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Sample records for weight arm wrist

  1. Hand/Wrist/Arm Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor right away.Start OverDiagnosisYou may have TENDINITIS, inflammation of a tendon.Self CareUse an over- ... OverDiagnosisYour may have TENNIS ELBOW, a type of TENDINITIS.Self CareRest the arm, apply ice packs to ...

  2. Development of prosthetic arm with pneumatic prosthetic hand and tendon-driven wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Kan, Hiroto; Hirano, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    Recently, various prosthetic arms have been developed, but few are both attractive and functional. Considering human coexistence, prosthetic arms must be both safe and flexible. In this research, we developed a novel prosthetic arm with a five-fingered prosthetic hand using our original pneumatic actuators and a slender tendon-driven wrist using a wire drive and two small motors. Because the prosthetic hand's driving source is comprised of small pneumatic actuators, the prosthetic hand is safe when it makes contact with people; it can also operate flexibly. In addition, the arm has a tendon-driven wrist to expand its motion space and to perform many operations. First, we explain the pneumatic hand's drive mechanism and its tendon-driven wrist. Next, we identify the characteristics of the hand and the wrist and construct a control system for this arm and verify its control performance.

  3. Perceived muscular tension predicts future neck - shoulder and arm - wrist - hand symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M.A.; Blatter, B.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate if perceived muscular tension predicts future neck - shoulder symptoms and arm - wrist - hand symptoms in symptomfree office workers. Methods: Data were used of a prospective cohort of 1951 office workers with a follow-up duration of 2 years (the P

  4. Effects of wrist tendon vibration on targeted upper-arm movements in poststroke hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Megan O; Scheidt, Robert A; Schmit, Brian D

    2011-01-01

    Impaired motor control of the upper extremity after stroke may be related to lost sensory, motor, and integrative functions of the brain. Artificial activation of sensory afferents might improve control of movement by adding excitatory drive to sensorimotor control structures. The authors evaluated the effect of wrist tendon vibration (TV) on paretic upper-arm stability during point-to-point planar movements. TV (70 Hz) was applied to the forearm wrist musculature of 10 hemiparetic stroke patients as they made center-out planar arm movements. End-point stability, muscle activity, and grip pressure were compared as patients stabilized at the target position for trials completed before, during, and after the application of the vibratory stimulus. Prior to vibration, hand position fluctuated as participants attempted to maintain the hand at the target after movement termination. TV improved arm stability, as evidenced by decreased magnitude of hand tangential velocity at the target. Improved stability was accompanied by a decrease in muscle activity throughout the arm as well as a mean decrease in grip pressure. These results suggest that vibratory stimulation of the distal wrist musculature enhances stability of the proximal arm and can be studied further as a mode for improving end-point stability during reaching in hemiparetic patients.

  5. Risk of low-energy hip, wrist, and upper arm fractures among current and previous users of hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundrup, Yrsa Andersen; Høidrup, Susanne; Ekholm, Ola

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effect of oestrogen alone and in combination with progestin on the risk of low-energy, hip, wrist, and upper arm fractures. Additionally, to examine to what extent previous use, duration of use as well as recency of discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) influences th...

  6. Anthropometry of height, weight, arm, wrist, abdominal circumference and body mass index, for Bolivian adolescents 12 to 18 years: Bolivian adolescent percentile values from the MESA study Referencias antropométricas de los adolescentes bolivianos de 12 a 18 años: estatura, peso, circunferencia del brazo, muñeca y abdominal, índice de masa corporal: Percentiles de adolescentes bolivianos (PAB del estudio MESA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baya Botti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometry is important as clinical tool for individual follow-up as well as for planning and health policymaking at population level. Recent references of Bolivian Adolescents are not available. The aim of this cross sectional study was to provide age and sex specific centile values and charts of Body Mass Index, height, weight, arm, wrist and abdominal circumference from Bolivian Adolescents. Data from the MEtabolic Syndrome in Adolescents (MESA study was used. Thirty-two Bolivian clusters from urban and rural areas were selected randomly considering population proportions, 3445 school going adolescents, 12 to 18 y, 45% males; 55% females underwent anthropometric evaluation by trained personnel using standardized protocols for all interviews and examinations. Weight, height, wrist, arm and abdominal circumference data were collected. Body Mass Index was calculated. Smoothed age- and gender specific 3rd, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 90th, 95th and 97th Bolivian adolescent percentiles(BAP and Charts(BAC where derived using LMS regression. Percentile-based reference data for the antropometrics of for Bolivian Adolescents are presented for the first time.La antropometría es una herramienta clínica importante para el seguimiento individual de los pacientes así como para la planificación de políticas públicas. En Bolivia no existen referencias antropométricas nacionales para adolescentes. El objetivo de este estudio transversal fue de desarrollar percentiles y diagramas de crecimiento para peso, talla, índice de masa corporal, presión arterial sistólica y diastólica, circunferencia de muñeca, brazo y abdominal de adolescentes bolivianos. Los datos antropométricos en el estudio MESA (Síndrome metabólico en adolescentes bolivianos fueron obtenidos a partir de 32 unidades muestrales, considerando proporcionalidad muestral con reposición. Fueron evaluados 3445 adolescentes de 12 a 18, 45% hombres; 55% mujeres, de colegios de

  7. Linear Low Density Polyethylene (LLDPE) as Flexible Substrate for Wrist and Arm Antennas in C-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Pragyan Jyoti; Bhattacharyya, Satyajib; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper focuses on the development and study of linear low density polyethylene as a flexible substrate for conformal antennas for body-worn applications. Thermal stability, tensile strength and elongation at break of the substrate were studied. The permittivity of the substrate was 2.2 and tan δ was found to be 0.0003 at 6 GHz. Since the antenna is being developed for wrist and arm wearing in C-band, the performance of the antenna, such as the S 11 parameter and radiation pattern, were studied with different bending axes and with bending curvature approximating that of the arm and wrist. The performance of a 6 GHz rectangular patch antenna with bending was found to be consistent with the flat profile antenna at the same frequency. A maximum shift in the resonant frequency of ˜20 MHz was observed. The -10 dB bandwidth and directivity of the antenna did not change much with bending. The maximum bending radius in the present study is 10 mm, and S 11 was found to be -17.53 dB at 5.94 GHz and -14.02 dB at 6.06 GHz for a bending axis parallel to the radiating and non-radiating edge, respectively.

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin [Shandong University, Department of MR, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yang, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Xu [Shandong Chest Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jinan, Shandong (China); Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Shanghai (China); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  9. A scoping review of disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand scores for hand and wrist conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Heather; Novak, Christine B; McCabe, Steven J

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the variability of reported baseline Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores for non-acute hand and wrist conditions. We hypothesized that DASH scores for evaluation of hand and wrist pathology would provide a map of scores that would correspond to severity. In addition to providing a catalog of DASH scores for various upper extremity pathologies, we hypothesized that this review would support the validity of the DASH instrument. A literature search was performed using 3 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) from the earliest available date through January 1, 2013. Search terms included "DASH" and "hand" and combinations of conditions found in the initial search. The search was restricted to studies with baseline DASH scores and DASH scores for isolated conditions, and written in the English language. Our search identified 1,770 citations; 136 full-text articles were reviewed and 85 studies were included in the scoping review. This provided 100 DASH scores mapped for 24 different diagnoses. Most articles (67%) included chronic conditions for inflammatory or degenerative pathologies rather than posttraumatic disorders. Posttraumatic DASH score reporting ranged from 4 months to 11 years after injury, and final outcome scores varied among studies assessing the same pathology. The greatest variation and highest scores were for de Quervain tendinitis (range, 29-93) and scapholunate advance collapse (range, 17-89). These scores indicated higher disability in de Quervain tendinitis and wrist osteoarthritis compared with conditions such as thumb amputation and upper extremity replantation. Substantial variation in the DASH scores and methodology was found and indicates a need for further study of the DASH to allow for standardized interpretation. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of overcommitment and reward on muscle activity, posture, and forces in the arm-wrist-hand region – a field study among computer workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijckelhof, B.H.W.; Bruno Garza, J.L.; Huysmans, M.A.; Blatter, B.M.; Johnson, P.W.; Dieën, J.H. van; Beek, A.J. van der; Dennerlein, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Office workers with high levels of overcommitment and low levels of reward are thought to be more prone to arm-wrist-hand symptoms, possibly through a higher internal physical exposure. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of high overcommitment and low reward on (i) forearm mu

  11. Arm Care. Relief and Prevention for Shoulder Tendonitis, Tennis Elbow, Bursitis and Wrist Sprain in Athletics and Other Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirschl, Robert P.

    The book provides a practical and meaningful treatment program for athletes involved in sports which injure the arm or shoulder to a high degree, such as tennis, baseball, swimming, raquetball, pole vaulting, javelin throwing, and weight training. The book's chapters present information on: (1) symptoms of injury; (2) the anatomy of injury; (3)…

  12. Arm Care. Relief and Prevention for Shoulder Tendonitis, Tennis Elbow, Bursitis and Wrist Sprain in Athletics and Other Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirschl, Robert P.

    The book provides a practical and meaningful treatment program for athletes involved in sports which injure the arm or shoulder to a high degree, such as tennis, baseball, swimming, raquetball, pole vaulting, javelin throwing, and weight training. The book's chapters present information on: (1) symptoms of injury; (2) the anatomy of injury; (3)…

  13. The impact of arm position and pulse pressure on the validation of a wrist-cuff blood pressure measurement device in a high risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Khoshdel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ali Reza Khoshdel1,2, Shane Carney2, Alastair Gillies21Faculty of Medicine, Aja University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran; 2John Hunter Hospital, Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NS W, AustraliaAbstract: Despite the increasing popularity of blood pressure (BP wrist monitors for self-BP measurement at home, device validation and the effect of arm position remains an issue. This study focused on the validation of the Omron HEM-609 wrist BP device, including an evaluation of the impact of arm position and pulse pressure on BP measurement validation. Fifty patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease were selected (age 65 ± 10 years. Each patient had two measurements with a mercury sphygmomanometer and three measurements with the wrist BP device (wrist at the heart level while the horizontal arm supported [HORIZONTAL], hand supported on the opposite shoulder [SHOULDER], and elbow placed on a desk [DESK], in random order. The achieved systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP wrist-cuff readings were compared to the mercury device and the frequencies of the readings within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg of the gold standard were computed and compared with the British Hypertension Society (BHS and Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI protocols. The results showed while SBP readings with HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions were significantly different from the mercury device (mean difference = 7.1 and 13.3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05, the DESK position created the closest reading to mercury (mean difference = 3.8, P > 0.1. Approximately 71% of SBP readings with the DESK position were within ±10 mmHg, whereas it was 62.5% and 34% for HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions, respectively. Wrist DBP attained category D with BHS criteria with all three arm positions. Bland–Altman plots illustrated that the wrist monitor systematically underestimated SBP and DBP values. However a reading adjustment of 5 and 10 mm

  14. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of 'Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-04

    Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. ISRCTN1648908; Pre-results. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02324634. Published by the BMJ

  15. Upper Arm Contouring with Brachioplasty after Massive Weight Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ho Han

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background As the obese population increases in Korea, the number of patients who are trying to lose weight has been increasing steadily. In these patients, skin laxity and deformation of the body contour occurs, which could possibly be corrected by various body contouring surgeries. Here, we introduce the brachioplasty method and our experience of various body contouring surgeries performed in our center. Methods From November 2009 to August 2011, five cases of brachioplasty were performed. When the patient presented with sagging of the lateral inframammary crease and bat wing deformity in the axilla, extended brachioplasty was performed; in this case, the deformation of the axilla and lateral chest was corrected at the same time. A traditional brachioplasty was performed when contouring was needed only for skin laxity in the upper arm. Results Complications, such as hematomas or nerve injuries, were not evident. Some patients experienced partial wound dehiscence due to tension or hypertrophic scars found during the follow-up. In general, all of the patients were satisfied with the improvement in their upper arm contour. Conclusions Given the demands for body contouring surgery, the number of brachioplasty surgical procedures is expected to increase significantly, with abdominoplasty comprising a large portion of these surgeries. For the brachioplasty procedure, preparation and preoperative consultation regarding design of the surgery by experienced surgeons was important to prevent complications such as nerve damage or hematoma formation.

  16. Animation of Phoenix's Wrist Unlatching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animation shows what happened underneath Phoenix's Robotic Arm wrist on Sol 3. The pin that goes through the loop is what holds the wrist in place. The rotation of the wrist pops the pin free. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Brain-Computer Interface-based robotic end effector system for wrist and hand rehabilitation: results of a three-armed randomized controlled trial for chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Keng eAng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an Electroencephalography (EEG-based Motor Imagery (MI Brain-Computer Interface (BCI coupled with a Haptic Knob (HK robot for arm rehabilitation in stroke patients. In this three-arm, single-blind, randomized controlled trial; 21 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMMA score 10-50, recruited after pre-screening for MI BCI ability, were randomly allocated to BCI-HK, HK or Standard Arm Therapy (SAT groups. All groups received 18 sessions of intervention over 6 weeks, 3 sessions per week, 90 minutes per session. The BCI-HK group received 1 hour of BCI coupled with HK intervention, and the HK group received 1 hour of HK intervention per session. Both BCI-HK and HK groups received 120 trials of robot-assisted hand grasping and knob manipulation followed by 30 minutes of therapist-assisted arm mobilization. The SAT group received 1.5 hours of therapist-assisted arm mobilization and forearm pronation-supination movements incorporating wrist control and grasp-release functions. In all, 14 males, 7 females, mean age 54.2 years, mean stroke duration 385.1 days, with baseline FMMA score 27.0 were recruited. The primary outcome measure was upper-extremity FMMA scores measured mid-intervention at week 3, end-intervention at week 6, and follow-up at weeks 12 and 24. Seven, 8 and 7 subjects underwent BCI-HK, HK and SAT interventions respectively. FMMA score improved in all groups, but no intergroup differences were found at any time points. Significantly larger motor gains were observed in the BCI-HK group compared to the SAT group at weeks 3, 12 and 24, but motor gains in the HK group did not differ from the SAT group at any time point. In conclusion, BCI-HK is effective, safe, and may have the potential for enhancing motor recovery in chronic stroke when combined with therapist-assisted arm mobilization.

