WorldWideScience

Sample records for weight loss strategies

  1. Weight Loss Strategies Utilized in a Men's Weight Loss Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Melissa M; Lutes, Lesley D; Sherwood, Nancy E; Ward, Dianne S; Tate, Deborah F

    2017-09-01

    Men are underrepresented in weight loss programs and little is currently known about the weight loss strategies men prefer. This study describes the weight loss strategies used by men during a men-only weight loss program. At baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, participants reported how frequently they used 45 weight loss strategies including strategies frequently recommended by the program (i.e., mentioned during every intervention contact; e.g., daily self-weighing), strategies occasionally recommended by the program (i.e., mentioned at least once during the program; e.g., reduce calories from beverages), and strategies not included in the program (e.g., increase daily steps). At baseline participants ( N = 107, 44.2 years, body mass index = 31.4 kg/m2, 76.6% White) reported regularly using 7.3 ± 6.6 ( M ± SD) strategies. The intervention group increased the number of strategies used to 19.1 ± 8.3 at 3 months and 17.1 ± 8.4 at 6 months with no changes in the waitlist group. The intervention group reported increased use of most of the strategies frequently recommended by the program (4 of 5), nearly half of the strategies occasionally recommended by the program (10 of 24), and one strategy not included in the program (of 16) at 6 months. The intervention effect at 6 months was significantly mediated by the number of strategies used at 3 months. This study adds to what is known about men's use of weight loss strategies prior to and during a formal weight loss program and will help future program developers create programs that are tailored to men.

  2. Family support and weight-loss strategies among adolescents reporting sustained weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Jennifer; Denny, Simon; Dixon, Robyn; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Teevale, Tasileta

    2013-03-01

    The current research aims to describe the weight-control strategies and family support for young people reporting sustained weight loss in a large, population-based sample. Data were collected as part of Youth'07, a nationally representative survey of the health and well-being of New Zealand youth. New Zealand secondary schools, 2007. Secondary-school students (n 9107). Among young people who attempted weight loss in the previous year, 51% reported long-term weight loss (lost weight and maintained weight loss for 6 months). Students reporting long-term weight loss were more likely to be male, but did not differ by age, ethnicity, socio-economic deprivation or measured weight status from students who reported temporary/recent weight loss or no weight loss. Students with long-term weight loss also reported healthier weight-control strategies (e.g., exercising, eating fewer fatty foods, eating fewer sweets), high parental support for healthy eating/activity and were less likely to report being teased about their weight by their family and having junk food available at home than students with temporary/recent weight loss or no weight loss. Approximately 50% of young people attempting weight loss reported sustained weight loss. Young people who reported sustained weight loss appeared to have more family support than those who did not achieve this, suggesting the importance for weight-control services and interventions in adolescents of actively engaging the family.

  3. Weight loss strategies for treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most serious and prevalent non-communicable diseases of the 21st century. It is also a patient-centered condition in which affected individuals seek treatment through a variety of commercial, medical and surgical approaches. Considering obesity as a chronic medical disease state helps to frame the concept of using a three-stepped intensification of care approach to weight management. As a foundation, all patients should be counseled on evidence-based lifestyle approaches that include diet, physical activity and behavior change therapies. At the second tier, two new pharmacological agents, phentermine-topiramate and lorcaserin, were approved in 2012 as adjuncts to lifestyle modification. The third step, bariatric surgery, has been demonstrated to be the most effective and long-term treatment for individuals with severe obesity or moderate obesity complicated by comorbid conditions that is not responsive to non-surgical approaches. By using a medical model, clinicians can provide more proactive and effective treatments in assisting their patients with weight loss. © 2014.

  4. Evidence-based strategies in weight-loss mobile apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry; Schneider, Kristin; Jojic, Mirjana; DeBiasse, Michele; Mann, Devin

    2013-11-01

    Physicians have limited time for weight-loss counseling, and there is a lack of resources to which they can refer patients for assistance with weight loss. Weight-loss mobile applications (apps) have the potential to be a helpful tool, but the extent to which they include the behavioral strategies included in evidence-based interventions is unknown. The primary aims of the study were to determine the degree to which commercial weight-loss mobile apps include the behavioral strategies included in evidence-based weight-loss interventions, and to identify features that enhance behavioral strategies via technology. Thirty weight-loss mobile apps, available on iPhone and/or Android platforms, were coded for whether they included any of 20 behavioral strategies derived from an evidence-based weight-loss program (i.e., Diabetes Prevention Program). Data on available apps were collected in January 2012; data were analyzed in June 2012. The apps included on average 18.83% (SD=13.24; range=0%-65%) of the 20 strategies. Seven of the strategies were not found in any app. The most common technology-enhanced features were barcode scanners (56.7%) and a social network (46.7%). Weight-loss mobile apps typically included only a minority of the behavioral strategies found in evidence-based weight-loss interventions. Behavioral strategies that help improve motivation, reduce stress, and assist with problem solving were missing across apps. Inclusion of additional strategies could make apps more helpful to users who have motivational challenges. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  5. The relationship between prevalence and duration of weight loss strategies and weight loss among overweight managed care organization members enrolled in a weight loss trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery Robert W

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adults in the United States report engaging in weight loss behaviors. The current study examined weight loss strategies among managed care organization members, to determine the prevalence and impact of weight loss behaviors in this population. We hypothesized that greater engagement in weight loss strategies would be associated with greater weight loss success. Methods Data were taken from Weigh-to-Be (WTB, a two-year weight loss trial (N = 1801, 72% female, mean age = 50.7 years, mean weight = 95.9 kg, mean BMI = 34.2 kg/m2. Every six months, participants completed a questionnaire assessing frequency and duration of weight loss strategies (calorie reduction, fat reduction, increased fruit/vegetable intake, increased exercise, elimination of sweets, consumption of less food. General linear models and structural equation methods were used to examine associations between weight loss strategy use and weight change over time. Results Weight loss strategy prevalence rates ranged from 68% to 76% over two years. For all dietary strategies, any use of the strategy between baseline and 24 months was associated with weight loss at 24 months; those who did not engage in the strategy showed weight gains during that period. Results of general linear models and structural equation models indicated that increased use of weight loss strategies was significantly associated with greater 24-month weight loss. Conclusion The prevalence of weight loss strategies in this obese adult managed care population was quite high, and use of these strategies was associated in dose-response fashion with better weight loss. Future interventions may benefit from emphasis on persistence of similar strategies to achieve more successful outcomes.

  6. Weight loss maintenance: A review on dietary related strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Azizi Soeliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Weight regain after weight loss is a common problem for all those obese or overweight who have had a recent weight loss. Different cures such as diet therapy, behavioral therapy, exercise or a mixture of them have been advised as solutions. The purpose of this review is to find the best diet or eating pattern to maintain a recent weight loss. Materials and Methods: We searched in PubMed and SCOPUS by using the following key words: Overweight, obesity, weight maintenance, weight regain, and diet therapy. Finally, we assessed 26 articles in the present article. Results: Meal replacement, low carbohydrate-low glycemic index (GI diet, high protein intake, and moderate fat consumption have shown some positive effects on weight maintenance. However, the results are controversial. A Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH-type diet seems helpful for weight maintenance although the need for more study has remained. Some special behaviors were associated with less weight regain, such as, not being awake late at night, drinking lower amount of sugar-sweetened beverages, and following a healthy pattern. Some special foods have been suggested for weight maintenance. However, the roles of specific foods are not confirmed. Conclusion: Healthy diets recommend low carbohydrate, low GI, and moderate fat foods, but it is not clear whether they are useful in preventing weight gain. It seems that consuming fewer calories helps people to keep weight loss. Further research to find strategies in obesity management focusing on successful maintenance of weight loss is needed.

  7. Popular Weight Loss Strategies: a Review of Four Weight Loss Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Jonathan; Pearlman, Michelle; Obert, Lois; Chapin, Sarah

    2017-11-09

    The purpose of this paper is to review the epidemiology of obesity and the most recent literature on popular fad diets and exercise regimens that are used for weight loss. The weight loss plans that will be discussed in this article include juicing or detoxification diets, intermittent fasting, the paleo diet, and high intensity training. Despite the growing popularity of fad diets and exercise plans for weight loss, there are limited studies that actually suggest these particular regimens are beneficial and lead to long-term weight loss. Juicing or detoxification diets tend to work because they lead to extremely low caloric intake for short periods of time, however tend to lead to weight gain once a normal diet is resumed. Both intermittent fasting and the paleo diet lead to weight loss because of overall decreased caloric intake as well. Lastly, studies on short bursts of high intensity training have shown remarkable weight loss and improvements in cardiovascular health. Review of the literature does suggest that some fad diets and exercise plans do lead to weight loss; however, the studies are quite limited and are all based on the concept of caloric restriction.

  8. Behavior Change Strategies for Successful Long-Term Weight Loss: Focusing on Dietary and Physical Activity Adherence, Not Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongu, Nobuko; Kataura, Martha P.; Block, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    This article helps Extension professionals guide individuals in a successful long-term weight loss program. A program should focus on behavioral changes (improving eating habits and physical activity), not just weight loss. In order to do this, Extension professionals should implement behavior change strategies that motivate individuals to…

  9. Personalized weight loss strategies - the role of macronutrient distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, J Alfredo; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Saris, Wim H M

    2014-01-01

    A large number of different dietary approaches have been studied in an attempt to achieve healthy, sustainable weight loss among individuals with overweight and obesity. Restriction of energy intake is the primary method of producing a negative energy balance leading to weight loss. However, owin...

  10. Prevalence of weight-loss strategies and use of substances for weight-loss among adults: a population study

    OpenAIRE

    Machado,Eduardo Coelho; Silveira,Mariângela Freitas da; Silveira,Vera Maria Freitas da

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns a cross-sectional population-based study conducted with adults living in the city of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. It aims to determine the prevalence of weight-loss practices and use of substances for weight-loss during the 12 months preceding the interview. The prevalence of weight-loss attempts was 26.6%. Although dietary control and regular physical exercise were the most commonly used strategies, the prevalence of the combined use of these methods was only...

  11. Identification and Prediction of Latent Classes of Weight-loss Strategies Among Women

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza, Stephanie T.; Savage, Jennifer S.; Birch, Leann L.

    2009-01-01

    We apply latent class analysis (LCA) to quantify multidimensional patterns of weight-loss strategies in a sample of 197 women, and explore the degree to which dietary restraint, disinhibition, and other individual characteristics predict membership in latent classes of weight-loss strategies. Latent class models were fit to a set of 14 healthy and unhealthy weight-loss strategies. BMI, weight concern, body satisfaction, depression, dietary disinhibition and restraint, and the interaction of d...

  12. Identification and prediction of latent classes of weight-loss strategies among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Stephanie T; Savage, Jennifer S; Birch, Leann L

    2010-04-01

    We apply latent class analysis (LCA) to quantify multidimensional patterns of weight-loss strategies in a sample of 197 women, and explore the degree to which dietary restraint, disinhibition, and other individual characteristics predict membership in latent classes of weight-loss strategies. Latent class models were fit to a set of 14 healthy and unhealthy weight-loss strategies. BMI, weight concern, body satisfaction, depression, dietary disinhibition and restraint, and the interaction of disinhibition and restraint were included as predictors of latent class membership. All analyses were conducted with PROC LCA, a recently developed SAS procedure available for download. Results revealed four subgroups of women based on their history of weight-loss strategies: No Weight Loss Strategy (10.0%), Dietary Guidelines (26.5%), Guidelines+Macronutrients (39.4%), and Guidelines+Macronutrients+Restrictive (24.2%). BMI, weight concerns, the desire to be thinner, disinhibition, and dietary restraint were all significantly related to weight-control strategy latent class. Among women with low dietary restraint, disinhibition increases the odds of engaging in any set of weight-loss strategies vs. none, whereas among medium- and high-restraint women disinhibition increases the odds of use of unhealthy vs. healthy strategies. LCA was an effective tool for organizing multiple weight-loss strategies in order to identify subgroups of individuals who have engaged in particular sets of strategies over time. This person-centered approach provides a measure weight-control status, where the different statuses are characterized by particular combinations of healthy and unhealthy weight-loss strategies.

  13. Weight loss strategies for adolescents: a 14-year-old struggling to lose weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, David S

    2012-02-01

    With prevalence approaching 20% in the United States, adolescent obesity has become a common problem for patients, parents, and clinicians. Obese adolescents may experience physical and psychosocial complications, as illustrated by the case of Ms K, a 14-year-old girl with a body mass index of 40. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of pediatric obesity treatment is modest in younger children and declines in older children and adolescents, and few interventions involving adolescents have produced significant long-term weight loss. Nevertheless, novel strategies to alter energy balance have shown preliminary evidence of benefit in clinical trials, including a diet focused on food quality rather than fat restriction and a lifestyle approach to encourage enjoyable physical activity throughout the day rather than intermittent exercise. Parents can have an important influence on weight-related behaviors in adolescents despite typically complicated emotional dynamics at this age, especially through the use of noncoercive methods. A key parenting practice applicable to children of all ages is to create a protective environment in the home, substituting nutritious foods for unhealthful ones and facilitating physical activities instead of sedentary pursuits. Other behaviors that may promote successful long-term weight management include good sleep hygiene, stress reduction, and mindfulness. Ultimately, the obesity epidemic can be attributed to changes in the social environment that hinder healthful lifestyle habits, and prevention will require a comprehensive public health strategy.

  14. Strategies that predict weight loss among overweight/obese young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk, Julia K; Norman, Gregory J; Rock, Cheryl L; Arredondo, Elva M; Madanat, Hala; Roesch, Scott C; Patrick, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the characteristics of young adults who have difficulty achieving a healthy weight may help develop more effective interventions. Signal detection was conducted to identify subgroups of overweight/obese young adults more or less likely to lose weight (5% weight loss) over 6 months. Data were collected from a diverse sample involved in a randomized controlled behavioral weight loss intervention (N = 404). Overall, 15% (N = 57) of participants achieved weight loss. Change in self-monitoring weight, baseline score of gym attendance/participating in exercise classes, and change in eating less fat were the best predictors of weight loss. These strategies may be particularly helpful to promote short-term weight loss in overweight/obese young adults.

  15. Strategies to Improve Adherence to Dietary Weight Loss Interventions in Research and Real-World Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Alice A; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2017-07-11

    Dietary interventions are the cornerstone of obesity treatment. The optimal dietary approach to weight loss is a hotly debated topic among health professionals and the lay public alike. An emerging body of evidence suggests that a higher level of adherence to a diet, regardless of the type of diet, is an important factor in weight loss success over the short and long term. Key strategies to improve adherence include designing dietary weight loss interventions (such as ketogenic diets) that help to control the increased drive to eat that accompanies weight loss, tailoring dietary interventions to a person's dietary preferences (and nutritional requirements), and promoting self-monitoring of food intake. The aim of this paper is to examine these strategies, which can be used to improve adherence and thereby increase the success of dietary weight loss interventions.

  16. Strategies to Improve Adherence to Dietary Weight Loss Interventions in Research and Real-World Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice A. Gibson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary interventions are the cornerstone of obesity treatment. The optimal dietary approach to weight loss is a hotly debated topic among health professionals and the lay public alike. An emerging body of evidence suggests that a higher level of adherence to a diet, regardless of the type of diet, is an important factor in weight loss success over the short and long term. Key strategies to improve adherence include designing dietary weight loss interventions (such as ketogenic diets that help to control the increased drive to eat that accompanies weight loss, tailoring dietary interventions to a person’s dietary preferences (and nutritional requirements, and promoting self-monitoring of food intake. The aim of this paper is to examine these strategies, which can be used to improve adherence and thereby increase the success of dietary weight loss interventions.

  17. Rate of weight loss can be predicted by patient characteristics and intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Elissa; Heymsfield, Steven B; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Although dietary weight-loss counseling usually employs a 500 to 1,000 kcal/day energy deficit to induce weight loss of 0.5 to 1 kg/week, this rate of weight loss is rarely achieved in research settings. Biological factors, such as changes in metabolic rate, are partly responsible, but would only account for a small deviation from expected weight loss. There must be other factors, behavioral or related to study design and implementation, that affect the rate of weight loss observed. To examine factors that influence the rate of weight loss obtained in clinical studies. Thirty-five weight-loss studies published between 1995 and 2009 were identified that used dietary counseling to induce weight loss in healthy subjects. Studies were included if they had a duration of at least 6 weeks, used a strategy to counsel subjects to reduce free-living energy intakes, and reported weight-loss data based on a completers analysis. Variables that were associated with the rate of weight loss among age, sex (percent female subjects), initial body weight, frequency of dietary counseling, placebo use, exercise level, study length, and prescribed energy deficit were examined using linear regression analysis. Study length was negatively related to the rate of weight loss (Ppopulation given the age, initial body weight, frequency of dietary counseling, and energy deficit prescription. These data from clinical studies suggest that the rate of weight loss is greater in older and heavier subjects and with higher contact frequency and caloric restriction. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Meta- and cost-effectiveness analysis of commercial weight loss strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Eric A; Kruger, Eliza

    2014-09-01

    To estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of clinically proven nonsurgical commercial weight loss strategies for those with BMIs between 25 and 40. We performed a systematic literature review to identify randomized controlled trials of commercially available weight loss studies of at least 1 year in duration. Using the results of these trials and publicly available cost data, we quantified the incremental cost per kilogram of weight loss and per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. We then use probabilistic sensitivity analyses to quantify uncertainty in our results. Based on the literature review, two lifestyle programs (Weight Watchers and Vtrim), one meal replacement program (Jenny Craig), and three pharmaceutical products (Qsymia, Lorcaserin, and Orlistat) were included in the analysis. Average cost per kilogram of weight lost ranged from $155 (95% CI: $110-$218) for Weight Watchers to $546 (95% CI: $390-$736) for Orlistat. The incremental cost per QALY gained for Weight Watchers and Qsymia was $34,630 and $54,130, respectively. All other interventions were prohibitively expensive or inferior in that weight loss could be achieved at a lower cost through one or a combination of the other strategies. Results suggest that, in the absence of other considerations and at current market prices, Weight Watchers and Qsymia represent the two most cost-effective strategies for nonsurgical weight loss. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  19. Self-Directed Weight Loss Strategies: Energy Expenditure Due to Physical Activity Is Not Increased to Achieve Intended Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbelt, Ulf; Schuetz, Tatjana; Knoll, Nina; Burkert, Silke

    2015-07-16

    Reduced physical activity and almost unlimited availability of food are major contributors to the development of obesity. With the decline of strenuous work, energy expenditure due to spontaneous physical activity has attracted increasing attention. Our aim was to assess changes in energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits in obese subjects aiming at self-directed weight loss. Energy expenditure and physical activity patterns were measured with a portable armband device. Nutritional habits were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Data on weight development, energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits were obtained for 105 patients over a six-month period from an initial cohort of 160 outpatients aiming at weight loss. Mean weight loss was -1.5 ± 7.0 kg (p = 0.028). Patients with weight maintenance (n = 75), with substantial weight loss (>5% body weight, n = 20) and with substantial weight gain (>5% body weight, n = 10) did not differ in regard to changes of body weight adjusted energy expenditure components (total energy expenditure: -0.2 kcal/kg/day; non-exercise activity thermogenesis: -0.3 kcal/kg/day; exercise-related activity thermogenesis (EAT): -0.2 kcal/kg/day) or patterns of physical activity (duration of EAT: -2 min/day; steps/day: -156; metabolic equivalent unchanged) measured objectively with a portable armband device. Self-reported consumption frequency of unfavorable food decreased significantly (p = 0.019) over the six-month period. An increase in energy expenditure or changes of physical activity patterns (objectively assessed with a portable armband device) are not employed by obese subjects to achieve self-directed weight loss. However, modified nutritional habits could be detected with the use of a food frequency questionnaire.

  20. Self-Directed Weight Loss Strategies: Energy Expenditure Due to Physical Activity Is Not Increased to Achieve Intended Weight Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Elbelt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reduced physical activity and almost unlimited availability of food are major contributors to the development of obesity. With the decline of strenuous work, energy expenditure due to spontaneous physical activity has attracted increasing attention. Our aim was to assess changes in energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits in obese subjects aiming at self-directed weight loss. Methods: Energy expenditure and physical activity patterns were measured with a portable armband device. Nutritional habits were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Results: Data on weight development, energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits were obtained for 105 patients over a six-month period from an initial cohort of 160 outpatients aiming at weight loss. Mean weight loss was −1.5 ± 7.0 kg (p = 0.028. Patients with weight maintenance (n = 75, with substantial weight loss (>5% body weight, n = 20 and with substantial weight gain (>5% body weight, n = 10 did not differ in regard to changes of body weight adjusted energy expenditure components (total energy expenditure: −0.2 kcal/kg/day; non-exercise activity thermogenesis: −0.3 kcal/kg/day; exercise-related activity thermogenesis (EAT: −0.2 kcal/kg/day or patterns of physical activity (duration of EAT: −2 min/day; steps/day: −156; metabolic equivalent unchanged measured objectively with a portable armband device. Self-reported consumption frequency of unfavorable food decreased significantly (p = 0.019 over the six-month period. Conclusions: An increase in energy expenditure or changes of physical activity patterns (objectively assessed with a portable armband device are not employed by obese subjects to achieve self-directed weight loss. However, modified nutritional habits could be detected with the use of a food frequency questionnaire.

  1. Weight-loss medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescription weight loss drugs; Diabetes - weight loss drugs; Obesity - weight loss drugs; Overweight - weight loss drugs ... are not approved by the FDA to treat weight-loss. So you should not take them if you do not have diabetes.

  2. Weight Loss Strategies in Combat Sports and Concerning Habits in Mixed Martial Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Oliver R; Chapman, Dale W; Abbiss, Chris R

    2017-12-28

    Combat sports are typically divided into weight classes and body mass manipulation to reach a weight class is commonplace. Previous research suggests that mixed martial arts (MMA) weight loss practices may be more extreme than other combat sports. We sought to investigate the magnitude of weight lost and prevalence of weight loss strategies in different combat sports. Competitors (n=637) from Brazilian jiu jitsu (BJJ), boxing, judo, MMA, muay Thai/kickboxing (MT/K), taekwondo (TKD) and wrestling completed an online questionnaire seeking information regarding their weight loss practices. Body mass manipulation was commonly undertaken by all combat sports athletes, with a particularly high incidence of gradual dieting, increased exercise and fluid restriction. Skipping meals was higher in TKD and wrestling (84%) compared with the other combat sports (~58%), whilst training in heated rooms and forced oral fluid loss (spitting) was higher in wrestling (83% and 47%, respectively) compared with other combat sports (~45% and ~19%, respectively). MMA athletes reported the highest usage of sauna (76%) and water loading (67%) whilst also reporting the second highest use of training in rubber/plastic suits (63%). Body mass manipulation was present in all combat sports with the prevalence and magnitude of acute weight loss greater in MMA. The incidence of and practices reported will assist support staff to be fully aware of the variety of methods these athletes and coaches may use to achieve weight loss. Additionally, the results could aid regulatory bodies in the further development of policies on weight cutting.

  3. Trying to lose weight: the association of income and age to weight-loss strategies in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinami, Lisa; Gauvin, Lise; Barnett, Tracie A; Paradis, Gilles

    2014-06-01

    Two thirds of the U.S. population is overweight or obese, but those living in poverty are disproportionately affected. Although 30%-50% of Americans report currently trying to lose weight, some strategies may be counterproductive. Little is known about how income may be associated with weight-loss strategies. This study aims to determine the association between income and weight-loss strategies in the general U.S. population. Cross-sectional data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were collected in 1999-2010 and analyzed in 2012. Annual household income was categorized as lose weight, respectively. Youth from households with income <$20,000/year were 2.5 times (95% CI=1.8, 3.5) more likely to use inconsistent strategies, but this association was not observed among adults. Stronger efforts to emphasize weight-loss strategies consistent with recommendations and the distinction between consistent and inconsistent strategies are needed, especially among lower socioeconomic groups. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Self-Directed Weight Loss Strategies: Energy Expenditure Due to Physical Activity Is Not Increased to Achieve Intended Weight Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ulf Elbelt; Tatjana Schuetz; Nina Knoll; Silke Burkert

    2015-01-01

    Reduced physical activity and almost unlimited availability of food are major contributors to the development of obesity. With the decline of strenuous work, energy expenditure due to spontaneous physical activity has attracted increasing attention. Our aim was to assess changes in energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits in obese subjects aiming at self-directed weight loss. Methods: Energy expenditure and physical activity patterns were measured with a portable ...

  5. The Effect of Different Types of Monitoring Strategies on Weight Loss: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jospe, Michelle R; Roy, Melyssa; Brown, Rachel C; Williams, Sheila M; Osborne, Hamish R; Meredith-Jones, Kim A; McArthur, Jenny R; Fleming, Elizabeth A; Taylor, Rachael W

    2017-09-01

    To determine the effectiveness of various monitoring strategies on weight loss, body composition, blood markers, exercise, and psychosocial indices in adults with overweight and obesity following a 12-month weight loss program. Two hundred fifty adults with BMI ≥ 27 were randomized to brief, monthly, individual consults, daily self-monitoring of weight, self-monitoring of diet using MyFitnessPal, self-monitoring of hunger, or control over 12 months. All groups received diet and exercise advice, and 171 participants (68.4%) remained at 12 months. No significant differences in weight, body composition, blood markers, exercise, or eating behavior were apparent between those in the four monitoring groups and the control condition at 12 months (all P ≥ 0.053). Weight differences between groups ranged from -1.1 kg (-3.8 to 1.6) to 2.2 kg (-1.0 to 5.3). However, brief support and hunger training groups reported significantly lower scores for depression (difference [95% CI]: -3.16 [-5.70 to -0.62] and -3.05 [-5.61 to -0.50], respectively) and anxiety (-1.84, [-3.67 to -0.02]) scores than control participants. Although adding a monitoring strategy to diet and exercise advice did not further increase weight loss, no adverse effects on eating behavior were observed, and some monitoring strategies may even benefit mental health. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  6. Fasting for weight loss: an effective strategy or latest dieting trend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, A

    2015-05-01

    With the increasing obesity epidemic comes the search for effective dietary approaches for calorie restriction and weight loss. Here I examine whether fasting is the latest 'fad diet' as portrayed in popular media and discuss whether it is a safe and effective approach or whether it is an idiosyncratic diet trend that promotes short-term weight loss, with no concern for long-term weight maintenance. Fasting has long been used under historical and experimental conditions and has recently been popularised by 'intermittent fasting' or 'modified fasting' regimes, in which a very low-calorie allowance is allowed, on alternate days (ADF) or 2 days a week (5:2 diet), where 'normal' eating is resumed on non-diet days. It is a simple concept, which makes it easy to follow with no difficult calorie counting every other day. This approach does seem to promote weight loss, but is linked to hunger, which can be a limiting factor for maintaining food restriction. The potential health benefits of fasting can be related to both the acute food restriction and chronic influence of weight loss; the long-term effect of chronic food restriction in humans is not yet clear, but may be a potentially interesting future dietary strategy for longevity, particularly given the overweight epidemic. One approach does not fit all in the quest to achieve body weight control, but this could be a dietary strategy for consideration. With the obesity epidemic comes the search for dietary strategies to (i) prevent weight gain, (ii) promote weight loss and (iii) prevent weight regain. With over half of the population of the United Kingdom and other developed countries being collectively overweight or obese, there is considerable pressure to achieve these goals, from both a public health and a clinical perspective. Certainly not one dietary approach will solve these complex problems. Although there is some long-term success with gastric surgical options for morbid obesity, there is still a requirement

  7. Weight-loss strategies of South African female university students and comparison of weight management-related characteristics between dieters and non-dieters

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanne Senekal; Gabrielle L. Lasker; Lindsay van Velden; Ria Laubscher; Norman J. Temple

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Female university students are at risk for weight gain and use of inappropriate weight-loss strategies. By gaining a greater understanding of the weight-loss strategies used by and weight management related characteristics of these students, effective weight management interventions for this vulnerable group can be developed. Methods Two hundred and fifty female students from South Africa universities, aged 18–25 years, participated in this cross-sectional study; 162 attem...

  8. Differences in consumer use of food labels by weight loss strategies and demographic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Bleich, Sara N.; Wolfson, Julia A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about national patterns in the use of fast food and packaged food labels among adults by weight loss strategies and demographic characteristics. Methods We analyzed the Consumer Behavior Module in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007?2010 among adults (N?=?9,690). For each of the outcome variables ? use of packed food and fast food menu labels ? multiple logistic regressions were used to adjust for potential differences in population characteris...

  9. Weight-loss strategies used by the general population: how are they perceived?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Julia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising prevalence of obesity and the social pressure for thinness increase the prevalence of dieting. However, little is known about the overall perception of dieting strategies actually used by the general population. OBJECTIVES: Our main objective was to investigate perceptions of weight-loss practices in an observational study in order to identify the most favourable strategy. DESIGN: Adults from the ongoing Nutrinet-Santé cohort study who had reported engaging in dieting in the three previous years were included in the study. For each diet, detailed information was collected on types of diets, circumstances and perception of the diet, and outcomes. Perceptions were compared across diets using sex-specific mixed effects models. RESULT: Among the 48 435 subjects who had completed the respective questionnaire, 12 673 (26.7%, 87.8% of women had followed at least one weight-loss diet in the previous three years. Diet plans prescribed by health professionals and diets conforming to official dietary recommendations were the most favourably perceived among all assessed weight-loss strategies. Alternatively, commercial diet plans and self-imposed dietary restrictions were more negatively perceived (Odds ratios (OR for adherence difficulty 1.30 (95% confidence interval (0.99;1.7 in men and OR 1.92 (1.76;2.10 in women compared to official nutritional guidelines; OR 1.06 (0.82;1.38 in men and OR 1.39 (1.26;1.54 in women respectively compared to official nutritional guidelines. CONCLUSION: Official dietary recommendations could be useful tools for maintaining a dietary balance while following a weight-loss diet.

  10. Qualitative analysis of the role of self-weighing as a strategy of weight control for weight-loss maintainers in comparison with a normal, stable weight group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, Isabelle; Kruseman, Maaike

    2016-10-01

    Self-weighing seems to have a primary role in weight-loss maintenance. The use of this strategy may help correct even slight weight regain and contribute to long-term weight stability. However, self-weighing has also been associated with negative psychological health consequences in specific subgroups. This study aimed to explore the use and the behavioral and psychological consequences of self-weighing in a group of weight-loss maintainers (WLoMs). We chose a qualitative design to conduct this investigation. Eighteen WLoMs were interviewed and compared to a matched comparison group of 18 participants with a lifelong normal stable weight (NSW). Analyses showed that most WLoMs needed regular self-weighing to be aware of their weight. The weight displayed on the scale helped WLoMs sustain the continuous efforts needed to maintain weight loss and also at times triggered corrective actions that were sometimes drastic. Weight changes generated both negative and positive affect among WLoMs, who could experience anxiety because of self-weighing or have their self-esteem impaired in the case of weight gain. In comparison, the NSW group rarely used self-weighing. They relied on a conscious way of living to control their weight and needed fewer strategies. NSW participants simply went back to their routine when they felt a slight increase in their weight, without experiencing consequences on their mood or self-esteem. Regular self-weighing as a component of weight-loss maintenance should be encouraged to help WLoMs regulate their food and physical activity, provided that potential consequences on psychological well-being, including self-esteem, are screened and addressed when needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-term weight loss maintenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wing, Rena R; Phelan, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    ...% of initial body weight and maintaining the loss for at least 1 y. The National Weight Control Registry provides information about the strategies used by successful weight loss maintainers to achieve and maintain long-term weight loss...

  12. A cross-sectional study assessing the self-reported weight loss strategies used by adult Australian general practice patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sze Lin; Carey, Mariko Leanne; Sanson-Fisher, Robert William; D'Este, Catherine

    2012-05-30

    Obesity is a significant public health concern. General practitioners (GPs) see a large percentage of the population and are well placed to provide weight management advice. There has been little examination of the types of weight loss strategies used in Australian general practice patients. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe the proportion of normal weight, overweight and obese general practice patients who report trying to lose weight in the past 12 months, the types of weight loss strategies and diets used as well as the proportion consulting their GP prior to trying to lose weight. Adult patients completed a touchscreen computer survey while waiting for their appointment. Responses from 1335 patients in twelve Australian practices are reported. A larger proportion of obese patients had tried to lose weight in the past 12 months (73%) compared to those who were overweight (55%) and normal weight (33%). The most commonly used strategy used was changing diet and increasing exercise in all BMI categories. Less than 10% used strategies such as prescription medication, over the counter supplements and consulted a weight loss specialist. Low calorie and low fat diets were the most frequently reported diets used to lose weight in those who were normal weight, overweight and obese. Overall, the proportion seeking GP advice was low, with 12% of normal weight, 15% of overweight and 43% of obese patients consulting their GP prior to trying to lose weight. A large proportion of overweight or obese patients have tried to lose weight and utilized strategies such as changing diet and increasing exercise. Most attempts however were unassisted, with low rates of consultation with GPs and weight loss specialists. Ways to assist overweight and obese general practice patients with their weight loss attempts need to be identified.

  13. A cross-sectional study assessing the self-reported weight loss strategies used by adult Australian general practice patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoong Sze

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a significant public health concern. General practitioners (GPs see a large percentage of the population and are well placed to provide weight management advice. There has been little examination of the types of weight loss strategies used in Australian general practice patients. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe the proportion of normal weight, overweight and obese general practice patients who report trying to lose weight in the past 12 months, the types of weight loss strategies and diets used as well as the proportion consulting their GP prior to trying to lose weight. Methods Adult patients completed a touchscreen computer survey while waiting for their appointment. Responses from 1335 patients in twelve Australian practices are reported. Results A larger proportion of obese patients had tried to lose weight in the past 12 months (73% compared to those who were overweight (55% and normal weight (33%. The most commonly used strategy used was changing diet and increasing exercise in all BMI categories. Less than 10% used strategies such as prescription medication, over the counter supplements and consulted a weight loss specialist. Low calorie and low fat diets were the most frequently reported diets used to lose weight in those who were normal weight, overweight and obese. Overall, the proportion seeking GP advice was low, with 12% of normal weight, 15% of overweight and 43% of obese patients consulting their GP prior to trying to lose weight. Conclusions A large proportion of overweight or obese patients have tried to lose weight and utilized strategies such as changing diet and increasing exercise. Most attempts however were unassisted, with low rates of consultation with GPs and weight loss specialists. Ways to assist overweight and obese general practice patients with their weight loss attempts need to be identified.

  14. Weight-loss strategies of South African female university students and comparison of weight management-related characteristics between dieters and non-dieters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senekal, Marjanne; Lasker, Gabrielle L; van Velden, Lindsay; Laubscher, Ria; Temple, Norman J

    2016-09-01

    Female university students are at risk for weight gain and use of inappropriate weight-loss strategies. By gaining a greater understanding of the weight-loss strategies used by and weight management related characteristics of these students, effective weight management interventions for this vulnerable group can be developed. Two hundred and fifty female students from South Africa universities, aged 18-25 years, participated in this cross-sectional study; 162 attempted weight loss during the year preceding the study (dieters) and 88 were non-dieters. Weight and height were measured and BMI (kg/m(2)) computed. A self-administered questionnaire was used to record all other variables. Weight loss strategies were described for dieters and compared between BMI groups within the dieters group. Weight management related characteristics were compared between dieters and non-dieters. Statistical tests included Pearson Chi-square test, independent samples t-test or Mann-Whitney U test (depending on distribution of the data). Predictors for a higher BMI and being overweight/obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m(2)) were identified using regression models. Healthy weight-loss strategies included increased exercise and fruit/vegetable intake and decreased intake of sugar and fat containing items; unhealthy methods included eating little food and skipping meals; and extreme weight loss strategies included laxatives and vomiting. The most commonly used weight-loss product was Herbex. Dieters were characterized by a higher BMI, overestimation of their weight (especially normal weight students), dissatisfaction with weight and select body parts, higher intake of breakfast and healthy foods, lower intake of unhealthy foods, higher levels of vigorous physical activity, higher use of select informal weight-loss information sources and experiencing more pressure to lose weight from mothers, siblings and friends. Predictors of higher BMI and/or increased risk for BMI ≥25 included weight-loss attempt

  15. Weight-loss strategies of South African female university students and comparison of weight management-related characteristics between dieters and non-dieters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanne Senekal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female university students are at risk for weight gain and use of inappropriate weight-loss strategies. By gaining a greater understanding of the weight-loss strategies used by and weight management related characteristics of these students, effective weight management interventions for this vulnerable group can be developed. Methods Two hundred and fifty female students from South Africa universities, aged 18–25 years, participated in this cross-sectional study; 162 attempted weight loss during the year preceding the study (dieters and 88 were non-dieters. Weight and height were measured and BMI (kg/m2 computed. A self-administered questionnaire was used to record all other variables. Weight loss strategies were described for dieters and compared between BMI groups within the dieters group. Weight management related characteristics were compared between dieters and non-dieters. Statistical tests included Pearson Chi-square test, independent samples t-test or Mann-Whitney U test (depending on distribution of the data. Predictors for a higher BMI and being overweight/obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m2 were identified using regression models. Results Healthy weight-loss strategies included increased exercise and fruit/vegetable intake and decreased intake of sugar and fat containing items; unhealthy methods included eating little food and skipping meals; and extreme weight loss strategies included laxatives and vomiting. The most commonly used weight-loss product was Herbex. Dieters were characterized by a higher BMI, overestimation of their weight (especially normal weight students, dissatisfaction with weight and select body parts, higher intake of breakfast and healthy foods, lower intake of unhealthy foods, higher levels of vigorous physical activity, higher use of select informal weight-loss information sources and experiencing more pressure to lose weight from mothers, siblings and friends. Predictors of higher BMI and/or increased

  16. E-mail contact as an effective strategy in the maintenance of weight loss in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D; Vydelingum, V; Lawrence, J

    2011-02-01

    Professional face-to-face contact is known to be beneficial in effective weight management, but costly, in supporting weight maintenance. Within the UK, studies have examined using the Internet to achieve weight loss; however, there is a need to evaluate the use of dietetic intervention via e-mail to support the maintenance of weight loss in a National Health Service (NHS) setting. The present study aimed to assess the effects of dietetic support through e-mail on weight loss maintenance on individuals who were successful in weight loss. Fifty-five patients, who had lost ≥5% body weight, were assigned to either an intervention group (weekly e-mail messages and monthly personal e-mail message with reporting of weight, n = 28) or a control group (n = 27). The level of weight maintenance, plus dietary changes and the ability to maintain a level of activity, were recorded after 6 months. At 6 months, the e-mail group maintained an average weight loss of 10%, which was significantly (P = 0.05) greater than the mean percentage weight loss maintained by the control group (7.3%). The control group regained weight at a statistically significant greater velocity (P = 0.02) than the intervention group. There were correlations between the amount of fruits and vegetables (P = 0.07) eaten and exercise episodes (P = 0.01) against weight change in maintenance. The present study showed that dietetic support using e-mail can be used effectively in reducing weight gain velocity and assisting in the maintenance of weight loss. It is a system that can be used in the UK NHS to reach many people. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  17. Individualised dietary strategies for Olympic combat sports: Acute weight loss, recovery and competition nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Reid; Slater, Gary; Burke, Louise M

    2017-07-01

    Olympic combat sports separate athletes into weight divisions, in an attempt to reduce size, strength, range and/or leverage disparities between competitors. Official weigh-ins are conducted anywhere from 3 and up to 24 h prior to competition ensuring athletes meet weight requirements (i.e. have 'made weight'). Fighters commonly aim to compete in weight divisions lower than their day-to-day weight, achieved via chronic and acute manipulations of body mass (BM). Although these manipulations may impair health and absolute performance, their strategic use can improve competitive success. Key considerations are the acute manipulations around weigh-in, which differ in importance, magnitude and methods depending on the requirements of the individual combat sport and the weigh-in regulations. In particular, the time available for recovery following weigh-in/before competition will determine what degree of acute BM loss can be implemented and reversed. Increased exercise and restricted food and fluid intake are undertaken to decrease body water and gut contents reducing BM. When taken to the extreme, severe weight-making practices can be hazardous, and efforts have been made to reduce their prevalence. Indeed some have called for the abolition of these practices altogether. In lieu of adequate strategies to achieve this, and the pragmatic recognition of the likely continuation of these practices as long as regulations allow, this review summarises guidelines for athletes and coaches for manipulating BM and optimising post weigh-in recovery, to achieve better health and performance outcomes across the different Olympic combat sports.

  18. A cross-sectional study assessing the self-reported weight loss strategies used by adult Australian general practice patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yoong Sze; Carey Mariko; Sanson-Fisher Robert; D’Este Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Obesity is a significant public health concern. General practitioners (GPs) see a large percentage of the population and are well placed to provide weight management advice. There has been little examination of the types of weight loss strategies used in Australian general practice patients. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe the proportion of normal weight, overweight and obese general practice patients who report trying to lose weight in the past 12 months, the...

  19. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight through diet and exercise or have serious health problems caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food ...

  20. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. ... you feel better. There are proven ways to lose weight. You can find what works for you. Research ...

  1. Overweight, Obesity, and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back to section menu Healthy Weight Weight and obesity Underweight Weight, fertility, and pregnancy Weight loss and ... section Home Healthy Weight Healthy Weight Weight and obesity Underweight Weight, fertility, and pregnancy Weight loss and ...

  2. "That's who I am: a fat person in a thin body": weight loss, negative self-evaluation, and mitigating strategies following weight loss surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría, Christine Aramburu; Larsen, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    To explore negative self-evaluation following weight loss surgery (WLS). In-depth interviews were conducted with 11 women who had WLS. Thematic analysis was conducted through an iterative process, allowing categories and themes to emerge. To ensure rigor, two coders analyzed the data. Data were collected until thematic saturation was achieved. All participants reported health as the motivation for WLS. Overall sentiment regarding WLS was positive. However, negative self-evaluation was reported and includes the following: (a) body-image distortion; (b) body-image dissatisfaction, including excessive skin; and (c) perceived stigma. Mitigating strategies include the following: (a) utilizing markers of progress to increase assimilation of a new identity as a thinner person, and (b) reflecting on the former self as a time of decreased quality of life. Nurse practitioners and other clinicians treat and counsel patients on obesity and obesity-related morbidity, and may need to discuss WLS with patients who are either contemplating it or have already undergone it. The findings from the present study can provide clinicians insight into the possible psychological effects of WLS-associated weight loss. Bringing possible negative self-evaluative effects into open discussion can help optimize patient care and healthcare results. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... APF You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... of carbohydrate and energy in an effort to lose weight can worsen these diseases. Severe acute attacks have ...

  4. The weight loss profile: a biopsychosocial approach to weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, M; Papciak, A; Shapiro, S; Tannenbaum, S

    1989-01-01

    Obesity is a common complicating condition in a variety of medical problems. Often effective consultation liaison involves recommendations to overweight patients involving lifestyle and health risk modification. Factors that need to be addressed include exercise, nutritional counseling/caloric restriction, and attitude and behavioral change regarding eating. Patients requiring weight loss typically seek various commercial programs that are readily accessible. One major problem associated with such programs is the high attrition rate within the first six weeks of initiation. Therefore, attempts to facilitate longer-term retention and associated weight loss are warranted. One approach is the identification of factors associated with problems in short-term retention and weight loss followed by the implementation of brief interventions to potentially reverse the influence of these factors on retention and weight loss. The present investigation was conducted to determine the effects of such a strategy on short-term retention and weight loss in a commercial weight loss program. Two groups (n = 66 per group) of female participants with a mean age of thirty-eight years, mean initial weight of 184.6 lbs, mean height of 64.3 inches, mean goal weight of 147.3 lbs, mean Body Mass Index of 31.4 kg/m2 were recruited for the study. Groups were matched for age, initial weight, height, goal weight, and body mass index. One group (controls) received a standard thirteen-week group cognitive-behavioral intervention that emphasized the teaching of self-management strategies for weight reduction. The second group (personalized intervention) received the same thirteen-week cognitive-behavioral intervention. This group also completed a questionnaire (Weight Loss Profile) that identifies factors associated with poor retention and minimal weight loss. Targeted interventions were implemented to modify specific problem areas identified on the Weight Loss Profile. The problem areas were based

  5. Sociocultural and Individual Influences on Muscle Gain and Weight Loss Strategies among Adolescent Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, Lina A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2003-01-01

    The study examined the role of body dissatisfaction, body image importance, sociocultural influences (media and parent and peer encouragement), self-esteem and negative affect on body change strategies to decrease weight and increase muscles in adolescent boys and girls. Surveys were administered to 587 boys and 598 girls aged between 11 and 15…

  6. Weight loss update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Unwanted weight loss in people with HIV can be caused by one or more factors simultaneously. A two-pronged approach that addresses the factors causing weight loss and malnutrition, and maintaining or gaining weight is critical. Many opportunistic infections (OIs) can cause diarrhea, but both the drugs used to treat diarrhea and the infections themselves can contribute to weight loss. Lactose intolerance is a common cause of diarrhea in people living with HIV. Because some of the drugs used to treat HIV and OIs are packaged with lactose, it may be necessary to replace the enzymes needed to break down lactose. Appetite loss may also contribute to wasting, and the lack of nutrients from a lost appetite can tax the body and further aggravate the problem. Appetite stimulants, vitamin supplements, or weight gain products that promote the building of protein are possible treatment options. Lean body mass production may require the use of anabolic (protein building) steroids or testosterone replacement therapy. Another wasting intervention option involves recombinant human growth hormone (rHGH), however, unsubstantiated safety concerns have arisen on the use of rHGH, and may require increased monitoring. Finally, counteracting weight loss may require adjusting the elevated levels of an immune system chemical called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) with thalidomide. Because of thalidomide's association with birth defects, sexually active heterosexual women should be advised to use multiple contraceptive mechanisms.

  7. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  8. Temporal changes in trying to lose weight and recommended weight-loss strategies among overweight and obese Americans, 1996-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradel, Lesley A; Gillespie, Cathleen; Kicklighter, Jana R; Doucette, Michele M; Penumetcha, Meera; Blanck, Heidi M

    2009-01-01

    We examined whether the reported prevalence of trying to lose weight among overweight and obese individuals has changed over time, and whether those trying to lose weight report using recommended weight-loss strategies. We used Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 50 states and the District of Columbia during 1996, 1998, 2000, and 2003. The sample included participants with a self-reported Body Mass Index (BMI) of > or =25.0 kg/m(2) (N=333,378). The prevalence of trying to lose weight and eating fewer calories, using physical activity, or both, were examined for endpoint change and linear trends. Between 1996 and 2003, the prevalence of trying to lose weight among obese individuals increased significantly, while it remained stable among overweight individuals. The prevalence of eating fewer calories, using physical activity and using a combination of both increased significantly over time among the overweight and obese individuals trying to lose weight. Despite a rise in the number of overweight and obese people, there was little change among overweight adults in trying to lose weight over time, and a modest-but significant-change among obese adults in trying to lose weight over time. Among those who reported trying to lose weight, there were significant increases in their efforts to use recommended strategies.

  9. Potential role of meal frequency as a strategy for weight loss and health in overweight or obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulovitz, Michelle G; Kravitz, Len R; Mermier, Christine; Gibson, Ann L; Conn, Carole A; Kolkmeyer, Deborah; Kerksick, Chad M

    2014-04-01

    Improved dietary strategies for weight loss are necessary to decrease metabolic disease risk in overweight or obese adults. Varying meal frequency (MF; i.e., increasing or decreasing eating occasions beyond the traditional pattern of three meals daily) has been thought to have an influence on body weight regulation, hunger control, and blood markers of health. It is common practice for weight management clinicians to recommend increasing MF as a strategy for weight management and to improve metabolic parameters. However, limited research exists investigating the effect of MF during controlled hypocaloric dietary interventions. Furthermore, MF literature often speculates with regard to efficacy of MF treatments based on research using normal weight, overweight/obese, or some combination, where much diversity exists within these various populations. In this review, we suggest that normal-weight and overweight/obese populations, as well as free-living versus investigator-controlled research trials, should be studied independently. Therefore, the objective of the present review is to survey the literature to assess whether the alteration of MF influences body weight regulation, hunger control, and/or blood markers of health in overweight/obese participants undergoing a controlled hypocaloric diet to induce weight loss. Findings of this review indicate that there is uncertainty in the literature when interpreting the optimal MF for obesity treatment, where reduced MF may even show more favorable lipid profiles in obese individuals compared with increased MF. Furthermore, the simple relationship of comparing MF with body fatness or body mass index should also consider whether eating frequency is associated with other healthy factors (e.g., increased physical activity). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Strategies for healthy weight loss: from vitamin C to the glycemic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Carol S

    2005-06-01

    America is experiencing a major obesity epidemic. The ramifications of this epidemic are immense since obesity is associated with chronic metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and heart disease. Reduced physical activity and/or increased energy intakes are important factors in this epidemic. Additionally, a genetic susceptibility to obesity is associated with gene polymorphisms affecting biochemical pathways that regulate fat oxidation, energy expenditure, or energy intake. However, these pathways are also impacted by specific foods and nutrients. Vitamin C status is inversely related to body mass. Individuals with adequate vitamin C status oxidize 30% more fat during a moderate exercise bout than individuals with low vitamin C status; thus, vitamin C depleted individuals may be more resistant to fat mass loss. Food choices can impact post-meal satiety and hunger. High-protein foods promote postprandial thermogenesis and greater satiety as compared to high-carbohydrate, low-fat foods; thus, diet regimens high in protein foods may improve diet compliance and diet effectiveness. Vinegar and peanut ingestion can reduce the glycemic effect of a meal, a phenomenon that has been related to satiety and reduced food consumption. Thus, the effectiveness of regular exercise and a prudent diet for weight loss may be enhanced by attention to specific diet details.

  11. Acute weight loss followed by an aggressive nutritional recovery strategy has little impact on on-water rowing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, G; Rice, A J; Tanner, R; Sharpe, K; Gore, C J; Jenkins, D G; Hahn, A G

    2006-01-01

    To assess the influence of moderate, acute weight loss on on-water rowing performance when aggressive nutritional recovery strategies were used in the two hours between weigh in and racing. Competitive rowers (n = 17) undertook three on-water 1800 m time trials under cool conditions (mean (SD) temperature 8.4 (2.0) degrees C), each separated by 48 hours. No weight limit was imposed for the first time trial--that is, unrestricted body mass (UNR1). However, one of the remaining two trials followed a 4% loss in body mass in the previous 24 hours (WT(-4%)). No weight limit was imposed for the other trial (UNR2). Aggressive nutritional recovery strategies (WT(-4%), 2.3 g/kg carbohydrate, 34 mg/kg Na+, and 28.4 ml/kg fluid; UNR, ad libitum) were used in the first 90 minutes of the two hours between weigh in and performance trials. WT(-4%) had only a small and statistically non-significant effect on the on-water time trial performance (mean 1.0 second, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.9 to 2.8; p = 0.29) compared with UNR. This was despite a significant decrease in plasma volume at the time of weigh in for WT(-4%) compared with UNR (-9.2%, 95% CI -12.8% to -5.6%; prowing performance, at least in cool conditions.

  12. Efficacy of water preloading before main meals as a strategy for weight loss in primary care patients with obesity: RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parretti, Helen M; Aveyard, Paul; Blannin, Andrew; Clifford, Susan J; Coleman, Sarah J; Roalfe, Andrea; Daley, Amanda J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of water preloading before meals as a weight loss strategy for adults with obesity. A two-group randomized controlled trial was conducted in Birmingham, England. Eighty-four adults with obesity were recruited from general practices. All participants were given a face-to-face weight management consultation at baseline (30 min) and a follow-up telephone consultation at 2 weeks (10 min). At baseline, participants were randomized to either drinking 500 ml of water 30 min before their main meals or an attention control group where participants were asked to imagine their stomach was full before meals. The primary outcome was weight change at 12-week follow-up. Several measures of adherence were also used, including 24 h total urine collections. 41 participants were randomized to the intervention group and 43 to the comparator group. The water preloading group lost -1.3 kg (95% CI -2.4 to -0.1, P = 0.028) more than comparators at follow up. Adjusting for ethnicity, deprivation, age, and gender resulted in the intervention group losing -1.2 kg (95% CI -2.4 to 0.07, P = 0.063) more than the comparator. There is preliminary evidence that water preloading before main meals leads to a moderate weight loss at follow up. ISRCTN33238158. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  13. A strategy for weight loss based on healthy dietary habits and control of emotional response to food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes Torrado, Yolanda; García-Villaraco Velasco, Ana; Hernández Galiot, Ana; Goñi Cambrodón, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy eating habits are major causes of a negative energy balance and excess body weight. The lifestyle of the Mediterranean diet eating pattern significantly reduces risk factors for non communicable diseases. Moreover, emotions have a powerful effect on feeding behavior. There is a direct relationship between food choices (type and amount), emotions and increased energy intake. To know the emotional behavior of individuals as a function of the relation between food intake and emotions to facilitate the establishment of personalized dietary guidelines based on healthy eating habits and increase the patient fidelity until the desired weight. 99 overweight adult people (81 women and 18 men) were subjected to a weight-reduction program based on the establishment of lifestyle and healthy eating habits. The adherence to Mediterranean dietary pattern and the effect of emotions on the choice of food and eating habits were determined using Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS) and Emotional- Eater Questionnaire (EEQ) respectively. The studied population was sedentary, consumed an unhealthy diet and eating behavior was highly affected by emotions. The majority of participants, (66% of women and 71% of men) were classified as emotional eater. During the treatment program eating habits and lifestyle subjects were modified and reduced at least 10% of their body weight. Know the relation between food intake and emotions allows to personalize the dietary strategy for weight loss in overweight and obesity. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. The contribution of fat-free mass to resting energy expenditure: implications for weight loss strategies in the treatment of adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Matthew G; Evans, Ronald K

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the strong relationship between fat-free mass (FFM) and resting energy expenditure (REE), the preservation of FFM is often emphasized in the treatment of adolescent obesity. Typical treatment regimens including an increased dietary consumption of protein and participation in resistance training are common components of adolescent weight management programs, despite limited evidence of a positive influence of FFM on weight loss outcomes in adolescents. Given the larger volume of FFM in obese relative to normal weight adolescents and the common treatment goals of both maximizing weight loss and attenuating the loss of FFM, a better understanding of the influence of FFM on energy balance is needed to determine whether strategies to preserve lean tissue or maximize absolute weight loss should be most emphasized. We review the associations among FFM, REE, and weight loss outcomes, focusing on how these relationships might influence energy balance in obese adolescents.

  15. Hypnotherapy in Weight Loss Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Gordon; Friesen, John

    1986-01-01

    Investigated effects of hypnosis as a treatment for weight loss among women. The primary hypothesis that hypnosis is an effective treatment for weight loss was confirmed, but seven concomitant variables and the use of audiotapes were not significant contributors to weight loss. (Author/ABB)

  16. Drug development strategies for the treatment of obesity: how to ensure efficacy, safety, and sustainable weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barja-Fernandez, S; Leis, R; Casanueva, FF; Seoane, LM

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide, and approximately 25%–35% of the adult population is obese in some countries. The excess of body fat is associated with adverse health consequences. Considering the limited efficacy of diet and exercise in the current obese population and the use of bariatric surgery only for morbid obesity, it appears that drug therapy is the only available method to address the problem on a large scale. Currently, pharmacological obesity treatment options are limited. However, new antiobesity drugs acting through central nervous system pathways or the peripheral adiposity signals and gastrointestinal tract are under clinical development. One of the most promising approaches is the use of peptides that influence the peripheral satiety signals and brain–gut axis such as GLP-1 analogs. However, considering that any antiobesity drug may affect one or several of the systems that control food intake and energy expenditure, it is unlikely that a single pharmacological agent will be effective as a striking obesity treatment. Thus, future strategies to treat obesity will need to be directed at sustainable weight loss to ensure maximal safety. This strategy will probably require the coadministration of medications that act through different mechanisms. PMID:25489237

  17. Drug development strategies for the treatment of obesity: how to ensure efficacy, safety, and sustainable weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barja-Fernandez, S; Leis, R; Casanueva, F F; Seoane, L M

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide, and approximately 25%-35% of the adult population is obese in some countries. The excess of body fat is associated with adverse health consequences. Considering the limited efficacy of diet and exercise in the current obese population and the use of bariatric surgery only for morbid obesity, it appears that drug therapy is the only available method to address the problem on a large scale. Currently, pharmacological obesity treatment options are limited. However, new antiobesity drugs acting through central nervous system pathways or the peripheral adiposity signals and gastrointestinal tract are under clinical development. One of the most promising approaches is the use of peptides that influence the peripheral satiety signals and brain-gut axis such as GLP-1 analogs. However, considering that any antiobesity drug may affect one or several of the systems that control food intake and energy expenditure, it is unlikely that a single pharmacological agent will be effective as a striking obesity treatment. Thus, future strategies to treat obesity will need to be directed at sustainable weight loss to ensure maximal safety. This strategy will probably require the coadministration of medications that act through different mechanisms.

  18. Diet for rapid weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... each day. A VLCD is only recommended for adults who are obese and need to lose weight for health reasons. These diets are often used before weight-loss surgery. You should only use a VLCD with ...

  19. Executive function in weight loss and weight loss maintenance: a conceptual review and novel neuropsychological model of weight control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettens, Katelyn M; Gorin, Amy A

    2017-10-01

    Weight loss maintenance is a complex, multifaceted process that presents a significant challenge for most individuals who lose weight. A growing body of literature indicates a strong relationship between cognitive dysfunction and excessive body weight, and suggests that a subset of high-order cognitive processes known as executive functions (EF) likely play an important role in weight management. Recent reviews cover neuropsychological correlates of weight status yet fail to address the role of executive function in the central dilemma of successful weight loss maintenance. In this paper, we provide an overview of the existing literature examining executive functions as they relate to weight status and initial weight loss. Further, we propose a novel conceptual model of the relationships between EF, initial weight loss, and weight loss maintenance, mapping specific executive functions onto strategies known to be associated with both phases of the weight control process. Implications for the development of more efficacious weight loss maintenance interventions are discussed.

