who became or were persistently impaired on cognitive functioning were at increased risk of becoming lonely. Loneliness, in particular emotional loneliness, is a common problem in cancer patients, and its frequency changes considerably over time. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Salivary mineral composition in patients with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewulska, Anna; Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Bachanek, Teresa; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    To analyse the mineral content of saliva in patients with oral cancer in order to identify possible markers that might aid the diagnosis of oral cancer. The study group consisted of 34 patients, aged 35-72 years with a diagnosis of oral cancer, including seven women and 27 men, before the start of treatment. Samples of unstimulated saliva were collected in plastic containers. The concentrations of sodium and potassium were assessed using ion selective electrodes, and the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, iron and phosphorus were assessed using colorimetric methods. Statistically significant differences between the study and control groups were found only for the concentration of sodium--higher concentrations were found in the study group. When comparing different cancer localisations, the highest levels of salivary sodium were found in cases of cancer of the floor of the oral cavity, and the lowest levels in tongue or parotid gland cancer. The highest calcium levels were found in cancer of the floor of the oral cavity, and the lowest levels in tongue cancer. The highest levels of magnesium were found in cancer of the floor of the oral cavity, and the lowest in tongue cancer. As regards the different histological types, higher sodium and calcium levels were found in squamous cell carcinomas than in other types. Salivary mineral content in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma is indicative of oral dehydration; however, we found no evidence of any salivary mineral markers that would be useful for the diagnosis of oral cancer.

  16. Coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Activated coagulation and fibrinolytic system in cancer patients is associated with tumor stroma formation and metastasis in different cancer types. The aim of this study is to explore the correlation of blood coagulation assays for various clinicopathologic factors in breast cancer patients. A total of 123 female breast cancer patients were enrolled into the study. All the patients were treatment naïve. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, APTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and platelet counts were evaluated. Median age of diagnosis was 51 years old (range 26-82). Twenty-two percent of the group consisted of metastatic breast cancer patients. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group except for PT (p50 years) was associated with higher D-dimer levels (p=0.003). Metastatic patients exhibited significantly higher D-dimer values when compared with early breast cancer patients (p=0.049). Advanced tumor stage (T3 and T4) was associated with higher INR (p=0.05) and lower PTA (p=0.025). In conclusion, coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

  17. Cancer Patient Preferences for Quality and Length of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J.; Egleston, Brian L.; Buzaglo, Joanne S.; Benson, Al B.; Cegala, Donald J.; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Fleisher, Linda; Miller, Suzanne M.; Sulmasy, Daniel P.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Optimal patient decision making requires integration of patient values, goals, and preferences with information received from the physician. In the case of life-threatening illness such as cancer, the weights placed on quality of life (QOL) and length of life (LOL) represent critical values. The objective of this study is to describe cancer patient values regarding QOL and LOL, and explore associations with communication preferences. Methods Patients with advanced cancer completed a computer-based survey prior to the initial consultation with a medical oncologist. Assessments included sociodemographics, physical and mental health state, values regarding quality and length of life, communication preferences and cancer-related distress. Results Seven hundred forty three advanced cancer patients were enrolled. Among 459 advanced cancer patients, fifty-five percent of patients equally valued QOL and LOL, 27% preferred QOL, and 18% preferred LOL. Patients with a QOL preference had lower levels of cancer-related distress (p style from their oncologists. Conclusions These data indicate that a values preference for length vs. quality of life may be simply measured, and is associated with wishes regarding the nature of oncologist communication. Awareness of these values during the clinical encounter could improve decision making by influencing the style and content of the communication between oncologists and their patients. PMID:18988231

  18. Fever and neutropenia in cancer patients : the diagnostic role of cytokines in risk assessment strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, CSMO; Daenen, SMGJ; Vellenga, E; van der Graaf, WTA; Gietema, JA; Groen, HJM; Kamps, WA; de Bont, ESJM

    2002-01-01

    Cancer patients treated with chemotherapy are susceptible to bacterial infections. Therefore, all neutropenic cancer patients with fever receive standard therapy consisting of broad-spectrum antibiotics and hospitalization. However, febrile neutropenia in cancer patients is often due to other causes

  19. Demographic charectrestics and risk factors in 320 thyroid cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmpa E

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid cancer is a rare disease which includes less than 1% percent of all human cancers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the demographic characteristics and risk factors among patients with thyroid malignancy at the Cancer institute and Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran Iran. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive study of the charts of 320 patients admitted with the diagnosis of thyroid malignancy based on pathologic reports in the above- mentioned hospitals from 1992 to 2002. Results: From the 320 patients diagnosed with thyroid malignancy 68.1% were papillary cancer, 10.9% were follicular cancer, 10.6% were anaplastic cancer, 9.06% were medullary cancer and 1.2% were lymphoma. The average of the patients was 50.2 years, ranging from 12 to 98 years; 60.6% were female and 39.4 %were male; 22.8% of the patients had histories of thyroid nodule and 5% had received radiation therapy. From the anatomic point of view 57.5% of the cancers were in the right lobe of thyroid, 38.1% were in left lobe and 4.4% in the isthmus. None of the patients had positive family history of thyroid malignancy. Conclusion: Thyroid malignancy is more prevalent in the fifth decade of life and more common among females. Therefore, among patients in this group, alarming symptoms, such as anterior neck mass, thyroid nodule and voice change, should be evaluated more seriously.

  20. Cultural beliefs and values in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, M

    2012-04-01

    In 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) released its World Cancer Report, which indicated that cancer accounts for approximately 12% of all-cause mortality worldwide. IARC estimated that globally 7.6 million people died from cancer and that 12.4 million new cases were diagnosed in 2008. The report went on to project that, due to increases in life expectancy, improvements in clinical diagnostics, and shifting trends in health behaviors (e.g. increases in smoking and sedentary lifestyles), in the absence of significant efforts to improve global cancer control, cancer mortality could increase to 12.9 million and cancer incidence to 20 million by the year 2030. Looking deeper into the data, it becomes clear that cancer-related stigma and myths about cancer are important problems that must be addressed, although different from a country to another. Stigmas about cancer present significant challenges to cancer control: stigma can have a silencing effect, whereby efforts to increase cancer awareness are negatively affected. The social, emotional, and financial devastation that all too often accompanies a diagnosis of cancer is, in large part, due to the cultural myths and taboos surrounding the disease. Combating stigma, myths, taboos, and overcoming silence will play important roles in changing this provisional trajectory. There are several reasons that cancer is stigmatized. Many people in our area perceived cancer to be a fatal disease. Cancer symptoms or body parts affected by the disease can cultivate stigma. Fears about treatment can also fuel stigma. There was evidence of myths associated with cancer, such as the belief that cancer is contagious, or cancer may be seen as a punishment. After reviewing these different examples of cultural myths and taboos met in cancer care, we can report these lessons learned: 1. Around the world, cancer continues to carry a significant amount of stigma, myths, and taboos; however, there are opportunities to

  1. Survey of Enteric Pathogens Causing Bacteremia in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Kalantar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic bacteraemia, is a frequent condition among cancer patients with a significant morbidity and mortality all over the world. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the burden of enteric pathogens causing bacteremia among cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Ten ml blood samples were withdrawn from the cancer patients under aseptic conditions. The blood specimens were added to the blood culture bottles and incubated at 37°C. The bacterial isolates from these samples were identified by routine biochemical reactions. Results: During the study period, 68 blood samples from cancer patients were analyzed for bacteremia. Of these patients, six were female (08/82% and 62 were male (91.18%; with age ranging from under 40 years to 85 years old (mean, 63 years. Gastro-intestinal cancer and cancers of head and neck were the most frequent cancer types in the studied group, accounting for 51 (75% and 15 (22.1% cases, respectively. The mean weight of patients was 69.18 Kg (range: 49-100 Kg. Similarly, the mean length of hospital stay was 8 days (range: 4-12 days. Positive blood cultures were detected in only 12 (17.65% and 11 (91.7% blood specimens from the Cancer Institute, Tehran, compared with one (08.33% from Shahid Kamali hospital, Karaj. From these patients, 15 bacteria were isolated; E. coli alone outnumbered other species and accounted for 33.33% of the episodes of bacteremia. Conclusions: In conclusion, our investigation revealed that cancers of GI tract are the most common cancer types causing bacteremia and also we identified that most common bacteria causing bacteremia in Cancer Institute, Tehran and Shahid Kamali Hospital, Karaj, are E. coli and S. aureus

  2. Stomathologycal conditions in cancer patients during and after cancer treatment: narrative literature review.

    OpenAIRE

    Rebolledo Cobos, Martha Leonor; Toloza Gutiérrez, Olga Patricia; Alonso Brujes, Iran David

    2017-01-01

    The behavior of anti-cancer treatments brings oral, systemic and decay of other injuries already determined by the patient prior to cancer diagnosis complications, which a poor reflection of cancer, regardless of body and translates affected system. Thus, the fact of having detailed information on these disease entities, should allow the development of preventive programs and control when a cancer diagnosis is made, thereby improving resource planning dental care in the health system allow ti...

  3. The prevalence of thyroid cancer in patients with hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjumohamed, Fathimabeebi P.; Al-Busaidi, Noor B.; Al-Musalhi, Hilal N.; Al-Shereiqi, Sulaiman Z.; Al-Salmi, Issa S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of thyroid cancer in patients with hyperthyroidism. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study using the data of 71 Omani patients with a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism due to Grave’s disease, toxic multinodular goiter, and solitary toxic adenoma. These patients underwent thyroidectomy at the Royal Hospital (RH), Muscat, Oman, and were followed up at the National Diabetes and Endocrine Center (NDEC) between 2007 and 2013. The details were collected from the medical records of both the RH and the NDEC. Patients who underwent thyroidectomy for other reasons like non-toxic goiter and hypothyroidism with cancer were excluded from the study. Results: Thyroid cancer was identified in 32.8% (n=23) of patients with hyperthyroidism. Half of these patients 52.1% (n=12) had papillary micro-cancer (intra-thyroidal), and 3 patients with Grave’s disease (13%) had lymph nodes metastasis (loco-regional infiltration. The cancer preponderance was higher in young (n=21, 91.3%) and female patients (n=18, 73.9%). Most patients with thyroid cancer had abnormal ultrasound neck findings and thyroid scintigraphy (99 mTc uptake). Conclusion: Many patients with hyperthyroidism in Muscat, Oman, especially those with Grave’s disease, show malignancy, and hence a proper initial evaluation of these patients is required as part of long-term management. PMID:26108596

  4. Seromic profiling of colorectal cancer patients with novel glycopeptide microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Blixt, Ola; Bennett, Eric P

    2011-01-01

    array displaying a comprehensive library of glycopeptides and glycoproteins derived from a panel of human mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6 and MUC7) known to have altered glycosylation and expression in cancer. Seromic profiling of patients with colorectal cancer identified cancer......Cancer-associated autoantibodies hold promise as sensitive biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Aberrant post-translational variants of proteins are likely to induce autoantibodies, and changes in O-linked glycosylation represent one of the most important cancer-associated post......-associated autoantibodies to a set of aberrant glycopeptides derived from MUC1 and MUC4. The cumulative sensitivity of the array analysis was 79% with a specificity of 92%. The most prevalent of the identified autoantibody targets were validated as authentic cancer immunogens by showing expression of the epitopes in cancer...

  5. [Cancer related fatigue in patients with breast cancer after chemotherapy and coping style].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pinglan; Wang, Shuhong; Jiang, Dongmei; Yu, Lingli

    2011-04-01

    To study the relevance between cancer related fatigue and coping styles in breast cancer patients after chemotherapy. A survey was conducted in 396 patients with breast cancer after chemotherapy on cancer related fatigue scale and Jalowiec coping scale, and the relation was analyzed. The rate of overall fatigue in breast cancer patients was 96.97%, mostly moderate fatigue. The rate of fatigue dimensions from high to low was physical fatigue, feeling fatigue and cognitive fatigue, respectively. The score of coping styles in patients with breast cancer after chemotherapy from high to low was optimistic coping, facing bravely, support seeking, self-reliance, emotional catharsis, avoidance, fatalism, and conservation. The most widely used coping style was optimistic coping style, and the least was emotional catharisis. There was a positive correlation between coping style of emotional catharsis and cancer related fatigue of all dimensions (Pcancer related fatigue in patients with breast cancer after chemotherapy. We should guide the patients to more active coping styles, to enhance the ability of psychological adaption in patients, reduce cancer related fatigue, and improve the quality of life.

  6. Patient function, long-term survival, and use of surgery in patients with kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hung-Jui; Chamie, Karim; Daskivich, Timothy J; Litwin, Mark S; Hu, Jim C

    2016-12-15

    Beyond age and comorbidity, functionality can shape the long-term survival potential of patients with cancer. Accordingly, herein the authors compared mortality and receipt of cancer-directed surgery according to patient function among older adults with kidney cancer. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data from 2000 through 2009, the authors studied 28,326 elderly subjects with primary kidney cancer. Patient function was quantified using function-related indicators, claims indicative of dysfunction and disability. Adjusting for patient and cancer characteristics, competing risk regression was used to assess the relationship between function-related indicator count and cause-specific mortality and then generalized estimating equations were used to quantify the probability of surgery. A total of 13,619 adult patients (48.1%) with at least 1 function-related indicator were identified. A higher indicator category was associated with older age, greater comorbidity, female sex, unmarried status, lower socioeconomic status, and higher stage of disease (Pkidney cancer mortality varied minimally with patient function. Patients with ≥ 2 indicators received cancer-directed surgery less often than those without disability (odds ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.56-0.66), although treatment probabilities remained high for patients with locoregional disease and low for those with metastatic cancer. Among older adults with kidney cancer, functional health stands as a significant predictor of long-term survival. However, receipt of cancer-directed surgery appears largely determined by cancer stage. Patient function should be considered more heavily when determining treatment for older adults with kidney cancer. Cancer 2016;122:3776-3784. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  8. Is admittance to specialised palliative care among cancer patients related to sex, age and cancer diagnosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adsersen, Mathilde; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2017-01-01

    /units. Patients with brain cancer were more often admitted to hospices, whereas patients with prostate cancer were more often admitted to hospital-based palliative care teams/units. CONCLUSION: It is unlikely that the variations in relation to sex, age and cancer diagnoses can be fully explained by differences...... to investigate whether cancer patients' admittance to SPC in Denmark varied in relation to sex, age and diagnosis, and whether the patterns differed by type of institution (hospital-based palliative care team/unit, hospice, or both). METHODS: This was a register-based study of adult patients living in Denmark...... who died from cancer in 2010-2012. Data sources were the Danish Palliative Care Database, Danish Register of Causes of Death and Danish Cancer Registry. The associations between the explanatory variables (sex, age, diagnosis) and admittance to SPC were investigated using logistic regression. RESULTS...

  9. Clinical Analysis of Lung Cancer Patients Younger Than 30 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjie HOU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It is common recognized that young patients of lung cancer have poor prognosis due to relatively higher malignancy and more invasive growth. In the past most studies on young patients of lung cancer selected patients younger than 40 or 45 years old, and there were few clinical materials for younger patients under 30 years. This study retrospectively described the the disease history, stage, treatment and pathology features of lung cancer patients younger than 30 years and aimed to provide references for these patients. Methods Those patients younger than 30 years, once admitted in the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army for lung cancer from 1993 to date, were sought in medical record system, and 53 patients were found in total. In this group, there were 34 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and 19 small cell lung cacer (SCLC patients. The male/female ratio was 1.5:1. In the NSCLC patients, there were 27 adenocarcinomas, 6 squamous carcinomas and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma, with no large cell carcinoma involved. In these patients, 12 patients received operations while 38 patients got chemo- and/or radiotherapy and 3 quited any treatment. Results There was no death in hospital, however, in the 12 patients who got operation, only 8 patients got complete resection while 4 patients got palliative resection. Conclusion Lung cancer patients younger than 30 years had a high fraction of adenocarcinoma and small cell type pathologically and most of them were in late stage when presenting with symptoms in hospital and would have a dismal prognosis. The routine health examination and early diagnosis should be emphasized to improve the prognosis of these patients.

  10. Salivary MicroRNA in Pancreatic Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Humeau

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Western countries, with the lowest 1-year survival rate among commonly diagnosed cancers. Reliable biomarkers for pancreatic cancer diagnosis are lacking and are urgently needed to allow for curative surgery. As microRNA (miRNA recently emerged as candidate biomarkers for this disease, we explored in the present pilot study the differences in salivary microRNA profiles between patients with pancreatic tumors that are not eligible for surgery, precancerous lesions, inflammatory disease or cancer-free patients as a potential early diagnostic tool.Whole saliva samples from patients with pancreatic cancer (n = 7, pancreatitis (n = 4, IPMN (n = 2, or healthy controls (n = 4 were obtained during endoscopic examination. After total RNA isolation, expression of 94 candidate miRNAs was screened by q(RTPCR using Biomark Fluidgm. Human-derived pancreatic cancer cells were xenografted in athymic mice as an experimental model of pancreatic cancer.We identified hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-23a, hsa-miR-23b and miR-29c as being significantly upregulated in saliva of pancreatic cancer patients compared to control, showing sensitivities of 71.4%, 85.7%, 85,7% and 57%, respectively and excellent specificity (100%. Interestingly, hsa-miR-23a and hsa-miR23b are overexpressed in the saliva of patients with pancreatic cancer precursor lesions. We found that hsa-miR-210 and let-7c are overexpressed in the saliva of patients with pancreatitis as compared to the control group, with sensitivity of 100% and 75%, and specificity of 100% and 80%, respectively. Last hsa-miR-216 was upregulated in cancer patients as compared to patients diagnosed with pancreatitis, with sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 100%. In experimental models of PDAC, salivary microRNA detection precedes systemic detection of cancer cells markers.Our novel findings indicate that salivary miRNA are discriminatory in pancreatic cancer patients

  11. Communicating with cancer patients in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younge, D; Moreau, P; Ezzat, A; Gray, A

    1997-02-20

    The following factors are relevant to the communication problems that exist in this country: 1. The impression is that patients here cope better with terminal illness at home than do patients elsewhere. The extended family, with its strong ties, and the strong Islamic faith that encourages its members to provide for parents and children in case of need mean that any input by health professionals is magnified by the family in the care of the patient. At first, it was uncertain if foreign health professionals would be accepted into Saudi homes (which are intensely private and protected for the family) for the purpose of caring for patients. This has proved unfounded. Hospitality is a very important part of Saudi society; nurses and doctors are welcomed and respected. Much of this success is due to the use of Saudi men as drivers and translators. These people provide 24-hour service, act as social workers assessing the needs of the family, and are the link between the patient and family, the nurse, and the doctor. 2. "CURE" OR "PALLIATION": The emphasis for cancer patients in Saudi Arabia is still on "curative treatment," even after any realistic hope of a cure is gone. The problem this causes is compounded by many patients being excluded from the decision-making process. Decisions made by the family may not always reflect the patient's wishes. Greater communication is needed to guide treatment decisions. 3. TRUTH-TELLING: Denying information of the patient's illness is probably more a historical than a cultural phenomenon. Similar attitudes prevailed until very recently in practically all other countries. In this very conservative country, people are committed to preserving Islamic culture in the face of Western technology. As medicine continues to demonstrate its effectiveness as well as its limitations, people will come to realize that the right of patients to know and understand their illness allows them to cope much better, and is compatible with the

  12. What Do Ovarian Cancer Patients Expect From Treatment?: Perspectives From an Online Patient Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simacek, Kristina; Raja, Priya; Chiauzzi, Emil; Eek, Daniel; Halling, Katarina

    Advances in ovarian cancer treatment have improved outcomes. However, the gap between patients' hopes and expectations and their actual outcomes remains an understudied aspect of treatment decision making. This gap has been noted to be a predictor of poorer health-related quality of life. Incorporating patient hopes and expectations for treatment into clinical care may improve patient experiences. The aim of this study is to describe the hopes and expectations of ovarian cancer patients at diagnosis and throughout treatment transitions. This study sampled from an online community of patients with ovarian cancer. Thirty members completed an online qualitative survey about their diagnostic and treatment journey, including hopes and expectations around treatment. Initially, ovarian cancer patients hoped for a complete cure or removal of cancer. As they progressed through treatment, hopes and expectations centered on issues related to living with ovarian cancer. A subset of patients emphasized a lack of information about treatment side effects. The shift in expectations from survival to living with ovarian cancer may demonstrate an enhanced understanding of ovarian cancer prognosis as patients learn more about their condition. Patients underscored that a more involved discussion of side effect profiles with clinicians would enhance their treatment decision making and expectation setting process. Expectation setting may be improved by contextualizing treatment in terms of the transitions ovarian cancer patients experience. Providing relevant information that aligns with patient needs, desires, and concerns at critical transitions may improve clinical care and decision making.

  13. Treatment of prostate cancer in unfit senior adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falci, Cristina; Morello, Elisabetta; Droz, Jean Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Prostate cancer is a disease typical of the elderly with a peak of incidence at 80 years. As most patients aged > or = 70 years show impairment of physical and/or cognitive performance, a complete geriatric assessment should be mandatory before planning any oncological treatment, in order to remove treatable conditions and to estimate the individual cancer-independent survival probability. In unfit patients with early prostate cancer watchful waiting represent the best strategy when the chance of living patients having high risk prostate cancer. Even in locally advanced prostate cancer active treatment could be deferred in asymptomatic patients, with short individual cancer-independent survival and well or moderately differentiated tumour. When hormonal deprivation therapy is administered a great attention should be paid to potential adverse events, that could precipitate the physical performance and accelerate the development of severe frailty. In the metastatic setting, the best supportive care, including bisphosphonates, should have the priority in the management of unfit patients. Chemotherapy, with Docetaxel as the standard regimen, should be reserved to patients showing diffuse symptoms, rapidly increasing PSA and/or presence of visceral metastasis, after all steps of endocrine therapy were covered. As regard the second line, a number of possibilities are available, but none have been tested in vulnerable and frail patients. At the present a number of issues about prostate cancer in unfit senior adults patients are still unsolved and should be debated in the light of results from dedicate prospective trials.

  14. Skin cancer in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Thyssen, J P; Gislason, G H

    2016-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: We investigated the risk of new-onset melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), respectively, in a large cohort of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: Data on all Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 were linked at individual......-level in nationwide registers. Incidence rates per 10 000 person-years were calculated, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression models. RESULTS: The study comprised 5 559 420 individuals with a maximum follow-up time of 16 years. There were 75 410 patients with psoriasis, and 25 087...... and 58 051 individuals developed melanoma and NMSC, respectively, during follow-up. Adjusted IRRs (95% CI) of melanoma were 1.19 (1.03-1.37), 1.09 (0.75-1.58) and 1.36 (0.94-1.99), in mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, respectively, and the corresponding adjusted IRRs of NMSC were...

  15. Understanding male cancer patients' barriers to participating in cancer rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Lomborg, Kirsten; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2015-01-01

    : ‘Autonomy and purpose’, ‘Solidarity and fellowship’ and ‘Forget and move on’. This study of male cancer survivors' and cancer rehabilitation documents how masculine ideals may constitute barriers for participation in rehabilitation and provides insights about why men are underrepresented in rehabilitation...

  16. Multiple Primary Cancers in Patients with Breast and Skin Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe extent of the problem The number of cancer survivors has been increasing dramatically and is expected to keep growing in the near future. In the Netherlands, a 38% increase of cancer survivors is estimated from 2005 to 2015, representing an increase from 500,000 to 692,000

  17. Quality of Life in Elderly Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavdaniti, Maria; Zyga, Sofia; Vlachou, Eugenia; Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina

    2017-01-01

    As life expectancy increases, it is expected that 60% of all cases of cancer will be detected in elderly patients in the next two decades. Cancer treatment for older persons is complicated by a number of factors, thus negatively affecting patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to investigate quality of life in elderly cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This study was descriptive and non-experimental. It was conducted in one large hospital in a major city of Northern Greece. The sample was convenience comprising 53 elderly cancer patients undergoing cycle 3 chemotherapy. The data was collected using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale and included questions related to demographic and clinical characteristics. The majority of participants were men (n = 27, 50.9%) who were married (n = 32, 79.5%). Their mean age was 70.07 ± 3.60. Almost half of the sample (n = 30, 56.6%) had colon cancer. There was a statistical significant difference between men and women pertaining to physical wellbeing (p = 0.004) and overall quality of life (p quality of life (p quality of life (p quality of life and its related factors in elderly cancer patients. It is highly recommended to envisage measures for improving quality of life in this group of cancer patients.

  18. Issues of hope and faith in the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carni, E

    1988-12-01

    Akira Kurosawa's 1952 film about a man with a terminal gastric cancer introduces a discussion of hope and faith in the oncology patient. A psychodynamic relationship between hope and faith is explored, using Lawrence LeShan's research in cancer psychotherapy and Erik Erikson's lifespan developmental theory. LeShan describes a cancer personality characterized by hopeless despair, while Erikson formulates a psychogenetic framework for the development of hope and despair. Hope and faith are linked through the individual's earliest strivings toward basic trust in the world and his or her own self-efficacy. Accordingly, cancer psychotherapy may aim at restoring adult patients' faith in life and inner creative resources.