  18. Brain-computer interface-based robotic end effector system for wrist and hand rehabilitation: results of a three-armed randomized controlled trial for chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Kai Keng; Guan, Cuntai; Phua, Kok Soon; Wang, Chuanchu; Zhou, Longjiang; Tang, Ka Yin; Ephraim Joseph, Gopal J; Kuah, Christopher Wee Keong; Chua, Karen Sui Geok

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an Electroencephalography (EEG)-based Motor Imagery (MI) Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) coupled with a Haptic Knob (HK) robot for arm rehabilitation in stroke patients. In this three-arm, single-blind, randomized controlled trial; 21 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMMA) score 10-50), recruited after pre-screening for MI BCI ability, were randomly allocated to BCI-HK, HK or Standard Arm Therapy (SAT) groups. All groups received 18 sessions of intervention over 6 weeks, 3 sessions per week, 90 min per session. The BCI-HK group received 1 h of BCI coupled with HK intervention, and the HK group received 1 h of HK intervention per session. Both BCI-HK and HK groups received 120 trials of robot-assisted hand grasping and knob manipulation followed by 30 min of therapist-assisted arm mobilization. The SAT group received 1.5 h of therapist-assisted arm mobilization and forearm pronation-supination movements incorporating wrist control and grasp-release functions. In all, 14 males, 7 females, mean age 54.2 years, mean stroke duration 385.1 days, with baseline FMMA score 27.0 were recruited. The primary outcome measure was upper extremity FMMA scores measured mid-intervention at week 3, end-intervention at week 6, and follow-up at weeks 12 and 24. Seven, 8 and 7 subjects underwent BCI-HK, HK and SAT interventions respectively. FMMA score improved in all groups, but no intergroup differences were found at any time points. Significantly larger motor gains were observed in the BCI-HK group compared to the SAT group at weeks 3, 12, and 24, but motor gains in the HK group did not differ from the SAT group at any time point. In conclusion, BCI-HK is effective, safe, and may have the potential for enhancing motor recovery in chronic stroke when combined with therapist-assisted arm mobilization.

  19. Wrist osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulan, J; Marteau, E; Bacle, G

    2015-02-01

    Painful wrist osteoarthritis can result in major functional impairment. Most cases are related to posttraumatic sequel, metabolic arthropathies, or inflammatory joint disease, although wrist osteoarthritis occurs as an idiopathic condition in a small minority of cases. Surgery is indicated only when conservative treatment fails. The main objective is to ensure pain relief while restoring strength. Motion-preserving procedures are usually preferred, although residual wrist mobility is not crucial to good function. The vast array of available surgical techniques includes excisional arthroplasty, limited and total fusion, total wrist denervation, partial and total arthroplasty, and rib-cartilage graft implantation. Surgical decisions rest on the cause and extent of the degenerative wrist lesions, degree of residual mobility, and patient's wishes and functional demand. Proximal row carpectomy and four-corner fusion with scaphoid bone excision are the most widely used surgical procedures for stage II wrist osteoarthritis secondary to scapho-lunate advanced collapse (SLAC) or scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist. Proximal row carpectomy is not indicated in patients with stage III disease. Total wrist denervation is a satisfactory treatment option in patients of any age who have good range of motion and low functional demands; furthermore, the low morbidity associated with this procedure makes it a good option for elderly patients regardless of their range of motion. Total wrist fusion can be used not only as a revision procedure, but also as the primary surgical treatment in heavy manual labourers with wrist stiffness or generalised wrist-joint involvement. The role for pyrocarbon implants, rib-cartilage graft implantation, and total wrist arthroplasty remains to be determined, given the short follow-ups in available studies.

  20. Wrist pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emergency. Signs of an infection include redness and warmth of the wrist, fever above 100°F (37. ... and strengthening exercises every day. Work with a physical therapist to learn the best and safest exercises ...

  1. Two-degree-of-freedom powered prosthetic wrist

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kyberd, Peter J; Lemaire, Edward D; Scheme, Erik; MacPhail, Catherine; Goudreau, Louis; Bush, Greg; Brookeshaw, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    .... This prosthetic wrist uses two motors arranged across the arm within the envelope of the hand. The drive is transmitted by a differential so that it produces wrist flexion and extension, pronation and supination, or a combination of both...

  2. The effects of container design and stair climbing on maximal acceptable lift weight, wrist posture, psychophysical, and physiological responses in wafer-handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H C; Wang, M J

    2001-12-01

    Despite the high level of automation in semiconductor manufacturing processes, many manual operations are still involved in the workplace. Due to inadequate human-machine interface design, stairs are frequently used to help operators perform wafer-handling tasks. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of climbing stairs and carrying wafer containers (pods) on psychophysical responses (maximal acceptable weight of lift--MAWL, and ratings of perceived exertion--RPE), physiological responses (oxygen consumption--VO2, and heart rate--HR), and wrist posture (ulnar and radial deviations). Each of 12 subjects (six males and six females) performed six sessions (3 climbing stairs x 2 pods types). The results indicate that climbing stairs had a significant influence on MAWL and VO2 (p<0.01). The type of pod effect on wrist posture was significant (p<0.01). Gender effect differences on MAWL, VO2 and wrist posture were also significant (p<0.05). Job design implications are discussed.

  3. Wrist arthrofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steve K; Gargano, Francesco; Hausman, Michael R

    2006-11-01

    Wrist arthrofibrosis is a condition of decreased range of wrist motion due to intrinsic adhesions and extrinsic contracture. It is clinically characterized by restricted wrist range of motion, pain, swelling, and a plateau in improvement after at least 6 months of intensive physiotherapy. Other conditions must be excluded, such as articular incongruity, arthritis, spasticity, skin and subcutaneous scarring, and loose bodies. We have devised a classification system based on pathologic anatomic location, where Type I represents intrinsic adhesions, and Type II represents extrinsic contracture. The types are subdivided according to where the pathology is present. The operative approach should be wrist arthroscopy for Types IA (radiocarpal adhesions) and IB (midcarpal adhesions) where intraarticular adhesions are present. Types IC (distal radioulnar joint adhesions) and II C (distal radioulnar joint capsular contracture) are best approached in an open manner where dorsal and palmar capsulectomies of the distal radioulnar joint are performed. For Types IIA, B, and D (dorsal, palmar, and combination extrinsic contracture, respectively), both open and arthroscopic methods are described.

  4. Integrated Design Optimization of a 5-DOF Assistive Light-weight Anthropomorphic Arm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lelai; Bai, Shaoping; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2011-01-01

    An integrated dimensional and drive train optimization method was developed for light-weight robotic arm design. The method deals with the determination of optimal link lengths and the optimal selection of motors and gearboxes from commercially available components. Constraints are formulated...

  5. Design optimization on the drive train of a light-weight robotic arm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lelai; Bai, Shaoping; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2011-01-01

    A drive train optimization method for design of light-weight robots is proposed. Optimal selections of motors and gearboxes from a limited catalog of commercially available components are done simultaneously for all joints of a robotic arm. Characteristics of the motor and gearbox, including gear...

  6. Design optimization on the drive train of a light-weight robotic arm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lelai; Bai, Shaoping; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2011-01-01

    A drive train optimization method for design of light-weight robots is proposed. Optimal selections of motors and gearboxes from a limited catalog of commercially available components are done simultaneously for all joints of a robotic arm. Characteristics of the motor and gearbox, including gear...... ratio, gear inertia, motor inertia, and gear efficiency, are considered in the drive train modeling. A co-simulation method is developed for dynamic simulation of the arm. A design example is included to demonstrate the proposed design optimization method....

  7. Exploiting arm posture synergies in activities of daily living to control the wrist rotation in upper limb prostheses: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, Federico; Controzzi, Marco; Cipriani, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Although significant technological advances have been made in the last forty years, natural and effortless control of upper limb prostheses is still an open issue. Commercially available myoelectric prostheses present limited Degrees of Freedom (DoF) mainly because of the lack of available and reliable independent control signals from the human body. Thus, despite the crucial role that an actuated wrist could play in a transradial prosthesis in terms of avoiding compensatory movements, commercial hand prostheses present only manually adjustable passive wrists or actuated rotators controlled by (unnatural) sequential control strategies. In the present study we investigated the synergies between the humeral orientation with respect to the trunk and the forearm pronation/supination angles during the execution of a wide range of activities of daily living, in healthy subjects. Our results showed consistent postural synergies between the two selected body segments for almost the totality of the activities of daily living under investigation. This is a promising result because these postural synergies could be exploited to automatically control the wrist rotator unit in transradial prostheses improving the fluency and the dexterity of the amputee.

  8. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance.

  9. Compensating the effects of FES-induced muscle fatigue by rehabilitation robotics during arm weight support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer-Rachner Paul

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor functions can be hindered in consequence to a stroke or a spinal cord injury. This often results in partial paralyses of the upper limb. The effectiveness of rehabilitation therapy can be improved by the use of rehabilitation robotics and Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES. We consider a hybrid arm weight support combining both. In order to compensate the effect of FES-induced muscle fatigue, we introduce a method to substitute the decreasing level of FES support by cable-driven robotics. We evaluated the approach in a trial with one healthy subject performing repetitive arm lifting. The controller automatically adapted the support and thus no increase in user generated volitional effort was observed when FES induced muscle fatigue occured.

  10. Midupper arm circumference and weight-for-length z scores have different associations with body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grijalva-Eternod, Carlos S; Wells, Jonathan Ck; Girma, Tsinuel;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A midupper arm circumference (MUAC) score (WHZ) or weight-for-length z score (WLZ) less than -3, all of which are recommended to identify severe wasting in children, often identify different children. The reasons behind this poor agreement are not well...... understood. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between these 2 anthropometric indexes and body composition to help understand why they identify different children as wasted. DESIGN: We analyzed weight, length, MUAC, fat-mass (FM), and fat-free mass (FFM) data from 2470 measurements from 595 healthy...... composition, and length influences these associations differently. Our results suggest that the WLZ is a good marker of tissue masses independent of length. The MUAC acts more as a composite index of poor growth indexing jointly tissue masses and length. This trial was registered at www...

  11. Wrist pulse (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle finger over the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base ... firmly with flat fingers until you feel the pulse in the radial artery.

  12. Design of a Compact, Reconfigurable, Prosthetic Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Zinck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a prosthetic wrist is the result of compromises between the function and the practicality of the device. Conventional prosthetic wrists use a single degree of freedom to produce pro/supination of the hand. It has not been demonstrated that this is the most functional alignment for a single axis. Previous work by the authors suggests that if the wrist must have only one rotatory axis then a more oblique orientation would be more functional. To test this idea, a compact wrist with a single axis and spherical design has been made that will allow any axis of rotation to be selected and the functional performance of the resulting arm be tested.

  13. Supinator Extender (SUE): a pneumatically actuated robot for forearm/wrist rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, James; Spencer, Steven J; Klein, Julius; Buell, Meghan; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Bobrow, James

    2011-01-01

    The robot described in this paper, SUE (Supinator Extender), adds forearm/wrist rehabilitation functionality to the UCI BONES exoskeleton robot and to the ArmeoSpring rehabilitation device. SUE is a 2-DOF serial chain that can measure and assist forearm supination-pronation and wrist flexion-extension. The large power to weight ratio of pneumatic actuators allows SUE to achieve the forces needed for rehabilitation therapy while remaining lightweight enough to be carried by BONES and ArmeoSpring. Each degree of freedom has a range of 90 degrees, and a nominal torque of 2 ft-lbs. The cylinders are mounted away from the patient's body on the lateral aspect of the arm. This is to prevent the danger of a collision and maximize the workspace of the arm robot. The rotation axis used for supination-pronation is a small bearing just below the subject's wrist. The flexion-extension motion is actuated by a cantilevered pneumatic cylinder, which allows the palm of the hand to remain open. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of SUE to measure and cancel forearm/wrist passive tone, thereby extending the active range of motion for people with stroke.

  14. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene H. L. Chan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1; immediately after training (T2; and at a 3-week follow-up (T3 by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone.

  15. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Irene H. L.; Chan, Dora Y. L.; Wang, Apple Q. L.; Cheng, Eddy K. N.; Chau, Pinky H. Y.; Chow, Kathy K. Y.; Cheung, Hobby K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone. PMID:27517053

  16. Education in wrist arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is an initiative for improving the education of residents in surgical skills and knowledge by using the current technical possibilities. The choice of wrist arthroscopy was driven by the fact that novel techniques have recently been developed within hand and wrist surgery

  17. Robot Control Using Electromyography (EMG Signals of the Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DaSalla

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to design a human–interface system, using EMG signals elicited by various wrist movements, to control a robot. EMG signals are normalized and based on joint torque. A three-layer neural network is used to estimate posture of the wrist and forearm from EMG signals. After training the neural network and obtaining appropriate weights, the subject was able to control the robot in real time using wrist and forearm movements.