  20. DNA Methylation and Hydroxymethylation Levels in Relation to Two Weight Loss Strategies: Energy-Restricted Diet or Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Carolina Ferreira; Nonino, Carla Barbosa; de Oliveira, Bruno Affonso Parenti; Pinhel, Marcela Augusta de Souza; Mansego, Maria Luisa; Milagro, Fermin Ignacio; Zulet, Maria Angeles; Martinez, José Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Weight loss can be influenced by genetic factors and epigenetic mechanisms that participate in the regulation of body weight. This study aimed to investigate whether the weight loss induced by two different obesity treatments (energy restriction or bariatric surgery) may affect global DNA methylation (LINE-1) and hydroxymethylation profile, as well as the methylation patterns in inflammatory genes. This study encompassed women from three differents groups: 1. control group (n = 9), normal weight individuals; 2. energy restriction group (n = 22), obese patients following an energy-restricted Mediterranean-based dietary treatment (RESMENA); and 3. bariatric surgery group (n = 14), obese patients underwent a hypocaloric diet followed by bariatric surgery. Anthropometric measurements and 12-h fasting blood samples were collected before the interventions and after 6 months. Lipid and glucose biomarkers, global hydroxymethylation (by ELISA), LINE-1, SERPINE-1, and IL-6 (by MS-HRM) methylation levels were assessed in all participants. Baseline LINE-1 methylation was associated with serum glucose levels whereas baseline hydroxymethylation was associated with BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. LINE-1 and SERPINE-1 methylation levels did not change after weight loss, whereas IL-6 methylation increased after energy restriction and decreased in the bariatric surgery group. An association between SERPINE-1 methylation and weight loss responses was found. Global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation might be biomarkers for obesity and associated comorbidities. Depending on the obesity treatment (diet or surgery), the DNA methylation patterns behave differently. Baseline SERPINE-1 methylation may be a predictor of weight loss values after bariatric surgery.

  1. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical problems . These problems include diabetes , heart disease, sleep apnea , and joint trouble . Lots of very overweight people turn their weight around by sticking to a doctor-approved diet ...

  2. Weight loss and alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... want to keep an eye on how drinking affects your eating habits. Calories and Portions Count So, how much can you drink if you are trying to lose weight? Health experts recommend that anyone who drinks does so ...

  3. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, F L

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an 'obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their efforts

  4. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, F L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an ‘obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their

  5. Drug development strategies for the treatment of obesity: how to ensure efficacy, safety, and sustainable weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barja-Fernandez S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available S Barja-Fernandez,1–3 R Leis,2 FF Casanueva,3,4 LM Seoane1,3 1Grupo Fisiopatología Endocrina, 2Departamento de Pediatría, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (USC, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago de Compostela (IDIS, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago (CHUS/SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; 3CIBER Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; 4Laboratorio de Endocrinología Molecular y Celular, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (USC Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago de Compostela (IDIS, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago (CHUS/SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela, Spain Abstract: The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide, and approximately 25%–35% of the adult population is obese in some countries. The excess of body fat is associated with adverse health consequences. Considering the limited efficacy of diet and exercise in the current obese population and the use of bariatric surgery only for morbid obesity, it appears that drug therapy is the only available method to address the problem on a large scale. Currently, pharmacological obesity treatment options are limited. However, new antiobesity drugs acting through central nervous system pathways or the peripheral adiposity signals and gastrointestinal tract are under clinical development. One of the most promising approaches is the use of peptides that influence the peripheral satiety signals and brain–gut axis such as GLP-1 analogs. However, considering that any antiobesity drug may affect one or several of the systems that control food intake and energy expenditure, it is unlikely that a single pharmacological agent will be effective as a striking obesity treatment. Thus, future strategies to treat obesity will need to be directed at sustainable weight loss to ensure maximal safety. This strategy will probably require the coadministration of medications

  6. Weigth loss strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Benetti

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Although it does not represent a great isolated cause of death, obesity may be considered one of the greatest health problems nowadays because it is associated with several diseases. Inorder to avoid both increase and appearance of new cases of obesity, it is paramount that preventive measures should be taken. Prevention may be implemented through changes in lifestyle, such as eating habits re-education and the practice of physical exercises. The objective of this study was to review what type of physical exercise and also the strategies that may be adopted in exercise prescription of to optimize weight loss. It was observed that muscular resistance exercise combined with aerobic exercise seemed to produce the best results in weight loss programs because they help to increase resting metabolic rate, to keep and/or increase fat-free mass and optimize the rate of mobilization, and use of fat during weight loss. The weight loss goal seems to be successfully reached in programs that included resistance exercise, continuous and/or intermittent aerobic exercises which demand a high energy flow (70% VO2máx.. This process seemed to be more efficient because it afforded a greater total caloric expenditure; not only during exercise, but also because it triggered an increase in post-exercise oxygen consumption, thus causing fat to be used during this period. RESUMO A obesidade pode ser considerada um dos maiores problemas de saúde da atualidade por estar associada a inúmeras doenças, apesar de não representar uma grande causa isolada de morte. Para evitar tanto o crescimento como o surgimento de novos casos de obesidade, faz-se necessário que medidas de prevenção sejam tomadas. A prevenção é realizada através de mudanças no estilo de vida, como reeducação alimentar e inclusão da prática de exercícios físicos. O objetivo desta revisão foi abordar qual o tipo de exercício físico e também as estratégias que podem ser adotadas na

  7. Dietary Supplements for Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 • WEIGHT-LOSS SUPPLEMENTS FACT SHEET FOR CONSUMERS Bitter orange Bitter orange contains synephrine (a stimulant), and is claimed to ... breakdown of fat, and decrease appetite. Products with bitter orange usually also contain caffeine and other ingredients. Bitter ...

  8. Blogging for weight loss: personal accountability, writing selves, and the weight-loss blogosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggatt-Cook, Chez; Chamberlain, Kerry

    2012-09-01

    Body weight is a key concern in contemporary society, with large proportions of the population attempting to control their weight. However, losing weight and maintaining weight loss is notoriously difficult, and new strategies for weight loss attract significant interest. Writing about experiences of weight loss in online journals, or blogging, has recently expanded rapidly. Weight-loss bloggers typically write about daily successes and failures, report calorie consumption and exercise output, and post photographs of their changing bodies. Many bloggers openly court the surveillance of blog readers as a motivation for accountability to their weight-loss goals. Drawing from a sample of weight-loss blogs authored by women, we explore three issues arising from this practice of disclosing a conventionally private activity within an online public domain. First, we examine motivations for blogging, focusing on accountability. Secondly, we consider the online construction of self, exploring how weight-loss bloggers negotiate discourses around fatness, and rework selves as their bodies transform. Finally, we consider the communities of interest that form around weight-loss blogs. This 'blogosphere' provides mutual support for weight loss. However, participating in online social spaces is complicated and bloggers must carefully manage issues of privacy and disclosure. © 2011 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a potential source of biomarkers to test the efficacy of weight-loss strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynés, Bàrbara; Díaz-Rúa, Rubén; Cifre, Margalida; Oliver, Paula; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) constitute an easily obtainable blood cell fraction useful in nutrition and obesity studies. Our aim was to study the potential use of PBMC to reflect metabolic recovery associated with weight loss in rats. By real-time PCR, the fasting response of key energy homeostatic genes in PBMC samples of control and cafeteria-obese rats and of rats fed a control diet after the intake of a cafeteria diet (post-cafeteria model) was analyzed. Fasting caused decreased mRNA expression of lipogenic (Fasn and Srebp1a) and adipogenic (Pparγ) genes in PBMC, whereas it increased the expression of the key beta-oxidation gene Cpt1a and the orexigenic gene Npy. Fasting response of the genes studied was impaired in cafeteria-obese animals but was recovered in post-cafeteria rats, which showed a significant body weight decrease and normalization of adipose and metabolic parameters. Npy expression analyzed in PBMC has been revealed to be especially useful as a marker of fasting sensitivity, as its fasting response is not affected by the age of the animals and it is recovered even after shorter time of exposure to a balanced diet. PBMC reflect homeostatic balance recovery associated with weight loss in obese animals, when reverting from a hyperlipidic to a control balanced diet. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  10. Weight Loss Practices and Body Weight Perceptions among US College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Christopher M.; Adams, Troy; Hampl, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors assessed associations between body weight perception and weight loss strategies. Participants: They randomly selected male and female college students (N = 38,204). Methods: The authors conducted a secondary data analysis of the rates of weight loss strategies and body weight perception among students who completed the…

  11. A systematic review of the effectiveness of smartphone applications that encourage dietary self-regulatory strategies for weight loss in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, H M; Povey, R; Clark-Carter, D

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to systematically review the evidence to explore whether smartphone applications that use self-regulatory strategies are beneficial for weight loss in overweight and obese adults over the age of 18 years. Sixteen electronic databases were searched for articles published up to April 2015 including MEDLINE, OVID, Ingenta, PSYCARTICLES and PSYCINFO, CINAHL, Sportdiscus, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, JSTOR, EBSCO, Proquest, Wiley and Google Scholar. Twenty nine eligible studies were retrieved of which six studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies that recruited participants under the age of 18 years, adults with a chronic condition or did not report weight loss outcomes were excluded. Study findings were combined using a narrative synthesis. Overall, evidence suggests that smartphone applications may be a useful tool for self-regulating diet for weight loss as participants in the smartphone application group in all studies lost at least some bodyweight. However, when compared to other self-monitoring methods, there was no significant difference in the amount of weight lost. Findings should be interpreted with caution based on the design of the studies and the comparator groups used. Future research needs to be more methodologically rigorous and incorporate measures of whether eating habits become healthier in addition to measuring weight and BMI. © 2016 World Obesity.

  12. Abandoning weight-loss programmes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the weight-loss programme. The facilitator of the discu.ssion groups, a clinical psychologist, asked only non-directive ques- tions and ensured participation of all members in the group. For every 4 panicipants a silent and non-panicipant observer recorded contributions. Group members formed a circle and silent observers ...

  13. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURC...

  14. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D

    2016-01-01

    : Ovid Medline, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane from inception to November 2015. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR STUDY SELECTION: Randomised controlled trials in overweight or obese adults reporting reduction in body mass index, body weight, or waist circumference by FTO genotype (rs9939609 or a proxy) after...... well to dietary, physical activity, or drug based weight loss interventions and thus genetic predisposition to obesity associated with the FTO minor allele can be at least partly counteracted through such interventions. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42015015969.......OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES...

  15. Toxicity of weight loss agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, May; Ewald, Michele Burns

    2012-06-01

    With the rise of the obesity epidemic in the United States over the last several decades and the medical complications seen with it, weight loss and dieting have become a national public health concern. Because of their increased use and availability through internet sales, several different dieting agents were reviewed for potential toxicity. These included: syrup of ipecac, cathartics, human chorionic gonadotropin hormone, 2,4 Dinitrophenol, guar gum, phenylpropanolamine, ma huang/ ephedra, caffeine, clenbuterol, fenfluramine, sibutramine, thyroid hormone, orlistat and cannabinoid antagonists. With the internet making even banned products readily accessible, healthcare providers need to be aware of the potential toxicities of a wide range of weight loss agents. Our review covered topics we thought to be most historically significant as well as pertinent to the practice of medical toxicology today.

  16. Gastric stimulation for weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Meir; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Ilan, Yaron

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is growing to epidemic proportions, and there is clearly a need for minimally invasive therapies with few adverse effects that allow for sustained weight loss. Behavior and lifestyle therapy are safe treatments for obesity in the short term, but the durability of the weight loss is limited. Although promising obesity drugs are in development, the currently available drugs lack efficacy or have unacceptable side effects. Surgery leads to long-term weight loss, but it is associated with morbidity and mortality. Gastric electrical stimulation (GES) has received increasing attention as a potential tool for treating obesity and gastrointestinal dysmotility disorders. GES is a promising, minimally invasive, safe, and effective method for treating obesity. External gastric pacing is aimed at alteration of the motility of the gastrointestinal tract in a way that will alter absorption due to alteration of transit time. In addition, data from animal models and preliminary data from human trials suggest a role for the gut-brain axis in the mechanism of GES. This may involve alteration of secretion of hormones associated with hunger or satiety. Patient selection for gastric stimulation therapy seems to be an important determinant of the treatment’s outcome. Here, we review the current status, potential mechanisms of action, and possible future applications of gastric stimulation for obesity. PMID:22654422

  17. Prevalence of body mass index and body weight cut-off points for in vitro fertilization treatment at U.S. clinics and current clinic weight loss strategy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Grant, Breănna L

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how many clinics providing in vitro fertilization (IVF) in the United States require a body mass index (BMI) or body weight cut-off point to determine treatment eligibility. US clinics listed as members on the Society of Assisted Reproduction website in late 2013 were contacted by phone between January and March 2014. Clinic personnel were asked if a BMI or body weight cut-off points was used to determine IVF treatment eligibility and what strategies they recommended for their patients to achieve a healthy body weight. Of the 379 clinics contacted, 347 responded (92% response rate) and 35% (n = 120) reported using a BMI or body weight cut-off points to determine eligibility for IVF treatment. Mean BMI (± SD) cut-off points was 38.4 ± 5.2 kg/m(2) and mean body weight (± SD) cut-off points was 130.2 ± 14.8 kg. Of the clinics using a set cut-off points, half (46%) provided no weight loss recommendations for patients. A sizable portion of US IVF clinics report a required or preferred BMI or body weight cut-off points for treatment. Despite this, most clinics did not provide a recommended program or approach for weight loss with very few clinics reporting an in-house program.

  18. Thermodynamics of weight loss diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fine Eugene J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly held that "a calorie is a calorie", i.e. that diets of equal caloric content will result in identical weight change independent of macronutrient composition, and appeal is frequently made to the laws of thermodynamics. We have previously shown that thermodynamics does not support such a view and that diets of different macronutrient content may be expected to induce different changes in body mass. Low carbohydrate diets in particular have claimed a "metabolic advantage" meaning more weight loss than in isocaloric diets of higher carbohydrate content. In this review, for pedagogic clarity, we reframe the theoretical discussion to directly link thermodynamic inefficiency to weight change. The problem in outline: Is metabolic advantage theoretically possible? If so, what biochemical mechanisms might plausibly explain it? Finally, what experimental evidence exists to determine whether it does or does not occur? Results Reduced thermodynamic efficiency will result in increased weight loss. The laws of thermodynamics are silent on the existence of variable thermodynamic efficiency in metabolic processes. Therefore such variability is permitted and can be related to differences in weight lost. The existence of variable efficiency and metabolic advantage is therefore an empiric question rather than a theoretical one, confirmed by many experimental isocaloric studies, pending a properly performed meta-analysis. Mechanisms are as yet unknown, but plausible mechanisms at the metabolic level are proposed. Conclusions Variable thermodynamic efficiency due to dietary manipulation is permitted by physical laws, is supported by much experimental data, and may be reasonably explained by plausible mechanisms.

  19. Cancer Cachexia: Beyond Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Andrew R; Kamal, Arif H; LeBlanc, Thomas W; Ma, Joseph D; Baracos, Vickie E; Roeland, Eric J

    2016-11-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by skeletal muscle loss leading to progressive functional impairment. Despite the ubiquity of cachexia in clinical practice, prevention, early identification, and intervention remain challenging. The impact of cancer cachexia on quality of life, treatment-related toxicity, physical function, and mortality are well established; however, establishing a clinically meaningful definition has proven challenging because of the focus on weight loss alone. Attempts to more comprehensively define cachexia through body composition, physical functioning, and molecular biomarkers, while promising, are yet to be routinely incorporated into clinical practice. Pharmacologic agents that have not been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration but that are currently used in cancer cachexia (ie, megestrol, dronabinol) may improve weight but not outcomes of interest such as muscle mass, physical activity, or mortality. Their routine use is limited by adverse effects. For the practicing oncologist, early identification and management of cachexia is critical. Oncologists must recognize cachexia beyond weight loss alone, focusing instead on body composition and physical functioning. In fact, becoming emaciated is a late sign of cachexia that characterizes its refractory stage. Given that cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome, it requires early identification and polymodal intervention, including optimal cancer therapy, symptom management, nutrition, exercise, and psychosocial support. Consequently, oncologists have a role in ensuring that these resources are available to their patients. In addition, in light of the promising investigational agents, it remains imperative to refer patients with cachexia to clinical trials so that available options can be expanded to effectively treat this pervasive problem.

  20. Obesity Epidemic: Pharmaceutical Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Stephanie A

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease universally defined as an excess of adipose tissue resulting in body mass index (BMI) > 30.0 kg/m2. Over the past few years, the concept of prevention has gained increased awareness, thus leading to the development of additional pharmaceutical options for the treatment of obesity since 2012. Treating obesity revolves around an individualized, multi-disciplinary approach with additional focus on a healthy and supportive lifestyle to maintain the weight loss. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-03.asp].

  1. The relationship among registered nurses' weight status, weight loss regimens, and successful or unsuccessful weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitkus, Bruce S

    2011-02-01

    To investigate relationships between body mass index (BMI), personality type, weight loss regimens, and successful or unsuccessful weight loss. Seven hundred and twenty-one registered nurses (RNs) were recruited from the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, the membership of a nursing honor society, and RNs at a large state university. Participants completed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a demographic survey (age, gender, height, weight, ethnicity, education status, disability, shift work hours, and prescription medication use), and questions related to their weight status, weight loss attempts, and motivation. RNs who had a lower BMI were more successful in losing weight than RNs who had a higher BMI. They were also more successful in their weight loss attempts if they did not use a diet regimen. RNs who were successful in losing weight did not use a specified dietary regimen. ©2011 The Author Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Prevalence of weight-loss strategies and use of substances for weight-loss among adults: a population study Prevalência de estratégias de emagrecimento e uso de substâncias para perder peso entre adultos: um estudo populacional

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Coelho Machado; Mariângela Freitas da Silveira; Vera Maria Freitas da Silveira

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns a cross-sectional population-based study conducted with adults living in the city of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. It aims to determine the prevalence of weight-loss practices and use of substances for weight-loss during the 12 months preceding the interview. The prevalence of weight-loss attempts was 26.6%. Although dietary control and regular physical exercise were the most commonly used strategies, the prevalence of the combined use of these methods was only...

  3. Effectiveness of weight loss interventions for obese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Holly C; West, Delia S

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of obesity among older adults are significant, yet few obesity interventions target this group. Unfamiliarity with weight loss intervention effectiveness and concerns that weight loss negatively affects older adults may be inhibiting targeting this group. This paper reviews the evidence on intentional weight loss and effective weight loss interventions for obese older adults to help dispel concerns and guide health promotion practice. PubMed articles. Randomized controlled trials examining behavioral and pharmaceutical weight loss strategies with 1-year follow-up targeting obese (body mass index ≥ 30) older adults (mean age ≥ 60 years), and studies with quasi-experimental designs examining surgical weight loss strategies targeting older adults were examined. Abstracts were reviewed for study objective relevancy, with relevant articles extracted and reviewed. Data were inserted into an analysis matrix. Evidence indicates behavioral strategies are effective in producing significant (all p weight loss without significant risk to obese older adults, but effectiveness evidence for surgical and pharmaceutical strategies for obese older adults is lacking, primarily because this group has not been targeted in trials or analyses did not isolate this group. These findings support the promotion of intentional weight loss among obese older adults and provide guidance to health promotion practitioners on effective weight loss interventions to use with this group.

  4. Weight Loss Surgery: An Option for Teens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Obesity > Weight Loss Surgery: An Option for Teens? Health Issues Listen ... for extremely overweight adolescents for whom more conservative weight loss ... obesity-related medical conditions such as high blood pressure , ...

  5. Osteoarthritis, obesity and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Leeds, A R; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is widely acknowledged as a risk factor for both the incidence and progression of osteoarthritis, and has a negative influence on outcomes. Loss of at least 10% of body weight, coupled with exercise, is recognized as a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with osteoarthritis......, and can lead to significant improvement in symptoms, pain relief, physical function and health-related quality of life. However, questions still remain surrounding optimal management. Given the significant health, social and economic burden of osteoarthritis, especially in obese patients, it is imperative...... to advance our knowledge of osteoarthritis and obesity, and apply this to improving care and outcomes. This paper overviews what is already known about osteoarthritis and obesity, discusses current key challenges and ongoing hypotheses arising from research in these areas, and finally, postulates what...

  6. The Influence of Weight-Loss Expectations on Weight Loss and of Weight-Loss Satisfaction on Weight Maintenance in Severe Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calugi, Simona; Marchesini, Giulio; El Ghoch, Marwan; Gavasso, Ilaria; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Conflicting evidence exists as to whether cognitive mechanisms contribute to weight loss and maintenance. To assess the influence of weight-loss expectations on weight loss, and of weight-loss satisfaction on weight maintenance, in individuals with severe obesity. A randomized controlled trial comparing two types of energy-restricted diets (high protein vs high carbohydrate) combined with weight-loss cognitive behavioral therapy, conducted over 51 weeks and divided into two phases: weight-loss phase (3 weeks of inpatient treatment and 24 weeks of outpatient treatment) and weight maintenance phase (24 weeks of outpatient treatment). Eighty-eight participants with severe obesity (mean age=46.7 years and mean body mass index=45.6), referred to an eating and weight disorders clinical service, were studied. Body weight was assessed at baseline, and after 3, 27 (end of weight-loss phase), and 51 weeks (end of weight maintenance phase). Weight loss expectations were assessed at the time of enrollment, and weight-loss satisfaction was assessed after 27 weeks. The relationship between weight-loss expectations and weight loss was assessed using a linear mixed model. The association between weight-loss satisfaction and final outcomes was tested by linear regression. The two groups had similar weight-loss expectations and satisfaction, and their results were therefore pooled. In general, the total amount of expected weight loss (in kilograms), but not the percentage of expected weight loss, predicted weight loss, and both satisfaction with weight loss and the amount of weight lost (in kilograms) were independent predictors of weight maintenance. Higher expected weight loss improves weight loss, and both the total amount of weight lost and satisfaction with weight loss are associated with weight-loss maintenance at 1-year follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 38 CFR 4.112 - Weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weight loss. 4.112... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.112 Weight loss. For purposes of evaluating conditions in § 4.114, the term “substantial weight loss” means a loss of greater than 20 percent of the...

  8. Mindfulness and weight loss: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, KayLoni L; Emery, Charles F

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness training has been incorporated increasingly into weight loss programs to facilitate dietary and physical activity changes. This systematic review of studies using mindfulness-based programs for weight loss evaluated study methodologies with the goal of determining the current evidence in support of mindfulness interventions for weight loss. Published studies of mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss were identified through systematic review including a comprehensive search of online databases. Studies were reviewed and graded according to methodological strengths and weaknesses. A total of 19 studies, including 13 randomized controlled trials and 6 observational studies, evaluated the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on weight among individuals attempting weight loss. Twelve of the studies were published in peer-reviewed journals and seven were unpublished dissertations. Among the eight randomized controlled trials published in peer-reviewed journals, six documented significant weight loss among participants in the mindfulness condition, one reported no significant change, and one failed to report body mass index at program completion. None of the studies documented a relationship between changes in mindfulness and weight loss. Significant weight loss was documented among participants in mindfulness interventions for 13 of the 19 studies identified for review. However, studies do not clarify the degree to which changes in mindfulness are a mechanism responsible for weight loss in mindfulness interventions. Methodological weaknesses and variability across studies limit the strength of the evidence. Further research is needed to document and evaluate the psychological, behavioral, and biological mechanisms involved in the relationship between mindfulness and weight loss.

  9. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency. Recent findings Long-term testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency produces significant and sustained weight loss, marked reduction in waist circumference and BMI and improvement in body composition. Further, testosterone therapy ameliorates components of the metabolic syndrome. The aforementioned improvements are attributed to improved mitochondrial function, increased energy utilization, increased motivation and vigor resulting in improved cardio-metabolic function and enhanced physical activity. Summary The implication of testosterone therapy in management of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency is of paramount clinical significance, as it produces sustained weight loss without recidivism. On the contrary, alternative therapeutic approaches other than bariatric surgery failed to produce significant and sustained outcome and exhibit a high rate of recidivism. These findings represent strong foundations for testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency and should spur clinical research for better understanding of usefulness of testosterone therapy in treatment of underlying pathophysiological conditions of obesity. PMID:25105998

  10. Using personality as a predictor of diet induced weight loss and weight management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munro Irene A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge for successful weight management is tailoring weight loss programs to individual needs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether personality traits could be used to match individuals to a compatible weight loss program that would maximize weight loss. Method Two different weight loss trials were conducted, both with a weight loss greater than 5% the measure of success. Fifty-four individuals, BMI 30-40 kg/m2, either followed a slow, healthy eating weight loss diet (HEWLD of 5000-6000 kJ/day for 12 weeks (n = 22, or a fast, very low energy diet (VLED of 3000 kJ/day for 4 weeks (n = 32. Anthropometric measurements were recorded at baseline, at the end of the weight loss period and, for VLED, at the end of 10 weeks of weight maintenance. Personality traits were measured at baseline using the Tangney Self Control Scale plus 3 of the scales from the Five Factor Model - Neuroticism, Conscientiousness and Extraversion. Results The percentage weight loss was significantly greater in VLED (-7.38% compared to HEWLD (-4.11%, (p Conclusion The personality factor, Neuroticism, was linked to successful weight loss (that is ≥ 5% with a particular weight loss treatment, suggesting that there is a potential to use measures of personality to identify appropriate weight loss/management strategies for individuals. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12611000716965

  11. Using personality as a predictor of diet induced weight loss and weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Irene A; Bore, Miles R; Munro, Don; Garg, Manohar L

    2011-11-23

    A major challenge for successful weight management is tailoring weight loss programs to individual needs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether personality traits could be used to match individuals to a compatible weight loss program that would maximize weight loss. Two different weight loss trials were conducted, both with a weight loss greater than 5% the measure of success. Fifty-four individuals, BMI 30-40 kg/m2, either followed a slow, healthy eating weight loss diet (HEWLD) of 5000-6000 kJ/day for 12 weeks (n = 22), or a fast, very low energy diet (VLED) of 3000 kJ/day for 4 weeks (n = 32). Anthropometric measurements were recorded at baseline, at the end of the weight loss period and, for VLED, at the end of 10 weeks of weight maintenance. Personality traits were measured at baseline using the Tangney Self Control Scale plus 3 of the scales from the Five Factor Model - Neuroticism, Conscientiousness and Extraversion. The percentage weight loss was significantly greater in VLED (-7.38%) compared to HEWLD (-4.11%), (p personality trait, Self Control, in either HEWLD or VLED. The personality factor, Neuroticism, was linked to successful weight loss (that is ≥ 5%) with a particular weight loss treatment, suggesting that there is a potential to use measures of personality to identify appropriate weight loss/management strategies for individuals. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12611000716965.

  12. Successful weight loss among obese U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklas, Jacinda M; Huskey, Karen W; Davis, Roger B; Wee, Christina C

    2012-05-01

    Little is known about weight control strategies associated with successful weight loss among obese U.S. adults in the general population. To identify strategies associated with losing at least 5% and 10% of body weight. Multivariable analysis of data from obese adult (BMI ≥30) participants in the 2001-2006 NHANES to identify strategies associated with losing ≥5% and ≥10% of body weight (conducted in 2009-2011). Of 4021 obese adults, 2523 (63%) reported trying to lose weight in the previous year. Among those attempting weight loss, 1026 (40%) lost ≥5% and 510 (20%) lost ≥10% weight. After adjustment for potential confounders, strategies associated with losing ≥5% weight included eating less fat (OR=1.41, 95% CI=1.14, 1.75); exercising more (OR=1.29, 95% CI=1.05, 1.60); and using prescription weight loss medications (OR=1.77, 95% CI=1.00, 3.13). Eating less fat (OR=1.37, 95% CI=1.04, 1.79); exercising more (OR=1.36, 95% CI=1.12, 1.65); and using prescription weight loss medications (OR=2.05, 95% CI=1.09, 3.86) were also associated with losing ≥10% weight, as was joining commercial weight loss programs (OR=1.72, 95% CI=1.00, 2.96). Adults eating diet products were less likely to achieve 10% weight loss (OR=0.48, 95% CI=0.31, 0.72). Liquid diets, nonprescription diet pills, and popular diets had no association with successful weight loss. A substantial proportion of obese U.S. adults who attempted to lose weight reported weight loss, at least in the short term. Obese adults were more likely to report achieving meaningful weight loss if they ate less fat, exercised more, used prescription weight loss medications, or participated in commercial weight loss programs. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Weight Loss: Ready to Change Your Habits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the challenge of overhauling your eating and exercise habits. Instead, consider giving your life a chance to calm down before you launch your weight-loss program. Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight is a lifelong process. Start by making ...

  14. Weighing Portions Adds Up to Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_167159.html Weighing Portions Adds Up to Weight Loss Put an end to guesstimating calories with simple ... control is a must when you want to lose weight. "Guesstimating" the size of a chicken breast at ...

  15. Effect of sibutramine on weight maintenance after weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, W P; Astrup, A; Finer, Nicholas

    2000-01-01

    Sibutramine is a tertiary amine that has been shown to induce dose-dependent weight loss and to enhance the effects of a low-calorie diet for up to a year. We did a randomised, double-blind trial to assess the usefulness of sibutramine in maintaining substantial weight loss over 2 years....

  16. Teammates and social influence affect weight loss outcomes in a team-based weight loss competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Tricia M; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad M; Wing, Rena R

    2012-07-01

    Team-based internet interventions are increasing in popularity as a way of promoting weight loss in large numbers of individuals. Given that social networks influence health behavior change, this study investigated the effects of teammates and social influence on individual weight loss during a team-based weight loss competition. Shape Up Rhode Island (SURI) 2009 was a 12-week online program open to adult residents of Rhode Island. Participants joined with a team and competed with other teams on weight loss and/or physical activity. Overweight/obese (OW/OB) individuals (N = 3,330; 76% female; age = 46.1 ± 10.8; BMI = 31.2 ± 5.3 kg/m(2)), representing 987 teams, completed the weight loss program. Multilevel modeling was used to examine whether weight loss clustered among teammates and whether percentage of teammates in the weight loss division and reported teammate influence on weight loss were associated with individual weight outcomes. OW/OB completers reported losing 4.2 ± 3.4% of initial body weight. Weight loss was similar among teammates (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.10, P social influence for weight loss were associated with greater percent weight loss (P's ≤ 0.002). Similarly, achieving a clinically significant (5%) weight loss tended to cluster within teams (ICC = 0.09; P social influence for weight loss were associated with increased likelihood of achieving a 5% weight loss (odds ratio (OR) = 1.06; OR = 1.20, respectively). These results suggest that teammates affect weight loss outcomes during a team-based intervention. Harnessing and maximizing teammate influence for weight loss may enhance weight outcomes in large-scale team-based programs.

  17. Healthy habits for weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you or try to tempt you with old eating habits. Send progress reports. Tell your friends your goal weight and send them weekly updates of how you are doing. Use social media. Some mobile apps let you log everything you ...

  18. Preserving Healthy Muscle during Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, Edda; Yeat, Nai Chien; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2017-05-01

    Weight loss is the cornerstone of therapy for people with obesity because it can ameliorate or completely resolve the metabolic risk factors for diabetes, coronary artery disease, and obesity-associated cancers. The potential health benefits of diet-induced weight loss are thought to be compromised by the weight-loss-associated loss of lean body mass, which could increase the risk of sarcopenia (low muscle mass and impaired muscle function). The objective of this review is to provide an overview of what is known about weight-loss-induced muscle loss and its implications for overall physical function (e.g., ability to lift items, walk, and climb stairs). The currently available data in the literature show the following: 1) compared with persons with normal weight, those with obesity have more muscle mass but poor muscle quality; 2) diet-induced weight loss reduces muscle mass without adversely affecting muscle strength; 3) weight loss improves global physical function, most likely because of reduced fat mass; 4) high protein intake helps preserve lean body and muscle mass during weight loss but does not improve muscle strength and could have adverse effects on metabolic function; 5) both endurance- and resistance-type exercise help preserve muscle mass during weight loss, and resistance-type exercise also improves muscle strength. We therefore conclude that weight-loss therapy, including a hypocaloric diet with adequate (but not excessive) protein intake and increased physical activity (particularly resistance-type exercise), should be promoted to maintain muscle mass and improve muscle strength and physical function in persons with obesity. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) KidsHealth / For Parents / Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) ... or bariatric surgery might be an option. About Bariatric Surgery Bariatric surgery had its beginnings in the 1960s, ...

  20. Maintained intentional weight loss reduces cardiovascular outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterson, I D; Finer, N; Coutinho, W

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The Sibutramine Cardiovascular OUTcomes trial showed that sibutramine produced greater mean weight loss than placebo but increased cardiovascular morbidity but not mortality. The relationship between 12-month weight loss and subsequent cardiovascular outcomes is explored. Methods: Overweight/obese...... change to Month 12 was -4.18 kg (sibutramine) or -1.87 kg (placebo). Degree of weight loss during Lead-in Period or through Month 12 was associated with a progressive reduction in risk for the total population in primary outcome events and cardiovascular mortality over the 5-year assessment. Although...... more events occurred in the randomized sibutramine group, on an average, a modest weight loss of approximately 3 kg achieved in the Lead-in Period appeared to offset this increased event rate. Moderate weight loss (3-10 kg) reduced cardiovascular deaths in those with severe, moderate or mild...

  1. Human biology of weight maintenance after weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariman, Edwin C M

    2012-01-01

    One year after losing weight, most people have regained a significant part of the lost weight. As such, weight regain after weight loss has a negative impact on human health. The risk for weight regain is determined by psychosocial and behavioral factors as well as by various physiological and molecular parameters. Here, the latter intrinsic factors are reviewed and assembled into four functional modules, two related to the energy balance and two related to resistance against weight loss. Reported genetic factors do not reveal additional functional processes. The modules form nodes in a network describing the complex interactions of intrinsically determined weight maintenance. This network indicates that after an initial weight loss persons with a high baseline fat mass will most easily succeed in maintaining weight, because they can lose fat without raising stress in adipocytes and at the same time spare fat-free mass. However, continued weight loss and weight maintenance requires extra measures like increased physical activity, limited energy intake and a fat-free sparing composition of the diet. Eventually, this network may help to design novel therapeutic measures based on preventing the return effect of specific plasma factors or by preventing the accumulation of adipocyte cellular stress. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Prior weight loss exacerbates the biological drive to gain weight after the loss of ovarian function

    OpenAIRE

    Sherk, Vanessa D; Jackman, Matthew R.; Giles, Erin D.; Higgins, Janine A.; Foright, Rebecca M.; Presby, David M.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Houck, Julie A.; Houser, Jordan L.; Oljira, Robera; MacLean, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Both the history of obesity and weight loss may change how menopause affects metabolic health. The purpose was to determine whether obesity and/or weight loss status alters energy balance (EB) and subsequent weight gain after the loss of ovarian function. Female lean and obese Wistar rats were randomized to 15% weight loss (WL) or ad?libitum fed controls (CON). After the weight loss period, WL rats were kept in EB at the reduced weight for 8?weeks prior to ovariectomy (OVX). After OV...

  3. Intentional Weight Loss and Endometrial Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juhua; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Hendryx, Michael; Rohan, Thomas; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Thomson, Cynthia A; Felix, Ashley S; Chen, Chu; Barrington, Wendy; Coday, Mace; Stefanick, Marcia; LeBlanc, Erin; Margolis, Karen L

    2017-04-10

    Purpose Although obesity is an established endometrial cancer risk factor, information about the influence of weight loss on endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women is limited. Therefore, we evaluated associations among weight change by intentionality with endometrial cancer in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) observational study. Patients and Methods Postmenopausal women (N = 36,794) ages 50 to 79 years at WHI enrollment had their body weights measured and body mass indices calculated at baseline and at year 3. Weight change during that period was categorized as follows: stable (change within ± 5%), loss (change ≥ 5%), and gain (change ≥ 5%). Weight loss intentionality was assessed via self-report at year 3; change was characterized as intentional or unintentional. During the subsequent 11.4 years (mean) of follow-up, 566 incident endometrial cancer occurrences were confirmed by medical record review. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate relationships (hazard ratios [HRs] and 95% CIs) between weight change and endometrial cancer incidence. Results In multivariable analyses, compared with women who had stable weight (± 5%), women with weight loss had a significantly lower endometrial cancer risk (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.95). The association was strongest among obese women with intentional weight loss (HR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.78). Weight gain (≥ 10 pounds) was associated with a higher endometrial cancer risk than was stable weight, especially among women who had never used hormones. Conclusion Intentional weight loss in postmenopausal women is associated with a lower endometrial cancer risk, especially among women with obesity. These findings should motivate programs for weight loss in obese postmenopausal women.

  4. [Success in maintaining weight loss in Portugal: the Portuguese Weight Control Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Paulo Nuno; Teixeira, Pedro; Sardinha, Luís Bettencourt; Santos, Teresa; Coutinho, Sílvia; Mata, Jutta; Silva, Marlene Nunes

    2014-01-01

    The scope of this article is to describe the Portuguese Weight Control Registry (PWCR) methodology and the participants currently enrolled specifically with respect to their individual and family weight history, previous weight loss attempts, and psychosocial characteristics. One hundred and ninety-eight adults (age: 39.7±11.1 years; BMI: 26.0±3.9 kg/m2), 59% women, filled out a questionnaire about demographics, health-related behaviors and motivation, and methods and strategies used to lose and/or maintain weight loss. Participants reported an average weight loss of 17.4 kg for an average of 29 months. Concerning the number of weight loss attempts, 73% of participants reported a maximum of three attempts of going on a diet, and 34% indicated only one attempt to lose weight in the past. The PWCR now features a considerable number of successful long-term weight loss maintainers in Portugal. Participants will be followed over the next years to learn about their characteristics and weight loss strategies in further detail, as well as to identify predictors of continued weight loss maintenance.

  5. Predictors of successful long-term weight loss maintenance: a two-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Sawamoto, Ryoko; Nozaki, Takehiro; Nishihara, Tomoe; Furukawa, Tomokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Komaki, Gen; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background Weight regain is a common problem following weight loss intervention, with most people who seek treatment for obesity able to lose weight, but few able to sustain the changes in behavior required to prevent subsequent weight regain. The identification of factors that predict which patients will successfully maintain weight loss or who are at risk of weight regain after weight loss intervention is necessary to improve the current weight maintenance strategies. The aim of the present...

  6. The impact of weight loss on patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Danilo Macasa; Jarrett, Patricia

    Weight loss due to cachexia is a common symptom in patients with advanced cancer and often affects their quality of life. This article outlines a literature review conducted to better understand the effects of weight loss on patients with cancer. Five themes were identified that encompassed patients' experiences, including personal response, physical effects, emotions and moods, changes in eating habits and effects on social life. The review suggests strategies that health professionals can implement to ensure patients' and their families' feelings about weight loss are taken into consideration.

  7. Circulating omentin concentration increases after weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricart Wifredo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Omentin-1 is a novel adipokine expressed in visceral adipose tissue and negatively associated with insulin resistance and obesity. We aimed to study the effects of weight loss-induced improved insulin sensitivity on circulating omentin concentrations. Methods Circulating omentin-1 (ELISA concentration in association with metabolic variables was measured in 35 obese subjects (18 men, 17 women before and after hypocaloric weight loss. Results Baseline circulating omentin-1 concentrations correlated negatively with BMI (r = -0.58, p Conclusion As previously described with adiponectin, circulating omentin-1 concentrations increase after weight loss-induced improvement of insulin sensitivity.

  8. The downside of weight loss: realistic intervention in body-weight trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosomworth, N John

    2012-05-01

    To explore the reasons why long-term weight loss is seldom achieved and to evaluate the consequences of various weight trajectories, including stability, loss, and gain. Studies evaluating population weight metrics were mainly observational. Level I evidence was available to evaluate the influence of weight interventions on mortality and quality of life. Sustained weight loss is achieved by a small percentage of those intending to lose weight. Mortality is lowest in the high-normal and overweight range. The safest body-size trajectory is stable weight with optimization of physical and metabolic fitness. With weight loss there is evidence for lower mortality in those with obesity-related comorbidities. There is also evidence for improved health-related quality of life in obese individuals who lose weight. Weight loss in the healthy obese, however, is associated with increased mortality. Weight loss is advisable only for those with obesity-related comorbidities. Healthy obese people wishing to lose weight should be informed that there might be associated risks. A strategy that leads to a stable body mass index with optimized physical and metabolic fitness at any size is the safest weight intervention option.

  9. Getting Past a Weight-Loss Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... still eating carefully and exercising regularly. The frustrating reality is that even well-planned weight-loss efforts ... Because you've already improved your diet and increased your exercise, you've already improved your health. ...

  10. Ischemic Colitis after Weight-Loss Medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Comay

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous weight-loss medications have received cautious support due to their association with pulmonary hypertension and valvular heart disease. However, newer drugs are increasingly being recommended as potentially safer and more efficacious. We report a case of ischemic colitis possibly linked to the use of a weight-loss drug, and review the literature to highlight an important latent consequence of these medications.

  11. Mediators of weight loss and weight loss maintenance in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro J; Silva, Marlene N; Coutinho, Sílvia R; Palmeira, António L; Mata, Jutta; Vieira, Paulo N; Carraça, Eliana V; Santos, Teresa C; Sardinha, Luís B

    2010-04-01

    Long-term behavioral self-regulation is the hallmark of successful weight control. We tested mediators of weight loss and weight loss maintenance in middle-aged women who participated in a randomized controlled 12-month weight management intervention. Overweight and obese women (N = 225, BMI = 31.3 +/- 4.1 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to a control or a 1-year group intervention designed to promote autonomous self-regulation of body weight. Key exercise, eating behavior, and body image variables were assessed before and after the program, and tested as mediators of weight loss (12 months, 86% retention) and weight loss maintenance (24 months, 81% retention). Multiple mediation was employed and an intention-to-treat analysis conducted. Treatment effects were observed for all putative mediators (Effect size: 0.32-0.79, P exercise self-efficacy (P exercise intrinsic motivation (P emotional eating, increased flexible cognitive restraint, and fewer exercise barriers mediated 12-month weight loss (R(2) = 0.31, P exercise self-efficacy mediated 24-month weight loss (R(2) = 0.17, P regulation mediators of weight loss and 2-year weight loss maintenance, in a large sample of overweight women. Results show that lowering emotional eating and adopting a flexible dietary restraint pattern are critical for sustained weight loss. For long-term success, interventions must also be effective in promoting exercise intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy.

  12. Friend and Family Support for Weight Loss in Adolescent Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Noel; Valle, Carmina G; Tate, Deborah F

    2016-02-01

    Overweight and obesity rates in children and adolescents are concerning, particularly among girls. Social support from friends has been associated with healthier eating and higher levels of physical activity, yet little is known about the relationship between social support and weight loss among adolescents. This aim of this study was to prospectively examine the relationship between baseline social support from friends and family, changes in social support, and weight loss. Sixty-five adolescent girls completed a one-year weight loss intervention trial. Data were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. At baseline, family support was higher compared to friend support; however, lower friend support at baseline and increases in friend support from baseline to 6 months and 12 months were associated with weight loss. When controlling for other predictors of weight loss, change in friend support for healthy eating was predictive of weight loss at 12 months. These findings suggest that weight loss interventions for adolescent females might consider including strategies to elicit or to create and promote social support for healthy eating from peers. Future studies are needed to test this relationship.

  13. Sleep is increased by weight gain and decreased by weight loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhiwei; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Bixler, Edward O; Fang, Jidong

    2008-05-01

    To determine whether weight loss could reverse excessive sleep in high-fat diet-induced obesity. Three groups of mice participated in the study. A weight gain/loss group was fed with high-fat food for 6 weeks (weight gain), and regular food again for 4 weeks (weight loss). A control group and a weight gain only group were fed with regular food and high-fat food, respectively, for 10 weeks after the baseline. Adult male C57BL/6 mice. The amounts of wake, rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REM sleep (NREMS) were determined at week 0 (baseline), week 6, and week 10. The weight gain/loss group displayed a significant decrease in wakefulness and increases in NREMS and episodes of NREMS during 6 weeks of weight gain, which were reversed during subsequent 4 weeks of weight loss. The weight gain only group displayed significant decrease in wakefulness and increase of NREMS and REMS at both week 6 and week 10. The control group did not show significant sleep alterations during the experiment. These observations indicate that sleep alterations induced by weight gain are reversed by weight loss in obese animals. These data may shed light on the mechanisms underlying the well-established association between obesity and sleepiness in humans and may lead to new therapeutic strategies for these 2 increasingly prevalent problems in the modern societies.

  14. Website Usage and Weight Loss in a Free Commercial Online Weight Loss Program: Retrospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jing; Trickey, Amber W; Sciamanna, Christopher N

    2013-01-01

    Background Online weight loss programs are increasingly popular. However, little is known about outcomes and associations with website usage among members of free online weight loss programs. Objective This retrospective cohort study examined the association between website usage and weight loss among members of a free commercial online weight loss program (SparkPeople). Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of a systematic random sample of members who joined the program during February 1 to April 30, 2008, and included follow-up data through May 10, 2010. The main outcome was net weight change based on self-reported weight. Measures of website usage included log-ins, self-monitoring entries (weight, food, exercise), and use of social support tools (discussion forums, friendships). Results The main sample included 1258 members with at least 2 weight entries. They were 90.7% female, with mean (SD) age 33.6 (11.0) and mean (SD) BMI 31.6 (7.7). Members with at least one forum post lost an additional 1.55 kg (95% CI 0.55 kg to 2.55 kg) relative to those with no forum posts. Having at least 4 log-in days, weight entry days, or food entry days per 30 days was significantly associated with weight loss. In the multiple regression analysis, members with at least 4 weight entry days per 30 days reported 5.09 kg (95% CI 3.29 kg to 6.88 kg) more weight loss per 30 days than those with fewer weight entry days. After controlling for weight entry days, the other website usage variables were not associated with weight change. Conclusions Weekly or more frequent self-monitoring of weight is associated with greater weight loss among members of this free online weight loss program. PMID:23322819

  15. Impact of Weight Loss Management in OSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Simon A; Hamilton, Garun S; Naughton, Matthew T

    2017-07-01

    The interaction between obesity and OSA is complex. Although it is often assumed that obesity is the major cause of OSA, and that treatment of the OSA might mitigate further weight gain, new evidence is emerging that suggests this may not be the case. Obesity explains about 60% of the variance of the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) definition of OSA, mainly in those OSA with CPAP is associated with a small but significant weight gain. This weight gain effect may result from abolition of the increased work of breathing associated with OSA. Unfortunately, weight loss by either medical or surgical techniques, which often cures type 2 diabetes, has a beneficial effect on sleep apnea in only a minority of patients. A short jaw length may be predictive of a better outcome. The slight fall in the overall AHI with weight loss, however, may be associated with a larger drop in the nonsupine AHI, thus converting some patients from nonpositional to positional (ie, supine only) OSA. Importantly, patients undergoing surgical weight loss need close monitoring to prevent complications. Finally, in patients with moderate to severe obesity-related OSA, the combination of weight loss with CPAP appears more beneficial than either treatment in isolation. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The weight loss blogosphere: an online survey of weight loss bloggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Martinus; Faghri, Pouran D; Pagoto, Sherry L; Schneider, Kristin L; Waring, Molly E; Whited, Matthew C; Appelhans, Bradley M; Busch, Andrew; Coleman, Ailton S

    2016-09-01

    Blogging is a form of online journaling that has been increasingly used to document an attempt in weight loss. Despite the prevalence of weight loss bloggers, few studies have examined this population. We examined characteristics of weight loss bloggers and their blogs, including blogging habits, reasons for blogging, like and dislikes of blogging, and associations between blogging activity and weight loss. Participants (N = 194, 92.3 % female, mean age = 35) were recruited from Twitter and Facebook to complete an online survey. Participants reported an average weight loss of 42.3 pounds since starting to blog about their weight loss attempt. Blogging duration significantly predicted greater weight loss during blogging (β = -3.65, t(185) = -2.97, p = .003). Findings suggest that bloggers are generally successful with their weight loss attempt. Future research should explore what determines weight loss success/failure in bloggers and whether individuals desiring to lose weight would benefit from blogging.

  17. Regulatory Focus, Proximity to Goal Weight, and Weight Loss Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, Paul T; Rothman, Alexander J; Jeffery, Robert W; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2015-09-01

    Regulatory focus theory proposes 2 self-regulatory orientations: promotion focus - related to achieving aspirations and positive outcomes - and prevention focus - related to fulfilling responsibilities and preventing negative outcomes. The investigation examined whether regulatory focus and proximity to goal weight moderated the effectiveness of a weight-loss maintenance intervention. Participants who lost ≥10% of their weight were assigned to guided or self-directed treatments and completed regulatory focus and weight goal measures. Across treatment groups, people who were more promotion-focused had better 2-year maintenance rates (defined as regain focused, especially if far from their goal weight (.59 versus .44). In the guided group, people who were more prevention-focused had better maintenance rates than people who were less prevention-focused if closer to their goal weight (.69 versus .42), but poorer maintenance rates if farther from their goal (.36 versus .72). In the self-directed group, prevention focus was unrelated to maintenance. Regulatory focus and proximity to goal weight moderated intervention effectiveness. Maintenance may be enhanced by tailoring treatments to regulatory focus and goal weight (eg, prevention-focused people far from their goals may need extra weight-loss support before focusing on maintenance).

  18. Teammates and social influence affect weight loss outcomes in a team-based weight loss competition

    OpenAIRE

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad M.; Wing, Rena R.

    2012-01-01

    Team-based Internet interventions are increasing in popularity as a way of promoting weight loss in large numbers of individuals. Given that social networks influence health behavior change, this study investigated the effects of teammates and social influence on individual weight loss during a team-based weight loss competition. Shape Up Rhode Island 2009 was a 12-week online program open to adult residents of Rhode Island. Participants joined with a team and competed with other teams on wei...

  19. Rapid Weight Loss in Sports with Weight Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaee, Morteza; Olewinski, Lucianne; Shadgan, Babak; Kiningham, Robert R

    2015-01-01

    Weight-sensitive sports are popular among elite and nonelite athletes. Rapid weight loss (RWL) practice has been an essential part of many of these sports for many decades. Due to the limited epidemiological studies on the prevalence of RWL, its true prevalence is unknown. It is estimated that more than half of athletes in weight-class sports have practiced RWL during the competitive periods. As RWL can have significant physical, physiological, and psychological negative effects on athletes, its practice has been discouraged for many years. It seems that appropriate rule changes have had the biggest impact on the practice of RWL in sports like wrestling. An individualized and well-planned gradual and safe weight loss program under the supervision of a team of coaching staff, athletic trainers, sports nutritionists, and sports physicians is recommended.

  20. [Fatigue and weight loss in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2012-04-01

    Fatigue is a common, under recognized, and poorly understood nonmotor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fatigue frequently presents early in PD, and its prevalence increases with disease progression, affecting up to 60% of patients. Fatigue has a negative impact on quality of life. Fatigue is often associated with other nonmotor symptoms, including sleep disturbance, excessive daytime sleepiness, and depression. Only a few reports have been published on the treatment of fatigue in PD (methylphenidate, levodopa, and pramipexole). Further well-designed studies, including physiotherapy, are necessary to develop more effective treatments for PD-associated fatigue. A number of patients with PD lose weight because of loss of fat. However, the evolution and determinants of weight loss are not well established. Possible determinants of weight loss in PD include loss of appetite, impaired hand-mouth coordination, difficulty in chewing and dysphagia, nausea, intestinal hypomotility, and increased energy requirements because of muscular rigidity and involuntary movements. Noticeable weight gain has repeatedly been reported after subthalamic or pallidal deep brain stimulation. Because low body weight is associated with negative health effects and a poor prognosis, monitoring weight and nutritional status should be part of PD management.

  1. Quick weight loss: sorting fad from fact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D C

    This article reviews popular diets for their ability to produce effective weight loss. Most of the "evidence" for fad diets is based on anecdotal findings, theories and testimonials of short term results. The most prominent elements of fad diets are those of ritual and sacrifice. These diets offer quick and painless weight loss while allowing consumption of favourite or tasty foods, but place severe restrictions on certain other foods or food categories. Fad diets often work in the short term because they are low-kilojoule diets in disguise; that is, energy intake as a result of the diet is lower than the person's requirements. Successful long term weight loss depends on the consumption over a long period of time of less energy than is expended. The ideal approach is to increase physical activity while modifying eating behaviour to achieve a nutritionally balanced intake.

  2. Smartphone applications to support weight loss: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Christine A; Pfammatter, Angela F; Conroy, David E; Spring, Bonnie

    2015-07-01

    Lower cost alternatives are needed for the traditional in-person behavioral weight loss programs to overcome challenges of lowering the worldwide prevalence of overweight and obesity. Smartphones have become ubiquitous and provide a unique platform to aid in the delivery of a behavioral weight loss program. The technological capabilities of a smartphone may address certain limitations of a traditional weight loss program, while also reducing the cost and burden on participants, interventionists, and health care providers. Awareness of the advantages smartphones offer for weight loss has led to the rapid development and proliferation of weight loss applications (apps). The built-in features and the mechanisms by which they work vary across apps. Although there are an extraordinary number of a weight loss apps available, most lack the same magnitude of evidence-based behavior change strategies typically used in traditional programs. As features develop and new capabilities are identified, we propose a conceptual model as a framework to guide the inclusion of features that can facilitate behavior change and lead to reductions in weight. Whereas the conventional wisdom about behavior change asserts that more is better (with respect to the number of behavior change techniques involved), this model suggests that less may be more because extra techniques may add burden and adversely impact engagement. Current evidence is promising and continues to emerge on the potential of smartphone use within weight loss programs; yet research is unable to keep up with the rapidly improving smartphone technology. Future studies are needed to refine the conceptual model's utility in the use of technology for weight loss, determine the effectiveness of intervention components utilizing smartphone technology, and identify novel and faster ways to evaluate the ever-changing technology.

  3. Does bone loss begin after weight loss ends? Results 2 years after weight loss or regain in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Thun, Nancy L; Sukumar, Deeptha; Heymsfield, Steven B; Shapses, Sue A

    2014-05-01

    Short-term weight loss is accompanied by bone loss in postmenopausal women. The longer-term impact of weight loss on bone in reduced overweight/obese women compared with women who regained their weight was examined in this study using a case-control design. Postmenopausal women (N = 42; mean [SD] body mass index, 28.3 [2.8] kg/m; mean [SD] age, 60.7 [5.5] y) were recruited 2 years after the start of a 6-month weight loss trial; those who maintained their weight (weight loss maintainer [WL-M] group) were matched to a cohort of women who regained their weight (weight loss regainer [WL-R] group). Serum hormones and bone markers were measured in a subset. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the femoral neck, trochanter, spine, radius, and total body, and soft-tissue composition were taken at baseline, 0.5 years, and 2 years. During weight loss, both groups lost 9.3% (3.4%) of body weight, with no significant difference between the groups. After weight loss, weight change was -0.1% (2.7%) and 6.0% (3.3%) in the WL-M (n = 22) and WL-R (n = 20) groups, respectively. After 2 years, both groups lost BMD at the femoral neck and trochanter (P ≤ 0.01), whereas only the WL-M group reduced BMD at the 1/3 radius (P weight reduction-induced bone loss, irrespective of weight regain. These data suggest that the period after weight loss may be an important point in time to prevent bone loss for those who maintain weight and those who regain weight.

  4. Bone Metabolism in Obesity and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapses, Sue A.; Sukumar, Deeptha

    2014-01-01

    Excess body weight due to obesity has traditionally been considered to have a positive effect on bone; however, more recent findings suggest that bone quality is compromised. Both obesity and caloric restriction increase fracture risk and are regulated by endocrine factors and cytokines that have direct and indirect effects on bone and calcium absorption. Weight reduction will decrease bone mass and mineral density, but this varies by the individual’s age, gender, and adiposity. Dietary modifications, exercise, and medications have been shown to attenuate the bone loss associated with weight reduction. Future obesity and weight loss trials would benefit from assessment of key hormones, adipokine and gut peptides that regulate calcium absorption, and bone mineral density and quality by using sensitive techniques in high-risk populations. PMID:22809104

  5. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, obesity, and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim Berg; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has frequently been found to have an impact on the development of obesity, with the relationship between past traumatic episodes and obesity usually thought of as uni-directional. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the level of PTSD......-symptoms would decrease as a result of weight loss in obese participants during a 16 week stay at a weight loss facility. During the 16 weeks participants’ Body Mass Index (BMI) decreased significantly. Concurrently, a significant decline in the level of PTSD symptoms was also reported. During the first week...