  19. Perioperative Nutritional Status Changes in Gastrointestinal Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hongjin; Cheong, Jae Ho; Lee, Kang Young; Lee, Hosun; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The presence of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer and its treatment might aggravate patient nutritional status. Malnutrition is one of the major factors affecting the postoperative course. We evaluated changes in perioperative nutritional status and risk factors of postoperative severe malnutrition in the GI cancer patients. Materials and Methods Nutritional status was prospectively evaluated using patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) perioperatively between May and September 2011. Results A total of 435 patients were enrolled. Among them, 279 patients had been diagnosed with gastric cancer and 156 with colorectal cancer. Minimal invasive surgery was performed in 225 patients. PG-SGA score increased from 4.5 preoperatively to 10.6 postoperatively (p60, pnutritional support should be considered. PMID:24142640

  20. Identifying Malnutrition: Nutritional Status in Newly Diagnosed Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, Karthikayini; Li Yoong, Tang; Mei Chan, Chong; Peng Choong, Lau; Chinna, Karuthan

    2017-02-01

    Malnutrition is common among patients with cancer, but little attention is given to its risks and consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the nutritional status and identify the factors associated with malnutrition among newly diagnosed patients with cancer. Patients admitted with newly diagnosed cancer at a teaching hospital in Malaysia were recruited from January to April 2015. Nutritional status was assessed before treatment initiation, and patients were classified into three categories. A total of 132 pretreatment patients were recruited into the study. About half were severely malnourished. Patients with stage III cancer had the highest prevalence of severe malnourishment. Clinical parameters and disease characteristics were significantly associated with nutritional status. Demographic variables were also statistically significantly associated with severe nutritional status.

  1. Online Social Networks - Opportunities for Empowering Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Davoodi, Somayeh; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Online social network technologies have become important to health and apply in most health care areas. Particularly in cancer care, because it is a disease which involves many social aspects, online social networks can be very useful. Use of online social networks provides a suitable platform for cancer patients and families to present and share information about their medical conditions, address their educational needs, support decision making, and help to coping with their disease and improve their own outcomes. Like any other new technologies, online social networks, along with many benefits, have some negative effects such as violation of privacy and publication of incorrect information. However, if these effects are managed properly, they can empower patients to manage cancer through changing behavioral patterns and enhancing the quality of cancer patients lives This paper explains some application of online social networks in the cancer patient care process. It also covers advantages and disadvantages of related technologies.

  2. CAN PROSTATE CANCER BE PREDICTED IN BPH PATIENTS WITH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To define a predictor of prostate cancer in BPH patients with an inter- mediate PSA (4.1-10 ng/ml) and a negative initial sextant biopsy. Patients and Methods During 1999, 193 BPH patients with an intermediate PSA (4.1-10 ng/ml) underwent TRUS and sextant bi- opsy. The patients whose initial biopsies.

  3. Communicating with older cancer patients: impact on information recall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.

    2009-01-01

    The central aim of this thesis was to unravel the relationship between patient characteristics, communication between patient and clinician, and subsequent patient information recall in the context of medical consultations with older cancer patients. Chapter 2 reviewed the literature to explore age

  4. Have We Improved Pain Control in Cancer Patients? A Multicenter Study of Ambulatory and Hospitalized Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta-Sales, Josep; Nabal-Vicuna, Maria; Vallano, Antonio; Espinosa, Jose; Planas-Domingo, Josep; Verger-Fransoy, Eugènia; Julià-Torras, Joaquim; Serna, Judith; Pascual-López, Antonio; Rodríguez, Dulce; Grimau, Isidre; Morlans, Germà; Sala-Rovira, Carme; Calsina-Berna, Agnes; Borras-Andrés, Josep Ma; Gomez-Batiste, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Pain in cancer patients is recognized as a major health problem, yet few studies of both inpatient and outpatient populations have been carried out. The study objective was to assess the frequency, type, and characteristics of pain in adult cancer patients, including both inpatients and outpatients. This cross-sectional study involved 1064 adult cancer patients (437 outpatients and 627 inpatients) from 44 hospitals and/or long-term-care centers in Catalonia, Spain. Cancer patients suffering from pain of any etiology for ≥2 weeks and/or under analgesic treatment ≥2 weeks were enrolled. Demographic and pain data were collected. The Spanish version of the Brief Pain Inventory was used to assess pain. Pain frequency was 55.3%. Pain was less frequent in outpatients than inpatients (41.6% versus 64.7%; ppatients, and intensity was similar in both out- and inpatients; however, outpatients reported less improvement, less pain interference with daily life, and less pain related to the cancer per se. In both groups, patients with multiple myeloma (73%), breast (65%), and lung cancer (61%) were most likely to report pain. Pain in cancer patients, both ambulatory and hospitalized, remains a challenge for health care professionals, health administrators, and stakeholders. Our study reveals the high level of pain and distress that cancer patients continue to suffer, a problem that is particularly notable in outpatients due to the intensity and duration of the pain.

  5. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  6. Differences in dietary intake during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients compared to women without cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Y.C.; Berg, van den M.M.G.A.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Boesveldt, S.; Kruif, de J.Th.C.M.; Buist, N.; Haringhuizen, A.; Los, M.; Sommeijer, D.W.; Timmer-Bonte, J.H.N.; Laarhoven, van H.W.M.; Visser, M.; Kampman, E.; Winkels, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy often experience symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite that potentially affect dietary habits. This study assessed the intake of energy, macronutrients and food groups before and during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

  7. Lung cancer mortality risk among breast cancer patients treated with anti-estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Benhamou, Simone; Schaffar, Robin; Verkooijen, Helena M; Fioretta, Gerald; Schubert, Hyma; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vlastos, Georges; Rapiti, Elisabetta

    2011-03-15

    The Women's Health Initiative randomized clinical trial reported that menopausal hormone therapy increases lung cancer mortality risk. If this is true, use of anti-estrogens should be associated with decreased lung cancer mortality risk. The authors compared lung cancer incidence and mortality among breast cancer patients with and without anti-estrogen therapy. Our study included all 6655 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1980 and 2003 and registered at the Geneva Cancer Registry. Among these women, 46% (3066) received anti-estrogens. All women were followed for occurrence and death from lung cancer until December 2007. The authors compared incidence and mortality rates among patients with and without anti-estrogens with those expected in the general population by Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs) and Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs). After a total of 57,257 person-years, 40 women developed lung cancer. SIRs for lung cancer were not significantly decreased among breast cancer patients with and without anti-estrogens (0.63, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 0.33-1.10; and 1.12, 95% CI, 0.74-1.62, respectively) while SMR was decreased among women with anti-estrogens (0.13, 95% CI, 0.02-0.47, P<.001) but not for women without anti-estrogens (0.76, 95% CI, 0.43-1.23). Compared with expected outcomes in the general population, breast cancer patients receiving anti-estrogen treatment for breast cancer had lower lung cancer mortality. This study further supports the hypothesis that estrogen therapy modifies lung cancer prognosis. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  8. Proteinuria as a Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Jee; Kang, Yong Un; Kim, Chang Seong; Choi, Joon Seok; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Kim, Soo Wan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the effects of proteinuria and renal insufficiency on all-cause mortality in patients with colorectal cancer, with special emphasis on cancer staging and cancer-related deaths. Materials and Methods We retrospectively studied a cohort of patients with colorectal cancer. In protocol 1, patients were classified into four groups based on the operability of cancer and proteinuria: group 1, early-stage cancer patients (colorectal cancer stage ?3) without proteinuria; group ...

  9. Sonographic appearance of thyroid cancer in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Sara M; Benson, Carol B; Arthaud, Dylan M; Alexander, Erik K; Frates, Mary C

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether the sonographic appearance of thyroid cancer differs in patients with and without Hashimoto thyroiditis. Patients with histologically proven thyroid cancer who had thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies measured and sonography performed preoperatively were included. We evaluated each nodule for size, echogenicity, composition, margins, halo, and vascularity and evaluated the background heterogeneity of the gland. There were 162 thyroid cancers in 145 patients. Forty-two patients (29.0%) had Hashimoto thyroiditis with positive TPO antibodies, and 103 patients (71.0%) had negative TPO antibodies. The background echogenicity was more often heterogeneous in TPO antibody-positive patients compared to those who had negative TPO antibodies (57.1% versus 26.2%; P= .0005). Comparing cancers in TPO antibody-positive to TPO antibody-negative patients, there was no significant difference in the size, echogenicity, composition, margins, halo presence, calcification presence and type, or vascularity of the cancerous nodule (P > .05). Among TPO antibody-positive patients, comparing thyroid cancerous nodules in patients with heterogeneous glands to those with homogeneous glands, there was no significant difference in any sonographic characteristic except the margin of the nodule, which was more often irregular or poorly defined in heterogeneous glands and more often smooth in homogeneous glands (PHashimoto thyroiditis. Among patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and thyroid cancer, the sonographic appearance of the cancerous nodule is similar, except that cancerous nodule margins are more likely to be irregular or poorly defined when the gland is heterogeneous. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  10. Emerging markers of cachexia predict survival in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mondello, Patrizia; Lacquaniti,Antonio; Mondello, Stefania; Bolignano, Davide; Pitini, Vincenzo; Aloisi, Carmela; Buemi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Background Cachexia may occur in 40% of cancer patients, representing the major cause of death in more than 20% of them. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of leptin, ghrelin and obestatin as diagnostic and predictive markers of cachexia in oncologic patients. Their impact on patient survival was also evaluated. Methods 140 adults with different cancer diagnoses were recruited. Thirty healthy volunteers served as control. Serum ghrelin, obestatin and leptin were tested at basel...

  11. Quality of life, religious attitude and cancer coping in a sample of Iranian patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atef-Vahid, Mohammad-Kazem; Nasr-Esfahani, Mehdi; Esfeedvajani, Mohsen Saberi; Naji-Isfahani, Homayoon; Shojaei, Mohammad Reza; Masoumeh, Yasavoli M; Goushegir, S Ashrafodin

    2011-07-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The incidence of cancer has increased markedly in recent decades in most countries. Studies have shown that diseases such as cancer affect the individuals' quality of life. The sample of study consisted of 384 patients selected through non-random convenient sampling procedure from three general hospitals and outpatient clinics in Isfahan and Tehran. The measures used in the study included a demographic questionnaire, the Iranian version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), the Cancer Coping Questionnaire, and the Religious Attitude Questionnaire. The results revealed significant correlation between patients' scores on the total scale of the Cancer Coping Questionnaire and their scores on the Global health status/Quality of Life. Significant correlations were also found between patients' scores on the Religious Attitude Questionnaire and various scales of the Quality of Life Questionnaire. However, no significant correlations were found between Cancer Coping and Religious Attitude measures in any type of cancer except for the prostate cancer. Religious attitude was a significant and important factor in coping with cancer. In addition, patients' quality of life correlated significantly with religious attitude as well as cancer coping measures. However, the results did not show any significant relationship between religious attitude and cancer coping measures except in patients with prostate cancer. The findings of this study are consistent with other studies that have shown significant correlations between religiosity and spirituality and quality of life in patients with life threatening diseases.

  12. Evaluating the quality of life of cancer patients: assessments by patients, significant others, physicians and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneeuw, K. C.; Aaronson, N. K.; Sprangers, M. A.; Detmar, S. B.; Wever, L. D.; Schornagel, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the usefulness of caregiver ratings of cancer patients' quality of life (QOL), an issue of relevance to both adequate patient care and to the possible use of proxy QOL raters in clinical studies. We compared QOL ratings of 90 cancer patients receiving inpatient chemotherapy with

  13. Factors related to treatment refusal in Taiwanese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ting-Yu; Wang, Chao-Hui; Lin, Yu-Fen; Chou, Shu-Lan; Wang, Ching-Ting; Juang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Yung-Chang; Lin, Mei-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates for cancer have increased dramatically in the recent 30 years in Taiwan. However, not all patients receive treatment. Treatment refusal might impair patient survival and life quality. In order to improve this situation, we proposed this study to evaluate factors that are related to refusal of treatment in cancer patients via a cancer case manager system. This study analysed data from a case management system during the period from 2010 to 2012 at a medical center in Northern Taiwan. We enrolled a total of 14,974 patients who were diagnosed with cancer. Using the PRECEDE Model as a framework, we conducted logistic regression analysis to identify independent variables that are significantly associated with refusal of therapy in cancer patients. A multivariate logistic regression model was also applied to estimate adjusted the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A total of 253 patients (1.69%) refused treatment. The multivariate logistic regression result showed that the high risk factors for refusal of treatment in cancer patient included: concerns about adverse effects (prefuse treatment have poor survival. The present study provides evidence of factors that are related to refusal of therapy and might be helpful for further application and improvement of cancer care.

  14. Cancer incidence in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Christine W; Black, Adam W; Lucas, F Lee; Vary, Calvin P H

    2017-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder characterized by deficiency in endoglin, an angiogenic protein. We previously showed that HHT, in which systemic endoglin expression is reduced, was associated with better survival outcomes in cancer patients (Duarte et al. in Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 23:117-125, 2014). Here, we evaluated whether HHT was associated with reduced cancer incidence. A matched case-control analysis using SEER Medicare was conducted to evaluate the effect of HHT on diagnosis with breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer between 2000 and 2007 (n = 633,162). Cancer and non-cancer patients were matched on age, sex, SEER registry region, and length of the ascertainment period for HHT. We assessed crude association using a McNemar's test and then adjusted for demographic variables, cancer type, cancer stage, comorbidities, and ascertainment period with a conditional logistic regression model for cancer incidence. The McNemar's test showed no significant association between HHT and cancer incidence (p = 0.74). Adjusting for covariates with the conditional logistic regression model did not change the result [HHT odds ratio 0.978; 95 % CI (0.795, 1.204)]. The lack of association between HHT and cancer incidence is unexpected given the previously discovered significant association between HHT and improved survival outcomes (Duarte et al. in Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 23:117-125, 2014). We conclude that the protective effect of reduced systemic endoglin expression in cancer is specific to cancer progression through its effect on vascularization and other stromal effects but does not extend to cancer initiation.

  15. Attitudes of patients with metastatic cancer towards research biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Danielle H; Churilov, Leonid; Lin, Nancy U; Lim, Elgene; Seah, Davinia

    2017-11-06

    To evaluate the attitudes of patients with different cancers towards research biopsies outside a clinical trial. Patients with metastatic cancer completed a questionnaire that assessed patients' willingness to consider research biopsies. Research biopsies were divided into two groups: biopsies performed as stand-alone procedures (research purposes only biopsy, RPOB) or performed during a clinically indicated biopsy (additional pass biopsy, APB). Factors analyzed included biopsy timing, biopsy site, sociodemographic information and information about prior trial participation. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted using random-effects logistic regression. One hundred and sixty-five patients with cancer (40 melanoma, 37 colorectal, 32 breast, 30 lung, 26 prostate) completed the questionnaire. Patients with melanoma demonstrated the greatest willingness to consider a research biopsy compared to patients with other cancer types (P biopsies, time since metastatic diagnosis, and previous trial enrolment were all statistically significant for willingness to consider a research biopsy on univariate analysis. When adjusting for statistically significant variables on univariate analysis, the odds of patients considering APBs were 14.6 times greater than RPOBs (P biopsies. Patients with cancer show a greater willingness to consider APBs compared to RPOBs, and biopsies performed at less invasive body sites. There are differences in the attitudes of patients with different cancers towards research biopsies. Further research addressing motivations and barriers to research biopsies should be considered to increase the availability of this important resource. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Perioperative nutritional status changes in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hongjin; Cheong, Jae Ho; Lee, Kang Young; Lee, Hosun; Lee, Jae Gil; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2013-11-01

    The presence of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer and its treatment might aggravate patient nutritional status. Malnutrition is one of the major factors affecting the postoperative course. We evaluated changes in perioperative nutritional status and risk factors of postoperative severe malnutrition in the GI cancer patients. Nutritional status was prospectively evaluated using patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) perioperatively between May and September 2011. A total of 435 patients were enrolled. Among them, 279 patients had been diagnosed with gastric cancer and 156 with colorectal cancer. Minimal invasive surgery was performed in 225 patients. PG-SGA score increased from 4.5 preoperatively to 10.6 postoperatively (pcancer patients, postoperative severe malnourishment increased significantly (p60, pcancer (pcancer, and open surgery remained significant as risk factors of severe malnutrition. The prevalence of severe malnutrition among GI cancer patients in this study increased from 2.3% preoperatively to 26.3% after an operation. Old age, preoperative weight loss, gastric cancer, and open surgery were shown to be risk factors of postoperative severe malnutrition. In patients at high risk of postoperative severe malnutrition, adequate nutritional support should be considered.

  17. A literature review of suicide in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguiano, Linda; Mayer, Deborah K; Piven, Mary Lynn; Rosenstein, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Cancer survivors have a higher suicide rate than the general population. Oncology nurses need to have knowledge and skills in assessing risk for suicide in this population. This study aimed to conduct a literature review on risk factors for and incidence of suicide in patients with cancer and to identify potential screening tools. PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO databases were searched to identify research articles in peer-reviewed journals from 1999 to 2009. The variables under study included suicide rate, cancer type, demographic characteristics, and signs and symptoms associated with suicide. In addition, articles focused on suicide risk assessment tools were also included. Twenty-four articles met the inclusion criteria. As in the general population, suicide risk was higher among men with cancer as compared with women with cancer. Patients aged 65 years or older with cancer have a higher rate of suicide compared with those younger than 65 years, with rates highest among men 80 years or older. Specific diagnoses associated with higher suicide rates include prostate, lung, pancreatic, and head and neck cancers. The first year after diagnosis carries a higher risk for completed suicide. Multiple risk assessment tools have been developed and are effective in identifying patients with depression or hopelessness, factors associated with higher risk for suicide. However, no tools exist that sensitively and specifically predict suicide. The incidence of suicide in someone with a cancer diagnosis is approximately double the incidence of suicide in the general population. Early detection of depression in special cancer populations, such as older male patients, may help identify those at greatest suicide risk. Oncology nurses should be aware of cancer patients considered at higher risk for suicide. Systematic screening for suicidal ideation and behavior may identify cancer patients at high risk and facilitate appropriate mental health evaluation and treatment.

  18. Association of family history with cancer recurrence and survival among patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B; Mayer, Robert J; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M; Warren, Robert S; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S

    2008-06-04

    A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Prospective observational study of 1087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up, 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in tumor specimens. Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Among 1087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57 of 195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343 of 892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared with patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) among those with 1 or more affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival, 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival, and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival. This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared with participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1 affected relative had a multivariate HR of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.57-1.04) for disease

  19. Cancer immunotherapy in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Pedersen, Magnus; Svane, Inge Marie

    2017-01-01

    Patients with preexisting active autoimmune disorders were excluded from clinical trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, patients with autoimmune disorders are diagnosed with cancer at least as frequently as the global population, and clinicians treating patients outside clinical trials...... have generally been reluctant to offer cancer immunotherapy to this patient group. In this brief article, we review the most recent literature on the efficacy and safety of CTLA-4- and PD-1-blocking antibodies in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders.......Patients with preexisting active autoimmune disorders were excluded from clinical trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, patients with autoimmune disorders are diagnosed with cancer at least as frequently as the global population, and clinicians treating patients outside clinical trials...

  20. Incidence of colorectal cancer in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme C M DE; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Monteiro, Mariane; Nahas, Sérgio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is traditionally diagnosed after de sixth decade of life, although a small percentage of cases are diagnosed in patients under 40 years of age, and incidence is increasing. There exists a great volume of controversy regarding clinical outcome of young patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) when compared to elder counterparts. Our aims were to evaluate the rate of CRC in young patients, to review the pertaining literature and to discuss outcomes and clinical prognosis. A retrospective review involving patients with CRC was undertaken, focusing on age at diagnosis. The information extracted from this literature review showed a trend towards a decreased incidence in older people with an opposite effect among adolescents and young adults. Moreover, biological aggressiveness in young adults diagnosed with CRC has not been fully recognized, although it is usually diagnosed later and in association with adverse histological features. Besides that, these features don't affect outcome. These apparent increase in CRC incidence among young patients during the last decades raises the need for a greater suspicious when evaluating common symptoms in this group. Thus, educational programs should widespread information for both population and physicians to improve prevention and early diagnosis results. RESUMO O câncer colorretal (CCR) esporádico é tradicionalmente diagnosticado após a sexta década de vida, embora uma pequena porcentagem de casos seja diagnosticada em doentes abaixo dos 40 anos de idade, e a incidência está aumentando. Existe uma grande controvérsia a respeito da evolução clínica de doentes jovens portadores de CCR em comparação aos mais idosos. Os objetivos deste estudo foram avaliar a prevalência de CCR em doentes jovens, rever a literatura pertinente e discutir suas características mais importantes nesta faixa etária. Para tanto realizou-se revisão da literatura envolvendo doentes com CCR com foco na

  1. Comparison of prostate cancer diagnosis in patients receiving unrelated urological and non-urological cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Anthony T; Smaldone, Marc C; Egleston, Brian L; Simhan, Jay; Ginzburg, Serge; Morgan, Todd M; Walton, John; Chen, David Y T; Viterbo, Rosalia; Greenberg, Richard E; Uzzo, Robert G; Kutikov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate prostate cancer diagnosis rates and survival outcomes in patients receiving unrelated (non-prostate) urological care with those in patients receiving non-urological care. We conducted a population-based study using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to identify men who underwent surgical treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC; n = 18,188) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC; n = 45,093) between 1992 and 2008. Using SEER*stat software to estimate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), we investigated rates of prostate cancer diagnosis in patients with RCC and patients with CRC. Adjusting for patient age, race and year of diagnosis on multivariate analysis, we used Cox and Fine and Gray proportional hazards regressions to evaluate overall and disease-specific survival endpoints. The observed incidence of prostate cancer was higher in both the patients with RCC and those with CRC: SIR = 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-1.46) vs 1.06 (95% CI 1.02-1.11). Adjusted prostate cancer SIRs were 30% higher (P cancer-adjusted mortalities (sub-distribution Hazard Ratio (sHR) = 1.17, P prostate cancer-specific mortality (sHR = 0.827, P = 0.391). Rates of prostate cancer diagnosis were higher in patients with RCC (a cohort with unrelated urological cancer care) than in those with CRC. Despite higher overall mortality in patients with RCC, prostate cancer-specific survival was similar in both groups. Opportunities may exist to better target prostate cancer screening in patients who receive non-prostate-related urological care. Furthermore, urologists should not feel obligated to perform prostate-specific antigen screening for all patients receiving non-prostate-related urological care. © 2013 BJU International.

  2. Recent advances in cancer surgery in older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoft, Siri; Audisio, Riccardo A

    2017-01-01

    Age is the most important risk factor for the occurrence of cancer, and a declining mortality from heart disease and other non-cancer causes leaves an older population that is at high risk of developing cancer. Choosing the optimal treatment for older cancer patients may be a challenge. Firstly, older age and associated factors such as comorbidities, functional limitations, and cognitive impairment are risk factors for adverse effects of cancer treatment. Secondly, older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, and current clinical guidelines rarely address how to manage cancer in patients who have comorbidities or functional limitations. The importance of incorporating frailty assessment into the preoperative evaluation of older surgical patients has received increasing attention over the last 10 years. Furthermore, studies that include endpoints such as functional status, cognitive status, and quality of life beyond the standard endpoints, i.e. postoperative morbidity and mortality, are starting to emerge. This review looks at recent evidence regarding geriatric assessment and frailty in older surgical cancer patients and provides a summary of newer studies in colorectal, liver, pancreatic, and gynecological cancer and renal and central nervous system tumors.

  3. Quality of life outcomes in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilou Paraskevi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life is now considered an important endpoint in cancer clinical trials. It has been shown that assessing quality of life in cancer patients could contribute to improved treatment and could even serve as a prognostic factor along with medical parameters. This paper presents a review of quality of life outcomes in patients with breast cancer according to previous descriptive findings. This is a bibliographic review of the literature covering publications that appeared in English language biomedical journals between 1987 and 2008. The search strategy included a combination of the key words quality of life and breast cancer in the titles of published articles. The major findings are summarized and presented under different headings: evaluation of health-related quality of life i at the time of diagnosis, ii during treatment, and iii after the completion of treatment. Breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy might experience several side-effects and symptoms that have a negative effect on their quality of life. Also adjuvant hormonal therapies were found to have a similar negative impact on quality of life. Psychological distress-anxiety and depression were found to be common among breast cancer patients. Symptoms-pain, fatigue, and insomnia were among the most common symptoms reported. There was quite an extensive body of literature on quality of life in breast cancer patients. These papers have made a considerable contribution to improving breast cancer care.

  4. Oral cancer among patients under the age of 35 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iype E

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the commonest cancers among males. AIMS: To assess the aetiological factors, patient characteristics, treatment and the outcome in young patients with oral cancer. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A retrospective descriptive study of patients under the age of 35 years with cancer of the oral cavity treated between 1982-1996, with the last follow-up till 2001, using the tumour registry data of Regional Cancer Centre (RCC, Trivandrum, Kerala, India. SUBJECT AND METHOD: The detailed clinical, treatment and follow-up data were obtained from the computerised records of RCC and recorded on a preset proforma. This was analysed with emphasis on age, sex, risk factors, site, histology, clinical extent and treatment methods and survival in the study group. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The survival analysis was carried by Kaplan-Meier method and the difference in survival was analysed using log-rank test. RESULTS: Out of 264 patients analysed, tongue was the commonest site identified in 136 (52% patients followed by buccal mucosa in 69 (26% patients. A male female ratio of 2.3:1 was observed with a significantly higher male preponderance in buccal mucosa (4.3:1. Prior exposure to tobacco or alcohol was noted in 59.4% patients, with more habitués in buccal mucosa cancer. Histological confirmation was present only in 83.7% patients and among them most were squamous cell carcinoma (85.9%. Radiotherapy, surgery or combined modalities of treatment were employed for majority of patients. The 5-year survival was 57.3%. T stage of the tumour was found to be significant in predicting disease free survival (P=0.03. CONCLUSIONS: The importance of early detection for clinical down staging is stressed. There is a need to investigate the aetiology of intra oral cancers in younger patients since a significant proportion (almost 40% of these patients do not have associated risk factors for cancer.