  18. MRI of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Elizabeth A. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dickelizabeth@hotmail.com; Burnett, Carole; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M.W. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist is increasingly recognised as the imaging modality of choice in wrist disorders as image resolution improves and clinicians realise its potential. Consequently the ability to confidently interpret such imaging will become more important to both general and musculoskeletal radiologists. This article reviews current optimal imaging protocols and describes common abnormalities with a particular emphasis on less well understood topics such as intercalated segment instability, the triangular fibrocartilage complex and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  19. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  20. Harmonic analysis of wrist mechanism of robot manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Shaik; Navuri, Karteek; Eswara Kumar, A.; Prakash, D.

    2016-09-01

    Wrist mechanism is a part of robot manipulator which is used to provide the pitch and yaw motions to the end effectors for orienting the loads carried by the end effectors. The wrist mechanism is subjected to different types of vibrations because of the various working conditions. Due to these vibrations wrist mechanism experience higher deformations and stresses; this causes failure of wrist mechanism. It is important to study the dynamic behaviour of the wrist mechanism under different loads before adopting in the application. The structure of the wrist mechanism is modelled in the ANSYS Workbench software and analysed for harmonic loads. Proper boundary conditions, mesh and connections between links& pins are assigned to the wrist mechanism assembly. From the present work, peak deformations of links and pins are occurred at 569.83Hz. Further, the link are analysed with 3D composites those are carbon epoxy and E-glass epoxy. It is observed that carbon epoxy shows better stiffness than E-Glass epoxy and it has weight reduction of 13.76% compared with metals.

  1. Wealth status, mid upper arm circumference (MUAC and antenatal care (ANC are determinants for low birth weight in Kersa, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nega Assefa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low Birth Weight (LBW is one of the major risk factor for death in early life. However, little is known about predictors of LBW in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure the incidence and determinants of LBW in a rural population of Ethiopia. METHODS: An observational cohort study on pregnant women was conducted from December 2009 to November 2010. During the study period 1295 live birth were registered and the weights of 956 children were measured within 24 hours after birth. Socio-demographic, economic, maternal and organizational factors were considered as a predicators of LBW, defined as birth weight below 2500g. Logistic regression was used to analyze the data, odds ratio (OR and confidence intervals (CI are reported. RESULT: The incidence of LBW was 28.3%. It is significantly associated with poverty [OR 2.1; 95% CI: 1.42, 3.05], maternal Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC less than 23 cm [OR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.19, 2.19], not attending ANC [OR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.28], mother's experience of physical violence during pregnancy [OR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.48], and longer time to walk to health facility [OR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.11, 2.40]. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION: The incidence of LBW was high in Kersa. Babies born to women who were poor, undernourished, experienced physical violence during pregnancy and who had poor access to health services were more likely to be LBW in this part of the country. In this largely poor community where ANC coverage is low, to reduce the incidence of LBW, it is essential to improve access for maternal health care. The involvement of husbands and the community at large to seek collective action on LBW is essential.

  2. User and clinician perspectives on DEKA arm: results of VA study to optimize DEKA arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Klinger, Shana Lieberman; Etter, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes feedback from Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) subjects and clinicians gathered during the VA optimization study of the DEKA Arm. VA subjects and clinicians tested two DEKA Arm prototypes (second-generation [gen 2] and third-generation [gen 3]). Features of the prototypes in three configurations are described. DEKA used feedback from the VA optimization study and from their own subjects to refine the gen 2 prototype. Thirty-three unique subjects participated in the VA evaluation; 26 participated in the gen 2 evaluation (1 subject participated twice), 13 participated in the gen 3 evaluation, and 5 participated in both gen 2 and gen 3 evaluations. Subject data were gathered through structured and open-ended surveys, interviews, and audio- and videotaped sessions. Study prosthetists and therapists provided ongoing feedback and completed surveys at the end of each subject's protocol. Eleven categories of feedback were identified: weight, cosmesis, hand grips, wrist design, elbow design, end-point control, foot controls, batteries and chargers, visual notifications, tactor, and socket features. Final feedback on the gen 3 was generally positive, particularly regarding improvements in wrist design, visual notifications, foot controls, end-point control, and cosmesis. Additional refinements to make the device lighter in weight, eliminate external wires and cables, and eliminate the external battery may further enhance its perceived usability and acceptability.

  3. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  4. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  5. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background Tennis elbow (TE) is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow. Objectives This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT) on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow. Patients and Methods Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years) with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively. Results Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02). Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03). Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001. Conclusions The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients. PMID:24350156

  6. Chondrocalcinosis of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffar, P

    2004-10-01

    Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Deposition (CPDD) disease has characteristic radiographic features including soft tissue calcification, joint space narrowing, bone sclerosis, subchondral cyst formation without osteophyte formation, and large intraosseous geodes. Triangular fibrocartilage calcification is frequently found and isolated scapho-trapezio-trapezoid (STT) arthritis is specific for CPDD. Distal radio-ulnar (DRUJ), isolated midcarpal joint and piso-triquetral joint involvement also occur. 127 patients were reviewed. Seventy-eight had symptomatic STT joint arthritis, for which 36 underwent surgery. Twenty-two patients had a SLAC wrist deformity for which ten underwent surgery. Eight patients had isolated midcarpal arthritis for which three midcarpal arthrodeses, two four-bone arthrodeses and two carpal tunnel releases were performed. Nineteen patients had a generalized arthritis and seven of the patients underwent surgery: four-corner arthrodesis+scaphoidectomy (one case), carpal tunnel release (two cases) extensor synovectomy (two cases) and trigger finger release (two cases).

  7. The instability of wrist joint and total wrist replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-xing Ma; Yong-Qing Xu

    2016-01-01

    Total wrist arthroplasty are not used as widely as total knee and hip replacement.The functional hands are requiring surgeons to design a durable and functional satisfying prosthesis.This article will list the main reasons that cause the failure of the prosthesis.Some remarkable and representative prostheses are listed to show the devolvement of total wrist prosthesis and their individual special innovations to fix the problems,And the second part we will discuss the part that biomechanical elements act in the total wrist replacement (TWA).Summarize and find out what the real problem is and how we can find a way to fix it.

  8. Direct effect of a dynamic wrist and hand orthosis on reach and grasp kinematics in chronic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis, Sharon Maria; Prange, Grada Berendina; Stienen, Arno; Buurke, Jaap; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Yu, Haoyong; Braun, David; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Many stroke patients have impaired arm and hand function. Distal arm and hand devices may support functional use of the upper extremity in activities in daily life. The present study assessed the direct effects of a passive dynamic wrist and hand orthosis on hand and arm movements during the

  9. Direct effect of a dynamic wrist and hand orthosis on reach and grasp kinematics in chronic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenhuis, S.M.; Prange, G.B.; Stienen, A.H.A.; Buurke, J.H.; Rietman, J.S.; Yu, Haoyong; Braun, David; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Many stroke patients have impaired arm and hand function. Distal arm and hand devices may support functional use of the upper extremity in activities in daily life. The present study assessed the direct effects of a passive dynamic wrist and hand orthosis on hand and arm movements during the perform

  10. Engineering analysis and test results of the pre-stage planetary gear trains for wrist rotation and pitch assembly and azimuth and elevation assembly of the extendable stiff arm manipulator kit assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    In order to improve the performance capability of the Extendable Stiff Arm Manipulator (ESAM) it was necessary to increase the overall gear ratio by a factor of approximately four. This is accomplished with minimum effect to existing hardware by the interposition of a planetary gear transmission between the respective drive motors and the harmonic drive transmissions. The engineering analysis in support of this design approach and the subsequent no-load test results are reported.

  11. Effect of wrist position on young adults pinch grip control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Luzia Barros de Andrade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pinch grip is used in a large number of handling activities that require precision and control of an object. The position of the upper arm joints affects the fingers force production in order to handle the object. This study aimed to verify the influence of the wrist position in the production of maximum strength and in the control fingers grip pinch submaximum strength control. Participants were 21 right handed adults (10 male, 18-26 years old. They made two attempts of maximum force production and eight attempts of submaximal force production (four at 20% and four at 40% of maximum strength for pinch grip in three wrist positions: neutral, flexion and extension. The results showed that the production of maximum strength is higher in neutral position compared to wrist flexion and extension and higher for men compared to women. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the length of the hand and the production of maximum strength. The results also indicated that the wrist position did not interfere in the submaximum force control during this task. However, participants showed more difficulty controlling 20% than 40% of maximum strength. The present study showed evidence that the motor units used to produce grip pinch maximum strength cross the wrist joint but those used for the 20% and 40% of maximum strength are present only in the fingers and hand.

  12. Wrist arthrography: a simple method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna-Serna, Juan D.; Reus, Manuel; Alonso, Jose [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Radiology, El Palmar (Murcia) (Spain); Martinez, Francisco; Domenech-Ratto, Gines [University of Murcia, Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Murcia (Spain)

    2006-02-01

    A technique of wrist arthrography is presented using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates to identify precisely sites for puncture arthrography of the wrist and to obviate the need for fluoroscopic guidance. Radiocarpal joint arthrography was performed successfully in all 24 cases, 14 in the cadaveric wrists and 10 in the live patients. The arthrographic procedure described in this study is simple, safe, and rapid, and has the advantage of precise localisation of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.)

  13. Trabecular bone structure in the primate wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Ann-Marie; Tofanelli, Sergio; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kivell, Tracy L

    2014-05-01

    Trabecular (or cancellous) bone has been shown to respond to mechanical loading throughout ontogeny and thus can provide unique insight into skeletal function and locomotion in comparative studies of living and fossil mammalian morphology. Trabecular bone of the hand may be particularly functionally informative because the hand has more direct contact with the substrate compared with the remainder of the forelimb during locomotion in quadrupedal mammals. This study investigates the trabecular structure within the wrist across a sample of haplorhine primates that vary in locomotor behaviour (and thus hand use) and body size. High-resolution microtomographic scans were collected of the lunate, scaphoid, and capitate in 41 individuals and eight genera (Homo, Gorilla, Pan, Papio, Pongo, Symphalangus, Hylobates, and Ateles). We predicted that particular trabecular parameters would 1) vary across suspensory, quadrupedal, and bipedal primates based on differences in hand use and load, and 2) scale with carpal size following similar allometric patterns found previously in other skeletal elements across a larger sample of mammals and primates. Analyses of variance (trabecular parameters analysed separately) and principal component analyses (trabecular parameters analysed together) revealed no clear functional signal in the trabecular structure of any of the three wrist bones. Instead, there was a large degree of variation within suspensory and quadrupedal locomotor groups, as well as high intrageneric variation within some taxa, particularly Pongo and Gorilla. However, as predicted, Homo sapiens, which rarely use their hands for locomotion and weight support, were unique in showing lower relative bone volume (BV/TV) compared with all other taxa. Furthermore, parameters used to quantify trabecular structure within the wrist scale with size generally following similar allometric patterns found in trabeculae of other mammalian skeletal elements. We discuss the challenges

  14. A minimal wrist arthroplasty for early wrist osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollstein, Ronit; Carlson, Lois

    2013-05-01

    Background The most common forms of salvage surgery for wrist arthritis of any stage are four corner fusion and proximal row carpectomy. Younger, high demand patients with early arthritis may not be candidates for this type of salvage surgery. We describe a technique and preliminary case series of a minimal radiocarpal arthroplasty aimed at patients with initial and isolated wrist arthritis (stage 1). This procedure does not preclude any procedure that may become necessary in the future. Patients A series of nineteen male heavy laborers with scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC grade 1-2) wrist osteoarthritis that felt the wrist arthritis was prohibiting their function enough to warrant surgery, but were unwilling to undergo a salvage procedure, were treated with the technique. The average age was 57.2 (± 7.7) years. The average follow up period was 40.3 months (9-63 months). All patients returned to heavy labor. No revision surgery was needed within the follow up period. Range of motion (ROM) and grip strength did not significantly improve. Patient satisfaction was high despite imperfect results. Conclusions Minimal arthroplasty as described may provide a temporary solution for active patients with symptomatic early wrist arthritis who are not candidates for salvage wrist surgery. Longer -term follow up as well as investigation of additional stabilization procedures is necessary.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  16. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist) Page ( 1 ) The radius is the larger of the two bones of the forearm. The ... the distal end. A fracture of the distal radius occurs when the area of the radius near ...

  17. Ulnar Neuropathy at the Wrist

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A case of ulnar nerve compression at the wrist within Guyon’s canal is reported. The clinical presentation initially appeared consistent with an ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow. The true diagnosis of an ulnar sensorimotor nerve lesion occurring within the canal of Guyon was made electrophysiologically. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated compression of the nerve within the canal by a ganglionic cyst, which was confirmed by surgical intervention. Ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist is ...