  6. Weight Loss Supplements: Boon or Bane?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Reshma Mohamed; Omar, Norfaizatul Shalida

    2017-01-01

    Dietary health supplements for weight loss seem to be the future nowadays. However, this industry is plagued by lack of regulations and ignorance regarding the constituents of the supplements. Of all the supplements consumed, the ones for weight loss are most commonly found in the market. Reports of liver failure, kidney impairment and worsening of chronic ailments in patients who consume these supplements are surfacing recently which make us question the credibility of these products. The safety of these products lie in the clear stating of the ingredients by the manufacturer, well informed patient, knowledgeable physician and tight regulations from the regulatory board. PMID:28814927

  7. Predicting successful long-term weight loss from short-term weight-loss outcomes: new insights from a dynamic energy balance model (the POUNDS Lost study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Diana M; Ivanescu, Andrada E; Martin, Corby K; Heymsfield, Steven B; Marshall, Kaitlyn; Bodrato, Victoria E; Williamson, Donald A; Anton, Stephen D; Sacks, Frank M; Ryan, Donna; Bray, George A

    2015-03-01

    Currently, early weight-loss predictions of long-term weight-loss success rely on fixed percent-weight-loss thresholds. The objective was to develop thresholds during the first 3 mo of intervention that include the influence of age, sex, baseline weight, percent weight loss, and deviations from expected weight to predict whether a participant is likely to lose 5% or more body weight by year 1. Data consisting of month 1, 2, 3, and 12 treatment weights were obtained from the 2-y Preventing Obesity Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS Lost) intervention. Logistic regression models that included covariates of age, height, sex, baseline weight, target energy intake, percent weight loss, and deviation of actual weight from expected were developed for months 1, 2, and 3 that predicted the probability of losing treatment approaches during early intervention. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Relationship of cravings with weight loss and hunger. Results from a 6 month worksite weight loss intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Payal; Das, Sai Krupa; Salinardi, Taylor; Robinson, Lisa; Saltzman, Edward; Scott, Tammy; Pittas, Anastassios G; Roberts, Susan B

    2013-10-01

    We examined the association of food cravings with weight loss and eating behaviors in a lifestyle intervention for weight loss in worksites. This research was part of a randomized controlled trial of a 6-month weight loss intervention versus a wait-listed control in 4 Massachusetts worksites. The intervention emphasized reducing energy intake by adherence to portion-controlled menu suggestions, and assessments were obtained in 95 participants at baseline and 6 months including non-fasting body weight, food cravings (Craving Inventory and Food Craving Questionnaire for state and trait) and the eating behavior constructs restraint, disinhibition and hunger (Eating Inventory). There were statistically significant reductions in all craving variables in the intervention group compared to the controls. Within the intervention group, changes in craving-trait were significantly associated with weight loss after controlling for baseline weight, age, gender and worksite. However, in a multivariate model with craving-trait and eating behaviors (restraint, disinhibition and hunger), hunger was the only significant predictor of weight change. In contrast to some previous reports of increased food cravings with weight loss in lifestyle interventions, this study observed a broad reduction in cravings associated with weight loss. In addition, greater reductions in craving-trait were associated with greater weight change, but craving-trait was not a significant independent correlate of weight change when hunger was included in statistical models. Studies are needed to examine the effectiveness of hunger suppressing versus craving-suppressing strategies in lifestyle interventions for obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ventricular tachycardia induced by weight loss pills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Hansson, Nils Henrik; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 29-year-old man was admitted with palpitations, dizziness, and near-syncope after he had recently started taking weight loss pills purchased on the internet. The pills contained caffeine and ephedrine. An electrocardiogram and telemetry revealed multiple episodes of non...

  10. Prevalence of weight-loss strategies and use of substances for weight-loss among adults: a population study Prevalência de estratégias de emagrecimento e uso de substâncias para perder peso entre adultos: um estudo populacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Coelho Machado

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns a cross-sectional population-based study conducted with adults living in the city of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. It aims to determine the prevalence of weight-loss practices and use of substances for weight-loss during the 12 months preceding the interview. The prevalence of weight-loss attempts was 26.6%. Although dietary control and regular physical exercise were the most commonly used strategies, the prevalence of the combined use of these methods was only 36% for individuals trying to lose weight. The prevalence of use of substances for weight-loss was 12.8% (48.4% of those who tried to lose weight. The use of dietary control and substances was more common among women, while men practiced physical exercise with greater frequency. Teas were the most frequently used substances for weight-loss. Multivariate analysis identified being female, excess weight and self-perception of excess weight as major associated factors for the use of substances for weight-loss. Finally, we found that, although weight-loss attempts are common, the majority of obese individuals do not make attempts to lose weight and only a minority follows the recommended practices.Estudo transversal de base populacional conduzido com adultos residentes na cidade de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, que objetivou determinar a prevalência de práticas de emagrecimento e uso de substâncias para emagrecer, nos últimos 12 meses antes da entrevista. A prevalência de tentativas de emagrecimento foi de 26,6%. Controle dietético e prática regular de exercícios físicos foram as estratégias mais frequentes, mas apenas 36% daqueles que tentaram emagrecer combinaram-nas. A prevalência do uso de substâncias para emagrecer foi de 12,8% (48,4% daqueles que tentaram emagrecer. Mulheres utilizaram controle dietético e substâncias mais frequentemente do que homens, enquanto estes utilizaram mais exercícios físicos. As substâncias de uso mais

  11. Weight-loss supplements: what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Mark K; Shewmake, Roger A

    2010-06-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in this country. In an effort to address this major public health problem, people have adopted a variety of strategies. These include medical and surgical interventions, both rational and fad diets, exercise and assorted weight-loss dietary supplements. Recent U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) action involving some of these proprietary supplements raises questions of both their safety and efficacy. This article reviews the evidence behind the components of many of these supplements and discusses the role of nutrition in weight loss.

  12. Weight loss before conception: A systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Forsum

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of overweight and obesity in women has increased during the last decades. This is a serious concern since a high BMI before conception is an independent risk factor for many adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Therefore, dietary counseling, intended to stimulate weight loss in overweight and obese women prior to conception has recently been recommended. However, dieting with the purpose to lose weight may involve health risks for mother and offspring. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify papers investigating the effects of weight loss due to dietary interventions before conception. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of weight loss prior to conception in overweight or obese women on a number of health-related outcomes in mother and offspring using studies published between January 2000 and December 2011. Our first literature search produced 486 citations and, based on predefined eligibility criteria, 58 were selected and ordered in full text. Two group members read each paper. Fifteen studies were selected for quality assessment and two of them were considered appropriate for inclusion in evidence tables. A complementary search identified 168 citations with four papers being ordered in full text. The two selected studies provided data for overweight and obese women. One showed a positive effect of weight loss before pregnancy on the risk of gestational diabetes and one demonstrated a reduced risk for large-for-gestational-age infants in women with a BMI above 25 who lost weight before pregnancy. No study investigated the effect of weight loss due to a dietary intervention before conception. There is a lack of studies on overweight and obese women investigating the effect of dietary-induced weight loss prior to conception on health-related variables in mother and offspring. Such studies are probably lacking since they are difficult to conduct. Therefore, alternative strategies to control the body

  13. Brain function predictors and outcome of weight loss and weight loss maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo-Reed, Amanda N; Breslin, Florence J; Lynch, Anthony M; Patrician, Trisha M; Martin, Laura E; Lepping, Rebecca J; Powell, Joshua N; Yeh, Hung-Wen Henry; Befort, Christie A; Sullivan, Debra; Gibson, Cheryl; Washburn, Richard; Donnelly, Joseph E; Savage, Cary R

    2015-01-01

    Obesity rates are associated with public health consequences and rising health care costs. Weight loss interventions, while effective, do not work for everyone, and weight regain is a significant problem. Eating behavior is influenced by a convergence of processes in the brain, including homeostatic factors and motivational processing that are important contributors to overeating. Initial neuroimaging studies have identified brain regions that respond differently to visual food cues in obese and healthy weight individuals that are positively correlated with reports of hunger in obese participants. While these findings provide mechanisms of overeating, many important questions remain. It is not known whether brain activation patterns change after weight loss, or if they change differentially based on amount of weight lost. Also, little is understood regarding biological processes that contribute to long-term weight maintenance. This study will use neuroimaging in participants while viewing food and non-food images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging will take place before and after completion of a twelve-week weight loss intervention. Obese participants will be followed though a 6-month maintenance period. The study will address three aims: 1. Characterize brain activation underlying food motivation and impulsive behaviors in obese individuals. 2. Identify brain activation changes and predictors of weight loss. 3. Identify brain activation predictors of weight loss maintenance. Findings from this study will have implications for understanding mechanisms of obesity, weight loss, and weight maintenance. Results will be significant to public health and could lead to a better understanding of how differences in brain activation relate to obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Energy Density and Weight Loss: Feel Full on Fewer Calories

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food energy density and body weight changes in obese adults. Nutrients. 2016;8:229. Jan. 20, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/weight-loss/art-20044318 . Mayo Clinic ...

  15. Outcomes from a medical weight loss program: primary care clinics versus weight loss clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, William C; Moore, Justin B; Kaplan, Michael; Lazorick, Suzanne

    2012-06-01

    Few studies have focused on weight loss programs implemented in community-based primary care settings. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of a weight loss program and determine whether physicians in primary care practices could achieve reductions in body weight and body fat similar to those obtained in weight loss clinics. Analyses were performed on chart review data from 413 obese participants who underwent weight loss at a primary care (n=234) or weight loss (n=179) clinic. Participants received physician-guided behavioral modification sessions and self-selected a diet plan partially or fully supplemented by meal replacements. A repeated-measures analysis of covariance was conducted with age and sex serving as covariates; significance was set at P≤.05. In 178 subjects (43%) completing 12 weeks of the program, primary care clinics were as effective as weight loss clinics at achieving reductions in body weight (12.4 vs 12.1 kg) but better with regard to reduction in body fat percentage (3.8% vs 2.7%; P≤.05). Regardless of location, participants completing 12 weeks lost an average of 11.1% of their body weight. Participants selecting full meal replacement had greater reductions in weight and body fat percentage (12.7 kg, 3.5%) compared with participants selecting a partial meal replacement plan (8.3 kg, 2.3%). Primary care physicians can successfully manage and treat obese patients using behavioral modification techniques coupled with meal replacement diets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictive Factors for Insufficient Weight Loss After Bariatric Surgery: Does Obstructive Sleep Apnea Influence Weight Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Raaff, Christel A L; Coblijn, Usha K; de Vries, Nico; Heymans, Martijn W; van den Berg, Bob T J; van Tets, Willem F; van Wagensveld, Bart A

    2016-05-01

    Important endpoints of bariatric surgery are weight loss and improvement of comorbidities, of which obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the highest accompanying comorbidity (70%). This study aimed to evaluate the influence of OSA on weight loss after bariatric surgery and to provide predictive factors for insufficient weight loss (defined as ≤50% excess weight loss (EWL)) at 1 year follow-up. All consecutive patients, who underwent primary laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy between 2006 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with data on preoperative apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and pre- and postoperative body mass index (BMI) were included. After surgery, the percentage excess weight loss (%EWL) and BMI changes were compared between preoperatively diagnosed OSA-, subdivided in mild, moderate, and severe OSA, and non-OSA patients. Multivariable logistic regression analysis evaluated predictive factors for ≤50% EWL. A total of 816 patients, 522 (64%) with and 294 (36%) without OSA, were included. After 1 year, OSA patients achieved less %EWL than non-OSA patients (65.5 SD 20.7 versus 70.3 SD 21.0; p weight loss after bariatric surgery.

  17. Weighing every day matters: daily weighing improves weight loss and adoption of weight control behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Dori M; Bennett, Gary G; Askew, Sandy; Tate, Deborah F

    2015-04-01

    Daily weighing is emerging as the recommended self-weighing frequency for weight loss. This is likely because it improves adoption of weight control behaviors. To examine whether weighing every day is associated with greater adoption of weight control behaviors compared with less frequent weighing. Longitudinal analysis of a previously conducted 6-month randomized controlled trial. Overweight men and women in Chapel Hill, NC, participated in the intervention arm (N=47). The intervention focused on daily weighing for weight loss using an e-scale that transmitted weights to a study website, along with weekly e-mailed lessons and tailored feedback on daily weighing adherence and weight loss progress. We gathered objective data on self-weighing frequency from the e-scales. At baseline and 6 months, weight change was measured in the clinic and weight control behaviors (total items=37), dietary strategies, and calorie expenditure from physical activity were assessed via questionnaires. Calorie intake was assessed using an online 24-hour recall tool. We used χ(2) tests to examine variation in discrete weight control behaviors and linear regression models to examine differences in weight, dietary strategies, and calorie intake and expenditure by self-weighing frequency. Fifty-one percent of participants weighed every day (n=24) over 6 months. The average self-weighing frequency among those weighing less than daily (n=23) was 5.4±1.2 days per week. Daily weighers lost significantly more weight compared with those weighing less than daily (mean difference=-6.1 kg; 95% CI -10.2 to -2.1; P=0.004). The total number of weight control behaviors adopted was greater among daily weighers (17.6±7.6 vs 11.2±6.4; P=0.004). There were no differences by self-weighing frequency in dietary strategies, calorie intake, or calorie expenditure. Weighing every day led to greater adoption of weight control behaviors and produced greater weight loss compared with weighing most days of the

  18. Dietary intakes associated with successful weight loss and maintenance during the Weight Loss Maintenance Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Catherine M.; Broyles, Stephanie T; Moran, Laura D.; Cash, Katherine C.; Levy, Erma J.; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Batch, Bryan C.; Lien, Lillian F.; Funk, Kristine L.; Dalcin, Arlene; Loria, Catherine; Myers, Valerie H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dietary components effective in weight maintenance efforts have not been adequately identified. Objective To determine impact of changes in dietary consumption on weight loss and maintenance during the Weight Loss Maintenance (WLM) clinical trial. Design WLM was a randomized controlled trial. Successful weight loss participants who completed Phase I of the trial and lost 4kg were randomized to one of three maintenance intervention arms in Phase II and followed for an additional 30 months. Participants/setting The multicenter trial was conducted from 2003–2007. This substudy included 828 successful weight loss participants. Methods Dietary Measures The Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) was used to assess nutrient intake levels and food group servings. Carbohydrates, proteins, fats, dietary fiber and fruit/vegetable and dairy servings were utilized as predictor variables. Data collection The FFQ was collected on all participants at study entry (beginning of Phase I). Those randomized to Phase II completed the FFQ at three additional time points; randomization (beginning of Phase II), 12 and 30 months. Intervention The main intervention focused on long term maintenance of weight loss using the Dietary Approaches to Hypertension (DASH) diet. This substudy examined whether changes to specific dietary variables were associated with weight loss and maintenance. Statistical analyses performed Linear regression models that adjusted for change in total energy examined the relationship between changes in dietary intake and weight for each time period. Site, age, race, sex, and a race-sex interaction were included as covariates. Results Participants who substituted protein for fat lost, on average, 0.33 kg per 6-months during Phase I (pintake of fruits and vegetables was associated with weight loss in Phases I and II: 0.29 kg per 6-months (pweight loss during both phases. Increasing dairy intake was associated with significant weight loss during Phase II (

  19. Genetic variation of habitual coffee consumption and glycemic changes in response to weight-loss diet intervention: the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liyuan; Ma, Wenjie; Sun, Dianjianyi; Heianza, Yoriko; Wang, Tiange; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Tao; Duan, Donghui; Bray, J George A; Champagne, Catherine M; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2017-11-01

    Background: Coffee consumption has been associated with glucose metabolism and risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective: We examined whether the genetic variation determining habitual coffee consumption affected glycemic changes in response to weight-loss dietary intervention. Design: A genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated based on 8 habitual coffee consumption-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms. We used general linear models to test changes in glycemic traits in groups randomly assigned to high- and low-fat diets according to tertiles of the GRS. Results: We observed significant interactions between the GRS and low compared with high dietary fat intake on 6-mo changes in fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) ( P -interaction = 0.023 and 0.022, respectively), adjusting for age, sex, race, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, seasonal variation, and baseline values of the respective outcomes. Participants with a higher GRS of habitual coffee consumption showed a greater reduction in fasting insulin and a marginally greater decrease in HOMA-IR in the low-fat diet intervention group. Conclusions: Our data suggest that participants with genetically determined high coffee consumption may benefit more by eating a low-fat diet in improving fasting insulin and HOMA-IR in a short term. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995 and NCT03258203. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. The weight-loss experience: a qualitative exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rogerson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term weight management consists of weight-loss, weight-loss maintenance, and weight-gain stages. Qualitative insights into weight management are now appearing in the literature however research appears to be biased towards explorations of weight-loss maintenance. The qualitative understanding of weight loss, which begets weight-loss maintenance and might establish the experiences and behaviours necessary for successful long-term weight management, is comparatively under-investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the weight-loss experiences of a sample of participants not aligned to clinical intervention research, in order to understand the weight-loss experiences of a naturalistic sample. Methods Participants (n = 8 with weight-loss (n = 4 and weight-maintenance experiences (n = 4 were interviewed using a semi-structured interview to understand the weight-loss experience. Interview data was analysed thematically using Framework Analysis and was underpinned by realist meta-theory. Results Weight loss was experienced as an enduring challenge, where factors that assisted weight loss were developed and experienced dichotomously to factors that hindered it. Participants described barriers to (dichotomous thinking, environments, social pressures and weight centeredness and facilitators of (mindfulness, knowledge, exercise, readiness to change, structure, self-monitoring and social support their weight-loss goals in rich detail, highlighting that weight loss was a complex experience. Conclusions Weight loss was a difficult task, with physical, social, behavioural and environmental elements that appeared to assist and inhibit weight-loss efforts concurrently. Health professionals might need to better understand the day-to-day challenges of dieters in order to provide more effective, tailored treatments. Future research should look to investigate the psycho-social consequences of weight-loss dieting, in

  1. Prior weight loss exacerbates the biological drive to gain weight after the loss of ovarian function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherk, Vanessa D; Jackman, Matthew R; Giles, Erin D; Higgins, Janine A; Foright, Rebecca M; Presby, David M; Johnson, Ginger C; Houck, Julie A; Houser, Jordan L; Oljira, Robera; MacLean, Paul S

    2017-05-01

    Both the history of obesity and weight loss may change how menopause affects metabolic health. The purpose was to determine whether obesity and/or weight loss status alters energy balance (EB) and subsequent weight gain after the loss of ovarian function. Female lean and obese Wistar rats were randomized to 15% weight loss (WL) or ad libitum fed controls (CON). After the weight loss period, WL rats were kept in EB at the reduced weight for 8 weeks prior to ovariectomy (OVX). After OVX, all rats were allowed to eat ad libitum until weight plateaued. Energy intake (EI), spontaneous physical activity, and total energy expenditure (TEE) were measured with indirect calorimetry before OVX, immediately after OVX, and after weight plateau. Changes in energy intake (EI), TEE, and weight gain immediately after OVX were similar between lean and obese rats. However, obese rats gained more total weight and fat mass than lean rats over the full regain period. Post-OVX, EI increased more (P ≤ 0.03) in WL rats (58.9 ± 3.5 kcal/d) than CON rats (8.5 ± 5.2 kcal/d), and EI partially normalized (change from preOVX: 20.5 ± 4.2 vs. 1.5 ± 4.9 kcal/day) by the end of the study. As a result, WL rats gained weight (week 1:44 ± 20 vs. 7 ± 25 g) more rapidly (mean = 44 ± 20 vs. 7 ± 25 g/week; P < 0.001) than CON Prior obesity did not affect changes in EB or weight regain following OVX, whereas a history of weight loss prior to OVX augmented disruptions in EB after OVX, resulting in more rapid weight regain. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  2. Weight loss in combat sports: physiological, psychological and performance effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The present article briefly reviews the weight loss processes in combat sports. We aimed to discuss the most relevant aspects of rapid weight loss (RWL) in combat sports. Methods This review was performed in the databases MedLine, Lilacs, PubMed and SciELO, and organized into sub-topics: (1) prevalence, magnitude and procedures, (2) psychological, physiological and performance effects, (3) possible strategies to avoid decreased performance (4) organizational strategies to avoid such practices. Results There was a high prevalence (50%) of RWL, regardless the specific combat discipline. Methods used are harmful to performance and health, such as laxatives, diuretics, use of plastic or rubber suits, and sauna. RWL affects physical and cognitive capacities, and may increase the risk of death. Conclusion Recommendations during different training phases, educational and organizational approaches are presented to deal with or to avoid RWL. PMID:23237303

  3. Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bodil Just; Iepsen, Eva Pers Winning; Lundgren, Julie Rehné

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to identify psychosocial determinants for maintaining weight loss. Methods: 42 obese individuals who achieved a 12% weight loss before entering a 52-week weight maintenance program were interviewed qualitatively. Psychosocial factors related to weight loss...

  4. Obesity, growth hormone and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby

    2009-01-01

    profile and bone mineral density. It is well established that adult GHD usually is accompanied by an increase in fat accumulation and GH replacement in adult patients with GHD results in reduction of fat mass and abdominal fat mass in particular. It is also recognized that obesity and abdominal obesity...... examining the efficacy of GH in obese subjects very little or no effect are observed with respect to weight loss, whereas GH seems to reduce total and abdominal fat mass in obese subjects. The observed reductions in abdominal fat mass are modest and similar to what can be achieved by diet or exercise...

  5. Weight loss and skin manifestations in obese patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Jensen, Peter; Kirchner Larsson, Lena

    Objective To examine if psoriatic patients can achieve a weight loss to the same extent as non-psoriatic patients To describe the effect of weight loss on the cutaneous manifestations. Conclusion Patients with psoriasis achieved a weight loss, similar to non-psoriatic patients, of 12 % of their b......Objective To examine if psoriatic patients can achieve a weight loss to the same extent as non-psoriatic patients To describe the effect of weight loss on the cutaneous manifestations. Conclusion Patients with psoriasis achieved a weight loss, similar to non-psoriatic patients, of 12...

  6. Effect of physical activity on weight loss, energy expenditure, and energy intake during diet induced weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLany, James P; Kelley, David E; Hames, Kazanna C; Jakicic, John M; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2014-02-01

    Objective measurements of physical activity (PA), energy expenditure (EE) and energy intake can provide valuable information regarding appropriate strategies for successful sustained weight loss. The total EE was examined by doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry, PA with activity monitors, and energy intake by the intake/balance technique in 116 severely obese undergoing intervention with diet alone (DO) or diet plus PA (D-PA). Weight loss of 9.6 ± 6.8 kg resulted in decreased EE which was not minimized in the D-PA group. Comparing the highest and lowest quartiles of increase in PA revealed a lower decrease in TDEE (-122 ± 319 vs. -376 ± 305 kcal day⁻¹), elimination of the drop in AEE (83 ± 279 vs. -211 ± 284 kcal day⁻¹) and greater weight loss (13.0 ± 7.0 vs. 8.1 ± 6.3 kg). Increased PA was associated with greater adherence to energy restriction and maintenance of greater weight loss during months 7-12. Noncompliance to prescribed PA in the DO and D-PA groups partially masked the effects of PA to increase weight loss and to minimize the reduced EE. Increased PA was also associated with improved adherence to prescribed caloric restriction. A strong recommendation needs to be made to improve interventions that promote PA within the context of behavioral weight loss interventions. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  7. Metabolic adaptation to weight loss: implications for the athlete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Norton, Layne E

    2014-01-01

    .... Energy restriction is accompanied by changes in circulating hormones, mitochondrial efficiency, and energy expenditure that serve to minimize the energy deficit, attenuate weight loss, and promote weight regain...

  8. Weight loss among women and men in the ASPIRE-VA behavioral weight loss intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimalananda, Varsha; Damschroder, Laura; Janney, Carol A; Goodrich, David; Kim, H Myra; Holleman, Robert; Gillon, Leah; Lutes, Lesley

    2016-09-01

    Weight loss was examined among women and men veterans in a clinical trial comparing Aspiring for Lifelong Health (ASPIRE), a "small changes" weight loss program using either mixed-sex group-visit or telephone-based coaching, to MOVE!(®) , the usual mixed-sex group-based program. Linear mixed-effects models were used to calculate adjusted percent weight change at 12 months by sex and compare outcomes across arms within sex. Analyses included 72 women (ASPIRE-Phone = 26; ASPIRE-Group = 26; MOVE! = 20) and 409 men (ASPIRE-Phone = 136; ASPIRE-Group = 134; MOVE! = 139). At 12 months, women displayed significant weight loss from baseline in ASPIRE-Group (-2.6%) and MOVE! (-2.7%), but not ASPIRE-Phone (+0.2%). Between-arm differences in weight change among women were: ASPIRE-Group versus ASPIRE-Phone, -2.8% (P = 0.15); MOVE! versus ASPIRE-Phone, -2.8% (P = 0.20); and ASPIRE-Group versus MOVE!, 0.0% (P = 1.0). At 12 months, men lost significant weight from baseline across arms (ASPIRE-Phone, -1.5%; ASPIRE-Group, -2.5%; MOVE!, -1.0%). Between-arm differences in weight change among men were: ASPIRE-Group versus ASPIRE-Phone, -0.9% (P = 0.23); MOVE! versus ASPIRE-Phone, +0.5% (P = 0.76); ASPIRE-Group versus MOVE!, -1.5% (P = 0.03). Mixed-sex, group-based programs can result in weight loss for both women and men veterans. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  9. [Strategies for successful weight reduction - focus on energy balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, M; Bornstein, S R; Barthel, A; Blüher, M

    2012-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related health problems is increasing worldwide and also in Germany. It is well known that substantial and sustained weight loss is difficult to accomplish. Therefore, a variety of studies has been performed in order to specify causes for weight gain and create hypotheses for better treatment options. Key factors of this problem are an adaptation of energy metabolism, especially resting metabolic rate (RMR), non-exercise thermogenesis and diet induced thermogenesis. The extremely high failure rate (> 80%) to keep the reduced weight after successful weight loss is due to adaptation processes of the body to maintain body energy stores. This so called "adaptive thermogenesis" is defined as a smaller than predicted change of energy expenditure in response to changes in energy balance. Adaptive thermogenesis appears to be a major reason for weight regain. The foremost objective of weight-loss programs is the reduction in body fat. However, a concomitant decline in lean tissue can frequently be observed. Since lean body mass (LBM) represents a key determinant of RMR it follows that a decrease in lean tissue could counteract the progress of weight loss. Therefore, with respect to long-term effectiveness of weight reduction programs, the loss of fat mass while maintaining LBM and RMR seems desirable. In this paper we will discuss the mechanisms of adaptive thermogenesis and develop therapeutic strategies with respect to avoiding weight regain successful weight reduction. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Delay discounting and utility for money or weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Y Y; Slaven, E M; Bickel, W K; Epstein, L H

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is related to a bias towards smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. This bias is typically examined by studying single commodity discounting. However, weight loss often involves choices among multiple commodities. To our knowledge, no research has examined delay discounting of delayed weight loss compared with other commodities. We examined single commodity discounting of money and cross commodity discounting of money and weight loss in a sample of 84 adults with obesity or overweight statuses interested in weight loss. The exchange rate between money and weight loss was calculated, and participants completed two delay discounting tasks: money now versus money later and money now versus weight loss later. Participants discounted weight loss more than money (p money (n = 23), those who preferred money over weight loss discounted weight loss even more than individuals that preferred weight loss (p = 0.003). Greater discounting of weight loss for those who preferred money suggest that idiosyncratic preferences are related to multiple commodity discounting, and greater discounting of weight loss across all participants provide insight on important challenges for weight control.

  11. Adherence to a behavioral weight loss treatment program enhances weight loss and improvements in biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushama D Acharya

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sushama D Acharya3, Okan U Elci3, Susan M Sereika1,2,3, Edvin Music3, Mindi A Styn3, Melanie Warziski Turk3, Lora E Burke2,31Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, 2Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, 3School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USAObjectives: To describe participants’ adherence to multiple components (attendance, energy intake, fat gram, exercise goals, and self-monitoring eating and exercise behaviors of a standard behavioral treatment program (SBT for weight loss and how adherence to these components may influence weight loss and biomarkers (triglycerides, low density lipoproteins [LDL], high density lipoprotein, and insulin during the intensive and less-intensive intervention phases. Methods: A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial consisting of a SBT with either fat-restricted standard or lacto-ovo vegetarian diet. The 12-month intervention was delivered in 33 group sessions. The first six months reflected the intensive phase; the second six months, the less-intensive intervention phase. We conducted the analysis without regard to treatment assignment. Eligible participants included overweight/obese adults (N = 176; mean body mass index = 34.0 kg/m2. The sample was 86.9% female, 70.5% White, and 44.4 ± 8.6 years old. The outcome measures included weight and biomarkers. Results: There was a significant decline in adherence to each treatment component over time (P < 0.0001. In the first six months, adherence to attendance, self-monitoring and the energy goal were significantly associated with greater weight loss (P < 0.05. Adherence to attendance and exercise remained significantly associated with weight loss in the second six months (P < 0.05. Adherence to attendance, self-monitoring and exercise had indirect effects through weight loss on LDL, triglycerides, and insulin (P < 0.05.Conclusions: We observed a decline in adherence to each

  12. Weight loss and muscular strength affect static balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handrigan, G; Hue, O; Simoneau, M; Corbeil, P; Marceau, P; Marceau, S; Tremblay, A; Teasdale, N

    2010-05-01

    Overweight individuals sway more than normal weight individuals. Major weight loss improves their balance control despite a related decrease in muscle strength. Presumably, muscular strength is an important factor for balance control. This study investigated the effect that a change in body mass has on relative strength and balance control. Force (isometric knee extension) and balance control (center of pressure speed and range) were studied in three groups; normal weight (BMI 40 kg m(-2)) Caucasian male individuals. The excess obese individuals who underwent bariatric surgery as a weight loss strategy were studied before, 3 and 12 months after losing on average, 66.9 kg (+/-95% CI 55.8, 77.9 kg; on average, 45% of their weight). The obese individuals who underwent diet modifications were studied before dieting and when resistance to weight loss occurred after losing on average 11.7 kg (+/-95% CI 9.3, 14.2 kg; on average, 12% of their weight). The control group was studied twice, 50 weeks apart. In obese and excess obese individuals, losing weight reduced absolute knee muscular strength on average, by 8.2 kg (+/-95% CI 3.9, 12.5 kg; on average, 10% of their strength) and 23.9 kg (+/-95% CI 12.1, 35.8 kg; on average, 33% of their strength). However, it also increased balance control measured with speed of the center of foot pressure, on average, by 0.10 cm s(-1) (+/-95% CI 0.05, 0.14 cm s(-1); or increased of 12%) and 0.28 cm s(-1) (+/-95% CI 0.07, 0.47 cm s(-1); increased of 27%), respectively. Relative strength increased approximately by 22% for only the excess obese group 12 months post surgery. This suggests, in overweight individuals, weight loss is more efficient at improving balance control than increasing, or even maintaining muscle strength. In these individuals, training programs aimed at improving balance control should primarily target weight loss.

  13. Weight loss and skin manifestations in obese patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Jensen, Peter; Kirchner Larsson, Lena

    % of their body weight following calorie restriction for 12 weeks. Taken together with recent literature the findings suggest that weight loss has a potential to reduce skin manifestations. Weight loss might also attenuate the increased cardiovascular and diabetes risks posed by obese psoriatric patients.......Objective To examine if psoriatic patients can achieve a weight loss to the same extent as non-psoriatic patients To describe the effect of weight loss on the cutaneous manifestations. Conclusion Patients with psoriasis achieved a weight loss, similar to non-psoriatic patients, of 12...

  14. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder obesity and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim Berg; Berntsen, Dorthe

    of depression also declined, whereas perceived social support was stable. The fact that the level of PTSD symptoms decreases simultaneously with weight loss is an interesting and positive side effect that has not been reported previously. The findings are discussed in term of cognitive theories of PTSD.......Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has frequently been found to have a significant impact on the development of obesity. Yet, while a reciprocal relationship has been found between obesity and depression, the relationship between past traumatic episodes and obesity is usually thought of as uni......, a significant decline in the level of PTSD symptoms was also reported. During the first week of treatment, 17 participants (57%) qualified for the diagnosis of PTSD when measured by a standardised checklist for PTSD symptoms. By week 16, only 6 participants (20%) qualified for the PTSD diagnosis. Level...

  15. Dietary fat intake, supplements, and weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Although there remains controversy regarding the role of macronutrient balance in the etiology of obesity, the consumption of high-fat diets appears to be strongly implicated in its development. Evidence that fat oxidation does not adjust rapidly to acute increases in dietary fat, as well as a decreased capacity to oxidize fat in the postprandial state in the obese, suggest that diets high in fat may lead to the accumulation of fat stores. Novel data is also presented suggesting that in rodents, high-fat diets may lead to the development of leptin resistance in skeletal muscle and subsequent accumulations of muscle triacylglycerol. Nevertheless, several current fad diets recommend drastically reduced carbohydrate intake, with a concurrent increase in fat content. Such recommendations are based on the underlying assumption that by reducing circulating insulin levels, lipolysis and lipid oxidation will be enhanced and fat storage reduced. Numerous supplements are purported to increase fat oxidation (carnitine, conjugated linoleic acid), increase metabolic rate (ephedrine, pyruvate), or inhibit hepatic lipogenesis (hydroxycitrate). All of these compounds are currently marketed in supplemental form to increase weight loss, but few have actually been shown to be effective in scientific studies. To date, there is little or no evidence supporting that carnitine or hydroxycitrate supplementation are of any value for weight loss in humans. Supplements such as pyruvate have been shown to be effective at high dosages, but there is little mechanistic information to explain its purported effect or data to indicate its effectiveness at lower dosages. Conjugated linoleic acid has been shown to stimulate fat utilization and decrease body fat content in mice but has not been tested in humans. The effects of ephedrine, in conjunction with methylxanthines and aspirin, in humans appears unequivocal but includes various cardiovascular side effects. None of these compounds have been

  16. Contour surgery in the patient with great weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitanguy, I; Gontijo de Amorim, N F; Radwanski, H N

    2000-01-01

    Obesity can be defined as a chronic disease in which there is excess of body adiposity, leading to severe secondary health problems. This metabolic pathology shortens life-span and is a main cause of diabetes, atherosclerosis, systemic arterial hypertension, and reduction of pulmonary function, among others. The plastic surgeon is involved with the obese patient under two circumstances: either the patient is currently overweight and requests reduction of excess adipose tissue, or has suffered a great weight loss and desires correction of one, or more, contour deformities. In either case, planning demands a close preoperative analysis and careful preparation of the patient, execution of a meticulous surgical routine, and close postoperative follow-up. In this article, various body contour deformities will be addressed, showing the senior author's strategy in treating the obese patient that has achieved the loss of considerable weight.

  17. Participants' evaluation of a weight-loss program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattfeldt-Beman, M K; Corrigan, S A; Stevens, V J; Sugars, C P; Dalcin, A T; Givi, M J; Copeland, K C

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate participants' perceptions of the weight-loss intervention used in a hypertension prevention clinical trial. A total of 308 overweight and moderately obese subjects participated in the weight-management intervention. After the 18-month program, 281 participants completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate their perceptions of the program's effectiveness. Adult participants (224 men and 84 women) in the weight-loss modality of the Trials of Hypertension Prevention Phase I, surveyed in 1991. chi 2 Analyses were used to test for statistical significance of group differences. Intervention components that were most useful are presented. Older participants (older than 50 years) were most likely to attend sessions and women were most likely to identify stress and frustration because of disappointing results. Successful participants were more likely to incorporate exercise into their daily activities, exercise regularly, and use self-monitoring strategies. Few participants found group exercise to be useful. These findings suggest that interventionists in weight-loss programs need to find flexible and creative ways to maintain contact with participants, continue to develop better methods of self-monitoring, obtain the skills needed to recognize frustration and provide timely support, continue to couple the message of diet and exercise, and emphasize helping participants develop their problem-solving skills. This may require training outside the traditional field of dietetics.

  18. Effectiveness of weight loss interventions ? is there a difference between men and women: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, R L; Wood, L G; Collins, C E; Callister, R

    2014-01-01

    Effective strategies are required to reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity; however, the effectiveness of current weight loss programmes is variable. One contributing factor may be the difference in weight loss success between men and women. A systematic review was conducted to determine whether the effectiveness of weight loss interventions differs between men and women. Randomized controlled trials published up until March 2014 were included. Effect sizes (Hedges' g) were used to ...

  19. Exercise for Weight Loss: Calories Burned in One Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Weight loss Being active can help you lose weight and keep it off. Find out how much you need. By ... Clinic Staff Being active is important for any weight-loss or weight-maintenance program. When you're active, ...

  20. Vaping to lose weight: Predictors of adult e-cigarette use for weight loss or control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E; Wedel, Amelia V

    2017-03-01

    Some traditional cigarette smokers are motivated to smoke to lose weight or control their weight. The current study evaluated whether a subset of adult e-cigarette users reported vaping to lose or control their weight and examined potential predictors of vaping for weight management. Adult e-cigarette users (n=459) who reported wanting to lose weight or maintain their weight completed an anonymous online survey. Participants reported on demographics, vaping frequency, e-cigarette nicotine content, cigarette smoking status, preferred e-cigarette/e-liquid flavors, current weight status (i.e., overweight, underweight), use of dieting strategies associated with anorexia and bulimia, lifetime history of binge eating, self-discipline, and impulse control. Binary logistic regression was used to examine whether vaping for weight loss/control was associated with the aforementioned variables. Participants who reported vaping for weight loss/control (13.5%) were more likely to vape frequently (adjOR=1.15; 95% CI [1.00, 1.31]); be overweight (adjOR=2.80; [1.33, 5.90]); restrict calories (adjOR=2.23; [1.13, 4.42]); have poor impulse control (adjOR=0.59; [0.41, 0.86]); and prefer coffee- (adjOR=2.92; [1.47, 5.80]) or vanilla-flavored e-liquid (adjOR=7.44; [1.56, 36.08]). A subset of adult e-cigarette users reported vaping for weight loss/control, raising concerns about expanded, scientifically unsubstantiated uses of e-cigarettes. Identifying where individuals obtain information about vaping for weight loss (e.g., e-cigarette ads, Internet) and whether weight-related motives promote e-cigarette initiation among e-cigarette naïve individuals is important to informing regulatory efforts. Further research also is needed to better understand the link between e-liquid flavors and weight loss motivations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Weight loss goals of patients in a health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Gareth R; Perri, Michael G; Dancer-Brown, Melissa; Goble, Mary; Van Vessem, Nancy

    2010-04-01

    Individuals seeking weight loss treatment endorse unrealistic expectations regarding their goals for weight loss, although these conclusions are primarily based on research conducted in obesity specialty clinics and/or controlled clinical trials. This study examined the weight loss goals and predictors of these goals among patients participating in obesity treatment in an applied, clinical setting (i.e., managed care organization). Managed care patients enrolled in a behavioral weight loss program (N=143; mean age=46.8 years; mean BMI=36.9 kg/m(2); 89.5% female; 64.5% Caucasian) completed a self-report survey during an initial weight loss session. The survey included items assessing patients' weight loss expectations, including goals for dream, happy, acceptable, and disappointed weights. Participants completed questions regarding contacts with their primary care physician and physician provision of weight loss counseling and/or referrals. They also provided values for current height and weight. BMI's and weight loss associated with dream, happy, acceptable, and disappointed weight goals were 24.8 kg/m(2) (30.9% loss), 27.1 kg/m(2) (25.2% loss), 29.3 kg/m(2) (19.7% loss), and 33.0 kg/m(2) (10.4% loss), respectively. There were significant gender differences in weight loss goals, with women endorsing more unrealistic goals than men for dream and happy weights, psgoals included baseline BMI, gender, ethnicity, and frequency of visits with one's primary care physician, pssetting endorsed unrealistic expectations for weight loss. However, more frequent contact with one's primary care physician was associated with more realistic goals. Future, longitudinal research is needed to document the discrepancy between these goals and actual weight loss achieved in such settings as well as to determine whether excessive goals are associated with diminished treatment outcomes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Weight-loss practices among university students in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Hernández, Pablo; Dosamantes-Carrasco, Darina; Lamure, Michel; López-Loyo, Perla; Hernández-Palafox, Corín; Pineda-Pérez, Dayana; Flores, Yvonne; Salmerón, Jorge

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of weight-loss practices among university students from Tlaxcala, Mexico. A cross-sectional study of 2,651 university students was conducted. Logistic regression tests were used to estimate the probability of students trying to lose weight and successfully achieving weight loss. Nearly 40% of students attempted to lose weight, though only about 7% lost more than 10% of their body weight and maintained this weight loss during the time of the study. The methods used most were exercise and dieting, and those who dieted were more successful at losing weight. The high prevalence of weight-loss attempts and the poor outcomes with these weight-loss methods among this sample of university students is a public health concern. Universities should provide students with healthy weight-control approaches, which include offering information about healthier lifestyles, access to healthy food and opportunities to be physically active.

  3. Successful weight loss initiation and maintenance among adolescents with overweight and obesity: does age matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancourt, D; Jensen, C D; Duraccio, K M; Evans, E W; Wing, R R; Jelalian, E

    2018-02-09

    Treatments for adolescents with overweight/obesity demonstrate mixed success, which may be due to a lack of consideration for developmental changes during this period. Potential developmental differences in weight loss motivations, weight maintenance behaviours and the role of parents in these efforts were examined in a sample of successful adolescent weight losers. Participants enrolled in the Adolescent Weight Control Registry (n = 49) self-reported demographic information and weight history, reasons for weight loss and weight control, weight loss approach and weight maintenance strategies, and perceived parental involvement with weight loss. Associations between age at weight loss initiation and the aforementioned factors were examined using linear and generalized regressions, controlling for highest z-BMI and sex. Adolescents who were older (≥16 years) at their weight loss initiation were more likely to report losing weight on their own (37.5% vs. 75%, P = 0.01) and reported greater responsibility for their weight loss and weight loss maintenance (P < 0.001) compared to younger adolescents. Younger age at weight loss initiation was associated with greater parental involvement (P = 0.005), whereas older age was associated with greater adolescent responsibility for the decision to lose weight (P = 0.002), the weight loss approach (P = 0.007) and food choices (P < 0.001). Findings suggest the importance of considering developmental differences in responsibility for weight loss and maintenance among adolescents with overweight/obesity. © 2018 World Obesity Federation.

  4. Weight loss goals and treatment outcomes among overweight men and women enrolled in a weight loss trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, J A; Jeffery, R W; Levy, R L; Pronk, N P; Boyle, R G

    2005-08-01

    Participants in weight loss programs typically set unrealistically high weight loss goals that some believe are detrimental to success. This study examined outcomes associated with goal and ideal body mass index (BMI). Participants (N=1801) were enrolled in a weight loss trial comprised of low-intensity mail or telephone interventions vs usual care. Goal and ideal weight losses were assessed by asking participants how many pounds they expect to lose in the program (goal) and how much they would like to weigh (ideal). Goal and ideal weight losses were unrealistically high (men: -16 and -19%, women: -21 and -27%). For women, less realistic goals were associated with greater weight loss at 24 months. Goals were not associated with participation or weight loss for men. Results are more supportive of the idea that higher goals motivate women to lose weight than of the hypothesis that high goals undermine effort.

  5. Promoting weight loss methods in parenting magazines: Implications for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Roberts, Katherine J; Samayoa-Kozlowsky, Sandra; Glaser, Debra B

    2016-01-01

    Weight gain before and after pregnancy is important for women's health. The purpose of this study was to assess articles and advertisements related to weight loss in three widely read parenting magazines, "Parenting School Years," "Parenting Early Years," and "Parenting," which have an estimated combined readership of approximately 24 million (mainly women readers). Almost a quarter (23.7%, n = 32) of the 135 magazine issues over a four year period included at least one feature article on weight loss. A variety of topics were covered in the featured articles, with the most frequent topics being on losing weight to please yourself (25.2%), healthy ways to lose weight (21.1%), and how to keep the weight off (14.7%). Less than half (45.9%) of the articles displayed author credentials, such as their degree, qualifications, or expertise. A fifth (20.0%, n = 27) of the magazines included at least one prominent advertisement for weight loss products. Almost half (46.9%) of the weight loss advertisements were for weight loss programs followed by weight loss food products (25.0%), weight loss aids (21.9%), and only 6.2% of the advertisements for weight loss were on fitness. Parenting magazines should advocate for healthy weight loss, including lifestyle changes for sustained health.

  6. Weighting of Acoustic Cues to a Manner Distinction by Children with and without Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Susan; Lowenstein, Joanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Children must develop optimal perceptual weighting strategies for processing speech in their first language. Hearing loss can interfere with that development, especially if cochlear implants are required. The three goals of this study were to measure, for children with and without hearing loss: (a) cue weighting for a manner distinction,…

  7. Losing Weight on Reality TV: A Content Analysis of the Weight Loss Behaviors and Practices Portrayed on The Biggest Loser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Lori A; Greenleaf, Christy; Paly, Natalie; Kessler, Molly M; Shoemaker, Colby G; Suchla, Erika A

    2015-01-01

    A number of weight loss-related reality television programs chronicle the weight loss experience of obese individuals in a competitive context. Although highly popular, such shows may misrepresent the behavior change necessary to achieve substantial weight loss. A systematic, quantitative content analysis of Seasons 10-13 (n = 66 episodes) of The Biggest Loser was conducted to determine the amount of time and number of instances that diet, physical activity, or other weight management strategies were presented. The average episode was 78.8 ± 15.7 min in length. Approximately 33.3% of an episode, representing 1,121 segments, portrayed behavioral weight management-related content. Within the episode time devoted to weight management content, 85.2% was related to physical activity, 13.5% to diet, and 1.2% to other. Recent seasons of The Biggest Loser suggest that substantial weight loss is achieved primarily through physical activity, with little emphasis on modifying diet and eating behavior. Although physical activity can impart substantial metabolic health benefits, it may be difficult to create enough of an energy deficit to induce significant weight loss in the real world. Future studies should examine the weight loss attitudes and behaviors of obese individuals and health professionals after exposure to reality television shows focused on weight loss.

  8. Assessing weight perception accuracy to promote weight loss among U.S. female adolescents: a secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Jennifer; Krainovich-Miller, Barbara; Budin, Wendy; Norman, Robert

    2010-08-09

    Overweight and obesity have become a global epidemic. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescents has almost tripled in the last 30 years. Results from recent systematic reviews demonstrate that no single, particular intervention or strategy successfully assists overweight or obese adolescents in losing weight. An understanding of factors that influence healthy weight-loss behaviors among overweight and obese female adolescents promotes effective, multi-component weight-loss interventions. There is limited evidence demonstrating associations between demographic variables, body-mass index, and weight perception among female adolescents trying to lose weight. There is also a lack of previous studies examining the association of the accuracy of female adolescents' weight perception with their efforts to lose weight. This study, therefore, examined the associations of body-mass index, weight perception, and weight-perception accuracy with trying to lose weight and engaging in exercise as a weight-loss method among a representative sample of U.S. female adolescents. A nonexperimental, descriptive, comparative secondary analysis design was conducted using data from Wave II (1996) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Data representative of U.S. female adolescents (N = 2216) were analyzed using STATA statistical software. Descriptive statistics and survey weight logistic regression were performed to determine if demographic and independent (body-mass index, weight perception, and weight perception accuracy) variables were associated with trying to lose weight and engaging in exercise as a weight-loss method. Age, Black or African American race, body-mass index, weight perception, and weight perceptions accuracy were consistently associated with the likeliness of trying to lose weight among U.S. female adolescents. Age, body-mass index, weight perception, and weight-perception accuracy were positively associated (p lose

  9. Assessing weight perception accuracy to promote weight loss among U.S. female adolescents: A secondary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity have become a global epidemic. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescents has almost tripled in the last 30 years. Results from recent systematic reviews demonstrate that no single, particular intervention or strategy successfully assists overweight or obese adolescents in losing weight. An understanding of factors that influence healthy weight-loss behaviors among overweight and obese female adolescents promotes effective, multi-component weight-loss interventions. There is limited evidence demonstrating associations between demographic variables, body-mass index, and weight perception among female adolescents trying to lose weight. There is also a lack of previous studies examining the association of the accuracy of female adolescents' weight perception with their efforts to lose weight. This study, therefore, examined the associations of body-mass index, weight perception, and weight-perception accuracy with trying to lose weight and engaging in exercise as a weight-loss method among a representative sample of U.S. female adolescents. Methods A nonexperimental, descriptive, comparative secondary analysis design was conducted using data from Wave II (1996) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Data representative of U.S. female adolescents (N = 2216) were analyzed using STATA statistical software. Descriptive statistics and survey weight logistic regression were performed to determine if demographic and independent (body-mass index, weight perception, and weight perception accuracy) variables were associated with trying to lose weight and engaging in exercise as a weight-loss method. Results Age, Black or African American race, body-mass index, weight perception, and weight perceptions accuracy were consistently associated with the likeliness of trying to lose weight among U.S. female adolescents. Age, body-mass index, weight perception, and weight-perception accuracy were

  10. Initial weight loss on an 800-kcal diet as a predictor of weight loss success after 8 weeks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handjieva-Darlenska, T.; Handjiev, S.; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment subject characteristics and weight change during the first weeks of a low-calorie diet (LCD) can predict weight loss outcomes at the end of a controlled 8-week weight loss period in overweight and obese adults.......The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment subject characteristics and weight change during the first weeks of a low-calorie diet (LCD) can predict weight loss outcomes at the end of a controlled 8-week weight loss period in overweight and obese adults....

  11. Development of 'Twazon': An Arabic App for Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnasser, Aroub; Sathiaseelan, Arjuna; Al-Khalifa, Abdulrahman; Marais, Debbi

    2016-05-16

    Weight gain and its related illnesses have become a major public health issue across the world, with Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries seeing dramatic increases in obesity and overweight, and yet there is very little information on how to intervene with this demographic due to cultural and linguistic barriers. As the use of smartphones and apps has also increased in the region, information communication technologies could be a cost-effective means of facilitating the delivery of behavior-modification interventions directly to the target population. Although there are existing apps that offer lifestyle-modification tools, they do not give consideration to the evidence-based practices for weight management. This offers an opportunity to create an Arabic language weight loss app that offers localized content and adheres to evidence-informed practices that are needed for effective weight loss. This paper describes the process of developing an Arabic weight loss app designed to facilitate the modification of key nutritional and physical activity behaviors among Saudi adults, while taking into consideration cultural norms. The development of the Twazon app involved: (1) reviewing all available Arabic weight loss apps and compared with evidence-based practices for weight loss, (2) conducting a qualitative study with overweight and obese Saudi women to ascertain their preferences, (3) selecting which behavioral change strategies and guidelines to be used in the app, (4) creating the Saudi Food Database, (5) deciding on graphic design for both iPhone operating system and Android platforms, including user interface, relational database, and programming code, and (6) testing the beta version of the app with health professionals and potential users. The Twazon app took 23 months to develop and included the compilation of an original Saudi Food database. Eight subjects gave feedback regarding the content validity and usability of the app and its features during a pilot

  12. Cholesterol metabolism and body composition in women: the effects of moderate weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, S; Demonty, I; Lichtenstein, A H; Jones, P J H

    2007-06-01

    To determine how moderate weight loss protocol through diet and exercise may affect changes in body composition, to determine the effects of weight loss on cholesterol metabolism and to examine the relationship between cholesterol metabolism and changes in body composition. Thirty-five otherwise healthy, hypercholesterolemic women completed a 24-week weight loss study. A 20% decrease in energy intake through diet and a 10% increase in energy expenditure by exercise were combined with motivational strategies to encourage weight loss. The diet was self-selected and comprised of 50-60% carbohydrates, 20% protein and dyslipidemia.

  13. Descriptive study of educated African American women successful at weight-loss maintenance through lifestyle changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ann Smith; Kimbro, Rachel T

    2012-10-01

    Interventions to address obesity and weight loss maintenance among African Americans have yielded modest results. There is limited data on African Americans who have achieved successful long-term weight loss maintenance. To identify a large sample of African American adults who intentionally achieved clinically significant weight loss of 10 %; to describe weight-loss and maintenance efforts of African Americans through a cross-sectional survey; to determine the feasibility of establishing a registry of African American adults who have successfully lost weight. African American volunteers from the United States ≥ 18 years of age were invited to complete a cross-sectional survey about weight, weight-loss, weight-loss maintenance or regain. Participants were invited to submit contact information to be maintained in a secure registry. Percentage of participants who achieved long-term weight-loss maintenance reporting various dietary and physical activity strategies, motivations for and social-cognitive influences on weight loss and maintenance, current eating patterns, and self-monitoring practices compared to African Americans who lost weight but regained it. Participants also completed the Short International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Of 3,414 individuals screened, 1,280 were eligible and completed surveys. Ninety-percent were women. This descriptive analysis includes 1,110 women who lost weight through non-surgical means. Over 90 % of respondents had at least some college education. Twenty-eight percent of respondents were weight-loss maintainers. Maintainers lost an average of 24 % of their body weight and had maintained ≥ 10 % weight loss for an average of 5.1 years. Maintainers were more likely to limit their fat intake, eat breakfast most days of the week, avoid fast food restaurants, engage in moderate to high levels of physical activity, and use a scale to monitor their weight. Influences and practices differ among educated African American women

  14. Weight loss and skin manifestations in obese patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Jensen, Peter; Kirchner Larsson, Lena

    % of their body weight following calorie restriction for 12 weeks. Taken together with recent literature the findings suggest that weight loss has a potential to reduce skin manifestations. Weight loss might also attenuate the increased cardiovascular and diabetes risks posed by obese psoriatric patients....

  15. Weight loss and skin manifestations in obese patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Jensen, Peter; Kirchner Larsson, Lena

    2010-01-01

    % of their body weight following calorie restriction for 12 weeks. Taken together with recent literature the findings suggest that weight loss has a potential to reduce skin manifestations. Weight loss might also attenuate the increased cardiovascular and diabetes risks posed by obese psoriatric patients....

  16. Weight loss in obese women - exercise v. dietary education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weight loss, body fat loss (%) and daily energy intake reductions were equally reduced in the subjects in all three groups who completed the programme. There was, however, a significantly higher dropout rate in the control group. Taking this into account, the weight loss in the two test groups was similar and greater than ...

  17. [EFFICACY OF SELF-MONITORING IN WEIGHT LOSS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada Ruelas, Katia; Bacardí-Gascon, Montserrat; Jiménez-Cruz, Arturo

    2015-12-01

    different studies have shown a strong relationship between self-monitoring and weight loss. The objective of this review was to analyze randomized clinical trials using self-monitoring as a strategy for weight loss. a search was conducted in PubMed database of randomized controlled trials using self-monitoring for weight loss in adults, published in English and Spanish, from January 1st, 2009 to April 30th, 2015. The sample size, age, weight loss, BMI, intervention strategy, duration, and retention rate, were recorded. six studies met the selection criteria. The intervention and the follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months. The study population ranged from 18-74 years of age and included subjects from 50-329. Weight loss ranged from 1.14 to 2.1 kg in the control group and -1.27 to -6.1 kg in the intervention group. The six studies determined a greater weight loss in the self-monitoring group with moderate to high evaluation evidence. greater weight loss was consistently found in the self-monitoring group. These results suggest the need to use self-monitoring as a strategy for weight loss. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Future Perspectives of Personalized Weight Loss Interventions Based on Nutrigenetic, Epigenetic, and Metagenomic Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goni, L; Cuervo, M; Milagro, F. I; Martinez, J. A

    2016-01-01

    As obesity has become a major global public health challenge, a large number of studies have analyzed different strategies aimed at inducing a negative energy balance and, consequently, body weight loss...

  19. Modeling and simulation of orlistat to predict weight loss and weight maintenance in obesity patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kiyohiko; Wada, Russell; Iida, Satofumi; Kawanishi, Takehiko; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Orlistat is used clinically worldwide as anti-obesity drug. It is a chemically synthesized hydrogenated derivative of lipstatin and is an inhibitor of gastric and pancreatic lipases. It has been found to reduce the absorption of dietary fat in the gastrointestinal tract. Modeling and simulation based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis is becoming increasingly used in the design of clinical trials to assure that the trials are of high quality and are conducted efficiently. We developed a clinical trial simulation model for orlistat based on Phase III clinical study data. This innovative weight loss model includes the relationships between orlistat dose, changes in fecal fat excretion, and weight loss, and also incorporates a dropout function. The model guided the dose-finding strategy and allowed simulation of long-term clinical outcomes of orlistat.

  20. Identification of factors contributing to successful self-directed weight loss: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiei, N; Gill, T

    2017-11-21

    Despite the number of weight management programmes and their wide promotion, most overweight and obese individuals tend to lose weight on their own. The present study aimed to understand the characteristics and strategies of those who successfully engage in self-directed weight loss, which could empower other overweight and obese individuals with information and strategies to manage their weight on their own. Men and women who had lost at least 5% of their body weight without direct interaction with professionals or weight management programmes were recruited. Demographic data were collected by questionnaire and participants' weight-loss experiences were explored using semi- structured interviews to elicit in-depth individual experiences and perspectives. Iterative thematic method data analysis was used to generate themes describing contributing factors to the success of self-directed weight loss identified by participants. Most characteristics of those who successfully self-managed their weight loss were in line with those reported by successful weight losers participating in professional-led projects. However, strategies such as early embedding of new lifestyle behaviours into daily routine, the ability to learn from previous weight-loss experiences, and not requiring social support were identified as distinctive factors that contributed to the success of self-directed weight loss by participants of the present study. Overweight or obese individuals with strong internal motivation, problem-solving skills and self-reliance are more likely to be successful at achieving self-directed weight loss. The patients identified with these characteristics could be encouraged to self-manage their weight-loss process, leaving the places available in more resource-intensive professional-led programmes to those individuals unlikely to succeed on their own. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  1. Healthy Weight: Healthy Weight Loss Starts With a Plan You Can Stick To

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Weight Healthy Weight Loss Starts With a Plan You Can ... providers don't always address issues such as healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management during general ...