  5. Risk of uncommon cancers in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P; Egeberg, A; Gislason, G

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer-associated mortality is increased in psoriasis. However, little is known about the risk of less common cancers. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the risk of less common cancers in patients with psoriasis compared to persons without psoriasis using a nationwide cohort study....... METHODS: Between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2012, we identified all Danish patients with a first-time hospital diagnosis of a less common cancer defined as cancer. RESULTS: We included 4 361 869...... individuals. Of these, 58 138 were classified as having psoriasis. After adjusting for age, sex, socio-economic status and healthcare consumption, we found significantly elevated hazard ratios for cancers of bone and cartilage (HR 4.97 [2.32-10.62], P

  6. [Complementary and alternative medicine use by lung cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossanaly Vasram, R; Zysman, M; Ribeiro Baptista, B; Ederle, C; Nguyen-Thi, P L; Clement-Duchene, C; Martinet, Y

    2017-09-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CMA) use is frequent among cancer patients. Only few results are available about lung cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate how often the CMA were used by lung cancer patients and to define the type of CMA used. Every lung cancer patients with an ongoing chemotherapy in the respiratory department of the University Hospital of Nancy were approached between November 2014 to July 2015. A detailed and anonymous survey was conducted and the socioeconomic characteristics were collected from medical records. Ninety-one patients were questioned. On 82 patients having answered, 19.5 % had used at least a CMA. The main CMA used was the physical exercise in 50 % of the patients. CMA users were significantly younger with a mean age of 56.4 years versus 65.4 years (P=0.0007). More than half patients did not indicate to their specialist that they used a CMA. The main information source was the circle of acquaintances. CMA use is frequent among lung cancer patients. The physical exercise is quoted most of the time among the various CMA. There is a real lack of communication on the subject between the physician and the patient. It is thus imperative that the pulmonologists give much interest to these practices in order to give better advices and to reinforce the patient-physician relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Determinants of patient-reported experience of cancer services responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Dominique; Roberge, Danièle; Berbiche, Djamal

    2015-09-28

    In coming years, patient-reported data are expected to play a more prominent role in ensuring early and efficient detection of healthcare system dysfunctions, developing interventions and evaluating their effects on health outcomes, and monitoring quality of care from the patient's perspective. The concept of responsiveness relates to patient-reported experience measures that focus on the system's response to service users' legitimate expectations. We explored this concept in an effort to address unresolved issues related to measuring and interpreting patient experience. Our objectives in this study were to report on patients' perceptions of cancer services responsiveness and to identify patient characteristics and organizational attributes that are potential determinants of a positive patient-reported experience. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 1379 cancer patients in nine participating ambulatory cancer clinics in hospitals across the province of Quebec, Canada. They were invited to complete the Cancer Services Responsiveness tool, a 19-item questionnaire evaluating patients' perceptions of the responsiveness of cancer services. Sociodemographic data and self-reported clinical and organizational data were collected. Descriptive statistical analysis, univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed. The patients surveyed generally perceived cancer services as highly responsive. The individual determinants of overall responsiveness found to be significant were self-assessed health status, age, and education level; organizational determinants were academic affiliation and geographic location of the clinic. Responsiveness refers to distinctive indicators of healthcare quality focused on patient-provider interactions and presents a complementary picture to other patient-reported experience measures. The identified determinants of patients' positive experience with cancer services provide valuable information to guide care providers in

  8. Evidence-Based Yoga Interventions for Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Angela; Fonteyn, Marsha

    2016-04-01

    Introducing patients with cancer to the practice of yoga can be beneficial for coping with the side effects of treatment and the psychological aspects of cancer that are often difficult and distressing for patients. Oncology nurses can learn to use simple yoga techniques for themselves and as interventions with their patients. This article provides details about the development and implementation of a yoga class for patients with cancer and provides details about other ways nurses can integrate yoga into oncology nursing and cancer care. Current research literature was reviewed and synthesized to provide support for the use of yoga as an evidence-based nursing intervention. A detailed approach for implementing yoga into professional practice was delineated. Yoga techniques can be easily integrated into nursing practice and have been shown to be beneficial for patients and nurses.

  9. PALLIATIVE CARE AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT IN OLDER CANCER PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Older cancer patients are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with Palliative Care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of the cancer patient with an emphasis on quality of life. In this article, we discuss the evaluation and management of pain and other common non-pain symptoms that occur in the elderly cancer patient, as well as end of life care. PMID:26614860

  10. Survival of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Listl; Lina Jansen; Albrecht Stenzinger; Kolja Freier; Katharina Emrich; Bernd Holleczek; Alexander Katalinic; Adam Gondos; Hermann Brenner

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002-2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well...

  11. Resilience and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gordana Ristevska-Dimitrоvska; Izabela Filov; Domnika Rajchanovska; Petar Stefanovski; Beti Dejanova

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many studies have shown that a relationship exists between quality of life (QoL) and resilience in breast cancer patients, but few studies present information on the nature of this relationship of resilience on QoL. Our aim was to examine the relationship between resilience and quality of life in breast cancer patients. METHODS: QoL was measured in 218 consequent breast cancer patients, with EORTC - QLQ Core 30 questionnaire, and EORTC QLQ-BR23. The resilience was measured wit...

  12. Herbal Medicine Practices of Patients With Liver Cancer in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Rojas, Teresa; Bourdy, Geneviève; Ruiz, Eloy; Cerapio, Juan-Pablo; Pineau, Pascal; Gardon, Jacques; Doimi, Franco; Deparis, Xavier; Deharo, Eric; Bertani, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    The highest burden of liver cancer occurs in developing countries, where the use of herbal medicine (HM) is still widespread. Despite this trend, few studies have been conducted to report HM practices of patients with a hepatic tumor in the developing world. Hence, this study aimed to document the use of HM among patients with liver cancer in Peru. A comparative behavioral epidemiological survey was conducted among liver cancer patients attending the National Cancer Institute of Peru. Information was obtained by direct interviews based on a semistructured questionnaire. The use of HM in Peruvian liver cancer patients was reported, first, regarding general consumption prior to the onset of disease, and second, after the appearance of symptoms that patients would relate to their tumor. In parallel, general consumption of HM in noncancerous people was assessed as a comparative figure. A correspondence analysis was performed to reveal potential associations between the symptoms of cancer and the specific use of HM. Eighty-eight patients and 117 noncancerous individuals participated in the survey. Overall, 68.3% of the people interviewed claimed to use HM on a regular basis for general health preservation. Furthermore, 56.8% of the patients turned to plants first to treat the disorders for which they later came to the cancer care center. When compared with the number of plant species used routinely (n = 78), a selection of plants was made by patients in response to the symptoms of cancer (n = 46). At least 2 plant species, Aloe vera and Morinda citrifolia, were significantly associated with the treatment of liver cancer-related symptoms in the patient group. The present study is the first survey on the HM practices of patients with liver cancer in Latin America and, more broadly, in the developing world. Our findings confirm that HM remains one of the principal primary health care resources in Peru, even for a severe disease like liver cancer. These traditional

  13. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Ming Wong

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one’s overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The ...

  14. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  15. Predicting bacterial infections among pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojha, Rohit P; Asdahl, Peter H; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Predicting Infectious Complications in Neutropenic Children and Young People with Cancer (PICNICC) model was recently developed for antibiotic stewardship among pediatric cancer patients, but limited information is available about its clinical usefulness. We aimed to assess...... the performance of the PICNICC model for predicting microbiologically documented bacterial infections among pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used data for febrile neutropenia episodes at a pediatric cancer center in Aarhus, Denmark between 2000 and 2016. We assessed...... calibration but did not improve net benefit. CONCLUSIONS: The PICNICC model has potential for reducing unnecessary antibiotic exposure for pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia, but continued validation and refinement is necessary to optimize clinical usefulness....

  16. Attitude about cancer disclosure and quality of life of patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mollarahimi-Malek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of cancer is often equal to facing with a crisis by the patients. Traditionally it is believed that cancer diagnosis should not be told to the patients. The aim of this study was to compare the attitudes towards the disclosure of cancer diagnosis in patients with cancer and control group included healthy people. This crosssectional study was carried out in 2015 with a total of 531 people. We used three questionnaires to collect data. The first one was EORTC QLQ-C30 to assess quality of life of patients with cancer. The second one included items to assess the patients' willingness for detection of the cancer diagnosis. Finally, the third one was the DUREL to evaluate religiosity. Five hundred and thirty one subjects including 216 patients with cancer and 315 healthy people were studied. Mean age of participants was 44 ± 15.7, 50.5% were female. Overall, 63% of patien ts with cancer were informed of their disease status and 37% uninformed. A significant association was seen between the awareness of cancer with physical and social functioning of quality of life. There was a positive significant association between the tendency for being informed of the diagnosis and non-organizational religious activity in participants without cancer. Global health status and all dimensions of religious were correlated in patients significantly. We found the majority of subjects tend to be aware of the disclosure of diagnosis. The physical and social functioning of quality of life were better in uninformed patients than informed patients.

  17. Cancer patients' experiences with nature: Normalizing dichotomous realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Sarah; O'Callaghan, Clare C; Schofield, Penelope; Salander, Pär

    2017-01-01

    To explore cancer patients' subjective experiences with nature in order to examine the relevance of nature-based care opportunities in cancer care contexts. The rationale was to describe the underlying mechanisms of this interaction and produce translatable knowledge. Qualitative research design informed by grounded theory. Sampling was initially convenience and then theoretical. Competent adults with any cancer diagnosis were eligible to participate in a semi-structured interview exploring views about the role of nature in their lives. Audio-recorded and transcribed interviews were analyzed using inductive, cyclic, and constant comparative analysis. Twenty cancer patients (9 female) reported detailed description about their experiences with nature from which a typology of five common nature interactions emerged. A theory model was generated constituting a core category and two inter-related themes explaining a normalization process in which patients negotiate their shifting realities (Core Category). Nature functioned as a support structure and nurtured patients' inner and outer capacities to respond and connect more effectively (Theme A). Once enabled and comforted, patients could engage survival and reconstructive maneuvers and explore the consequences of cancer (Theme B). A dynamic relationship was evident between moving away while, simultaneously, advancing towards the cancer reality in order to accept a shifting normality. From a place of comfort and safety, patients felt supported to deal differently and more creatively with the threat and demands of cancer diagnosis, treatment and outlook. New understanding about nature's role in cancer patients' lives calls attention to recognizing additional forms of psychosocial care that encourage patients' own coping and creative processes to deal with their strain and, in some cases, reconstruct everyday lives. Further research is required to determine how nature opportunities can be feasibly delivered in the cancer

  18. Doctor-patient communication about cancer-related internet information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Gueguen, Jennifer A; D'Agostino, Thomas A; Li, Yuelin; Sonet, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the effect of doctor-patient communication about cancer-related Internet information on self-reported outcomes. Two hundred and thirty cancer patients and caregivers completed an online survey regarding their experiences searching for and discussing with their doctors cancer-related Internet information. Participants who assertively introduced the Internet information in a consultation were more likely to have their doctor agree with the information. When doctors showed interest and involvement and took the information seriously, participants were less likely to report a desire to change the doctor's response. Taking the information seriously was also associated with greater satisfaction. This preliminary evidence that the doctor's response is associated with patient outcomes indicates the potential for improving patient-centered communication. In an effort to maximize patient-centered communication, doctors should be encouraged to take their patients and the information they present seriously, as well as show their patients that they are interested and involved.

  19. Language barriers and patient-centered breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Hwang, E Shelley; Nickleach, Dana; Kaplan, Celia P

    2011-08-01

    Provision of high quality patient-centered care is fundamental to eliminating healthcare disparities in breast cancer. We investigated physicians' experiences communicating with limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer patients. Survey of a random sample of California oncologists and surgeons. Of 301 respondents who reported treating LEP patients, 46% were oncologists, 75% male, 68% in private practice, and on average 33% of their patients had breast cancer. Only 40% reported at least sometimes using professional interpretation services. Although 75% felt they were usually able to communicate effectively with LEP patients, more than half reported difficulty discussing treatment options and prognosis, and 56% acknowledged having less-patient-centered treatment discussions with LEP breast cancer patients. In multivariate analysis, use of professional interpreters was associated with 53% lower odds of reporting less-patient-centered treatment discussions (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.26-0.85). California surgeons and oncologists caring for breast cancer patients report substantial communication challenges when faced with a language barrier. Although use of professional interpreters is associated with more patient-centered communication, there is a low rate of professional interpreter utilization. Future research and policy should focus on increasing access to and reimbursement for professional interpreter services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Cancer-Related Complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane B L Torres

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are at risk for severe complications related to the underlying malignancy or its treatment and, therefore, usually require admission to intensive care units (ICU. Here, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in this subgroup of patients.Secondary analysis of two prospective cohorts of cancer patients admitted to ICUs. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify variables associated with hospital mortality.Out of 2,028 patients, 456 (23% had cancer-related complications. Compared to those without cancer-related complications, they more frequently had worse performance status (PS (57% vs 36% with PS≥2, active malignancy (95% vs 58%, need for vasopressors (45% vs 34%, mechanical ventilation (70% vs 51% and dialysis (12% vs 8% (P<0.001 for all analyses. ICU (47% vs. 27% and hospital (63% vs. 38% mortality rates were also higher in patients with cancer-related complications (P<0.001. Chemo/radiation therapy-induced toxicity (6%, venous thromboembolism (5%, respiratory failure (4%, gastrointestinal involvement (3% and vena cava syndrome (VCS (2% were the most frequent cancer-related complications. In multivariable analysis, the presence of cancer-related complications per se was not associated with mortality [odds ratio (OR = 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.66, P = 0.131]. However, among the individual cancer-related complications, VCS [OR = 3.79 (1.11-12.92, P = 0.033], gastrointestinal involvement [OR = 3.05 (1.57-5.91, P = <0.001] and respiratory failure [OR = 1.96(1.04-3.71, P = 0.038] were independently associated with in-hospital mortality.The prognostic impact of cancer-related complications was variable. Although some complications were associated with worse outcomes, the presence of an acute cancer-related complication per se should not guide decisions to admit a patient to ICU.

  1. Fear of pain in patients with advanced cancer or in patients with chronic noncancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Katerine; Wilson, Keith G; Buenger, Usha; Jarvis, Virginia; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Bhimji, Khadija; Dobkin, Patricia L

    2011-02-01

    pain is one of the most prevalent symptoms in patients with advanced cancer and, according to anecdotal reports, perhaps the most feared. Surprisingly, fear of pain has been the subject of little research within cancer care. The literature on chronic noncancer pain, however, suggests that fear of pain contributes to limitations in function in populations with diverse chronic illness. Little is known about the extent to which such findings might generalize from patients with chronic noncancer pain to those with chronic cancer pain. Therefore, this research examined the extent to which fear of pain is associated with limitations in function in patients with advanced cancer and also compared patients with chronic cancer and noncancer pain. we recruited 117 patients with advanced cancer who received a referral for pain management and 118 patients with a primary complaint of chronic noncancer pain. Participants completed self-report questionnaires. findings revealed similarities between the groups for fear of pain and limitations in function, but they differed on level of depression and pain severity (patients with noncancer pain were more depressed and reported higher pain severity). Fear of pain independently predicted limitations in function in both groups controlling for demographic variables and pain severity. When depression and physical symptoms were controlled, fear of pain predicted limitations in function only in patients with advanced cancer. the findings emphasize the importance of psychological dimensions of pain in patients with advanced cancer, as well as the similarities and differences between the 2 groups of patients suffering from chronic pain.

  2. Cytokines and depression in cancer patients and caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Madeline Li,1,2 Ekaterina Kouzmina,3 Megan McCusker,1 Danielle Rodin,4 Paul C Boutros,3,5,6 Christopher J Paige,6–8 Gary Rodin1,2 1Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Department of Supportive Care, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 3Informatics & Biocomputing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 6Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 7Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 8Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Objective: A better understanding of the biobehavioral mechanisms underlying depression in cancer is required to translate biomarker findings into clinical interventions. We tested for associations between cytokines and the somatic and psychological symptoms of depression in cancer patients and their healthy caregivers.Patients and methods: The GRID Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Ham-D was administered to 61 cancer patients of mixed type and stage, 26 primary caregivers and 38 healthy controls. Concurrently, blood was drawn for multiplexed plasma assays of 15 cytokines. Multiple linear regression, adjusted for biobehavioral variables, identified cytokine associations with the psychological (Ham-Dep and somatic (Ham-Som subfactors of the Ham-D.Results: The Ham-Dep scores of cancer patients were similar to their caregivers, but their Ham-Som scores were significantly higher (twofold, p=0.016. Ham-Som was positively associated with IL-1ra (coefficient: 1.27, p≤0.001 in cancer patients, and negatively associated with IL-2 (coefficient: -0.68, p=0.018 in caregivers. Ham-Dep was negatively associated with IL-4 (coefficient: -0.67, p

  3. QUALITY OF LIFE IN MALE CANCER PATIENTS AT KENYATTA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-07-01

    Jul 1, 2004 ... psychiatrist and psychologist, the anatomic site of cancer, treatment given and responses on modified Beck's depression inventory. Results: Forty two patients were studied, their age range 13-72 years, mean 43.2 and peak 13-26 years. Forty seven per cent of cases had no formal education. The cancers.

  4. Original Research Risk factors for common cancers among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data from 504 registered cancer patients were included—300 (59.5%) were female and 204 (40.5%) were male. ... Data management and analysis ..... Agency for Research on Cancer; 2008. 37. Mwanda WO, Orem Jackson et al. Dose-Modified Oral. Chemotherapy in Treatment of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  5. Nonreferral of Nursing Home Patients With Suspected Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, Marije E.; Hamelinck, Victoria C.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Bastiaannet, Esther; Smorenburg, Carolien H.; Achterberg, Wilco P.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: People with suspected breast cancer who are not referred for diagnostic testing remain unregistered and are not included in cancer statistics. Little is known about the extent of and motivation for nonreferral of these patients. Methods: A Web-based survey was sent to all elderly care

  6. Plasma transforming growth factor beta levels in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sminia, P; Barten, AD; Van Waarde, MAWH; Vujaskovic, Z; Van Tienhoven, G

    1998-01-01

    We investigated whether the concentration of circulating transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) yields diagnostic value in breast cancer. Blood was collected from twenty stage I and II breast cancer patients both prior to treatment and after surgical excision of the tumour. Both latent and

  7. Posttraumatic stress disorder among bereaved relatives of cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, A.; Reinholt, Nina; Nielsen, Louise Hjort

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and predictors of PTSD in individuals who experienced the loss of a close relative to cancer. A total of 251 bereaved relatives ages 14 to 76 (M = 41.3, SD = 16.8) were recruited at a counseling service for cancer patients...

  8. Alterations In Lipid Profile Of Patients With Advanced Cervical Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alterations In Lipid Profile Of Patients With Advanced Cervical Cancer. ... C Student's t-test was performed to compare mean values of the parameters. Results A significant decrease ... Also there was direct relationship between reduced lipid levels and cervical cancer progression, this was statistically significant. Conclusion ...

  9. An Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: There exist a strong correlation between the use of Inj. Doxorubicin and risk for developing hepatotoxicity. The health‑care professionals dealing with breast cancer patients need to have awareness for hepatotoxicity with the use of Inj. Doxorubicin therapy. Keywords: Breast cancer, Doxorubicin, Hepatotoxicity, ...

  10. Nutritional knowledge and dietary diversity of cancer patients at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer cases are on the increase in Kenya and have become one of the leading public health issues. This increase is possibly attributed to change in behavior and adoption of predisposing factors such as increase in environmental carcinogens and unhealthy lifestyles. Cancer patients undergo treatment regimes such as ...

  11. Impact of denosumab on bone mass in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown-Glaberman U

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ursa Brown-Glaberman, Alison T StopeckUniversity of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Cancer therapy-induced bone loss (CTIBL is a form of secondary osteoporosis associated with systemic chemotherapy and hormonal ablation therapy. The monitoring and treatment of CTIBL is an important component of comprehensive cancer care, especially for patients with curable disease and long life expectancies. Whereas oral bisphosphonates remain the most commonly used therapeutic option for CTIBL, additional treatment options may be required for patients who do not respond adequately or are intolerant to bisphosphonates, have renal insufficiency, or are receiving treatment with nephrotoxic medications. For these patients, denosumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, offers an effective and well-tolerated alternative. Several recent randomized trials have examined the use of denosumab as treatment for CTIBL associated with hormone ablation therapy for breast and prostate cancer. Recent data suggest a possible role for RANKL inhibitors in both chemoprevention and the prevention of cancer recurrence through direct effects on breast tissue and breast cancer stem cells. The outcomes of several international Phase III clinical trials currently underway will help clarify the role of denosumab in patients undergoing cancer therapy.Keywords: denosumab, osteoporosis, osteopenia, hormone ablation therapy, cancer therapy-induced bone loss, chemotherapy

  12. Treatment interruption among head and neck cancer patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loss of taste (61.5%), trismus (34.6%) and voice change (30.89%) were relatively less common. Conclusion: Our findings show that the probability of cancer control and cure among head and neck cancer patients treated at KNH could be severely eroded by treatment interruptions as a result of severe radiation morbidity.

  13. Predictive factors in epithelial ovarian cancer: Towards individualized patient care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease with a high mortality. Most patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) present with advanced stage disease with multiple tumour deposits in the peritoneal cavity. Survival of early stages is high, yet, survival of advanced stage disease is low with a five year survival

  14. Recall in older cancer patients: measuring memory for medical information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Weert, J. van; Meulen, N. van der; Dulmen, S. van; Heeren, Th.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients’ recall of information after

  15. Optimizing treatment of low risk breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, F.

    2017-01-01

    Standard of care for most women with early stage breast cancer is nowadays breast conserving therapy, which consists of a wide local excision of the tumor followed by adjuvant radiotherapy to the breast. This standard approach for the treatment of all breast cancer patients is under debate

  16. An Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Occurrence of organ dysfunction is a common phenomenon in the cancer unit and hepatic dysfunction in the cancer unit has a significant impact on patient outcomes and represents a substantial health-care burden, which requires consideration of hepatic function and probable or proven site of chemotherapy.[1] The ...

  17. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference: individualized therapy and patient factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGee, J.; Bookman, M.; Harter, P.; Marth, C.; McNeish, I.; Moore, K.N.; Poveda, A.; Hilpert, F.; Hasegawa, K.; Bacon, M.; Gatsonis, C.; Kridelka, F.; Berek, J.; Ottevanger, N.; Levy, T.; Silverberg, S.; Kim, B.G.; Hirte, H.; Okamoto, A.; Stuart, G.; Ochiai, K.

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript reports the consensus statements regarding the design and conduct of clinical trials in patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), following deliberation at the Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (OCCC), held in Tokyo in November 2015. Three

  18. Clinical significance of adiponectin expression in colon cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Canhoroz

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Adiponectin, which is secreted by adipose tissue, may have a role in the development and progression of cancer via its pro-apoptotic and/or anti-proliferative effects. Adiponectin expression in tumor tissues is likely to have a negative effect on disease - free survival in patients with stage II/III colon cancer; however, no statistically significant effect was demonstrated.

  19. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJpma, I; Renken, R J; Ter Horst, G J; Reyners, A K L

    2015-02-01

    Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic taste in chemotherapy treated cancer patients. Literature search for metallic taste and chemotherapy was performed in PubMed up to September 2014, resulting in 184 articles of which 13 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria: English publications addressing metallic taste in cancer patients treated with FDA-approved chemotherapy. An additional search in Google Scholar, in related articles of both search engines, and subsequent in the reference lists, resulted in 13 additional articles included in this review. Cancer patient forums were visited to explore management strategies. Prevalence of metallic taste ranged from 9.7% to 78% among patients with various cancers, chemotherapy treatments, and treatment phases. No studies have been performed to investigate the influence of metallic taste on dietary intake, body weight, and quality of life. Several management strategies can be recommended for cancer patients: using plastic utensils, eating cold or frozen foods, adding strong herbs, spices, sweetener or acid to foods, eating sweet and sour foods, using 'miracle fruit' supplements, and rinsing with chelating agents. Although metallic taste is a frequent side effect of chemotherapy and a much discussed topic on cancer patient forums, literature regarding metallic taste among chemotherapy treated cancer patients is scarce. More awareness for this side effect can improve the support for these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of combined hospice care on terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Song-Seng; Rau, Kung-Ming; Huang, Chih-Fang

    2011-06-01

    Many patients with advanced cancer will develop physical and psychological symptoms related to their disease. These symptoms are infrequently treated by conventional care. Palliative care programs have been developed to fill this gap in care. However, there are limited beds in hospice units. To allow more terminal cancer patients to receive care from a hospice team, a combined hospice care system was recently developed in Taiwan. This study is a report of our experiences with this system. From January to December 2009, terminal cancer patients who accepted consultation from a hospice team for combined hospice care were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, clinical symptoms, referring department, type of cancer, and outcome were analyzed. A total of 354 terminal cancer patients in acute wards were referred to a hospice consulting team. The mean patient age was 61 years, and the proportion of males was 63.28%. After combined hospice care, there was a significant improvement in the sign rate of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders from 41.53% to 71.47% (p care also enabled 64.21% of terminal cancer patients who were not transferred to hospice ward to receive combined care by a hospice consulting team while in acute wards, thus increasing the hospice utilization of terminal cancer patients. The major symptoms presented by the patients were pain (58%), dyspnea (52%), constipation (45%), and fatigue (23%). Through the hospice consulting system, hospice combined care has a positive effect on the utilization of hospice care, rate of DNR signing and quality of end-of-life care for terminal cancer patients.

  1. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwi-joong Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain.