  18. Psychometric properties of two questionnaires in the context of total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Merser, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Disabilites of Arm Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) and Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation questionnaires in patients with total wrist arthroplasty. METHODS: In a prospective cohort of 102 cases, we evaluated the QuickDASH. Furthermore, in a cross-sectional study and a test-retest on a subgroup of the patients, we...... patients scored significantly higher on the QuickDASH than other patients did. The scores of both questionnaires were very closely related. CONCLUSION: Both questionnaires are valid and equivalent for use in patients with total wrist arthroplasty. FUNDING: This research received no specific grant from any...

  19. Simulation of extension, radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist with a rigid body spring model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischli, S; Sellens, R W; Beek, M; Pichora, D R

    2009-06-19

    A novel computational model of the wrist that predicts carpal bone motion was developed in order to investigate the complex kinematics of the human wrist. This rigid body spring model (RBSM) of the wrist was built using surface models of the eight carpal bones, the bases of the five metacarpal bones, and the distal parts of the ulna and radius, all obtained from computed tomography (CT) scans of a cadaver upper limb. Elastic contact conditions between the rigid bodies modeled the influence of the cartilage layers, and ligamentous structures were constructed using nonlinear, tension-only spring elements. Motion of the wrist was simulated by applying forces to the tendons of the five main wrist muscles modeled. Three wrist motions were simulated: extension, ulnar deviation and radial deviation. The model was tested and tuned by comparing the simulated displacement and orientation of the carpal bones with previously obtained CT-scans of the same cadaver arm in deviated (45 degrees ulnar and 15 degrees radial), and extended (57 degrees ) wrist positions. Simulation results for the scaphoid, lunate, capitate, hamate and triquetrum are presented here and provide credible prediction of carpal bone movement. These are the first reported results of such a model. They indicate promise that this model will assist in future wrist kinematics investigations. However, further optimization and validation are required to define and guarantee the validity of results.

  20. The effects of electromechanical wrist robot assistive system with neuromuscular electrical stimulation for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X L; Tong, K Y; Li, R; Xue, J J; Ho, S K; Chen, P

    2012-06-01

    An electromyography (EMG)-driven electromechanical robot system integrated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) was developed for wrist training after stroke. The performance of the system in assisting wrist flexion/extension tracking was evaluated on five chronic stroke subjects, when the system provided five different schemes with or without NMES and robot assistance. The tracking performances were measured by range of motion (ROM) of the wrist and root mean squared error (RMSE). The performance is better when both NMES and robot assisted in the tracking than those with either NMES or robot only (Pmotor functions in the hand, wrist and elbow functions after the training, as indicated by the clinical scores of Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Action Research Arm Test, Wolf Motor Function Test; and also showed reduced spasticity in the wrist and the elbow as measured by the Modified Ashworth Score of each subject. After the training, the co-contractions were reduced between the flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis, and between the biceps brachii and triceps brachii. Assistance from the robot helped improve the movement accuracy; and the NMES helped increase the muscle activation for the wrist joint and suppress the excessive muscular activities from the elbow joint. The NMES-robot assisted wrist training could improve the hand, wrist, and elbow functions.

  1. Arm morbidity after breast cancer treatments and analysis of related factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Mi Son; Chung, Yong Sik; Kang, Seung Hee [College of Medicine, Ajou University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Seong Mi [Ajou University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Hyun [Ajou University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Jin; Song, Yeoung Suk [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Bung [Hee Bung Park Breast Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    To evaluate the incidence of arm morbidity following breast cancer surgery including axillary dissection and to identify related factors. One hundred and fifty nine patients were studied using a self-report questionnaire and a clinical examination. Lymphedema, reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint and subjective symptoms (pain, impaired arm movement, numbness, stiffness) were evaluated. As related factors, demographic, oncologic characteristics and types of treatment were analysed. The incidence of lymphedema ({>=} 2 cm difference comparing to unaffected arm) was 6.3%, 10.7%, 22.6% and 23.3% at each 10 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm, and 40 cm from wrist. Reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint ({>=} 20 degree difference comparing to unaffected arm) was noted in more than 1/3 patients for flexion, abduction and internal rotation. Especially the reduction of range of motion in internal rotation was severe (> 50% reduction) in 1/3 patients. Approximately 50 to 60% of patients complained impaired arm movement, numbness, stiffness and pain. Body mass index (BMI) was the significant risk factor for lymphedema. Lymphedema was present in 1/3 of patients and the common sites of edema were 30 cm 40 cm proximal from the wrist. Also most severe reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint was with internal rotation. There needs weight control for lymphedema because BMI was the significant risk factor for lymphedema. Also rehabilitation program for range of motion especially internal rotation in shoulder joint should be developed.

  2. Scapholunate advanced collapse wrist salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmead, D; Watson, H K; Damon, C; Herber, S; Paly, W

    1994-09-01

    Patients with scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrist do not have to undergo total wrist arthrodesis; the SLAC pattern spares the radiolunate articulation, providing a basis for salvage. We report the results of 100 cases in which a technique comprised of scaphoid excision and limited wrist arthrodesis was used. The average followup period of 44 months revealed excellent functional status and a high rate of patient satisfaction. The majority of employed patients were able to return to their original jobs, and many chose to resume wrist-related recreational activities. Pain relief was good to excellent in most cases. Extension/flexion averaged 72 degrees (53% of a normal opposite wrist), radioulnar deviation 37 degrees (59%), and grip strength 80% of the opposite side. X-ray films revealed only two instances of radiolunate destruction, both in conjunction with ulnar translation of the carpus. The other 98 patients demonstrated a well-preserved radiolunate joint regardless of followup interval. Complications were few. Nonunion occurred in three cases. A dorsal impingement of the capitate and radius (12%) was felt to be technique-related and avoidable by careful capitolunate alignment.

  3. Arm Lift (Brachioplasty)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sagging. An arm lift might also boost your body image. As you get older, the skin on your upper arms changes — sagging and becoming loose. Significant weight loss also can cause the undersides of your upper arms to droop. While exercise can strengthen and improve muscle tone in the ...

  4. Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Carisa; Feinberg, Joseph; Wolfe, Scott W

    2009-09-01

    A case of ulnar nerve compression at the wrist within Guyon's canal is reported. The clinical presentation initially appeared consistent with an ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow. The true diagnosis of an ulnar sensorimotor nerve lesion occurring within the canal of Guyon was made electrophysiologically. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated compression of the nerve within the canal by a ganglionic cyst, which was confirmed by surgical intervention. Ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist is uncommon and difficult to diagnose; therefore, it is important to understand the nerve's anatomical course and distribution to allow for accurate diagnosis by clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluations. Electrodiagnosis is an important tool in identifying ulnar nerve lesions at the wrist while excluding other disorders in the differential and recognizing coexisting pathology.

  5. Epoxy/anhydride thermosets modified with end-capped star polymers with poly(ethyleneimine cores of different molecular weight and poly(ε–caprolactone arms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Acebo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiarm star polymers, with a hyperbranched poly(ethyleneimine (PEI core and poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL arms end-capped with acetyl groups were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone from PEI cores of different molecular weight. These star polymers were used as toughening agents for epoxy/anhydride thermosets. The curing process was studied by calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. The final properties of the resulting materials were determined by thermal and mechanical tests. The addition of the star polymers led to an improvement up to 130% on impact strength and a reduction in the thermal stresses up to 55%. The structure and molecular weight of the modifier used affected the morphology of the resulting materials. Electron microscopy showed phase-separated morphologies with nano-sized fine particles well adhered to the epoxy/anhydride matrix when the higher molecular weight modifier was used.

  6. Correlation between elite male Iranian gymnast’s wrist injuries and their anthropometric characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Hadi; Rajabi, Reza; Alizadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Nikro, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: In gymnastics, wrists are under considerable force that causes various injuries. The influences of various risk factors have not been studied sufficiently to date to reduce the wrist injuries of gymnasts. The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between anthropometric characteristics and the wrist injuries of elite male gymnasts who took part in the Iranian Premier League and Division One in 2012. Methods: This was a cross-sectional correlation study concerning the injuries of 43 elite male gymnasts. The extent of their wrist injuries was determined by a questionnaire and interviews. Also, their anthropometric characteristics were collected according to the criteria established by the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry. Event tree analysis and the Spearman rho correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Results: Among the gymnasts, 53.5% experienced wrist injuries over the past year, and the rate of wrist injuries was three per gymnast for one year. The incidents of skin and muscular injuries were the most prevalent type of injuries followed by Injuries to ligaments and bones respectively. Body weight was the only anthromopetric characteristic of the participants that was found to have a significant positive relationship with wrist injuries (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Gymnasts and their coaches should pay special attention to gymnasts’ weight as an intrinsic risk factor and take the required actions to prevent wrist injuries. PMID:25763171

  7. Ulnar nerve excursion and strain at the elbow and wrist associated with upper extremity motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, T W; Glowczewskie, F; Cowin, D; Wheeler, D L

    2001-07-01

    Significant excursion of the ulnar nerve is required for unimpeded upper extremity motion. This study evaluated the excursion necessary to accommodate common motions of daily living and associated strain on the ulnar nerve. The 2 most common sites of nerve entrapment, the cubital tunnel and the entrance of Guyon's canal, were studied. Five fresh-frozen, thawed transthoracic cadaver specimens (10 arms) were dissected and the nerve was exposed at the elbow and wrist only enough to be marked with a microsuture. Excursion was measured with a laser mounted on a Vernier caliper fixed to the bone and aligned in the direction of nerve motion. A Microstrain (Burlington, VT) DVRT strain device was applied to the nerve at both the elbow and wrist. Nerve excursion associated with motion of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and fingers (measured by goniometer) was measured at the wrist and elbow. An average of 4.9 mm ulnar nerve excursion was required at the elbow to accommodate shoulder motion from 30 degrees to 110 degrees of abduction, and 5.1 mm was needed for elbow motion from 10 degrees to 90 degrees. When the wrist was moved from 60 degrees of extension to 65 degrees of flexion, 13.6 mm excursion of the ulnar nerve was required at the wrist. When all the motions of the wrist, fingers, elbow, and shoulder were combined, 21.9 mm of ulnar nerve excursion was required at the elbow and 23.2 mm at the wrist. Ulnar nerve strain of 15% or greater was experienced at the elbow with elbow flexion and at the wrist with wrist extension and radial deviation. Any factor that limits excursion at these sites could result in repetitive traction of the nerve and possibly play a role in the pathophysiology of cubital tunnel syndrome or ulnar neuropathy at Guyon's canal.

  8. Computational Biomechanics of the Wrist Joint

    CERN Document Server

    Nazri Bajuri, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    This book presents an analysis of the stress distribution and contact stresses in severe rheumatoid wrist after total wrist arthroplasty. It assesses and compares the load transfer throughout the joint and contact pressure at the articulations. The data obtained from this study is of importance as this provide greater evidence to the benefits of total wrist arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  9. The impact of posture on wrist tendinosis among blue-collar workers: the San Francisco study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Adamson, Carisa; You, Doohee; Eisen, Ellen A; Goldberg, Robert; Rempel, David

    2014-02-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of wrist posture on incidence of wrist tendinosis in a prospective cohort of blue-collar workers. Previous studies have identified awkward wrist posture as a risk factor for wrist tendinosis, though the magnitude of the relationship is unclear. Workers (N = 413) at four industries were followed for up to 28 months with questionnaires and physical examinations every 4 months. Individualized exposure assessments of wrist posture were based on video analysis to determine the wrist extension/flexion angle for up to four tasks. Posture measures were calculated while in "heavy pinch" (> 1 kg force), "heavy power grip" (> 4 kg force), and across "all grips." A proportional hazards model estimated the relationship between time-weighted average posture measures and incidence of dominant-side wrist tendinosis. In a model based on tertiles of exposure, adjusted for age, gender, hand force, and repetition of exertions, risk of tendinosis more than doubled in the highest category (HR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.01-7.21) across all grips. The relative risk was highest during heavy pinch (HR = 5.03, 95% CI = 0.74-34.05), though not statistically significant. Increased median wrist extension while in heavy power grip was protective (HR = 0.24, 95% CI = 0.06-0.94). In this study of production workers, median wrist flexion of more than 70, across all grips, was associated with an increased risk of tendinosis. The protective findings on median wrist extension during power grip deserve further investigation. Work tasks and tools should be designed to prevent sustained wrist flexion, especially during tasks involving forceful pinch.

  10. Efficacy of Continuing Education in Improving Pharmacists' Competencies for Providing Weight Management Service: Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarayani, Amir; Rashidian, Arash; Gholami, Kheirollah; Torkamandi, Hassan; Javadi, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Weight management is a new public health role for community pharmacists in many countries. Lack of expertise is one of the key barriers to counseling obese patients. We evaluated the comparative efficacy of three alternative continuing education (CE) meetings on weight management. Methods: We designed a randomized controlled trial…

  11. Dissection of two quantitative trait loci for grain weight linked in repulsion on the long arm of chromosome 1 of rice(Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang; Guo; Kai; Wang; Junyu; Chen; Derun; Huang; Yeyang; Fan; Jieyun; Zhuang

    2013-01-01

    Grain weight is a key determinant of grain yield in rice. Three sets of rice populations with overlapping segregating regions in isogenic backgrounds were established in the generations of BC2 F5, BC2 F6 and BC2 F7, derived from Zhenshan 97 and Milyang 46, and used for dissection of quantitative trait loci(QTL) for grain weight. Two QTL linked in repulsion phase on the long arm of chromosome 1 were separated. One was located between simple sequence repeat(SSR) markers RM11437 and RM11615, having a smaller additive effect with the enhancing allele from the maintainer line Zhenshan 97 and a partially dominant effect for increasing grain weight. The other was located between SSR markers RM11615 and RM11800, having a larger additive effect with the enhancing allele from the restorer line Milyang 46 and a partially dominant effect for increasing grain weight. When the two QTL segregated simultaneously, a residual additive effect with the enhancing allele from Milyang 46 and an over-dominance effect for increasing grain weight were detected. This suggests that dominant QTL linked in repulsion phase might play an important role in heterosis in rice. Our study also indicates that the use of populations with overlapping segregating regions in isogenic backgrounds is helpful for the dissection of minor linked QTL.