  2. Weight gain since menopause and its associations with weight loss maintenance in obese postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénéchal, M; Arguin, H; Bouchard, D R; Carpentier, A C; Ardilouze, J L; Dionne, I J; Brochu, M

    2011-01-01

    To examine the association between weight gain since menopause and weight regain after a weight loss program. Participants were 19 obese women who participated in a 15-week weight loss program and a 12-month follow-up. Main outcomes were: body composition, resting metabolic rate, energy intake, energy expenditure, and weight regain at follow-up. All body composition measures significantly decreased after intervention (all P ≤ 0.01) while all measures of fatness increased significantly after the 12-month follow-up (P ≤ 0.01). Body weight gain since menopause was associated with body weight regain (r = 0.65; P = 0.003) after follow-up even after adjustment for confounders. Weight gain since menopause is associated with body weight regain following the weight loss program. Therefore, weight gain since menopause should be considered as a factor influencing weight loss maintenance in older women.

  3. Which weight-loss programmes are as effective as Weight Watchers®?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Claire D; Daley, Amanda J; Lewis, Amanda L; Jolly, Kate; Aveyard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Three randomised controlled trials have provided strong evidence that Weight Watchers® is an effective weight-loss programme but there is insufficient evidence to determine whether three other weight-loss programmes are also effective. Aim To examine whether other group-based weight-loss programmes were not inferior to Weight Watchers. Design and setting A prospective cohort study using a non-inferiority analysis of 3290 adults referred through primary care. Method Participants who met the eligibility criteria for primary care obesity management treatment chose a free programme (Weight Watchers, Rosemary Conley Diet and Fitness Clubs, Slimming World or a NHS group programme) lasting 3 months; they were weighed at 3 months (programme end) and self-reported their weight at 12 months. Results At 3 months, weight loss achieved through Rosemary Conley and Slimming World was not inferior to Weight Watchers. The NHS group programme was inferior. At 12 months Slimming World and Rosemary Conley were not inferior to Weight Watchers, although participants using Slimming World lost significantly more weight than those using Weight Watchers. Data on the NHS group programme were inconclusive. Conclusion In the short term all commercial weight-loss programmes appear to result in similar weight loss but the NHS alternative appears to produce less weight loss. At 12 months Slimming World led to greater weight loss but the differences between commercial programmes was small and of minor clinical importance. PMID:24567651

  4. Ain’t no mountain high enough? Setting high weight loss goals predict effort and short-term weight loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vet, E.; Nelissen, R.M.A.; Zeelenberg, M.; de Ridder, D.T.D.

    2013-01-01

    Although psychological theories outline that it might be beneficial to set more challenging goals, people attempting to lose weight are generally recommended to set modest weight loss goals. The present study explores whether the amount of weight loss individuals strive for is associated with more

  5. Ain’t no mountain high enough? Setting high weight loss goals predicts effort and short-term weight loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vet, de E.; Nelissen, R.M.A.; Zeelenberg, M.; Ridder, de D.T.D.

    2013-01-01

    Although psychological theories outline that it might be beneficial to set more challenging goals, people attempting to lose weight are generally recommended to set modest weight loss goals. The present study explores whether the amount of weight loss individuals strive for is associated with more

  6. Delay discounting and utility for money or weight loss

    OpenAIRE

    Sze, Y. Y.; Slaven, E. M.; Bickel, W. K.; Epstein, L. H.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objective Obesity is related to a bias towards smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. This bias is typically examined by studying single commodity discounting. However, weight loss often involves choices among multiple commodities. To our knowledge, no research has examined delay discounting of delayed weight loss compared with other commodities. Methods We examined single commodity discounting of money and cross commodity discounting of money and weight loss in a sample of 84...

  7. "Guaranteed in Just Six Weeks...". Weight Loss Fads and Fantasies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H.; Allensworth, Diane D.

    1980-01-01

    The most popular fad diets, weight control devices, salons, and diet clubs are examined and the claims of each are evaluated in relation to their long-term success in producing weight loss and control. (JMF)

  8. Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs and Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can they really help people who have diabetes lose weight? Are there side effects? Answers from M. Regina ... blood sugar control, but may also lead to weight loss. There are many proposed ways in which these ...

  9. Collagen metabolism in obesity: the effect of weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Jensen, L T; Andersen, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of obesity, fat distribution and weight loss on collagen turnover using serum concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (S-PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III pro-collagen (S-PIIINP) as markers for collagen turnover...... restriction (P weight loss (r = 0.32; P obesity and associated with body fat distribution, suggesting...... an increased turnover of type III collagen related to obesity in general and to abdominal obesity in particular. S-PIIINP levels decreases during weight loss in obese subjects, whereas S-PICP levels seems un-related to obesity and weight loss....

  10. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and energy efficiency in weight loss diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fine Eugene J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbohydrate restriction as a strategy for control of obesity is based on two effects: a behavioral effect, spontaneous reduction in caloric intake and a metabolic effect, an apparent reduction in energy efficiency, greater weight loss per calorie consumed. Variable energy efficiency is established in many contexts (hormonal imbalance, weight regain and knock-out experiments in animal models, but in the area of the effect of macronutrient composition on weight loss, controversy remains. Resistance to the idea comes from a perception that variable weight loss on isocaloric diets would somehow violate the laws of thermodynamics, that is, only caloric intake is important ("a calorie is a calorie". Previous explanations of how the phenomenon occurs, based on equilibrium thermodynamics, emphasized the inefficiencies introduced by substrate cycling and requirements for increased gluconeogenesis. Living systems, however, are maintained far from equilibrium, and metabolism is controlled by the regulation of the rates of enzymatic reactions. The principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics which emphasize kinetic fluxes as well as thermodynamic forces should therefore also be considered. Here we review the principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and provide an approach to the problem of maintenance and change in body mass by recasting the problem of TAG accumulation and breakdown in the adipocyte in the language of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. We describe adipocyte physiology in terms of cycling between an efficient storage mode and a dissipative mode. Experimentally, this is measured in the rate of fatty acid flux and fatty acid oxidation. Hormonal levels controlled by changes in dietary carbohydrate regulate the relative contributions of the efficient and dissipative parts of the cycle. While no experiment exists that measures all relevant variables, the model is supported by evidence in the literature that 1 dietary carbohydrate, via its

  11. Instrumentalization of eating improves weight loss maintenance in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bodil Just; Iepsen, Eva Winning; Lundgren, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to identify psychosocial determinants for maintaining weight loss. Methods: 42 obese individuals who achieved a 12% weight loss before entering a 52-week weight maintenance program were interviewed qualitatively. Psychosocial factors related to weight loss.......008), no comfort eating (p = 0.016) and less psychosocial stress (p = 0.04) compared to weight regainers. The ability to instrumentalize eating behavior emerged as an important factor (p = 0.007). Nutritional knowledge, motivation or exercise level did not differ between groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Successful...

  12. Assessing weight perception accuracy to promote weight loss among U.S. female adolescents: A secondary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yost Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overweight and obesity have become a global epidemic. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescents has almost tripled in the last 30 years. Results from recent systematic reviews demonstrate that no single, particular intervention or strategy successfully assists overweight or obese adolescents in losing weight. An understanding of factors that influence healthy weight-loss behaviors among overweight and obese female adolescents promotes effective, multi-component weight-loss interventions. There is limited evidence demonstrating associations between demographic variables, body-mass index, and weight perception among female adolescents trying to lose weight. There is also a lack of previous studies examining the association of the accuracy of female adolescents' weight perception with their efforts to lose weight. This study, therefore, examined the associations of body-mass index, weight perception, and weight-perception accuracy with trying to lose weight and engaging in exercise as a weight-loss method among a representative sample of U.S. female adolescents. Methods A nonexperimental, descriptive, comparative secondary analysis design was conducted using data from Wave II (1996 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health. Data representative of U.S. female adolescents (N = 2216 were analyzed using STATA statistical software. Descriptive statistics and survey weight logistic regression were performed to determine if demographic and independent (body-mass index, weight perception, and weight perception accuracy variables were associated with trying to lose weight and engaging in exercise as a weight-loss method. Results Age, Black or African American race, body-mass index, weight perception, and weight perceptions accuracy were consistently associated with the likeliness of trying to lose weight among U.S. female adolescents. Age, body-mass index, weight perception, and weight

  13. Changes in weight control behaviors and hedonic hunger during a 12-week commercial weight loss program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Patrick M; Theim, Kelly R; Boeka, Abbe; Johnson, Gail; Miller-Kovach, Karen

    2012-12-01

    Greater use of key self-regulatory behaviors (e.g., self-monitoring of food intake and weight) is associated with greater weight loss within behavioral weight loss treatments, although this association is less established within widely-available commercial weight loss programs. Further, high hedonic hunger (i.e., susceptibility to environmental food cues) may present a barrier to successful behavior change and weight loss, although this has not yet been examined. Adult men and women (N=111, body mass index M±SD=31.5±2.7kg/m(2)) were assessed before and after participating in a 12-week commercial weight loss program. From pre- to post-treatment, reported usage of weight control behaviors improved and hedonic hunger decreased, and these changes were inversely associated. A decrease in hedonic hunger was associated with better weight loss. An improvement in reported weight control behaviors (e.g., self-regulatory behaviors) was associated with better weight loss, and this association was even stronger among individuals with high baseline hedonic hunger. Findings highlight the importance of specific self-regulatory behaviors within weight loss treatment, including a commercial weight loss program developed for widespread community implementation. Assessment of weight control behavioral skills usage and hedonic hunger may be useful to further identify mediators of weight loss within commercial weight loss programs. Future interventions might specifically target high hedonic hunger and prospectively examine changes in hedonic hunger during other types of weight loss treatment to inform its potential impact on sustained behavior change and weight control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Weight Loss: Subject Compliance with Prescribed Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph K.; Labbe, Elise E.

    In the past few years, a comprehensive behavioral treatment program has often been the treatment of choice for obesity. The basis for these techniques is the energy balance model of weight control. Obese adults (N=28) completed a 10-week behavioral weight control program and were subsequently monitored during a 2-year follow-up period. During…

  15. Ain't no mountain high enough? Setting high weight loss goals predict effort and short-term weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vet, Emely; Nelissen, Rob M A; Zeelenberg, Marcel; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2013-05-01

    Although psychological theories outline that it might be beneficial to set more challenging goals, people attempting to lose weight are generally recommended to set modest weight loss goals. The present study explores whether the amount of weight loss individuals strive for is associated with more positive psychological and behavioral outcomes. Hereto, 447 overweight and obese participants trying to lose weight completed two questionnaires with a 2-month interval. Many participants set goals that could be considered unrealistically high. However, higher weight loss goals did not predict dissatisfaction but predicted more effort in the weight loss attempt, as well as more self-reported short-term weight loss when baseline commitment and motivation were controlled for.

  16. Genetic susceptibility to diabetes and long-term improvement of insulin resistance and β cell function during weight loss: the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Ley, Sylvia H; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Tiange; Bray, George A; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Diet interventions have shown effectiveness in improving diabetes risk factors; however, little is known about whether the effects of diet intervention are different according to genetic susceptibility. We examined interactions between weight-loss diets and the genetic risk score (GRS) for diabetes on 2-y changes in markers of insulin resistance and β cell function in a randomized controlled trial. Data from the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial were analyzed. A GRS was calculated on the basis of 31 diabetes-associated variants in 744 overweight or obese nondiabetic adults (80% white Americans). We assessed the changes in insulin resistance and β cell function over the 2-y intervention. Dietary protein significantly interacted with the diabetes GRS on fasting insulin, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), the homeostasis model assessment of β cell function (HOMA-B), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) at 2 y in white Americans (P-interaction = 0.02, 0.04, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively). The lower GRS was associated with a greater decrease in fasting insulin (P = 0.04), HbA1c (P = 0.0001), and HOMA-IR (P = 0.02), and a lesser increase in HOMA-B (P = 0.004) in participants consuming a low-protein diet. Participants with a higher GRS might have a greater reduction in fasting insulin when consuming a high-protein diet (P = 0.03). Our data suggest that individuals with a lower genetic risk of diabetes may benefit more from consuming a low-protein weight-loss diet in improving insulin resistance and β cell function, whereas a high-protein diet may be more beneficial for white patients with a higher genetic risk. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Determinants of weight loss success with alternate day fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, Krista A; Hoddy, Kristin K; Kroeger, Cynthia M; Trepanowski, John F; Klempel, Monica C; Barnosky, Adrienne; Bhutani, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined what characteristics predict weight loss success with alternate day fasting (ADF). Four 8-week trials of ADF (n=121) were included in the analysis. Subjects aged 50-59 y achieved greater (P=0.01) weight loss than other age groups. Males and females achieved similar weight loss. Caucasian subjects achieved greater (P=0.03) weight loss than other races. Baseline body weight and baseline BMI did not predict degree of weight loss achieved with the diet. These findings may help clinicians to decide which population groups may benefit most from an ADF approach. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Unrealistic weight loss expectations in candidates for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaly, Perry; Orellana, Susan; Torrella, Tracy; Takagishi, Curtis; Saff-Koche, Lisa; Murr, Michel M

    2008-01-01

    Unrealistic expectations of weight loss are prevalent in obese patients and can negatively affect their adherence to dietary and health goals. We sought to examine the expectations and perceived notions about weight loss in candidates for bariatric surgery. A total of 284 consecutive and prospective bariatric patients were surveyed using a validated Goals and Relative Weights questionnaire before an educational seminar. The participants categorized their weight loss expectations as "dream," "happy," "acceptable," and "disappointed" and rated the effect of surgically-induced weight loss on 21 indicators of health, quality of life, social functioning, and self-image on a 1-10 scale. The data are presented as the mean +/- standard deviation. Of the 284 patients, 230 were women and 54 were men (age 45 +/- 10 years; body mass index 50 +/- 8 kg/m(2)). These patients stated that their "dream" weight would be 89% +/- 8% excess body weight loss and that 77% +/- 9%, 67% +/- 10%, 49% +/- 14% excess body weight loss would be their "happy," "acceptable," and "disappointed" weight, respectively. Participants ranked health, fitness, body image, work performance, and self-confidence as the most important benefits of bariatric surgery. Women had greater "happy" and "acceptable" weight loss expectations and put more emphasis on physical presence (r = .17-.33, P realistic expectations is an important aspect of the preoperative evaluation and education, especially for younger women.

  19. Longitudinal Analysis of Leptin Variation during Weight Regain after Weight Loss in Obese Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jens-Christian, Holm; Michael, Gamborg; Leigh, Ward

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed if lower than predicted serum leptin concentrations seen during weight loss persisted during weight regain, with possible implications for weight control. Methods: 115 children were investigated during a 12-week weight loss program. 90 children completed the program....... Results: Children with the greatest increases in BMI standard deviation score (SDS) exhibited the largest leptin increments. The disproportionate reduction of leptin seen during weight loss recovered after weight loss. Leptin increases mirrored increases in BMI SDS during weight regain, and the leptin......-BMI SDS relationship seen during follow-up resembled the baseline leptin-BMI SDS relationship. Conclusion: Proportional increases of leptin and BMI SDS during weight regain suggests an intact leptin response during re-accumulation of fat. Following the pronounced reduction of leptin during weight loss...

  20. The Effects of Weight Loss Versus Weight Loss Maintenance on Sympathetic Nervous System Activity and Metabolic Syndrome Components

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Straznicky, Nora E; Grima, Mariee T; Eikelis, Nina; Nestel, Paul J; Dawood, Tye; Schlaich, Markus P; Chopra, Reena; Masuo, Kazuko; Esler, Murray D; Sari, Carolina I; Lambert, Gavin W; Lambert, Elisabeth A

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates divergent effects of successful weight loss maintenance on whole body norepinephrine spillover rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in obese metabolic syndrome subjects. Context...

  1. Gender Differences in Weight Loss: Evidence from a NHS Weight Management Service

    OpenAIRE

    BHOGAL, Manpal Singh; Langford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Provides evidence that men lose more weight than women when enrolled on a weight loss intervention.\\ud •\\ud Men lose more weight than women from their initial assessment up to 12-months.\\ud •\\ud Men maintain their weight and continue to lose more weight postintervention compared to women.

  2. Weight-Loss and Nutrition Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D—cereals or soy-based beverages Myth: “Going vegetarian” will help you lose weight and be healthier. Some research shows that a healthy vegetarian eating plan may be linked to lower obesity ...

  3. Weight Loss: Ready to Change Your Habits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the challenge of overhauling your eating and exercise habits. Instead, consider giving your life a chance to ... lose weight more quickly if you change your habits significantly. Be careful, though. Radical changes that aren' ...

  4. Cardiometabolic results from an armband-based weight loss trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverdes, John C; Sui, Xuemei; Hand, Gregory A; Barry, Vaughn W; Wilcox, Sara; Meriwether, Rebecca A; Hardin, James W; McClain, Amanda C; Blair, Steven N

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the blood chemistry and blood pressure (BP) results from the Lifestyle Education for Activity and Nutrition (LEAN) study, a randomized weight loss trial. A primary purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of real-time self-monitoring of energy balance (using the SenseWear(™) Armband, BodyMedia, Inc Pittsburgh, PA) on these health factors. 164 sedentary overweight or obese adults (46.8 ± 10.8 years; BMI 33.3 ± 5.2 kg/m(2); 80% women) took part in the 9-month study. Participants were randomized into 4 conditions: a standard care condition with an evidence-based weight loss manual (n = 40), a group-based behavioral weight loss program (n = 44), an armband alone condition (n = 41), and a group plus armband (n = 39) condition. BP, fasting blood lipids and glucose were measured at baseline and 9 months. 99 participants (60%) completed both baseline and follow-up measurements for BP and blood chemistry analysis. Missing data were handled by baseline carried forward. None of the intervention groups had significant changes in blood lipids or BP when compared to standard care after adjustment for covariates, though within-group lowering was found for systolic BP in group and group + armband conditions, a rise in total cholesterol and LDL were found in standard care and group conditions, and a lowering of triglycerides was found in the two armband conditions. Compared with the standard care condition, fasting glucose decreased significantly for participants in the group, armband, and group + armband conditions (all P < 0.05), respectively. Our results suggest that using an armband program is an effective strategy to decrease fasting blood glucose. This indicates that devices, such as the armband, can be a successful way to disseminate programs that can improve health risk factors. This can be accomplished without group-based behavioral programs, thereby potentially reducing costs.

  5. Weight loss for overweight and obese individuals with gout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sabrina M; Bartels, Else Marie; Henriksen, Marius

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Weight loss is commonly recommended for gout, but the magnitude of the effect has not been evaluated in a systematic review. The aim of this systematic review was to determine benefits and harms associated with weight loss in overweight and obese patients with gout. METHODS: We search...

  6. Autonomy support, self-regulation, and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Amy A; Powers, Theodore A; Koestner, Richard; Wing, Rena R; Raynor, Hollie A

    2014-04-01

    Social support is believed to contribute to weight loss success, yet the type of support received is rarely assessed. To develop more effective weight loss interventions, examinations of the types of support that are associated with positive outcomes are needed. Self-Determination Theory suggests that support for an individual's autonomy is beneficial and facilitates internalization of autonomous self-regulation. We examined whether autonomy support and directive forms of support were associated with weight loss outcomes in a larger randomized controlled trial. Adults (N = 201; 48.9 ± 10.5 years; 78.1% women) participating in a weight loss trial were assessed at 0, 6, and 18 months. Autonomy support (AS), directive support, and autonomous self-regulation (ASR) were measured at 0 and 6 months and examined in relation to 18-month weight loss outcomes. Baseline AS and ASR did not predict outcomes; however, AS and ASR at 6 months positively predicted 18-month weight losses (ps Autonomy support predicted better weight loss outcomes while some forms of directive support hindered progress. Weight loss trials are needed to determine whether family members and friends can be trained to provide autonomy support and whether this is more effective than programs targeting more general or directive forms of support.

  7. Weight loss practices among newly enrolling clients in a commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Ghana, obesity is showing a rising trend and there are weight loss initiatives being practised by individuals. However, the levels of commitment to such programs and the reasons for discontinuing have not been assessed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the weight loss practices of participants ...

  8. Probability Weighting and Loss Aversion in Futures Hedging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattos, F.; Garcia, P.; Pennings, J.M.E.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze how the introduction of probability weighting and loss aversion in a futures hedging model affects decision making. Analytical findings indicate that probability weighting alone always affects optimal hedge ratios, while loss and risk aversion only have an impact when probability

  9. How Adolescent Girls Interpret Weight-Loss Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Renee; Broder, Sharon; Pope, Holly; Rowe, Jonelle

    2006-01-01

    While they demonstrate some ability to critically analyze the more obvious forms of deceptive weight-loss advertising, many girls do not recognize how advertising evokes emotional responses or how visual and narrative techniques are used to increase identification in weight-loss advertising. This study examined how girls aged 9-17 years…

  10. Biochemical parameters response to weight loss in patients with non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    al. who reported that weight loss reduces TNF- α in the obese22. Also, Sandoval and Davis approved that patients who had bariatric surgery gained reduction in. IL-6 concentration and improved insulin sensitivity in parallel to weight loss23. However, Chu and colleagues confirmed that serum leptin level was reduced after.

  11. Practising physical activity following weight-loss surgery: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While health care professionals advise those who have undergone weight loss surgery (WLS) to increase their levels of physical activity, research suggests that often this is not achieved. This paper explores the experiences of ten Norwegian women as they engaged in physical activity several years after weight loss surgery ...

  12. Dietary and psych predictors of weight loss after gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Benjamin; Chen, Ellie; Suzo, Andrew; Jolles, Sally; Greenberg, Jacob A; Campos, Guilherme M; Voils, Corrine I; Funk, Luke M

    2015-08-01

    Identifying severely obese patients who will succeed after bariatric surgery remains challenging. Although numerous studies have attempted to identify preoperative patient characteristics associated with weight loss, the roles of many dietary and psychological characteristics are unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine preoperative dietary and psychological predictors of successful weight loss after bariatric surgery. This retrospective cohort study included all patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass from September 2011-June 2013 at a single institution (n = 124). Patient demographics, comorbidities, dietary and psychological factors, and weight loss outcomes were extracted from the electronic medical record. Bivariate associations between these factors and successful weight loss (≥50% excess body weight) were examined. Factors significant at P ≤ 0.1 were included in a multivariate logistic regression model. On bivariate analysis, absence of either type 2 diabetes or hypertension, preoperative weight 50 lbs, no previous purging or family history of obesity, and no soda consumption preoperatively were associated with successful weight loss (P 50 lbs (OR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.04-0.43]), and decreasing soda consumption by >50% (OR, 0.27 [95% CI, 0.08-0.99]). Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, significant previous weight loss, and poor soda consumption habits are more likely to experience suboptimal weight loss after bariatric surgery. Additional preoperative counseling and close postoperative follow-up is warranted for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Complications following body contouring surgery after massive weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasanbegovic, Emir; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a way to achieve lasting weight loss in the obese. Body contouring surgery seeks to alleviate some of the discomfort caused by the excessive loose skin following massive weight loss. Higher complication rates are described in this type of surgery when done post-bariatric....... The purpose of this article is to compare complication rates of body contouring surgery when performed on patients with weight loss due to bariatric surgery compared to patients who lost weight due to dietary changes and/or exercise....

  14. Misuse of prescription stimulants for weight loss, psychosocial variables, and eating disordered behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Amy; Benotsch, Eric G; Koester, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the non-medical use of prescription drugs among young adults including an increase in the use of prescription stimulants normally used to treat ADHD. Reported motivations for the non-medical use of prescription stimulants (NPS) include enhancing academic performance and to get high. Although a common side effect of these medications is appetite suppression, research examining weight loss as a motivation for NPS among young adults is sparse. In the present study, undergraduate students (n=705) completed an online survey assessing weight loss behaviors, motivations for weight loss, and eating behaviors. Nearly 12% of respondents reported using prescription stimulants to lose weight. Participants who reported using prescription stimulants for weight loss had greater appearance-related motivations for weight loss, greater emotion and stress-related eating, a more compromised appraisal of their ability to cope, lower self-esteem, and were more likely to report engaging in other unhealthy weight loss and eating disordered behaviors. Results suggest some young adults are misusing prescription stimulants for weight loss and that this behavior is associated with other problematic weight loss strategies. Interventions designed to reduce problematic eating behaviors in young adults may wish to assess the misuse of prescription stimulants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Weight Loss Can Lead to Resolution of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms: A Prospective Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep; Lee, Jaehoon; Gupta, Neil; Gaddam, Srinivas; Smith, Bryan K.; Wani, Sachin B.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Rastogi, Amit; Bansal, Ajay; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Sharma, Prateek

    2013-01-01

    Objective Weight gain is an important risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, whether weight loss can lead to resolution of GERD symptoms is not clear. Our aim was to measure the impact of weight loss on GERD symptoms. Design and Methods In a prospective cohort study at a tertiary referral center, overweight/obese subjects (BMI 25-39.9 kg/m2) were enrolled in a structured weight loss program. Weight loss strategies included dietary modifications, increased physical activity and behavioral changes. At baseline and at 6 months, BMI and waist circumference were measured and all participants completed a validated reflux disease questionnaire. Results A total of 332 adult subjects, mean age 46 years and 66% women were prospectively enrolled. At baseline, the mean body weight, BMI, and waist circumference were 101 (±18) kg, 35 (±5) kg/m2 and 103 (±13) cm. At 6 months, majority of the subjects (97%) lost weight (average weight loss: 13 ± 7.7 kg) and as compared with baseline, there was a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of GERD (15 vs. 37%; P weight loss and reduction in GERD symptom scores (r = 0.17, P weight loss program can lead to complete resolution of GERD symptoms in the majority of these subjects. PMID:23532991

  16. Associated among endocrine, inflammatory, and bone markers, body composition and weight loss induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss reduces co-¬morbidities of obesity but decreases bone mass. Our aims were to determine whether adequate dairy intake could prevent weight loss related bone loss and to evaluate the contribution of energy-related hormones and inflammatory markers to bone metabolism. Overweight and obese w...

  17. The utility of weight loss medications after bariatric surgery for weight regain or inadequate weight loss: A multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Alfaris, Nasreen; Gomez, Gricelda; Ricks, Elizabeth T; Shukla, Alpana P; Corey, Kathleen E; Pratt, Janey S; Pomp, Alfons; Rubino, Francesco; Aronne, Louis J

    2017-03-01

    Patients who undergo bariatric surgery often have inadequate weight loss or weight regain. We sought to discern the utility of weight loss pharmacotherapy as an adjunct to bariatric surgery in patients with inadequate weight loss or weight regain. Two academic medical centers. We completed a retrospective study to identify patients who had undergone bariatric surgery in the form of a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or a sleeve gastrectomy from 2000-2014. From this cohort, we identified patients who were placed on weight loss pharmacotherapy postoperatively for inadequate weight loss or weight regain. We extracted key demographic data, medical history, and examined weight loss in response to surgery and after the initiation of weight loss pharmacotherapy. A total of 319 patients (RYGB = 258; sleeve gastrectomy = 61) met inclusion criteria for analysis. More than half (54%; n = 172) of all study patients lost≥5% (7.2 to 195.2 lbs) of their total weight with medications after surgery. There were several high responders with 30.3% of patients (n = 96) and 15% (n = 49) losing≥10% (16.7 to 195.2 lbs) and≥15% (25 to 195.2 lbs) of their total weight, respectively, Topiramate was the only medication that demonstrated a statistically significant response for weight loss with patients being twice as likely to lose at least 10% of their weight when placed on this medication (odds ratio = 1.9; P = .018). Regardless of the postoperative body mass index, patients who underwent RYGB were significantly more likely to lose≥5% of their total weight with the aid of weight loss medications. Weight loss pharmacotherapy serves as a useful adjunct to bariatric surgery in patients with inadequate weight loss or weight regain. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Weight Loss Goals among African American Women with Type 2 Diabetes in a Behavioral Weight Control Program

    OpenAIRE

    White, D.B.; Bursac, Z.; DiLillo, V.; West, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    African American women with type 2 diabetes experience limited weight loss in behavioral weight control programs. Some research suggests overly ambitious weight loss expectations may negatively affect weight losses achieved but it is unknown whether they affect weight loss among African American women. The current study examined personal weight loss goals and expected satisfaction with a reasonable weight loss among African American women with type 2 diabetes starting a behavioral obesity tre...

  19. Consequences of obesity and weight loss: a devil's advocate position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R E; Kuk, J L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with multiple negative health consequences and current weight management guidelines recommend all obese persons to lose weight. However, recent evidence suggests that not all obese persons are negatively affected by their weight and that weight loss does not necessarily always improve health. The purpose of this review is not to trivialize the significant health risks associated with obesity, but to discuss subpopulations of obese people who are not adversely affected, or may even benefit from higher adiposity, and in who weight loss per se may not always be the most appropriate recommendation. More specifically, this review will take a devil's advocate position when discussing the consequences of obesity and weight loss for adults with established cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, weight cyclers, metabolically healthy obese adults, youth, older adults and obese individuals who are highly fit. PMID:25410935

  20. Physiogenomic analysis of weight loss induced by dietary carbohydrate restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Richard J

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diets that restrict carbohydrate (CHO have proven to be a successful dietary treatment of obesity for many people, but the degree of weight loss varies across individuals. The extent to which genetic factors associate with the magnitude of weight loss induced by CHO restriction is unknown. We examined associations among polymorphisms in candidate genes and weight loss in order to understand the physiological factors influencing body weight responses to CHO restriction. Methods We screened for genetic associations with weight loss in 86 healthy adults who were instructed to restrict CHO to a level that induced a small level of ketosis (CHO ~10% of total energy. A total of 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were selected from 15 candidate genes involved in fat digestion/metabolism, intracellular glucose metabolism, lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite regulation. Multiple linear regression was used to rank the SNPs according to probability of association, and the most significant associations were analyzed in greater detail. Results Mean weight loss was 6.4 kg. SNPs in the gastric lipase (LIPF, hepatic glycogen synthase (GYS2, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP and galanin (GAL genes were significantly associated with weight loss. Conclusion A strong association between weight loss induced by dietary CHO restriction and variability in genes regulating fat digestion, hepatic glucose metabolism, intravascular lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite were detected. These discoveries could provide clues to important physiologic adaptations underlying the body mass response to CHO restriction.

  1. The Relationship Between Intuitive Eating and Postpartum Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Katie; Berlin, Kristoffer S; Banks, Gabrielle G; Bachman, Jessica

    2017-08-01

    Objective Postpartum weight loss is challenging for new mothers who report limited time and difficulties following traditional weight loss methods. Intuitive eating (IE) is a behavior that includes eating based on physical hunger and fullness and may have a role in encouraging weight loss. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between IE and postpartum weight loss. Methods Women 12-18 months postpartum completed a questionnaire regarding weight changes surrounding pregnancy, exercise, breastfeeding and intuitive eating using the Intuitive Eating Scale. Latent growth curve modeling was utilized to determine the relationship between IE, breastfeeding, weight gain during pregnancy, and postpartum weight trajectories. Results Participants (n = 50) were 28.5 ± 4.9 years old, had an average pre-pregnancy BMI of 26.4 ± 6.8 and the majority were married, and non-Hispanic white. The conditional model revealed that more intuitive eating practices predicted greater postpartum BMI decreases (Est. = -0.10, p intuitive eating approach to food consumption may encourage postpartum weight loss without the required weighing, measuring, recording and assessing dietary intake that is required of traditional weight loss programs. IE could offer an alternative approach that may be less arduous for new mothers.

  2. Personality characteristics in obesity and relationship with successful weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, S; Cloninger, C R; Przybeck, T R; Klein, S

    2007-04-01

    Personality influences lifestyle behaviors. Therefore, certain personality traits could contribute to obesity and the response to behaviorally based weight loss therapy. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that personality characteristics differ between lean and obese persons in the community, obese persons in the community and obese persons seeking weight loss therapy by enrolling in a comprehensive weight loss program, and in obese persons who were successful and unsuccessful in achieving behavioral therapy-induced weight loss. The Temperament and Character Inventory was administered to 264 lean (body mass index (BMI) obese (BMI> or =35 kg/m(2)) subjects from the St Louis community and 183 obese patients (BMI=44+/-10 kg/m(2)) enrolled in the Washington University Weight Management Program (WUWMP), which involved weekly group behavioral therapy and diet education sessions for 22 weeks. Compared with lean subjects, obese subjects in the community scored higher in novelty seeking (19.7+/-5.9 vs 16.2+/-6.0, Pobese persons in the general population in both Reward Dependence (17.1+/-4.2 vs 15.7+/-4.3, P10% weight loss) after 22 weeks of behavioral therapy scored lower in novelty seeking than those who were unsuccessful in losing weight (personality traits differ between lean and obese persons, and between obese persons who enroll and who do not enroll in a comprehensive weight management program. Moreover, high scores in novelty seeking are associated with decreased success in achieving behavioral therapy-induced weight loss.

  3. Relationship of cravings with weight loss and hunger: results from a 6 month worksite weight loss intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the association of food cravings with weight loss and eating behaviors in a 6 month worksite lifestyle weight loss program. This randomized controlled trial of the intervention versus a wait-listed control was conducted at 4 worksites, and 95 participants completed outcome assessments ...

  4. Gestational weight gain and subsequent postpartum weight loss among young, low-income, ethnic minority women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould Rothberg, Bonnie E; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace S; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2011-01-01

    Document weight change trajectories that lead to gestational weight gain or postpartum weight loss outside clinical recommendations established by the Institute of Medicine. Women aged 14-25 receiving prenatal care and delivering singleton infants at term (n = 427). Medical record review and 4 structured interviews conducted: second and third trimester, 6- and 12-months postpartum. Longitudinal mixed modeling to evaluate weight change trajectories. Only 22% of participants gained gestational weight within Institute of Medicine guidelines. There were 62% that exceeded maximum recommendations-more common among those overweight/obese (body mass index ≥25.0; P weight gain and retention documented among smokers and women with pregnancy-induced hypertension; breastfeeding promoted postpartum weight loss (all P weight gain and inadequate postpartum weight loss are highly prevalent among young low-income ethnic minority women. Pregnancy and postpartum are critical junctures for weight management interventions. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Calorie Estimation in Adults Differing in Body Weight Class and Weight Loss Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    BROWN, RUTH E; CANNING, KARISSA L; FUNG, MICHAEL; JIANDANI, DISHAY; RIDDELL, MICHAEL C; MACPHERSON, ALISON K; KUK, JENNIFER L

    ... meal. The objective of this study was to determine if accuracy of estimation of moderate or vigorous exercise energy expenditure and calories in food is associated with body weight class or weight loss status...

  6. Longitudinal Analysis of Leptin Variation during Weight Regain after Weight Loss in Obese Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens-Christian; Gamborg, Michael; Ward, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed if lower than predicted serum leptin concentrations seen during weight loss persisted during weight regain, with possible implications for weight control. Methods: 115 children were investigated during a 12-week weight loss program. 90 children completed the program......, and 68 children entered a follow-up program spanning 28 months. Measurements were performed at baseline and day 82 as well as at months 10, 16, and 28. Height, weight, body composition, Tanner stages, testicular size, and serum concentrations of leptin, and insulin were measured at all time points....... Results: Children with the greatest increases in BMI standard deviation score (SDS) exhibited the largest leptin increments. The disproportionate reduction of leptin seen during weight loss recovered after weight loss. Leptin increases mirrored increases in BMI SDS during weight regain, and the leptin...

  7. Persistence of obstructive sleep apnea after surgical weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, Christopher J; Eliasson, Arn H; Greenburg, David L

    2008-08-15

    Weight loss may reduce the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but persistence of OSA following surgical weight loss has not been defined. We sought to clarify the impact of bariatric surgery on OSA. We hypothesized that, despite substantial weight loss and reductions in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), many will have persistent disease. Consecutive patients referred for preoperative sleep evaluation underwent polysomnography before and 1 year following bariatric surgery. We compared the effects of weight loss on body mass, OSA, and continuous positive airway pressure requirements. We defined OSA severity using the AHI (normal weight loss and assessed compliance with therapy. Twenty-four patients (aged 47.9 +/- 9.3 years; 75% women) were enrolled. At baseline, all subjects had OSA, the majority of which was severe. Weight loss reduced body mass index from 51.0 +/- 10.4 kg/m2 to 32.1 +/- 5.5 kg/m2 (p weight loss reduces the AHI, but many patients have residual OSA one year after bariatric surgery.

  8. Influence of Weight Loss Attempts on Bariatric Surgery Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sayantan; Voller, Lindsey; Palisch, Chase; Ceja, Omar; Turner, Wes; Rivas, Homero; Morton, John M

    2016-10-01

    Many payors require an additional attempt at nonsurgical weight loss before approval of bariatric procedures. This study evaluates this requirement by characterizing the prior weight loss attempts (WLAs) undergone by bariatric surgery patients and correlating those attempts to postoperative weight loss outcomes. Number and duration of WLAs were obtained from a preoperative clinic assessment. Body mass index (BMI) and percentage of excess weight loss (%EWL) were used to assess weight loss. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman Correlation tests were performed to analyze data using GraphPad Prism 6. Mean number of WLAs before surgery was 3.5 ± 0.2 attempts, with an average duration of 15.2 ± 1.1 years. There was a significant negative correlation between duration of WLAs and preoperative BMI (r = -0.2637, P = 0.0025). No significant difference was found for preoperative BMI or mean 12-month %EWL among any WLA groups. The number and duration of dietary attempts before surgery do not significantly affect long-term weight loss outcomes after bariatric surgery. Given these data, an additional preoperative WLA may not be efficacious in improving patients' chances at weight loss.

  9. Could habits hold the key to weight loss maintenance? A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleo, G; Isenring, E; Thomas, R; Glasziou, P

    2017-10-01

    Despite the significance placed on lifestyle interventions for obesity management, most weight loss is followed by weight regain. Psychological concepts of habitual behaviour and automaticity have been suggested as plausible explanations for this overwhelming lack of long-term weight loss success. Interventions that focus on changing an individual's behaviour are not usually successful at changing an individual's habits because they do not incorporate the strategies required to break unhealthy habits and/or form new healthy habits. A narrative review was conducted and describes the theory behind habit formation in relation to weight regain. The review evaluated the effectiveness of using habits as tools to maintain weight loss. Three specific habit-based weight loss programmes are described: '10 Top Tips', 'Do Something Different' and 'Transforming Your Life'. Participants in these interventions achieved significant weight loss compared to a control group or other conventional interventions. Habit-based interventions show promising results in sustaining behaviour change. Weight loss maintenance may benefit from incorporating habit-focused strategies and should be investigated further. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. Success of a weight loss plan for overweight dogs: The results of an international weight loss study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, John; Bissot, Thomas; Hours, Marie-Anne; Moreno, Bernabe; Feugier, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a global concern in dogs with an increasing prevalence, and effective weight loss solutions are required that work in different geographical regions. The main objective was to conduct an international, multi-centre, weight loss trial to determine the efficacy of a dietary weight loss intervention in obese pet dogs. Methods A 3-month prospective observational cohort study of weight loss in 926 overweight dogs was conducted at 340 veterinary practices in 27 countries. Commercially available dry or wet weight loss diets were used, with the initial energy allocation being 250–335 kJ/kg target body weight0.75/day (60–80 kcal/kg target body weight0.75/day) depending on sex and neuter status. The primary outcome measure was percentage weight loss; the main secondary outcomes were changes in activity, quality of life, and food-seeking behaviour, which were subjectively determined from owner descriptions. Results At baseline, median (range) age was 74 (12 to 193) months and median body condition score was 8 (range 7–9). 896 of the 926 dogs (97%) lost weight, with mean weight loss being 11.4 ±5.84%. Sexually intact dogs lost more weight than neutered dogs (P = 0.001), whilst female dogs lost more weight than male dogs (P = 0.007), with the difference being more pronounced in North and South American dogs (median [Q1, Q3]: female: 11.5% [8.5%, 14.5%]; male: 9.1% [6.3%, 12.1%], P = 0.053) compared with those from Europe (female: 12.3% [8.9%, 14.9%]; male: 10.9% [8.6%, 15.4%]). Finally, subjective scores for activity (Pbehaviour decreased sequentially (Pdogs. Most dogs lost a clinically significant amount of weight, although there were notable differences between dogs of different sex, neuter status and in different geographical locations. PMID:28886096

  11. Weight Loss Maintenance in African American Women: A Systematic Review of the Behavioral Lifestyle Intervention Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Tussing-Humphreys

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review of the behavioral lifestyle intervention trials conducted in the United States published between 1990 and 2011 that included a maintenance phase of at least six months, to identify intervention features that promote weight loss maintenance in African American women. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. Generally, African American women lost less weight during the intensive weight loss phase and maintained a lower % of their weight loss compared to Caucasian women. The majority of studies failed to describe the specific strategies used in the delivery of the maintenance intervention, adherence to those strategies, and did not incorporate a maintenance phase process evaluation making it difficult to identify intervention characteristics associated with better weight loss maintenance. However, the inclusion of cultural adaptations, particularly in studies with a mixed ethnicity/race sample, resulted in less % weight regain for African American women. Studies with a formal maintenance intervention and weight management as the primary intervention focus reported more positive weight maintenance outcomes for African American women. Nonetheless, our results present both the difficulty in weight loss and maintenance experienced by African American women in behavioral lifestyle interventions.

  12. Intentional Weight Loss Improved Performance in Obese Ischaemic Heart Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina; Myint, Khin Swe; Heck, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    ) on physical performance and cardiovascular risk factors in obese patients with moderate-to-severe HF and/or ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Methods and Results: Results from two weight loss interventions at two centres, one in Denmark (DK - 12 week intervention in 21 subjects (14 LED, 7 controls)) and one......Aims: The risk of heart failure (HF) increases with BMI, but paradoxically obesity has been associated with reduced mortality in patients with HF. The effect of intentional or therapeutic weight loss on HF is not well known. We examined the effect of weight loss induced by low energy diet (LED...... improvement in physical performance and cardiovascular risk markers....

  13. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-11-27

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss.

  14. Extremes of weight gain and weight loss with detailed assessments of energy balance: Illustrative case studies and clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, Ryan S; Shook, Robin P; Hand, Gregory A; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2015-04-01

    Extreme weight changes, or changes in weight greater than 10 kg within a 2-year period, can be caused by numerous factors that are much different than typical weight fluctuations. This paper uses two interesting cases of extreme weight change (a female who experienced extreme weight gain and a male who experienced extreme weight loss) from participants in the Energy Balance Study to illustrate the physiological and psychosocial variables associated with the weight change over a 15-month period, including rigorous assessments of energy intake, physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure, and body composition. In addition, we provide a brief review of the literature regarding the relationship between energy balance (EB) and weight change, as well as insight into proper weight management strategies. The case studies presented here are then placed in the context of the literature regarding EB and weight change. This report further supports previous research on the importance of regular doses of PA for weight maintenance, and that even higher volumes of PA are necessary for weight loss. Practitioners should emphasize the importance of PA to their patients and take steps to monitor their patients' involvement in PA.

  15. Physician Communication Techniques and Weight Loss in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Kathryn I.; Alexander, Stewart C.; Coffman, Cynthia J.; Tulsky, James A.; Lyna, Pauline; Dolor, Rowena J.; James, Iguehi E.; Namenek Brouwer, Rebecca J.; Manusov, Justin R.E.; Østbye, Truls

    2010-01-01

    Background Physicians are encouraged to counsel overweight and obese patients to lose weight. Purpose It was examined whether discussing weight and use of motivational-interviewing techniques (e.g., collaborating, reflective listening) while discussing weight predicted weight loss 3 months after the encounter. Methods 40 primary care physicians and 461 of their overweight or obese patient visits were audio recorded between December 2006 and June 2008. Patient actual weight at the encounter and 3 months after the encounter (n=426), whether weight was discussed, physicians’ use of Motivational-Interviewing techniques, and patient, physician and visit covariates (e.g., race, age, specialty) were assessed. This was an observational study and data were analyzed in April 2009. Results No differences in weight loss were found between patients whose physicians discussed weight or did not. Patients whose physicians used motivational interviewing–consistent techniques during weight-related discussions lost weight 3 months post-encounter; those whose physician used motivational interviewing–inconsistent techniques gained or maintained weight. The estimated difference in weight change between patients whose physician had a higher global “motivational interviewing–Spirit” score (e.g., collaborated with patient) and those whose physician had a lower score was 1.6 kg (95% CI=−2.9, −0.3, p=.02). The same was true for patients whose physician used reflective statements 0.9 kg (95% CI=−1.8, −0.1, p=.03). Similarly, patients whose physicians expressed only motivational interviewing–consistent behaviors had a difference in weight change of 1.1 kg (95% CI=−2.3, 0.1, p=.07) compared to those whose physician expressed only motivational interviewing–inconsistent behaviors (e.g., judging, confronting). Conclusions In this small observational study, use of motivational-interviewing techniques during weight loss discussions predicted patient weight loss. PMID

  16. Assessing weight perception accuracy to promote weight loss among U.S. female adolescents: A secondary analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yost, Jennifer; Krainovich-Miller, Barbara; Budin, Wendy; Norman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Overweight and obesity have become a global epidemic. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescents has almost tripled in the last 30 years. Results from recent systematic reviews demonstrate that no single, particular intervention or strategy successfully assists overweight or obese adolescents in losing weight. An understanding of factors that influence healthy weight-loss behaviors among overweight and obese female adolescents promotes effective, multi...

  17. Randomized trial of tapas acupressure technique for weight loss maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Charles R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is an urgent public health problem, yet only a few clinical trials have systematically tested the efficacy of long-term weight-loss maintenance interventions. This randomized clinical trial tested the efficacy of a novel mind and body technique for weight-loss maintenance. Methods Participants were obese adults who had completed a six-month behavioral weight-loss program prior to randomization. Those who successfully lost weight were randomized into either an experimental weight-loss maintenance intervention, Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT®, or a control intervention comprised of social-support group meetings (SS led by professional facilitators. TAT combines self-applied light pressure to specific acupressure points accompanied by a prescribed sequence of mental steps. Participants in both maintenance conditions attended eight group sessions over six months of active weight loss maintenance intervention, followed by an additional 6 months of no intervention. The main outcome measure was change in weight from the beginning of the weight loss maintenance intervention to 12 months later. Secondary outcomes were change in depression, stress, insomnia, and quality of life. We used analysis of covariance as the primary analysis method. Missing values were replaced using multiple imputation. Results Among 285 randomized participants, 79% were female, mean age was 56 (standard deviation (sd = 11, mean BMI at randomization was 34 (sd = 5, and mean initial weight loss was 9.8 kg (sd = 5. In the primary outcome model, there was no significant difference in weight regain between the two arms (1.72 kg (se 0.85 weight regain for TAT and 2.96 kg (se 0.96 weight regain for SS, p post hoc tests showing that greater initial weight loss was associated with more weight regain for SS but less weight regain for TAT. Conclusions The primary analysis showed no significant difference in weight regain between TAT and SS, while secondary

  18. Influence of weight and weight change on bone loss in perimenopausal and early postmenopausal Scottish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Helen M; New, Susan A; Campbell, Marion K; Reid, David M

    2005-02-01

    Weight is recognized as an important factor in determining an individual's risk of osteoporosis. However, little is known about whether weight or weight change influences bone loss around the time of the menopause, and the relationship with energy intake and physical activity level remains largely undefined. Healthy premenopausal women (1,064 selected from a random population of 5,119 women aged 45-54 years at baseline) each had bone mineral density (BMD), weight and height measurements, and completed a food frequency and physical activity questionnaire. Of the original participants, 907 women (85.2%) returned 6.3 +/- 0.6 years later for repeat BMD measurements, and 896 women completed the questionnaires. Bone loss at the hip (FN) and spine (LS) occurred before the menopause. Weight change rather than weight was associated with FN BMD loss (r=0.102, p=0.002), but weight at follow-up was associated with LS BMD change (r=0.105, p=0.002). Although an increase in physical activity level (PAL) appeared to be beneficial for FN BMD in women who were heavy weight gainers, PAL was associated with increased LS BMD loss in women who lost weight. For current HRT users, neither weight nor weight change was associated with change in BMD. Postmenopausal women not taking HRT should be made aware that low body weight or losing weight during this particularly vulnerable period may worsen bone loss.

  19. Concomitant changes in sleep duration and body weight and body composition during weight loss and 3-mo weight maintenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verhoef, S.P; Camps, S.G; Gonnissen, H.K; Westerterp, K.R; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S

    2013-01-01

    An inverse relation between sleep duration and body mass index (BMI) has been shown. We assessed the relation between changes in sleep duration and changes in body weight and body composition during weight loss...

  20. Treatment of Obesity: Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Bruce M; Kvach, Elizaveta; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-05-27

    This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying, and indications for, bariatric surgery in the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as other expected benefits of this intervention. The fundamental basis for bariatric surgery for the purpose of accomplishing weight loss is the determination that severe obesity is a disease associated with multiple adverse effects on health, which can be reversed or improved by successful weight loss in patients who have been unable to sustain weight loss by nonsurgical means. An explanation of possible indications for weight loss surgery as well as specific bariatric surgical procedures is presented, along with review of the safety literature of such procedures. Procedures that are less invasive or those that involve less gastrointestinal rearrangement accomplish considerably less weight loss but have substantially lower perioperative and longer-term risk. The ultimate benefit of weight reduction relates to the reduction of the comorbidities, quality of life, and all-cause mortality. With weight loss being the underlying justification for bariatric surgery in ameliorating CVD risk, current evidence-based research is discussed concerning body fat distribution, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, inflammation, obstructive sleep apnea, and others. The rationale for bariatric surgery reducing CVD events is discussed and juxtaposed with impacts on all-cause mortalities. Given the improvement of established obesity-related CVD risk factors after weight loss, it is reasonable to expect a reduction of CVD events and related mortality after weight loss in populations with obesity. The quality of the current evidence is reviewed, and future research opportunities and summaries are stated. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Treatment of Obesity: Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Bruce M.; Kvach, Elizaveta; Eckel, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying, and indications for, bariatric surgery in the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as other expected benefits of this intervention. The fundamental basis for bariatric surgery for the purpose of accomplishing weight loss is the determination that severe obesity is a disease associated with multiple adverse effects on health which can be reversed or improved by successful weight loss in patients who have been unable to sustain weight loss by non-surgical means. An explanation of possible indications for weight loss surgery as well as specific bariatric surgical procedures is presented, along with review of the safety literature of such procedures. Procedures that are less invasive or those that involve less gastrointestinal rearrangement accomplish considerably less weight loss but have substantially lower perioperative and longer-term risk. The ultimate benefit of weight reduction relates to the reduction of the co-morbidities, quality of life and all-cause mortality. With weight loss being the underlying justification for bariatric surgery in ameliorating CVD risk, current evidence-based research is discussed concerning body fat distribution, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, obstructive sleep apnea and others. The rationale for bariatric surgery reducing CVD events is discussed and juxtaposed with impacts on all-cause mortalities. Given the improvement of established obesity-related CVD risk factors following weight loss, it is reasonable to expect a reduction of CVD events and related mortality following weight loss in populations with obesity. The quality of the current evidence is reviewed and future research opportunities and summaries are stated. PMID:27230645

  2. Motivational Factors Predict Weight Loss in Rural Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jill R; Yates, Bernice C; Houfek, Julia; Briner, Wayne; Schmid, Kendra K; Pullen, Carol H

    2016-05-01

    The objective was to: (a) describe the changes over time in motivational factors of weight loss and (b) to examine predictors of weight loss in rural adults enrolled in a weight loss program. A longitudinal study was conducted in a convenience sample of 50 adults recruited from a rural Young Men's Christian Association. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (preprogram), 1, 2 and 3 months (end of program). Mean age was 42.4 (SD ± 11.8); 84% were female and mean BMI was 32.9 (SD ± 4.3). Individuals lost an average of 12.1 pounds. Barriers to healthy eating decreased significantly over time (p < .001). Significant predictors of weight loss included gender (β = .501, p < .001), and the amount of change between baseline and 3 months in controlled regulation (β = .270, p < .05), barriers to healthy eating (β = -0.225, p < .05), and physical activity (β = .238, p < .05) explaining 45% of the variance (F[(8, 41] = 5.92, p < .001) in weight loss. Rural adults were more likely to lose weight if they had higher levels of controlled regulation, if barriers were reduced, and if physical activity levels increased during the 3-month weight loss program. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Telomere length elongation after weight loss intervention in obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carulli, L; Anzivino, C; Baldelli, E; Zenobii, M F; Rocchi, M B L; Bertolotti, M

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres may be considered markers of biological aging, shorter telomere length is associated with some age-related diseases; in several studies short telomere length has also been associated to obesity in adults and adolescents. However the relationship between telomere complex functions and obesity is still not clear. Aim of the study was to assess telomere length (TL) in adults' obese subjects before and after weight loss obtained by placement of bioenteric intragastric balloon (BIB) for 6months. We enrolled 42 obese subjects before and after BIB placement as weight loss intervention. Blood samples were collected in order to obtain DNA from leukocyte to measure TL by quantitative PCR. Data were analyzed only in 37 subjects with complete data; all presented important body weight loss (124.06±26.7 vs 105.40±23.14, pweight loss (r=0.44, p=0.007) as well as an inverse correlation between TL at baseline and TL elongation (r=-0.35, p=0.03).The predictors of TL elongation were once again weight loss and short TL at baseline (respectively p=0.007 and p=0.003). Our study shows that weight loss is associated to telomere lengthening in a positive correlation: the greater weight loss the greater telomere lengthening; moreover telomere lengthening is more significant in those subjects with shortest telomeres at baseline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment in Antipsychotic Treated Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Ginger E.; Kolko, Rachel P.; Mills, Monica; Gunnarsdottir, Thrudur; Yingling, Michael D.; Schweiger, Julia A.; Lenze, Eric J.; Newcomer, John W.; Wilfley, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic-treated youth have increased risk for the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Behavioral weight loss treatments show promise in reducing obesity and diabetes risk in antipsychotic treated adults, but have received no study in antipsychotic treated youth. Objective We describe a rationale for behavioral weight loss interventions in high-weight antipsychotic treated youth, and report behavioral, anthropomorphic, and metabolic findings from a case series of obese antipsychotic-treated adolescents participating in a short-term, family-based behavioral weight loss intervention. Methods We adapted the Traffic Light Plan, a 16-week family-based weight loss intervention that promotes healthy energy balance using the colors of the traffic light to categorize the nutritional value of foods and intensity of physical activity, adapting a social ecological framework to address health behavior change in multiple social contexts. The intervention was administered to three obese adolescents with long-term antipsychotic medication exposure. Efficacy of the intervention was evaluated with a battery of anthropomorphic and metabolic assessments including weight, body mass index percentile, whole body adiposity, liver fat content, and fasting plasma glucose and lipids. Participants and their parents also filled out a treatment satisfaction questionnaire upon study completion. Results Two males and 1 female (all aged 14 years) participated. All 3 participants attended all 16 sessions, and experienced beneficial changes in adiposity, fasting lipids and liver fat content associated with weight stabilization or weight loss. Adolescents and their parents all reported a high level of satisfaction with the treatment. Conclusions Family-based behavioral weight loss treatment can be feasibly delivered and is acceptable to antipsychotic-treated youth and their families. Randomized controlled trials are needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability

  5. Preoperative Weight Loss and Operative Outcome After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Seki, Yosuke; Haruta, Hidenori; Kikkawa, Eri; Kasama, Kazunori

    2017-10-01

    Use of a preoperative diet before bariatric surgery to improve postoperative complications and weight loss has been reported. However, evidence supporting this diet for laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is insufficient. We aimed to investigate postoperative outcomes influenced by preoperative diet before LSG. This study included 247 patients who underwent LSG after preoperative weight management. They were classified according to preoperative weight changes (group 1, weight gain; group 2, 0-3.0% total weight loss (TWL); group 3, 3.1-5.0% TWL; group 4, >5.1% TWL) and investigated for early postoperative complications and weight loss at 1 year. There were 37 patients in group 1, 79 in group 2, 64 in group 3, and 67 in group 4. There were no statistical differences in initial physical status among the 4 groups. The median BMI declined to 27.6 kg/m2 in the entire group. Although the average %TWL during the combined preoperative and postoperative periods showed no statistical differences (P = 0.69), the average %TWL during the postoperative period decreased gradually as the extent of preoperative weight loss increased (P = 0.01). The early postoperative complication rate for the entire group was 6.9%; it tended to be lower as the extent of preoperative weight loss increased. However, a multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that the preoperative diet was not a statistical predictor of reduced early postoperative complications (P = 0.28). The extent of preoperative weight loss statistically affected postoperative weight loss. A preoperative diet might have minor advantages in reducing the risk of early postoperative complications.

  6. Breast cancer survivors' experience of making weight, dietary and physical activity changes during participation in a weight loss intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Caroline O; Lawler, Sheleigh P; Spathonis, Kym; Eakin, Elizabeth G; Reeves, Marina M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore breast cancer survivors' experience of a weight loss intervention and identify potential facilitators and barriers of initiating and maintaining weight, dietary or physical activity changes. Fourteen women randomised to and completing the 12-month weight loss intervention completed semi-structured interviews 7.5 ± 0.5 months after intervention completion. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted whereby interviews were independently coded and themes identified. Women were (mean ± SD) 55.6 ± 8.5 years, 30.2 ± 4.6 kg/m2 and 17.1 ± 3.4 months post-diagnosis at study baseline. Four themes emerged: (1) perceived motivation to participate in the intervention, (2) facilitators, (3) challenges and (4) maintenance of weight loss and behaviour changes. All women noted the impact of social/family environments, either to facilitate (e.g., support from family members) or impede (e.g., major family event) changes. The structure and support of the intervention, particularly accountability to their coach, was also seen as facilitating. Formation of habitual physical activity facilitated dietary changes. Dietary change strategies most perceived to facilitate weight loss were reducing energy intake by dietary self-monitoring, increasing vegetable intake and portion control. Challenges included breast cancer-specific issues such as post-diagnosis weight gain, treatment-related side effects and psychological issues around readiness to change and self-regulation. Diminished accountability following intervention completion impacted the maintenance of weight loss and behaviour changes, notably dietary self-monitoring. Results suggest that formal involvement of a support person (e.g. family member/friend) and referring women to ongoing, community-based services to maintain patient-perceived accountability may be particularly useful strategies for future weight loss intervention trials targeting women with breast cancer.