  2. Clinical outcome of urachal cancer in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Yuasa, Takeshi; Uehara, Sho; Inoue, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Masuda, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Fukui, Iwao; Yonese, Junji

    2016-02-01

    The outcome of treatment of Japanese patients with urachal cancer is not well known. The purpose of this study is to clarify the characteristics and outcomes of Japanese patients with urachal cancer. The medical records of patients with urachal cancer who were treated in our hospital between 1994 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed and statistically analyzed. We found 28 patients who had been diagnosed with urachal cancer and treated in our hospital during the study period. The median age of these patients was 52.3 years [interquartile range (IQR), 46.0-56.8 years]. Seventeen patients underwent surgery in our department. The median observation period of these patients was 42.6 months (IQR, 21.1-49.7 months). Among patients who had undergone surgery, cancer recurred in 7 (41 %). The estimated median time from surgery to recurrence and overall survival (OS) period were 35.8 months [95 % confidence interval (CI), 7.7 months-not determined] and not reached, respectively. Seventeen patients received chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The estimated median OS time from initial metastasis was 23.5 months (95 % CI, 11.8-33.3 months). Urachal cancer is usually locally advanced at presentation and it has a high risk of distant metastases. However, long-term survival following surgical treatment occurs in a significant fraction of patients. This study indicates the current treatment results for patients with urachal cancer in Japanese clinical practice. To establish a standard operation method and chemotherapy, a multicenter, prospective study is needed in a larger population in the future.

  3. Evidence-based nutritional support of the elderly cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    The papers included in this section represent the effort of the Task Force on Nutrition of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology to synthetize the evidence-based concepts on nutritional support of the elderly cancer patients. In the attempt of presenting a comprehensive overview of the topic, the panel included experts from different specialties: basic researchers, nutritionists, geriatricians, nurses, dieticians, gastroenterologists, oncologists. Cancer in elderly people is a growing problem. Not only in almost every country, the proportion of people aged over 60 years is growing faster than any other age group, but cancer per se is also a disease of old adult-elderly people, hence the oncologists face an increasing number of these patients both now and in the next years. The are several studies on nutrition of elderly subjects and many other on nutrition of cancer patients but relatively few specifically devoted to the nutritional support of the elderly cancer patients. However, the awareness that elderly subjects account for a high proportion of the mixed cancer patients population, in some way legitimates us to extend some conclusions of the literature also to the elderly cancer patients. Although the topics of this Experts' Consensus have been written by specialists in different areas of nutrition, the final message is addressed to the oncologists. Not only they should be more directly involved in the simplest steps of the nutritional care (recognition of the potential existence of a "nutritional risk" which can compromise the planned oncologic program, use of some oral supplements, etc.) but, as the true experts of the natural history of their cancer patient, they should also coordinate the process of the nutritional support, integrating this approach in the overall multidisciplinary cancer care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Altered Sphingolipid Metabolism in Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd E. Fox

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although numerous genetic mutations and amplifications have been identified in pancreatic cancer, much of the molecular pathogenesis of the disease remains undefined. While proteomic and transcriptomic analyses have been utilized to probe and characterize pancreatic tumors, lipidomic analyses have not been applied to identify perturbations in pancreatic cancer patient samples. Thus, we utilized a mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach, focused towards the sphingolipid class of lipids, to quantify changes in human pancreatic cancer tumor and plasma specimens. Subgroup analysis revealed that patients with positive lymph node metastasis have a markedly higher level of ceramide species (C16:0 and C24:1 in their tumor specimens compared to pancreatic cancer patients without nodal disease or to patients with pancreatitis. Also of interest, ceramide metabolites, including phosphorylated (sphingosine- and sphinganine-1-phosphate and glycosylated (cerebroside species were elevated in the plasma, but not the pancreas, of pancreatic cancer patients with nodal disease. Analysis of plasma level of cytokine and growth factors revealed that IL-6, IL-8, CCL11 (eotaxin, EGF and IP10 (interferon inducible protein 10, CXCL10 were elevated in patients with positive lymph nodes metastasis, but that only IP10 and EGF directly correlated with several sphingolipid changes. Taken together, these data indicate that sphingolipid metabolism is altered in human pancreatic cancer and associated with advanced disease. Assessing plasma and/or tissue sphingolipids could potentially risk stratify patients in the clinical setting.

  5. Cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Dorothea; Tjaden, Christine; Hackert, Thilo; Schneider, Lutz; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Steindorf, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience reduced physical fitness due to the disease itself as well as treatment-related side effects. However, studies on physical fitness in pancreatic cancer patients are missing. Therefore, we assessed cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength of pancreatic cancer patients. We included 65 pancreatic cancer patients, mostly after surgical resection. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and 6-min walk test (6MWT). Hand-held dynamometry was used to evaluate isometric muscle strength. Physical fitness values were compared to reference values of a healthy population. Associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables with patients' physical fitness were analyzed using multiple regression models. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak, 20.5 ± 6.9 ml/min/kg) was significantly lower (-24%) compared to healthy reference values. In the 6MWT pancreatic cancer patients nearly reached predicted values (555 vs. 562 m). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the upper (-4.3%) and lower extremities (-13.8%) were significantly lower compared to reference values. Overall differences were larger in men than those in women. Participating in regular exercise in the year before diagnosis was associated with greater VO2peak (p fitness with regard to both cardiorespiratory function and isometric muscle strength, already in the early treatment phase (median 95 days after surgical resection). Our findings underline the need to investigate exercise training in pancreatic cancer patients to counteract the loss of physical fitness.

  6. Cancer patient preferences for quality and length of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Egleston, Brian L; Buzaglo, Joanne S; Benson, Al B; Cegala, Donald J; Diefenbach, Michael A; Fleisher, Linda; Miller, Suzanne M; Sulmasy, Daniel P; Weinfurt, Kevin P

    2008-12-15

    Optimal patient decision making requires integration of patient values, goals, and preferences with information received from the physician. In the case of a life-threatening illness such as cancer, the weights placed on quality of life (QOL) and length of life (LOL) represent critical values. The objective of the current study was to describe cancer patient values regarding QOL and LOL and explore associations with communication preferences. Patients with advanced cancer completed a computer-based survey before the initial consultation with a medical oncologist. Assessments included sociodemographics, physical and mental health state, values regarding quality and length of life, communication preferences, and cancer-related distress. Among 459 patients with advanced cancer, 55% placed equal valued on QOL and LOL, 27% preferred QOL, and 18% preferred LOL. Patients with a QOL preference had lower levels of cancer-related distress (P style from their oncologists. These data indicate that a values preference for LOL versus QOL may be simply measured, and is associated with wishes regarding the nature of oncologist communication. Awareness of these values during the clinical encounter could improve decision making by influencing the style and content of the communication between oncologists and their patients.

  7. Cancer-related false knowledge in relatives of cancer patients and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhal, N S; Dane, F; Ulus, C; Sari, S; Senturk, N; Bingol, D

    2010-01-01

    Although there are many myths about cancer in Turkey, there is no study evaluating Turkish public's knowledge about cancer. The goals of our research were to: 1) measure the extent of knowledge of cancer among the Turkish public; 2) determine the differences in extent of cancer-related knowledge between participants who have relatives with cancer and those who do not; and 3) determine the sources of knowledge possessed. Data were obtained from a total of 415 participants (244 female, 171 male), all of them sitting at the Marmara University Faculty of Medicine Hospital (MUFMH) outpatient clinic waiting area for non-cancer-related reasons. Each participant completed a 3-part questionnaire. Appropriate statistical tests were used for comparison. The mean age was 41 years. Of 415 participants, 65.3% stated that they had one or more cancer patient in their immediate family; 70.1% of the participants had a high-school education or greater. The questionnaire showed that, depending on the question, anywhere from 1.7% to 88.5% of the general public possesses some false information; furthermore, the difference in accuracy between relatives of cancer patients and non-relatives was marginal. Only 3 specific questions, related to the following ideas, rendered answers that were statistically significantly different between these 2 groups: breast cancer is only seen in females (p knowledge about cancer was unacceptably high in our cohort. Broader efforts should be made to inform the Turkish public about cancer.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage in Cancer Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) methods and clinical characteristics in cancer patients in southeast of Turkey. A total of 324 patients (173 female) were enrolled to this study. Questionnaire was applied to all patients individually for approximately 15 ...

  9. Hematological issues in critically ill patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Karen S; DeSancho, Maria T

    2010-01-01

    Patients with solid and hematologic malignancies presenting with major bleeding or thrombotic complications, potentially life-ending events in a cancer patient's clinical course, usually require admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), making their diagnosis and management even more important for the intensivist. Given the significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of almost all types of cancers in recent years, the intensivist is likely to encounter an ever-increasing number of cancer patients in the ICU setting with these complications. Abnormal hemostasis can occur as a consequence of both the pathology and treatment of cancer. Because cancer can have multiple effects on hemostatic equilibrium, treatment of these complications can be more complex than in the general population. This article reviews the physiology of coagulation and fibrinolysis, with special attention to those aspects that are most frequently altered in the setting of malignancy. The pathophysiology of bleeding and thrombotic complications specific to critically ill cancer patients are then detailed, and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on new cancer medications that have an effect on hemostasis, and on novel clotting and anticoagulant agents that are available to the intensivist for the management of these patients.

  10. Survival of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002–2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany. PMID:23349710

  11. [Investigating Demodex folliculorum in patients with urological cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ozlem Aycan; Inci, Melek; Yula, Erkan; Gökçe, Hasan; Rifaioğlu, M Murat; Demirtaş, Onur; Yengil, Erhan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine frequency of Demodex folliculorum infestation in patients with urological cancers. This study evaluated 49 patients with urological cancers; 31 sex-matched healthy individuals as a control group were included in the study between March 2011 and April 2012 at the Hospital of Mustafa Kemal University, School of Medicine, Urology Clinic. The demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Samples from the perineal region of the subjects were taken by standard method of superficial skin biopsy and evaluated by microscopy. Presence of five or more Demodex sp. in a cm 2 was considered as positive. Mean age was found to be 60.2±18.6 years. D. folliculorum was found to be positive in 11 (22.4%) of the patients with cancer and in 1 (3.2%) of the subjects in the control group. It was found that D. folliculorum frequency was significantly higher in the cancer group compared to the control group. No significant difference was found among the cancer groups in terms of D. folliculorum detection. In the cancer group, mean age was significantly higher in D. folliculorum positive patients than negative ones. It should be kept in mind that D. folliculorum incidence may increase in immunosuppressive states, such as cancer.

  12. Dietary changes among breast cancer patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaharudin, Soraya Hanie; Sulaiman, Suhaina; Shahril, Mohd Razif; Emran, Nor Aina; Akmal, Sharifah Noor

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer patients often show an interest in making dietary changes after diagnosis of breast cancer to improve their health condition and prevent cancer recurrence. The objective of the study was to determine changes in dietary intake 2 years after diagnosis among breast cancer patients. One hundred sixteen subjects were asked to complete a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, diet recalls, and dietary changes questionnaire to assess dietary intake before and after diagnosis. The information on sociodemographic background, cancer treatment history, and anthropometric indices was also collected. Seventy-two subjects considered diet as a contributing factor to breast cancer, and 67 subjects changed their dietary habits after breast cancer diagnosis. The reasons for changes in diet were physician and dietitian advice and desire to cure cancer. The sources of information were derived from their physician, mass media, and family members. Total energy, protein, total fat, fatty acids, and vitamin E intake were significantly decreased after diagnosis. Meanwhile, the intake of β-carotene and vitamin C increased significantly after diagnosis. The changes included reduction in red meat, seafood, noodles, and poultry intake. An increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, fish, low-fat milk, and soy products was observed. The subjects tended to lower high-fat foods intake and started to eat more fruits and vegetables. Breast cancer patients had changed to a healthier diet after breast cancer diagnosis, although the changes made were small. This will be helpful to dietitians in providing a better understanding of good eating habits that will maintain patients' health after breast cancer diagnosis.

  13. The influence of cancer impact on patients' preparatory grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilika, Eleni; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Galanos, Antonis; Sakkas, Pavlos; Vlahos, Lambros

    2009-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the preparatory grief and traumatic distress in advanced cancer patients in a palliative care unit. A total of 94 advanced cancer patients completed the Preparatory Grief in Advanced Cancer Patients (PGAC) scale and the Greek version of the Impact of Events Scale- Revised (IES-R-Gr). The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group was used to measure patients' performance status. Statistically significant associations were found between PGAC, patients' performance status, and all the IES-R-Gr scales (avoidance, intrusion, hyperarousal) and IES-R-Gr total score. The multiple regression analysis revealed that preparatory grief was predicted by patients' young age, poor performance status, as well as by their high levels of intrusion and hyperarousal, in a model explaining 51.5% of the total variance. Concluding, in advanced cancer patients, preparatory grief is significantly correlated with the impact of cancer and patients' physical condition, and seems to be influenced by components of the event impact, patients' age, and physical performance.

  14. Acupuncture as a complementary treatment for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Demet; Uncu, Dogan; Sendur, Mehmet Ali; Koca, Nuran; Zengin, Nurullah

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment for eliminating the side effects of cancer therapy may not always be efficacious. Acupuncture is one of the most widely accepted alternative and complementary therapies in use today. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of acupuncture in patients experiencing cancer treatment side effects, including nausea, vomiting, pain, poor sleep quality and anxiety. A total of 45 inpatients who underwent chemotherapy between February and April 2013 in the Oncology Department of Numune Hospital were included in our study. Acupuncture was administered to the patients one day prior to chemotherapy, on the day of chemotherapy and one day after chemotherapy. The patients were evaluated on nausea, vomiting, pain, sleep quality and anxiety before the chemotherapy and on the 4th day of chemotherapy. Of the 45 patients included in the study, 18 (40%) were female and 27 (60%) were male. A total of 25 (55.6%) had an elementary school education; 32 patients (71%) had stage 4 cancer and were treated with palliative chemotherapy (the patient characteristics are shown in Table 1). Statistically significant decreases (panxiety scores were observed after the acupuncture treatment compared to baseline. There were no differences in the age, gender, education level, stage or metastasis levels between the patient groups whose symptoms improved or were unchanged. Our study showed that acupuncture has positive effects in cancer treatment patients who experience nausea, vomiting, pain, poor sleep quality and anxiety as side effects of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-related side effects in cancer patients could be decreased by the concurrent use of acupuncture.

  15. Preventing Fatigue in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marrow, Gary

    2001-01-01

    ... or alleviate the development of treatment-induced fatigue. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 124 breast cancer patients who were studied for up to four successive chemotherapy treatments...

  16. Treatment Costs Can Be Another Blow to Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Costs Can Be Another Blow to Cancer Patients Obamacare has improved access to therapies, but finances are ... under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, expenses such as deductibles, co-pays and co- ...

  17. Hot Flashes and Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, Linda A

    2005-01-01

    This ongoing longitudinal study examines hot flashes and Quality of Life (QoL) in breast cancer (BC) patients undergoing initial treatment, and develops a taxonomy of the medical and Complementary and Alternative Medicine...

  18. A review of patients with advanced cervical cancer presenting to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , which has the highest rate of this disease in the world. Most cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage . Aim To describe the symptom burden, palliative care interventions, and outcomes of cervical cancer patients who entered care at ...

  19. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, I.; Renken, R. J.; ter Horst, G. J.; Reyners, A. K. L.

    Background: Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic

  20. Perioperative Rehabilitation in Operable Lung Cancer Patients (PROLUCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Maja S; Trier, Karen; Vibe-Petersen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical resection in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be associated with significant morbidity, functional limitations, and decreased quality of life. Objectives: The safety and feasibility of a preoperative and early postoperative rehabilitation program...

  1. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence B

    2005-01-01

    To determine the incidence, dose/time-dependence, and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  2. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence dose/time-dependence and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  3. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    To determine the incidence, dose/time-dependence, and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  4. Herbal preparation use by patients suffering from cancer in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Jamous, Rania M

    2011-11-01

    This study sought to describe type, frequency, purpose and patterns of herbal medicine used by a sample of patients with cancer in Palestine. A cross-sectional survey of patients attending the outpatient cancer departments at the Governmental Hospitals was undertaken using semi-structured questionnaires. A total of 1260 patients with cancer were interviewed. Of the participants, 60.9% (n = 767) reported using herbs primarily bought from Palestine (92.3%) frequently employed in the form of decoctions (43%). The most common herbal product was Arum palaestinum (22.5%). Most Complementary and Alternative (CAM) users were more than 40 years of age, predominantly female, and living in rural areas of Palestine. Family member's recommendation was cited as the main factor prompting participants to use CAM (43.5%). This study revealed that there is an appreciable prevalence of herbal use among patients with cancer in Palestine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  6. Drug Extends Lives of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer: Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extends Lives of Patients With Advanced Prostate Cancer: Studies Findings could 'change clinical practice overnight,' leading oncologist ... when added to standard androgen deprivation therapy, both studies found. Abiraterone also appeared to more than double ...

  7. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  8. QUALITY OF LIFE IN MALE CANCER PATIENTS AT KENYATTA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-07-01

    Jul 1, 2004 ... Background: The quality of life of cancer patients is likely to be influenced by psychological ... retardation, insomnia, weight loss, fatigability and depression. Gambling, suicidal ideas ..... Body image changes. 0.79. 1. 33 (26.2).

  9. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  10. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co‐detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  11. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  12. Sleep Quality of Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yajing He; Zhaowei Meng; Qiang Jia; Fang Hu; Xianghui He; Jian Tan; Guizhi Zhang; Xue Li; Jianping Zhang; Qing Zhang; Li Liu; Lili Zhao; Jing Li; Yuling Wang; Yumei Qian

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to measure prevalence of sleep disturbance in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) by calculating Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and compare these data with patients with benign thyroid nodules or normal participants. Methods Three groups of patients participated in this cross-sectional study. In the first group, 162 patients with DTC received total thyroidectomy, and then 131I therapy. The second group consisted of 84 patients with benign thyroid nodul...

  13. Priorities in Fertility Decisions for Reproductive-Aged Cancer Patients: Fertility Attitudes and Cancer Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flink, Dina M; Kondapalli, Laxmi A; Kellar-Guenther, Yvonne

    2017-09-01

    The Fertility Attitudes and Cancer Treatment Study (FACTS) aims at better understanding the reasons and priorities of young adult cancer patients making decisions for fertility preservation (FP). Identifying the factors that center around a patient's fertility decisions will support the development of educational tools for providers and improve clinical care to meet patients' reproductive needs. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted of 27 newly diagnosed male and female cancer patients who had presented for an oncofertility consultation. Interviews lasted ∼30 minutes and were transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis was conducted to explore the factors driving decisions for future fertility. Themes were grouped to address the following topics: reasons for/against FP, patient priorities, informational needs, support, wellness, and satisfaction with information. Strength of the theme was determined by examining the frequency of a response. Patients who chose FP versus those who did not choose FP and men versus women proved to be more similar than different in their reasoning, priorities, and informational needs for FP decisions. Patients who chose FP identified a "concern for future fertility" as a top reason to do so and "parenthood" as a top priority. For those who did not choose FP, "cancer treatment" was identified as their top priority. For patients identifying financial barriers, 50% of them were able to overcome this to pursue FP. Reproductive-aged patients diagnosed with a new cancer should be referred to a reproductive specialist and provided the opportunity to come to a fertility decision on their own before initiating cancer treatment.

  14. Cancer Worry, Perceived Risk and Cancer Screening in First-Degree Relatives of Patients with Familial Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jenny; Hart, Tae L; Aronson, Melyssa; Crangle, Cassandra; Govindarajan, Anand

    2016-06-01

    Currently, there is a lack of evidence evaluating the psychological impact of cancer-related risk perception and worry in individuals at high risk for gastric cancer. We examined the relationships between perceived risk, cancer worry and screening behaviors among first-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with familial gastric cancer. FDRs of patients diagnosed with familial gastric cancer with a non-informative genetic analysis were identified and contacted. Participants completed a telephone interview that assessed socio-demographic information, cancer risk perception, cancer worry, impact of worry on daily functioning, and screening behaviors. Twenty-five FDRs completed the telephone interview. Participants reported high levels of comparative and absolute cancer risk perception, with an average perceived lifetime risk of 54 %. On the other hand, cancer-related worry scores were low, with a significant minority (12 %) experiencing high levels of worry. Study participants exhibited high levels of confidence (median = 70 %) in the effectiveness of screening at detecting a curable cancer. Participants that had undergone screening in the past showed significantly lower levels of cancer-related worry compared to those that had never undergone screening. In conclusion, individuals at high-risk for gastric cancer perceived a very high personal risk of cancer, but reported low levels of cancer worry. This paradoxical result may be attributed to participants' high levels of confidence in the effectiveness of screening. These findings highlight the importance for clinicians to discuss realistic risk appraisals and expectations towards screening with unaffected members of families at risk for gastric cancer, in an effort to help mitigate anxiety and help with coping.

  15. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; De Paoli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of their own health conditions in particular. The National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Organization of European Cancer Institutes encourage comprehensive cancer centers in providing educational programs conceived to overcome these gaps. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe the key elements necessary to develop a global patient education program and provide recommendations for strategies with practical examples for implementation in the daily activities of cancer institutes. A multidisciplinary committee was established for patient education, including patient representatives as equal partners, to define, implement, verify, and evaluate the fundamental steps for establishing a comprehensive education program. Six essential topics were identified for the program: appropriate communication of cancer epidemiology, clinical trial information, new therapeutic technologies, support in the use of medicines, psycho-oncological interventions, age-personalized approaches, and training programs for healthcare providers. Integration of these topics along with patient feedback is the key to a successful model for educational programs. An integrated educational program can transform a comprehensive cancer center to an institution that provides research and care for and with patients.

  16. Physical exercise : effects in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Physical exercise plays an important role in cancer prevention as well as in the prevention and treatment of cancer related fatigue during and after treatment. Some of these effects are presented in the thesis of M.J. Velthuis. In Part I effects of physical exercise on anthropometric measurements

  17. Management of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, Silke; Attard, Gerhardt; Beer, Tomasz M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In advanced prostate cancer (APC), successful drug development as well as advances in imaging and molecular characterisation have resulted in multiple areas where there is lack of evidence or low level of evidence. The Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2017 address...

  18. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant...

  19. Depression in cancer patients: Pathogenesis, implications and treatment (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hamish R

    2015-04-01

    Depression is a common comorbidity in cancer cases, affecting >10% of patients. A cancer diagnosis is life-changing, and is a source of considerable psychological and emotional stress. Non-pathological sadness may be a normal response to a cancer diagnosis, however, stress beyond the coping mechanisms of patients may result in major depressive disorder. The current review, in addition to the obvious psychosocial elements of depression, explores its biological mechanisms, including tissue damage, inflammatory mediators and the chronic stress response, and how these immune and endocrine pathways may underlie depression in cancer. Possible iatrogenic causes of depression in cancer are also explored. There is a strong need to identify and treat depression in cancer patients in order to increase quality of life and reduce mortality. The most popular clinical and potential future biochemical screening tools for depression in cancer are briefly discussed. The interventions used will vary for every patient, but may include psychosocial therapies or pharmacotherapy; however, a paucity of research on the most effective management of depression in cancer means the optimal combination of therapies is unknown. Selection of antidepressants should be carefully considered, given the common side effects of chemotherapy (such as nausea), and the necessity to avoid serious interactions, including reducing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs. The possible link between the chronic stress response, which may predispose patients to depression, and the risk of mortality from cancer is also explored. The complex interactions between the endocrine, nervous and immune systems, which continue to be elucidated, may offer the opportunity for the development of more rapid and efficacious treatments for depression in cancer in the future.

  20. Searching for new biomarkers in ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentze, Julie L.; Høgdall, Claus; Kjær, Susanne K.

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a silent killer and, due to late diagnosis, the primary cause of death amongst gynecological cancers, killing approximately 376 women annually in Denmark. The discovery of a specific and sensitive biomarker for ovarian cancer could improve early diagnosis, but also treatment...... regarding biomarkers and/or prognostic markers, with a focus on rationale and design. The study described has 3 major branches: microRNAs, epigenetics and Next Generation Sequencing. Tissue and blood from ovarian cancer patients, already enrolled in the prospective ongoing pelvic mass cohort...

  1. Perioperative fasting time among cancer patients submitted to gastrointestinal surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Nayara de Castro Pereira; Ruth Natalia Teresa Turrini; Vanessa de Brito Poveda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the length of perioperative fasting among patients submitted to gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. METHOD Retrospective cohort study, developed by consulting the medical records of 128 patients submitted to gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. RESULTS The mean of total length of fasting was 107.6 hours. The total length of fasting was significantly associated with the number of symptoms presented before (p=0.000) and after the surgery (p=0.007), the length of h...

  2. Overprotective caregivers of elderly cancer patients: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Umberto; Brunello, Antonella; Magro, Cristina; Favaretto, Adolfo; Monfardini, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    The essential role of the caregiver in the management of elderly cancer patients is still poorly documented. This case report concerns a woman with metastatic lung carcinoma who was sincerely informed and successfully treated with chemotherapy and gefitinib only after gaining the trust of her overprotective daughter. Devoting time to the relatives represents a key element to create a communicative and efficient relationship with older cancer patients.