  12. Reproducibility of radiographic classification of scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, K; Hearnden, A; Talwalkar, S; Hayton, M; Murali, S R; Trail, I A

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure inter- and intra-observer agreement on the radiographic classification of scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist. Radiographs of 41 patients with SLAC wrist and 47 patients with SNAC wrist were graded on two separate occasions by four orthopaedic consultants specializing in hand and wrist surgery. Inter-observer agreement was evaluated using the multi-rater kappa value. Landis and Koch criteria were used to assess the level of agreement. Intra-observer agreement was tested by re-grading the radiographs after an interval of 2 to 4 weeks and calculating the weighted kappa value. For SLAC wrist, the inter-observer agreement was moderate (kappa value = 0.59) and intra-observer agreement substantial (kappa value = 0.65). For SNAC wrist, the inter-observer agreement was slight (kappa value = 0.20) and intra-observer agreement was fair (kappa value = 0.29). Radiographic classification of SLAC wrist has moderate reliability and reproducibility, whereas classification of SNAC wrist has limited reliability.

  13. The effect of handle angle on MAWL, wrist posture, RPE, and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M J; Chung, H C; Chen, H C

    2000-01-01

    In manual material handling tasks, the handle serves as the interface between the human operator and the box (the materials). Handle angle design can affect both wrist posture and lifting ability. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of handle angle on maximal acceptable weight of lifting (MAWL), perceived whole-body exertion, whole-body workload, wrist posture, and perceived wrist exertion. The results indicate that handle angle had a significant effect on wrist posture and wrist rating of perceived exertion (RPE). A box with a 0 degrees handle angle induced the greatest ulnar deviation and the highest wrist RPE. A 75 degrees handle angle induced the greatest radial deviation and a relatively high wrist RPE. A 30 degrees handle angle resulted in the greatest MAWL and the lowest level of wrist RPE. Overall, these findings suggest that 30 degrees and 45 degrees handle angles can provide favorable coupling conditions for the cutout-type handhold container handle. Actual or practical applications include the ergonomic design of container handles for manual material handling tasks industry.

  14. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shamsoddini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tennis elbow (TE is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow.Objectives: This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow.Patients and Methods: Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively.Results: Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02. Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03. Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001.Conclusions: The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients.

  15. Measuring Sleep by Wrist Actigraph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    C-804G UNCLASSIFIED N i* mhEEmohmhEmhI * - 1 1 ~ 2 AD REPORT NUMBER 1 MEASURING SLEEP BY WRIST ACTIGRAPH * ANNUAL REPORT Daniel F . Kripke, Daniel J...9 17 ~. Daniel F ./iripke, Daniel J./Mullaney.,.~~ DADl17-78-C-8040 and Sam/Messin -..~w.Y~~pn.MITWIATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT

  16. [Design of minimally invasive surgery wrist institution actuated by shape memory alloy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Cao, Tong; Chen, Hua; Liu, Da; Shi, Zhenyun; Ma, Chen

    2013-06-01

    The rapid development of minimally invasive surgery technology requires higher flexibility of surgical treatment and small volume of medical instrument. This paper proposed a new type of minimally invasive surgery wrist institution actuated by TiNi shape memory alloy (SMA) wire. The wrist institution has some advantages such as compact structure, flexible function, light weight, big movement space, and high output position precision. The paper briefly introduces the properties of TiNi SMA and describes the configuration of wrist institution. We also carried out mechanism simulation analysis to the mechanics model and set up kinematics equations, and finally presented the workspace of the institution.

  17. T2-signal of ulnar nerve branches at the wrist in guyon's canal syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Kollmer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate T2-signal of high-resolution MRI in distal ulnar nerve branches at the wrist as diagnostic sign of guyon's-canal-syndrome (GCS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 11 GCS patients confirmed by clinical/electrophysiological findings, and 20 wrists from 11 asymptomatic volunteers were prospectively included to undergo the following protocol: axial T2-weighted-fat-suppressed and T1-weighted-turbo-spin-echo-sequences (3T-MR-scanner, Magnetom/Verio/Siemens. Patients were examined in prone position with the arm extended and wrist placed in an 8-channel surface-array-coil. Nerve T2-signal was evaluated as contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNR from proximal-to-distal in ulnar nerve trunk, its superficial/sensory and deep/motor branch. Distal motor-nerve-conduction (distal-motor-latency (dml to first dorsal-interosseus (IOD I and abductor digiti minimi muscles was correlated with T2-signal. Approval by the institutional review-board and written informed consent was given by all participants. RESULTS: In GCS, mean nerve T2-signal was strongly increased within the deep/motor branch (11.7±4.8 vs.controls:-5.3±2.4;p = 0.001 but clearly less and not significantly increased in ulnar nerve trunk (6.8±6.4vs.-7.4±2.5;p = 0.07 and superficial/sensory branch (-2.1±4.9vs.-9.7±2.9;p = 0.08. Median nerve T2-signal did not differ between patients and controls (-9.8±2.5vs.-6.7±4.2;p = 0.45. T2-signal of deep/motor branch correlated strongly with motor-conduction-velocity to IOD I in non-linear fashion (R(2 = -0.8;p<0.001. ROC-analysis revealed increased nerve T2-signal of the deep/motor branch to be a sign of excellent diagnostic performance (area-under-the-curve 0.94, 95% CI: 0.85-1.00; specificity 90%, sensitivity 89.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Nerve T2-signal increase of distal ulnar nerve branches and in particular of the deep/motor branch is highly accurate for the diagnostic determination of GCS. Furthermore, for the first time it was found in nerve entrapment

  18. Image-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unberath, Mathias; Choi, Jang-Hwan; Berger, Martin; Maier, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    We previously introduced four fiducial marker-based strategies to compensate for involuntary knee-joint motion during weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of the lower body. 2D methods showed significant reduction of motion- related artifacts, but 3D methods worked best. However, previous methods led to increased examination times and patient discomfort caused by the marker attachment process. Moreover, sub-optimal marker placement may lead to decreased marker detectability and therefore unstable motion estimates. In order to reduce overall patient discomfort, we developed a new image-based 2D projection shifting method. A C-arm cone-beam CT system was used to acquire projection images of five healthy volunteers at various flexion angles. Projection matrices for the horizontal scanning trajectory were calibrated using the Siemens standard PDS-2 phantom. The initial reconstruction was forward projected using maximum-intensity projections (MIP), yielding an estimate of a static scan. This estimate was then used to obtain the 2D projection shifts via registration. For the scan with the most motion, the proposed method reproduced the marker-based results with a mean error of 2.90 mm +/- 1.43 mm (compared to a mean error of 4.10 mm +/- 3.03 mm in the uncorrected case). Bone contour surrounding modeling clay layer was improved. The proposed method is a first step towards automatic image-based, marker-free motion-compensation.

  19. Arthroscopic repair of peripheral avulsions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, S J; Savoie, F H; Geissler, W B; Whipple, T L; Jiminez, W; Jenkins, N

    1997-02-01

    A multicenter study to assess arthroscopic reconstruction of the peripheral attachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex was undertaken. A total of 44 patients (45 wrists) from three institutions were reviewed. Twenty-seven of the 45 wrists had associated injuries, including distal radius fracture (4), partial or complete rupture of the scapholunate (7), lunotriquetral (9), ulnocarpal (2), or radiocarpal (2) ligaments. There were two fractured ulnar styloids and one scapholunate accelerated collapse (SLAC) wrist deformity. The peripheral tears were repaired using a zone-specific repair kit. The patients were immobilized in a munster cast, allowing elbow flexion and extension, but no pronation or supination for 4 weeks, followed by 2 to 4 weeks in a short arm cast or VersaWrist splint. All patients were reexamined independently 1 to 3 years postoperatively by a physician, therapist, and registered nurse. The results were graded according to the Mayo modified wrist score. Twenty-nine of the 45 wrists were rated excellent. 12 good, 1 fair, and 3 poor. Overall, 42 of the 45 patients (93%) rated as satisfactory and returned to sports or work activities. One patient had chronic pain, and two patients had ulnar nerve symptoms, although motion was normal in all, and their grip strength was at least 75% of the opposite hand. Arthroscopic repair of peripheral tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is a satisfactory method of repairing these injuries.

  20. Blisters associated with elective wrist surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Tsipora; Chernofsky, Michael A; Luria, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Blistering of the skin has been reported after high energy trauma or arthroplasties of large joints. It is rare in wrist trauma and seldom reported following elective wrist surgery. We present three cases of skin blistering after elective wrist surgery. Two female patients aged 18 and 35 years and one male patient aged 53 years were treated with total wrist fusion, carpometacarpal fusion, and open wrist ligament repair. They reported burning pain at the blister site. The blisters were clear and treated with dressing changes. There were no infections or wound complications and all blisters resolved without sequelae. These complications were probably due to a combination of factors, including swelling, compression from dressing and splint, multiple surgical incisions, and the use of adhesive dressing. Reassurance and proper wound care are recommended for the complication of clear blistering following elective wrist surgery.

  1. The effect of six keyboard designs on wrist and forearm postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, David; Barr, Alan; Brafman, David; Young, Ed

    2007-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that alternative geometry keyboards may prevent or reduce arm pain or disorders, and presumably the mechanism is by reducing awkward arm postures. However, the effect of alternative keyboards, especially the new designs, on wrist and arm postures are not well known. In this laboratory study, the wrist and forearm postures of 100 subjects were measured with a motion analysis system while they typed on 6 different keyboard configurations. There were significant differences in wrist extension, ulnar deviation, and forearm pronation between keyboards. When considering all 6 wrists and forearm postures together, the keyboard with an opening angle of 12 degrees , a gable angle of 14 degrees , and a slope of 0 degrees appears to provide the most neutral posture among the keyboards tested. Subjects most preferred this keyboard or a similar keyboard with a gable angle of 8 degrees and they least preferred the keyboard on a conventional laptop computer. These findings may assist in recommendations regarding the selection of keyboards for computer usage.

  2. Tendon involvement in rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C.; Ercolani, P.; De Nigris, E. [Ancona Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Giovagnoni, A. [Modena Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-03-01

    Objective. To evaluate the distribution and extent of wrist tendon alterations in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Design and patients. Forty-three clinically active RA patients with an illness duration of less than 4 years and no clinical evidence of tendons tears were enrolled in the study. There were 10 men and 33 women, with an average age of 52 years (range 33-63 years). MRI of both wrists, with one exception, was performed at 1.0 T using T1- and T2-weighted sequences (slice thickness 3 mm). Twelve healthy subjects (8 women, 4 men; mean age 31 years) were also evaluated as a control group. Two radiologists reviewed each of four schematic anatomical regions (volar, dorsal, ulnar, radial) for the degree of tendon and tendon sheath alterations using two progressive scales. Results. In the control group all tendons had homogeneous low signal intensity on all sequences. A small amount of fluid was found in six subjects but the diameter was always less than 1 mm. In the patient group minimal fluid (<2 mm) was found in 35 (41%) wrists, grade 2 fluid (<2>5mm) in 26 (31%) and grade 3 fluid (>5 mm) in 24 (28%). Fiftynine (69%) of the grade 1 changes were in the volar compartment but grade 2 involvement was evenly distributed. Grade 3 changes were most common in the dorsal compartment and combined grade 2 and 3 in the dorsal and ulnar compartments were 32 (38%) and 25 (30%) compared with 16 (18%) and 17 (20%) respectively in the volar and radial compartments. The tendons were normal (grade 0) in 47 (46%) wrists. A maximum tendon signal change (grade 1) was demonstrated in 28 wrists (32%). When associated with other individual tendons grades this grade was demonstrated in the dorsal compartment in 30 (35%) wrists, in the volar compartment in 12 (14%), in the radial compartment in 17 (20%) and in the ulnar compartment in 26 (30%). A partial tear (grade 2) was detected in 7 (8%) wrists, all involving the dorsal and ulnar

  3. Can total wrist arthroplasty be an option in the treatment of the severely destroyed posttraumatic wrist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen;

    2013-01-01

    Background Severely destroyed posttraumatic wrists are usually treated by partial or total wrist fusion or proximal row carpectomy. The indications for and longevity of total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) are still unclear. Case Description The aim of this study was to analyze a series in which one la...