  7. Repeated lifestyle interventions lead to progressive weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Sune; Ritz, Christian; Verdich, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: This study aimed to investigate whether repeated lifestyle interventions lead to progressive weight loss or to weight cycling. METHODS: A retrospective review chart study with follow-up on 2120 participants (mean±SD age 36±15 years; body weight 116±28 kg; fat 43±6%). All had participated...... in one to four 11-12 week lifestyle interventions (residential weight loss programme, mixed activities). Weight loss was promoted through a hypocaloric diet (-500 to -700 kcal/day) and daily physical activity (1-3 hours/day). Primary outcomes were weight loss and change in body composition (bioimpedance...... interventions decreased with the number of interventions (2.4, 2.2, 2.1 and 1.4). Rates of weight loss during the interventions ranged from 0.70±0.06 to 1.06±0.01 kg/week and the maximum weight regain during the follow-up periods was 0.039±0.007 kg/week. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated relatively short lifestyle...

  8. Sleep duration and weight loss among overweight/obese women enrolled in a behavioral weight loss program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, E M; Fava, J; Subak, L L; Stone, K; Hart, C N; Demos, K; Wing, R

    2012-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether baseline sleep duration predicts weight loss outcomes in a randomized controlled trial examining a behavioral weight loss (BWL) intervention among overweight and obese (OW/OB) women with urinary incontinence; and whether participation in the BWL intervention is associated with changes in sleep duration. Longitudinal, clinical intervention study of a 6-month BWL program. Three hundred sixteen OW/OB women, with urinary incontinence (age: 30-81 years, body mass index (BMI; 25-50 kg m(-2)) enrolled from July 2004-April 2006. Measured height and weight, self-report measures of demographics, sleep and physical activity. Neither self-reported total sleep time (TST) nor time in bed (TIB) at baseline significantly predicted weight loss outcomes among OW/OB women in a BWL treatment. BWL treatment was successful regardless of how much subjects reported sleeping at baseline, with an average weight loss of 8.19 kg for OW/OB women receiving BWL treatment, versus a weight loss of 1.44 kg in the control condition. Similarly, changes in weight, BMI and incontinence episodes did not significantly predict changes in sleep duration or TIB across the treatment period. Although epidemiological and cross-sectional studies support a relationship between short sleep and increased BMI, the present study found no significant relationship between TST or TIB and weight loss for OW/OB women participating in a BWL treatment.

  9. Strategies for determining soil-loss tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Earl B.

    1988-11-01

    Excessive soil losses due to erosion or lateral displacement by machinery impair productivity. Some soil loss is tolerable, but not so much that plant productivity diminishes. Thus productivity is the dominant concern in determining soil-loss tolerance. The effects of soil loss on productivity, however, are difficult to determine. Therefore, two alternatives are discussed for determining the limits of soil loss, or soil-loss tolerance. These alternatives are the maintenance of soil organic matter and, for shallow and moderately deep soils, the maintenance of soil depth. They are not new strategies, but our rapidly increasing knowledge of the dynamics of soil organic matter and the rates of soil formation from bedrock or consolidated sediments warrants the reconsideration of these alternatives. Reductions in either soil organic matter or the depth of shallow or moderately deep soils will lead to declining productivity. Soil organic matter, considered to be a surrogate for productivity, is much easier to monitor than is productivity. Also, there are many computer models for predicting the effects of management on soil organic matter. Recently compiled data on rates of soil formation suggest that soil losses of 1 t/a (2.24 Mg/ha yr) are greater than the rate of replenishment by the weathering of lithic or paralithic material in all but very wet climates.

  10. Thyroid hormones and changes in body weight and metabolic parameters in response to weight loss diets: the POUNDS LOST trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Liang, L; Bray, G A; Qi, L; Hu, F B; Rood, J; Sacks, F M; Sun, Q

    2017-06-01

    The role of thyroid hormones in diet-induced weight loss and subsequent weight regain is largely unknown. To examine the associations between thyroid hormones and changes in body weight and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a diet-induced weight loss setting. Data analysis was conducted among 569 overweight and obese participants aged 30-70 years with normal thyroid function participating in the 2-year Prevention of Obesity Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS) LOST randomized clinical trial. Changes in body weight and RMR were assessed during the 2-year intervention. Thyroid hormones (free triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (T4), total T3, total T4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)), anthropometric measurements and biochemical parameters were assessed at baseline, 6 months and 24 months. Participants lost an average of 6.6 kg of body weight during the first 6 months and subsequently regained an average of 2.7 kg of body weight over the remaining period from 6 to 24 months. Baseline free T3 and total T3 were positively associated, whereas free T4 was inversely associated, with baseline body weight, body mass index and RMR. Total T4 and TSH were not associated with these parameters. Higher baseline free T3 and free T4 levels were significantly associated with a greater weight loss during the first 6 months (Pweight. Comparing extreme tertiles, the multivariate-adjusted weight loss±s.e. was -3.87±0.9 vs -5.39±0.9 kg for free T3 (Ptrend=0.02) and -4.09±0.9 vs -5.88±0.9 kg for free T4 (Ptrend=0.004). The thyroid hormones did not predict weight regain in 6-24 months. A similar pattern of associations was also observed between baseline thyroid hormones and changes in RMR. In addition, changes in free T3 and total T3 levels were positively associated with changes in body weight, RMR, body fat mass, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, triglycerides and leptin at 6 months and 24 months (all Pweight loss setting, higher baseline free T3 and free T4

  11. Weight-loss surgery - after - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart disease Gastric bypass surgery Laparoscopic gastric banding Obstructive sleep apnea - adults Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Gastric bypass surgery - discharge Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge Weight-loss surgery - before - what to ask your doctor Your ...

  12. Weight-loss surgery - before - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart disease Gastric bypass surgery Laparoscopic gastric banding Obstructive sleep apnea - adults Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Gastric bypass surgery - discharge Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge Weight-loss surgery - after - what to ask your doctor Your ...

  13. Gut Bacteria Changes After Some Weight-Loss Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165987.html Gut Bacteria Changes After Some Weight-Loss Surgeries Better diversity ... Specifically, the procedure leads to increased diversity of bacteria in the gut, and a microbial population distinct ...

  14. Metabolism and Weight Loss: How You Burn Calories

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... guidelines_and_more/catalog_guidelines/catalog_endocrine_guidelines/obesity__adults/. Accessed June 7, 2017. Beware of products promoting miracle weight loss. Food and Drug Administration. https://www.fda.gov/ ...

  15. Orlistat for obesity: benefits beyond weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Jung; Wang, Pei-Wen; Liu, Rue-Tsuan; Tung, Shih-Chen; Chien, Wen-Yen; Chen, Jung-Fu; Chen, Chen-Hsiong; Kuo, Ming-Chun; Hu, Ya-Hui

    2005-01-01

    Orlistat lowers lipids and improves insulin sensitivity, but its effect on other metabolic syndrome related parameters is not known. To assess its influence on adiponectin, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and other metabolic syndrome related parameters, this study enrolled 106 participants in a weight-reduction program and categorized them into a group of 51 who had been treated with orlistat 360 mg/day for one year and a group of 55 age and sex and body mass index (BMI) matched controls. The orlistat group had greater changes in BMI, % body fat (% BF), waist circumference, and insulin resistance, hs-CRP, leptin and adiponectin levels after one year on the program than the controls. After adjusting for % BF and waist circumference, change of serum leptin and adiponectin levels remained significantly different. It was found that orlistat could effectively manage obesity related co-morbidities, especially insulin resistance and atherosclerosis risk. It decreases leptin and increases adiponectin independent of % BF and waist circumference. Therefore, orlistat appears to have anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic properties and may help prevent metabolic syndrome in the overweight people.

  16. Individual Hearing Loss: Characterization, Modelling, Compensation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully...... account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR...

  17. Intracranial germinoma presenting as anorexia and unexplained weight loss

    OpenAIRE

    Shashank Kraleti; David Nelsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe a patient with germinoma of pineal body who presented with anorexia and unexplained weight loss of 70 pounds. Case Summary: A 23-year-old man with no significant past medical history presented with nausea, vomiting, anorexia and weight loss of 70 pounds over a period of 6–8 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans demonstrated tumor lesions that were confirmed as germinoma histologically. A good treatment response to surgery, radiation, chemot...

  18. Obesity-induced lymphatic dysfunction is reversible with weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitti, Matthew D; Hespe, Geoffrey E; Kataru, Raghu P; García Nores, Gabriela D; Savetsky, Ira L; Torrisi, Jeremy S; Gardenier, Jason C; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Mehrara, Babak J

    2016-12-01

    Obesity induces lymphatic leakiness, decreases initial lymphatic vessel density, impairs collecting vessel pumping and decreases transport of macromolecules. Obesity results in perilymphatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and accumulation of T cells and macrophages. Deleterious effects of obesity on the lymphatic system correlate with weight gain. Weight loss restores lymphatic function in obese animals and decreases perilymphatic iNOS and inflammatory cell accumulation. Although clinical and experimental studies have shown that obesity results in lymphatic dysfunction, it remains unknown whether these changes are permanent or reversible with weight loss. In the current study, we used a mouse model of diet-induced obesity to identify putative cellular mechanisms of obesity-induced lymphatic dysfunction, determine whether there is a correlation between these deleterious effects and increasing weight gain, and finally examine whether lymphatic dysfunction is reversible with diet-induced weight loss. We report that obesity is negatively correlated with cutaneous lymphatic collecting vessel pumping rate (r = -0.9812, P weight gain and accumulation of perilymphatic inflammatory cells (r = 0.9872, P Weight loss resulting from conversion to a normal chow diet for 8 weeks resulted in more than a 25% decrease in body weight and normalized cutaneous lymphatic collecting vessel pumping rate, lymphatic vessel density, lymphatic leakiness, and lymphatic macromolecule clearance (all P weight loss markedly decreased perilymphatic inflammation and iNOS expression. Taken together, our findings show that obesity is linearly correlated with lymphatic dysfunction, perilymphatic inflammation and iNOS expression, and that weight loss via dietary modification effectively reverses these deleterious effects. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  19. Obesity: Risk factors, complications, and strategies for sustainable long-term weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruh, Sharon M

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this article are to review the effects of obesity on health and well-being and the evidence indicating they can be ameliorated by weight loss, and consider weight-management strategies that may help patients achieve and maintain weight loss. Narrative review based on literature searches of PubMed up to May 2016 with no date limits imposed. Search included terms such as "obesity," "overweight," "weight loss," "comorbidity," "diabetes," cardiovascular," "cancer," "depression," "management," and "intervention." Over one third of U.S. adults have obesity. Obesity is associated with a range of comorbidities, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and cancer; however, modest weight loss in the 5%-10% range, and above, can significantly improve health-related outcomes. Many individuals struggle to maintain weight loss, although strategies such as realistic goal-setting and increased consultation frequency can greatly improve the success of weight-management programs. Nurse practitioners have key roles in establishing weight-loss targets, providing motivation and support, and implementing weight-loss programs. With their in-depth understanding of the research in the field of obesity and weight management, nurse practitioners are well placed to effect meaningful changes in weight-management strategies deployed in clinical practice. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  20. Weight loss methods and changes in eating habits among successful weight losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Sirpa; Mustajoki, Pertti; Eriksson, Johan G

    2016-01-01

    Changes in several lifestyle related factors are required for successful long-term weight loss. Identification of these factors is of major importance from a public health point of view. This study was based upon findings from the Finnish Weight Control Registry (FWCR), a web-based registry. In total, 316 people were recruited and 184 met the study inclusion criteria. The aims of this study were to assess means and typical changes in eating habits associated with successful long-term weight loss. Half of the participants (48%) reported that they lost weight slowly primarily with dietary changes. Self-weighing frequency was high, 92% was weighing themselves at least once a week during the weight loss phase, and 75% during the maintenance phase. Dietary aspects associated with successful weight loss and weight maintenance included an increase in intake of vegetables, a reduction in frequency of eating candies and fast food, regular meal frequency and application of the Plate model. Both slow and fast weight loss may lead to successful long-term results and weight maintenance. A decrease in energy intake was achieved by reducing intake of energy-dense food, applying the Plate model and by regular meal frequency. Key messages Successful long-term weight loss is associated with a reduction in intake of energy-dense food. A more regular meal frequency and a high frequency of self-weighing seem to be helpful.

  1. Hurricane Loss Analysis Based on the Population-Weighted Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Kakareko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses different measures for quantifying regional hurricane loss. The main measures used in the past are normalized percentage loss and dollar value loss. In this research, we show that these measures are useful but may not properly reflect the size of the population influenced by hurricanes. A new loss measure is proposed that reflects the hurricane impact on people occupying the structure. For demonstrating the differences among these metrics, regional loss analysis was conducted for Florida. The regional analysis was composed of three modules: the hazard module stochastically modeled the wind occurrence in the region; the vulnerability module utilized vulnerability functions developed in this research to calculate the loss; and the financial module quantified the hurricane loss. In the financial module, we calculated three loss metrics for certain region. The first metric is the average annual loss (AAL which represents the expected loss per year in percentage. The second is the average annual dollar loss which represents the expected dollar amount loss per year. The third is the average annual population-weighted loss (AAPL—a new measure proposed in this research. Compared with the AAL, the AAPL reflects the number of people influenced by the hurricane. The advantages of the AAPL are illustrated using three different analysis examples: (1 conventional regional loss analysis, (2 mitigation potential analysis, and (3 forecasted future loss analysis due to the change in population.

  2. Cardiometabolic results from an armband-based weight loss trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieverdes JC

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available John C Sieverdes, Xuemei Sui, Gregory A Hand, Vaughn W Barry, Sara Wilcox, Rebecca A Meriwether, James W Hardin, Amanda C McClain, Steven N BlairDepartment of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USAPurpose: This report examines the blood chemistry and blood pressure (BP results from the Lifestyle Education for Activity and Nutrition (LEAN study, a randomized weight loss trial. A primary purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of real-time self-monitoring of energy balance (using the SenseWearTM Armband, BodyMedia, Inc Pittsburgh, PA on these health factors.Methods: 164 sedentary overweight or obese adults (46.8 ± 10.8 years; BMI 33.3 ± 5.2 kg/m2; 80% women took part in the 9-month study. Participants were randomized into 4 conditions: a standard care condition with an evidence-based weight loss manual (n = 40, a group-based behavioral weight loss program (n = 44, an armband alone condition (n = 41, and a group plus armband (n = 39 condition. BP, fasting blood lipids and glucose were measured at baseline and 9 months.Results: 99 participants (60% completed both baseline and follow-up measurements for BP and blood chemistry analysis. Missing data were handled by baseline carried forward. None of the intervention groups had significant changes in blood lipids or BP when compared to standard care after adjustment for covariates, though within-group lowering was found for systolic BP in group and group + armband conditions, a rise in total cholesterol and LDL were found in standard care and group conditions, and a lowering of triglycerides was found in the two armband conditions. Compared with the standard care condition, fasting glucose decreased significantly for participants in the group, armband, and group + armband conditions (all P < 0.05, respectively.Conclusion: Our results suggest that using an armband program is an effective strategy to decrease fasting blood glucose. This indicates that devices, such as

  3. Weight-loss dieting behavior: an economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Odelia

    2012-07-01

    In light of the widespread phenomena of diet failure and excessive dieting, this paper presents a theoretical economic analysis of the decision-making process of weight-loss dieting. The paper incorporates behavioral elements involved in the process of dieting: effort exerted in dieting, influence of social norms concerning body weight, time-inconsistent present biased preferences, and a distinction between naiveté and sophistication. The model explains cyclic dieting and provides interesting insights on the extent of weight-loss dieting. The extent of dieting is an increasing function of initial body weight and a decreasing function of the effort exerted in dieting and the strength of social norms concerning ideal weight. Income and diet strictness have an ambiguous effect. In addition, greater dieting efforts are not necessarily balanced against a slowdown in body metabolism or a higher initial body weight. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Pretreatment fasting plasma glucose modifies dietary weight loss maintenance success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads Fiil; Due, Anette; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FI) were studied as diet-specific prognostic markers for successful weight loss maintenance in participants with overweight. METHODS: After losing ≥ 8% of body weight, participants received one of three ad libitum diets for 6...

  5. Weight Loss: Choosing a Diet That's Right for You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health benefits, including improving your mood, strengthening your cardiovascular system and reducing your risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. And exercise is an important factor in maintaining weight loss. People who get regular physical activity may be more likely to maintain their weight ...

  6. Massive weight loss-induced mechanical plasticity in obese gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobagyi, Tibor; Herring, Cortney; Pories, Walter J.; Rider, Patrick; DeVita, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Hortobagyi T, Herring C, Pories WJ, Rider P, DeVita P. Massive weight loss-induced mechanical plasticity in obese gait. J Appl Physiol 111: 1391-1399, 2011. First published August 18, 2011; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00291.2011.-We examined the hypothesis that metabolic surgery-induced massive weight

  7. Belly Fat in Men: Why Weight Loss Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you're not physically active. Loss of muscle mass decreases the rate at which your body uses ... they do in their 30s due to this muscle loss. Your genes also can ... weight gain, despite your age and genetics. Drinking excess alcohol ...

  8. The Influence of Sleep Disordered Breathing on Weight Loss in a National Weight Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janney, Carol A.; Kilbourne, Amy M.; Germain, Anne; Lai, Zongshan; Hoerster, Katherine D.; Goodrich, David E.; Klingaman, Elizabeth A.; Verchinina, Lilia; Richardson, Caroline R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the influence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) on weight loss in overweight/obese veterans enrolled in MOVE!, a nationally implemented behavioral weight management program delivered by the National Veterans Health Administration health system. Methods: This observational study evaluated weight loss by SDB status in overweight/obese veterans enrolled in MOVE! from May 2008–February 2012 who had at least two MOVE! visits, baseline weight, and at least one follow-up weight (n = 84,770). SDB was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Primary outcome was weight change (lb) from MOVE! enrollment to 6- and 12-mo assessments. Weight change over time was modeled with repeated-measures analyses. Results: SDB was diagnosed in one-third of the cohort (n = 28,269). At baseline, veterans with SDB weighed 29 [48] lb more than those without SDB (P Weight loss patterns over time were statistically different between veterans with and without SDB (P weight (−2.5 [0.1] lb) compared to those without SDB (−3.3 [0.1] lb; P = 0.001) at 6 months. At 12 mo, veterans with SDB continued to lose weight whereas veterans without SDB started to re-gain weight. Conclusions: Veterans with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) had significantly less weight loss over time than veterans without SDB. SDB should be considered in the development and implementation of weight loss programs due to its high prevalence and negative effect on health. Citation: Janney CA, Kilbourne AM, Germain A, Lai Z, Hoerster KD, Goodrich DE, Klingaman EA, Verchinina L, Richardson CR. The influence of sleep disordered breathing on weight loss in a national weight management program. SLEEP 2016;39(1):59–65. PMID:26350475

  9. Weight problems and spam e-mail for weight loss products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Joshua; Shlivko, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on young adult behaviors with regard to spam e-mails that sell weight loss products. Participants (N = 200) with and without weight problems were asked if they received, opened, and bought products from spam e-mail about weight loss topics in the past year. Psychological factors of self-esteem and perceived stress were measured. Those with weight problems had significantly greater percentages than those without weight problems for receiving (87.7% vs. 73.3%, P = 0.02), opening (41.5% vs. 17.8%, P spam e-mails.

  10. Weight-Loss Expectancies, Relative Weight, and Symptoms of Bulimia in Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Dennis L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A canonical correlation analysis of various weight concerns in a sample of college women revealed that strong expectations of weight loss benefits and a high relative body weight were positively correlated with the four major symptoms of bulimia. Expectations of increased self-worth and social confidence were linked to eating problems. (RJM)

  11. Rise of plasma ghrelin with weight loss is not sustained during weight maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is postulated to be an orexigenic signal that promotes weight regain after weight loss (WL). However, it is not known whether this putative effect of ghrelin is sustained after weight stabilization. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of plasma ghrelin concentrati...

  12. Pretreatment fasting plasma glucose modifies dietary weight loss maintenance success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads Fiil; Due, Anette; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FI) were studied as diet-specific prognostic markers for successful weight loss maintenance in participants with overweight. METHODS: After losing ≥ 8% of body weight, participants received one of three ad libitum diets for 6.......12 to -0.43]; P = 0.020). The addition of FI strengthened these associations. CONCLUSIONS: Slightly elevated pretreatment FPG determined success in dietary weight loss maintenance among overweight patients on ad libitum diets differing in macronutrient and fiber content....

  13. Psychological predictors of weight loss after bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz; Dela, Flemming; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Background: Morbid obesity is the fastest growing BMI group in the U.S. and the prevalence of morbid obesity worldwide has never been higher. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe forms of obesity especially with regardto a sustained long-term weight loss. Psychological...... of surgical weight loss.Methods: We searched PubMed, PsycInfo and Web of Science, for original prospectivestudies with a sample size >30 and at least one year follow-up, using a combina-tion of search terms such as ‘bariatric surgery’, ‘morbid obesity’, ‘psychologicalpredictors’, and ‘weight loss’. Only...

  14. Concomitant changes in sleep duration and body weight and body composition during weight loss and 3-mo weight maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; Camps, Stefan G J A; Gonnissen, Hanne K J; Westerterp, Klaas R; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-07-01

    An inverse relation between sleep duration and body mass index (BMI) has been shown. We assessed the relation between changes in sleep duration and changes in body weight and body composition during weight loss. A total of 98 healthy subjects (25 men), aged 20-50 y and with BMI (in kg/m(2)) from 28 to 35, followed a 2-mo very-low-energy diet that was followed by a 10-mo period of weight maintenance. Body weight, body composition (measured by using deuterium dilution and air-displacement plethysmography), eating behavior (measured by using a 3-factor eating questionnaire), physical activity (measured by using the validated Baecke's questionnaire), and sleep (estimated by using a questionnaire with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale) were assessed before and immediately after weight loss and 3- and 10-mo follow-ups. The average weight loss was 10% after 2 mo of dieting and 9% and 6% after 3- and 10-mo follow-ups, respectively. Daytime sleepiness and time to fall asleep decreased during weight loss. Short (≤7 h) and average (>7 to sleep duration, whereas sleep duration in long sleepers (≥9 h) did not change significantly during weight loss. This change in sleep duration was concomitantly negatively correlated with the change in BMI during weight loss and after the 3-mo follow-up and with the change in fat mass after the 3-mo follow-up. Sleep duration benefits from weight loss or vice versa. Successful weight loss, loss of body fat, and 3-mo weight maintenance in short and average sleepers are underscored by an increase in sleep duration or vice versa. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01015508.

  15. Relationship between sleep quality and quantity and weight loss in women participating in a weight-loss intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia A; Morrow, Kelly L; Flatt, Shirley W; Wertheim, Betsy C; Perfect, Michelle M; Ravia, Jennifer J; Sherwood, Nancy E; Karanja, Njeri; Rock, Cheryl L

    2012-07-01

    Evidence suggests that individuals who report fewer total hours of sleep are more likely to be overweight or obese. Few studies have prospectively evaluated weight-loss success in relation to reported sleep quality and quantity. This analysis sought to determine the association between sleep characteristics and weight loss in overweight or obese women enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of a weight-loss program. We hypothesized that in overweight/obese women, significant weight loss would be demonstrated more frequently in women who report a better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) Global Score or sleep >7 h/night as compared to women who report a worse PSQI score or sleep ≤7 h/night. Women of ages 45.5 ± 10.4 (mean ± SD) years and BMI of 33.9 ± 3.3 (n = 245) were randomized and completed PSQI at baseline and 6 months; 198 had weight change assessed through 24 months. At baseline, 52.7% reported PSQI scores above the clinical cutoff of 5. Better subjective sleep quality increased the likelihood of weight-loss success by 33% (relative risk (RR), 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52-0.86), as did sleeping >7 h/night. A worse Global Score at 6 months was associated with a 28% lower likelihood of continued successful weight loss at 18 months, but unassociated by 24 months. These results suggest that sleep quality and quantity may contribute to weight loss in intervention-based studies designed to promote weight control in overweight/obese adult women.

  16. Can't wait to lose weight? Characterizing temporal discounting parameters for weight-loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Lark; Bruce, Amanda S

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is often related to steeper temporal discounting, that is, higher decision impulsivity for immediate rewards over delayed rewards. However, previous studies have measured temporal discounting parameters through monetary rewards. The aim of this study was to develop a temporal discounting measure based on weight-loss rewards, which may help to understand decision-making mechanisms more closely related to body weight regulation. After having their heights and weights measured, healthy young adults completed the Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ), and an adapted version of the MCQ, with weight-loss as a reward. Participants also completed self-reports that measure obesity-related cognitive variables. For 42 participants who expressed a desire to lose weight, weight-loss rewards were discounted over time and had a positive correlation with temporal discounting for monetary rewards. Higher temporal discounting for weight loss rewards (i.e., preference for immediate weight loss) showed correlations with beliefs that obesity is under obese persons' control and largely due to lack of willpower, while temporal discounting parameters for monetary rewards did not. Taken together, our weight loss temporal discounting measure demonstrated both convergent and divergent validity, which can be utilized for future obesity research and interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Obesity: the allostatic load of weight loss dieting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Angelo; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2012-04-12

    The obesity epidemic that is prevailing in most countries of the world is generally attributed to the increased amount of opportunities to be in positive energy balance in a context of modernity. This obviously refers not only to sedentariness and unhealthy eating that may dominate life habits of many individuals but also to unsuspected non-caloric factors which produce discrete allostatic changes in the body. In this paper, the focus is put on the impact of some of these factors with the preoccupation to document the allostatic burden of weight loss. Thus, beyond the fact that modernity favors opportunities to eat much and not to be active, the proposed conceptual integration leads to the conclusion that a modern lifestyle makes weight loss more difficult for obese individuals. In addition to the natural effects of weight loss favoring resistance to lose fat, a lifestyle promoting shorter sleep duration and more cognitive demand produces allostatic changes that may interfere with weight loss. The case of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is also discussed as an example of the potential detrimental effects of a contaminated environment on metabolic processes involved in the control of energy expenditure. Taken together, these observations suggest that weight loss is more than ever a search for compromise between its metabolic benefits and its allostatic effects promoting body weight regain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypertension in Obesity and the Impact of Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jordana B

    2017-08-24

    Several interrelated mechanisms promote the development of hypertension in obesity, often contributing to end organ damage including cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. The treatment of hypertension in obesity is complicated by a high prevalence of resistant hypertension, as well as unpredictable hemodynamic effects of many medications. Weight loss stabilizes neurohormonal activity and causes clinically significant reductions in blood pressure. While lifestyle interventions can improve blood pressure, they fail to consistently yield sustained weight loss and have not demonstrated long-term benefits. Bariatric surgery provides more permanent weight reduction, corresponding with dramatic declines in blood pressure and attenuation of long-term cardiovascular risk. Hypertension is closely linked to the prevalence, pathophysiology, and morbidity of obesity. There are multiple barriers to managing hypertension in obesity. Surgical weight loss offers the most promise in reducing blood pressure and decreasing end organ damage in this patient population.

  19. Updates in weight loss surgery and gastrointestinal peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Maria Saur; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Madsbad, Sten

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy are referred to as 'metabolic surgery' due to hormonal shifts with impacts on diabetes remission and weight loss. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings in mechanisms underlying beneficial effects...... of weight loss surgery. RECENT FINDINGS: Importantly, gut hormone secretion is altered after RYGB and sleeve gastrectomy due to accelerated transit of nutrients to distal parts of the small intestine, leading to excessive release of L-cell peptide hormones [e.g. glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY......; as demonstrated by relapse of impaired glucose tolerance in studies blocking the GLP-1 receptor by exendin 9-39, and later after major weight loss increased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Gut hormone secretion changes towards a more anorectic profile and is likely important for less caloric intake and weight...

  20. Understanding the challenge of weight loss maintenance: a systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research on weight loss maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Colin; Poltawski, Leon; Garside, Ruth; Briscoe, Simon

    2017-06-01

    Behaviour change interventions can be effective in helping people to lose weight, but weight is often regained. Effective interventions are required to prevent this. We conducted a systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research on people's experiences of weight loss maintenance. We searched bibliographic databases for qualitative studies about the experience of currently or previously overweight adults trying to maintain weight loss. We thematically synthesised study findings to develop a model of weight loss maintenance. Twenty six studies from five countries with 710 participants were included. The model developed through our synthesis proposes that making the behaviour changes required for weight loss maintenance generates psychological 'tension' due to the need to override existing habits, and incompatibility of the new behaviours with the fulfilment of psychological needs. Successful maintenance involves management or resolution of this tension. Management of tension can be achieved through self-regulation, renewing of motivation and managing external influences, although this can require constant effort. Resolution may be achieved through changing habits, finding non-obesogenic methods for addressing needs, and potentially through change in self-concept. Implications for the development of weight loss maintenance interventions are explored.

  1. Effect of weight loss on cellulite: gynoid lypodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalls, Lola K; Hicks, Matthew; Passeretti, David; Gersin, Keith; Kitzmiller, W John; Bakhsh, Adel; Wickett, R Randall; Whitestone, Jennifer; Visscher, Marty O

    2006-08-01

    Gynoid lipodystrophy (cellulite) affects most women, and many seek plastic surgery consultation to improve appearance. Various products are offered, but the literature on the cause and treatment is limited. Understanding the biological and biophysical factors that affect severity may facilitate the development of effective therapies. There has been a dramatic increase in the number of people who have lost significant weight as a result of bariatric surgery or medically supervised weight programs. The effect of weight loss on cellulite severity has not been systematically studied and remains a common patient concern. The authors hypothesized that cellulite severity would decrease with weight loss and subsequent decrease in subcutaneous fat in most subjects. The authors examined the cellulite changes in female subjects who were enrolled in medically supervised weight loss programs using quantitative surface roughness by three-dimensional laser surface scanning, tissue composition by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, dermal-subcutaneous structure with three-dimensional ultrasound, and tissue elasticity with biomechanical measurements. The majority of subjects had an improvement in cellulite with weight loss, but the condition worsened for others. Improvement was associated with significant reductions in weight and percentage of thigh fat, significantly higher starting body mass index, and significantly greater initial severity. Cellulite worsened with a significantly smaller starting body mass index, smaller reductions in weight accompanied by no change in percentage of thigh fat, and significant increases in tissue compliance. Cellulite is a complex condition, and treatments such as weight loss have variable effects on the improvement or worsening of this condition. Additional studies are required to understand how the factors that influence and modulate cellulite severity, particularly those at the level of the subcutaneous tissue septa, can be manipulated to

  2. The effectiveness of breakfast recommendations on weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhurandhar, Emily J; Dawson, John; Alcorn, Amy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breakfast is associated with lower body weight in observational studies. Public health authorities commonly recommend breakfast consumption to reduce obesity, but the effectiveness of adopting these recommendations for reducing body weight is unknown.OBJECTIVE: We tested the relative...... effectiveness of a recommendation to eat or skip breakfast on weight loss in adults trying to lose weight in a free-living setting. DESIGN: We conducted a multisite, 16-wk, 3-parallel-arm randomized controlled trial in otherwise healthy overweight and obese adults [body mass index (in kg/m(2)) between 25 and 40...... were randomly assigned.RESULTS: A total of 283 of the 309 participants who were randomly assigned completed the intervention. Treatment assignment did not have a significant effect on weight loss, and there was no interaction between initial breakfast eating status and treatment. Among skippers, mean...

  3. Dietary and physical activity behaviors among adults successful at weight loss maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillespie Cathleen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited population-based data on behavioral factors found to be important for successful weight loss maintenance among adults. Methods Data from the 2004 Styles surveys, mailed to U.S. adults aged ≥18 years were used to examine the difference in selected weight loss strategies and attitudes among persons who reported successful weight loss attempts (lost weight and able to keep it off and persons who were not successful (previous attempts to lose weight were unsuccessful or they could not keep the lost weight off. Behaviors examined included modification of diet, leisure-time and sports activities, and self-monitoring, and barriers to weight management. Results Among adults who reported losing weight or trying to lose weight, 31.0% had been successful at both losing weight and maintenance after weight loss. Successful weight loss status differed by sex, age, and current weight status. Assessment of reported weight loss strategies, found that exercising ≥30 minutes/day and adding physical activity to daily life were significantly higher among successful versus unsuccessful weight losers. Individuals who were successful at weight loss and maintenance were less likely to use over-the-counter diet products than those who were unsuccessful at weight loss. Significantly more successful versus unsuccessful weight losers reported that on most days of the week they planned meals (35.9% vs. 24.9%, tracked calories (17.7% vs. 8.8%, tracked fat (16.4% vs. 6.6%, and measured food on plate (15.9% vs. 6.7%. Successful losers were also more likely to weigh themselves daily (20.3% vs. 11.0%. There were a significantly higher proportion of successful losers who reported lifting weights (19.0% versus unsuccessful (10.9%. The odds of being a successful weight loser were 48%–76% lower for those reporting exercise weight control barriers were influencing factors (e.g., no time, too tired to exercise, no one to exercise with, too

  4. Weight loss maintenance in relation to locus of control: The MedWeight study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Costas A; Fappa, Evaggelia; Karfopoulou, Eleni; Gkza, Anastasia; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2015-08-01

    Locus of control, i.e. the degree of an individual's belief on the control of his/her life, has been related to many health outcomes, including weight loss in overweight/obese individuals. No information is available on the impact of locus of control in maintaining weight loss. We aimed to investigate the effect of locus of control in weight loss maintenance and explore potential associations with lifestyle factors. Study participants included 239 individuals (41% males) who had lost at least 10% of body weight in the past and either maintained the loss (maintainers: weight maintenance of at least 10% of initial weight) or regained it (regainers). Locus of control was defined by a relevant multi-dimensional scale; participants were categorised to internals and externals, based on "internal" and "others" sub-scales. A significant interaction was found between locus of control and weight loss maintenance status (p locus of control. Individualised treatment, according to locus of control, may increase weight loss maintenance rates in former overweight/obese individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Subcutaneous fat loss is greater than visceral fat loss with diet and exercise, weight-loss promoting drugs and bariatric surgery: a critical review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlotti, C; Ceriani, V; Morabito, A; Pontiroli, A E

    2017-05-01

    Aim of this review is to compare visceral and subcutaneous fat loss with all available strategies (diet and exercise, weight-loss promoting agents and bariatric surgery). Eighty-nine studies, all full papers, were analyzed to evaluate visceral and subcutaneous fat changes, measured through ultrasound, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and expressed as thickness, weight, area and volume. Studies were included in a meta-analysis (random-effects model). Intervention effect (absolute and percent changes of visceral and subcutaneous fat) was expressed as standardized mean differences, with 95% confidence intervals. Publication bias was formally assessed. The result was that subcutaneous fat was greater than visceral fat when measured as area, volume and weight, not as thickness; decrease of subcutaneous fat was greater than visceral fat when measured as area, volume and weight, not as thickness; percent decrease of visceral fat was always greater than percent decrease of subcutaneous fat, with no differences between different strategies. No intervention preferentially targets visceral fat. Basal visceral fat depots are smaller than basal subcutaneous fat depots. Visceral fat loss is linked to subcutaneous fat loss. With all strategies, percent decrease of visceral fat prevails on subcutaneous fat loss.

  6. CPAP, weight loss, or both for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Julio A; Gurubhagavatula, Indira; Teff, Karen; Rader, Daniel J; Wadden, Thomas A; Townsend, Raymond; Foster, Gary D; Maislin, Greg; Saif, Hassam; Broderick, Preston; Chittams, Jesse; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Pack, Allan I

    2014-06-12

    Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea tend to coexist and are associated with inflammation, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and high blood pressure, but their causal relation to these abnormalities is unclear. We randomly assigned 181 patients with obesity, moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea, and serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) greater than 1.0 mg per liter to receive treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a weight-loss intervention, or CPAP plus a weight-loss intervention for 24 weeks. We assessed the incremental effect of the combined interventions over each one alone on the CRP level (the primary end point), insulin sensitivity, lipid levels, and blood pressure. Among the 146 participants for whom there were follow-up data, those assigned to weight loss only and those assigned to the combined interventions had reductions in CRP levels, insulin resistance, and serum triglyceride levels. None of these changes were observed in the group receiving CPAP alone. Blood pressure was reduced in all three groups. No significant incremental effect on CRP levels was found for the combined interventions as compared with either weight loss or CPAP alone. Reductions in insulin resistance and serum triglyceride levels were greater in the combined-intervention group than in the group receiving CPAP only, but there were no significant differences in these values between the combined-intervention group and the weight-loss group. In per-protocol analyses, which included 90 participants who met prespecified criteria for adherence, the combined interventions resulted in a larger reduction in systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure than did either CPAP or weight loss alone. In adults with obesity and obstructive sleep apnea, CPAP combined with a weight-loss intervention did not reduce CRP levels more than either intervention alone. In secondary analyses, weight loss provided an incremental reduction in insulin resistance and serum

  7. Neighborhood factors and six-month weight change among overweight individuals in a weight loss intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara D. Mendez, PhD, MPH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the neighborhood environment and the association with weight change among overweight/obese individuals in the first six months of a 12-month weight loss intervention, EMPOWER, from 2011 to 2015. Measures of the neighborhood environment included neighborhood racial composition, neighborhood income, and neighborhood food retail stores density (e.g., grocery stores. Weight was measured at baseline and 6 months and calculated as the percent weight change from baseline to 6 months. The analytic sample (N = 127 was 91% female and 81% white with a mean age of 51 (±10.4 years. At 6 months, the mean weight loss was 8.0 kg (±5.7, which was equivalent to 8.8% (±6% of baseline weight. Participants living in neighborhoods in which 25–75% of the residents identified as black had the greatest percentage of weight loss compared to those living in neighborhoods with 75% black residents. No other neighborhood measures were associated with weight loss. Future studies testing individual-level behavioral weight loss interventions need to consider the influence of neighborhood factors, and how neighborhood-level interventions could be enhanced with individual-level interventions that address behaviors and lifestyle changes.

  8. Outcomes of a Third Bariatric Procedure for Inadequate Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Ali; Romero-Talamás, Héctor; Corcelles, Ricard; Mackey, Jennifer; Rogula, Tomasz; Brethauer, Stacy A.; Schauer, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The robust volume of bariatric surgical procedures has led to significant numbers of patients requiring reoperative surgery because of undesirable results from primary operations. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety, and outcomes of the third bariatric procedure after previous attempts resulted in inadequate results. Methods: We retrospectively identified patients who underwent a third bariatric procedure for inadequate weight loss or significant weight regain after the second operation. Data were analyzed to establish patient demographic characteristics, perioperative parameters, and postoperative outcomes. Results: A total of 12 patients were identified. Before the first, second, and third procedures, patients had a mean body mass index of 67.1 ± 29.3 kg/m2, 60.9 ± 28.3 kg/m2, and 49.4 ± 19.8 kg/m2, respectively. The third operations (laparoscopic in 10 and open in 2) included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 5), revision of pouch and/or stoma of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 3), limb lengthening after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 3), and sleeve gastrectomy (n = 1). We encountered 5 early complications in 4 patients, and early reoperative intervention was needed in 2 patients. At 1-year follow-up, the excess weight loss of the cohort was 49.4% ± 33.8%. After a mean follow-up time of 43.0 ± 28.6 months, the body mass index of the cohort reached 39.9 ± 20.8 kg/m2, which corresponded to a mean excess weight loss of 54.4% ± 44.0% from the third operation. At the latest follow-up, 64% of patients had excess weight loss >50% and 45% had excess weight loss >80%. Conclusion: Reoperative bariatric surgery can be carried out successfully (often laparoscopically), even after 2 previous weight loss procedures. PMID:25392664

  9. Chili pepper as a body weight-loss food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Sharon; Kubatka, Peter; Rodrigo, Luis; Gazdikova, Katarina; Caprnda, Martin; Fedotova, Julia; Zulli, Anthony; Kruzliak, Peter; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2017-06-01

    Chili has culinary as well as medical importance. Studies in humans, using a wide range of doses of chili intake (varying from a single meal to a continuous uptake for up to 12 weeks), concluded that it facilitates weight loss. In regard to this, the main targets of chili are fat metabolism, energy expenditure, and thermogenesis. To induce weight loss, the active substance of chili, capsaicin, activates Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel sub-family V member 1 (TRPV1) channels) receptors causing an increase in intracellular calcium levels and triggering the sympathetic nervous system. Apart from TRPV1, chili directly reduces energy expenditure by activating Brown Adipose Tissue. Weight loss by chili is also the result of an improved control of insulin, which supports weight management and has positive effects for treatment for diseases like obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. This review summarizes the major pathways by which chili contributes to ameliorating parameters that help weight management and how the consumption of chili can help in accelerating weight loss through dietary modifications.

  10. Structural changes in the knee during weight loss maintenance after a significant weight loss in obese patients with osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M; Christensen, R; Hunter, D J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare structural knee joint changes in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) that after an intensive weight loss therapy were randomized to continuous dietetic support, a specialized knee exercise program, or 'no attention' for 1 year. METHODS: 192 obese individuals with knee...... (difference: -0.21 [95%CI -0.40:-0.03]) and "no attention" (difference: -0.26 [95%CI -0.44:-0.07]) groups. CONCLUSION: In this 1 year follow-up after weight-loss in obese knee OA patients, we found a potentially increased number of BMLs in the exercise group compared to the diet and no attention groups...... OA underwent an intensive 16-week weight loss program with subsequent randomization to one of the three treatment groups. Changes in cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), synovitis, and effusion were assessed using semi quantitative assessments of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained...

  11. Effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitcomb EL

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Emily L Whitcomb1, Leslee L Subak21Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Orange County-Irvine Medical Center, Irvine, CA, USA; 2University of California San Francisco, UCSF Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, and Urology, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, SF Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USABackground: The purpose of this research was review the epidemiology of the association of obesity and urinary incontinence, and to summarize the published data on the effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence.Methods: A literature review of the association between urinary incontinence and overweight/obesity in women was performed. Case series and clinical trials reporting the effect of surgical, behavioral, and/or pharmacological weight loss on urinary incontinence are summarized.Results: Epidemiological studies demonstrate that obesity is a strong and independent risk factor for prevalent and incident urinary incontinence. There is a clear dose-response effect of weight on urinary incontinence, with each 5-unit increase in body mass index associated with a 20%–70% increase in risk of urinary incontinence. The maximum effect of weight on urinary incontinence has an odds ratio of 4–5. The odds of incident urinary incontinence over 5–10 years increase by approximately 30%–60% for each 5-unit increase in body mass index. There appears to be a stronger association between increasing weight and prevalent and incident stress incontinence (including mixed incontinence than for urge incontinence. Weight loss studies indicate that both surgical and nonsurgical weight loss leads to significant improvements in prevalence, frequency, and/or symptoms of urinary incontinence.Conclusion: Epidemiological studies document overweight and obesity as important risk factors for urinary incontinence. Weight loss by both surgical and more conservative

  12. Effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Emily L; Subak, Leslee L

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this research was review the epidemiology of the association of obesity and urinary incontinence, and to summarize the published data on the effect of weight loss on urinary incontinence. Methods A literature review of the association between urinary incontinence and overweight/obesity in women was performed. Case series and clinical trials reporting the effect of surgical, behavioral, and/or pharmacological weight loss on urinary incontinence are summarized. Results Epidemiological studies demonstrate that obesity is a strong and independent risk factor for prevalent and incident urinary incontinence. There is a clear dose-response effect of weight on urinary incontinence, with each 5-unit increase in body mass index associated with a 20%–70% increase in risk of urinary incontinence. The maximum effect of weight on urinary incontinence has an odds ratio of 4–5. The odds of incident urinary incontinence over 5–10 years increase by approximately 30%–60% for each 5-unit increase in body mass index. There appears to be a stronger association between increasing weight and prevalent and incident stress incontinence (including mixed incontinence) than for urge incontinence. Weight loss studies indicate that both surgical and nonsurgical weight loss leads to significant improvements in prevalence, frequency, and/or symptoms of urinary incontinence. Conclusion Epidemiological studies document overweight and obesity as important risk factors for urinary incontinence. Weight loss by both surgical and more conservative approaches is effective in reducing urinary incontinence symptoms and should be strongly considered as a first line treatment for overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence. PMID:24198645

  13. Effect of CPAP, Weight Loss, or CPAP Plus Weight Loss on Central Hemodynamics and Arterial Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Snigdha; Gurubhagavatula, Indira; Townsend, Raymond; Kuna, Samuel T; Teff, Karen; Wadden, Thomas A; Chittams, Jesse; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Maislin, Greg; Saif, Hassam; Broderick, Preston; Ahmad, Zeshan; Pack, Allan I; Chirinos, Julio A

    2017-12-01

    Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea tend to coexist. Little is known about the effects of obstructive sleep apnea, obesity, or their treatment on central aortic pressures and large artery stiffness. We randomized 139 adults with obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m2) and moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea to (1) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy (n=45), (2) weight loss (WL) therapy (n=48), or (3) combined CPAP and WL (n=46) for 24 weeks. We assessed the effect of these interventions on central pressures and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (a measure of large artery stiffness), measured with arterial tonometry. Central systolic pressure was reduced significantly only in the combination arm (-7.4 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -12.5 to -2.4 mm Hg; P=0.004), without significant reductions detected in either the WL-only (-2.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -7.5 to 3.0; P=0.39) or the CPAP-only (-3.1 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -8.3 to 2.0; P=0.23) arms. However, none of these interventions significantly changed central pulse pressure, pulse pressure amplification, or the central augmentation index. The change in mean arterial pressure (P=0.008) and heart rate (P=0.027) induced by the interventions was significant predictors of the change in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. However, after adjustment for mean arterial pressure and heart rate, no significant changes in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were observed in any group. In obese subjects with obstructive sleep apnea, combination therapy with WL and CPAP is effective in reducing central systolic pressure. However, this effect is largely mediated by changes in mean, rather than central pulse pressure. WL and CPAP, alone or in combination, did not reduce large artery stiffness in this population. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00371293. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Changes in Energy Expenditure with Weight Gain and Weight Loss in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Manfred J; Enderle, Janna; Bosy-Westphal, Anja

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic adaptation to weight changes relates to body weight control, obesity and malnutrition. Adaptive thermogenesis (AT) refers to changes in resting and non-resting energy expenditure (REE and nREE) which are independent from changes in fat-free mass (FFM) and FFM composition. AT differs in response to changes in energy balance. With negative energy balance, AT is directed towards energy sparing. It relates to a reset of biological defence of body weight and mainly refers to REE. After weight loss, AT of nREE adds to weight maintenance. During overfeeding, energy dissipation is explained by AT of the nREE component only. As to body weight regulation during weight loss, AT relates to two different set points with a settling between them. During early weight loss, the first set is related to depleted glycogen stores associated with the fall in insulin secretion where AT adds to meet brain's energy needs. During maintenance of reduced weight, the second set is related to low leptin levels keeping energy expenditure low to prevent triglyceride stores getting too low which is a risk for some basic biological functions (e.g., reproduction). Innovative topics of AT in humans are on its definition and assessment, its dynamics related to weight loss and its constitutional and neuro-endocrine determinants.

  15. Is lost lean mass from intentional weight loss recovered during weight regain in postmenopausal women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kristen M; Lyles, Mary F; Davis, Cralen C; Wang, Xuewen; Beavers, Daniel P; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2011-09-01

    Despite the well-known recidivism of obesity, surprisingly little is known about the composition of body weight during weight regain. The objective of this study was to determine whether the composition of body weight regained after intentional weight loss is similar to the composition of body weight lost. The design was a follow-up to a randomized controlled trial of weight loss in which body composition was analyzed and compared in 78 postmenopausal women before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and 6 and 12 mo after the intervention. All body mass and composition variables were lower immediately after weight loss than at baseline (all P lost with weight loss, which resulted in body-composition changes favoring a lower percentage of body fat and a higher lean-to-fat mass ratio (P weight regain was noted (CV = 1.07). In women who regained ≥2 kg body weight, a decreasing trend in the lean-to-fat mass ratio was observed, which indicated greater fat mass accretion than lean mass accretion (P lost during the weight-loss intervention, 0.26 kg lean tissue was lost; for every 1 kg fat regained over the following year, only 0.12 kg lean tissue was regained. Although not all postmenopausal women who intentionally lose weight will regain it within 1 y, the data suggest that fat mass is regained to a greater degree than is lean mass in those who do experience some weight regain. The health ramifications of our findings remain to be seen.

  16. Is lost lean mass from intentional weight loss recovered during weight regain in postmenopausal women?123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Mary F; Davis, Cralen C; Wang, Xuewen; Beavers, Daniel P; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the well-known recidivism of obesity, surprisingly little is known about the composition of body weight during weight regain. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether the composition of body weight regained after intentional weight loss is similar to the composition of body weight lost. Design: The design was a follow-up to a randomized controlled trial of weight loss in which body composition was analyzed and compared in 78 postmenopausal women before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and 6 and 12 mo after the intervention. Results: All body mass and composition variables were lower immediately after weight loss than at baseline (all P lost with weight loss, which resulted in body-composition changes favoring a lower percentage of body fat and a higher lean-to-fat mass ratio (P weight regain was noted (CV = 1.07). In women who regained ≥2 kg body weight, a decreasing trend in the lean-to-fat mass ratio was observed, which indicated greater fat mass accretion than lean mass accretion (P lost during the weight-loss intervention, 0.26 kg lean tissue was lost; for every 1 kg fat regained over the following year, only 0.12 kg lean tissue was regained. Conclusions: Although not all postmenopausal women who intentionally lose weight will regain it within 1 y, the data suggest that fat mass is regained to a greater degree than is lean mass in those who do experience some weight regain. The health ramifications of our findings remain to be seen. PMID:21795437

  17. Body contouring surgery for military personnel following massive weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, S J; Kok, Y O; Foo, C L

    2011-12-01

    The burgeoning global obesity epidemic extends to the military service, where 6-53% of military personnel are overweight. Obese military personnel who adhere to a strict training and diet regime may potentially achieve and maintain significant weight loss. They may however face physical problems such as excess skin folds causing discomfort, difficulty in uniform fitting, personal hygiene, interference with full physical activities and psychological issues such as body image dissatisfaction, low self esteem and difficulty in social acceptance. We present a case report of a highly motivated military conscript who achieved and maintained significant weight loss but had physical defects following Massive Weight Loss. Body contouring surgery was successfully utilised to correct his physical defects and allowed him to return to full physical duties.

  18. Reversal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-associated weight loss : are there pharmacological treatment options?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jean K; Baum, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Poor nutritional status is associated with an increased incidence of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While a number of factors have been shown to produce tissue catabolism, no single mechanism has been clearly identified as a primary cause for weight loss in patients with severe COPD. Without a clear understanding of the aetiology of weight loss, therapeutic strategies to reverse this process have historically been unsuccessful. A review of recent studies allows consideration of a model of mechanisms of weight loss. This model includes multiple pathways that may be activated singly or simultaneously to cause loss of weight, specifically lean body mass. These include energy imbalances, elevated levels of cytokines, tissue hypoxia and the effects of cocorticosteroid therapy. To date, interventional studies that have looked at newer pharmacotherapies such as growth hormone and anabolic steroids in patients with COPD who are losing weight have not demonstrated reversal of weight loss or improvement in nutritional status. Currently, early identification of patients at risk for weight loss and aggressive nutritional supplementation coupled with an exercise programme has demonstrated the greatest benefit. However, with increasing understanding of the mechanisms that may be implicated, new targets for therapies are being identified. Of particular research interest are molecules such as leukotrienes, hormones, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and acute-phase proteins, which are noted to be elevated in some patients with COPD-associated weight loss. Currently, inhibitors to some of these inflammatory substances are used therapeutically in other chronic illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer cachexia. Future research may investigate their usefulness in COPD and direct new therapies that target the processes contributing to weight loss in these patients.

  19. An analysis of weight loss articles and advertisements in mainstream women's health and fitness magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethan, Danna; Basch, Corey H; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Berdnik, Alyssa; Huynh, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Magazines are a commonly used source for health and fitness information. Little is known about the nature and extent of weight loss strategies and products presented in mainstream women's health and fitness magazines. This preliminary cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of articles and advertisements featuring weight loss content and products in mainstream US-based health and fitness magazines, as well as assessed weight loss themes presented. Thirty-one US health and fitness-focused magazine issues were coded. Prevalence of, product type, and themes related to weight loss in articles and advertisements were assessed. Among the 31 issues of the five US-based women's magazines examined, we identified 39 articles (4.8% [95% CI = 3.3% to 5.5%] of 819 articles) related to weight loss with 14 identified weight loss topics. The most prevalent article topics covered were exercising/workouts (32.0% [95% CI = 28.8% to 33.6%]) followed by dieting (18.6% [95% CI = 15.9% to 19.9%]).The most common product advertised was weight loss pills (46.0% [95% CI = 42.6% to 47.7%]). Fat burners were also frequently advertised (14.9% [95% CI = 12.5% to 16.1%]) followed by hunger reduction strategies (10.3% [95% CI = 8.2% to 11.3%]) and fat blockers (6.9% [95% CI= 5.2% to 7.8%]). Articles presented information about exercise and dieting whereas advertisements supported potentially harmful health beliefs and behaviors. As a well-utilized American media format, health and fitness-focused magazines have an opportunity to communicate frequent,accurate messaging about healthy weight reduction and limit advertisements that may include misleading claims.

  20. Weight gain since menopause and its associations with weight loss maintenance in obese postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sénéchal M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available M Sénéchal1,2, H Arguin6, DR Bouchard4,5, AC Carpentier3, JL Ardilouze3, IJ Dionne1,2, M Brochu1,21Research Centre on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre, University Institute of Geriatrics of Sherbrooke, 2Faculty of Physical Education and Sports, University of Sherbrooke, 3Clinical Research Centre, Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre, Sherbrooke, QC; 4Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB; 5Health, Leisure & Human Performance Research Institute, Winnipeg, MB; 6Division of Kinesiology, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, QC, CanadaObjective: To examine the association between weight gain since menopause and weight regain after a weight loss program.Methods: Participants were 19 obese women who participated in a 15-week weight loss program and a 12-month follow-up. Main outcomes were: body composition, resting metabolic rate, energy intake, energy expenditure, and weight regain at follow-up.Results: All body composition measures significantly decreased after intervention (all P ≤ 0.01 while all measures of fatness increased significantly after the 12-month follow-up (P ≤ 0.01. Body weight gain since menopause was associated with body weight regain (r = 0.65; P = 0.003 after follow-up even after adjustment for confounders.Conclusion: Weight gain since menopause is associated with body weight regain following the weight loss program. Therefore, weight gain since menopause should be considered as a factor influencing weight loss maintenance in older women.Keywords: obesity, body weight, weight regain, postmenopausal women, aging

  1. Cardiometabolic risk after weight loss and subsequent weight regain in overweight and obese postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Daniel P; Beavers, Kristen M; Lyles, Mary F; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the effect of intentional weight loss and subsequent weight regain on cardiometabolic risk factors in older adults. The objective of this study was to determine how cardiometabolic risk factors change in the year following significant intentional weight loss in postmenopausal women, and if observed changes were affected by weight and fat regain. Eighty, overweight and obese, older women (age = 58.8±5.1 years) were followed through a 5-month weight loss intervention and a subsequent 12-month nonintervention period. Body weight/composition and cardiometabolic risk factors (blood pressure; total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; triglycerides; fasting glucose and insulin; and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance) were analyzed at baseline, immediately postintervention, and 6- and 12-months postintervention. Average weight loss during the 5-month intervention was 11.4±4.1kg and 31.4% of lost weight was regained during the 12-month follow-up. On average, all risk factor variables were significantly improved with weight loss but regressed toward baseline values during the year subsequent to weight loss. Increases in total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance during the postintervention follow-up were significantly (p weight and fat mass regain. Among women who regained weight, model-adjusted total cholesterol (205.8±4.0 vs 199.7±2.9mg/dL), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (128.4±3.4 vs 122.7±2.4mg/dL), insulin (12.6±0.7 vs 11.4±0.7mg/dL), and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (55.8±3.5 vs 50.9±3.7mg/dL) were higher at follow-up compared with baseline. For postmenopausal women, even partial weight regain following intentional weight loss is associated with increased cardiometabolic risk. Conversely, maintenance of or continued weight loss is associated with sustained improvement in the cardiometabolic profile.

  2. A Clinical Trial on Weight Loss among Truck Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Thiese

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high prevalence of obesity among commercial truck drivers may be related to sedentary nature of the job, lack of healthy eating choices, and lack of exercise. There may be a link between obesity and crash risk, therefore an intervention to reduce obesity in this population is needed. Objective: To assess feasibility of a 12-week weight loss intervention for truck drivers with a weight loss goal of 10% of initial body weight. Methods: Drivers were selected based on age (≥21 years and body mass index (≥30 kg/m2. The drivers participated in a before-after clinical trial. The intervention included a 12-week program that provided information on healthy diet and increasing exercise, and telephone-based coaching using SMART goals. Outcomes included change from baseline in reported energy intake, measured weight, waist, hip, and neck circumference, blood pressure, and point of care capillary blood lipids and hemoglobin A1c. Exit interviews were conducted to gain insight into driver opinions on the program features and usefulness. This study was registered with the NIH Clinical Trials Registry, number NCT02348983. Results: 12 of 13 drivers completed the study. Weight loss was statistically significant (p=0.03. Reported energy (p=0.005, total fat consumption (p=0.04, and saturated fat consumption (p=0.02 intake were also lower after the 12-week intervention. Drivers attributed their weight loss to health coaching and suggested a longer intervention so that they could reach their goal and become accustomed to the changes. Conclusion: This weight loss intervention is feasible for this difficult population. Additional research is needed to compare this intervention with a control group.