  3. Variation in symptom distress in underserved Chinese American cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Lara K; Lam, Kin; Cheung, William; Shao, Theresa; Li, Zujun; Van de Maele, Sandra; Chang, Victor T; Chen, Jack; Ye, Huiyan; Wong, Rhoda; Lam, Wan Ling; Chan, Selina; Bookbinder, Marilyn; Dieckmann, Nathan F; Portenoy, Russell

    2015-09-15

    Cancer is prevalent in the rapidly growing Chinese American community, yet little is known about the symptom experience to guide comprehensive treatment planning. This study evaluated symptom prevalence and patient subgroups with symptom distress in a large sample of Chinese American cancer patients. Patients were consecutively recruited from 4 oncology practices, and they completed a translated cancer symptom scale. Latent class cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups of patients with distinct symptom distress profiles. There were 1436 patients screened; 94.4% were non-English-speaking, and 45.1% were undergoing cancer therapy. The cancers included breast (32.6%), lung (14.8%), head and neck (12.5%), and hematologic cancer (10.1%). Overall, 1289 patients (89.8%) had 1 or more symptoms, and 1129 (78.6%) had 2 or more. The most prevalent symptoms were a lack of energy (57.0%), dry mouth (55.6%), feeling sad (49.3%), worrying (47.5%), and difficulty sleeping (46.8%). Symptoms causing "quite a bit" or "very much" distress included difficulty sleeping (37.9%), a lack of appetite (37.2%), feeling nervous (35.8%), pain (35.2%), and worrying (34.0%). Four patient subgroups were identified according to the probability of reporting moderate to high symptom distress: very low physical and psychological symptom distress (49.5%), low physical symptom distress and moderate psychological symptom distress (25.2%), moderate physical and psychological symptom distress (17.4%), and high physical and psychological symptom distress (7.8%). Symptom prevalence is high in community-dwelling Chinese American cancer patients, and nearly half experience severe distress (rated as "quite a bit" or "very much" distressing) from physical symptoms, psychological symptoms, or both. These data have important implications for the development of effective symptom control interventions. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  4. Suffering Among the Families of Cancer Patients : Conceptual Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Seyama, Ruka; Kanda, Kiyoko

    2008-01-01

    We clarified the construct of the suffering among the families of cancer patients based on domestic and overseas studies that had been announced up to now as original article. Referencing Walker’s concept analysis, we extracted the concept of suffering by looking at the general uses of the word “suffering”, suffering as viewed in psychology and studies on the suffering of families of cancer patients. We found that such, suffering consisted of two constructs unpleasant psychological pain and u...

  5. Helping patients and their family caregivers cope with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Laurel L

    2012-09-01

    Family caregivers face multiple demands as they care for their loved ones with cancer, and these demands have increased dramatically in recent years. Patients with cancer now receive toxic treatments in outpatient settings and return home to the care of their family members. Some patients receive in-home infusions, which were unheard of a few years ago. Family caregivers provide tasks that were previously provided by nurses; however, caregivers lack the educational preparation that nurses receive.

  6. Satisfaction with information provided to Danish cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2013-01-01

    To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction.......To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction....

  7. Multiple neoplasms among cervical cancer patients in the material of the lower Silesian cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmajłowicz, Barbara; Kornafel, Jan; Błaszczyk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    According to the definition by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), primary multiple neoplasms are two or more neoplasms of different histopathological build in one organ, or two or more tumors occurring in one patient, regardless of the time of their occurrence (synchronic - up to 6 months, metachronous - after 6 months), coming from an organ or a tissue and not being an infiltration from another neoplasm, a relapse or a metastasis. It was the aim of the study to analyze the frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasms among patients suffering from uterine cervix cancer, with a special interest in coexistent neoplasms, the time of their occurrence and total 5-year survivals. The data from the Lower Silesian Cancer Registry concerning the years 1984-2009 formed the material of the present study. 5.3% of all cervix neoplasms occurred as multiple cancers. Cervix neoplasms were 13.4% of multiple neoplasms. On average, cervical cancer occurred as a subsequent cancer in 6 patients yearly (60.7% of the occurrences of cervical cancer were in the period of 5 years following treatment for the first neoplasm). 5-year survival in patients suffering from primarily multiple cervix neoplasms constituted 57% and was convergent with the results for all patients suffering from cervical cancer. Cervical cancer as the first neoplasm occurred in 287 patients, on average in 11 patients annually. In the period of the first 5 years after the treatment of cervical cancer, there were 42.8% occurrences of other cancers. Cervical neoplasms most frequently coexisted with cancers of the breast, lung and large intestine. The frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasm among cervical cancer patients is increasing. Most frequently they coexist with other tobacco-related neoplasms, those related to HPV infections and with secondary post-radiation neoplasms. These facts should be taken into consideration during post-treatment observation and when directing diagnostic

  8. Applying a coping with stress questionnaire for cancer patients to patients with non-cancer chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orive, Miren; Quintana, Jose M; Vrotsou, Kalliopi; Las Hayas, Carlota; Bilbao, Amaia; Barrio, Irantzu; Matellanes, Begoña; Padierna, Jesús A

    2013-06-01

    One of the few instruments to evaluate coping skills among patients with chronic illnesses is the Cuestionario de Afrontamiento al Estrés para Pacientes Oncológicos (CAEPO), created initially for cancer patients. We evaluate how well CAEPO applies to patients with non-cancer chronic illnesses. A total of 344 patients (115 with chronic hepatitis C, 120 with inflammatory bowel disease and 109 with recurrent vertigo) completed the CAEPO. Exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha provide only partial support for the seven factors suggested by the original CAEPO. A streamlined version with fewer dimensions and items may be a better solution for identifying coping strategies among these patients.

  9. Tobacco Cessation May Improve Lung Cancer Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson Amato, Katharine A; Hyland, Andrew; Reed, Robert; Mahoney, Martin C; Marshall, James; Giovino, Gary; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Zevon, Michael A; Cummings, K Michael; Nwogu, Chukwumere; Singh, Anurag K; Chen, Hongbin; Warren, Graham W; Reid, Mary

    2015-07-01

    This study characterizes tobacco cessation patterns and the association of cessation with survival among lung cancer patients at Roswell Park Cancer Institute: an NCI Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. Lung cancer patients presenting at this institution were screened with a standardized tobacco assessment, and those who had used tobacco within the past 30 days were automatically referred to a telephone-based cessation service. Demographic, clinical information, and self-reported tobacco use at last contact were obtained via electronic medical records and the Roswell Park Cancer Institute tumor registry for all lung cancer patients referred to the service between October 2010 and October 2012. Descriptive statistics and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess whether tobacco cessation and other factors were associated with lung cancer survival through May 2014. Calls were attempted to 313 of 388 lung cancer patients referred to the cessation service. Eighty percent of patients (250 of 313) were successfully contacted and participated in at least one telephone-based cessation call; 40.8% (102 of 250) of persons contacted reported having quit at the last contact. After controlling for age, pack year history, sex, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, time between diagnosis and last contact, tumor histology, and clinical stage, a statistically significant increase in survival was associated with quitting compared with continued tobacco use at last contact (HR = 1.79; 95% confidence interval: 1.14-2.82) with a median 9 month improvement in overall survival. Tobacco cessation among lung cancer patients after diagnosis may increase overall survival.

  10. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1-9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels.

  11. Unique perception of clinical trials by Korean cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su Jin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past few years, the number of clinical trials has increased rapidly in East Asia, especially for gastric and hepatobiliary cancer that are prevalent in Asian populations. However, the actual degree of understanding or perceptions of clinical trials by cancer patients in East Asian countries have seldom been studied. Methods Between July 1st and November 30th of 2011, we conducted a prospective study to survey cancer patients regarding their awareness of, and willingness to participate in, a clinical trial. Patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary cancer who visited the Hematology-Oncology outpatient clinic at Samsung Medical Center (SMC were enrolled. A total of 21 questions were asked including four questions which used the Visual analogue scale (VAS score. Results In this survey study, 1,000 patients were asked to participate and 675 patients consented to participate (67.5%. The awareness of clinical trials was substantially higher in patients who had a higher level of education (pp=0.004, and had a higher economic status (p=0.001. However, the willingness to participate in a clinical trial was not affected by the level of education or economic status of patients. The most influential factors for patient willingness to participate were a physician recommendation (n=181, 26.8%, limited treatment options (n=178, 26.4%, and expectations of effectiveness of new anti-cancer drugs (n=142, 21.0%. Patients with previous experience in clinical trials had a greater willingness to participate in clinical trials compared to patients without previous experience (p Conclusions This large patient cohort survey study showed that Korean cancer patients are more aware of clinical trials, but awareness did not translate into willingness to participate.

  12. Screening patients with a family history of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Robert H; Lobb, Rebecca; Bauer, Mark R; Kemp, James Alan; Palmer, Richard C; Kleinman, Ken P; Miroshnik, Irina; Emmons, Karen M

    2007-04-01

    To compare screening practices and beliefs in patients with and without a clinically important family history. We mailed a brief questionnaire asking about family history and a second, longer survey asking about knowledge of and beliefs about colorectal cancer to all respondents with a family history and a random sample of respondents without a family history of colorectal cancer. We reviewed electronic medical records for screening examinations and recording of family history. One thousand eight hundred seventy of 6,807 randomly selected patients ages 35-55 years who had been continuously enrolled in a large multispecialty group practice for at least 5 years. Recognition of increased risk, screening practices, and beliefs-all according to strength of family history and patient's age. Nineteen percent of respondents reported a family history of colorectal cancer. In 11%, this history was strong enough to warrant screening before age 50 years. However, only 39% (95% CI 36, 42) of respondents under the age of 50 years said they had been asked about family history and only 45% of those with a strong family history of colorectal cancer had been screened appropriately. Forty-six percent of patients with a strong family history did not know that they should be screened at a younger age than average risk people. Medical records mentioned family history of colorectal cancer in 59% of patients reporting a family history. More efforts are needed to translate information about family history of colorectal cancer into the care of patients.

  13. Exploring Positive Survivorship Experiences of Indigenous Australian Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst Indigenous Australians, “cancer” has negative connotations that detrimentally impact upon access to cancer care services. Barriers to accessing cancer services amongst Indigenous Australians are widely reported. In contrast, factors that facilitate this cohort to successfully navigate cancer care services (“enablers” are scarcely reported in the literature. Through qualitative interviews, this article examines factors that assist Indigenous Australians to have positive cancer experiences. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve adult Indigenous oncology patients recruited from a tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia during 2012–2014. Data generated from the interviews were independently reviewed by two researchers via inductive thematic analytical processes. Discussions followed by consensus on the major categories allowed conclusions to be drawn on potential enablers. Two major categories of enablers were identified by the researchers: resilience and communication. Individual’s intrinsic strength, their coping strategies, and receipt of support improved participant’s resilience and consequently supported a positive experience. Communication methods and an effective patient-provider relationship facilitated positive experiences for participants. Despite potential barriers to access of care for Indigenous cancer patients, participants in the study demonstrated that it was still possible to focus on the positive aspects of their cancer experiences. Many participants explained how cancer changed their outlook on life, often for the better, with many feeling empowered as they progressed through their cancer diagnosis and treatment processes.

  14. Transcript expression in endometrial cancers from Black and White patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, G Larry; Allard, Jay; Gadisetti, Chandramouli V R; Litzi, Tracy; Casablanca, Yovanni; Chandran, Uma; Darcy, Kathleen M; Levine, Douglas A; Berchuck, Andrew; Hamilton, Chad A; Conrads, Thomas P; Risinger, John I

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies suggest that differences in molecular features of endometrial cancers between racial groups may contribute to the poorer survival in Blacks. The objective of this investigation was to determine whether gene expression among endometrial cancers is different between Blacks and Whites. Fresh frozen tumors from 25 Black patients were matched by stage, grade, and histology to endometrial cancer specimens from 25 White patients. Each case was macrodissected to produce specimens possessing a minimum of 75% cancer cellularity. A subset of 10 matched pairs was also prepared using laser microdissection (LMD) to produce specimens possessing a minimum of 95% cancer cells. Total RNA isolated from each sample was analyzed using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Data were analyzed using principal component analysis and binary class comparison analyses. Unsupervised analysis of the 50 endometrial cancers failed to identify global gene expression profiles unique to Black or White patients. In a subset analysis of 10 matched pairs from Blacks and Whites prepared using LMD and macrodissection, unsupervised analysis did not reveal a unique gene expression profile associated with race in either set, but associations were identified that relate to sample preparation technique, histology and stage. Our microarray data revealed no global gene expression differences and identified few individual gene differences between endometrial cancers from Blacks and Whites. More comprehensive methods of transcriptome analysis could uncover RNAs that may underpin the disparity of outcome or prevalence of endometrial cancers in Blacks and Whites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hormonal treatment of obstructed kidneys in patients with prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Rolff, H

    1993-01-01

    A review of 1288 patients with previously untreated prostatic cancer revealed 209 patients (16%) with ureteric obstruction; the obstruction was bilateral in 36%. The effect of hormonal treatment was assessed in 88 patients with 120 obstructed kidneys: 77 patients had androgen deprivation...... or hormonal medication alone and 11 patients needed percutaneous nephrostomy or ureteric catheters in addition. Drainage improved in 58% of the kidneys. The diverting catheter was withdrawn in 9 of the 11 patients after a median of 4 weeks. In all, 95% of patients were discharged. The patients with hormonal...

  16. Racial differences in cancer risk among relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, Jessica L; Coté, Michele L; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Schwartz, Ann G

    2007-05-01

    Relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer are at increased risk for lung cancer, and this risk varies by race. This study evaluates whether first-degree relatives of patients with early onset lung cancer are at increased risk for cancer at sites other than lung. Family histories were ascertained from 673 lung cancer patients < 50 years of age identified from the Metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, and 773 age-, race-, and sex-matched control subjects were obtained via random-digit dialing. Data were collected for 3,556 case relatives (mothers, fathers, and siblings) and 3,943 control relatives, and unconditional logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Among case relatives, African Americans were 2.44-fold more likely to have head and neck cancers and 1.86-fold more likely to have any tobacco-related cancer compared to white case relatives (95% CI, 1.04 to 5.69% and 95% CI, 1.25 to 2.76, respectively). African-American case relatives were at increased risk for head and neck cancers (OR, 13.42; 95% CI, 1.65 to 109.01), all tobacco-related cancers (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.16 to 6.55), tobacco-related cancers other than lung (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.56 to 10.79), and cancer at any site (OR, 1.45, 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.02) compared to African-American control relatives. These results can be used to counsel family members of patients with early onset lung cancer, and suggest target populations for preventive strategies, including smoking cessation and appropriate screening.

  17. Sperm preservation by electroejaculation in adolescent cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, Itai; Toren, Amos; Hourvitz, Ariel; Raviv, Gil; Band, Gili; Baum, Micha; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Inbar, Rotem; Madgar, Igael

    2014-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of cancer survivors who are infertile due to gonadal failure highlights the importance of fertility preservation prior to gonadotoxic treatments. Adolescent cancer patients may not be mature enough to produce sperm by masturbation, leading to the use of alternative methods for obtaining sperm for cryopreservation. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of electroejaculation (EEJ) for cryopreservation among adolescent cancer patients. This retrospective cohort study included 45 adolescent (12-18 years old) cancer patients who underwent EEJ during 2002-2012 in an academic tertiary referral fertility center. Sperm cryopreservation, ejaculate parameters, and procedure complications were evaluated. EEJ was performed without documented complications. Sperm was successfully obtained in 30 (66.7%) patients. Retrieval failures included ejaculates without sperm in 8 patients (17.8%) and no ejaculate in 7 patients (15.5%). Cryopreserved ejaculates were characterized by severe asthenospermia, normal sperm concentration, and low volume. Retrieved sperm group was further divided to 19 motile sperm ejaculates with significantly higher volume, sperm concentration, and total count compared to 10 non-motile sperm patients. EEJ is a safe and feasible procedure for cryopreservation in adolescent cancer patients who are unable to masturbate. The wide diversity of EEJ outcome and ejaculate parameters may represent a continuum of pubertal changes in that population. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cancer risk of patients discharged with acute myocardial infarct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, L; Olsen, J H

    1998-01-01

    We studied whether common shared environmental or behavioral risk factors, other than tobacco smoking, underlie both atherosclerotic diseases and cancer. We identified a group of 96,891 one-year survivors of acute myocardial infarct through the Danish Hospital Discharge Register between 1977...... and 1989. We calculated the incidence of cancer in this group by linking it to the Danish Cancer Registry for the period 1978-1993. There was no consistent excess over the expected figures for any of the categories of cancer not related to tobacco smoking. Specifically, the rates of colorectal cancer...... onset of acute myocardial infarct and for female patients. Overall, there do not seem to be major shared environmental or behavioral risk factors for acute myocardial infarct and cancers, except for smoking, and there seems to be no common inherited susceptibility to the development of these diseases....

  19. Oral complications and management strategies for patients undergoing cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hai Ming

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given.

  20. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  1. Current practices in fertility preservation in male cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Charles Osterberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of a cancer diagnosis in children and young adolescents is increasing. With better treatments, the number of young cancer survivors living through reproductive age is increasing. Fertility preservation of these men and women has become essential and needs to be discussed prior to the start of cancer treatment. Here we review the current guidelines for male oncofertility patients and highlight some of the important gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. Options for fertility preservation are also discussed along with resources that should be made available to all patients.

  2. Can we predict toxicity and efficacy in older patients with cancer? Older patients with colorectal cancer as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine Brændegaard; Jørgensen, Trine Lembrecht; Pfeiffer, Per

    2016-01-01

    As older and frail patients are under-represented in clinical trials, most of the evidence available on treatment of older metastatic colorectal patients with cancer originates from pooled analyses of the older patients included in large prospective clinical trials and from community-based studie...

  3. The impact of weight loss on patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Danilo Macasa; Jarrett, Patricia

    Weight loss due to cachexia is a common symptom in patients with advanced cancer and often affects their quality of life. This article outlines a literature review conducted to better understand the effects of weight loss on patients with cancer. Five themes were identified that encompassed patients' experiences, including personal response, physical effects, emotions and moods, changes in eating habits and effects on social life. The review suggests strategies that health professionals can implement to ensure patients' and their families' feelings about weight loss are taken into consideration.

  4. Communication of the cancer diagnosis to an elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Terra Jonas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to collect evidence on matters which involve cancer diagnosis disclosure to an elderly patient. Methods: integrative revision made in five important data bases in the area of health with seven selected articles. Results: it was noticeable that there are conflicts between family members and health professionals concerning cancer diagnosis disclosure to an elderly patient and that the preferences of those people on the disclosure of the diagnosis are similar to other patients. Conclusion: health professionals, especially the nurses, need training in order to have a secure and clarifying communication, matching the information to the specific needs of each patient, considering their reality and type of confrontation..

  5. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  6. Introduction to managing patients with recurrent ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Gabra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cancer found in women in the UK. It is the leading cause of death from gynaecological cancer, and is the 4th most common cause of cancer death among UK women. Similar to the majority of other cancers, relative survival rates for ovarian cancer are improving, although 5-year mortality rates remain stubbornly low. The stage of the disease at diagnosis is the single most important determinant of ovarian cancer survival, as many patients first present with advanced disease. Treatment of ovarian cancer involves a combination of ‘upfront’ primary surgery followed by chemotherapy. Platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy is the recommended standard-of-care first-line chemotherapy, but the majority of patients will relapse with drug-resistant disease within 3-5 years. However, not all patients can continue with platinum combination therapies due to loss of activity or toxicity-related issues, including hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity, alopecia and ototoxicity. Therefore the choice of second-line chemotherapy must take into account factors such as platinum-free treatment interval (PFI; patient's performance status; current symptoms; history of and likely future toxicities while on chemotherapy; dosing schedule requirement; and cost of treatment. A consensus in 2010 established 4 distinct subgroups within the ROC patient population based on the PFI: (platinum sensitive <12 months, partially platinum sensitive 6-12 months, platinum resistant <6 months, and refractory disease ≤4 weeks. Within patients with platinum sensitive disease, those with partially platinum sensitive disease remain the most clinically challenging to manage effectively. Non-platinum based combination therapies, in particular trabectedin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD, offers new options together with a significant survival advantage relative to PLD alone for these patients.

  7. Non-cancer life stressors contribute to impaired quality of life in ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutgendorf, Susan K; Slavich, George M; Degeest, Koenraad; Goodheart, Michael; Bender, David; Thaker, Premal H; Penedo, Frank; Zimmerman, Bridget; Lucci, Joseph; Mendez, Luis; Collins, Katherine; Sood, Anil K

    2013-12-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for a life threatening illness such as cancer are known to be psychologically impactful. However, little is known about the influence that non-cancer life stressors have on the quality of life (QOL) of ovarian cancer patients. The goal of the present study was to examine associations between non-cancer life stressors and QOL in 123 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer who were followed prospectively and longitudinally for one year. Mixed models for repeated measures were used to examine the relationship between life stressors and QOL pre-surgery and one year later, while adjusting for age, cancer stage, depressive symptoms, anxiety, and chemotherapy status (at one year). Prospective associations between QOL pre-surgery and one-year QOL were also examined. Number and severity of life stressors were unrelated to QOL of participants before surgery. At one year, however, participants experiencing a greater number of life stressors reported poorer concurrent physical well-being (PWB) (p=0.015), functional well-being (FWB) (pstressors pre-surgery predicted poorer overall QOL one year post-diagnosis (pstressors can substantially impact long-term QOL of ovarian cancer patients, adjusting for medical variables such as chemotherapy and cancer stage, thus highlighting the importance of evaluating the stress burden of patients in ongoing cancer care. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. History of Comorbidities and Survival of Ovarian Cancer Patients, Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Eng, Kevin H; Cannioto, Rikki A; Friel, Grace; Szender, J Brian; Segal, Brahm; Odunsi, Kunle; Mayor, Paul; Diergaarde, Brenda; Zsiros, Emese; Kelemen, Linda E; Köbel, Martin; Steed, Helen; deFazio, Anna; Jordan, Susan J; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goodman, Marc T; Dörk, Thilo; Edwards, Robert; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mizuno, Mika; Karlan, Beth Y; Goode, Ellen L; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Estrid; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Terry, Kathryn L; Cramer, Daniel W; Bandera, Elisa V; Paddock, Lisa E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Sutphen, Rebecca; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Wu, Anna H; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Jensen, Allan; Webb, Penelope M; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2017-09-01

    Background: Comorbidities can affect survival of ovarian cancer patients by influencing treatment efficacy. However, little evidence exists on the association between individual concurrent comorbidities and prognosis in ovarian cancer patients.Methods: Among patients diagnosed with invasive ovarian carcinoma who participated in 23 studies included in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we explored associations between histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, and neurological diseases and overall and progression-free survival. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age at diagnosis, stage of disease, histology, and study site, we estimated pooled HRs and 95% confidence intervals to assess associations between each comorbidity and ovarian cancer outcomes.Results: None of the comorbidities were associated with ovarian cancer outcome in the overall sample nor in strata defined by histologic subtype, weight status, age at diagnosis, or stage of disease (local/regional vs. advanced).Conclusions: Histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, or neurologic diseases were not associated with ovarian cancer overall or progression-free survival.Impact: These previously diagnosed chronic diseases do not appear to affect ovarian cancer prognosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1470-3. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. [Out-Patient Psychosocial Cancer Counseling Centers and their Clients - Services Provided and Service Utilization by Patients and Patients' Relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, JürgenM; Weis, Joachim; Schreib, Melanie; Eichhorn, Svenja; Kuhnt, Susanne; Faust, Tanja; Mehnert, Anja; Ernst, Jochen

    2015-12-01

    Psychosocial cancer counseling centers represent an increasingly important part of comprehensive psychosocial cancer care. Research on the services provided by those centers is sparse, however, as is research on person-, disease-, and treatment-related characteristics of their clients. Therefore, the present study analyzes the services provided by 26 psychosocial cancer counseling centers temporarily being funded by the German Cancer Aid as well as selected characteristics of their clients. Analyses are based on data collected during 2011 by means of a documentation system specifically designed for the purposes of psychosocial cancer counseling. Testing focuses on whether cancer patients and cancer patients' relatives differ with respect to various characteristics and the services used. The results show that psychosocial and benefit counseling represent a major part of counseling services, followed by giving information and employing relaxation techniques. Clients seek counseling primarily in early phases of disease and treatment. Women with breast cancer are over-represented among clients. Analyses also reveal significant differences between cancer patients and patients' relatives. Psychotherapeutic interventions and grief-counseling are more frequent in counseling relatives, whereas benefit counseling is more frequent in working with patients. The results emphasize the relevance of outpatient psychosocial cancer counseling. They may also help support initiatives aiming at establishing psychosocial cancer counseling targeted to the needs of each individual client. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  11. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  12. Patient engagement in research with older adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puts, Martine T E; Sattar, Schroder; Ghodraty-Jabloo, Vida; Hsu, Tina; Fitch, Marg; Szumacher, Ewa; Ayala, Ana Patricia; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2017-11-01

    Cancer is a disease that mostly affects older adults. Older adults have been under-represented in clinical cancer research. Around the world there is a push for patient engagement on study teams as it is anticipated to improve study design, recruitment and dissemination of findings. In the current overview we examined the evidence with regard to: 1) the history of patient engagement in research and frameworks developed; 2) impact of patient engagement on patient and research outcomes; 3) use of patient engagement in geriatrics and oncology, 4) recommendations for successful engagement; and 5) gaps in the literature that should be studied further. A narrative review was conducted. Articles published in English were searched in Medline with the help of a librarian. Patient engagement has been shown to improve the conduct of studies by making the study design more relevant and feasible, and improving recruitment rates and uptake of research findings by patients. However, the best way to engage patients is not clear yet. Several resources have been developed to support researchers engaging older adults with cancer in research. While patient engagement in research seems promising to improve study outcomes, little evidence is available thus far in geriatric oncology settings. Several gaps in the literature are identified that should be further studied to determine the value of, and best approaches to, patient engagement with older adults with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Colorectal cancer in senior patients - are we doing it well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrouch, D; Martínek, L; Hoch, J

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric patients form a significant part of patients with colorectal cancer and their numbers will probably continue to increase. Analysis of the quality of care provided to seniors and the results from their treatment are currently gaining more attention. The aim of this study was to compare how often standard oncological therapy is administered to seniors with colorectal cancer and to compare their results with younger patients along with complications of the therapy. A retrospective analysis of data from 170 patients with the diagnosis of colorectal cancer undergoing an elective curative surgical procedure in 2014 and 2015 was performed. Patients were divided into three groups according to their age (oncological treatment in the individual age groups. Patients 80 years and older had significantly higher ASA scores (p=0.0001) and significantly higher stages of tumors according to TNM-7 classification (p=0.0413) in comparison to younger patients. Differences in numbers of serious complications (oncological treatment (oncological treatment is possible even in selected patients that are 80 years and older. Implementation of more reliable methods to objectively predict postoperative complications can become a tool to modify the treatment and improve the results of surgical care in elderly patients.Key words: geriatric patients - oncosurgery complex geriatric assessment colorectal cancer.