  4. Key Technologies in Large-scale Rescue Robot Wrists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The full-Automatic Quick Hitch Coupling Device (full-AQHCD for short is used as the starting point, key technologies in a large-scale rescue robot wrist, which is constituted by integrating a quick hitch coupling device, a turning device, and a swaying device together, are reviewed respectively. Firstly, the semi-AQHCD made domestically for the main-Arm Claw Wrist (main-ACW for short is introduced, and the full-AQHCD imported from Oil Quick company in Sweden for the vice-Arm Cutter Wrist (vice-ACW for short is presented. Secondly, aiming at three key technologies in the full-AQHCD including rotary joint technology, automatic docking technology and precise docking technology for quick action coupling, are concisely expressed. Thirdly, the hydraulic motor driving gear type slewing bearing technology of the turning device made domestically for the main-ACW is introduced, and the hydraulic motor driving worm type slewing bearing technology of the turning device imported from HKS company in Germany for the vice-ACW is presented, especially, the existing gap in the similar domestic technology is discussed. Subsequently, the hydraulic cylinder driving 4-bar linkage technology of the swaying device made domestically for the main-ACW is introduced, and the hydraulic double spiral swing cylinder technology of the swaying device imported from HKS company in Germany for the vice-ACW is presented, especially, the existing gap in the similar domestic technology is discussed. Finally, it is emphasized that these technological gaps have seriously restricted the ability of the vice-ACW to successfully work in future actual rescue combats, therefore, it must be highly valued in the follow-up research and development (R&D through cooperating with professional manufacturers in China, thereby making technological advances.

  5. Weight loss reduces breast ductal fluid estrogens in obese postmenopausal women: a single arm intervention pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter Catherine L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of excess body fat increases breast cancer risk after menopause. Whether the localized breast is differently influenced by adipose tissue compared to the rest of the body, has not been well studied. Our purpose was to demonstrate feasibility and preliminarily evaluate serum-based and localized breast biomarker changes resulting from a weight loss intervention among obese postmenopausal women. Methods We conducted a 12-week pilot controlled dietary and exercise intervention among healthy obese postmenopausal women, collected serum and breast ductal fluid before and after the intervention, and estimated the association with systemic and localized biomarker changes. We recruited 7 obese (mean body mass index = 33.6 kg/m2 postmenopausal women. We collected samples at baseline and the 12th week for: anthropometry; phlebotomy; dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (lean and fat mass; exercise fitness (maximum oxygen consumption (VO2Max; 1-repetition strength maximum; and breast ductal lavage. Results Changes from baseline occurred in body composition and exercise performance including fat mass loss (14% average drop, VO2Max (+36% increase and strength improvement (+26%. Breast ductal fluid markers declined from baseline with estradiol showing a 24% reduction and IL-6 a 20% reduction. We also observed serum biomarker reductions from baseline including leptin (36% decline, estrone sulfate (−10%, estradiol (−25%, and Il-6 (−33%. Conclusions Conduct of the diet and exercise intervention, collection of ductal fluid, and measurement of hormones and cytokines contained in the ductal fluid were all feasible. We preliminarily demonstrated estradiol and IL-6 reductions from baseline in both serum and breast ductal fluid among obese postmenopausal women who participated in the 12-week weight loss diet and exercise intervention.

  6. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pal, Saikat [Biomedical Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California 93407 (United States); Beaupré, Gary S. [Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  7. Coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscle activity as a function of wrist joint angle during two-digit grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamie A; Bobich, Lisa R; Santello, Marco

    2010-04-26

    Fingertip forces result from the activation of muscles that cross the wrist and muscles whose origins and insertions reside within the hand (extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles, respectively). Thus, tasks that involve changes in wrist angle affect the moment arm and length, hence the force-producing capabilities, of extrinsic muscles only. If a grasping task requires the exertion of constant fingertip forces, the Central Nervous System (CNS) may respond to changes in wrist angle by modulating the neural drive to extrinsic or intrinsic muscles only or by co-activating both sets of muscles. To distinguish between these scenarios, we recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles of the thumb and index finger as a function of wrist angle during a two-digit object hold task. We hypothesized that changes in wrist angle would elicit EMG amplitude modulation of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles. In one experimental condition we asked subjects to exert the same digit forces at each wrist angle, whereas in a second condition subjects could choose digit forces for holding the object. EMG activity was significantly modulated in both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a function of wrist angle (both pmuscles. We conclude that the CNS controlled both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a muscle synergy. These findings are discussed within the theoretical frameworks of synergies and common neural input across motor nuclei of hand muscles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Promising one- to six-year results with the Motec wrist arthroplasty in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigstad, O; Lütken, T; Grimsgaard, C; Bolstad, B; Thorkildsen, R; Røkkum, M

    2012-11-01

    The Motec cementless modular metal-on-metal ball-and-socket wrist arthroplasty was implanted in 16 wrists with scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC; grades 3 or 4) and 14 wrists with scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) in 30 patients (20 men) with severe (grades 3 or 4) post-traumatic osteoarthritis of the wrist. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (31 to 71). All prostheses integrated well radiologically. At a mean follow-up of 3.2 years (1.1 to 6.1) no luxation or implant breakage occurred. Two wrists were converted to an arthrodesis for persistent pain. Loosening occurred in one further wrist at five years post-operatively. The remainder demonstrated close bone-implant contact. The clinical results were good, with markedly decreased Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and pain scores, and increased movement and grip strength. No patient used analgesics and most had returned to work. Good short-term function was achieved using this wrist arthroplasty in a high-demand group of patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

  9. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Tyson K; Walden, Anna L; Wilt, Jessica M

    2014-05-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0-10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance Pain relief

  10. A Pilot Cross-Sectional Study of Postpartum Wrist Pain in an Urban Chinese Population: Its Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Regina W S; Tam, Wing-Hung; Chan, Dicken C C; Yip, Benjamin H K; Tam, Lucia W Y; Chow, Lyan L Y; Chung, Vincent C H; Chung, Roger Y; Wong, Samuel Y S

    2017-07-01

    Wrist pain after childbirth is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Little is known about the prevalence of this musculoskeletal disorder which is important to overall maternal health. To examine the prevalence of and risk factors for de novo wrist pain in women after childbirth. A pilot cross-sectional survey. A telephone interview was conducted 2 months after childbirth among women who delivered at a tertiary hospital in Hong Kong. The prevalence of de novo wrist pain was recorded; its severity was rated using the numerical rating scale and Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) with pain and functional subscale scores. In total, 259 women aged 32.8 ± 4.0 years participated; 149 women (57.5%) developed wrist pain after childbirth and 125 (84%) had persistent wrist pain 2 months postpartum. The majority had moderate (43.5%) to severe (21%) wrist pain. Bilateral involvement was common (56.8%), with most of the pain (59.3%) located on the radial side of the wrist. Primiparity was associated with wrist pain development (odds ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.33 - 5.16, P = 0.01); pain intensity was negatively correlated with the baby's birth weight (beta = -1.059, P = 0.013). Mean PRWE pain and function scores were 22.8 ± 10.3 and 15.6 ± 10.7, respectively. Cross-sectional survey is prone to volunteer bias, though recent literature indicates that the bias may not substantially affect the internal validity of the study. Wrist pain is prevalent after childbirth; future studies may consider looking into its exact pathology, long-term consequences, and overall effect on maternal health. Wrist pain, DeQuervain disease, postpartum, childbirth, mothers, prevalence, cross sectional study, survey.

  11. [Functional results after proximal row carpectomy (PRC) in patients with SNAC-/SLAC-wrist stage II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, S; Germann, G; Dragu, A; Tränkle, M; Sauerbier, M

    2005-04-01

    The proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is a motion preserving procedure which creates a new joint without arthrosis. It is a frequently used procedure in stage II of a posttraumatic degenerative arthrosis of the wrist after scaphoid nonunion or scapholunate ligament instability (SNAC-/SLAC-wrist). In this retrospective analysis the functional postoperative results of this operation are compared in light of a homogenous indication (SNAC-/SLAC-wrist stage II). In 38 patients PRC was performed for a stage II SNAC- (n = 29) or SLAC-wrist (n = 9) between June 1994 and March 2002. Postoperative examination included range of motion and grip strength. Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS 0 - 100). The DASH questionnaire (disability of the arm, shoulder and hand) was used to evaluate the disabilities in activities of daily living (ADL). Thirty patients (79 %) with a mean age of 39 years (23 - 59) were evaluated with a mean follow-up of 27 months (6 - 100). Mean extension and flexion of the wrist reached 75 degree which was 57 % of the contralateral hand. Mean radial and ulnar deviation was 33 degree corresponding with 52 % of the contralateral hand. The average grip strength was 50 % of the unaffected side. The postoperative DASH score was 27.4. Pain with strenuous activity was reduced by 40 %, resting pain by 77 %. Three patients showed radiological signs of a radiocapitate arthrosis, one patient needed conversion into a complete wrist arthrodesis. Our results are in concordance with the literature. However, our follow-up time is relatively short and we cannot make any conclusion about the long-term outcome. PRC is a technically straightforward procedure for treatment of carpal collapse. For stage II of the SNAC-/SLAC-wrist we consider the resection of the proximal carpal row an alternative procedure to the midcarpal arthrodesis particularly in patients who require less grip strength and when a shorter postoperative immobilization is reasonable.

  12. Split-arm swinging: the effect of arm swinging manipulation on interlimb coordination during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Moshe; Zeilig, Gabi; Bloch, Ayala; Fasano, Alfonso; Plotnik, Meir

    2017-08-01

    Human locomotion is defined by bilateral coordination of gait (BCG) and shared features with the fore-hindlimb coordination of quadrupeds. The objective of the present study is to explore the influence of arm swinging (AS) on BCG. Sixteen young, healthy individuals (eight women; eight right motor-dominant, eight left-motor dominant) participated. Participants performed 10 walking trials (2 min). In each of the trials AS was unilaterally manipulated (e.g., arm restriction, weight on the wrist), bilaterally manipulated, or not manipulated. The order of trials was random. Walking trials were performed on a treadmill. Gait kinematics were recorded by a motion capture system. Using feedback-controlled belt speed allowed the participants to walk at a self-determined gait speed. Effects of the manipulations were assessed by AS amplitudes and the phase coordination index (PCI), which quantifies the left-right anti-phased stepping pattern. Most of the AS manipulations caused an increase in PCI values (i.e., reduced lower limb coordination). Unilateral AS manipulation had a reciprocal effect on the AS amplitude of the other arm such that, for example, over-swinging of the right arm led to a decrease in the AS amplitude of the left arm. Side of motor dominance was not found to have a significant impact on PCI and AS amplitude. The present findings suggest that lower limb BCG is markedly influenced by the rhythmic AS during walking. It may thus be important for gait rehabilitation programs targeting BCG to take AS into account.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Control mechanisms for four-limb coordination in human locomotion are not fully known. To study the influence of arm swinging (AS) on bilateral coordination of the lower limbs during walking, we introduced a split-AS paradigm in young, healthy adults. AS manipulations caused deterioration in the anti-phased stepping pattern and impacted the AS amplitudes for the contralateral arm, suggesting that lower limb coordination is markedly

  13. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S. [Univ. of California, Orange (United States). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb.

  14. A New Computed Tomography-Based Radiographic Method to Detect Early Loosening of Total Wrist Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivecrona, H.; Noz, M.E.; Maguire, G.Q. Jr; Zeleznik, M.P.; Sollerman, C.; Olivecrona, L. [Dept. of Hand Surgery, Soedersjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-11-15

    Background: Diagnosis of loosening of total wrist implants is usually late using routine radiographs. Switching modality to computed tomography (CT) should aid in early diagnosis. Purpose: To propose and evaluate the accuracy of a new CT method for assessing loosening of the carpal component in total wrist arthroplasty. Material and Methods: A protocol encompassing volume registration of paired CT scans of patients with unexplained pain in a prosthetically replaced wrist (used in clinical routine) is presented. Scans are acquired as a dynamic examination under torsional load. Using volume registration, the carpal component of the prosthesis is brought into spatial alignment. After registration, prosthetic loosening is diagnosed by a shift in position of the bones relative to the prosthesis. This study is a preclinical validation of this method using a human cadaverous arm with a cemented total wrist implant and tantalum markers. Seven CT scans of the arm were acquired. The scans were combined into 21 pairs of CT volumes. The carpal component was registered in each scan pair, and the residual mismatch of the surrounding tantalum markers and bone was analyzed both visually and numerically. Results: The detection limit for prosthetic movement was less than 1 mm. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that CT volume registration holds promise to improve detection of movement of the carpal component at an earlier stage than is obtainable with plain radiography.

  15. A Global Obstacle-avoidance Map for Anthropomorphic Arms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Fang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available More and more humanoid robots are used in human society, and they face a wide variety of complicated manipulation tasks, which are mainly to be achieved by their anthropomorphic arms. Obstacle avoidance for the anthropomorphic arm must be a fundamental consideration to guarantee the successful implementation of these tasks. Different from traditional methods searching for feasible or optimal collision-free solutions for the anthropomorphic arm, a global obstacle- avoidance map for the whole arm is proposed to indicate the complete set of feasible solutions. In this map, the motion of the arm can be appropriately planned to intuitively control the configuration of the arm in motion. First, the cubic spline function is adopted to interpolate some well-chosen path points to generate a smooth collision-free path for the wrist of the anthropomorphic arm. Second, based on the path function of the wrist, the time and the self-rotation angle of the arm about the “shoulder-wrist” axis are used to parameterize all possible configurations of the arm so that a global two- dimensional map considering the obstacle avoidance can be established. Subsequently, a collision-free self-rotation angle profile of the arm can be well planned. Finally, the joint trajectories of a specific anthropomorphic arm, which correspond to the planned path of the wrist and self-rotation angle profile of the arm, can be solved on the basis of the general kinematic analysis of the anthropomorphic arm, and the specific structure. Several simulations are conducted to verify that the proposed collision-free motion planning method for anthropomorphic arms has some advantages and can be regarded as a convenient and intuitive tool to control the configuration of the anthropomorphic arm in motion, without collision with obstacles in its surroundings.