  3. Weight loss in orthognathic surgery: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Douglas; Williams, Rhodri W; Juj, Kiranjit; O'Connell, Susan; Isherwood, Grant; Hammond, Nichola

    2015-09-01

    To analyse weight change, body composition change and Body Mass Index change in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. A service evaluation was undertaken in orthognathic patients pre-operatively and at 4 weeks post-surgery. Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham outpatient department. Thirty-one patients scheduled for single- or two-jaw orthognathic surgery and rigid internal fixation. Immediately pre-operatively and at 4 weeks post-surgery the following information was gathered: (1) patient height; (2) patient weight (kg); (3) Patient Body Mass Index; and (4) patient body fat percentage. In the 4-week post-operative period, the average weight loss was -4·96 kg (range: -9·6 to +3·0 kg), with a body fat reduction of -3·07% (range: -5·80% to +2·30%) and an average reduction in Body Mass Index of -1·63 (range: -3·4 to +0·8). There was no statistically significant difference in weight loss (P = 0·1562) or body fat composition change (P = 0·2391) between single- or two-jaw surgery. There was no statistically significant difference in weight loss (P = 0·4858) or body fat composition change (P = 0·5321) between male and female patients. Weight loss observed was similar to that reported in studies using inter-maxillary fixation. Closer psychological and dietetic support is needed for patients who have a low normal or underweight Body Mass Index. Better and more bespoke tailored Oral Nutritional Supplementation must be provided for all orthognathic surgery patients to potentially reduce this significant weight loss.

  4. Weight loss for overweight patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Hansen, Julie Bolvig; Lund, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows:  To determine the benefits and harms associated with weight loss in overweight individuals with knee or hip osteoarthritis in terms of pain, physical function, quality of life, and safety.  Further we will have...... an explicit focus on quality of the weight loss intervention (including magnitude and intensity) (Herbert 2005), to see whether there is a dose-response relationship at the trial (i.e. group) level....

  5. Role of fermented beverages in the maintenance of weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monereo Megías, Susana; Arnoriaga Rodríguez, María; Olmedilla Ishishi, Yoko Lucía; Martínez de Icaya, Purificación

    2016-07-12

    Obesity is a very prevalent disease with multiple chronic complications that decrease or disappear after a small (5-10%) but maintained weight loss. Nevertheless, maintaining weight loss after the treatment is very difficult and it involves one of the biggest challenges to control this epidemic. Although the reasons that contribute to regain the lost weight are diverse and related to the biological response to caloric restriction and the lack of adherence to treatment, up to 20% of the patients are able to keep it off. The keys to success, involve the maintenance of healthy habits, exercise and a reasonable daily calorie intake to allow a normal way of life, without sacrificing the social life. At this point, learning to distinguish food and drink options in a society where social life often revolves around the table is very important. We review the keys to keep the weight off after a diet as well as the role of fermented beverages such as beer, in this process. In conclusion, maintenance the weight loss is harder than losing it. The mild-to-moderate consumption of fermented beverages such as beer is not associated with weight increase.

  6. Medication-Assisted Weight Loss in the Age of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Laura G

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is a complex and potentially deadly health concern; yet, there are few medications available to treat this chronic, recurrent disease. Patients are frequently told to "lose weight" and change their diet and exercise habits. For many, making behavioral lifestyle changes is not enough to enhance weight loss efforts and improve overall health and quality of life. Medication-assisted weight loss must be considered as an adjunct treatment to lifestyle changes, as neither alone may provide the sustainable reduction in weight necessary to decrease the medical and psychiatric comorbidities associated with obesity. Short- and long-term medications are available to assist patients in losing excess weight. These agents are safe when taken as prescribed and monitored by a health care professional and incorporated into a plan to create and sustain a healthy lifestyle. Weight loss medication is not a "quick fix" but rather a tool in the kit of resources to combat obesity and improve patients' quality of life. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(8), 21-26. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Assessing the effect of weight and weight loss in obese persons with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Curtis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Bradley Curtis1, Risa P Hayes1, Sheri Fehnel2, Laurie Zografos21Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Co, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USAAbstract: The objective of this study was to assess specific areas of life in which obesity affects individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and changes that obese persons with T2DM experience with weight loss of varying degrees. Thirty in-depth interviews were conducted in persons identified as: age ≥40 years, diagnosed with T2DM for ≥2 years, on oral antihyperglycemic medications >3 months, BMI 30–35 kg/m2, having attempted to lose weight in the last 2 years. Participants (60% female, mean age 53 years, 53% Caucasian, mean BMI 32.2 kg/m2 agreed that 5% weight loss, while not reflective of an ultimate goal, would be meaningful and important; benefits were expected to accrue in physical functioning, self-confidence, blood glucose levels, and motivation to keep losing weight. Participants reported the greatest effect of weight loss on energy, physical activity, mobility, pain, and clothes/appearance. Participants reported weight affecting mood, with feelings of depression and frustration most commonly described. This research indicates that weight loss is likely to affect health-related quality of life in obese individuals with T2DM. Given the purported weight loss benefits of many emerging diabetic medications, it will be important to include measures of weight-related quality of life in future clinical trials of these agents.Keywords: health-related quality of life, obesity, type 2 diabetes, weight loss, patient-reported outcomes

  8. Intermuscular adipose tissue and thigh muscle area dynamics during an 18-month randomized weight loss trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaskolka Meir, Anat; Shelef, Ilan; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Gepner, Yftach; Tene, Lilac; Zelicha, Hila; Tsaban, Gal; Bilitzky, Avital; Komy, Oded; Cohen, Noa; Bril, Nitzan; Rein, Michal; Serfaty, Dana; Kenigsbuch, Shira; Chassidim, Yoash; Zeller, Lior; Ceglarek, Uta; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Thiery, Joachim; Stampfer, Meir J; Rudich, Assaf; Shai, Iris

    2016-08-01

    It remains unclear whether intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) has any metabolic influence or whether it is merely a marker of abnormalities, as well as what are the effects of specific lifestyle strategies for weight loss on the dynamics of both IMAT and thigh muscle area (TMA). We followed the trajectory of IMAT and TMA during 18-mo lifestyle intervention among 278 sedentary participants with abdominal obesity, using magnetic resonance imaging. We measured the resting metabolic rate (RMR) by an indirect calorimeter. Among 273 eligible participants (47.8 ± 9.3 yr of age), the mean IMAT was 9.6 ± 4.6 cm(2) Baseline IMAT levels were directly correlated with waist circumference, abdominal subdepots, C-reactive protein, and leptin and inversely correlated with baseline TMA and creatinine (P weight loss (P weight loss. In similar models, 18-mo TMA loss remained associated with decreased RMR, decreased activity, and with increased fasting glucose levels and IMAT (P fat depots, IMAT may not represent a unique or specific adipose tissue, instead largely reflecting body weight change per se. Moderate weight loss induced a significant decrease in thigh muscle area, suggesting the importance of resistance training to accompany weight loss programs. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Social embeddedness in an online weight management programme is linked to greater weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncela-Casasnovas, Julia; Spring, Bonnie; McClary, Daniel; Moller, Arlen C; Mukogo, Rufaro; Pellegrini, Christine A; Coons, Michael J; Davidson, Miriam; Mukherjee, Satyam; Nunes Amaral, Luis A

    2015-03-06

    The obesity epidemic is heightening chronic disease risk globally. Online weight management (OWM) communities could potentially promote weight loss among large numbers of people at low cost. Because little is known about the impact of these online communities, we examined the relationship between individual and social network variables, and weight loss in a large, international OWM programme. We studied the online activity and weight change of 22,419 members of an OWM system during a six-month period, focusing especially on the 2033 members with at least one friend within the community. Using Heckman's sample-selection procedure to account for potential selection bias and data censoring, we found that initial body mass index, adherence to self-monitoring and social networking were significantly correlated with weight loss. Remarkably, greater embeddedness in the network was the variable with the highest statistical significance in our model for weight loss. Average per cent weight loss at six months increased in a graded manner from 4.1% for non-networked members, to 5.2% for those with a few (two to nine) friends, to 6.8% for those connected to the giant component of the network, to 8.3% for those with high social embeddedness. Social networking within an OWM community, and particularly when highly embedded, may offer a potent, scalable way to curb the obesity epidemic and other disorders that could benefit from behavioural changes. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of addressing reasons for weight loss on behavioral weight-control outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Levine, Michele D; Klem, Mary L; Burke, Lora E; Soulakova, Julia N; Marcus, Marsha D

    2011-01-01

    One way to improve weight control may be to place greater emphasis on the main reasons why individuals want to lose weight. To evaluate the effects of emphasizing physical appearance, health, or both on behavioral weight-control outcome. RCT. Data were collected from 2003 to 2005 and analyzed in 2009. 203 women aged 18-55 years (M=41.8, SD=9.2) and BMI>27 and appearance and health as important reasons for weight loss, enrolled at a university medical center. A 6-month weekly behavioral intervention alone (Standard) was compared to an enhanced focus on physical appearance (Appearance), health benefits of weight loss (Health), or both appearance and health (Combined). The 6-month period of acute intervention was followed by six monthly booster sessions. The primary outcome was change in body weight (kg). Additional outcomes included the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, and questions about satisfaction with weight, appearance, and health. Assessments were conducted at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months. Appearance demonstrated significantly greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 months (p=0.0107). Combined demonstrated greater weight loss compared to Standard at 6 and 12 months (p's=0.0034 and 0.0270, respectively). Although addressing motivators differentially affected satisfaction at 6 months, satisfaction was unrelated to weight outcome over the following year. Behavioral interventions incorporating components with a focus on physical appearance were associated with improved short-term weight loss. The mechanism for this effect is unclear and warrants further study. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Drug Induced Hearing Loss: Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Drug-Induced Hearing Loss Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve Hearing Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table ... Read More "Drug Induced Hearing Loss" Articles Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve Hearing / What Is Ototoxicity? Spring 2016 ...

  12. Long-Term Weight Maintenance Strategies Are Experienced as a Burden by Persons Who Have Lost Weight Compared to Persons with a lifetime Normal, Stable Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Kruseman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess dietary intake, eating patterns, physical activity and eating behaviors, and to explore strategies and perceptions of the experience of weight maintenance in weight loss maintainers (weight loss maintenance (WLM ≥ 10% weight loss maintained for ≥1 year and in matched controls with a lifetime stable normal weight. Methods: Volunteers (32 were recruited by a snowball procedure in this cross-sectional, mixed-methods study. Diet, physical activity, and eating behaviors were assessed with validated questionnaires. Strategies and experiences were investigated during interviews. Descriptive coding, thematic analysis (qualitative data as well as descriptive analysis and t-tests (quantitative data were performed. Results: Both groups had similar energy and macronutrient consumption. Those in the WLM group reported higher levels of exercise and scored higher on several dimensions of eating disorders. Four themes - ‘food choices,' ‘quantities and portion control,' ‘physical activity', and ‘burden' - emerged from the qualitative data. Both groups used similar weight maintenance strategies, but those in the WLM group experienced a higher burden, expressing effortful control which contrasted with the control group's confidence in their internal cues. Conclusion: Our results show an additional burden related with maintaining weight loss compared to keeping a stable normal weight. They provide evidence to devise interventions that will address the difficulty of regulating intake.

  13. Overweight men's motivations and perceived barriers towards weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabinsky, Marianne; Toft, U. N.; Raben, A.

    2007-01-01

    of the interviews were motives and perceived barriers towards weight loss. Results: Main barriers for losing weight appeared to be lack of motivation and the perception of the slimming diet. The men had a desire to have a lean appearance and avoid illness, but in all the interviews it appeared that the strongest...... motive for losing weight was a strong desire to become more effective and a greater asset for one's workplace. Overweight subjects were considered less effective and attractive for the labour market. Conclusion: This study indicates that if men from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are to be motivated...

  14. Changes in body composition and fat distribution in response to weight loss and weight regain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooy, van der K.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes the effects of weight loss and subsequent weight regain on body composition, fat distribution and resting energy expenditure in moderately obese men and moderately obese premenopausal women. Participants were subjected to a controlled 4.2 MJ/day energy deficit diet for

  15. Impact on weight and physical function of intensive medical weight loss in older adults with stage II and III obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, Jamy D; Cook, Miranda; Rushing, Julia; Frain, Annette; Beavers, Kristen; Miller, Gary; Miller, Michael E; Nicklas, Barb

    2016-09-01

    A 6-month pilot trial compared two strategies for weight loss in older adults with body mass indexes (BMIs) ≥35 kg/m(2) to assess weight loss response, safety, and impact on physical function. Twenty-eight volunteers were randomized to a balanced deficit diet (BDD) (500 kcal/day below estimated energy needs) or an intensive, low-calorie, meal replacement diet (ILCD, 960 kcal/day). Behavioral interventions and physical activity prescriptions were similar for both groups. Primary outcomes were changes in body weight and adverse event frequency; secondary outcomes included measures of physical function and body composition. ILCD average weight change was -19.1 ± 2.2 kg or 15.9 ± 4.6% of initial body weight compared with -9.1 ± 2.7 kg or 7.2 ± 1.9% for BDD. ILCD lost more fat mass (-7.7 kg, 95% CI [-11.9 to -3.5]) but had similar loss of lean mass (-1.7 kg, 95% CI [-4.1 to 0.6]) compared with BDD. There were no significant differences in change in physical function or adverse event frequency. Compared with a traditional BDD intervention, older adults who have severe obesity treated with intensive medical weight loss had greater weight loss and decreases in fat mass without a higher frequency of adverse events. In the short term, however, this did not translate into greater improvements in physical function. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  16. Exploring Gender Differences in a Randomized Trial of Weight Loss Maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, Melissa M.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Sherwood, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore gender differences in reasons for losing weight, weight loss methods, and weight loss behaviors prior to and during a weight loss maintenance trial. This is a secondary analysis of data from a 24-month randomized controlled trial comparing Self-Directed or Guided phone-based weight loss maintenance interventions among adults who had intentionally lost ≥10% of their body weight in the year prior to enrollment. Participants reported their weight loss meth...

  17. Relationships between depression, gender, and unhealthy weight loss practices among overweight or obese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, E P; Kolodziejczyk, J K; Norman, G J; Calfas, K; Huang, J S; Rock, C L; Griswold, W; Fowler, J H; Marshall, S J; Gupta, A; Patrick, K

    2014-04-01

    Unhealthy weight loss practices are common among female college students. It is unknown if these practices are also most common among women in the subset of overweight or obese college students or if these practices are related to depression. We examined the relationship between gender, depression, and unhealthy weight loss practices among overweight or obese college students. Students (body mass index between 25.0 and 34.9 kg/m(2)) from three Southern California universities (M(age) = 22 years, SD = 4; 70% women) were recruited from May 2011 to May 2012 for participation in a weight loss clinical trial (N = 404). Logistic regressions were performed with baseline data to assess the cross-sectional relationship between self-reported unhealthy weight loss practices and gender and depression as measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression short form. Twenty-nine percent of participants reported engaging in at least one unhealthy weight loss behavior (e.g., fasting, purging) over the last 30 days, with no differences by gender. Self-report of at least one unhealthy weight loss behavior was associated with report of symptoms of depression (e(B) = 1.14 [confidence interval, CI: 1.08-1.20]), adjusting for potential confounders. Interactions between gender and depression were not significant (e(B) = 1.04 [CI: 0.93-1.16]). Among an overweight or obese sample of college students, unhealthy weight loss practices were equally common in both genders, and students with depressive symptomatology were at greatest risk. Obesity interventions targeting overweight or obese college students should educate both men and women about the dangers of unhealthy weight loss practices. In addition, screening for depression can help identify students who would benefit from additional supportive and coping strategies and resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Relations of hedonic hunger and behavioral change to weight loss among adults in a behavioral weight loss program utilizing meal-replacement products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theim, Kelly R; Brown, Joshua D; Juarascio, Adrienne S; Malcolm, Robert R; O'Neil, Patrick M

    2013-11-01

    Greater self-regulatory behavior usage is associated with greater weight loss within behavioral weight loss treatments. Hedonic hunger (i.e., susceptibility to environmental food cues) may impede successful behavior change and weight loss. Adult men and women (N = 111, body mass index M ± SD = 35.89 ± 6.97 kg/m(2)) were assessed before and after a 15-week lifestyle change weight loss program with a partial meal-replacement diet. From pre- to post-treatment, reported weight control behavior usage improved and hedonic hunger decreased, and these changes were inversely related. Individuals with higher hedonic hunger scores at baseline showed the greatest weight loss. Similarly, participants with lower baseline use of weight control behaviors lost more weight, and increased weight control behavior usage was associated with greater weight loss-particularly among individuals with low baseline hedonic hunger. Further study is warranted regarding the significance of hedonic hunger in weight loss treatments.

  19. Epigenetic patterns in successful weight loss maintainers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Maccani, Jennifer Z J; Hawley, Nicola L; Wing, Rena R; Kelsey, Karl T; McCaffery, Jeanne M

    2015-05-01

    DNA methylation changes occur in animal models of calorie restriction, simulating human dieting, and in human subjects undergoing behavioral weight loss interventions. This suggests that obese (OB) individuals may possess unique epigenetic patterns that may vary with weight loss. Here, we examine whether methylation patterns in leukocytes differ in individuals who lost sufficient weight to go from OB to normal weight (NW; successful weight loss maintainers; SWLMs) vs currently OB or NW individuals. This study examined peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) methylation patterns in NW (n=16, current/lifetime BMI 18.5-24.9) and OB individuals (n=16, current body mass index (BMI)⩾30), and SWLM (n=16, current BMI 18.5-24.9, lifetime maximum BMI ⩾30, average weight loss 57.4 lbs) using an Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadArray. No leukocyte population-adjusted epigenome-wide analyses were significant; however, potentially differentially methylated loci across the groups were observed in ryanodine receptor-1 (RYR1; P=1.54E-6), myelin protein zero-like 3 (MPZL3; P=4.70E-6) and alpha 3c tubulin (TUBA3C; P=4.78E-6). In 32 obesity-related candidate genes, differential methylation patterns were found in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; gene-wide P=0.00018). In RYR1, TUBA3C and BDNF, SWLM differed from OB but not NW. In this preliminary investigation, leukocyte SWLM DNA methylation patterns more closely resembled NW than OB individuals in three gene regions. These results suggest that PBMC methylation is associated with weight status.

  20. [Weight loss in overweight or obese patients and family functioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Sánchez, Rosalba; Espinosa-de Santillana, Irene; Espíndola-Jaramillo, Ilia Angélica

    2012-01-01

    to determine the association between weight loss and family functioning. a cohort of 168 persons with overweight or obesity from 20-49 years, either sex, with no comorbidity was studied at the nutrition department. A sociodemographic data was obtained and FACES III instrument to measure family functioning was applied. At the third month a new assessment of the body mass index was measured. Descriptive statistical analysis and relative risk were done. obesity presented in 50.6 %, 59.53 % of them did not lose weight. Family dysfunction was present in 56.6 % of which 50 % did not lose weight. From 43.4 % of functional families, 9.52 % did not lose weight (p = 0.001). The probability or risk of not losing weight was to belong to a dysfunctional family is 4.03 % (CI = 2.60-6.25). A significant association was found between the variables: weight loss and family functioning. Belonging to a dysfunctional family may be a risk factor for not losing weight.

  1. Energy density and weight change in a long-term weight-loss trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welsh Ericka M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health risks linked to obesity and the difficulty most have in achieving weight loss underscore the importance of identifying dietary factors that contribute to successful weight loss. Methods This study examined the association between change in dietary energy density and weight loss over time. Subjects were 213 men and women with BMI of 30–39 kg/m2 and without chronic illness enrolled in 2004 in a randomized trial evaluating behavioral treatments for long-term weight loss. Subjects completed a 62-item food frequency questionnaire at baseline and at 6, 12, and 18 months. Results Pearson correlations between BMI and energy density (kcals/g of solid food at baseline were not significantly different from zero (r = -0.02, p = 0.84. In a longitudinal analysis, change in energy density was strongly related to change in BMI. The estimated β for change in BMI (kg/m2 of those in the quartile representing greatest decrease in energy density at 18 months compared to those in the quartile with the least was -1.95 (p = 0.006. The association was especially strong in the first six months (estimated β = -1.43, the period with greatest weight loss (mean change in BMI = -2.50 kg/m2 from 0–6 months vs. 0.23 kg/m2 from 12–18 months and the greatest contrast with respect to change in energy density. Conclusion Decreased energy density predicted weight loss in this 18 month weight loss study. These findings may have important implications for individual dietary advice and public health policies targeting weight control in the general population

  2. Internalized weight stigma and its ideological correlates among weight loss treatment seeking adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carels, R A; Young, K M; Wott, C B; Harper, J; Gumble, A; Hobbs, M Wagner; Clayton, A M

    2009-01-01

    There are significant economic and psychological costs associated with the negative weight-based social stigma that exists in American society. This pervasive anti-fat bias has been strongly internalized among the overweight/obese. While the etiology of weight stigma is complex, research suggests that it is often greater among individuals who embrace certain etiological views of obesity or ideological views of the world. This investigation examined 1) the level of internalized weight stigma among overweight/obese treatment seeking adults, and 2) the association between internalized weight stigma and perceived weight controllability and ideological beliefs about the world ('just world beliefs', Protestant work ethic). Forty-six overweight or obese adults (BMI >or=27 kg/m2) participating in an 18- week behavioral weight loss program completed implicit (Implicit Associations Test) and explicit (Obese Person's Trait Survey) measures of weight stigma. Participants also completed two measures of ideological beliefs about the world ("Just World Beliefs", Protestant Ethic Scale) and one measure of beliefs about weight controllability (Beliefs about Obese Persons). Significant implicit and explicit weight bias was observed. Greater weight stigma was consistently associated with greater endorsement of just world beliefs, Protestant ethic beliefs and beliefs about weight controllability. Results suggest that the overweight/obese treatment seeking adults have internalized the negative weight-based social stigma that exists in American society. Internalized weight stigma may be greater among those holding specific etiological and ideological beliefs about weight and the world.

  3. Abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour of adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour in female Jewish adolescents. Teachersf awareness of these factors and their attitudes towards a school programme to address these were also investigated. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted.

  4. Impact of weight loss on oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for obesity associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Objective: This study was designed to detect the effects of weight loss on the inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress markers in obese type 2 diabetic patients. Material and Methods: Eighty obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, their age ranged from 35-57 years ...

  5. Abandoning weight-loss programmes | Van Staden | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    "ies in maintaining weight loss. A study of unsuccessful dieters focused on a group of 50 obese subjects who had previously joined a slimming organisation, but who had dropped out. They were interviewed with emphasis on factors relating to ...

  6. Energy Drinks, Weight Loss, and Disordered Eating Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Amy J.; Vatalaro Hill, Katherine E.; Benotsch, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study examined energy drink consumption and relations with weight loss attempts and behaviors, body image, and eating disorders. Participants/Methods: This is a secondary analysis using data from 856 undergraduate students who completed the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II…

  7. Organizing a Community "Biggest Loser" Weight Loss Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kirstin D.

    2013-01-01

    The program described here shows how Extension can be a strong collaborative partner in a rural setting in improving the overall health of the community by organizing a three month "Biggest Loser" Weight Loss Challenge. A pre-and post-fitness assessment and bi-weekly weigh-ins were administered. Three healthy lifestyle educational…

  8. Weight Loss Program in a Student Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Susan McConville

    1980-01-01

    The overweight college student is faced not only with the normal anxieties of adolescence but also with the special stress of surviving in a new environment. The nurse practitioner can guide students to bear responsibility for good health and provide a sound nutritional framework for a weight loss program. (CJ)

  9. Biochemical parameters response to weight loss in patients with non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to detect changes in biochemical parameters including insulin resistance, cytokines, blood lipid profile and liver enzymes following weight loss in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Materials and methods: One hundred obese patients with NASH, their age between 35-50 years, body mass ...

  10. Herbal weight-loss products: how informed are we?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-09

    Nov 9, 2012 ... Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Professions, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein. Herbal weight-loss ... 59%), apple cider vinegar (100% and 96%), lemon juice (100% and 87%) and alcohol (100% and 91%), respectively, being ingredients in.

  11. Weight loss improves biomarkers endothelial function and systemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... while changes were not significant in group (B). Also, there were significant differences between mean levels of the investigated parameters in group (A) and group (B) after treatment. Conclusion: Weight loss ameliorates inflammatory cytokines and markers of endothelial function in obese postmenopausal Saudi women.

  12. Weight loss improves biomarkers endothelial function and systemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bariatric surgery decreased CRP ,IL-6 and increased the circulating level of adiponectin32-36. Reductions in pro- inflammatory cytokines concentrations after weight loss is explained by reduction in fat mass37. Concerning the markers of endothelial function, the ob- servation in this study indicated a significant reduction in.

  13. Sleep quality is associated with weight loss maintenance status: the MedWeight study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannakoulia, M; Anastasiou, C A; Karfopoulou, E; Pehlivanidis, A; Panagiotakos, D B; Vgontzas, A

    2017-06-01

    Sleep duration and quality have been associated with many health outcomes, including weight management. We aimed to investigate the effect of self-reported sleep duration and quality on weight loss maintenance in participants of the MedWeight study, a registry of individuals that lost at least 10% of body weight in the past and either maintained the loss (maintainers: weight maintenance of at least 10% of initial weight loss) or regained it (regainers: weight ≥95% of their maximum body weight). Study participants included 528 volunteers (61% women). Sleep quantity referred to the reported duration of nocturnal sleep, as well as the frequency of mid-day naps during the last month. Sleep quality was assessed through the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS). Reported sleep quantity was associated with weight maintenance status, but the association became non-significant when the AIS score entered the model. In specific, AIS was inversely associated with the likelihood of being a maintainer (OR=0.89 per AIS unit, 95% CI: 0.81 - 0.98), even after adjusting for potential confounders. Sex-specific analysis revealed that the association between the AIS score and maintenance status was evident in men but not in women. Future studies are needed to confirm these results in other population groups and reveal underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Racial Differences in Weight Loss Among Adults in a Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention: Role of Diet and Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kelliann K; Tate, Deborah F; Lang, Wei; Neiberg, Rebecca H; Polzien, Kristen; Rickman, Amy D; Erickson, Karen; Jakicic, John M

    2015-12-01

    African-Americans lose less weight during a behavioral intervention compared with Whites, which may be from differences in dietary intake or physical activity. Subjects (30% African American, 70% White; n = 346; 42.4 ± 9.0 yrs.; BMI = 33.0 ± 3.7 kg/m2) in an 18-month weight loss intervention were randomized to a standard behavioral (SBWI) or a stepped-care (STEP) intervention. Weight, dietary intake, self-report and objective physical activity, and fitness were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months. Weight loss at 18 months was greater in Whites (-8.74 kg with 95% CI [-10.10, -7.35]) compared with African Americans (-5.62 kg with 95% CI [-7.86, -3.37]) (P = .03) in the SBWI group and the STEP group (White: -7.48 kg with 95% CI [-8.80, -6.17] vs. African American: -4.41kg with 95% CI [-6.41, -2.42]) (P = .01). Patterns of change in dietary intake were not different between groups. Objective physical activity (PA) changed over time (P weight (3.10 kg) than African American adults. Although there were no differences in dietary intake, Whites had higher levels of objective PA and fitness. Thus, the discrepancy in weight loss may be due to differences in PA rather than dietary intake. However, the precise role of these factors warrants further investigation.

  15. Enhanced metabolic efficiency contributes to weight regain after weight loss in obesity-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Paul S; Higgins, Janine A; Johnson, Ginger C; Fleming-Elder, Brooke K; Donahoo, William T; Melanson, Edward L; Hill, James O

    2004-12-01

    Metabolic adjustments occur with weight loss that may contribute to a high rate of weight regain. We have previously observed in obesity-prone, obese rats that weight reduction is accompanied by a suppression in resting metabolic rate beyond what would be predicted for the change in metabolic mass. In the present study, we examine if this adjustment in metabolic efficiency is affected by the length of time in weight maintenance and if it contributes to the propensity to regain after weight loss. Twenty-four-hour, nonresting, and resting energy expenditure (REE) were obtained by indirect calorimetry and normalized to metabolic mass estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A 10% loss in body weight in weight-reduced rats was accompanied by a 15% suppression in adjusted REE. This enhancement in metabolic efficiency was not altered with either 8 or 16 wk of weight maintenance, but it did resolve when the forced control of intake was removed and the weight was regained. The rate of weight regain increased with the time in weight maintenance and was exceptionally high early during the relapse period. During this high rate of weight gain, the suppression in REE persists while consumption increases to a level that is higher than when they were obese. In summary, an enhanced metabolic efficiency and an elevated appetite both contribute (60% and 40%, respectively) to a large potential energy imbalance that, when the forcible control of energy intake is relieved, becomes actualized and results in an exceptionally high rate of weight regain.

  16. Major rapid weight loss induces changes in cardiac repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Larsen, Esben; Iepsen, Eva Pers Winning; Lundgren, Julie

    2016-01-01

    analysis has been suggested as a more sensitive method to identify changes in cardiac repolarization. We examined the effect of a major and rapid weight loss on T-wave morphology. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-six individuals had electrocardiograms (ECG) taken before and after eight weeks of weight loss...... intervention along with plasma measurements of fasting glucose, HbA1c, and potassium. For assessment of cardiac repolarization changes, T-wave Morphology Combination Score (MCS) and ECG intervals: RR, PR, QT, QTcF (Fridericia-corrected QT-interval), and QRS duration were derived. The participants lost......A1c (pMonitoring of MCS during calorie restriction makes it possible to detect repolarization changes with higher discriminative power than the QT-interval during major rapid weight...

  17. Hepatic effects of dietary weight loss in morbidly obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T; Gluud, C; Franzmann, Magnus

    1991-01-01

    This prospective study was carried out in order to evaluate the influence on liver morphology and function of a very-low-calorie formula diet. Fourty-one morbidly obese, non-alcoholic subjects had liver biopsy performed before and after a median weight loss of 34 kg. Fatty change improved (p less...... than 0.001), but 24% of the patients developed slight portal inflammation (p = 0.039) or slight portal fibrosis (p = 0.063). Patients developing portal fibrosis had a higher degree of fatty change at entry (p = 0.029), a more pronounced reduction of fatty change (p = 0.014) and a faster weight loss (p...... = 0.026). Liver biochemistry, which was of no individual diagnostic value, improved. It is concluded that morbidly obese subjects with a high degree of hepatic fatty change are at risk of developing portal inflammation and fibrosis when undergoing very fast dietary weight reductions....

  18. Exercise Training and Energy Expenditure following Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary R; Fisher, Gordon; Neumeier, William H; Carter, Stephen J; Plaisance, Eric P

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to determine the effects of aerobic or resistance training on activity-related energy expenditure (AEE; kcal·d(-1)) and physical activity index (activity-related time equivalent (ARTE)) following weight loss. It was hypothesized that weight loss without exercise training would be accompanied by decreases in AEE, ARTE, and nontraining physical activity energy expenditure (nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)) and that exercise training would prevent decreases in free-living energy expenditure. One hundred forty premenopausal women had an average weight loss of 25 lb during a diet (800 kcal·d(-1)) of furnished food. One group aerobically trained 3 times per week (40 min·d(-1)), another group resistance-trained 3 times per week (10 exercises/2 sets × 10 repetitions), and the third group did not exercise. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure body composition, indirect calorimetry was used to measure resting energy expenditure (REE) and walking energy expenditure, and doubly labeled water was used to measure total energy expenditure (TEE). AEE, ARTE, and nontraining physical activity energy expenditure (NEAT) were calculated. TEE, REE, and NEAT all decreased following weight loss for the no-exercise group, but not for aerobic and resistance trainers. Only REE decreased in the two exercise groups. Resistance trainers increased ARTE. HR and oxygen uptake while walking on the flat and up a grade were consistently related to TEE, AEE, NEAT, and ARTE. Exercise training prevents a decrease in energy expenditure, including free-living energy expenditure separate from exercise training, following weight loss. Resistance training increases physical activity, whereas economy/ease of walking is associated with increased TEE, AEE, NEAT, and ARTE.

  19. Exercise Training and Energy Expenditure following Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary R.; Fisher, Gordon; Neumeier, William H.; Carter, Stephen J.; Plaisance, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Determine the effects of aerobic or resistance training on activity related energy expenditure (AEE, kcal/d) and physical activity index (ARTE) following weight loss. It was hypothesized that weight loss without exercise training would be accompanied by a decrease in AEE, ARTE, and non-training physical activity energy expenditure (NEAT) and that exercise training would prevent decreases in free living energy expenditure. Methods 140 pre-menopausal women underwent an average of 25 pound weight loss during an 800 kcal/day diet of furnished food. One group aerobically trained 3 times/wk (40 min/d), another resistance trained 3 times/wk (10 exercises/2 sets x10 repetitions) and the third group did not exercise. DXA was used to measure body composition, indirect calorimetry to measure resting (REE) and walking energy expenditure, and doubly labeled water to measure total energy expenditure (TEE). AEE, ARTE, and non-training physical activity energy expenditure (NEAT) were calculated. Results TEE, REE, and NEAT all decreased following weight loss for the no exercise group, but not for the aerobic and resistance trainers. Only REE decreased in the two exercise groups. The resistance trainers increased ARTE. Heart rate and oxygen uptake while walking on the flat and up a grade were consistently related to TEE, AEE, NEAT, and ARTE. Conclusion Exercise training prevents a decrease in energy expenditure, including free living energy expenditure separate from the exercise training, following weight loss. Resistance training increased physical activity, while ease and economy in walking associates with increased TEE, AEE, NEAT, and ARTE. PMID:25606816

  20. Minimal alteration in muscle lipid genes following stabilized weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Robert H; Robinette, Leizleigh; Kern, Philip A

    2017-12-01

    Variations in skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), carntine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), perilipin protein 2 (PLIN2), and adipose tissue triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) have been described as playing important roles in the metabolic regulation of lipid oxidation, and may influence intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and muscle lipid droplet size (LDS). While acute changes in caloric balance and/or aerobic capacity may affect lipid metabolism, the influence of sustained weight loss derived from caloric restriction with weight loss (CWL) compared with exercise training with weight loss (EWL) on the abovementioned parameters has not been fully elucidated. Using a combination of metabolic feeding and/or supervised exercise training, we evaluated the influence of stabilized weight loss elicited by CWL compared with EWL without the confounding influence of acute alterations in caloric balance on molecular markers of mitochondrial metabolism and lipid droplet size in middle-aged overweight individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. There were no significant changes in PGC-1α, CPT-1, PLIN2, ATGL and, CGI-58 messenger RNA (mRNA) in CWL and EWL. While there were no changes in ATGL mRNA in CWL, there was a strong trend (P = 0.05) for the ΔATGL mRNA in EWL with stabilized weight loss. There were no significant changes in IMCL or LDS within skeletal muscle in CWL or EWL, respectively. In conclusion, under the conditions of chronic caloric balance following dietary or exercise-based interventions, mediators of mitochondrial function, IMCL and LDS, were largely unaffected. Future studies should focus on intervention-based changes in protein expression and/or phosphorylation and the relationship to physiological endpoints.

  1. Weight loss expectations and body dissatisfaction in young women attempting to lose weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siervo, M; Montagnese, C; Muscariello, E; Evans, E; Stephan, B C M; Nasti, G; Papa, A; Iannetti, E; Colantuoni, A

    2014-04-01

    Unrealistic weight loss expectations (WLEs) and greater body dissatisfaction may be associated with the poor long-term outcomes of dietary and lifestyle weight loss treatments. We evaluated the association between body size, WLEs and body dissatisfaction in young women attempting to lose weight. Forty-four young healthy women [age range 18-35 years, body mass index (BMI) range 23-40 kg/m2] were recruited. Women were classified as obese (BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m2) and non-obese (BMI Body Dissatisfaction scale of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 and the Body Image Assessment for Obesity silhouette charts were used to assess body dissatisfaction. WLEs were categorised according to personal (ideal, happiness, satisfaction, weight history), lifestyle (fitness) and social (career, family acceptance, peer acceptance, mass media, social pressure) factors. Individual WLEs were compared with recommended clinical targets (5%, 10% and 20%) for weight loss. Body dissatisfaction was lower in non-obese subjects and was directly associated with BMI (P body weight, whereas the proportion was significantly higher in the obese group (17 subjects; 74%). Subjects derived the greatest WLEs from mass media, whereas they perceived that family and friends were supportive of a lesser degree of weight loss. We observed a mismatch between clinical and personal expectations, and social pressure and interpersonal relationships appear to have a prominent role with respect to influencing the association. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  2. Who will lose weight? A reexamination of predictors of weight loss in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barata José T

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to analyze pretreatment predictors of short-term weight loss in Portuguese overweight and obese women involved in a weight management program. Behavioral and psychosocial predictors were selected a priori from previous results reported in American women who participated in a similar program. Methods Subjects were 140 healthy overweight/obese women (age, 38.3 ± 5.9 y; BMI, 30.3 ± 3.7 kg/m2 who participated in a 4-month lifestyle weight loss program consisting of group-based behavior therapy to improve diet and increase physical activity. At baseline, all women completed a comprehensive behavioral and psychosocial battery, in standardized conditions. Results Of all starting participants, 3.5% (5 subjects did not finish the program. By treatment's end, more than half of all women had met the recomended weight loss goals, despite a large variability in individual results (range for weight loss = 19 kg. In bivariate and multivariate correlation/regression analysis fewer previous diets and weight outcome evaluations, and to a lesser extent self-motivation and body image were significant and independent predictors of weight reduction, before and after adjustment for baseline weight. A negative and slightly curvilinear relationship best described the association between outcome evaluations and weight change, revealing that persons with very accepting evaluations (that would accept or be happy with minimal weight change lost the least amount of weight while positive but moderate evaluations of outcomes (i.e., neither low nor extremely demanding were more predictive of success. Among those subjects who reported having initiated more than 3–4 diets in the year before the study, very few were found to be in the most successful group after treatment. Quality of life, self-esteem, and exercise variables did not predict outcomes. Conclusions Several variables were confirmed as predictors of success in short

  3. Effects of weight gain and weight loss on regional fat distribution1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prachi; Somers, Virend K; Romero-Corral, Abel; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Davison, Diane E

    2012-01-01

    Background: Normal-weight adults gain lower-body fat via adipocyte hyperplasia and upper-body subcutaneous (UBSQ) fat via adipocyte hypertrophy. Objectives: We investigated whether regional fat loss mirrors fat gain and whether the loss of lower-body fat is attributed to decreased adipocyte number or size. Design: We assessed UBSQ, lower-body, and visceral fat gains and losses in response to overfeeding and underfeeding in 23 normal-weight adults (15 men) by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal computed tomography scans. Participants gained ∼5% of weight in 8 wk and lost ∼80% of gained fat in 8 wk. We measured abdominal subcutaneous and femoral adipocyte sizes and numbers after weight gain and loss. Results: Volunteers gained 3.1 ± 2.1 (mean ± SD) kg body fat with overfeeding and lost 2.4 ± 1.7 kg body fat with underfeeding. Although UBSQ and visceral fat gains were completely reversed after 8 wk of underfeeding, lower-body fat had not yet returned to baseline values. Abdominal and femoral adipocyte sizes, but not numbers, decreased with weight loss. Decreases in abdominal adipocyte size and UBSQ fat mass were correlated (ρ = 0.76, P = 0.001), as were decreases in femoral adipocyte size and lower-body fat (ρ = 0.49, P = 0.05). Conclusions: UBSQ and visceral fat increase and decrease proportionately with a short-term weight gain and loss, whereas a gain of lower-body fat does not relate to the loss of lower-body fat. The loss of lower-body fat is attributed to a reduced fat cell size, but not number, which may result in long-term increases in fat cell numbers. PMID:22760561

  4. Effects of weight gain and weight loss on regional fat distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prachi; Somers, Virend K; Romero-Corral, Abel; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Davison, Diane E; Jensen, Michael D

    2012-08-01

    Normal-weight adults gain lower-body fat via adipocyte hyperplasia and upper-body subcutaneous (UBSQ) fat via adipocyte hypertrophy. We investigated whether regional fat loss mirrors fat gain and whether the loss of lower-body fat is attributed to decreased adipocyte number or size. We assessed UBSQ, lower-body, and visceral fat gains and losses in response to overfeeding and underfeeding in 23 normal-weight adults (15 men) by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal computed tomography scans. Participants gained ∼5% of weight in 8 wk and lost ∼80% of gained fat in 8 wk. We measured abdominal subcutaneous and femoral adipocyte sizes and numbers after weight gain and loss. Volunteers gained 3.1 ± 2.1 (mean ± SD) kg body fat with overfeeding and lost 2.4 ± 1.7 kg body fat with underfeeding. Although UBSQ and visceral fat gains were completely reversed after 8 wk of underfeeding, lower-body fat had not yet returned to baseline values. Abdominal and femoral adipocyte sizes, but not numbers, decreased with weight loss. Decreases in abdominal adipocyte size and UBSQ fat mass were correlated (ρ = 0.76, P = 0.001), as were decreases in femoral adipocyte size and lower-body fat (ρ = 0.49, P = 0.05). UBSQ and visceral fat increase and decrease proportionately with a short-term weight gain and loss, whereas a gain of lower-body fat does not relate to the loss of lower-body fat. The loss of lower-body fat is attributed to a reduced fat cell size, but not number, which may result in long-term increases in fat cell numbers.

  5. Taking Orlistat: Predicting Weight Loss over 6 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Hollywood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the predictors of weight loss following orlistat with a focus on both baseline variables and changes in beliefs and behaviours occurring over the course of taking the drug. Patients (n=566 prescribed orlistat completed a questionnaire at baseline and after 6 months concerning their weight, beliefs and behaviours. By 6 months the majority had lost some weight and showed improvements in diet. Many had also stopped taking the drug and a large minority reported using it flexibly as a lifestyle drug. Those who lost most weight showed a decrease in beliefs in a medical solution, a decrease in unhealthy eating, an increased belief in treatment control and an increased belief that the unpleasant consequences are both due to their eating behaviour and just part of the drug. When taken with fatty food orlistat causes symptoms such as anal leakage and oily stools. These may encourage some patients to focus on the behavioural aspects of their weight problem thus promoting the dietary changes needed for both short and longer term weight loss. When prescribing orlistat, clinicians should encourage patients to see the consequences as an education as a means to promote the effectiveness of this form of medical management.

  6. Effects of weight loss on airway responsiveness in obese adults with asthma: does weight loss lead to reversibility of asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhale, Smita; Baron, Justine; Dent, Robert; Vandemheen, Katherine; Aaron, Shawn D

    2015-06-01

    The growing epidemics of obesity and asthma are major public health concerns. Although asthma-obesity links are widely studied, the effects of weight loss on asthma severity measured by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) have received limited attention. The main study objective was to examine whether weight reduction reduces asthma severity in obese adults with asthma. In a prospective, controlled, parallel-group study, we followed 22 obese participants with asthma aged 18 to 75 years with a BMI ≥ 32.5 kg/m2 and AHR (provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 [PC20] weight reduction program for 3 months, and six served as control subjects. The primary outcome was change in AHR over 3 months. Changes in lung function, asthma control, and quality of life were secondary outcomes. At study entry, participant mean ± SD age was 44 ± 9 years, 95% were women, and mean BMI was 45.7 ± 9.2 kg/m2. After 3 months, mean weight loss was 16.5 ± 9.9 kg in the intervention group, and the control group had a mean weight gain of 0.6 ± 2.6 kg. There were significant improvements in PC20 (P = .009), FEV1 (P = .009), FVC (P = .010), asthma control (P Weight loss in obese adults with asthma can improve asthma severity, AHR, asthma control, lung function, and quality of life. These findings support the need to actively pursue healthy weight-loss measures in this population.

  7. Changes in weight bias and perceived employability following weight loss and gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carels, Robert A; Rossi, James; Borushok, Jessica; Taylor, Maija B; Kiefner-Burmeister, Allison; Cross, Nicole; Hinman, Nova; Burmeister, Jacob M

    2015-03-01

    The present weight stigma study examined whether attitudes toward and employability of a normal weight person can change after learning that the person had been obese. Participants (N = 154) viewed an image of a normal weight woman and rated their impression of her. Next, participants rated their impression of her overweight image after learning how she had previously gained and subsequently lost weight. Participants rated the model far less favorably including perceived employability if they thought the once overweight model lost weight through surgery vs. diet and exercise. How the model initially gained the weight had little impact on participant ratings. Surgical weight loss had a significant impact on personality judgments. These negative views extended to hiring decisions.

  8. Effectiveness of weight loss interventions – is there a difference between men and women: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R L; Wood, L G; Collins, C E; Callister, R

    2015-01-01

    Effective strategies are required to reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity; however, the effectiveness of current weight loss programmes is variable. One contributing factor may be the difference in weight loss success between men and women. A systematic review was conducted to determine whether the effectiveness of weight loss interventions differs between men and women. Randomized controlled trials published up until March 2014 were included. Effect sizes (Hedges' g) were used to examine the difference in weight outcomes between men and women. A total of 58 studies met the eligibility criteria with 49 studies of higher quality included in the final data synthesis. Eleven studies that directly compared weight loss in men and women reported a significant sex difference. Ten of these reported that men lost more weight than women; however, women also lost a significant amount of weight. Analysis of effect sizes found small differences in weight loss favouring men for both diet (g = 0.489) and diet plus exercise (g = 0.240) interventions. There is little evidence from this review to indicate that men and women should adopt different weight loss strategies. Current evidence supports moderate energy restriction in combination with exercise for weight loss in both men and women. PMID:25494712

  9. Early weight loss while on lorcaserin, diet, and exercise as a predictor of week 52 weight-loss outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Steven R; O'Neil, Patrick M; Astrup, Arne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify an early treatment milestone that optimizes sensitivity and specificity for predicting ≥5% weight loss at Week (W) 52 in patients with and without type 2 diabetes on lorcaserin or placebo. METHODS: Post hoc area under the curve for receiver operating characteristic analyses...

  10. Does Successful Weight Loss in an Internet-Based Worksite Weight Loss Program Improve Employee Presenteeism and Absenteeism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Samantha M.; You, Wen; Almeida, Fabio A.; Hill, Jennie L.; Linnan, Laura A.; Allen, Kacie C.; Estabrooks, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Certain risk factors associated with overweight and obesity may lead to reduced productivity in the workforce (i.e., increased absenteeism and presenteeism). Participants in a large, Internet-based worksite weight loss intervention, who were present at follow-up (N = 1,030), completed a self-reported productivity measure (World Health…

  11. Fatty acid composition of adipose tissue triglycerides after weight loss and weight maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunešová, M; Hlavatý, P; Tvrzická, E

    2012-01-01

    of the DIOGENES dietary intervention study. After an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) subjects with > 8 % weight loss were randomized to 5 ad libitum weight maintenance diets for 6 months: low protein (P)/low glycemic index (GI) (LP/LGI), low P/high GI (LP/HGI), high P/low GI (HP/LGI), high P/high GI (HP....../HGI), and a control diet. Fatty acid composition in adipose tissue triglycerides was determined by gas chromatography in 195 subjects before the LCD (baseline), after LCD and weight maintenance. Weight change after the maintenance phase was positively correlated with baseline adipose palmitoleic (16:1n-7...

  12. E-cigarettes and weight loss - product design innovation insights from industry patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkirat; Kennedy, Ryan David; Lagasse, Lisa; Czaplicki, Lauren M; Cohen, Joanna E

    2017-05-19

    There is emerging evidence that e-cigarettes are being used by some to mitigate weight gain after quitting smoking, and being used to help control weight. This study sought to identify and describe patents related to innovations for e-cigarette devices associated and weight loss. Relevant patents were identified using Google Patents with the core search terms: "electronic cigarette" OR "e-cigarette" OR "vaporizer" OR "vapourizer" AND "nicotine" AND "weight loss" OR "weight control" OR "obesity" OR "hunger". Patents were reviewed to identify and classify the innovation related to weight loss or weight control. Our search identified 23 unique patents that were filed between 2004 and 2015. Patent applications were sponsored by individual inventors (n=7), tobacco companies (n=5), e-cigarette companies (n=8), pharmaceutical companies (n=2) and a cannabis company (n=1). More than half the patents (n=12) were filed in the US; other countries included China, Germany, South Korea and South Africa. Strategies included using e-cigarette devices to deliver constituents to users that support weight loss through altered metabolism, reduced nutrient absorption, suppressed appetite, or supported healthy behavior change. In most cases (n=18), the innovations detailed in the patents were intended to be used with an e-cigarette device that delivered nicotine to the user. Companies from around the world, and from a range of industries are developing and patenting technologies related to e-cigarettes and weight loss. E-cigarettes may be presented to cigarette users as a possible solution to support smoking cessation and address the fear of weight gain.

  13. Effect of ethnicity on weight loss after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorgami, Zhamak; Arheart, Kristopher L; Zhang, Chi; Messiah, Sarah E; de la Cruz-Muñoz, Nestor

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported better weight loss after bariatric surgery among non-Hispanic whites (NHW) versus non-Hispanic blacks (NHB) and Hispanics. The majority of these studies took place in areas where NHW are the majority. This study aimed to compare post-surgery weight outcomes by ethnicity in a geographic area where Hispanics are the majority. A retrospective medical chart review of 3268 patients (1561 Hispanic, 660 NHB, and 1047 NHW) who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or Adjustable Gastric Band (AGB) placement from 2002 to 2012 were analyzed. Percentages of excess weight loss (EWL) and body mass index (BMI) changes at 6, 12, and 24 months post-surgery were compared by ethnic group. At 6 months, EWL was significantly different by ethnicity (52.7 ± 15.9 Hispanics, 49.7 ± 15.7 NHW, 43.0 ± 17.3 NHB, P 40 kg/m(2). Up to 2 years after RYGB, mean EWL and BMI reduction patterns are similar among NHW and Hispanics and significantly better than NHB. These patterns were comparable but not as pronounced among patients with AGB surgery. Our findings suggest that social factors may contribute to successful weight loss after bariatric surgery.

  14. Micronutrient Gaps in Three Commercial Weight-Loss Diet Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Engel, Matthew; J Kern, Hua; Brenna, J Thomas; H Mitmesser, Susan

    2018-01-20

    Weight-loss diets restrict intakes of energy and macronutrients but overlook micronutrient profiles. Commercial diet plans may provide insufficient micronutrients. We analyzed nutrient profiles of three plans and compared their micronutrient sufficiency to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for male U.S. adults. Hypocaloric vegan (Eat to Live-Vegan, Aggressive Weight Loss; ETL-VAWL), high-animal-protein low-carbohydrate (Fast Metabolism Diet; FMD) and weight maintenance (Eat, Drink and Be Healthy; EDH) diets were evaluated. Seven single-day menus were sampled per diet ( n = 21 menus, 7 menus/diet) and analyzed for 20 micronutrients with the online nutrient tracker CRON-O-Meter. Without adjustment for energy intake, the ETL-VAWL diet failed to provide 90% of recommended amounts for B 12 , B₃, D, E, calcium, selenium and zinc. The FMD diet was low (90% DRIs for all but vitamin D, calcium and potassium. Several micronutrients remained inadequate after adjustment to 2000 kcal/day: vitamin B 12 in ETL-VAWL, calcium in FMD and EDH and vitamin D in all diets. Consistent with previous work, micronutrient deficits are prevalent in weight-loss diet plans. Special attention to micronutrient rich foods is required to reduce risk of micronutrient deficiency in design of commercial diets.

  15. Bone mineral density (BMD) in obesity effect of weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossain, V V; Rao, D S; Carella, M J; Divine, G; Rovner, D R

    1999-01-01

    It is generally believed that bone mineral density (BMD) is increased in obese subjects, but the effect of weight loss on BMD has not been well studied. Therefore, we evaluated BMD among 11 obese women (mean age 45.5 +/- 14.2 years) before and after weight loss achieved by ingesting an 800 calorie diet for 12 weeks. BMD measurements were made at baseline, 6 months and 1 year intervals. Urinary hydroxyproline:creatinine (H:Cr), calcium:creatinine (Ca:Cr) ratios were measured as indices of bone turnover. Mean weight at baseline was 103.8 +/- 15.8 kg and decreased to 83.2 +/- 12.2 at six months and was 85.8 +/- 14.2 kg at one year. Total body, hip and lumbar spine BMD were 1.12 +/- 0.07, .87 +/- 0.11, and 1.02 +/- 0.12 gm/cm2, respectively. Total body BMD was significantly lower at 12 months compared to baseline. No significant change was observed in BMD of the lumbar spine. There was also a significant decrease in hip BMD at six months and 12 months compared to baseline. H:Cr and Ca:Cr ratios did not change over time. We conclude that weight loss achieved by VLCD is accompanied by a statistically significant change in BMD, but the BMD remained in the normal range.

  16. Micronutrient Gaps in Three Commercial Weight-Loss Diet Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G. Engel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Weight-loss diets restrict intakes of energy and macronutrients but overlook micronutrient profiles. Commercial diet plans may provide insufficient micronutrients. We analyzed nutrient profiles of three plans and compared their micronutrient sufficiency to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs for male U.S. adults. Hypocaloric vegan (Eat to Live-Vegan, Aggressive Weight Loss; ETL-VAWL, high-animal-protein low-carbohydrate (Fast Metabolism Diet; FMD and weight maintenance (Eat, Drink and Be Healthy; EDH diets were evaluated. Seven single-day menus were sampled per diet (n = 21 menus, 7 menus/diet and analyzed for 20 micronutrients with the online nutrient tracker CRON-O-Meter. Without adjustment for energy intake, the ETL-VAWL diet failed to provide 90% of recommended amounts for B12, B3, D, E, calcium, selenium and zinc. The FMD diet was low (<90% DRI in B1, D, E, calcium, magnesium and potassium. The EDH diet met >90% DRIs for all but vitamin D, calcium and potassium. Several micronutrients remained inadequate after adjustment to 2000 kcal/day: vitamin B12 in ETL-VAWL, calcium in FMD and EDH and vitamin D in all diets. Consistent with previous work, micronutrient deficits are prevalent in weight-loss diet plans. Special attention to micronutrient rich foods is required to reduce risk of micronutrient deficiency in design of commercial diets.

  17. Micronutrient Gaps in Three Commercial Weight-Loss Diet Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Kern, Hua; Brenna, J. Thomas; H. Mitmesser, Susan

    2018-01-01

    Weight-loss diets restrict intakes of energy and macronutrients but overlook micronutrient profiles. Commercial diet plans may provide insufficient micronutrients. We analyzed nutrient profiles of three plans and compared their micronutrient sufficiency to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for male U.S. adults. Hypocaloric vegan (Eat to Live-Vegan, Aggressive Weight Loss; ETL-VAWL), high-animal-protein low-carbohydrate (Fast Metabolism Diet; FMD) and weight maintenance (Eat, Drink and Be Healthy; EDH) diets were evaluated. Seven single-day menus were sampled per diet (n = 21 menus, 7 menus/diet) and analyzed for 20 micronutrients with the online nutrient tracker CRON-O-Meter. Without adjustment for energy intake, the ETL-VAWL diet failed to provide 90% of recommended amounts for B12, B3, D, E, calcium, selenium and zinc. The FMD diet was low (90% DRIs for all but vitamin D, calcium and potassium. Several micronutrients remained inadequate after adjustment to 2000 kcal/day: vitamin B12 in ETL-VAWL, calcium in FMD and EDH and vitamin D in all diets. Consistent with previous work, micronutrient deficits are prevalent in weight-loss diet plans. Special attention to micronutrient rich foods is required to reduce risk of micronutrient deficiency in design of commercial diets. PMID:29361684

  18. Successful weight loss: how information technology is used to lose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Cheryl L; Koopman, Richelle J; Kabel, Allison; Canfield, Shannon

    2014-02-01

    Commercial producers have outpaced traditional academic healthcare in terms of novel repackaging of traditional approaches to weight control for online delivery. Little is known, however, about consumers' experiences with such products and services. We explored ways that people use information technology (IT) to facilitate health-related behavioral change. Qualitative methods and grounded theory methodology were used to analyze transcripts of audiotaped material from three focus groups, each with 12 participants. Participants were recruited from an ongoing, community-wide weight-loss event, who reported regular or frequent use of IT. Participants frequently used IT applications for completing functional tasks associated with weight loss. In contrast, most participants preferred in-person social support. IT applications facilitated integration of behavior change tasks into everyday life. Despite easy access to a range of social networking Web sites and tools, however, having access to in-person social support was targeted as critical to successful weight loss and well-being. To this end, the role of work peers and work environments was emphasized by these participants. In terms of patient care, successful health portals may benefit from either developing or integrating existing IT applications that save time and/or provide users with visual feedback on progress toward goals. IT-delivered resources would likely optimize community-based behavioral health interventions that target naturally occurring social groups.