  14. Ups and downs in physician - cancer patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State, M; Briceag, I; Popescu, B; Scăunașu, R; Armean, P

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years, there has been an increasing interest in involving the cancer patients in the decision making regarding the therapy management due to several factors. The most important aspect to be taken into consideration is the principle of patient autonomy. More and more patients have become interested in making informed decisions regarding their therapy options and physicians need to be able to provide data on the aspect. Some patient-physician models have been proposed and used for 40 years now. Still, the debate is very important for most of the physicians due to the shifts in the approach. To really express the concerns that the authors address, the case of a head and neck cancer patient and the possible dialogues with the physician were presented. Each type of communication model with the patient is very important because nowadays, intrications between the four are likely to occur. There are legal aspects that need to be taken into consideration such as the informed consent, the ethical and moral aspects. The possibility of individualized oncological therapy for the cancer patient leads to different decisions for both the patient and the physician. The decision making process involves the patient at different levels. Legal implications tend to affect the healthiness of the dialogue between the physician and the cancer patient and might be a key-point in the further development of the ethical aspects.

  15. [Malnutrition in patients with cancer; four years experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, María Teresa; Saenz Fernández, Cecilia Alejandra; de Sás Prada, María Trinidad; Alonso Urrutia, Susana; Bardasco Alonso, María Luisa; Alves Pérez, María Teresa; Rivero Luis, María Teresa; Alvarez Vázquez, Paula; Mato Mato, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the prevalence and degree of malnutrition among patients with cancer who were sent to an Oncological Nutrition visit. It is an observational crosssectional descriptive study. First nutrition visit data of all patientes aged ≥ 18 with cancer who were evaluated from march of 2008 to february of 2012 were used. A total of 997 patients were studied using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment. 69% of the patients had lost more than 5% of their usual weight within the previous 3 months, the patients with the highest frequency of weight loss were those with digestive cancer. Eating problems were encountered by the 81.2% of the patients, the most frequent problem being anorexia (53.3%) and the median number of symptoms was 3. Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment shows a malnutrition prevalence of 72.9% (29.9% with moderate malnutrition and 43% with severe malnutrition). Malnutrition was related to the type of cancer and the stage of the disease and was not related to age, gender neither usual body mass index. Malnutrition prevalence among patients who were evaluated in our consulting-room is high. Nutritional evaluation is very important to detect patients at risk of malnutrition or with malnutrition and helps to choose the nutritional treatment. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Unmet needs in cancer rehabilitation during the early cancer trajectory - a nationwide patient survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veloso, Astrid Gisèle; Sperling, Cecilie; Holm, Lise Vilstrup

    2013-01-01

    A cancer diagnosis may lead to psychosocial problems and physical symptoms that can be relieved during rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to analyse patient-perceived unmet needs of rehabilitation close to time of diagnosis, i.e. frequencies of unmet needs and the association with sociodem...... with sociodemographic characteristics, cancer type and treatment....

  17. Illustrations enhance older colorectal cancer patients' website satisfaction and recall of online cancer information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, N.; Smets, E. M A; Eddes, E. H.; de Haes, J. C J M; Loos, E. F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/078758475; van Weert, J. C M

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of illustrations in online cancer information on older cancer patients' website satisfaction (i.e. satisfaction with the attractiveness, comprehensibility and emotional support from the website) and recall of information. In an online experiment, 174

  18. Quality-of-life assessment in colorectal cancer patients: evaluation of cancer therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the need to assess the impact of colorectal cancer and its treatment on patients' quality of life (QL). An overview is provided of generic and (colorectal) cancer-specific QL questionnaires that yield adequate levels of reliability and validity. These measures have

  19. Breast Cancer Diagnosed During Pregnancy: Adapting Recent Advances in Breast Cancer Care for Pregnant Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loibl, S.; Schmidt, A.; Gentilini, O.; Kaufman, B.; Kuhl, C.; Denkert, C.; Minckwitz, G. von; Parokonnaya, A.; Stensheim, H.; Thomssen, C.; Calsteren, K. van; Poortmans, P.; Berveiller, P.; Markert, U.R.; Amant, F.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer during pregnancy (BCP), although rare, is becoming more common and treatment should be as similar as possible to that for nonpregnant young patients with breast cancer. A group of specialists convened to review current guidelines and provide guidance on how recent advances in breast

  20. Breast cancer treatment and work disability: patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedtke, Corine; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; de Rijk, Angelique; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Donceel, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Most female breast cancer patients are forced to interrupt their professional activities during treatment. Qualitative research was carried out to assess women's experiences of being work disabled because of breast cancer. In-depth interviews were analyzed to understand patient's experiences and to gain more insight in their perspectives on living with breast cancer. We identified a 'three-experience model': (1) disruption, with the feeling of irreparable loss, despair and no hope for the future; (2) episode, an unpleasant and inconvenient period, after which life continues as before; and/or (3) meaningful period, during which new life priorities' are set. The different experiences will require different types of support, especially concerning communication around disability and returning to work. Our findings highlight the need of an individual approach of the management of work disability for breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance of activities of daily living among hospitalized cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Line; Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    and characterize ADL task performance problems among a group of adult disabled hospitalized cancer patients using interview and questionnaire data. METHODS: Cross-sectional study on prevalence of ADL task performance problems experienced by disabled hospitalized cancer patients using the Activities of Daily Living...... when using only one of the instruments. CONCLUSION: Adult hospitalized disabled cancer patients experience a high degree and variation in difficulties performing ADL, illustrating the need for a comprehensively planned assessment of problems and needs....... Questionnaire (ADL-Q) (n = 118) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) (n = 55). RESULTS: All 118 patients reported problems with ADL task performance. Based on the ADL-Q patients reported more problems within instrumental (I-)ADL than personal (P-)ADL. In both I-ADL and P-ADL the results...

  2. [Management of secondary lymphedema in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenczl, Enikő

    2016-03-27

    Due to the increased number of cancer patients and the progress in cancer treatment, there are more cases with cancer-related lymphedema. Lymphedema treatment became part of oncological patients' care. Basic therapy for lymphedema is the complex decongestive therapy, which should be embedded into the patient's comprehensive medical care and should always be determined individually. Results of therapy are influenced by the experience of the doctor and the physiotherapist in lymphedema care, patient's complience, tumor behavior and the accompanying diseases. Lymphedema is a chronic disease, requires lifelong follow-up and treatment. For prevention and better care, it would be important to inform patients about lymphedema risk and appropriate life-style (e.g. weight control) preoperatively and during oncological follow-up. Early diagnosis is important. Lymphedema treatment should be integrated into palliative programmes. If therapy is started in time, complications may be avoided, healthcare costs may be reduced and better quality of life may be achieved.

  3. Staging with computed tomography of patients with colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrom, M. L.; Brisling, S.; Klausen, T. W.

    2018-01-01

    to overstaging among all individuals was calculated as the number needed to harm 11.7 (95% CI, 9–16). Conclusions There is basis for improvement of CT-based preoperative staging of patients with colorectal cancer. Supplementary modalities may be needed for correct staging of patients preoperatively, especially......Purpose Accurate staging of colonic cancer is important for patient stratification. We aimed to correlate the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative computed tomography (CT) with final histopathology as reference standard. Methods Data was collected retrospectively on 615 consecutive patients operated...... for colonic cancer. Evaluation was based upon T-stage. Patients were stratified into high-risk and low-risk groups, based on the extent of tumor invasion beyond the proper muscle layer of more or less than 5 mm. The Kendall tau correlation coefficient was used to calculate concordance between radiological (r...

  4. Proteinuria as a Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jee; Kang, Yong Un; Kim, Chang Seong; Choi, Joon Seok; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kweon, Sun-Seog

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the effects of proteinuria and renal insufficiency on all-cause mortality in patients with colorectal cancer, with special emphasis on cancer staging and cancer-related deaths. Materials and Methods We retrospectively studied a cohort of patients with colorectal cancer. In protocol 1, patients were classified into four groups based on the operability of cancer and proteinuria: group 1, early-stage cancer patients (colorectal cancer stage ≤3) without proteinuria; group 2, early-stage cancer patients with proteinuria; group 3, advanced-stage cancer patients without proteinuria (colorectal cancer stage=4); and group 4, advanced-stage cancer patients with proteinuria. In protocol 2, patients were classified into four similar groups based on cancer staging and renal insufficiency (eGFR proteinuria was 495 (14.6%). The prevalence of proteinuria was higher in advanced-stage cancer (n=151, 22.3%) than in early-stage cancer patients (n=344, 12.7%). After adjusting for age, gender and other clinical variables, the proteinuric, early-stage cancer group was shown to be associated with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.67 and a 95% confidence interval of 1.38-2.01, compared with non-proteinuric early-stage cancer patients. However, renal insufficiency was not associated with colorectal cancer mortality. Conclusion Proteinuria is an important risk factor for cancer mortality, especially in relatively early colorectal cancer. PMID:23918569

  5. BRCA Testing in Young Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testing for genetic mutations strongly associated with an increased breast cancer risk has risen dramatically among women younger than age 40 who are diagnosed with the disease, according to a new study.

  6. The Palatability of Cereal Based Nutritional Supplements in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Hyun Wook; Lee, Yu Sun; Song, Min-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it is reported that intervention of oral nutritional supplement improves the nutritional status of cancer patients, and the effectiveness is affected by the sensory preference of cancer patients on the oral nutritional supplement. However, the variety of oral nutritional supplement is extremely limited and the number of patient's benefits from using the products are restricted mostly due to sensory dislikes. The objective of this study was to provide sensory preference score of trial manufactured products with different accessory ingredients to maximize the use of oral nutritional supplements. Cancer patients (n = 30) and age, sex-matched healthy volunteers (n = 30) participated in the sensory assessments (taste, flavor, viscosity, color and overall preference) of three types of oral supplements (cereal base, cereal base+herb and cereal base+fruit) and a control supplement product with scorched cereal flavor, a top seller in current Korean market. Results indicate that the cancer patients' overall preference was significantly higher for the control supplement, and fruit added supplement was preferred over plain cereal and herb added products, although the difference was insignificant. However, there was no significant preference difference for the supplements among the control group for all sensory factors. These results suggest that cancer patients are more sensitive to sensory preferences compared to the control group, and the patients prefer the flavor of cooked cereal which is a staple food in Korea. PMID:24527420

  7. Nutritional Risk Screening Predicts Tumor Response in Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illa, Petr; Tomiskova, Marcela; Skrickova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition in cancer patients may be associated with poor tolerance of chemotherapy and lower response rate after oncological treatment. Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS) adapted for oncological patients was used to assess the risk of undernutrition in a group of 188 patients with lung cancer. The risk was evaluated on a 6-point scale according to common signs of nutritional status (weight loss, body mass index, and dietary intake), tumor, and its treatment risk factors. A score of 3 or more (called "nutritional risk") means significant risk of malnutrition and poor outcome. Acceptable NRS score was found in 50.6%, and in 45.3% a score of 3-5 suggested the risk of malnutrition (nutritional risk). Unexpectedly, the toxicity of anticancer treatment was not significantly different between the subgroups (acceptable score vs nutritional risk). The rate of treatment response evaluated by imaging techniques was significantly higher in patients with an acceptable score compared to nutritional risk. Overall survival rate was significantly higher in cytostatically treated patients with lung cancer with an acceptable score. Nutritional risk screening is a significant predictor of tumor response in patients with lung cancer. Early detection of malnutrition is important to determine the prognosis of cancer patients as well as to plan effective supportive care.

  8. Time perception of cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in a palliative, end-of-life-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Schilderman, Johannes; Verhagen, Constans A H H V M; Prins, Judith B

    2011-01-01

    Time perception may be an important factor influencing distress of cancer patients. However, no comparative studies have been performed for cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in the palliative, end-of-life-care setting. The objectives of the study were to assess time perception in disease-free and advanced cancer patients and examine the relation of time perception with patients' distress. A descriptive research design was used. Ninety-six disease-free and 63 advanced cancer patients filled out Cottle's Circle Test to assess time coherence and time dominance, Cottle's Line Test to assess temporal extension and Bayes' question on speed of time, the European Organisation for Research-and-Treatment of Cancer QOL-Questionnaire version 2.0, Beck's Depression Inventory for primary care, and Beck's Hopelessness-Scale. In patients without evidence of disease, future dominance was most often observed, whereas in advanced cancer patients, the present was the dominant time segment. In both groups, a focus on the past was associated with distress. In contrast with patients without evidence of disease, advanced cancer patients perceived time as moving slowly, and this was correlated with distress. The time perception of cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients is significantly different and is related to distress. The observed relation between a focus on the past and distress gives room for interventions of nurses and other healthcare professionals. Specific attention is needed for differences between cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients.

  9. Urban and rural differences in characteristics of ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpurek, Dariusz; Moszynski, Rafał; Szubert, Sebastian; Sajdak, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was evaluation of the urban and rural differences in ovarian cancer patients' characteristics at the moment of diagnosis. The study comprised women with ovarian cancer diagnosed and treated in the Division of Gynecological Surgery of Poznan University of Medical Sciences between 2004-2011. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on their place of residence: 1) patients residing in large cities (over 50,000 people), 2) inhabitants of small towns (below 50,000 people), 3) women from rural areas. Among the studied groups of patients no differences were found in the FIGO stage at diagnosis (p=0.453), histological grade of the tumour (p=0.916), histopathological types of ovarian neoplasms (p=0.431), median tumour volume (p=0.855), presence of fluid in the pouch of Douglas (p=0.872). Women with ovarian cancer residing in large cities had lower median parity (p=0.0005), higher education level status (p=0.0001), and experienced menarche at an earlier age (p=0.039). There were no differences in the use of oral contraception (p=0.93) and body mass index (p=0.23) between the women included in the study. There were no differences in advancement of ovarian cancer at the moment of diagnosis or in tumour type and size between women residing large cities, small towns and rural areas. Several ovarian cancer risk factors were more common among ovarian cancer patients living in urbanized areas.

  10. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Prevention Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient ...

  11. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Prevention Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient ...

  12. Understanding cognition in older patients with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karuturi, Meghan; Wong, Melisa L.; Hsu, Tina; Kimmick, Gretchen G.; Lichtman, Stuart M.; Holmes, Holly M.; Inouye, Sharon K.; Dale, William; Loh, Kah P.; Whitehead, Mary I.; Magnuson, Allison; Hurria, Arti; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mohile, Supriya

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and neurocognitive disorders, such as dementia and delirium, are common and serious diseases in the elderly that are accompanied by high degree of morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, evidence supports the under-diagnosis of both dementia and delirium in older adults. Complex questions exist regarding the interaction of dementia and delirium with cancer, beginning with guidelines on how best measure disease severity, the optimal screening test for either disorder, the appropriate leve...

  13. Treatment-related mortality with everolimus in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Robert; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Lustberg, Maryam; Paskell, Maria; Shapiro, Charles L; Macrae, Erin R

    2014-06-01

    The overall incidence and odds of fatal adverse events (FAEs) after exposure to everolimus are not well defined. We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the role of everolimus in treatment-related mortality in patients with cancer. PubMed databases and abstracts from the proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium were searched for RCTs of everolimus either alone or in combination with another agent compared with the control arm without everolimus and that reported deaths from an adverse event from January 1966 to July 2013. The primary objective was to determine the difference of FAEs between everolimus-treated patients and control group patients. In total, 2,997 patients with multiple solid tumors from nine RCTs were included. The overall incidence of FAEs in cancer patients treated with everolimus was 0.7% (95% CI 0.3%-1.1%) compared with 0.4% (95% CI 0.0%-0.7%) in cancer patients who did not receive everolimus. The odds ratio of FAEs was greater in everolimus-treated patients (Peto odds ratio = 3.80, 95% CI 1.59-9.07, p = .003). In subgroup analyses, no significant difference was found in the incidence or odds of FAEs by everolimus administration (alone or in combination) or tumor type (breast cancer vs. nonbreast cancer; p = .63). In patients with cancer, everolimus is associated with a small but significant increase in the odds of a treatment-related fatal events. ©AlphaMed Press.

  14. Will patients benefit from regionalization of gynecologic cancer care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F Brookfield

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patient chances for cure and palliation for a variety of malignancies may be greatly affected by the care provided by a treating hospital. We sought to determine the effect of volume and teaching status on patient outcomes for five gynecologic malignancies: endometrial, cervical, ovarian and vulvar carcinoma and uterine sarcoma. METHODS: The Florida Cancer Data System dataset was queried for all patients undergoing treatment for gynecologic cancers from 1990-2000. RESULTS: Overall, 48,981 patients with gynecologic malignancies were identified. Endometrial tumors were the most common, representing 43.2% of the entire cohort, followed by ovarian cancer (30.9%, cervical cancer (20.8%, vulvar cancer (4.6%, and uterine sarcoma (0.5%. By univariate analysis, although patients treated at high volume centers (HVC were significantly younger, they benefited from an improved short-term (30-day and/or 90-day survival for cervical, ovarian and endometrial cancers. Multivariate analysis (MVA, however, failed to demonstrate significant survival benefit for gynecologic cancer patients treated at teaching facilities (TF or HVC. Significant prognostic factors at presentation by MVA were age over 65 (HR = 2.6, p<0.01, African-American race (HR = 1.36, p<0.01, and advanced stage (regional HR = 2.08, p<0.01; advanced HR = 3.82, p<0.01, respectively. Surgery and use of chemotherapy were each significantly associated with improved survival. CONCLUSION: No difference in patient survival was observed for any gynecologic malignancy based upon treating hospital teaching or volume status. Although instances of improved outcomes may occur, overall further regionalization would not appear to significantly improve patient survival.

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF TYPES OF CANCER AND PATTERNS OF CANCER TREATMENT AMONG THE PATIENTS AT VARIOUS HOSPITALS IN DHAKA DIVISION, BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan A.H.M Nazmul; Uddin Md.Mesbah; Rafiquzzaman Md.; Chowdhury Sanchita Sharmin; Wahed Tania Binte

    2012-01-01

    A survey study on 171 cancer patients for various aspects related to cancer was done at different hospitals in Dhaka division, Bangladesh, using a questionnaire. Histopathologically confirmed cancer patients; patients having radiological evidence or clinical evidence of malignancy were included in the study. Majority of the patients came from various districts of Dhaka division (57.8%), while only 3.3% patients were from Sylhet division of Bangladesh. There were 117 male and 54 female patient...

  16. Clinical analysis of esophageal cancer patients with a history of metachronous primary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudou, Michihiro; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Sakakura, Chouhei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2014-11-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is often associated with multiple primary cancers, and the frequency of EC in patients with a history of metachronous primary cancers (HMPC) was reported as 7.8%. The clinical characteristics of these cases have not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, we analyzed 36 EC patients with HMPC among 370 cases that underwent curative resection in our hospital between 1996 and 2013. The most frequent HMPC was gastric cancer (36.1%). The group with HMPC was significantly older than the group without HMPC, whereas no significant differences were observed in other background factors. The stomach was used for reconstruction more frequently reconstructed in the group without HMPC (pHMPC were similar to those of EC patients without HMPC; therefore, curative surgery should be considered for EC patients with HMPC.

  17. Intensive care for cancer patients: An interdisciplinary challenge for cancer specialists and intensive care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellongowski, Peter; Kiehl, Michael; Kochanek, Matthias; Staudinger, Thomas; Beutel, Gernot

    Every sixth to eighth European intensive care unit patient suffers from an underlying malignant disease. A large proportion of these patients present with cancer-related complications. This review explains why the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients has improved substantially over the last decades and which risk factors are of prognostic importance. Furthermore, the main reasons for intensive care unit admission - acute respiratory failure and septic complications - are discussed with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic specifics. In addition, we discuss potential intensive care unit admission criteria with respect to cancer prognosis. The successful management of critically ill cancer patients requires a close collaboration of intensivists with hematologists, oncologists and colleagues from other disciplines, such as infectious disease specialists, microbiologists, radiologists, surgeons, pharmacists, and others.

  18. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C. J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; van der Heide, Iris; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L. J.; van Berkel, Sietske; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Wim; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  19. BRCA2 Mutations in 154 Finnish Male Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Syrjäkoski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of male breast cancer (MBC are poorly known. This is due to the fact that the disease is rare, and large-scale genetic epidemiologic studies have been difficult to carry out. Here, we studied the frequency of eight recurrent Finnish BRCA2 founder mutations in a large cohort of 154 MBC patients (65% diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1996. Founder mutations were detected in 10 patients (6.5%, eight of whom carried the 9346(-2 A>G mutation. Two novel mutations (4075 delGT and 5808 del5 were discovered in a screening of the entire BRCA2 coding region in 34 samples. However, these mutations were not found in the rest of the 120 patients studied. Patients with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were often BRCA2 mutation carriers (44%, whereas those with no family history showed a low frequency of involvement (3.6%; P < .0001. Finally, we found only one Finnish MBC patient with 999 dell, the most common founder mutation in Finnish female breast cancer (FBC patients, and one that explains most of the hereditary FBC and MBC cases in Iceland. The variation in BRCA2 mutation spectrum between Finnish MBC patients and FBC patients in Finland and breast cancer patients in Iceland suggests that modifying genetic and environmental factors may significantly influence the penetrance of MBC and FBC in individuals carrying germline BRCA2 mutations in some populations.

  20. Unraveling the Determinants of Cancer Patients' Intention to Express Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Kim; Linn, Annemiek J; Smit, Edith G; van Weert, Julia C M

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the behavioral determinants that underlie cancer patients' intention to express concerns during a consultation. This information can be relevant to developing effective interventions for cancer patients. In this study, the integrative model of behavioral prediction (IMBP) is used as a framework to unravel the determinants of patients' intention to express concerns. The objectives of this study are to examine which of the IMBP determinants (attitude, perceived social norm, and/or self-efficacy) are significantly related to intention and what content of these determinants can be targeted to effect a change in patients' intention. An online survey based on the IMBP determinants was distributed. A total of 236 cancer patients and cancer survivors participated. The results of the survey showed that patients' attitudes and perceived social norm were the most important determinants of their intention to express concerns. The largest change in patients' intention might be achieved by targeting the affective attitude, referring to the extent to which patients believe that expressing concerns is (un)pleasant, and the social norm, referring to the extent to which patients feel (un)supported by significant others in expressing concerns.

  1. International Framework for Cancer Patient Advocacy: Empowering Organizations and Patients to Create a National Call to Action on Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schear, Rebekkah M; Manasco, Leigh; McGoldrick, Devon; Kajana, Kiti; Rosenthal, Lauren; McMikel, Ann; Lins, Nancy

    2015-12-01

    With the rate of cancer and other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) growing globally, cancer prevention and control efforts are critical internationally. Moreover, since the 2011 United Nations High-Level Meeting on NCDs, the international health and development community has shifted its awareness to include NCDs as a global health priority, especially in developing countries where mortality rates are disproportionately high. Simultaneously, with the dissemination of the World Cancer Declaration and the evolution of cancer control policies, the international cancer community has recognized the value of engaging patients in reducing the global cancer burden. Cancer advocacy programs that involve patients, survivors, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have increasing opportunities for global impact. We developed a framework over 4 years through implementation of two pilot projects. We created a series of trainings and tools to build the capacity of local NGOs and patients to plan and implement a forum for patients with cancer and to create and disseminate a national call to action. The framework was piloted in South Africa from 2009 to 2011 and Japan from 2012 to 2014, and results were measured through postproject surveys completed by members of the collaborative working group and interviews with the in-country partner. The framework is globally relevant and could be adapted and implemented in low- and middle-income countries to amplify patient voices in the policymaking process, increase grassroots mobilization, and improve health systems and infrastructure through addressing patient needs. With the dominant paradigm of global health in developing countries-which has previously focused on HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, tuberculosis, and malaria-shifting to adapt to the burgeoning NCD burden, effective patient-centered advocacy frameworks are critical to the success of NCD control.

  2. A Patient-Centered Perspective on Cancer Survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Zebrack

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Survivorship is a complicated notion because people often confuse a process of survivorship with a mythic identity of being a cancer survivor. This confusion may be a distraction to addressing the real-life struggles and challenges experienced by all people diagnosed with cancer. A more expansive perspective of survivorship, one that attends to patients’ physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential challenges throughout a continuum of care, would be more in line with what is known empirically about people’s experiences with cancer. In an effort to gain a patient-centered perspective on cancer, and one that emphasizes multiple dimensions of cancer survivorship, the author reports findings from a non-scientific social media poll (via Facebook and personal emails in which survivors and colleagues working in the field of cancer survivorship answered the question: What does cancer survivorship mean to you? The comments are enlightening and useful for guiding the development of a patient-centered, and, thus, more comprehensive, approach to caring for people affected by cancer.