  16. Midupper arm circumference and weight-for-length z scores have different associations with body composition: evidence from a cohort of Ethiopian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva-Eternod, Carlos S; Wells, Jonathan C K; Girma, Tsinuel; Kæstel, Pernille; Admassu, Bitiya; Friis, Henrik; Andersen, Gregers S

    2015-09-01

    A midupper arm circumference (MUAC) <115 mm and weight-for-height z score (WHZ) or weight-for-length z score (WLZ) less than -3, all of which are recommended to identify severe wasting in children, often identify different children. The reasons behind this poor agreement are not well understood. We investigated the association between these 2 anthropometric indexes and body composition to help understand why they identify different children as wasted. We analyzed weight, length, MUAC, fat-mass (FM), and fat-free mass (FFM) data from 2470 measurements from 595 healthy Ethiopian infants obtained at birth and at 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, and 6 mo of age. We derived WLZs by using 2006 WHO growth standards. We derived length-adjusted FM and FFM values as unexplained residuals after regressing each FM and FFM against length. We used a correlation analysis to assess associations between length, FFM, and FM (adjusted and nonadjusted for length) and the MUAC and WLZ and a multivariable regression analysis to assess the independent variability of length and length-adjusted FM and FFM with either the MUAC or the WLZ as the outcome. At all ages, length showed consistently strong positive correlations with the MUAC but not with the WLZ. Adjustment for length reduced observed correlation coefficients of FM and FFM with the MUAC but increased those for the WLZ. At all ages, both length-adjusted FM and FFM showed an independent association with the WLZ and MUAC with higher regression coefficients for the WLZ. Conversely, length showed greater regression coefficients for the MUAC. At all ages, the MUAC was shown to be more influenced than was the WLZ by the FM variability relative to the FFM variability. The MUAC and WLZ have different associations with body composition, and length influences these associations differently. Our results suggest that the WLZ is a good marker of tissue masses independent of length. The MUAC acts more as a composite index of poor growth indexing jointly

  17. Scaphocapitolunate arthrodesis and radial styloidectomy for posttraumatic degenerative wrist disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausmeyer, Melissa A; Fernandez, Diego L; Caloia, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Long-standing scaphoid nonunion, scaphoid malunion, and chronic scapholunate dissociation result in malalignment of the carpal bones, progressive carpal collapse, instability, and osteoarthritis of the wrist. The most commonly used procedures to treat scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are the four-corner fusion (4CF) and the proximal row carpectomy (PRC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of a different treatment modality: radial styloidectomy and scaphocapitolunate (SCL) arthrodesis. This treatment option is chosen in an effort to maintain the joint contact surface and load transmission across the radiocarpal joint. We conducted a retrospective review of 20 patients (average age 62 years, range: 27 to 75 years) treated from 1994 to 2010. Seven patients were treated for SNAC, 12 patients for SLAC wrists, and 1 for degenerative joint disease following a transscapho-transcapitate perilunar dislocation. Sixteen patients had Herbert screw fixation, and four had Spider plate fixation. All patients had autologous bone graft used for the arthrodesis. The mean follow-up was 4.6 years (range: 2 to 9.6 years). Patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically. Nineteen of 20 arthrodeses healed on an average of 9.6 weeks. One patient was reoperated 8 months after the initial operation with salvage of the SCL arthrodesis with a spider plate with an adequate result. The mean active flexion-extension arc was 70 degrees and the radioulnar deviation arc was 23 degrees. Pain decreased in all patients, 13 of whom were pain free postoperatively. The average postoperative disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand score was 24. Radiographically, neither radiolunate nor radioscaphoid arthritis was noted on follow-up. SCL arthrodesis with radial styloidectomy resulted in an adequate residual range of motion and pain relief. This method preserves the normal ulnar sided joints of the carpus and

  18. Function of the shoulder muscles during arm elevation: an assessment using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Rei; Sano, Hirotaka; Ohnuma, Masahiro; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Watanuki, Shoichi; Tashiro, Manabu; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-05-01

    Although 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been used for the assessment of skeletal muscle activities, its application to the shoulder muscles is only sparse. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activities of the shoulder muscles during arm elevation using PET. Six healthy volunteers performed an arm elevation exercise before and after FDG injection. The exercise consisted of 200 repetitions of arm elevation in the scapular plane with a 0.25-kg weight fixed to the wrist on both arms. PET examination was performed 50 min after FDG injection. For control data, PET scan was repeated for each subject on a separate day without any exercise. The volume of interest was established for each shoulder muscle. The subscapularis was divided into three portions (superior, middle, and inferior). The standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated in each muscle to quantify its activity. The SUVs increased significantly after exercise in the deltoid, supraspinatus, and the superior portion of subscapularis. Among three divided portions of the subscapularis, the SUV of the superior one-third was significantly greater than the rest of the muscle after exercise. Our current study clearly indicated that there were two functionally different portions in the subscapularis muscle and the superior one-third played an important role during arm elevation in the scapular plane.

  19. Function of the shoulder muscles during arm elevation: an assessment using positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Rei; Sano, Hirotaka; Ohnuma, Masahiro; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Watanuki, Shoichi; Tashiro, Manabu; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    Although 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been used for the assessment of skeletal muscle activities, its application to the shoulder muscles is only sparse. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activities of the shoulder muscles during arm elevation using PET. Six healthy volunteers performed an arm elevation exercise before and after FDG injection. The exercise consisted of 200 repetitions of arm elevation in the scapular plane with a 0.25-kg weight fixed to the wrist on both arms. PET examination was performed 50 min after FDG injection. For control data, PET scan was repeated for each subject on a separate day without any exercise. The volume of interest was established for each shoulder muscle. The subscapularis was divided into three portions (superior, middle, and inferior). The standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated in each muscle to quantify its activity. The SUVs increased significantly after exercise in the deltoid, supraspinatus, and the superior portion of subscapularis. Among three divided portions of the subscapularis, the SUV of the superior one-third was significantly greater than the rest of the muscle after exercise. Our current study clearly indicated that there were two functionally different portions in the subscapularis muscle and the superior one-third played an important role during arm elevation in the scapular plane. PMID:20298439

  20. Risk factors for hand-wrist disorders in repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J. F.; Mikkelsen, S.; Andersen, JH

    2007-01-01

    (wrist pain and palpation tenderness) were determined in 3123 employees in 19 industrial settings. With the use of questionnaires and video recordings of homogenous work tasks number of wrist movements, hand force requirements and wrist position were analysed as risk factors for hand-wrist disorders......OBJECTIVES: To identify the risk of hand-wrist disorders related to repetitive movements, use of hand force and wrist position in repetitive monotonous work. METHODS: Using questionnaires and physical examinations, the prevalence and incidence of hand-wrist pain and possible extensor tendonitis...... were less consistent. Working with the hand in a non-neutral position could not be identified as a risk factor...

  1. Asymptomatic SLAC wrist: does it exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassler, P R; Stern, P J; Kiefhaber, T R

    1993-07-01

    Twenty-five patients (30 wrists) had x-ray evidence of scapholunate advanced collapse. Twenty-two wrists had no pain; 12 of these were diagnosed and treated for carpal tunnel syndrome. Eight wrists had mild pain. All patients were reevaluated an average of 2 years later. At that time, 20 wrists were totally free of symptoms and 10 had occasional pain, especially with increased activity (no patients required analgesics). No patient had undergone surgical management for the scapholunate advanced collapse. We believe that there are some patients (especially older and low-demand persons) in whom x-ray evidence of arthritis and clinical findings do not correlate. In these circumstances surgical intervention for treatment of the arthritis may not be warranted.

  2. Favorable results after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, G.; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose During the past 40 years, several attempts have been made with total wrist arthroplasty to avoid fusion in severely destroyed wrists. The results have often been disappointing. There is only modest clinical documentation due to the small number of patients (especially non....... The wrists had been reviewed annually and analysis was done on the latest follow-up data. Results 60 patients had been operated (5 bilaterally), 5 wrists had been revised, and 52 were available for follow-up (with the revised cases excluded). The pain scores, QuickDASH scores, ulnar flexion, and supination...... for the whole group were statistically significantly better at follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences between the rheumatoid and the non-rheumatoid patients except for motion, which was better in the non-rheumatoid group. The motion obtained depended on the preoperative motion. Implant...

  3. Arthroscopic resection of wrist ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathoulin, C; Hoyos, A; Pelaez, J

    2004-12-01

    The arthroscopic resection of synovial cysts of the wrist is a simple technique which is comfortable for the patient. We report on a series of 96 patients with dorsal synovial cysts (75 women, 21 men). All patients had undergone preliminary treatment which had been unsuccessful. We operated on 32 patients with a volar cyst (27 women, five men). All the patients were operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthesia. For the dorsal cysts, after having precisely located the cyst, it is then resected after having inserted a shaver directly through the wall of the cyst starting with the capsule. For the volar cysts the arthroscope was inserted through a 3-4 portal and the shaver was inserted through a 1-2 radiocarpal portal. In all cases, there was no immobilisation and a range of motion was started the same day. For the dorsal cysts, our average follow-up was 34 months (range 12-46 months). There were no complications. We had four recurrences. For the palmar cysts, our average follow-up was 26 months (range 12-39 months). There have been no recurrences to date.

  4. Proprioceptive control of wrist extensor motor units in humans: dependence on handedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimonetti, J M; Morin, D; Schmied, A; Vedel, J P; Pagni, S

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of the monosynaptic proprioceptive assistance to the wrist extensor motoneurone activity was investigated during voluntary contraction in relation to the subjects' handedness. The reflex responses of 411 single motor units to homonymous tendon taps were recorded in the wrist extensor carpi radialis muscles in both arms of five right-handed and five left-handed subjects. In the right-handed subjects, the motor unit reflex responses were clearly lateralized in favour of their right arm, whereas no side-related differences were observed in the left-handed subjects, whatever the motor units' mechanical properties and firing rates. When the muscle spindle sensitivity was by-passed by electrically stimulating the primary afferents in both arms of three right-handed and three left-handed subjects, no side-related differences were observed in the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) amplitude in either of the two lateralization groups. The effectiveness of the primary afferent synapses on to the motoneurones therefore does not seem to depend on the subject's handedness. Without excluding the possibility of structural changes being involved at the periphery, the comparisons carried out on the data obtained using electrical vs mechanical stimulation suggest that the asymmetrical effectiveness of the proprioceptive assistance observed in favour of the right arm in the right-handed subjects might result from either the gamma or beta drive being more efficient. This asymmetry might result from the preferential use of the right hand in skilled movements. In a predominantly right-handed world, however, left-handed people might tend to develop the ability to use their right arm almost as skillfully as their preferred left arm, which could explain the symmetrical effectiveness of the proprioceptive assistance observed here in the left-handers' wrist extensor muscles.

  5. [Operative differential therapy of rheumatic wrists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, H; Fürst, M; Rüther, H; Schill, S

    2007-09-01

    The wrists are affected in the long-term in 90% of people with rheumatism and are often (42%) the first manifestation of a destructive disease. The functionality of the wrist and the whole hand is of great importance because in many cases loss of function of the wrists leads to severe limitations. Local and operative treatment of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the main duties in rheuma-orthopaedics. For operative treatment there is a finely tuned differential therapeutic spectrum available. The diagnostic indications take the local and total pattern of affection, the current systemic therapy as well as patient wishes and patient compliance into consideration. In the early stages according to LDE (Larsen, Dale, Eek), soft tissues operations such as articulo-tenosynovectomy (ATS) are most commonly carried out. In further advanced stages osseus stabilisation must often be performed. At this point a smooth transition from partial arthrodesis to complete fixation is possible. After initial euphoria, arthroplasty of the wrist is being increasingly less used for operative treatment due to the unconvincing long-term results and high complication rate. With reference to the good long-term results of all operative procedures, in particular early ATS with respect to pain, function and protection of tendons, after failure of medicinal treatment and persistence of inflammatory activity in the wrist, patients should be transferred to an experienced rheuma-orthopaedic surgeon.

  6. Design And Implementation Of Anthropomorphic Robotic Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The report focuses on the design and demonstration of an anthropomorphic robotic arm with seven degrees of freedom using readily available low-cost components to perform different real time human hand applications. The robotic arm consists of a shoulder, elbow, wrist and a five-finger gripper. It can perform different gripping actions, such as lateral, spherical, cylindrical and tip-holding gripping actions; each finger has three movable links. The actuator used for the robotic arm is a high torque dc servo motor and the five-finger gripper consists of five cables placed like tendons in the human arm. Implementation is done using a human hand glove which senses the motion from sensor technology to produce a proportional analog voltage, digitized via the microcontroller Atmel ATmega32. The microcontroller then through the processed signal controls the mechanical structure that is the robotic arm. Keywords –

  7. Blood pressure monitor with a position sensor for wrist placement to eliminate hydrostatic pressure effect on blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hironori; Koshimizu, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Shingo; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of blood pressure at wrist requires the heart and wrist to be kept at the same level to avoid the effects of hydrostatic pressure. Although a blood pressure monitor with a position sensor that guides appropriate forearm angle without use of a chair and desk has already been proposed, a similar functioning device for measuring upper arm blood pressure with a chair and desk is needed. In this study, a calculation model was first used to explore design of such a system. The findings were then implemented into design of a new blood pressure monitor. Results of various methods were compared. The calculation model of the wrist level from arthrosis angles and interarticulars lengths was developed and considered using published anthropometric dimensions. It is compared with 33 volunteer persons' experimental results. The calculated difference of level was -4.1 to 7.9 (cm) with a fixed chair and desk. The experimental result was -3.0 to 5.5 (cm) at left wrist and -2.1 to 6.3(cm) at right wrist. The absolute difference level equals ±4.8 (mmHg) of blood pressure readings according to the calculated result. This meets the AAMI requirements for a blood pressure monitor. In the conclusion, the calculation model is able to effectively evaluate the difference between the heart and wrist level. Improving the method for maintaining wrist to heart level will improve wrist blood pressure measurement accuracy when also sitting in the chair at a desk. The leading angle of user's forearm using a position sensor is shown to work for this purpose.