  19. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton EF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth F Sutton, Leanne M Redman Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or “apps” along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive and collect personal health information. Apps and accompanying tools now allow an individual to “self-digitize” and, pertaining to weight management, monitor their body weight, caloric intake, physical activity, and more. These products possess the ability to improve the scalability of traditional in-person weight management services considering their near ubiquity, affordability, and capability to deliver information directly and personally to the user. However, similar to the dietary supplement market, the anecdotal value of these products has driven their popularity and acceptance by the general public without requirement of scientific validation or, in the area of weight management or diet/exercise, validation of the safety and efficacy by the Food and Drug Administration prior to market launch. By conducting a literature and clinical trial search, we found remarkably few active, completed, or published studies testing the efficacy of smart device applications using randomized controlled trials. Research efforts must be focused on illuminating the efficacy of behavioral interventions and remote self-monitoring for weight loss/maintenance treatment with true, randomized controlled trials. Keywords: smartphone, mobile phone, application, app, weight, weight loss, weight maintenance

  20. The role of protein in weight loss and maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Heather J; Clifton, Peter M; Astrup, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 y, higher-protein diets have been touted as a successful strategy to prevent or treat obesity through improvements in body weight management. These improvements are thought to be due, in part, to modulations in energy metabolism, appetite, and energy intake. Recent evidence also...

  1. A weight-loss program adapted to the menstrual cycle increases weight loss in healthy, overweight, premenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina R W; Ritz, Christian; Pedersen, Sue D

    2016-01-01

    compared with the effect of simple energy restriction. DESIGN: A total of 60 healthy, overweight, premenopausal women were included in a 6-mo weight-loss program in which each subject consumed a diet of 1600 kcal/d. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a combined diet and exercise program......BACKGROUND: Hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle influence energy intake and expenditure as well as eating preferences and behavior. OBJECTIVE: We examined the impact of a diet and exercise weight-loss program that was designed to target and moderate the effects of the menstrual cycle...... that was tailored to metabolic changes of the menstrual cycle (Menstralean) or to undergo simple energy restriction (control). RESULTS: Thirty-one women (19 Menstralean and 12 control women) completed the study [mean ± SD body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 32.0 ± 5.2]. Both groups lost weight during the study...

  2. Effects of surgical weight loss for treating obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Eun-Kee; Lee, Yeon Ji; Yun, Chang-Ho; Heo, Yoonseok

    2014-12-01

    Weight loss has been reported to reduce the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), particularly in the obese population. However, prospective studies with polysomnography (PSG) for the precise evaluation of OSA are lacking especially in Asian countries. We evaluated the effects of surgical weight loss for treating OSA using PSG data obtained before and after surgery. We performed a prospective study analyzing the clinical and PSG data obtained from our cohort of bariatric surgical candidates with moderate to severe OSA, as confirmed by preoperative PSG. The patients underwent follow-up PSG at least 12 months after bariatric surgery (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass). Of the 47 patients (70.1%) with moderate to severe OSA among 67 patients who underwent preoperative PSG, 10 patients underwent postoperative PSG. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of these 10 patients significantly reduced from 51.0±34.2 to 9.3±12.9 events/h, while their mean body mass index (BMI) loss was from 39.9±8.3 to 26.9±4.4 kg/m2. Although the severity of OSA improved considerably, OSA resolution was achieved in only five patients (50%). When compared to the patients who achieved OSA resolution, the patients with residual OSA showed a tendency to have lower minimum arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) levels and higher supine AHI values in preoperative PSG. Surgical weight loss resulted in the significant improvement of OSA associated with obesity. However, OSA remained in a considerable proportion of patients even after substantial weight loss. We recommend that postoperative PSG be considered for the evaluation of residual OSA, especially in patients with low minimum SaO2 levels and high supine AHI in preoperative PSG.

  3. The Effects of Weight Perception on Adolescents' Weight-Loss Intentions and Behaviors: Evidence from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Maoyong; Jin, Yanhong

    2015-11-17

    The objective of this study was to examine the correlation between self-perception of being overweight and weight loss intentions, eating and exercise behaviors, as well as extreme weight-loss strategies for U.S. adolescents. This study uses 50,241 observations from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBSS) 2001-2009, which were nationally representative sample of 9th- through 12th-grade students in both public and private schools in the US. This study finds that, irrespective of the weight status base on self-reported weight and height, adolescents who perceive themselves as overweight have a stronger intention to lose weight, but do not develop better eating and exercise habits, compared with their counterparts of same gender and reported weight status. Normal-weight adolescents, if they perceive themselves as overweight, are more likely to engage in health-compromising weight-loss methods. This study shows that it is critical to transform weight-loss intentions into actual behaviors among overweight/obese adolescents and improve the efficacy of behavioral interventions against childhood obesity. It also highlights the need of establishing a correct perception of body weight among normal weight adolescents to curb extreme weight-loss methods.

  4. The Effects of Weight Perception on Adolescents’ Weight-Loss Intentions and Behaviors: Evidence from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maoyong Fan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the correlation between self-perception of being overweight and weight loss intentions, eating and exercise behaviors, as well as extreme weight-loss strategies for U.S. adolescents. This study uses 50,241 observations from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBSS 2001–2009, which were nationally representative sample of 9th- through 12th-grade students in both public and private schools in the US. This study finds that, irrespective of the weight status base on self-reported weight and height, adolescents who perceive themselves as overweight have a stronger intention to lose weight, but do not develop better eating and exercise habits, compared with their counterparts of same gender and reported weight status. Normal-weight adolescents, if they perceive themselves as overweight, are more likely to engage in health-compromising weight-loss methods. This study shows that it is critical to transform weight-loss intentions into actual behaviors among overweight/obese adolescents and improve the efficacy of behavioral interventions against childhood obesity. It also highlights the need of establishing a correct perception of body weight among normal weight adolescents to curb extreme weight-loss methods.

  5. Dietary patterns in weight loss maintenance: results from the MedWeight study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karfopoulou, Eleni; Brikou, Dora; Mamalaki, Eirini; Bersimis, Fragiskos; Anastasiou, Costas A; Hill, James O; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2017-04-01

    The dietary habits contributing to weight loss maintenance are not sufficiently understood. We studied weight loss maintainers in comparison with regainers, to identify the differentiating behaviors. The MedWeight study is a Greek registry of weight loss maintainers and regainers. Participants had intentionally lost ≥10 % of their weight and either had maintained this loss for over a year, or had regained weight. Questionnaires on demographics and lifestyle habits were completed online. Dietary assessment was carried out by two telephone 24-h recalls. Present analysis focused on 361 participants (32 years old, 39 % men): 264 maintainers and 97 regainers. Energy and macronutrient intake did not differ by maintenance status (1770 ± 651 kcal in maintainers vs. 1845 ± 678 kcal in regainers, p = 0.338), although protein intake per kg of body weight was higher in maintainers (1.02 ± 0.39 vs. 0.83 ± 0.28 g/kg in regainers, p women. Salty snacks, alcohol and regular soda were more frequently consumed by men regainers. Principal component analysis identified a healthy dietary pattern featuring mainly unprocessed cereal, fruit, vegetables, olive oil and low-fat dairy. Male maintainers were 4.6 times more likely to follow this healthy pattern compared to regainers (OR 4.6, 95 % CI 2.0-11.0). No similar finding was revealed in women. Other characteristics of maintainers but not of regainers were: involvement in meal preparation and eating at home for men, and a higher eating frequency and slower eating rate for women. Men maintaining weight loss were much more likely to adhere to a healthy eating pattern. Eating at home, involvement in meal preparation, higher eating frequency and slower eating rate were also associated with maintenance. These lifestyle habits of successful maintainers provide target behaviors to improve obesity treatment.

  6. Effects of canagliflozin on weight loss in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wenjun; Zhao, Mei; Wang, Meng; Yan, Wenhui; Liu, Yuan; Ren, Shuting; Lu, Jun; Wang, Bing; Chen, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Canagliflozin, an inhibitor of sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT) 2, has been shown to reduce body weight during the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this study, we sought to determine the role of canagliflozin in body weight loss and liver injury in obesity. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet to simulate diet-induced obesity (DIO). Canagliflozin (15 and 60 mg/kg) was administered to DIO mice for 4 weeks. Orlistat (10 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. The body weight, liver weight, liver morphology, total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels were examined. Signaling molecules, including diacylgycero1 acyltransferase-2 (DGAT2), peroxisome proliferation receptor alpha-1 (PPARα1), PPARγ1, PPARγ2 mRNA levels and the protein expression of SGLT2 were evaluated. Canagliflozin reduced body weight, especially the high-dose canagliflozin, and resulted in increased body weight loss compared with orlistat. Moreover, canagliflozin reduced the liver weight and the ratio of liver weight to body weight, lowered the serum levels of TC and TG, and ameliorated liver steatosis. During the canagliflozin treatment, SGLT2, DGAT2, PPARγ1 and PPARγ2 were inhibited, and PPARα1 was elevated in the liver tissues. This finding may explain why body weight was reduced and secondary liver injury was ameliorated in response to canagliflozin. Together, the results suggest that canagliflozin may be a potential anti-obesity strategy.

  7. Weight change among people randomized to minimal intervention control groups in weight loss trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, David J; Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie; Jebb, Susan A; Aveyard, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Evidence on the effectiveness of behavioral weight management programs often comes from uncontrolled program evaluations. These frequently make the assumption that, without intervention, people will gain weight. The aim of this study was to use data from minimal intervention control groups in randomized controlled trials to examine the evidence for this assumption and the effect of frequency of weighing on weight change. Data were extracted from minimal intervention control arms in a systematic review of multicomponent behavioral weight management programs. Two reviewers classified control arms into three categories based on intensity of minimal intervention and calculated 12-month mean weight change using baseline observation carried forward. Meta-regression was conducted in STATA v12. Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria, twenty-nine of which had usable data, representing 5,963 participants allocated to control arms. Control arms were categorized according to intensity, as offering leaflets only, a single session of advice, or more than one session of advice from someone without specialist skills in supporting weight loss. Mean weight change at 12 months across all categories was -0.8 kg (95% CI -1.1 to -0.4). In an unadjusted model, increasing intensity by moving up a category was associated with an additional weight loss of -0.53 kg (95% CI -0.96 to -0.09). Also in an unadjusted model, each additional weigh-in was associated with a weight change of -0.42 kg (95% CI -0.81 to -0.03). However, when both variables were placed in the same model, neither intervention category nor number of weigh-ins was associated with weight change. Uncontrolled evaluations of weight loss programs should assume that, in the absence of intervention, their population would weigh up to a kilogram on average less than baseline at the end of the first year of follow-up. © 2016 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  8. Motivations for Weight Loss Among Active Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclin-Akinyemi, Courtney; Krukowski, Rebecca A; Kocak, Mehmet; Talcott, G Wayne; Beauvais, Alexis; Klesges, Robert C

    2017-09-01

    Rates of overweight and obesity among Active Duty Military Personnel remain high despite fitness test requirements, negative consequences of fitness test failure, and emphasis on weight and appearance standards. Specific motivating factors for weight loss influence weight loss program interest and often differ by gender, race, ethnicity, or age. This study investigates the weight loss motivations endorsed by a diverse population of Active Duty Military Personnel initiating a behavioral weight loss study, to inform the development of future recruitment efforts and program development. Active Duty Military Personnel (n = 248) completed a 16-item questionnaire of weight loss motivations before initiating a behavioral weight loss study. We evaluated endorsement patterns by demographic characteristics (body mass index [BMI], gender, race, ethnicity, age, and military rank). Data collection for this study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center and acknowledged by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Results indicated that improved physical health, improved fitness, improved quality of life, and to live long were endorsed as "very important" motivations by at least three-fourths of the sample. "To pass the fitness test" was endorsed less frequently as a "very important" motivation, by 69% of the sample. A greater proportion of women as compared to men endorsed being very motivated by improving mood/well-being, quality of life, physical mobility, job performance, appearance, and sex life, as well as fitting into clothes. Participants categorized in the "Other" racial group and African Americans more frequently endorsed motivations to improve fitness and physical strength when compared to Caucasians. Moreover, participants in the "Other" race category were significantly more likely to rate their ability to physically defend themselves, improve physical mobility, and improve

  9. Weight loss goals among African-American women with type 2 diabetes in a behavioral weight control program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Della B; Bursac, Zoran; Dilillo, Vicki; West, Delia S

    2011-01-01

    .... The current study examined personal weight loss goals and expected satisfaction with a reasonable weight loss among African-American women with type 2 diabetes starting a behavioral obesity treatment...

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea after weight loss: a clinical trial comparing gastric bypass and intensive lifestyle intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredheim, Jan Magnus; Rollheim, Jan; Sandbu, Rune; Hofsø, Dag; Omland, Torbjørn; Røislien, Jo; Hjelmesæth, Jøran

    2013-05-15

    Few studies have compared the effect of surgical and conservative weight loss strategies on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We hypothesized that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) would be more effective than intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) at reducing the prevalence and severity of OSA (apnea-hypopnea-index [AHI] ≥ 5 events/hour). A total of 133 morbidly obese subjects (93 females) were treated with either a 1-year ILI-program (n = 59) or RYGB (n = 74) and underwent repeated sleep recordings with a portable somnograph (Embletta). Participants had a mean (SD) age of 44.7(10.8) years, BMI 45.1(5.7) kg/m(2), and AHI 17.1(21.4) events/hour. Eighty-four patients (63%) had OSA. The average weight loss was 8% in the ILI-group and 30% in the RYGB-group (p weight loss, rather than the surgical procedure per se, explains the beneficial effects.

  11. Obesity and Pancreatic Cancer: Overview of Epidemiology and Potential Prevention by Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mu; Jung, Xiaoman; Hines, O Joe; Eibl, Guido; Chen, Yijun

    2018-02-01

    Currently, there are no effective preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer. Obesity has been increasingly recognized as a strong but modifiable risk factor of pancreatic cancer. In this article, we aim to review the literature regarding weight loss on prevention of pancreatic cancer. Epidemiological and laboratory studies have shown that obesity is associated with increased incidence of pancreatic cancer and potentially worse cancer outcome. Whereas the underlying pathomechanisms remain unclear, chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, and altered intestinal microbiota are all implicated in the carcinogenic effect of obesity. Weight loss, especially the durable and significant weight loss after bariatric surgery, has been shown to reduce the risks of multiple cancers and may become a good intervention for pancreatic cancer prevention.

  12. [Ketogenic diets and weight loss: basis and effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín

    2008-06-01

    The international consensus is that carbohydrates are the basis of the food pyramid of a healthy diet. Today's specialists believe that the best way to lose weight is by cutting down on calories, essentialy in the form of fat. However, this paper will clarify that ketogenic diets are, from a physiological, biochemicale and practical point of view, a much more effective way of losing weight, since such diets provide metabolic advantages such as the capacity to preserve muscle mass, reduce appetite, to have a lower metabolic efficiency, produce a metabolic activation of thermogenesis and favour a greater fat loss even with a greater number of calories.

  13. Adverse Psychiatric Effects Associated with Herbal Weight-Loss Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saverio Bersani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and overeating are among the most prevalent health concerns worldwide and individuals are increasingly using performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs as an easy and fast way to control their weight. Among these, herbal weight-loss products (HWLPs often attract users due to their health claims, assumed safety, easy availability, affordable price, extensive marketing, and the perceived lack of need for professional oversight. Reports suggest that certain HWLPs may lead to onset or exacerbation of psychiatric disturbances. Here we review the available evidence on psychiatric adverse effects of HWLPs due to their intrinsic toxicity and potential for interaction with psychiatric medications.

  14. A Physics Model for Weight Loss by Dieting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    body, weight change, diet, energy loss. Resumen El peso promedio de una persona está determinado por el equilibrio entre su ingesta de calorías...through by 2x to get 2 1 1dx X dt T x X        , (2) where the two constants a and b have been re-expressed in terms of two new... constants /X a b and 22 /T a b . Their physical significance is that 2W X is the person’s equilibrium weight and T is a time constant characterizing

  15. [Unhealthy weight loss. Erosion by apple cider vinegar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambon, D L; Brand, H S; Veerman, E C I

    2012-12-01

    Erosive tooth wear was diagnosed in the dentition of a 15-year-old girl with a Moroccan background. After an anamnesis, extensive analysis of possible risk factors and a study of the pattern of erosion, it was concluded that the erosive tooth wear was induced by daily consumption of a glass of apple cider vinegar Further investigation revealed that in North-African culture, women have used apple cider vinegar to achieve weight loss for generations. Bodybuilders are also known to make use of this method of weight reduction.

  16. Weight loss in grappling combat sports: review and applied recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lancha Junior

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review is to organize the main literature findings on the effects of rapid weight loss onphysiological systems and performance in grappling combat sports. Several surveys showed that most wrestlers lose significant amount of body weight few days prior to competitions by means of several harmful methods, as severe food and water restriction, or even vomiting and use of laxative and diuretics. The same weight loss patterns seems to occur among Brazilian judo athletes. Many athletes begin to lose weight frequently in puberty. In general, the weight cycles are very recurrent during seasons. A small decrease in some growth variables, followed by a rapid catch-up can be observed during a season. The rapid weight loss involves several adverse effects such as hormonal imbalance, body fat redistribution, decrease of immune system activity, impairments on cardiovascular system, imbalance on water and electrolytes homeostasis and decrease in renal function and in mental and mood state. The aerobic as well as anaerobic performance can be negatively affected by weight reduction. Depending on the kind of weight loss, diet and the recovery time after weighing, anaerobic performance may not be decreased. The weight reduction, if necessary, should be gradual and small. Athletes must consume a high carbohydrate diet during weight loss period and after weighing, prior to the beginning of the competitions. Dehydration should be avoided. Relatively simple changes in rules combined with educational programs could minimize rapid weight loss-related problems. RESUMO O objetivo desta revisão é organizar os principais achados da literatura a respeito dos efeitos das práticas de perda rápida de peso sobre os sistemas fisiológicos e sobre o desempenho em esportes de combate. Diversos levantamentos demonstraram que grande parte dos atletas norte-americanos de luta olímpica perde significativaquantidade de peso dias antes das competições, por

  17. Effect of weight loss on inflammatory and endothelial markers and FMD using two low-fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, P M; Keogh, J B; Foster, P R; Noakes, M

    2005-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is strongly associated with obesity and there is evidence that weight loss has positive effects on cardiovascular disease risk. The aims of this study were to compare meal replacements (MR) with a conventional low-fat diet as weight loss strategies and to examine the effect of weight loss on flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and other markers of endothelial function in overweight Australians with raised triglycerides (TG) (> 2 mmol/l). Subjects matched for age, gender, fasting plasma TG and body mass index were randomized to two low- fat high- carbohydrate weight loss strategies (both FMD, pulse wave velocity and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline and at 3 months, as were fasting blood samples for lipids, glucose, insulin, C reactive protein (CRP) and endothelium-derived factors. Mean weight loss was 6.3 +/- 3.7 kg (6.0 +/- 4.2 vs 6.63 +/- 3.35 kg, MR vs C) with no difference between diet groups. TG, insulin, CRP, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM1) fell after weight loss, but FMD did not change. Systolic BP fell by 8 mmHg and pulse wave velocity improved. In subjects with elevated TG, weight loss resulted in significant improvements in cardiovascular risk markers, particularly endothelium-derived factors (PAI-1 and sICAM1). However, FMD did not improve with weight loss.

  18. Exercise autonomous motivation predicts 3-yr weight loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marlene N; Markland, David; Carraça, Eliana V; Vieira, Paulo N; Coutinho, Sílvia R; Minderico, Cláudia S; Matos, Margarida G; Sardinha, Luís B; Teixeira, Pedro J

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated exercise-related predictors of successful long-term weight control in women by analyzing the extent to which sustained exercise participation and self-determination theory (SDT)-based exercise motivation variables mediated the impact of a behavioral weight control intervention on 3-yr weight change. Longitudinal randomized controlled trial consisting of a 1-yr SDT-based intervention and a 2-yr follow-up with 221 female participants (means ± SD: age = 37.6 ± 7 yr, body mass index = 31.6 ± 4.1 kg·m(-2)). The tested model incorporated experimentally manipulated perceived need support, motivational regulations, and 2-yr exercise adherence as mediators of the intervention's impact on 3-yr weight change. Paths were tested using partial least squares analysis. Where there were significant intervening paths, tests of mediation were conducted. Treatment had significant effects on 1- and 2-yr autonomous regulations, 2-yr physical activity, and 3-yr weight change, fully mediated by the tested paths (effect ratio = 0.10-0.61). Moderate and vigorous exercise at 2 yr had a significant effect (P autonomous regulation effects on follow-up weight change were only partially mediated by physical activity (effect ratio = 0.42). This application of SDT to physical activity and weight management showed that not all types of motivation predict long-term behavioral outcomes and that sustained moderate and vigorous exercise mediated long-term weight change. It provides strong evidence for a link between experimentally increased autonomous motivation and exercise and long-term weight loss maintenance. Results highlight the importance of interventions targeting the internalization of exercise behavioral regulation and making exercise and physical activity positive and meaningful experiences rather than simply focusing on immediate behavior change in overweight/obese women.

  19. Weight loss competitions at the work site: impact on weight, morale and cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, K D; Cohen, R Y; Stunkard, A J; Felix, M R; Cooley, N B

    1984-11-01

    Three weight loss competitions were held in business/industrial settings. One competition was between three banks; the other two were within industries, either between employee teams selected at random or between divisions of the industry. Attrition in the competitions was less than 1 per cent and weight loss averaged 5.5 kg. Both employees and management reported positive changes in morale and employee/management relations, and both considered the competition important to the success of the program. The cost-effectiveness ratio ($ 2.93 per 1 per cent reduction in percentage overweight) is the best yet reported.

  20. "When the honeymoon is over, the real work begins:" Gastric bypass patients' weight loss trajectories and dietary change experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    To understand gastric bypass patients' experiences with managing food and eating for long-term weight management, this study examined patients' self-reported dietary changes and weight loss patterns. Thirteen women and three men between 15 months and 10 years post-gastric bypass surgery were recruited in Upstate New York. They completed two qualitative, in-depth interviews about their weight loss and dietary experiences. Using verbatim transcripts, researchers created timelines for each participant that summarized weight changes and the associated dietary behaviors. Constant comparative analysis of the timelines and transcripts identified a common, initial rapid weight loss period followed by weight stabilization, after which participants' weight loss patterns diverged into three possible long-term trajectories (Maintaining, Regained/Losing, and Regained) and one short-term trajectory (Losing). Dietary management over the periods of weight loss involved six components: physical needs, hunger and fullness, relationship with food, strategy use, habit formation, and awareness of eating. In the "honeymoon period" weight loss was "easy" because "surgery does the work" in limiting appetite, portion sizes, and interest in foods. As weight stabilized, "the work begins" as participants became capable of eating a greater quantity and a wider variety of foods. Differences in weight loss trajectories were associated with participants' abilities to maintain changes in relationship with food, dietary strategies and habits, and awareness of eating behaviors. Viewing weight loss outcomes of gastric bypass surgery as trajectories that develop as the result of dietary transitions and changes in dietary management suggests that patients need to be counseled on a variety of cognitive and behavioral strategies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Obesity-induced Lymphedema Nonreversible following Massive Weight Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Arin K.; Grant, Frederick D.; Maclellan, Reid A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Lymphedema is the progressive enlargement of tissue due to inadequate lymphatic function. Obesity-induced lymphedema of the lower extremities can occur once a patient?s body mass index (BMI) exceeds 50. We report our first patient with obesity-induced lower extremity lymphedema who was followed prospectively before and after weight loss. A 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 80 presented to our Lymphedema Program complaining of bilateral lower extremity swelling. Lymphoscintigraphy showe...

  2. Postprandial coagulation activation in overweight individuals after weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Due, Anette Pia

    2014-01-01

    . This was tested in a parallel intervention trial on overweight individuals (aged 28.4 (SD 4.7) years) randomly assigned to a MUFA-diet (35-45% of energy as fat; >20% as MUFA, n=21) or a low-fat (LF) diet (20-30% of energy as fat, n=22) for 6months after a weight loss of ~10%. All foods were provided free...

  3. Cognitive behavioral therapy to aid weight loss in obese patients: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Cattivelli, Roberto; Rossi, Alessandro; Novelli, Margherita; Varallo, Giorgia; Molinari, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition associated with risk factors for many medical complications and comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, osteoarthritis, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, type-2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and different psychosocial issues and psychopathological disorders. Obesity is a highly complex, multifactorial disease: genetic, biological, psychological, behavioral, familial, social, cultural, and environmental factors can influence in different ways. Evidence-based strategies to improve weight loss, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce related comorbidities typically integrate different interventions: dietetic, nutritional, physical, behavioral, psychological, and if necessary, pharmacological and surgical ones. Such treatments are implemented in a multidisciplinary context with a clinical team composed of endocrinologists, nutritionists, dietitians, physiotherapists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and sometimes surgeons. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is traditionally recognized as the best established treatment for binge eating disorder and the most preferred intervention for obesity, and could be considered as the first-line treatment among psychological approaches, especially in a long-term perspective; however, it does not necessarily produce a successful weight loss. Traditional CBT for weight loss and other protocols, such as enhanced CBT, enhanced focused CBT, behavioral weight loss treatment, therapeutic education, acceptance and commitment therapy, and sequential binge, are discussed in this review. The issue of long-term weight management of obesity, the real challenge in outpatient settings and in lifestyle modification, is discussed taking into account the possible contribution of mHealth and the stepped-care approach in health care.

  4. Cognitive behavioral therapy to aid weight loss in obese patients: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Cattivelli, Roberto; Rossi, Alessandro; Novelli, Margherita; Varallo, Giorgia; Molinari, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition associated with risk factors for many medical complications and comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, osteoarthritis, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, type-2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and different psychosocial issues and psychopathological disorders. Obesity is a highly complex, multifactorial disease: genetic, biological, psychological, behavioral, familial, social, cultural, and environmental factors can influence in different ways. Evidence-based strategies to improve weight loss, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce related comorbidities typically integrate different interventions: dietetic, nutritional, physical, behavioral, psychological, and if necessary, pharmacological and surgical ones. Such treatments are implemented in a multidisciplinary context with a clinical team composed of endocrinologists, nutritionists, dietitians, physiotherapists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and sometimes surgeons. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is traditionally recognized as the best established treatment for binge eating disorder and the most preferred intervention for obesity, and could be considered as the first-line treatment among psychological approaches, especially in a long-term perspective; however, it does not necessarily produce a successful weight loss. Traditional CBT for weight loss and other protocols, such as enhanced CBT, enhanced focused CBT, behavioral weight loss treatment, therapeutic education, acceptance and commitment therapy, and sequential binge, are discussed in this review. The issue of long-term weight management of obesity, the real challenge in outpatient settings and in lifestyle modification, is discussed taking into account the possible contribution of mHealth and the stepped-care approach in health care. PMID:28652832

  5. Maintenance of weight loss after lifestyle interventions for overweight and obesity, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barte, J. C. M.; ter Bogt, N. C. W.; Bogers, R. P.; Teixeira, P. J.; Blissmer, B.; Mori, T. A.; Bemelmans, W. J. E.

    2010-01-01

    P>Lifestyle interventions can reduce body weight, but weight regain is common and may particularly occur with higher initial weight loss. If so, one may argue whether the 10% weight loss in clinical guidelines is preferable above a lower weight loss. This systematic review explores the relation

  6. Herbal Weight Loss Pill Overdose: Sibutramine Hidden in Pepper Pill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Pamukcu Gunaydin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supposedly herbal weight loss pills are sold online and are widely used in the world. Some of these products are found to contain sibutramine by FDA and their sale is prohibited. We report a case of a female patient who presented to the emergency department after taking slimming pills. 17-year-old female patient presented to the emergency room with palpitations, dizziness, anxiety, and insomnia. She stated that she had taken 3 pills named La Jiao Shou Shen for slimming purposes during the day. Her vital signs revealed tachycardia. On her physical examination, she was restless, her oropharynx was dry, her pupils were mydriatic, and no other pathological findings were found. Sibutramine intoxication was suspected. She was given 5 mg IV diazepam for restlessness. After supportive therapy and observation in emergency department for 12 hours there were no complications and the patient was discharged home. Some herbal pills that are sold online for weight loss have sibutramine hidden as an active ingredient, and their sale is prohibited for this reason. For people who use herbal weight loss drugs, sibutramine excessive intake should be kept in mind at all times.

  7. Weight loss and survival of Biomphalaria Glabrata deprived of water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vianey-Liaud

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Immature and mature Biomphalaria glabrata are kept out of water at relative humidities varying from 0 to 100%. When snails are submitted to a saturated atmosphere, they show a slow weight loss and survival may be long. If relative humidity (RH decreases, weight loss becomes important and survival is short. A reduced RH (0 to 65% produces similar effects. During desiccation, fasting has no noticeable effect; survival depends essentially on weight loss.Biomphalaria glabrata maduros ou imaturos são mantidos fora da água, variando a umidade de 0 a 100%. Quando caramujos são submetidos a uma atmosfera saturada, sofrem uma lenta perda de peso e a sobrevivência pode ser longa. Se a umidade relativa decresce, a perda de peso será importante e a sobrevida será abreviada. Uma umidade relativa de 0 a 65% pode produzir efeitos similares. Durante a dessecação, a privação de alimento não tem efeito notável, a sobrevivência dependendo essencialmente da perda de peso.

  8. Daily pattern of energy distribution and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Hollie A; Li, Fan; Cardoso, Chelsi

    2018-02-19

    Timing of energy intake, a temporal dietary pattern, may enhance health. Eating a greater amount of energy earlier and a smaller amount of energy later in the day, a behavioral circadian rhythm, may assist with chronoenhancement. Chronoenhancement seeks to enhance entrainment (synchronization) of biological and behavioral circadian rhythms. In humans, research reports that eating a greater amount of energy early and a smaller amount of energy later in the day increases dietary induced thermogenesis, improves cardiometabolic outcomes, and enhances weight loss. However, little human research has examined if this eating pattern enhances regularity of biological circadian rhythm. In a randomized controlled 8-week pilot study, the influence of energy distribution timing on weight loss and regularity of sleep onset and wake times (marker for biological circadian rhythm) was examined. Within an hypocaloric, three-meal prescription, participants (n = 8) were assigned to either: 1) Morning: 50%, 30%, and 20% of kcal at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, respectively; or 2) Evening: 20%, 30%, and 50% of kcal at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, respectively. Percent weight loss and regularity of sleep onset and wake times were significantly (p energy distribution timing on health, longer studies conducted in free-living participants, with dietary intake assessed using time-stamped methods, that include measures of the circadian timing system are needed. This small review is based upon a symposium presentation at the Society of the Study of Ingestive Behavior in 2017. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Weight Loss after Sleeve Gastrectomy in Super Superobesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Catheline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This prospective study evaluated laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for its safety and efficiency in excess weight loss (%EWL in super superobese patients (BMI >60 Kg/m2. Results. Thirty patients (33 women and 7 men were included, with mean age of 35 years (range 18 to 59. Mean preoperative BMI was 66 Kg/m2 (range 60 to 85. The study included one patient with complete situs inversus and 4 (14% with previous restrictive gastric banding. The mean operative time was 120 minutes (range 80 to 220 min and the mean hospital stay was 7.5 days (4 to 28 days. There was no postoperative mortality or need for a laparotomy conversion. Two subphrenic hematomas, one gastric fistula, and one pulmonary embolism, were the major complications. After 18 months 17 (77% had sufficient weight loss and six had insufficient results, leading to either re-sleeve gastrectomy (3, or gastric bypass (2. Three years after the initial laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, the mean EWL was 51% (range 21 to 82. Conclusion. The laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and efficient operating procedure for treating super superobesity. In the case of insufficient weight loss, a second-stage operation like resleeve gastrectomy or gastric bypass can be proposed.

  10. Herbal Weight Loss Pill Overdose: Sibutramine Hidden in Pepper Pill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamukcu Gunaydin, Gul; Dogan, Nurettin Ozgur; Levent, Sevcan; Kurtoglu Celik, Gulhan

    2015-01-01

    Supposedly herbal weight loss pills are sold online and are widely used in the world. Some of these products are found to contain sibutramine by FDA and their sale is prohibited. We report a case of a female patient who presented to the emergency department after taking slimming pills. 17-year-old female patient presented to the emergency room with palpitations, dizziness, anxiety, and insomnia. She stated that she had taken 3 pills named La Jiao Shou Shen for slimming purposes during the day. Her vital signs revealed tachycardia. On her physical examination, she was restless, her oropharynx was dry, her pupils were mydriatic, and no other pathological findings were found. Sibutramine intoxication was suspected. She was given 5 mg IV diazepam for restlessness. After supportive therapy and observation in emergency department for 12 hours there were no complications and the patient was discharged home. Some herbal pills that are sold online for weight loss have sibutramine hidden as an active ingredient, and their sale is prohibited for this reason. For people who use herbal weight loss drugs, sibutramine excessive intake should be kept in mind at all times. PMID:25861489

  11. The effects of water and non-nutritive sweetened beverages on weight loss during a 12-week weight loss treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, John C; Wyatt, Holly R; Foster, Gary D; Pan, Zhaoxing; Wojtanowski, Alexis C; Vander Veur, Stephanie S; Herring, Sharon J; Brill, Carrie; Hill, James O

    2014-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of non-nutritive sweetened beverages (NNS) or water for weight loss during a 12-week behavioral weight loss treatment program. An equivalence trial design with water or NNS beverages as the main factor in a prospective randomized trial among 303 men and women was employed. All participants participated in a behavioral weight loss treatment program. The results of the weight loss phase (12 weeks) of an ongoing trial (1 year) that is also evaluating the effects of these two treatments on weight loss maintenance were reported. The two treatments were not equivalent with the NNS beverage treatment group losing significantly more weight compared to the water group (5.95 kg versus 4.09 kg; P water group during 12 weeks. These results show that water is not superior to NNS beverages for weight loss during a comprehensive behavioral weight loss program. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  12. Factors Associated with Achievement of Clinically Significant Weight Loss by Women in a National Nonprofit Weight Loss Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Nia S; Furniss, Anna L; Helmkamp, Laura J; Van Pelt, Rachael E

    2017-08-01

    Clinically significant weight loss (CSWL) is ≥5% of initial weight. The purpose of the study is to determine factors associated with women achieving CSWL in Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS), a national, nonprofit weight loss program. This is a retrospective analysis of 48,674 females who joined TOPS from 2005 to 2011 and had a birth date in the database. Predictors of CSWL were evaluated using log-binomial regression and adjusted relative risks [99% CI] for participant age, initial weight, number of members per chapter, and chapter age. Older women were more likely to achieve CSWL, with women ≥70 years 1.23 (1.18, 1.28) times more likely to achieve CSWL compared to women 18 to lose weight as those in chapters less than 10 years old. Women in TOPS were more likely to achieve CSWL if older, ≥113 kg, and in larger, newer chapters. Future studies should address ways to modify the program to improve achievement of CSWL.

  13. Epigenetics in Adipose Tissue, Obesity, Weight Loss, and Diabetes12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J. Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I.; Claycombe, Kate J.; Schalinske, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Given the role that diet and other environmental factors play in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the implication of different epigenetic processes is being investigated. Although it is well known that external factors can cause cell type-dependent epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, histone tail modifications, and chromatin remodeling, the regulation of these processes, the magnitude of the changes and the cell types in which they occur, the individuals more predisposed, and the more crucial stages of life remain to be elucidated. There is evidence that obese and diabetic people have a pattern of epigenetic marks different from nonobese and nondiabetic individuals. The main long-term goals in this field are the identification and understanding of the role of epigenetic marks that could be used as early predictors of metabolic risk and the development of drugs or diet-related treatments able to delay these epigenetic changes and even reverse them. But weight gain and insulin resistance/diabetes are influenced not only by epigenetic factors; different epigenetic biomarkers have also been identified as early predictors of weight loss and the maintenance of body weight after weight loss. The characterization of all the factors that are able to modify the epigenetic signatures and the determination of their real importance are hindered by the following factors: the magnitude of change produced by dietary and environmental factors is small and cumulative; there are great differences among cell types; and there are many factors involved, including age, with multiple interactions between them. PMID:24425725

  14. Lifestyle medicine consulting walking meetings for sustained weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frates, Elizabeth Pegg; Crane, Margaret E

    2016-02-01

    With rates of obesity and diabetes rising worldwide, effective ways of managing weight are becoming more important. We present the case study of a middle-aged Caucasian-American woman (body mass index (BMI) 27.8, overweight category) who wanted to lose weight. The patient participated in a behaviour modification programme with a physician trained in lifestyle medicine as well as health and wellness coaching. After the 14-week programme, which included 9, 1 h long walking sessions with the clinician, the patient lost 11 Ibs (BMI 24.7, normal category). The programme included a combination of increasing physical activity, eating appropriate quantities of healthy foods, goal setting and a positive attitude. The patient has kept her BMI at or below 24.1 for over 2 years. This case demonstrates a novel approach to weight loss management--walking therapeutic sessions--and also outlines critical components of lifestyle medicine counselling that facilitate the process of sustainable weight loss and lasting change. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Impact of body-composition methodology on the composition of weight loss and weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, M; Schautz, B; Braun, W; Gluer, C-C; Bosy-Westphal, A; Müller, M J

    2013-05-01

    We intended to (i) to compare the composition of weight loss and weight gain using densitometry, deuterium dilution (D₂O), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the four-compartment (4C) model and (ii) to compare regional changes in fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM) and skeletal muscle as assessed by DXA and MRI. Eighty-three study participants aged between 21 and 58 years with a body mass index range of 20.2-46.8 kg/m(2) had been assessed at two different occasions with a mean follow-up between 23.5 and 43.5 months. Body-weight changes within weight stable, a gain or a loss of >3% of initial weight was considered as a significant weight change. There was a considerable bias between the body-composition data obtained by the individual methods. When compared with the 4C model, mean bias of D₂O and densitometry was explained by the erroneous assumption of a constant hydration of FFM, thus, changes in FM were underestimated by D₂O but overestimated by densitometry. Because hydration does not normalize after weight loss, all two-component models have a systematic error in weight-reduced subjects. The bias between 4C model and DXA was mainly explained by FM% at baseline, whereas FFM hydration contributed to additional 5%. As to the regional changes in body composition, DXA data had a considerable bias and, thus, cannot replace MRI. To assess changes in body composition associated with weight changes, only the 4C model and MRI can be used with confidence.

  16. Use of artificial sweeteners and fat-modified foods in weight loss maintainers and always-normal weight individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, S; Lang, W; Jordan, D; Wing, R R

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dietary strategies, and use of fat- and sugar-modified foods and beverages in a weight loss maintainer group (WLM) and an always-normal weight group (NW). WLM (N=172) had maintained > or = 10% weight loss for 11.5 years, and had a body mass index (BMI) of 22.0 kg m(-2). NW (N=131) had a BMI of 21.3 kg m(-2) and no history of being overweight. Three, 24-h recalls on random, non-consecutive days were used to assess dietary intake. WLM reported consuming a diet that was lower in fat (28.7 vs 32.6%, Pfat-modification strategies than NW. WLM also consumed a significantly greater percentage of modified dairy (60 vs 49%; P=0.002) and modified dressings and sauces (55 vs 44%; P=0.006) than NW. WLM reported consuming three times more daily servings of artificially sweetened soft drinks (0.91 vs 0.37; P=0.003), significantly fewer daily servings of sugar-sweetened soft drinks (0.07 vs 0.16; P=0.03) and more daily servings of water (4.72 vs 3.48; P=0.002) than NW. These findings suggest that WLM use more dietary strategies to accomplish their weight loss maintenance, including greater restriction on fat intake, use of fat- and sugar-modified foods, reduced consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and increased consumption of artificially sweetened beverages. Ways to promote the use of fat-modified foods and artificial sweeteners merits further research in both prevention- and treatment-controlled trials.

  17. Longitudinal changes in blood pressure during weight loss and regain of weight in obese boys and girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens-Christian; Gamborg, Michael; Neland, Mette

    2012-01-01

    To investigate blood pressure (BP) in relation to changes in body mass index (BMI) in obese children during weight loss and subsequent weight regain.......To investigate blood pressure (BP) in relation to changes in body mass index (BMI) in obese children during weight loss and subsequent weight regain....

  18. Exercise duration and intensity in a weight-loss program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, Heather O

    2005-03-01

    To examine the effect of duration and frequency of exercise on weight loss and cardiorespiratory fitness in previously sedentary, overweight, women. Randomized, controlled, 4-arm trial of 12-months duration. A university-based behavioral weight loss program during the years 2000 and 2001. Eligibility criteria were: women, 21 to 45 years of age, body mass index (BMI) 27 to 40, reporting exercise exercise or that would affect metabolism or weight loss, being treated for psychologic conditions, pregnant, recently pregnant, or planning pregnancy, having a medical condition that could affect metabolism or body weight (eg, diabetes) or that would limit exercise participation. All 201 participants were assigned to a standard behavioral weight loss program, which included regular group meetings and telephone calls, and caloric and dietary fat restrictions. Participants were given meal plans and kept weekly food diaries. The women were assigned to 1 of 4 exercise groups based on energy expenditure of 1000 kcal/wk or 2000 kcal/wk and exercise intensity (moderate versus vigorous). Exercise intensity was prescribed according to percentage of age-predicted maximal heart rate and rating of perceived exertion. Energy expenditure was converted to minutes of exercise per week. The groups were vigorous intensity/high duration, moderate intensity/high duration, moderate intensity/moderate duration, and vigorous intensity/moderate duration. All 4 groups started the program at moderate intensity and moderate duration (100 min/week of walking) and increased the vigor and duration of exercise to set targets of 200, 300, 200, and 150 min/week, for the groups respectively. Treadmills were provided to the participants, and feedback on their weekly exercise logs was given. At 6 and 12 months, changes in body weight and BMI were measured. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by a graded exercise treadmill test and expressed as percent change in oxygen consumption from baseline. Excluding 5

  19. Regular exercise attenuates the metabolic drive to regain weight after long-term weight loss

    OpenAIRE

    MacLean, Paul S.; Higgins, Janine A.; Wyatt, Holly R.; Melanson, Edward L.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Giles, Erin D.; Brown, Ian E.; Hill, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Weight loss is accompanied by several metabolic adaptations that work together to promote rapid, efficient regain. We employed a rodent model of regain to examine the effects of a regular bout of treadmill exercise on these adaptations. Obesity was induced in obesity-prone rats with 16 wk of high-fat feeding and limited physical activity. Obese rats were then weight reduced (∼14% of body wt) with a calorie-restricted, low-fat diet and maintained at that reduced weight for 8 wk by providing li...

  20. Naltrexone + bupropion (Mysimba). Too risky for only modest weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Weight loss and its long-term maintenance are mainly based on dietary measures and regular physical activity. There are currently no weight-loss medications with a favourable harm-benefit balance. Bupropion is chemically related to certain amphetamines, while naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist. A fixed-dose combination of these two drugs has received marketing authorisation in the European Union for obese patients and for over-weight patients with other cardiovascular risk factors. In five placebo-controlled, randomised, double-blind trials, the patients, weighing on average between 100 kg and 105 kg (average body mass index 36 kg/m2), the naltrexone + bupropion combination was associated with an average weight loss of a few additional kilograms compared with placebo, after 6 months or one year of treatment. There are no post-trial follow-up data to show whether or not the patients regained their lost weight after treatment discontinuation. One trial including more than 8900 patients examined the effect of the naltrexone + bupropion combination on the freauency of maior cardiovascular events, but poor handling of an interim analysis undermined the validity of the final results. The known adverse effects of bupropion consist of potentially severe neuropsychiatric disorders such as aggressiveness, depression and suicidal ideation, and also allergic reactions, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Misuse and excessive consumption have been reported. In trials in obese or overweight patients, the naltrexone + bupropion combination caused sometimes severe neuropsychiatric disorders, including seizures, cognitive impairment, dizziness, anxiety, sleep disorders and psychotic symptoms. In clinical trials, the combination led to an increase in blood pressure compared with placebo, and also an excess of cardiac arrhythmias. About half of patients who took naltrexone + bupropion experienced gastrointestinal disorders such as nausea, vomiting and constipation. The

  1. Initial weight loss goals: have they changed and do they matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Lent, M. R.; Vander Veur, S S; Peters, J. C.; Herring, S J; Wyatt, H. R.; Tewksbury, C.; Wojtanowski, A. C.; Hill, J. O.; Foster, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Nearly 20?years ago, participants in behavioural weight loss programmes reported goals that greatly exceeded the amount of weight typically produced by these programmes. Whether having unrealistic weight loss goals impacts weight loss or attrition is unclear. The intent of the current study was to revisit current weight loss goals and examine whether goals impact outcomes. Methods Adults (N?=?308, BMI?=?33.7???4.2?kg/m2) participated in a 12?month behavioural weight manageme...

  2. Initial weight loss on an 800-kcal diet as a predictor of weight loss success after 8 weeks: the Diogenes study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handjieva-Darlenska, T; Handjiev, S; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment subject characteristics and weight change during the first weeks of a low-calorie diet (LCD) can predict weight loss outcomes at the end of a controlled 8-week weight loss period in overweight and obese adults.......The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment subject characteristics and weight change during the first weeks of a low-calorie diet (LCD) can predict weight loss outcomes at the end of a controlled 8-week weight loss period in overweight and obese adults....

  3. Developing a consumer evaluation tool of weight control strategy advertisements on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevorasirikul, Kanokrat; Gray, Nicola J; Anderson, Claire W

    2008-06-01

    To develop two evaluation tools for weight loss and weight gain advertisements on the Internet in order to help consumers to evaluate the quality of information within these advertisements. One hundred websites identified by Internet search engines for weight loss and weight gain strategies (50 websites each) were evaluated using two specific scoring instruments, developed by adapting questions from the 'DISCERN' tool and reviewing all related weight control guidelines and advertising regulations. The validity and reliability of the adapted tools were tested. Our evaluation tools rated the information from most websites as poor quality (70%). In the case of weight loss strategies, statements about rapid (18%) and permanent (28%) weight loss caused concern as well as lack of sensible advice about dieting and a lack of product warnings (84%). Safety concerns relating to weight gain products were the lack of warnings about side effects in products containing steroids and creatine (92%). The adapted tools exhibited acceptable validity and reliability. Quality of information within weight control advertisements on the Internet was generally poor. Problems of false claims, little advice on healthy ways to modify weight and few warnings on side effects have been highlighted in this study.

  4. Fat mass loss predicts gain in physical function with intentional weight loss in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kristen M; Miller, Michael E; Rejeski, W Jack; Nicklas, Barbara J; Krichevsky, Stephen B; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Clinical recommendation of weight loss (WL) in older adults remains controversial, partially due to concerns regarding lean mass loss and potential loss of physical function. The purpose of this study is to determine the independent associations between changes in fat and lean mass and changes in physical function in older, overweight, and obese adults undergoing intentional WL. Data from three randomized-controlled trials of intentional WL in older adults with similar functional outcomes (short physical performance battery and Pepper assessment tool for disability) were combined. Analyses of covariance models were used to investigate relationships between changes in weight, fat, and lean mass (acquired using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and changes in physical function. Overall loss of body weight was -7.8 ± 6.1 kg (-5.6 ± 4.1 kg and -2.7 ± 2.4 kg of fat and lean mass, respectively). In all studies combined, after adjustment for age, sex, and height, overall WL was associated with significant improvements in self-reported mobility disability (p fat and lean mass as independent variables found only the change in fat mass to significantly predict change in mobility disability (β[fat] = 0.04; p fat] = -0.01; p loss of body weight, following intentional WL, is associated with significant improvement in self-reported mobility disability and walking speed in overweight and obese older adults. Importantly, fat mass loss was found to be a more significant predictor of change in physical function than lean mass loss.

  5. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Elizabeth F; Redman, Leanne M

    2016-01-01

    The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or "apps" along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive and collect personal health information. Apps and accompanying tools now allow an individual to "self-digitize" and, pertaining to weight management, monitor their body weight, caloric intake, physical activity, and more. These products possess the ability to improve the scalability of traditional in-person weight management services considering their near ubiquity, affordability, and capability to deliver information directly and personally to the user. However, similar to the dietary supplement market, the anecdotal value of these products has driven their popularity and acceptance by the general public without requirement of scientific validation or, in the area of weight management or diet/exercise, validation of the safety and efficacy by the Food and Drug Administration prior to market launch. By conducting a literature and clinical trial search, we found remarkably few active, completed, or published studies testing the efficacy of smart device applications using randomized controlled trials. Research efforts must be focused on illuminating the efficacy of behavioral interventions and remote self-monitoring for weight loss/maintenance treatment with true, randomized controlled trials.

  6. CB(1) blockade-induced weight loss over 48 weeks decreases liver fat in proportion to weight loss in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholm, R; Sevastianova, K; Santos, A; Kotronen, A; Urjansson, M; Hakkarainen, A; Lundbom, J; Tiikkainen, M; Rissanen, A; Lundbom, N; Yki-Järvinen, H

    2013-05-01

    Studies in mice have suggested that endocannabinoid blockade using the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) blocker rimonabant prevents obesity-induced hepatic steatosis. To determine effects of rimonabant on liver fat in humans, we measured liver fat content by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 37 subjects who used either a CB1 blocker rimonabant or placebo in a double-blind, randomized manner. This was retrospectively compared with a historical hypocaloric diet weight loss group (n=23). Weight loss averaged 8.5±1.4 kg in the rimonabant, 1.7±1.0 kg in the placebo and 7.5±0.2 kg in the hypocaloric diet group (Pfat decreased more in the rimonabant (5.9% (2.5-14.6%) vs 1.8% (0.9-3.5%), before vs after) than in the placebo group (6.8% (2.2-15.7%) vs 4.9% (1.6-7.8%), before vs after, Ploss of liver fat (r=0.70, P>0.0001). The decreases in liver fat were comparable between the rimonabant and the young historical hypocaloric diet groups. We conclude that, unlike in mice, in humans rimonabant decreases liver fat in proportion to weight loss.

  7. The role of exercise and physical activity in weight loss and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Lavie, Carl J; Earnest, Conrad P; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This review explores the role of physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) in the prevention of weight gain, initial weight loss, weight maintenance, and the obesity paradox. In particular, we will focus the discussion on the expected initial weight loss from different ET programs, and explore intensity/volume relationships. Based on the present literature, unless the overall volume of aerobic ET is very high, clinically significant weight loss is unlikely to occur. Also, ET also has an important role in weight regain after initial weight loss. Overall, aerobic ET programs consistent with public health recommendations may promote up to modest weight loss (~2 kg), however the weight loss on an individual level is highly heterogeneous. Clinicians should educate their patients on reasonable expectations of weight loss based on their physical activity program and emphasize that numerous health benefits occur from PA programs in the absence of weight loss. © 2014.

  8. Lifestyle patterns associated with diet, physical activity, body mass index and amount of recent weight loss in a sample of successful weight losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, Paul T; Jeffery, Robert W; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2012-06-26

    Research suggests that the interaction between biological susceptibility and environmental risk is complex and that further study of behavioral typologies related to obesity and associated behaviors is important to further elucidate the nature of obesity risk and how to approach it for intervention. The current investigation aims to identify phenotypical lifestyle patterns that might begin to unify our understanding of obesity and obesity related behaviors. Individuals who had recently lost substantial weight of their own initiative completed measures of intentional weight control behaviors and lifestyle behaviors associated with eating. These behaviors were factor analyzed and the resulting factors were examined in relation to BMI, recent weight loss, diet, and physical activity. Four meaningful lifestyle and weight control behavioral factors were identified- regularity of meals, TV related viewing and eating, intentional strategies for weight control, and eating away from home. Greater meal regularity was associated with greater recent weight loss and greater fruit and vegetable intake. Greater TV related viewing and eating was associated with greater BMI and greater fat and sugar intake. More eating away from home was related to greater fat and sugar intake, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less physical activity. Greater use of weight control strategies was most consistently related to better weight, diet, and physical activity outcomes. Compared to the individual behavior variables, the identified lifestyle patterns appeared to be more reliably related to diet, physical activity, and weight (both BMI and recent weight loss). These findings add to the growing body of literature identifying behavioral patterns related to obesity and the overall weight control strategy of eating less and exercising more. In future research it will be important to replicate these behavioral factors (over time and in other samples) and to examine how changes in these factors

  9. Green tea for weight loss and weight maintenance in overweight or obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Tannis M; Whelan, Anne Marie; Killian, Lara; Doucette, Steve; Kirk, Sara; Foy, Elizabeth

    2012-12-12

    Preparations of green tea are used as aids in weight loss and weight maintenance. Catechins and caffeine, both contained in green tea, are each believed to have a role in increasing energy metabolism, which may lead to weight loss. A number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the role of green tea in weight loss have been published; however, the efficacy of green tea preparations in weight loss remains unclear. To assess the efficacy and safety of green tea preparations for weight loss and weight maintenance in overweight or obese adults. We searched the following databases from inception to specified date as well as reference lists of relevant articles: The Cochrane Library (Issue 12, 2011), MEDLINE (December 2011), EMBASE (December 2011), CINAHL (January 2012), AMED (January 2012), Biological Abstracts (January 2012), IBIDS (August 2010), Obesity+ (January 2012), IPA (January 2012) and Web of Science (December 2011). Current Controlled Trials with links to other databases of ongoing trials was also searched. RCTs of at least 12 weeks' duration comparing green tea preparations to a control in overweight or obese adults. Three authors independently extracted data, assessed studies for risk of bias and quality, with differences resolved by consensus. Heterogeneity of included studies was assessed visually using forest plots and quantified using the I(2) statistic. We synthesised data using meta-analysis and descriptive analysis as appropriate; subgroup and sensitivity analyses were conducted. Adverse effects reported in studies were recorded. Due to the level of heterogeneity among studies, studies were divided into two groups; those conducted in Japan and those conducted outside Japan. Study length ranged between 12 and 13 weeks. Meta-analysis of six studies conducted outside Japan showed a mean difference (MD) in weight loss of -0.04 kg (95% CI -0.5 to 0.4; P = 0.88; I(2) = 18%; 532 participants). The eight studies conducted in Japan were not similar

  10. Daily self-monitoring of body weight, step count, fruit/vegetable intake, and water consumption: a feasible and effective long-term weight loss maintenance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Jeremy D; Cornett, Rachel A; Savla, Jyoti S; Davy, Kevin P; Davy, Brenda M

    2012-05-01

    Maintenance of weight loss remains a challenge for most individuals. Thus, practical and effective weight-loss maintenance (WTLM) strategies are needed. A two-group 12-month WTLM intervention trial was conducted from June 2007 to February 2010 to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of a WTLM intervention for older adults using daily self-monitoring of body weight, step count, fruit/vegetable (F/V) intake, and water consumption. Forty weight-reduced individuals (mean weight lost=6.7±0.6 kg; body mass index [calculated as kg/m²] 29.2±1.1), age 63±1 years, who had previously participated in a 12-week randomized controlled weight-loss intervention trial, were instructed to record daily body weight, step count, and F/V intake (WEV [defined as weight, exercise, and F/V]). Experimental group (WEV+) participants were also instructed to consume 16 fl oz of water before each main meal (ie, three times daily), and to record daily water intake. Outcome measures included weight change, diet/physical activity behaviors, theoretical constructs related to health behaviors, and other clinical measures. Statistical analyses included growth curve analyses and repeated measures analysis of variance. Over 12 months, there was a linear decrease in weight (β=-0.32, Pweight for each participant determined that weight loss was greater over the study period in the WEV+ group than in the WEV group, corresponding to weight changes of -0.67 kg and 1.00 kg, respectively, and an 87% greater weight loss (β=-0.01, Pweight, physical activity, and F/V consumption is a feasible and effective approach for maintaining weight loss for 12 months, and daily self-monitoring of increased water consumption may provide additional WTLM benefits. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Weight loss from maximum body weight and mortality: the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Linked Mortality File.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, D D; Mussolino, M E

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study is to examine the relationship between weight loss from maximum body weight, body mass index (BMI), and mortality in a nationally representative sample of men and women. Longitudinal cohort study. In all, 6117 whites, blacks, and Mexican-Americans 50 years and over at baseline who survived at least 3 years of follow-up, from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Linked Mortality Files (1988-1994 with passive mortality follow-up through 2000), were included. Measured body weight and self-reported maximum body weight obtained at baseline. Weight loss (maximum body weight minus baseline weight) was categorized as or=15%. Maximum BMI (reported maximum weight (kg)/measured baseline height (m)(2)) was categorized as healthy weight (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and obese (>or=30.0). In all, 1602 deaths were identified. After adjusting for age, race, smoking, health status, and preexisting illness, overweight men with weight loss of 15% or more, overweight women with weight loss of 5-women in all BMI categories with weight loss of 15% or more were at increased risk of death from all causes compared with those in the same BMI category who lost Weight loss of 5-Weight loss of 15% or more from maximum body weight is associated with increased risk of death from all causes among overweight men and among women regardless of maximum BMI.

  12. Body weight perception and weight loss practices among Sri Lankan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Ranil; Byrne, Nuala M; Soares, Mario J; Katulanda, Prasad; Hills, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between self-perception of body weight, weight loss approaches and measured body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) among Sri Lankan adults. A nationally representative sample of 600 adults aged ≥18 years was selected using a multi-stage random cluster sampling technique. An interviewer-administrated questionnaire was used to assess demographic characteristics, body weight perception, abdominal obesity perception and details of weight losing practices. Weight, height and waist circumference (WC) were measured and Asian anthropometric cut-offs for BMI and WC were applied. Body weight mis-perception was common among Sri Lankan adults. Two-thirds of overweight males and 44.7% females considered themselves as ‘about right weight’, moreover, 4.1% and 7.6% overweight men and women reported themselves as being ‘underweight’. Over one third of both male and female obese subjects perceived themselves as ‘about right weight’ or ‘underweight’. Nearly 32% of centrally obese men and women perceived that their WC is about right. People who perceived themselves as overweight or very overweight (n = 154) only 63.6% tried to lose weight (n = 98), and one quarter of adults sought advice from professionals (n = 39). Body weight misperception was common among underweight, healthy weight, overweight, and obese adults in Sri Lanka. Over 2/3 of overweight and 1/3 of obese Sri Lankan adults believe they are in right weight category or are under weight. © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . All rights reserved.