  3. [Treatment Decision-Making Process of Cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiu-Yu C Katie

    2016-10-01

    The decision-making process that is used by cancer patients to determine their treatment has become more multi-foci, difficult and complicated in recent years. This has in part been attributed to the increasing incidence rate of cancer in Taiwan and the rapid development of medical technologies and treatment modalities. Oncology nurses must assist patients and family to make informed and value-based treatment decisions. Decision-making is an information process that involves appraising one's own expectation and values based on his/her knowledge on cancer and treatment options. Because cancer treatment involves risks and uncertainties, and impacts quality of life, the treatment decision-making for cancer is often stressful, or even conflicting. This paper discusses the decision-making behaviors of cancer patients and the decisional conflict, participation, and informational needs that are involved in cancer treatment. The trend toward shared decision-making and decisional support will be also explored in order to facilitate the future development of appropriate clinical interventions and research.

  4. Patient-specific data fusion defines prognostic cancer subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinyin Yuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Different data types can offer complementary perspectives on the same biological phenomenon. In cancer studies, for example, data on copy number alterations indicate losses and amplifications of genomic regions in tumours, while transcriptomic data point to the impact of genomic and environmental events on the internal wiring of the cell. Fusing different data provides a more comprehensive model of the cancer cell than that offered by any single type. However, biological signals in different patients exhibit diverse degrees of concordance due to cancer heterogeneity and inherent noise in the measurements. This is a particularly important issue in cancer subtype discovery, where personalised strategies to guide therapy are of vital importance. We present a nonparametric Bayesian model for discovering prognostic cancer subtypes by integrating gene expression and copy number variation data. Our model is constructed from a hierarchy of Dirichlet Processes and addresses three key challenges in data fusion: (i To separate concordant from discordant signals, (ii to select informative features, (iii to estimate the number of disease subtypes. Concordance of signals is assessed individually for each patient, giving us an additional level of insight into the underlying disease structure. We exemplify the power of our model in prostate cancer and breast cancer and show that it outperforms competing methods. In the prostate cancer data, we identify an entirely new subtype with extremely poor survival outcome and show how other analyses fail to detect it. In the breast cancer data, we find subtypes with superior prognostic value by using the concordant results. These discoveries were crucially dependent on our model's ability to distinguish concordant and discordant signals within each patient sample, and would otherwise have been missed. We therefore demonstrate the importance of taking a patient-specific approach, using highly-flexible nonparametric

  5. Suicide in cancer patients within the first year of diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Myung Hee; Park, Subin; Lee, Hochang Benjamin; Ramsey, Christine M; Na, Riji; Kim, Seon Ok; Kim, Jeong Eun; Yoon, Shinkyo; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-05-01

    A diagnosis of cancer is associated with an increased suicide risk, and this risk is the highest within the first year of diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine risk factors of suicide occurring within the first year of cancer diagnosis (early suicide). The sampling pool consisted of 164,497 patients with cancer admitted to a general hospital in Seoul, South Korea, from 1996 to 2009. We conducted a 1:2 matched case-control study by matching 373 patients who died from suicide (cases) with 746 patients who did not die from suicide (controls) on age, sex, anatomic site, and at the time of cancer diagnosis. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Suicide within the first year after a cancer diagnosis occurred in 149 patients (40.0% of 373 total suicides). The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for early suicide was 1.65 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.40-1.94] and was significantly higher for biliary-pancreatic (SMR = 3.07; 95% CI = 2.02-4.46), lung (SMR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.19-3.30), and stomach (SMR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.16-2.42) cancers than for other cancers. Early and late suicide was significantly different in anatomic site (p = 0.01) and stage (p cancer was independently associated with early suicide risk. Cancers with an advanced stage at diagnosis were associated with an increased risk of suicide within 1 year of diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Individual patient oesophageal cancer 3D models for tailored treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, John H; Onion, David; Collier, Pamela; Dorrington, Matthew S; Argent, Richard H; Clarke, Philip A; Reece-Smith, Alex M; Parsons, Simon L; Grabowska, Anna M

    2017-04-11

    A model to predict chemotherapy response would provide a marked clinical benefit, enabling tailored treatment of oesophageal cancer, where less than half of patients respond to the routinely administered chemotherapy. Cancer cells were established from tumour biopsies taken from individual patients about to undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A 3D-tumour growth assay (3D-TGA) was developed, in which cancer cells were grown with or without supporting mesenchymal cells, then subjected to chemo-sensitivity testing using the standard chemotherapy administered in clinic, and a novel emerging HDAC inhibitor, Panobinostat. Individual patient's cancer cells could be expanded and screened within a clinically applicable timescale of 3 weeks. Incorporating mesenchymal support within the 3D-TGA significantly enhanced both the growth and drug resistance profiles of the patient's cancer cells. The ex vivo drug response in the presence, but not absence, of mesenchymal cells accurately reflected clinical chemo-sensitivity, as measured by tumour regression grade. Combination with Panobinostat enhanced response and proved efficacious in otherwise chemo-resistant tumours. This novel method of establishing individual patient oesophageal cancers in the laboratory, from small endoscopic biopsies, enables clinically-relevant chemo-sensitivity testing, and reduces use of animals by providing more refined in vitro models for pre-screening of drugs. The 3D-TGA accurately predicted chemo-sensitivity in patients, and could be developed to guide tailored patient treatment. The incorporation of mesenchymal cells as the stromal cell component of the tumour micro-environment had a significant effect upon enhancing chemotherapy drug resistance in oesophageal cancer, and could prove a useful target for future drug development.

  7. Nodal status of the head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, D. S.; Choi, M. S.; Choi, J. O. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-12-01

    It is well known that the risk of lymph nodes metastases to head and neck cancers are influenced by the location and size of the primary tumor, as well as the degree and types of histological differentiation. In order to obtain current status of such data, we have analyzed cancer patients at the department of radiation oncology, Korea university hospital for radiation treatment. We have evaluated nine-hundred and ninety seven (997) head and neck cancer patients who visited to the Department of radiation oncology, between November 1981 to December 1995. After careful physical examinations and CAT scan, patients were divided into two groups, those with positive lymph node metastases and with negative lymph node metastases. 416 patients out of the 997 patients were lymph node positive (42%) and 581 patients were lymph node negative (58%) when they were first presented at the department of radiation oncology. The frequency of lymph node metastases according to the primary sites is as follow: larynx: 283 (28.5%), paranasal sinuses: 182 (18%), oropharynx: 144 (14.5%), nasopharynx: 122 (12%), oral cavity: 92 (9%), hypopharynx: 71 (7%), salivary gland: 58 (6%), unknown primary: 31 (3%), skin: 14 (2%). The most frequent primary site for the positive lymph node metastases was nasopharynx (71%) followed by hypopharynx (69%), oropharynx (64%), oral cavity (39%). The most common histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma (652/997: 65.4%), followed by malignant lymphoma (109/997: 11%). Statistical results of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer at our department were very similar to those obtained from other countries. It is concluded that the location of primary cancer influences sites of metastases on head and neck, and stage of the primary cancer also influences the development of metastatic lesions. Since the present study is limited on the data collected from one institute, further statistical analyses on Korean cancer patients are warrented. (author).

  8. Optimism, pessimism and self-efficacy in female cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Maik; Einenkel, Jens; Zenger, Markus; Hinz, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this examination was to study whether psychological resource variables (optimism and self-efficacy) decrease when cancer is present and to test the predictive power of these variables for anxiety, depression and quality of life (QoL). The patient sample was comprised of 354 German women suffering from breast cancer or gynecological cancer. Participants filled in the resource assessment tools Life Orientation Test-Revised and the General Self-Efficacy Scale as well as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 and the QoL instrument EORTC QLQ-C30 at two time points: (t1) during patients' hospital stay and (t2) 3 months later. The mean scores for optimism (total score: M = 16.2) and self-efficacy (M = 29.8) were even somewhat higher than the corresponding means of the general population. Optimism and self-efficacy were positively correlated with QoL (r between 0.15 and 0.17, P optimism was predictive of the t2 anxiety, depression and QoL scores when statistically taking into account the baseline levels of the outcome variables. Having cancer does not generally reduce optimism and self-efficacy on the level of patients' mean scores. Cancer patients with a high level of habitual optimism will adapt to their disease better than pessimistic patients, even if the baseline levels of the outcome variables have been accounted for.

  9. Patients with Acromegaly Presenting with Colon Cancer: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray B. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Frequent colonoscopy screenings are critical for early diagnosis of colon cancer in patients with acromegaly. Case Presentations. We performed a retrospective analysis of the incidental diagnoses of colon cancer from the ACCESS trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01995734. Colon cancer was identified in 2 patients (4.5%. Case  1 patient was a 36-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove the pituitary adenoma. After surgery, the patient underwent routine colonoscopy screening, which revealed a 40 mm tubular adenoma in the descending colon. A T1N1a carcinoma was surgically removed, and 1 of 22 lymph nodes was positive for metastatic disease, leading to a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. Case  2 patient was a 50-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove a 2 cm pituitary adenoma. The patient reported severe cramping and lower abdominal pain, and an invasive 8.1 cm3 grade 2 adenocarcinoma with signet rings was identified in the ascending colon and removed. Of the 37 lymph nodes, 34 were positive for the presence of tumor cells, and stage 3c colon cancer was confirmed. Conclusion. Current guidelines for colonoscopy screening at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly and at appropriate follow-up intervals should be followed.

  10. Emerging markers of cachexia predict survival in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondello, Patrizia; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Mondello, Stefania; Bolignano, Davide; Pitini, Vincenzo; Aloisi, Carmela; Buemi, Michele

    2014-11-16

    Cachexia may occur in 40% of cancer patients, representing the major cause of death in more than 20% of them. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of leptin, ghrelin and obestatin as diagnostic and predictive markers of cachexia in oncologic patients. Their impact on patient survival was also evaluated. 140 adults with different cancer diagnoses were recruited. Thirty healthy volunteers served as control. Serum ghrelin, obestatin and leptin were tested at baseline and after a follow-up period of 18 months. Ghrelin levels were significantly higher in cancer patients than in healthy subjects (573.31 ± 130 vs 320.20 ± 66.48 ng/ml, p obestatin (17.42 ± 7.12 vs 24.89 ± 5.54 ng/ml, p obestatin (AUC 0.798; sensitivity 74.5%; specificity 81.5%) and leptin (AUC 0.828; sensitivity 79%; specificity 73%) was superior to that of albumin (AUC 0.547; sensitivity 63%, specificity 69.4%) for detecting cachexia among cancer patients. On Cox multivariate analyses ghrelin (HR 1.02; 95% CI 1.01 - 1.03; p cancer patients.

  11. [Quality of diagnosis information given to terminal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font-Ritort, Sergi; Martos-Gutiérrez, José Antonio; Montoro-Lorite, Mercedes; Mundet-Pons, Lluís

    To determine the information that terminal cancer patients have about their diagnosis, identifying key words used, and quantifying the conspiracy of silence. A cross-sectional, analytical study was conducted by reviewing the hospice support team data base which contains the medical history and a semi-structured interview with terminal cancer patients in the first visit to the hospice. Demographic and socioeconomic data was collected, as well as relevant clinical information (diagnosis, prevalent symptoms, number of symptoms, patient functionality, QoL, information given, and words used). Out of total of sample of 723 records, 77.87% (95% CI: 74.70-80.74) of the patients were properly informed about their diagnosis. The most used words were cancer in 26% of the patients, tumour in 51.59%, and for the remaining 10.65%, the word inflammation was used. Statistically significant differences of information were found between sexes, age, types of cancer, and hospital ward. Terminal cancer patients have knowledge on their diagnosis, suggesting that the conspiracy of silence is present to a lesser extent. This knowledge is transmitted using different words and with euphemisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Lung cancer in patients under the age of 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, Jerzy; Kaczmarczyk, Grzegorz; Porębska, Irena; Szmygin-Milanowska, Katarzyna; Gołecki, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    In the paper clinical cases of individuals diagnosed with lung cancer below the age of 40 years have been analyzed. THE ANALYSIS INCLUDED: sex, age, clinical symptoms found before and at the moment of diagnosis, character of changes visible in radiological imaging, time that passed from the first symptoms to reporting to a doctor and to establishing a diagnosis, type of diagnostic method used in establishing the final diagnosis, histopathologic type of cancer, degree of cancer progression. The results have been compared with a peer group who had been diagnosed 20 years earlier. Currently 7% of patients were diagnosed at the age of 25 or younger, whereas in the previous cohort patients in this age constituted 2%. The predominant pathological type was adenocarcinoma (currently 33%, previously 4%) in contrast to the earlier group in which 57% of patients had small cell lung cancer (57%). The incidence is equally distributed between both sexes, although there is an evident increase in female lung cancer cases. In the majority of patients the clinical presentation is a peripheral mass on chest X-ray. 20% of patients present pleural effusion on diagnosis. Patients reported the following complaints: breathlessness, chest pain, weight loss and fatigue. The majority of cases were diagnosed in advanced stages on the basis of a bronchoscopy acquired specimen. Time course from symptoms to diagnosis tends to be shorter than 20 years ago.

  13. Is obesity an advantage in patients with colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasi, Pashtoon Murtaza; Zafar, S Yousuf; Grothey, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Obesity/higher BMI appears to be important determinants in the development of colon cancer as well as in predicting outcomes in the adjuvant setting in these patients. These associations seem to be stronger for men and tend to be 'J-shaped', with worse outcomes in both lower and upper BMI categories than in the middle categories. How this factors in the metastatic setting is less clear. A recent pooled analysis of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving bevacizumab in the first-line setting observed that patients with the lowest BMI had the lowest median overall survival. An incremental BMI increase of 5 kg/m(2) led to actually a decrease in the risk of death (hazard ratio, 0.911 [95% CI, 0.879-0.944]). The observed association does not necessarily mean that obesity is an advantage for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. More likely, it is conceivable that, in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with a lower BMI, the effects of cancer-related cachexia may be more deleterious than the potential adverse events related to a higher BMI. In patients already diagnosed with metastatic disease, studying how body weight affects tumor biology and treatment-related decisions are important considerations.

  14. Cancer-related loneliness mediates the relationships between social constraints and symptoms among cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rebecca N; Mosher, Catherine E; Winger, Joseph G; Abonour, Rafat; Kroenke, Kurt

    2017-10-05

    Cancer patients have high rates of persistent and disabling symptoms. Evidence suggests that social constraints (e.g., avoidance and criticism) negatively impact symptoms, but pathways linking these variables have yet to be identified. This study examined whether cancer-related loneliness (i.e., feeling socially disconnected related to having cancer) mediated the relationships between social constraints and symptoms (i.e., pain interference, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and cognitive complaints) in patients with various cancers (N = 182). Patients (51% female, mean age = 59) were recruited from the Indiana Cancer Registry and completed questionnaires assessing social constraints, cancer-related loneliness, and symptoms. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the hypothesized relationships among variables. The model demonstrated good fit. Consistent with our hypothesis, cancer-related loneliness mediated the relationships between social constraints and each symptom. Findings suggest that addressing cancer-related loneliness in symptom management interventions may mitigate the negative impact of social constraints on outcomes.

  15. Baseline C-reactive protein is associated with incident cancer and survival in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with risk of incident cancer in the general population and early death in patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 10,408 individuals from the Danish general population who had CRP...... measured at baseline were observed for up to 16 years; 1,624 developed cancer, and of these, 998 patients died during follow-up. Follow-up was 100% complete. We excluded individuals with a cancer diagnosis at baseline. RESULTS: Baseline CRP levels more than 3 versus less than 1 mg/L were associated...... with multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios of 1.3 (95% CI, 1.0 to 1.6) for cancer of any type, 2.2 (95% CI, 1.0 to 4.6) for lung cancer, 1.9 (95% CI, 0.8 to 4.6) for colorectal cancer, and 0.7 (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.4) for breast cancer. Corresponding hazard ratios for the highest versus the lowest quintile of baseline...

  16. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research in palliative care is considered difficult due to the poor health of patients. However, patient-provided data are essential for a thorough description of patient symptomatology and for the evaluation of care. METHODS: The authors examined the feasibility of a questionnaire......-based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes...... the symptomatology of participating patients and examines differences in symptomatology between patients in three palliative care functions: inpatient, outpatient, and palliative home care. RESULTS: Of 267 eligible patients who were referred to a department of palliative medicine, initial self...

  17. Patient navigation and activation interventions for elderly patients with cancer : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ee, Birgit; Hagedoorn, M.; Slaets, J. P. J.; Smits, C.H.M.

    Patient navigation (PN) and patient activation (PA) interventions are widely used to help patients with cancer to manage the disease and the care trajectory. However, the usability and impact of these interventions on older patients and their well-being are unclear. This study aims to show which PN

  18. Doctor-patient communication and cancer patients' quality of life and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, L. M.; Visser, M. R.; Lammes, F. B.; de Haes, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between (a) doctor's and patients' communication and (b) doctors' patient-centredness during the oncological consultation and patients' quality of life and satisfaction was examined. Consultations of 96 consecutive cancer patients were recorded and content analysed by

  19. Symptom prevalence and management of cancer patients in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad Huijer, Huda; Abboud, Sarah; Doumit, Myrna

    2012-09-01

    Cancer patients experience a great number of distressing physical and psychological symptoms. In Lebanon, there are no available data on symptom prevalence and symptom management in adults with cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptoms and the effectiveness of treatment received as reported by patients. The study used a cross-sectional, descriptive survey design. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale were translated to Arabic and used; data were collected from adult Lebanese cancer patients at the American University of Beirut Medical Center. A total of 200 cancer patients participated in the study; the majority were female with breast cancer and mean age was 54 years. The cognitive functioning domain of the EORTC QLQ-C30 scale was found to have the highest score and social functioning the lowest. The most prevalent symptom was lack of energy. Nausea and pain were the symptoms most treated. Males reported better quality of life (QoL), physical functioning, and role functioning than females; females reported more fatigue, pain, and appetite loss than males. Higher physical and psychological symptoms were correlated with lower health status, QoL, and functioning. Although this sample reported a fair QoL and social functioning, many symptoms were highly prevalent and inadequately treated. Symptoms were found to negatively affect QoL and functioning. Based on these results, providing adequate symptom management and social support to Lebanese cancer patients is highly recommended. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Nutritional assessment and perioperative nutritional support in gastric cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyung Won; Yoon, Ki Young

    2013-04-01

    Weight loss and malnutrition are common in cancer patients. Although weight loss is predominantly due to loss of fat mass, the morbidity risk is given by the decrease in muscle mass. The assessment of nutritional status is essential for a diagnosis of nutritional compromise and required for the multidisciplinary approach. Subjective global assessment (SGA) is made by the patients nutritional symptoms and weight loss. The objective assessment, a significant weight loss (>10%) for 6 months is considered an indicator of nutritional deficiency. The mean body index, body fat mass and body protein mass are decreased as cancer stage increases. The biochemical data of albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, Zn, transferrin, total lymphocyte count are decreased in advanced cancer stage. Daily energy intake, cabohyderate and Vit B1 intake is decreased according to cancer stage. The patients are divided into three groups according to SGA. The three groups showed a significant difference in body weight, 1 month weight loss%, 6 month weight loss%, body mass index, mid arm circumference, albumin, energy intake, as well as carbohyderate intake protein and energy malnutrition. Nutritional assessment is of great importance because undernutrition has been shown to be associated with increase in stomach cancer associated morbidity and mortality. The authors concluded that nutritional assessment should be done in cancer patients preoperatively, and with adequate nutritional support, the morbidity and mortality would be decreased.

  1. Analysis of lipid profile in cancer patients, smokers, and nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A Vikramsimha; Killampalli, Lakshmi Keerthana; Prakash, A Ravi; Naag, Sushma; Sreenath, G; Biraggari, Sunil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in maintaining the cell membrane integrity. Lipid profile is a panel of blood tests that serve as an initial medical screening for abnormalities in lipids and approximate risk for cancer, cardiovascular diseases, pancreatitis, etc., The present study evaluates the alterations in lipid profile in cancer patients, smokers, and nonsmokers and aims to achieve a correlation between them. The study is an in vitro type of cross-sectional study with 25 oral cancer patients, 25 chronic smokers (habit persisting for 15 years or more), and 15 nonsmokers as control group. Blood samples had been collected, and triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were analyzed using a lipid profile kit and an autoanalyzer. The results were analyzed using the unpaired t-test and ANOVA test (P lipid profile in smokers and cancer patients. The decrease in lipid profile in cancer patients might be due to their increased utilization of lipids by neoplastic cells in membrane biogenesis. Therefore, a decrease in lipid profile in smokers can be assumed that they might be more prone to develop cancerous conditions.

  2. Do recently diagnosed black breast cancer patients find questions about cancer fatalism acceptable? A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Vanessa B; Davis, Kimberly; Boisvert, Marc; Boisvert, Mare; Jennings, Yvonne; Montalvo, Becky

    2011-03-01

    Socio-cultural factors such as cancer fatalism have been understudied in cancer patients. Women from two cancer centers completed a structured phone survey and an open-ended cognitive interview. Socio-cultural variables of fatalism, hope, and spiritual coping were measured using standardized scales. Older women had significantly higher fatalism scores compared to younger women (p Fatalism rates were low. Ratings of hope and collaborative religious coping were high (m = 20, m = 35, respectively). Qualitative comments confirmed the overall low acceptability of the fatalism measures. Further research is needed to identify measures that are acceptable to newly diagnosed patients.

  3. Use Of Chinese Medicine Among Colorectal Cancer Patients: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted using registration and claims data sets for 2007 from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the Registry for Catastrophic illness Patients. Binary logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios ...

  4. Prognosis and Survival in patients with Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the outcome after colorectal surgery and to try to find possible ways to improve staging and treatment, especially in patients with stage I and II colonic cancer. The first part of this thesis describes the outcome and quality of life in patients with

  5. Internet Use for Prediagnosis Symptom Appraisal by Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.; Longo, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study explored the characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who accessed Internet-based health information as part of their symptom appraisal process prior to consulting a health care provider. Method: Newly diagnosed CRC patients who experienced symptoms prior to diagnosis were interviewed. Brief COPE was used to…

  6. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cree, I.A.; Deans, Z.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Normanno, N.; Edsjo, A.; Rouleau, E.; Sole, F.; Thunnissen, E.; Timens, W.; Schuuring, E.; Dequeker, E.; Murray, S.; Dietel, M.; Groenen, P.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2014-01-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this

  7. Evaluation of patients\\' adherence to chemotherapy for breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to establish the common reasons for non-adherence to drug treatment among breast cancer patients at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria over a ten-year period (Jan 1993 - Dec 2002). Patients\\' adherence and reasons for non-adherence to chemotherapy were ...

  8. Delayed presentation of breast cancer patients | Otieno | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the extent and nature of delayed presentation of patients treated for breast cancer at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH). Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) which is a tertiary, teaching and referral hospital in Nairobi, Kenya. Results: A total of 166 patients were recruited into the study. The mean ...

  9. HIFU therapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovov, V. A.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.; Matysh, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Objectives. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or ADT alone. The widely accepted definition of high-risk prostate was first proposed by D'Amico based on a pretreatment Gleason score of ≥8, clinical stage T3, PSA level ≥20 ng/mL. There is no trial that compares traditional methods of treatment of such patients with HIFU therapy. Here we explored the effectiveness of the HIFU in multimodal treatment for patients with high risk prostate cancer. Materials & Methods. 701 patients with high risk prostate cancer were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2013. Gleason score were 8-10, stage T3N0M0, age 69 (58-86) years, mean PSA before treatment 43.3 (22.1-92.9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume - 59.3 (38-123) cc. 248 patients were treated by HIFU. We compare this group of patients with patients who undertook EBRT: number 196, and ADT: number 257. Mean follow-up time 58 months (6-72). Results. The 5-year overall survival rates in patients after HIFU were 73.8 %, after EBRT - 63.0 % and after ADT - 18.1%. Conclusions. Our experience showed that HIFU therapy in combined treatment were successful for high risk prostate cancer.

  10. Quality of life in colorectal cancer. Stoma vs. nonstoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M. A.; Taal, B. G.; Aaronson, N. K.; te Velde, A.

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: The bowel and sexual function of colorectal cancer patients undergoing either sphincter-saving or sphincter-sacrificing surgical procedures may be impaired. A legitimate question is how these different surgical techniques affect the patients' quality of life. METHODS: Seventeen studies were

  11. Do patients with lung cancer benefit from physical exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas Holst; Vinther, Anders; Poulsen, Lise-Lotte

    2011-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer are often burdened by dyspnoea, fatigue, decreased physical ability and loss of weight. Earlier studies of physical exercise of patients with COPD have shown promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate, if a well-documented COPD rehabilitation protocol ca...

  12. A Diagnostic Program for Patients Suspected of Having Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, Jos A.; Uil, Steven M.; Oostdijk, Ad H.; Boers, James E.; van den Berg, Jan-Willem K.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2012-01-01

    In 297 patients suspected of having lung cancer, invasive diagnostic procedures followed positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) on the same day. For patients with a diagnosis of malignancy (215/297), investigations were finalized on 1 day in 85%, and bronchoscopy was performed in

  13. [Nutritional status and postoperative complications in patients with digestive cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pañella, Loreto; Jara, Marlene; Cornejo, Morelia; Lastra, Ximena; Contreras, María Gladys; Alfaro, Kattia; De La Maza, María Pía

    2014-11-01

    Risk of malnutrition is elevated among oncologic patients, and this increases postoperative morbidity and mortality. To study the association between nutritional status and postoperative outcomes in a group of patients with gastrointestinal cancers. We studied 129 patients with diagnosis of digestive cancer, previous to potentially curative surgery. Nutritional status was evaluated through anthropometric measures, Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), dietary intake recalls and routine biochemical parameters. Functional performance was assessed by the Karnofsky index (KI). Cancer stage was classified according to TNM4. During the postoperative period, complications, length of stay at the critical care ward and duration of hospitalization were registered. Thirty days after discharge, patients were contacted, and the appearance of new complications was listed. According to SGA 14.7% of patients were classified as well nourished (A), 57.3% as moderately undernourished or at risk of malnutrition (B) and 27.9% as severely malnourished (C). The incidence of total complications was 25.5%. Nutritional status was not associated with cancer stage. The frequency of complications among patients classified as A, B and C were 5.5, 25.3 and 37.1% respectively (p = 0.03). We detected a high frequency of malnutrition in this group of patients. Overall the frequency of postoperative complications was low, however malnourished patients exhibited a higher rate of surgical complications.