  13. Coaching and barriers to weight loss: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Obino KF

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Karen Fernanda Muñoz Obino,1 Caroline Aguiar Pereira,1 Rafaela Siviero Caron-Lienert2 1Nutrology/Clinical Nutrition Unit, Ernesto Dornelles Hospital, 2Nutrition of the Educational and Research Institute of Moinhos de Vento Hospital, Porto Alegre, Brazil Introduction: Coaching is proposed to raise a patient’s awareness and responsibility for their health behaviour change by transforming the professional–patient relationship.Objective: To review the scientific literature on how coaching can assist in weight loss and improve a patient’s state of health.Methodology: An integrative literature search was performed using PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences, and Scientific Electronic Library Online. We selected articles that were published in Portuguese, English, and Spanish over the last 10 years. Data analysis was performed using a validated data collection instrument.Results: Among the 289 articles identified in the search, 276 were excluded because they did not address the leading research question, their full texts were not available on the Internet, or they were duplicate publications. Therefore, for the analysis, we selected 13 articles that we classified as randomized clinical studies (46.15%; n=6, cohort studies (30.76%; n=4, cross-sectional studies (7.69%; n=1, case studies (7.69%; n=1, and review articles (7.69%; n=1. Joint intervention (combined in-person and telecoaching sessions constituted the majority of session types. The use of technical coaching was superior in reducing anthropometric measurements and increasing the levels of motivation and personal satisfaction compared with formal health education alone.Conclusion: Coaching is an efficient, cost-effective method for combining formal education and treatment of health in the weight-loss process. Additional randomized studies are needed to demonstrate its effectiveness with respect to chronic disease indicators. Keywords: coaching, weight loss

  14. Influence of maximal fat oxidation on long-term weight loss maintenance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Sune; Husted, Karina; Amdisen, Signe

    2017-01-01

    composition (dual X-ray absorptiometry) and fat oxidation (indirect calorimetry) during incremental exercise were measured at follow-up. Blood and a muscle biopsy were sampled. At follow-up, a U-shaped parabolic relationship between MFO and percent weight loss was observed (r = 0.448; P ...Impaired maximal fat oxidation has been linked to obesity and weight regain after weight loss. The aim was to investigate the relationship between maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and long-term weight loss maintenance. Eighty subjects [means (SD): age, 36(13) yrs; BMI, 38(1) kg/m2] were recruited from...... a total of 2,420 former participants of an 11- to 12-wk lifestyle intervention. Three groups were established based on percent weight loss at follow-up [5.3(3.3) yr]: clinical weight loss maintenance (CWL), >10% weight loss; moderate weight loss (MWL), 1–10% weight loss; and weight regain (WR). Body...

  15. Herbal Weight Loss Pill Overdose: Sibutramine Hidden in Pepper Pill

    OpenAIRE

    Pamukcu Gunaydin, Gul; Dogan, Nurettin Ozgur; Levent, Sevcan; Kurtoglu Celik, Gulhan

    2015-01-01

    Supposedly herbal weight loss pills are sold online and are widely used in the world. Some of these products are found to contain sibutramine by FDA and their sale is prohibited. We report a case of a female patient who presented to the emergency department after taking slimming pills. 17-year-old female patient presented to the emergency room with palpitations, dizziness, anxiety, and insomnia. She stated that she had taken 3 pills named La Jiao Shou Shen for slimming purposes during the day...

  16. Body Contouring Surgery in the Massive Weight Loss Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Dennis J; Ayeni, Omodele

    2016-08-01

    Plastic surgeons subspecializing in body contouring are meeting the challenge of postbariatric surgery massive weight loss patients. With an appreciation of the magnitude of the surface deformity, and altered metabolism, nutrition, and psychological makeup of these patients, innovative plastic surgeons have forged an organized approach to preparation, operative technique, and postoperative care. Patients at greatest risk for complications are identified, appraised, and either their condition improved or they are counselled to reduce expectations. Beyond the removal of excess skin and adipose tissue, advanced gender-specific techniques have improved aesthetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sex differences in the relation of weight loss self-efficacy, binge eating, and depressive symptoms to weight loss success in a residential obesity treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presnell, Katherine; Pells, Jennifer; Stout, Anna; Musante, Gerard

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine whether weight loss self-efficacy, binge eating, and depressive symptoms predicted weight loss during treatment, and whether gender moderates these associations with prospective data from 297 participants (223 women and 74 men) enrolled in a residential obesity treatment program. Men reported higher initial levels of self-efficacy than women, whereas women reported greater pre-treatment levels of binge eating and depressive symptoms. Higher pre-treatment levels of weight control self-efficacy, binge eating, and depressive symptoms predicted greater weight loss in men, but not in women. Results suggest that certain psychological and behavioral factors should be considered when implementing weight loss interventions, and indicate a need to consider gender differences in predictors of weight loss treatment. Future research should seek to identify predictors of weight loss among women.

  18. Weight Loss Expectations and Attrition in Treatment-Seeking Obese Women

    OpenAIRE

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Calugi, Simona; Compare, Angelo; El Ghoch, Marwan; Petroni, Maria Letizia; Tomasi, Franco; Mazzali, Gloria; Marchesini, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The analysis of the relation between weight loss goals and attrition in the treatment of obesity has produced conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of weight loss goals on attrition in a cohort of obese women seeking treatment at 8 Italian medical centres. Methods 634 women with obesity, consecutively enrolled in weight loss programmes, were included in the study. Weight loss goals were evaluated with the Goals and Relative Weights Questionnai...

  19. Weight loss expectations and attrition in treatment-seeking obese women

    OpenAIRE

    Riccardo Dalle Grave; Simona Calugi; Angelo Compare; Marwan El Ghoch; Maria Letizia Petroni; Franco Tomasi; Gloria Mazzali; Giulio Marchesini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The analysis of the relation between weight loss goals and attrition in the treatment of obesity has produced conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of weight loss goals on attrition in a cohort of obese women seeking treatment at 8 Italian medical centres. Methods: 634 women with obesity, consecutively enrolled in weight loss programmes, were included in the study. Weight loss goals were evaluated with the Goals and Relative Weights Questionn...

  20. Behavioral Mediators of Treatment Effects in the Weight Loss Maintenance Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullion, C. M.; Brantley, P. J.; Stevens, V. J.; Bauck, A.; Champagne, C. M.; Dalcin, A. T.; Funk, K. L.; Hollis, J. F.; Jerome, G. J.; Lien, L. F.; Loria, C. M.; Myers, V. H.; Appel, L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Weight Loss Maintenance Trial tested strategies for maintenance of weight loss. Personal contact was superior to interactive technology and self-directed conditions. Purpose We aimed to identify behavioral mediators of the superior effect of personal contact vs. interactive technology and of personal contact vs. self-directed arms. Methods Overweight/obese adults at risk for cardiovascular disease (n=1,032) who lost at least 4 kg were randomized to personal contact, interactive technology, or self-directed. After 30 months, 880 participants had data on weight and behavioral strategies. Results Reported increase of intake of fruits and vegetables and physical activity and more frequent self-weighing met criteria as mediators of the better outcome of personal contact vs. interactive technology. Increased intake of fruits and vegetables, more frequent self-weighing, and decreased dessert consumption were mediators of the difference between personal contact vs. self-directed. Conclusion Inducing changes in the identified behaviors might yield better outcomes in future weight loss maintenance trials. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00054925) PMID:23813320

  1. Predictors of weight loss in young adults who are over-weight or obese and have psychosocial problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lous, Jørgen; Freund, Kirsten S.

    2016-01-01

    . In a logistic regression model, predictors of weight loss or no weight loss were a) pre-interventional consideration of weight loss within 30 days, b) having weight loss as a prioritised goal for improved quality of life, c) being female, d) being in the oldest half of participants, and e) having many......BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is in a general practice trial setting to identify predictive factors for weight loss after 1 year among young adults who are over-weight or obese and who have several psychosocial problems. METHODS: Twenty-eight general practitioners recruited 495 patients aged 20......-45 years with psychosocial problems for a randomized general preventive study to increase self-efficacy to achieve a self-prioritised goal for a better life by discussions of resources and barriers for reaching the goal. The present study is a post hoc analysis of possible predictors of weight loss among...

  2. Weight Maintenance Following the STRIDE Weight Loss and Lifestyle Intervention for Individuals taking Antipsychotic Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carla A.; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H.; Leo, Michael C.; Stumbo, Scott P.; Perrin, Nancy A.; Nichols, Gregory A.; Stevens, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Individuals taking antipsychotic medications have increased risk of obesity-related early morbidity/mortality. This report presents weight maintenance results from a successful weight loss and behavioral lifestyle change program developed for people taking antipsychotic medications. Design and Methods STRIDE was a 2-arm, randomized controlled trial. Intervention participants attended weekly group meetings for 6 months, then monthly group meetings for 6 months. Assessments were completed at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results At 24-months, intervention participants lost 3.7% of baseline weight and control participants 2.1%, a non-significant difference. Fasting glucose results followed a similar pattern. There was a statistically significant difference, however, for fasting insulin—the intervention group’s levels decreased between the end of the intensive intervention (at 6 months) and 24 months (10.1 to 7.91μU/mL); control participants’ levels increased (11.66 to 12.92μU/mL) during this period. There were also fewer medical hospitalizations among intervention participants (5.7%) than controls (21.1%; Χ2=8.47, p=0.004) during the 12 to 24-month post-intervention maintenance period. Conclusions Weight-change differences between arms diminished following the intervention period, though fasting insulin levels continued to improve. Reduced hospitalizations suggest that weight loss, even with regain, may have long-term positive benefits for people taking antipsychotic medications and may reduce costs. PMID:26334929

  3. Regular exercise attenuates the metabolic drive to regain weight after long-term weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Paul S; Higgins, Janine A; Wyatt, Holly R; Melanson, Edward L; Johnson, Ginger C; Jackman, Matthew R; Giles, Erin D; Brown, Ian E; Hill, James O

    2009-09-01

    Weight loss is accompanied by several metabolic adaptations that work together to promote rapid, efficient regain. We employed a rodent model of regain to examine the effects of a regular bout of treadmill exercise on these adaptations. Obesity was induced in obesity-prone rats with 16 wk of high-fat feeding and limited physical activity. Obese rats were then weight reduced (approximately 14% of body wt) with a calorie-restricted, low-fat diet and maintained at that reduced weight for 8 wk by providing limited provisions of the diet with (EX) or without (SED) a daily bout of treadmill exercise (15 m/min, 30 min/day, 6 days/wk). Weight regain, energy balance, fuel utilization, adipocyte cellularity, and humoral signals of adiposity were monitored during eight subsequent weeks of ad libitum feeding while the rats maintained their respective regimens of physical activity. Regular exercise decreased the rate of regain early in relapse and lowered the defended body weight. During weight maintenance, regular exercise reduced the biological drive to eat so that it came closer to matching the suppressed level of energy expenditure. The diurnal extremes in fuel preference observed in weight-reduced rats were blunted, since exercise promoted the oxidation of fat during periods of feeding (dark cycle) and promoted the oxidation of carbohydrate (CHO) later in the day during periods of deprivation (light cycle) . At the end of relapse, exercise reestablished the homeostatic steady state between intake and expenditure to defend a lower body weight. Compared with SED rats, relapsed EX rats exhibited a reduced turnover of energy, a lower 24-h oxidation of CHO, fewer adipocytes in abdominal fat pads, and peripheral signals that overestimated their adiposity. These observations indicate that regimented exercise altered several metabolic adaptations to weight reduction in a manner that would coordinately attenuate the propensity to regain lost weight.

  4. Predicting dropout in dietary weight loss trials using demographic and early weight change characteristics: Implications for trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, Marijka; Tapsell, Linda C; Charlton, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    Attrition causes analytical and efficacy issues in weight loss trials. Consistent predictors of attrition in weight loss trials have not been identified. Trial design could be improved if factors predicting attrition are accounted for. The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of easily measured pre study and early study variables to determine their relationship with attrition in dietary weight loss trials. Data was pooled from four previous dietary weight loss trials. Mixed effects logistic regression, Receiver Operator Curves and decision trees (classification and regression trees) were used to determine which of the variables (percent weight loss at 1 month, age, gender and baseline BMI) predicted dropout and to determine cutoffs useful for future trial design. The sample included 289 subjects, 73% female, with a mean age of 46.68±9.27years and average dropout of 25%. Percent weight loss at 1 month was the strongest predictor of dropout, those with a weight loss ≤2% were 4.99 times (95% CI 2.71, 9.18) more likely to drop out than those with a weight loss >2% in the first month (P50 (P=0.006). Early weight loss and age were identified as significant variables for predicting attrition in weight loss trials. Trial designs maybe improved by incorporating these variables and developing interventions targeting these factors may improve participant retention. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of water and non‐nutritive sweetened beverages on weight loss and weight maintenance: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jimikaye; Cardel, Michelle; Wyatt, Holly R.; Foster, Gary D.; Pan, Zhaoxing; Wojtanowski, Alexis C.; Vander Veur, Stephanie S.; Herring, Sharon J.; Brill, Carrie; Hill, James O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of water versus beverages sweetened with non‐nutritive sweeteners (NNS) on body weight in subjects enrolled in a year‐long behavioral weight loss treatment program. Methods The study used a randomized equivalence design with NNS or water beverages as the main factor in a trial among 303 weight‐stable people with overweight and obesity. All participants participated in a weight loss program plus assignment to consume 24 ounces (710 ml) of water or NNS beverages daily for 1 year. Results NNS and water treatments were non‐equivalent, with NNS treatment showing greater weight loss at the end of 1 year. At 1 year subjects receiving water had maintained a 2.45 ± 5.59 kg weight loss while those receiving NNS beverages maintained a loss of 6.21 ± 7.65 kg (P weight loss and maintenance during a 1‐year behavioral treatment program. NNS beverages were superior for weight loss and weight maintenance in a population consisting of regular users of NNS beverages who either maintained or discontinued consumption of these beverages and consumed water during a structured weight loss program. These results suggest that NNS beverages can be an effective tool for weight loss and maintenance within the context of a weight management program. PMID:26708700

  6. Mediating Effect of Body Image Distortion on Weight Loss Efforts in Normal-Weight and Underweight Korean Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Sil; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background: We explored the relationship between body mass index-for-age percentile, body image distortion, and unnecessary weight loss efforts in Korean adolescent girls who are underweight and normal weight and examined the mediating effect of body image distortion on weight loss efforts. Methods: This study used data from the 2013 Korea Youth…

  7. Breast cancer biomarkers predict weight loss after gastric bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauter Edward R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has long been associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk and more recently with premenopausal breast cancer risk. We previously observed that nipple aspirate fluid (n levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA were associated with obesity. Serum (s levels of adiponectin are lower in women with higher body mass index (BMI and with breast cancer. We conducted a prospective study of obese women who underwent gastric bypass surgery to determine: 1 change in n- and s-adiponectin and nPSA after surgery and 2 if biomarker change is related to change in BMI. Samples (30-s, 28-n and BMI were obtained from women 0, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Findings There was a significant increase after surgery in pre- but not postmenopausal women at all time points in s-adiponectin and at 3 and 6 months in n-adiponectin. Low n-PSA and high s-adiponectin values were highly correlated with decrease in BMI from baseline. Conclusions Adiponectin increases locally in the breast and systemically in premenopausal women after gastric bypass. s-adiponectin in pre- and nPSA in postmenopausal women correlated with greater weight loss. This study provides preliminary evidence for biologic markers to predict weight loss after gastric bypass surgery.

  8. Weight loss diets advertised in non-scientific publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amancio Olga Maria Silverio

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Weight-loss diets advertised in mainstream non-scientific publications and targeting the adult female public were evaluated in relation to total energy value, macronutrients, calcium, iron, vitamins A and E, and cholesterol content, as well as the presence of information regarding the duration of diets, fluid intake, physical activity, and maintenance diets. Two publications were selected, considering periodicity, circulation, readership, and years in publication. The Virtual Nutri software was used to evaluate the nutrients of 112 diets. Micronutrient content was compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes. All diets were inadequate in at least one of the evaluated items. Less than 25.0% of the diets presented adequate macronutrient distribution. Calcium, iron, and vitamin E were also predominantly inadequate (85.7, 97.3, and 91.9%, respectively. Non-scientific publications should not be allowed to advertise weight-loss diets. In addition, their chemical composition is inadequate and they are not accompanied by important instructions for such therapy.

  9. Unusual cause of profound weight loss in a young woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Ashu; Uppula, Pavan; Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Bhansali, Anil

    2016-11-22

    A 27-year-old woman presented with anorexia, weight loss and psychiatric symptoms for the past 4 years. She did not have history of headache, visual disturbances or symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. She was sarcopenic with body mass index of 10.16 kg/m2Her systemic examination was normal except for temporal hemianopia suggesting a sellar/suprasellar lesion. Hormonal evaluation revealed pan-hypopituitarism with central diabetes insipidus. Subsequent neuroimaging revealed sellar-suprasellar mass lesion with intense contrast enhancement and leptomeningeal metastases. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed elevated β human chorionic gonadotropin and the presence of syncytiotrophoblast germ cells. Histopathology from the mass lesion confirmed the diagnosis of germinoma. Immunohistochemistry of the tumour tissue was positive for c-kit and placental alkaline phosphatise. She received a combination of chemotherapy with craniospinal irradiation. Significant weight loss in a young woman may not always be an eating disorder like anorexia nervosa albeit more common than germ cell tumour. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Coaching and barriers to weight loss: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Obino, Karen Fernanda; Aguiar Pereira, Caroline; Caron-Lienert, Rafaela Siviero

    2017-01-01

    Coaching is proposed to raise a patient's awareness and responsibility for their health behaviour change by transforming the professional-patient relationship. To review the scientific literature on how coaching can assist in weight loss and improve a patient's state of health. An integrative literature search was performed using PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences, and Scientific Electronic Library Online. We selected articles that were published in Portuguese, English, and Spanish over the last 10 years. Data analysis was performed using a validated data collection instrument. Among the 289 articles identified in the search, 276 were excluded because they did not address the leading research question, their full texts were not available on the Internet, or they were duplicate publications. Therefore, for the analysis, we selected 13 articles that we classified as randomized clinical studies (46.15%; n=6), cohort studies (30.76%; n=4), cross-sectional studies (7.69%; n=1), case studies (7.69%; n=1), and review articles (7.69%; n=1). Joint intervention (combined in-person and telecoaching sessions) constituted the majority of session types. The use of technical coaching was superior in reducing anthropometric measurements and increasing the levels of motivation and personal satisfaction compared with formal health education alone. Coaching is an efficient, cost-effective method for combining formal education and treatment of health in the weight-loss process. Additional randomized studies are needed to demonstrate its effectiveness with respect to chronic disease indicators.

  11. Mediators of weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot study for overweight fathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubans David R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A poor understanding of the specific lifestyle behaviors that result in weight loss has hindered the development of effective interventions. The aim of this paper was to identify potential behavioral mediators of weight loss in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK intervention for overweight fathers. Findings The three-month intervention was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial and conducted in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Baseline, three month (immediate post-intervention and six month assessments were conducted. Recruitment and follow-up occurred between October 2008 and May 2009. The study sample included 53 overweight/obese men [mean ( SD age=40.6( 97.1 years; body mass index (BMI=33.2 (3.9 kgm-2] and their primary school-aged children [n=71, 54% boys; age=8.2 (2.0 years] who were randomized to HDHK program or a wait-list control group. Physical activity (PA was assessed using pedometers and dietary behaviors were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. The intervention resulted in significant weight loss (5.131.27kg, PPP Conclusions PA was an important mediator of weight loss in the HDHK intervention. Encouraging overweight fathers to be more active with their children appears to be a promising strategy for obesity treatment in men.

  12. Self-Monitoring in Weight Loss: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Self-monitoring is the centerpiece of behavioral weight loss intervention programs. This article presents a systematic review of the literature on three components of self-monitoring in behavioral weight loss studies: diet, exercise and self-weighing. This review included articles that were published between 1993 and 2009 that reported on the relationship between weight loss and these self-monitoring strategies. Of the 22 studies identified, 14 focused on dietary self-monitoring, one on self-monitoring exercise and six on self-weighing. A wide array of methods was used to perform self-monitoring; the paper diary was used most often. Adherence to self-monitoring was reported most frequently as the number of diaries completed or the frequency of log-ins or reported weights. The use of technology, which included the Internet, personal digital assistants and electronic digital scales were reported in five studies. Descriptive designs were used in the earlier studies while more recent reports involved prospective studies and randomized trials that examined the effect of self-monitoring on weight loss. A significant association between self-monitoring and weight loss was consistently found; however, the level of evidence was weak because of methodological limitations. The most significant limitations of the reviewed studies were the homogenous samples and reliance on self-report. In all but two studies, the samples were predominantly White and female. This review highlights the need for studies in more diverse populations, for objective measures of adherence to self-monitoring, and for studies that establish the required dose of self-monitoring for successful outcomes. PMID:21185970

  13. Self-monitoring in weight loss: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lora E; Wang, Jing; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Self-monitoring is the centerpiece of behavioral weight loss intervention programs. This article presents a systematic review of the literature on three components of self-monitoring in behavioral weight loss studies: diet, exercise, and self-weighing. This review included articles that were published between 1993 and 2009 that reported on the relationship between weight loss and these self-monitoring strategies. Of the 22 studies identified, 15 focused on dietary self-monitoring, one on self-monitoring exercise, and six on self-weighing. A wide array of methods was used to perform self-monitoring; the paper diary was used most often. Adherence to self-monitoring was reported most frequently as the number of diaries completed or the frequency of log-ins or reported weights. The use of technology, which included the Internet, personal digital assistants, and electronic digital scales were reported in five studies. Descriptive designs were used in the earlier studies whereas more recent reports involved prospective studies and randomized trials that examined the effect of self-monitoring on weight loss. A significant association between self-monitoring and weight loss was consistently found; however, the level of evidence was weak because of methodologic limitations. The most significant limitations of the reviewed studies were the homogenous samples and reliance on self-report. In all but two studies, the samples were predominantly white and women. This review highlights the need for studies in more diverse populations, for objective measures of adherence to self-monitoring, and for studies that establish the required dose of self-monitoring for successful outcomes. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Participation as a leader in immersion weight loss treatment may benefit, not harm, young adult staff members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumberg, K; Anderson, D A; Kirschenbaum, D S; Earleywine, M

    2015-08-01

    Despite the success of weight-management programmes, some researchers caution that participation in an aggressive approach to weight management could promote the development of eating pathology. The current study evaluated the risks and benefits for young adults of serving as staff members in an immersion treatment of adolescent obesity over the course of a summer. Participants included weight loss staff members (n = 108) along with a comparison group of young adults with similar demographic characteristics (n = 136). Participants completed assessments of eating disorder and obesity risk at three time points: the beginning of the summer, the end of the summer and a 6-week follow-up. Weight loss leadership participants who were initially overweight lost weight over the course of the summer, but those at healthy weights maintained their weight. Comparison participants also maintained their weight during the summer. Weight loss staff members also increased dietary restraint over the summer, and increases in dietary restraint appeared to facilitate appropriate weight reduction. Participation as a leader in an immersion weight loss programme seemed to benefit, not harm, young adults; this suggests potential advantages for using weight controlling interventions in a wide range of individuals, including as an obesity prevention strategy. © 2015 World Obesity.

  15. Successful long-term weight loss maintenance in a rural population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milsom VA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Vanessa A Milsom1,2, Kathryn M Ross Middleton2, Michael G Perri21Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USABackground: Few investigations of successful long-term weight loss beyond two years have been conducted, and none has examined weight changes in medically underserved rural populations of older adults. The purpose of this study was to assess long-term weight loss maintenance 3.5 years after the completion of an initial six-month lifestyle intervention for obesity among women aged 50–75 years residing in rural communities.Methods: One hundred and ten obese women with a mean (± standard deviation age of 60.08 ± 6.17 years and mean body mass index of 36.76 ± 5.10 kg/m2 completed an in-person assessment during which their weight and adherence to behavioral weight management strategies were evaluated.Results: Participants showed a mean weight reduction of 10.17% ± 5.0% during the initial six-month intervention and regained 6.95% ± 9.44% from the completion of treatment to follow-up assessment 3.5 years later. A substantial proportion of participants (41.80% were able to maintain weight reductions of 5% or greater from baseline to follow-up. "Successful" participants (those who maintained losses of 5% or greater at follow-up reported weighing themselves, self-monitoring their intake and calories, planning meals in advance, and choosing lower calorie foods with greater frequency than "unsuccessful" participants (those who lost less than 5%.Conclusion: Collectively, these findings indicate that a large proportion of participants were able to maintain clinically significant weight losses for multiple years after treatment, and that self-monitoring was a key component of successful long-term weight management.Keywords: obesity, weight loss, weight maintenance, lifestyle intervention, rural, health disparities

  16. Weight loss social support in 140 characters or less: use of an online social network in a remotely delivered weight loss intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Tate, Deborah F

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about how online social networking can help enhance weight loss. To examine the types of online social support utilized in a behavioral weight loss intervention and relationship of posting and weight loss. A sub-analysis of the content and number of posts to Twitter among participants (n = 47) randomized to a mobile, social network arm as part of a 6-month trial among overweight adults, examining weight loss, use of Twitter, and type of social support (informational, tangible assistance, esteem, network, and emotional support). A number of Twitter posts were related to % weight loss at 6 months (p status update (n = 1,319). Engagement with Twitter was related to weight loss and participants mainly used Twitter to provide Information support to one another through status updates.

  17. Weight loss improves renal hemodynamics in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Guedes Andrade Ezequiel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of weight loss on urinary albumin excretion (UAE and creatinine clearance in obese patients with metabolic syndrome. METHODS: Thirty-five obese patients undertook a 12-week calorie-restricted diet. The patients underwent a metabolic (oral glucose tolerance test, plasma lipids, and uric acid and renal hemodynamic evaluations (creatinine clearance and urinary albumin excretion before (phase 1, and after the 12-week diet (phase 2. RESULTS: After the dietary intervention, the subjects were divided into two groups: patients who achieved the target weight reduction (R: responders, n = 14, and patients who did not (NR: non-responders, n = 21. The patients in Group R showed an improvement in lipid profile, a decrease in UAE (median = 162.5 mg/24 hours, range: 0.8 to 292 mg/24 hours, at phase 1 versus 10.4 mg/24 hours, range: 1.6 to 22.4 mg/24 hours, at phase 2, and a significant reduction in creatinine clearance (121.4 ± 66.5 mL/min. in phase 1 to 92.9 ± 35.6 mL/min. at the end of phase 2, p = 0.001. In Group NR, no statistically significant differences were observed between phases 1 and 2. CONCLUSION: Body weight reduction has a positive impact on renal hemodynamics, decreasing urinary albumin excretion as well as glomerular hyperfiltration in obese patients with metabolic syndrome.

  18. Weight loss endoscopy: Development, applications, and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its comorbidities - including diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea - have taken a large and increasing toll on the United States and the rest of the world. The availability of commercial, clinical, and operative therapies for weight management have not been effective at a societal level. Endoscopic bariatric therapy is gaining acceptance as more effective than diet and lifestyle measures, and less invasive than bariatric surgery. Various endoscopic therapies are analogues of the restrictive or bypass components of bariatric surgery, utilizing gastric remodeling or intestinal anastomosis to achieve proven weight loss and metabolic benefits. Others, such as aspiration therapy, employ novel mechanisms of action. Intragastric balloons have recently been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, and a number of other technologies have completed large multicenter trials (such as AspireAssist aspiration therapy and Primary Obesity Surgery Endolumenal). Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty and transoral outlet reduction for endoscopic revision of gastric bypass have proven safe and effective in a number of studies. As devices are approved for use, data will continue to accumulate for safety, effectiveness, and cost effectiveness. Bariatric endoscopists should be prepared to appropriately target and apply various endoscopic bariatric therapies in the context of a comprehensive long-term weight management program. PMID:27610017

  19. Weight-based victimization: bullying experiences of weight loss treatment-seeking youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Rebecca M; Peterson, Jamie Lee; Luedicke, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have comprehensively examined weight-based victimization (WBV) in youth, despite its serious consequences for their psychosocial and physical health. Given that obese and treatment-seeking youth may be highly vulnerable to WBV and its negative consequences, the current study provides a comprehensive assessment of WBV in a weight loss treatment-seeking sample. Adolescents (aged 14-18 years; N = 361) enrolled in 2 national weight loss camps were surveyed. An in-depth assessment of WBV was conducted by using an online survey, in which participants indicated the duration, typical locations, frequent perpetrators, and forms of WBV they had experienced. Findings indicate that 64% of the study participants reported WBV at school, and the risk of WBV increased with body weight. Most participants reported WBV enduring for 1 year (78%), and 36% were teased/bullied for 5 years. Peers (92%) and friends (70%) were the most commonly reported perpetrators, followed by adult perpetrators, including physical education teachers/sport coaches (42%), parents (37%), and teachers (27%). WBV was most frequently reported in the form of verbal teasing (75%-88%), relational victimization (74%-82%), cyberbullying (59%-61%), and physical aggression (33%-61%). WBV was commonly experienced in multiple locations at school. WBV is a prevalent experience for weight loss treatment-seeking youth, even when they are no longer overweight. Given the frequent reports of WBV from adult perpetrators in addition to peers, treatment providers and school personnel can play an important role in identifying and supporting youth who may be at risk for pervasive teasing and bullying.

  20. The association between weight loss and engagement with a web-based food and exercise diary in a commercial weight loss programme: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wardle Jane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internet provides a widely accessible platform for weight loss interventions. Automated tools can allow self-guided monitoring of food intake and other target behaviours that are established correlates of weight change. Many programmes also offer social support from the virtual community. The aim of this research was to assess associations between engagement with self-monitoring tools and social support, and weight loss in an online weight-control programme. Methods This paper describes a retrospective analysis of weight change among 3621 subscribers to a commercial Internet-based weight loss programme. Participants were all subscribers (2979 women; 642 men joining the programme between July 2005 and November 2008 with two or more recorded weights spanning at least 28 days of participation in the programme. Engagement was indexed with frequency of using online diet and exercise diaries and with use of the social support forums. Results Programme engagement was associated with weight loss in both men and women after controlling for initial BMI and duration of participation. The three engagement variables accounted for 13% of variance in percentage weight loss in women (p 5% weight loss (men: OR = 3.45 p Conclusions Use of self-monitoring tools and participation in online support are predictive of weight loss in the context of a commercial, online weight control programme.

  1. Exploring Gender Differences in a Randomized Trial of Weight Loss Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Melissa M; Jeffery, Robert W; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore gender differences in reasons for losing weight, weight loss methods, and weight loss behaviors prior to and during a weight loss maintenance trial. This is a secondary analysis of data from a 24-month randomized controlled trial comparing Self-Directed or Guided phone-based weight loss maintenance interventions among adults who had intentionally lost ≥10% of their body weight in the year prior to enrollment. Participants reported their weight loss methods and reasons for recently losing weight at baseline. Dietary intake, physical activity, and dietary patterns were assessed at baseline, 12, and 24 months. Participants included 419 adults (18.4% men, age 47.0 ± 10.8, BMI 28.4 ± 5.0). Women were more likely than men to report having used an organized weight loss program during their weight loss (55.9% vs. 24.7%, p .05). Men reported higher energy intake than women while physical activity was similar. Although more men self-directed their initial weight loss and more women utilized organized weight loss programs, behaviors reported during weight loss maintenance were similar. Futures studies are needed to understand if these results generalize to other men who have successfully lost weight and are participants in other weight loss maintenance interventions.

  2. Initial weight loss goals: have they changed and do they matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, M R; Vander Veur, S S; Peters, J C; Herring, S J; Wyatt, H R; Tewksbury, C; Wojtanowski, A C; Hill, J O; Foster, G D

    2016-06-01

    Nearly 20 years ago, participants in behavioural weight loss programmes reported goals that greatly exceeded the amount of weight typically produced by these programmes. Whether having unrealistic weight loss goals impacts weight loss or attrition is unclear. The intent of the current study was to revisit current weight loss goals and examine whether goals impact outcomes. Adults (N = 308, BMI = 33.7 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)) participated in a 12-month behavioural weight management programme and completed questionnaires about their goals. Participants' weight loss goal was 19.8 ± 7.9% of their body weight, and 90.4% selected a goal ≥10%. Weight goals were not associated with weight loss at 3 (p = 0.75) or 12 months (p = 0.47), or from 3 to 12 months (p = 0.55). Weight loss goals were not related to attrition at 3 (p = 0.91) or 12 months (p = 0.86). Participants believed that weight reduction would positively impact their health and psychosocial functioning. Weight loss goals have decreased, but still greatly exceed what can be expected by most. Unrealistic goals, however, had no impact on weight loss or attrition. These results question the utility of counseling people with obesity to set more realistic weight loss goals, which is typically practiced in behavioural weight management.

  3. Weighty dynamics: exploring couples' perceptions of post-weight-loss interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Lynsey Kluever; Dailey, René M

    2014-01-01

    Although romantic couples can use communication to help one another lose weight and maintain weight loss, the effect of weight loss on partner interaction is less understood. However, an examination of the interpersonal context in which partners manage their weight is important to help partners negotiate their weight, their relationship, and the U.S. obesity epidemic. Guided by systems theory, this study explored partners' perceptions of post-weight-loss interaction in relationships in which one partner lost weight and the other did not. Through qualitative questionnaires of 42 adults (21 romantic couples), the dyadic investigation revealed that while losing weight resulted in positive interaction for many partners (e.g., engaging in a shared healthy lifestyle), shedding weight also yielded some negative consequences (e.g., non-weight-loss partner criticism). The extent to which partners embraced new weight management rules and patterns largely influenced post-weight-loss communication and behavior.

  4. Exercise decreases lipogenic gene expression in adipose tissue and alters adipocyte cellularity during weight regain after weight loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Danielle Giles

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is a potent strategy to facilitate long-term weight maintenance. In addition to increasing energy expenditure and reducing appetite, exercise also favors the oxidation of dietary fat, which likely helps prevent weight re-gain. It is unclear whether this exercise-induced metabolic shift is due to changes in energy balance, or whether exercise imparts additional adaptations in the periphery that limit the storage and favor the oxidation of dietary fat. To answer this question, adipose tissue lipid metabolism and related gene expression were studied in obese rats following weight loss and during the first day of relapse to obesity. Mature, obese rats were weight-reduced for 2 weeks with or without daily treadmill exercise (EX. Rats were weight maintained for 6 weeks, followed by relapse on: a ad libitum low fat diet (LFD, b ad libitum LFD plus EX, or c a provision of LFD to match the positive energy imbalance of exercised, relapsing animals. 24h retention of dietary- and de novo-derived fat were assessed directly using 14C palmitate/oleate and 3H20, respectively. Exercise decreased the size, but increased the number of adipocytes in both retroperitoneal (RP and subcutaneous (SC adipose depots, and prevented the relapse-induced increase in adipocyte size. Further, exercise decreased the expression of genes involved in lipid uptake (CD36 & LPL, de novo lipogenesis (FAS, ACC1, and triacylglycerol synthesis (MGAT & DGAT in RP adipose during relapse following weight loss. This was consistent with the metabolic data, whereby exercise reduced retention of de novo-derived fat even when controlling for the positive energy imbalance. The decreased trafficking of dietary fat to adipose tissue with exercise was explained by reduced energy intake which attenuated energy imbalance during refeeding. Despite having decreased expression of lipogenic genes, the net retention of de novo-derived lipid was higher in both the RP and SC adipose of exercising

  5. N-of-1 study of weight loss maintenance assessing predictors of physical activity, adherence to weight loss plan and weight change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnicka, Dominika; Dombrowski, Stephan U; White, Martin; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2017-06-01

    Behaviour change interventions are effective in supporting individuals to achieve clinically significant weight loss, but weight loss maintenance (WLM) is less often attained. This study examined predictive variables associated with WLM. N-of-1 study with daily ecological momentary assessment combined with objective measurement of weight and physical activity, collected with wireless devices (Fitbit™) for six months. Eight previously obese adults who had lost over 5% of their body weight in the past year took part. Data were analysed using time series methods. Predictor variables were based on five theoretical themes: maintenance motives, self-regulation, personal resources, habits, and environmental influences. Dependent variables were: objectively estimated step count and weight, and self-reported WLM plan adherence. For all participants, daily fluctuations in self-reported adherence to their WLM plan were significantly associated with most of the explanatory variables, including maintenance motivation and satisfaction with outcomes, self-regulation, habit, and stable environment. Personal resources were not a consistent predictor of plan adherence. This is the first study to assess theoretical predictions of WLM within individuals. WLM is a dynamic process including the interplay of motivation, self-regulation, habit, resources, and perceptions of environmental context. Individuals maintaining their weight have unique psychological profiles which could be accounted for in interventions.

  6. Perceptions of Body Weight, Weight Management Strategies, and Depressive Symptoms among US College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harring, Holly Anne; Montgomery, Kara; Hardin, James

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine if inaccurate body weight perception predicts unhealthy weight management strategies and to determine the extent to which inaccurate body weight perception is associated with depressive symptoms among US college students. Participants: Randomly selected male and female college students in the United States (N = 97,357).…

  7. Antipsychotic-associated weight gain: management strategies and impact on treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayabandara M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Madhubhashinee Dayabandara, Raveen Hanwella, Suhashini Ratnatunga, Sudarshi Seneviratne, Chathurie Suraweera, Varuni A de Silva Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka Abstract: Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is a major management problem for clinicians. It has been shown that weight gain and obesity lead to increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality, reduced quality of life and poor drug compliance. This narrative review discusses the propensity of various antipsychotics to cause weight gain, the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions available to counteract this effect and its impact on adherence. Most antipsychotics cause weight gain. The risk appears to be highest with olanzapine and clozapine. Weight increases rapidly in the initial period after starting antipsychotics. Patients continue to gain weight in the long term. Children appear to be particularly vulnerable to antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Tailoring antipsychotics according to the needs of the individual and close monitoring of weight and other metabolic parameters are the best preventive strategies at the outset. Switching to an agent with lesser tendency to cause weight gain is an option, but carries the risk of relapse of the illness. Nonpharmacologic interventions of dietary counseling, exercise programs and cognitive and behavioral strategies appear to be equally effective in individual and group therapy formats. Both nonpharmacologic prevention and intervention strategies have shown modest effects on weight. Multiple compounds have been investigated as add-on medications to cause weight loss. Metformin has the best evidence in this respect. Burden of side effects needs to be considered when prescribing weight loss medications. There is no strong evidence to recommend routine prescription of add-on medication for weight reduction. Heterogeneity of study methodologies and other

  8. Postnatal weight loss in term infants: what is "normal" and do growth charts allow for it?

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, C.; Parkinson, K

    2004-01-01

    Background: Although it is a well known phenomenon, limited normative data on neonatal weight loss and subsequent gain are available, making it hard to assess individual children with prolonged weight loss.

  9. Descriptive Study of Educated African American Women Successful at Weight-Loss Maintenance Through Lifestyle Changes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barnes, Ann Smith; Kimbro, Rachel T

    2012-01-01

    .... There is limited data on African Americans who have achieved successful long-term weight loss maintenance.To identify a large sample of African American adults who intentionally achieved clinically significant weight loss of 10...

  10. Weight Loss Percentage Prediction of Subsequent Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in Exclusively Breastfed Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Jane Chang

    2012-02-01

    Conclusion: This study documented the relationship between weight loss percentage and subsequent hyperbilirubinemia incidence. Our data provide a basis for determination of an optimal weight loss percentage cut-off value that indicates supplementary feeding.

  11. Prognostic markers for diet-induced weight loss in obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Buemann, B; Gluud, C

    1995-01-01

    To identify prognostic metabolic and hormonal markers for long-term weight loss outcome in obese women.......To identify prognostic metabolic and hormonal markers for long-term weight loss outcome in obese women....

  12. Metabolic syndrome, circulating RBP4, testosterone, and SHBG predict weight regain at 6 months after weight loss in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ping; Menheere, Paul P C A; Astrup, Arne

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Weight loss helps reduce the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the obese, but weight regain after active weight loss is common. We investigated the changes and predictive role of circulating adipokines and sex hormones for weight regain in men during dietary intervention......, adiponectin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), luteinizing hormone, prolactin, progesterone, total and free testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were measured at baseline, after 8-week low-calorie diet-induced active weight loss, and after a subsequent 26-week ad libitum weight maintenance...... diet, and analyzed together with anthropometrical and physiological parameters. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese men with MetS at baseline had higher risk to regain weight (odds ratio=2.8, P=0.015). High baseline RBP4, and low total testosterone and low SHBG are predictors of weight loss...

  13. Perceived Barriers to Weight loss Programs for Overweight or Obese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Sharifi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to develop appropriate obesity control and treat¬ment strategies, the key point is to understand the barriers perceived by overweight or obese people in trying to follow weight-loss programs. This study examined perceived barriers to weight-loss programs among over¬weight or obese women.Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 204 overweight or obese women aged 31.97± 10.62 yr, were selected randomly from the nutritional counseling centers in 2008 in Tabriz, Iran. The mean BMI was 33.83 ±5.75 kg/ m2. A structured questionnaire including questions on barriers to weight-loss diet and physical activity was filled out for each participant by face-to-face interview. Height and weight measured objectively and demo¬graphic details were obtained. Data analysis carried out using mul¬tiple re¬gression and factor analysis.Results: The most important perceived barriers to weight-loss diets were 'situational barriers', stress, depression, and food craving. High educational level was independent determinant of situational barriers (β=0.329, P=0.048. Employee women had a higher mean score on stress and de¬pres¬sion than students and housewives. Lack of time and exercising lonely were the most important items of "External barriers" and Lack of motiva¬tion was the most important item of "internal barriers" to physical activity. Employ¬ment and being student were highly associated with external bar¬riers (β=1.018, P<0.001 and β=0.541, P= 0.002. Moreover, older women who had low educational level, perceived more internal barriers. Conclusion: Weight reducing strategies should take into account the spe¬cific perceived barriers to weight-loss diets faced by overweight or obese women, particularly situational barriers, stress and depression and food craving; and lack of time and lack of motivation as barriers to physical ac¬tivity.

  14. Weight loss versus muscle loss: re-evaluating inclusion criteria for future cancer cachexia interventional trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeland, Eric J; Ma, Joseph D; Nelson, Sandahl H; Seibert, Tyler; Heavey, Sean; Revta, Carolyn; Gallivan, Andrea; Baracos, Vickie E

    2017-02-01

    Participation in cancer cachexia clinical trials requires a defined weight loss (WL) over time. A loss in skeletal muscle mass, measured by cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) image analysis, represents a possible alternative. Our aim was to compare WL versus muscle loss in patients who were screened to participate in a cancer cachexia clinical trial. This was a single-center, retrospective analysis in metastatic colorectal cancer patients screened for an interventional cancer cachexia trial requiring a ≥5 % WL over the preceding 6 months. Concurrent CT images obtained as part of standard oncology care were analyzed for changes in total muscle and fat (visceral, subcutaneous, and total). Of patients screened (n = 36), 3 (8 %) enrolled in the trial, 17 (47 %) were excluded due to insufficient WL (20 %), and 16 (44 %) met inclusion criteria for WL. Patients who met screening criteria for WL (5-20 %) had a mean ± SD of 7.7 ± 8.7 % muscle loss, 24.4 ± 37.5 % visceral adipose loss, 21.6 ± 22.3 % subcutaneous adipose loss, and 22.1 ± 24.7 % total adipose loss. Patients excluded due to insufficient WL had 2 ± 6.4 % muscle loss, but a gain of 8.5 ± 39.8 % visceral adipose, and 4.2 ± 28.2 % subcutaneous adipose loss and 0.8 ± 28.4 % total adipose loss. Of the patients excluded due to WL 5 %. Defining cancer cachexia by WL over time may be limited as it does not capture skeletal muscle loss. Cross-sectional CT body composition analysis may improve early detection of muscle loss and patient participation in future cancer cachexia clinical trials.

  15. Mediators of weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot study for overweight fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubans, David R; Morgan, Philip J; Collins, Clare E; Okely, Anthony D; Burrows, Tracy; Callister, Robin

    2012-04-18

    A poor understanding of the specific lifestyle behaviors that result in weight loss has hindered the development of effective interventions. The aim of this paper was to identify potential behavioral mediators of weight loss in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK) intervention for overweight fathers. The three-month intervention was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial and conducted in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Baseline, three month (immediate post-intervention) and six month assessments were conducted. Recruitment and follow-up occurred between October 2008 and May 2009. The study sample included 53 overweight/obese men [mean ( SD) age=40.6( 97.1) years; body mass index (BMI)=33.2 (3.9) kgm-2] and their primary school-aged children [n=71, 54% boys; age=8.2 (2.0) years] who were randomized to HDHK program or a wait-list control group. Physical activity (PA) was assessed using pedometers and dietary behaviors were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. The intervention resulted in significant weight loss (5.131.27 kg, Pfathers (2769750 steps/day, PFathers PA mediated weight loss in the intervention (AB=2.31, 95% CI=4.63 to 0.67) and was responsible for 47% of the intervention effect. Changes in dietary behaviors were not statistically significant. PA was an important mediator of weight loss in the HDHK intervention. Encouraging overweight fathers to be more active with their children appears to be a promising strategy for obesity treatment in men.

  16. The Role of Stigma in Weight Loss Maintenance Among U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Rebecca M; Quinn, Diane M; Weisz, Bradley M; Suh, Young J

    2017-10-01

    Challenges of maintaining long-term weight loss are well-established and present significant obstacles in obesity prevention and treatment. A neglected but potentially important barrier to weight-loss maintenance is weight stigmatization. We examined the role of weight stigma-experienced and internalized-as a contributor to weight-loss maintenance and weight regain in adults. A diverse, national sample of 2702 American adults completed an online battery of questionnaires assessing demographics, weight-loss history, subjective weight category, experienced and internalized weight stigma, weight-monitoring behaviors, physical activity, perceived stress, and physical health. Analyses focused exclusively on participants who indicated that their body weight a year ago was at least 10% less than their highest weight ever (excluding pregnancy), the weight loss was intentional, and that attempts to lose or maintain weight occurred during the past year (n = 549). Participants were further classified as weight regainers (n = 235) or weight-loss maintainers (n = 314) based on subsequent weight loss/gain. Data were collected in 2015 and analyzed in 2016. Hierarchical logistic regression models showed that internalized weight stigma and subjective weight category made significant individual contributions to prediction of weight-loss maintenance, even after accounting for demographics, perceived stress, experienced stigma, physical health, and weight-loss behaviors. For every one-unit increase in internalized weight stigma, the odds of maintaining weight loss decreased by 28% (95% CI: 14-40%, p maintenance. Implications for addressing stigma in obesity-focused clinical interventions are highlighted.

  17. Trying to lose weight: diet strategies among Americans with overweight or obesity in 1996 and 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyeva, Tatiana; Long, Michael W; Henderson, Kathryn E; Grode, Gabrielle M

    2010-04-01

    Health professionals recommend that individuals with overweight and obesity lose weight by reducing energy intake while maintaining a healthful diet. This study was designed to examine trends in weight loss attempts and strategies for adults with overweight or obesity among different sociodemographic groups. Data from the 1996 and 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to estimate changes in weight loss attempts and strategies across population groups. Data were analyzed in 2009. Slightly more adults with overweight or obesity attempted weight loss in 2003 compared to 1996. There were substantial changes in the diet approaches reported: rates of those using energy restriction to lose weight doubled between 1996 and 2003, whereas low-fat dieting decreased by one third. Hispanic and less-educated adults did not shift away from low-fat diets. Attempted weight loss was associated with higher fruit and vegetable consumption for most population groups. Increasingly more adults with overweight or obesity tried to lose weight through energy reduction, but some at-risk groups did not follow this beneficial trend between 1996 and 2003. Dietetics practitioners and public health campaigns should target such groups with concrete recommendations to reduce energy intake while maintaining a healthful diet, including adequate consumption of fruit and vegetables. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A 9-Day-Old With Weight Loss and Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, Prabi; Mandelia, Chetan; Janjua, Halima S; Selvakumar, Praveen Kumar Conjeevaram; Krishna, Sangeeta

    2017-05-01

    A 9-day-old infant girl presented with diarrhea and weight loss of 19% since birth. She was born via spontaneous vaginal delivery at 39 weeks' gestation to a mother positive for group B Streptococcus who received adequate intrapartum prophylaxis. The infant was formula-fed every 2 to 3 hours with no reported issues with feeding or swallowing. The infant had nonmucoid watery stools ∼5 to 15 times per day. Her family history was significant for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in several of her family members. Her initial vital signs and physical examination were normal. Laboratory data on hospital admission showed a normal complete blood cell count, but her chemistry analysis revealed significant hypernatremia, hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, and acute kidney injury. Her hypernatremia was resistant to fluid management. In this article, we discuss the infant's hospital course, our clinical thought process, and how we arrived at our final diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Predictors of Weight Loss for African-American Women in the Faith, Activity, and Nutrition (FAN) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyryliuk, Rebecca; Baruth, Meghan; Wilcox, Sara

    2015-05-01

    Understanding predictors of weight loss can assist in developing targeted evidence-based programs to reduce obesity in faith-based settings. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of weight loss for a sample of African-American women taking part in in a church-based study. Participants (N = 350) completed physical assessments and comprehensive surveys at baseline and 15 months later. Analyses examined baseline variables and change in variables from baseline to posttest, as predictors of ≥ 5% weight loss at posttest. Demographic, health-related, and behavioral variables were examined. Lower baseline stress predicted greater likelihood of weight loss. Increased leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) from baseline to posttest was predictive of greater weight loss. The odds of ≥ 5% weight loss was 38% lower for every 1-point increase in baseline stress (OR = 0.62, CI = 0.39, 0.98, P = .04) and 6% greater for every 1-hour increase in posttest LTPA (OR = 1.06, CI = 1.0, 1.12, P = .049). Increased LTPA appears to be an independent predictor of modest but meaningful reductions in weight among African-American women. African-American women reporting higher levels of stress at baseline may require more intense strategies emphasizing increased LTPA to lose weight.

  20. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, and psychosocial predictors of attrition across behavioral weight-loss trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Rachel W; Ye, Lei; Sereika, Susan M; Zheng, Yaguang; Mattos, Meghan; Acharya, Sushama D; Ewing, Linda J; Danford, Cynthia; Hu, Lu; Imes, Christopher C; Chasens, Eileen; Osier, Nicole; Mancino, Juliet; Burke, Lora E

    2016-01-01

    Preventing attrition is a major concern in behavioral weight loss intervention studies. The purpose of this analysis was to identify baseline and six-month predictors associated with participant attrition across three independent clinical trials of behavioral weight loss interventions (PREFER, SELF, and SMART) that were conducted over 10 years. Baseline measures included body mass index, Barriers to Healthy Eating, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI), Hunger Satiety Scale (HSS), Binge Eating Scale (BES), Medical Outcome Study Short Form (MOS SF-36 v2) and Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire (WEL). We also examined early weight loss and attendance at group sessions during the first 6 months. Attrition was recorded at the end of the trials. Participants included 504 overweight and obese adults seeking weight loss treatment. The sample was 84.92% female and 73.61% white, with a mean (± SD) age of 47.35 ± 9.75 years. After controlling for the specific trial, for every one unit increase in BMI, the odds of attrition increased by 11%. For every year increase in education, the odds of attrition decreased by 10%. Additional predictors of attrition included previous attempts to lose 50-79 lbs, age, not possessing health insurance, and BES, BDI, and HSS scores. At 6 months, the odds of attrition increased by 10% with reduced group session attendance. There was also an interaction between percent weight change and trial (pthree trials showed education, age, BMI, and BES scores were independently associated with attrition (ps ≤ .01). These findings may inform the development of more robust strategies for reducing attrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of Exercise and Physical Activity in Weight Loss and Maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Swift, Damon L.; Johannsen, Neil M.; Lavie, Carl J.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Church, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    This review explores the role of physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) in the prevention of weight gain, initial weight loss, weight maintenance, and the obesity paradox. In particular, we will focus the discussion on the expected initial weight loss from different ET programs, and explore intensity/volume relationships. Based on the present literature, unless the overall volume of aerobic ET is very high, clinically significant weight loss is unlikely to occur. Also, ET also has ...

  2. Psychological effects of rapid weight loss and attitudes towards eating among professional jockeys

    OpenAIRE

    Caulfield, MJ; Karageorghis, CI

    2008-01-01

    We examined the psychological effects of rapid weight loss among a sample of 41 professional jockeys (mean age 30.9 years, s¼7.0). Participants completed the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) and the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26) to establish the relationships between rapid weight loss, mood, and attitudes towards eating. These instruments were administered on three occasions: at the jockeys’ minimal weight (achieved through rapid weight loss), their optimal riding weight (when they were not exce...

  3. Weight loss and regain and effects on body composition: the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, J.S.; Visser, M.; Tylavsky, F.A.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Schwartz, A.; Sahyoun, N.; Harris, T.B.; Newman, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundOlder adults are less able to conserve lean mass relative to fat mass with weight change. A cycle of weight loss and regain in an older individual could accelerate sarcopenia. We examined whether older adults experiencing weight loss and regain would show a greater loss of lean mass during

  4. Impact of weight loss on markers of systemic inflammation in obese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Weight loss studies were conducted in children without asthma have demonstrated a reduction in systemic inflammation. However, the impact of weight loss in the obese paediatric population with asthma has not been investigated. Objective: To measure the effects of weight loss on markers of systemic ...

  5. Drug abuse and weight loss in HIV-infected Hispanic men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss is an independent risk factor for mortality in HIV, but the role of drug use in HIV-related weight loss is not well described. We conducted this study to determine the role of drug abuse in HIV-related weight loss. Men (n=304), all of whom were Hispanic, were recruited into one of three ...

  6. Weight loss expectations and goals in a population sample of overweight and obese US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricatore, Anthony N; Wadden, Thomas A; Rohay, Jeffrey M; Pillitteri, Janine L; Shiffman, Saul; Harkins, Andrea M; Burton, Steven L

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate weight loss expectations and goals in a population sample of US adults who planned to make a weight loss attempt, and to examine predictors of those expectations and goals. Participants were 658 overweight and obese adults (55% women, mean age = 47.9 years, BMI = 31.8 kg/m(2)) who responded to a telephone survey about weight loss. Respondents reported weight loss expectations (i.e., reductions they realistically expected) and goals (i.e., reductions they ideally desired) for an upcoming "serious and deliberate" weight loss attempt. They also reported the expectations they had, and the reductions they actually achieved, in a previous attempt. Respondents' weight loss expectations for their upcoming attempt (8.0% reduction in initial weight) were significantly more modest than their goals for that attempt (16.8%), and smaller than the losses that they expected (12.0%), and achieved (8.9%) in their most recent past attempt (Ps goals. After controlling for BMI, age, and gender, previous weight loss was unrelated to expectations (but was inversely related to goals) for the upcoming weight loss attempt. Results suggest that overweight and obese individuals can select realistic weight loss expectations that are more modest than their ideal goals. BMI and gender appear to be more important than previous weight loss experiences in determining expectations among persons planning a weight loss attempt.

  7. Weight loss and its relation to fat aspiration yields in liposuction: a survey in 48 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeni, R

    2012-01-01

    Liposuction surgeons often observe individually fluctuating amounts of aspirated fat. In patients with sagging skin due to previous weight loss there is a tendency of decreased fat aspiration volumes. To study the influence of weight loss on fat aspiration volumes in a series of 48 patients. We matched individuals of the same gender, but with a different weight history from a vast number of patients who had undergone liposuction surgery. The aspirated fat to wetting solution ratio (FWR) of the circumferential abdominal region was evaluated in three groups: A - patients with no weight loss (n = 16; 8 males/ 8 females), B - patients with a history of moderate weight loss (weight loss 5-10% of body weight; n = 16; 8 males/8 females), and C - patients who had a massive weight loss prior to surgery (weight loss exceeding 15% of body weight; n = 16; 8 males/8 females). The aspirated FWR was 3.4 ± 0.5, 1.0 ± 0.3 and 0.4 ± 0.2 in groups A, B and C, respectively. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (p loss in regard to fat aspiration volumes compared to patients without prior weight loss. These findings point to the importance of a weight loss history prior to surgery. Regardless of lower fat aspiration yields in patients with massive weight loss, good results are still achievable. This is not only due to volume reduction but to skin tightening. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Weight loss programs for urban-based, postpartum African-American women: perceived barriers and preferred components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setse, Rosanna; Grogan, Ruby; Cooper, Lisa A; Strobino, Donna; Powe, Neil R; Nicholson, Wanda

    2008-01-01

    There are currently 1.85 million reproductive-aged women in the United States with diabetes or glucose intolerance. While it is known that postpartum weight retention can lead to obesity and diabetes, particularly among African-American women, little is known about African-American women's preferences for postpartum weight loss programs. Our objective was to explore urban-based African-American women's attitudes toward weight gain, perceived barriers to postpartum weight loss, and preferences for weight intervention strategies. Focus groups of pregnant African-American women (n = 22) were conducted by a race-concordant moderator. Open-ended questions were posed to stimulate discussions which were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcriptions were independently reviewed by two investigators who extracted quotations and coded each statement to identify major themes. The median age of participants was 26 years. Median pre-pregnancy or first