  14. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Tietze, Anna; Khalil, Azza Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prophylactic cerebral irradiation (PCI) is a standard treatment for all small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with response to chemotherapy. The aims of this study were: to evaluate patients undergoing PCI with regard to cerebral recurrence rate, site of recurrence, and overall...

  15. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Kørner, Ejnar Alex

    2016-01-01

    Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test can be used as screening tools for delirium among inpatients with cancer, but even in synergy, they lack specificity. Combining cognitive testing and attention to nurses' records might improve detection, yet further studies are needed to create a more detailed patient...... Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious...

  16. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2011-01-01

    .0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number...... and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27...

  17. An Application for Measuring Frailty of Myeloma Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corradini, Andrea; Bøgelund Hansen, Martin; Savic, Toma

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a responsive web-based application that we have been developing for the cancer hospital in the city of Vejle, Denmark. The application administers and handles systematic frailty scoring of patients with multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer) and thereby helps the doctor...... make a more efficient and more effective treatment choice. The application is currently being tested with a small number of patients and is to replace the frailty measurement system used until now, which is usually done by the doctor on a per patient basis....

  18. Immediate breast reconstruction with expander in pregnant breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohsiriwat, Visnu; Peccatori, Fedro Alessandro; Martella, Stefano; Azim, Hatem A; Sarno, Maria Anna; Galimberti, Viviana; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Intra, Mattia; Sangalli, Claudia; Rotmensz, Nicole; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Renne, Giuseppe; Schorr, Mario Casales; Nevola Teixeira, Luiz Felipe; Rietjens, Mario; Giroda, Massimo; Gentilini, Oreste

    2013-10-01

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is currently considered an essential component in managing breast cancer patients, particularly those diagnosed at a young age. However, no studies have been published on the feasibility of immediate breast reconstruction in patients diagnosed and operated during the course of gestation. We retrospectively identified all breast cancer patients who were subjected to mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction during pregnancy at the European Institute of Oncology between 2002 and 2012. Patient demographics, gestational age at surgery, tumor stage, adjuvant treatment, details of the surgical procedures, surgical outcomes and fetal outcomes were analyzed. A total of 78 patients with breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy were subjected to a surgical procedure during the course of gestation. Twenty-two patients had mastectomy; of whom 13 were subjected to immediate breast reconstruction. Twelve out of 13 patients had a two-stage procedure with tissue expander insertion. Median gestational age at surgery was 16 weeks. No major surgical complications were encountered. Only one patient elected to have an abortion, otherwise, no spontaneous abortions or pregnancy complications were reported. Median gestational age at delivery was 35 weeks (range: 32-40 weeks). No major congenital malformations were reported. At a median follow-up of 32 months, all patients are alive with no long-term surgical complications. This is the first study of immediate breast reconstruction in pregnant breast cancer patients. Tissue expander insertion appears to ensure a short operative time, and does not seem to be associated with considerable morbidity to the patient or the fetus. Hence, it could be considered in the multidisciplinary management of women diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Legal and Policy Issues for LGBT Patients with Cancer or at Elevated Risk of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Sean R

    2018-02-01

    To understand the major legal and policy issues for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cancer patients. LGBT health policy research. Major policy issues include discrimination, lack of cultural competency and clinically appropriate care, insurance coverage, family recognition, and sexual orientation and gender identity data collection. Nurses play a major role in providing affirming and competent care to LGBT cancer patients. Using correct names and pronouns with transgender patients, and collecting sexual orientation and gender identity data can send an affirming message to LGBT patients, as well as inform decision support and preventive screenings, and improve treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Local changes in hemostasis in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacova, E; Kinova, S; Duris, I; Remkova, A

    2009-01-01

    Disorders of haemostasis and haemocoagulation are often seen in cancer patients as a part of the paraneoplastic syndrome. This study describes a novel compound that activates coagulation and also inhibits fibrinolytic system and fibrin degradation products in the gastric juice of 33 patients with gastric cancer. Similar, but less pronounced changes have been found in gastric juice of patients with gastric precancerosis. Procoagulant activity, induced by pathologically changed cells or monocytes, macrophages from tumor stroma, indicates the activation of local coagulation with the production of fibrin. It can be concluded that the local changes of coagulation and fibrinolysis may precede coagulopathies in cancer patients (Tab. 2, Ref. 15). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  1. Nonpharmacologic approach to fatigue in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachman, Deirdre R; Price, Katharine A; Carey, Elise C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is a common yet underappreciated problem with a significant impact on functional ability and quality of life. Practice guidelines mandate that all cancer patients and survivors be screened for cancer-related fatigue (CRF) at regular intervals. Comorbidities that could contribute to fatigue should be treated, and patients with moderate to severe fatigue should undergo a comprehensive evaluation. Nonpharmacologic interventions are important tools to combat CRF and should be incorporated into routine practice. Physical activity, educational interventions, and cognitive-behavioral therapy have the most supportive data and can be recommended to patients with confidence. From a practical standpoint, general education on CRF is something that most care providers can readily offer patients as part of routine care. Other interventions that appear promising but are as yet lacking convincing evidence include mindfulness-based stress reduction, yoga, and acupuncture. Reiki, Qigong, hypnosis, and music therapy may be worthy of further investigation.

  2. Preparatory grief, psychological distress and hopelessness in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystakidou, K; Parpa, E; Tsilika, E; Athanasouli, P; Pathiaki, M; Galanos, A; Pagoropoulou, A; Vlahos, L

    2008-03-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the preparatory grief process in advanced cancer patients and its relationship with hopelessness, depression and anxiety. In total, 94 advanced cancer patients treated in a Pain Relief and Palliative Care Unit completed the Preparatory Grief in Advanced Cancer Patients (PGAC) Scale, the Greek Hospital Anxiety and Depression (G-HAD) scales, and a measure of hopelessness the Beck Hopelessness Scale. The strongest correlation was found between grief and hopelessness (r = 0.63, P grief, metastases (P = 0.073) and education (P = 0.043). In the multiple regression analysis (enter method), anxiety (P grief followed by hopelessness (P = 0.002), presence of metastases (P = 0.004) and depression (P = 0.033). Depression, hopelessness, anxiety and terminally ill patients' metastases contribute to the prediction of preparatory grief in this population.

  3. Cancer patients and positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Birkelund, Regner

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how cancer patients experience the meaning of positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment such as architecture, decoration and the interior. Data were obtained at a general hospital in Denmark by interviewing six cancer patients at two different wards. The analysis...... process was guided by the hermeneutical–phenomenological theory of interpretation as presented by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Two main themes were identified: to preserve identity and positive thoughts and feelings. The participants experienced that positive sensory impressions in the hospital...... to recall some of their feelings of identity. This paper adds knowledge about how cancer patients experience sensory impressions in the hospital environment. An environment that provides homeliness and offers a view to nature seems to help some patients to preserve their identity. Furthermore, positive...

  4. Time Perception of Cancer Patients Without Evidence of Disease and Advanced Cancer Patients in a Palliative, End-of-Life-Care Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Schilderman, J.; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.M.; Prins, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: : Time perception may be an important factor influencing distress of cancer patients. However, no comparative studies have been performed for cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in the palliative, end-of-life-care setting. OBJECTIVE: : The objectives

  5. Time perception of cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in a palliative, end-of-life-care setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Schilderman, Johannes; Verhagen, Constans A. H. H. V. M.; Prins, Judith B.

    2011-01-01

    Time perception may be an important factor influencing distress of cancer patients. However, no comparative studies have been performed for cancer patients without evidence of disease and advanced cancer patients in the palliative, end-of-life-care setting. The objectives of the study were to assess

  6. Quality of care in cancer: An exploration of patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mahapatra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is as important as is the care itself. When the patient has a disease like cancer it becomes even more important. A cancer patient not only suffers from the disease but also undergoes substantial mental trauma, agony, stress, uncertainty, and apprehension. There are limited studies in India eliciting patient's views on the quality of care being received by cancer patients. Methodology: A cross-sectional triangulation data transformation model mixed method design (Quant + Qual was used to conduct the study between March and May 2015 among patients attending specialty hospitals providing oncology services in Odisha, India. The quantitative data were collected using, Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 to assess satisfaction. The qualitative data were obtained through in-depth interviews using open-ended questionnaire. Results: The results showed that general satisfaction among the patients was 60%. The maximum score was obtained for the communication of doctors. The qualitative findings revealed that travel for distant places for minor illness, waiting period, and lack of services at the primary care facilities were reasons for patient's dissatisfaction. Conclusion: The study found that the patients were generally satisfied with the quality of services. However, more studies should be conducted including perceptions of the patients as well as the caregiver.

  7. Psychosocial determinants of cancer-related information seeking among cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Fishbein, Martin; Hornik, Robert C

    2011-02-01

    This study explores the utility of using the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction as a framework for predicting cancer patients' intentions to seek information about their cancer from sources other than a physician, and to examine the relation between patients' baseline intentions to seek information and their actual seeking behavior at follow-up. Within 1 year of their diagnosis with colon, breast, or prostate cancer, 1,641 patients responded to a mailed questionnaire assessing intentions to seek cancer-related information from a source other than their doctor, as well as their attitudes, perceived normative pressure, and perceived behavioral control with respect to this behavior. In addition, the survey assessed their cancer-related information seeking. One year later, 1,049 of these patients responded to a follow-up survey assessing cancer-related information seeking during the previous year. Attitudes, perceived normative pressure, and perceived behavioral control were predictive of information-seeking intentions, although attitudes emerged as the primary predictor. Intentions to seek information, perceived normative pressure regarding information seeking, baseline information-seeking behavior, and being diagnosed with stage 4 cancer were predictive of actual information-seeking behavior at follow-up. Practical implications are discussed.

  8. Synchronous and Metachronous Colon Cancers in Patients with Gastric Cancer: Report of 2 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung Jo Suh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the most common synchronous or metachronous cancer in patients with gastric cancer. I report two cases of synchronous and metachronous colon cancer with gastric cancer. Case 1: A 70-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of gastric cancer, which had been diagnosed during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD screening. The recommended preoperative testing was colonofiberscopy (CFS. The CFS revealed a 3-cm ulcerofungating mass, located 20 cm from the anal verge. The pathological report showed a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Consequently, we performed radical total gastrectomy and low anterior resection simultaneously. There was no recurrence during the 40-month follow-up of this individual on an out-patient basis. Case 2: A 71-year-old man who was treated with laparoscopically assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG due to early gastric cancer underwent regular follow-up examination with EGD and abdominopelvic computed tomography. A CFS performed 5 years after the LADG revealed a polypoid mass in the sigmoid colon. The pathological report showed a villous adenoma with adenocarcinoma in situ. The patient underwent a colonofiberscopic mucosectomy. At 36 months after the endoscopic mucosectomy, the patient remained free of recurrence.

  9. Screening for Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) among endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Heather; Frankel, Wendy; Panescu, Jenny; Lockman, Janet; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Fix, Daniel; Comeras, Ilene; La Jeunesse, Jennifer; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Westman, Judith A; Prior, Thomas W; Clendenning, Mark; Penzone, Pamela; Lombardi, Janet; Dunn, Patti; Cohn, David E; Copeland, Larry; Eaton, Lynne; Fowler, Jeffrey; Lewandowski, George; Vaccarello, Luis; Bell, Jeffrey; Reid, Gary; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2006-08-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common cancer in women with Lynch syndrome. The identification of individuals with Lynch syndrome is desirable because they can benefit from increased cancer surveillance. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and desirability of molecular screening for Lynch syndrome in all endometrial cancer patients. Unselected endometrial cancer patients (N = 543) were studied. All tumors underwent microsatellite instability (MSI) testing. Patients with MSI-positive tumors underwent testing for germ line mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Of 543 tumors studied, 118 (21.7%) were MSI positive (98 of 118 MSI high and 20 of 118 MSI low). All 118 patients with MSI-positive tumors had mutation testing, and nine of them had deleterious germ line mutations (one MLH1, three MSH2, and five MSH6). In addition, one case with an MSI-negative tumor had abnormal MSH6 immunohistochemical staining and was subsequently found to have a mutation in MSH6. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with the mutation result in all seven truncating mutation-positive cases but was not consistent in two of the three missense mutation cases. We conclude that in central Ohio, at least 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-3.5%) of newly diagnosed endometrial cancer patients had Lynch syndrome. Seven of the 10 Lynch syndrome patients did not meet any published criteria for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, and six of them were diagnosed at age >50. Studying all endometrial cancer patients for Lynch syndrome using a combination of MSI and immunohistochemistry for molecular prescreening followed by gene sequencing and deletion analysis is feasible and may be desirable.

  10. Analysis of esophagogastric cancer patients enrolled in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program sponsored phase 1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hideaki; Rubinstein, Larry; Harris, Pamela; Yoshino, Takayuki; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Welch, John; Takebe, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    In phase 1 trials, an important entry criterion is life expectancy predicted to be more than 90 days, which is generally difficult to predict. The Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) prognostic score that is determined by lactate dehydrogenase level, albumin level, and number of metastatic sites of disease was developed to help project patient outcomes. There have been no systematic analyses to evaluate the utility of the RMH prognostic score for esophagogastric cancer patients. All nonpediatric phase 1 oncology trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program that began between 2001 and 2013 were considered in this review. Of 4722 patients with solid tumors, 115 patients were eligible for our analysis; 54 (47 %) with cancer of the esophagus, 14 (12 %) with cancer of the esopagogastric junction, and 47 (41 %) with stomach cancer. Eighty-six patients (75 %) had a good RMH prognostic score (0 or 1) and 29 patients (25 %) had a poor RMH prognostic score (2 or 3). Disease control rates were significantly different between patients with good and poor RMH prognostic scores (49 % vs 17 %; two-sided Fisher's exact test P = 0.004). The median treatment duration and overall survival for good and poor RMH prognostic score patients were significantly different (median treatment duration 2.1 months vs 1.2 months respectively, P = 0.016; median overall survival 10.9 months vs 2.1 months respectively, P cancer patients who might participate in a phase 1 trial.

  11. Translating basic research in cancer patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Maugeri-Saccà

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of molecular targeted therapies and the development of high-throughput biotechnologies, it has become evident that progress in cancer research is largely due to the creation of multidisciplinary teams able to plan clinical trials supported by appropriate molecular hypotheses. These efforts have culminated in the identification and validation of biomarkers predictive of response, as well as in the generation of more accurate prognostic tools. The identification of cancer stem cells has provided further insights into mechanisms of cancer, and many studies have tried to translate this biological notion into prognostic and predictive information. In this regard, new agents targeting key stemness-related pathways have entered the clinical development, and preliminary data suggested an encouraging antitumor activity.

  12. Cancer survival in adult patients in Spain. Results from nine population-based cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirlaque, M D; Salmerón, D; Galceran, J; Ameijide, A; Mateos, A; Torrella, A; Jiménez, R; Larrañaga, N; Marcos-Gragera, R; Ardanaz, E; Sant, M; Minicozzi, P; Navarro, C; Sánchez, M J

    2017-07-17

    With the aim of providing cancer control indicators, this work presents cancer survival in adult (≥15 years) patients in Spain diagnosed during the period 2000-2007 from Spanish cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE project. Cancer cases from nine Spanish population-based cancer registries were included and analysed as a whole. All primary malignant neoplasms diagnosed in adult patients were eligible for the analysis. Cancer patients were followed until 31 December 2008. For each type of cancer, 1-, 3- and 5-year observed and relative survival were estimated by sex, age and years from diagnosis. Furthermore, age-standardized 5-year relative survival for the period 2000-2007 has been compared with that of the period 1995-1999. Skin melanoma (84.6 95% CI 83.0-86.2), prostate (84.6% 95% CI 83.6-85.6) and thyroid (84.2% CI 95% 82.0-86.6) cancers showed the highest 5-year relative survival, whereas the worst prognosis was observed in pancreatic (6% 95% CI 5.1-7.0) and oesophageal (9.4% 95% CI 7.9-11.1) cancers. Overall, survival is higher in women (58.0%) than in men (48.9%). The absolute difference in relative survival between 2000-2007 and 1995-1999 was positive for all cancers as a whole (+4.8% in men, +1.6% in women) and for most types of tumours. Survival increased significantly for chronic myeloid leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rectum cancer in both sexes, and for acute lymphoid leukaemia, prostate, liver and colon cancers in men and Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer in women. Survival patterns by age were similar in Europe and Spain. A decline in survival by age was observed in all tumours, being more pronounced for ovarian, corpus uteri, prostate and urinary bladder and less for head and neck and rectum cancers. High variability and differences have been observed in survival among adults in Spain according to the type of cancer diagnosed, from above 84% to below 10%, reflecting high heterogeneity. The differences in prognosis by age, sex

  13. Routine endoscopy for esophageal cancer is suggestive for patients with oral, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Han Hung

    Full Text Available This study attempted to reveal the incidence and risk of synchronous and metachronous esophageal cancer in subjects with oral, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer based on a population-wide database in Taiwan.We retrieved data for this cross-sectional study from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. The study group included 2,965 subjects who had received their first-time diagnosis of oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer in 2002∼2009. We assigned the date of their first diagnosis of oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer as the index date. We also randomly retrieved 29,650 comparison subjects matched with the study subjects in terms of gender and age group. We assigned their first medical utilization that occurred in the index year as the index date for the comparison group. We further performed a conditional logistic regression to investigate the association between esophageal cancer and oral cancer.Results showed that prevalences of esophageal cancer within 3 months before and after the index date were respectively 2.19% and 0.04% for the study and comparison groups. A conditional logistic regression revealed that the odds ratio (OR of esophageal cancer for subjects with oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 55.33 (95% confidence interval (CI: 29.86∼102.52 compared to comparison subjects. Furthermore, compared to comparison subjects, ORs for esophageal cancer were respectively 18.41 (95% CI: 8.50-39.85, 40.49 (95% CI: 15.11∼108.64, and 240.96 (95% CI: 125.49-462.69 for study subjects with a malignancy of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx.We concluded that there were relatively high chances for synchronous and metachronous esophageal cancers being detected through panendoscopy in patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancers. The routine use of panendoscopy in such patients should be encouraged with a higher priority.

  14. Baseline cognitive functions among elderly patients with localised breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Marie; Giffard, Bénédicte; Noal, Sabine; Rigal, Olivier; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Heutte, Natacha; Lévy, Christelle; Allouache, Djelila; Rieux, Chantal; Le Fel, Johan; Daireaux, Aurélie; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Veyret, Corinne; Barthélémy, Philippe; Longato, Nadine; Eustache, Francis; Joly, Florence

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive deficits (CD) are reported among cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, but may also be observed before treatment. Though elderly patients are expected to be more prone to present age-related CD, poor information is available regarding the impact of cancer and chemotherapy on this population. This study assessed baseline cognitive functions (before adjuvant treatment) in elderly early stage breast cancer (EBC) patients. Women >65years-old with newly diagnosed EBC were included in this prospective study. Episodic memory, working memory, executive functions and information processing speed were assessed by neuropsychological tests. Questionnaires were used to assess subjective CD, anxiety, depression, fatigue, quality of life and geriatric profile. Objective CD were defined using International Cognition and Cancer Task Force criteria. A group of elderly women without cancer coupled with published data related to healthy women were used for comparison (respectively to subjective and objective CD). Among the 123 elderly EBC patients (70±4years) included, 41% presented objective CD, which is greater than expected in healthy population norms (binomial test P<.0001). Verbal episodic memory was mainly impaired (21% of patients). No correlation was observed between objective CD and cancer stage or geriatric assessment. Subjective CD only correlated with verbal episodic memory (P=.01). This is the first large series assessing baseline cognitive functions in elderly EBC patients. More than 40% presented objective CD before any adjuvant therapy, which is higher than what is reported among younger patients. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that age is a risk factor for CD in EBC patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determinants of suicidal ideation in gynecological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G X; Yan, P P; Yan, C L; Fu, B; Zhu, S J; Zhou, L Q; Huang, X; Wang, Y; Lei, J

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancer survivors are at increased risk of psychological problems including suicide risk. Suicidal ideation, which was thought to be precursor to suicide attempts, has not been well studied. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence, and determinants of suicidal ideation for women with gynecological cancer, and then to assess the effect of coping style and social support on suicidal ideation. Patients with cervical, ovarian and endometrial cancers seen at Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital from September 2012 to June 2013 were consecutively recruited and were asked to complete the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, Suicidal Ideation of Self-rating Scale, Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire and Social Support Rating Scale. Path analysis was used to examine the relationship among coping style, social support, depression symptoms and suicidal ideation. A total of 579 (579/623, 93.0%) gynecological cancer patients were enrolled in this study and completed all investigations between September 2012 and June 2013. Among them, 105 (18.1%) patients reported suicidal ideation, with the highest rate in patients with ovarian cancer (30.16%). Suicidal ideation was associated with depression symptoms, care providers, chemotherapy history and acceptance-resignation. Path analysis showed that the acceptance-resignation affected suicidal ideation directly as well as mediated by social support and depression symptoms, while confrontation and avoidance affected suicidal ideation entirely through social support and depression symptoms. Suicidal ideation is high among patients with gynecological cancer, especially among ovarian cancer patients. Coping strategies such as confrontation and avoidance, and social support may be helpful for preventing suicidal ideation among them. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. LMWH in cancer patients with renal impairment - better than warfarin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersachs, Rupert M

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the leading causes of death in cancer patients, which are known to have a 5- to 7-fold increased risk for VTE. The anticoagulant treatment of VTE in cancer patients is less effective with a three-fold increased risk of VTE recurrence compared to non-cancer patients, and it is less safe with more than double rates of major bleeding. Compared to vitamin-K antagonists (VKA), long-term secondary prevention with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent VTE in cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), and therefore, current international guidelines recommend the use of LMWH over VKA. With increasing age, cancer prevalence and VTE incidence increase while renal function decreases. Anti-cancer treatment may impair renal function additionally. Therefore, renal insufficiency is a frequent challenge in CAT patients, which is associated with a higher risk of both bleeding and recurrent VTE. Both VKA and LMWH may be associated with less efficacy and higher bleeding risk in renal insufficiency. Unfortunately, there is a lack of prospective data on renal insufficiency and CAT. A recent sub-analysis from a large randomized controlled trial shows that the bleeding risk in patients with severe renal insufficiency in CAT is not elevated with the use of LMWH compared to VKA while efficacy is maintained. In addition, LMWH treatment has several practical advantages over VKA, particularly in patients with CAT while they are receiving anti-cancer treatment. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychological factors and preferences for communicating prognosis in esophageal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Sanne J.; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; van Werven, Jochem R.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Tran, Khe T. C.; Plukker, John Th. M.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Discussing prognosis is often confronting and complex for cancer patients. This study investigates bow patients' psychological characteristics relate to their preferences concerning the disclosure of prognosis. Methods: One hundred and seventy-six esophageal cancer patients participated

  18. Systematic review: isocaloric ketogenic dietary regimes for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, N; Boscheri, A; Linke, B; Huebner, J

    2017-05-01

    The efficacy and benefits of ketogenic diets (KD) have recently been gaining worldwide and remain a controversial topic in oncology. This systematic review therefore presents and evaluates the clinical evidence on isocaloric KD dietary regimes and reveals that evidence supporting the effects of isocaloric ketogenic dietary regimes on tumor development and progression as well as reduction in side effects of cancer therapy is missing. Furthermore, an array of potential side effects should be carefully considered before applying KD to cancer patients. In regard to counseling cancer patients considering a KD, more robust and consistent clinical evidence is necessary before the KD can be recommended for any single cancer diagnosis or as an adjunct therapy.

  19. Obesity adversely affects survival in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Robert R; Matsumoto, Martha E; Burch, Patrick A; Kim, George P; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; de Andrade, Mariza; Reid-Lombardo, Kaye; Bamlet, William R

    2010-11-01

    Higher body-mass index (BMI) has been implicated as a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer, but its effect on survival has not been thoroughly investigated. The authors assessed the association of BMI with survival in a sample of pancreatic cancer patients and used epidemiologic and clinical information to understand the contribution of diabetes and hyperglycemia. A survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards by usual adult BMI was performed on 1861 unselected patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; analyses were adjusted for covariates that included clinical stage, age, and sex. Secondary analyses incorporated self-reported diabetes and fasting blood glucose in the survival model. BMI as a continuous variable was inversely associated with survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma (hazard ratio [HR], 1.019 for each increased unit of BMI [kg/m2], Ppancreatic cancer. Although the mechanism of this association remains undetermined, diabetes and hyperglycemia do not appear to account for the observed association. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  20. Experiences of Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Figen Şengün; Günüşen, Neslihan Partlak; Üstün, Besti

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe the experiences of women in Turkey during the diagnostic phase of breast cancer. In the research, the phenomenological approach was used. The data were collected through semistructured in-depth interviews. The sample comprised nine breast cancer patients in the diagnostic phase. The data were categorized into four themes: facing the breast cancer diagnosis, uncertainty, avoidance, and holding on to life. Women experience intense uncertainty about the disease, treatment, and social relationships and thus exhibit avoidance behavior. Nurses should be aware of psychosocial difficulties suffered during the diagnostic phase and provide care for patients. It is important that nurses provide information about the diagnostic phase to women with breast cancer and encourage them to ask questions and express their feelings. © The Author(s) 2014.