  8. Tuberculous Tenosynovitis Presenting as Ganglion of Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaji Chavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still endemic in many developed countries. Involvement of the hand and wrist at presentation is extremely rare, and the diagnosis is often missed. A 57 years old male presented with swelling over the left wrist since 3 years Three swellings over dorsal aspect of the left wrist Soft in consistency Non tender Non compressible Mobile at right angles to the plane of the wrist joint. ESR: 45 mm in 1 hr and rest blood investigations were normal. Ultrsonography showed giant cell tumor of Extensor Digitorum sheath. X-ray: soft tissue swelling and MRI was suggestive of extensor tendon sheath extraskeletal synovial Koch’s, or giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision of swelling was planned and intraoperatively, rice bodies were seen inside it. Histopathological examination showed caseous necrosis with granuloma formation. Patient was put on DOT1 therapy. Tuberculous tenosynovitis was first described by Acrel in 1777. Rice bodies occurring in joints affected by tuberculosis were first described in 1895 by Reise. Rice bodies will be diagnosed on plain radiographs when mineralization occurs. More than 50% of cases recur within 1 year of treatment. The currently recommended 6-month course is often adequate with extensive curettage lavage and synovectomy should be performed. Surgery is essential, but the extent of surgical debridement is still debatable. The surgeon has to be aware of the significance of loose bodies when performing routine excision of innocuous looking wrist ganglia.

  9. Ensemble Methods for Classification of Physical Activities from Wrist Accelerometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Alok Kumar; Tjondronegoro, Dian; Chandran, Vinod; Trost, Stewart G

    2017-09-01

    To investigate whether the use of ensemble learning algorithms improve physical activity recognition accuracy compared to the single classifier algorithms, and to compare the classification accuracy achieved by three conventional ensemble machine learning methods (bagging, boosting, random forest) and a custom ensemble model comprising four algorithms commonly used for activity recognition (binary decision tree, k nearest neighbor, support vector machine, and neural network). The study used three independent data sets that included wrist-worn accelerometer data. For each data set, a four-step classification framework consisting of data preprocessing, feature extraction, normalization and feature selection, and classifier training and testing was implemented. For the custom ensemble, decisions from the single classifiers were aggregated using three decision fusion methods: weighted majority vote, naïve Bayes combination, and behavior knowledge space combination. Classifiers were cross-validated using leave-one subject out cross-validation and compared on the basis of average F1 scores. In all three data sets, ensemble learning methods consistently outperformed the individual classifiers. Among the conventional ensemble methods, random forest models provided consistently high activity recognition; however, the custom ensemble model using weighted majority voting demonstrated the highest classification accuracy in two of the three data sets. Combining multiple individual classifiers using conventional or custom ensemble learning methods can improve activity recognition accuracy from wrist-worn accelerometer data.

  10. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome and wrist osteoarthritis in long-term paraplegic patients compared with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, M; Penzkofer, S; Weber, M A; Bruckner, T; Winterstein, M; Jung, M

    2014-02-01

    We compared functional and structural changes in the hands, in particular the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome, in 56 paraplegic patients who had been wheelchair dependent for over 25 years with a group of able-bodied volunteers (with matching criteria for gender and age). The hands were assessed by clinical examination, electrophysiology, disabilities of the arm shoulder and hand score and magnetic resonance imaging. Hand function was worse and wrist pain was experienced more often in the paraplegic patients, and they also had a significantly higher prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome both clinically and electrophysiologically. The prevalence of wrist and trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis was significantly higher in the right hand.

  11. Two Case Report on Wrist Ganglion Treated with Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Seop Shin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Object : This study was to investigate the clinical effect of Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on two patients suffering from Wrist Ganglion. Methods : We treated two patients suffering from Wrist Ganglion with both acupuncture and injection of Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture. Then we measured the sizes of Wrist Ganglion and Visual Analogue Scale(VAS. Results and Conclusions : We found that the sizes of Wrist Ganglion of the two patients were significantly reduced. Moreover, the pain and discomfort of the wrists of the patients were reported to be reduced. So, we concluded that Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture has an excellent effect on Wrist Ganglion. However, further studies are needed to investigate its exact effects.

  12. Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing and Trunk Diameter in Al-7-Weight-Percentage Si Alloy Directionally Solidified Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Lauer, M.; Poirier, D. R.; Grugel, R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Under a NASA-ESA collaborative research project, three Al-7-weight-percentage Si samples (MICAST-6, MICAST-7 and MICAST 2-12) were directionally solidified aboard the International Space Station to determine the effect of mitigating convection on the primary dendrite array. The samples were approximately 25 centimeters in length with a diameter of 7.8 millimeter-diameter cylinders that were machined from [100] oriented terrestrially grown dendritic Al-7Si samples and inserted into alumina ampoules within the Sample Cartridge Assembly (SCA) inserts of the Low Gradient Furnace (LGF). The feed rods were partially remelted in space and directionally solidified to effect the [100] dendrite-orientation. MICAST-6 was grown at 5 microns per second for 3.75 centimeters and then at 50 microns per second for its remaining 11.2 centimeters of its length. MICAST-7 was grown at 20 microns per second for 8.5 centimeters and then at 10 microns per second for 9 centimeters of its remaining length. MICAST2-12 was grown at 40 microns per second for 11 centimeters. The thermal gradient at the liquidus temperature varied from 22 to 14 degrees Kelvin per centimeter during growth of MICAST-6, from 26 to 24 degrees Kelvin per centimeter for MICAST-7 and from 33 to 31 degrees Kelvin per centimeter for MICAST2-12. Microstructures on the transverse sections along the sample length were analyzed to determine nearest-neighbor spacing of the primary dendrite arms and trunk diameters of the primary dendrite-arrays. This was done along the lengths where steady-state growth prevailed and also during the transients associated with the speed-changes. The observed nearest-neighbor spacings during steady-state growth of the MICAST samples show a very good agreement with predictions from the Hunt-Lu primary spacing model for diffusion controlled growth. The observed primary dendrite trunk diameters during steady-state growth of these samples also agree with predictions from a coarsening-based model

  13. De quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Asif M; Ilyas, Asif; Ast, Michael; Schaffer, Alyssa A; Thoder, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    De quervain disease, or stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, is a common wrist pathology. Pain results from resisted gliding of the abductor pollicis longus and the extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the fibro-osseus canal. de Quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist is more common in women than men. Diagnosis may be made on physical examination. Radiographs are helpful in ruling out offending bony pathology. Nonsurgical management, consisting of corticosteroid injections and supportive thumb spica splinting, is usually successful. In resistant cases, surgical release of the first dorsal compartment is done, taking care to protect the radial sensory nerve and identify all accessory compartments. Repair of the extensor retinaculum by step-cut lengthening or other techniques is rarely required.

  14. Ultrasonography of the hand, wrist, and elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Marko; Fullerton, Brad

    2010-08-01

    High-frequency diagnostic ultrasonography of the hand, wrist and elbow has significant potential to improve the quality of diagnosis and care provided by neuromuscular and musculoskeletal specialists. In patients referred for weakness, pain and numbness of the hand, wrist or elbow, diagnostic ultrasonography can be an adjunct to electrodiagnosis and help in identifying ruptured tendons and treating conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome or trigger finger. Use of a small high-frequency (>10-15 MHz) transducer, an instrument with a blunt pointed tip to enhance sonopalpation and a model of the hand, wrist and elbow is advised to enhance visualization of small anatomical structures and complex bony contours. A range of conditions, including tendon and ligament ruptures, trigger finger, de Quervain tenosynovitis, intersection syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and osteoarthritis, is described along with detailed ultrasonography-guided injection techniques for carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger.

  15. Differences in wrist mechanics during the golf swing based on golf handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorcik, Gregory G; Queen, Robin M; Abbey, Alicia N; Moorman, Claude T; Ruch, David S

    2012-05-01

    Variation in swing mechanics between golfers of different skill levels has been previously reported. To investigate if differences in three-dimensional wrist kinematics and the angle of golf club descent between low and high handicap golfers. A descriptive laboratory study was performed with twenty-eight male golfers divided into two groups, low handicap golfers (handicap = 0-5, n = 15) and high handicap golfers (handicap ≥ 10, n = 13). Bilateral peak three-dimensional wrist mechanics, bilateral wrist mechanics at ball contact (BC), peak angle of descent from the end of the backswing to ball contact, and the angle of descent when the forearm was parallel to the ground (DEC-PAR) were determined using an 8 camera motion capture system. Independent t-tests were completed for each study variable (α = 0.05). Pearson correlation coefficients were determined between golf handicap and each of the study variables. The peak lead arm radial deviation (5.7 degrees, p = 0.008), lead arm radial deviation at ball contact (7.1 degrees, p = 0.001), and DEC-PAR (15.8 degrees, p = 0.002) were significantly greater in the high handicap group. In comparison with golfers with a low handicap, golfers with a high handicap have increased radial deviation during the golf swing and at ball contact. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Can live bi-plane sonography reduce work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the wrist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Ben; Elliott, Simon T

    2013-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are a recognized problem affecting up to 81% of sonographers. Live bi-plane imaging is a new technology derived from matrix transducers, which allows the operator to scan in more than one plane simultaneously and can reduce the off-axis movement of the scanning arm when assessing abdominal organs. This study was performed to assess if using a bi-planar technique would reduce stressful movements of the wrist. Twelve patients were scanned by three operators (four each) using both a standard scanning abdominal protocol and a live bi-plane abdominal protocol using an iu22 scanner (Philips Healthcare, Bothell, WA) and an X6-1 probe with a bi-axial flexible electrogoniometer measuring the postural stresses on the scanning wrist throughout the study. Significant flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviations were markedly reduced using the bi-plane scanning protocol compared to the standard B-mode protocol, with an average reduction in significant repetitive wrist movements of 71.6% (p = <0.001). Bi-planar ultrasound scanning technique may reduce stressful movements on the scanning arm and might reduce the likelihood of WMSD assuming there are no other contributing factors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Regression Model-Based Walking Speed Estimation Using Wrist-Worn Inertial Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Walking speed is widely used to study human health status. Wearable inertial measurement units (IMU) are promising tools for the ambulatory measurement of walking speed. Among wearable inertial sensors, the ones worn on the wrist, such as a watch or band, have relatively higher potential to be easily incorporated into daily lifestyle. Using the arm swing motion in walking, this paper proposes a regression model-based method for longitudinal walking speed estimation using a wrist-worn IMU. A novel kinematic variable is proposed, which finds the wrist acceleration in the principal axis (i.e. the direction of the arm swing). This variable (called pca-acc) is obtained by applying sensor fusion on IMU data to find the orientation followed by the use of principal component analysis. An experimental evaluation was performed on 15 healthy young subjects during free walking trials. The experimental results show that the use of the proposed pca-acc variable can significantly improve the walking speed estimation accuracy when compared to the use of raw acceleration information (p<0.01). When Gaussian process regression is used, the resulting walking speed estimation accuracy and precision is about 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively. PMID:27764231

  18. Wrist-worn pervasive gaze interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Lund, Haakon; Biermann, Florian

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses gaze interaction for smart home control, conducted from a wrist-worn unit. First we asked ten people to enact the gaze movements they would propose for e.g. opening a door or adjusting the room temperature. On basis of their suggestions we built and tested different versions ...

  19. Mechanical design of EFW Exo II: A hybrid exoskeleton for elbow-forearm-wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Hui; Chen, Ziye; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Tieshi

    2017-07-01

    The use of rehabilitation exoskeleton has become an important means for the treatment of stroke patients. A hybrid exoskeleton named EFW Exo II is developed for the motor function rehabilitation of elbow, forearm and wrist. The EFW Exo II is based on a parallel 2-URR/RRS mechanism and a serial R mechanism. It could fit both left and right arms for the symmetrical and open structure, and the distance between the elbow and wrist could automatically adjust for different forearm length. Details of the mechanical design are introduced. Brushless DC servo motors with planetary gear reducer are used as the actuators of the exoskeleton. Gear drive and belt drive are used for power transmission. A three dimensional force sensor is mounted in the handle to regulate the interaction between the exoskeleton and patient. The EFW Exo II can realize rehabilitation exercise for each joint and the ranges of motion meet the rehabilitation demands of daily living.

  20. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6 min bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE.

  1. Accuracy of a new wrist cuff oscillometric blood pressure device: comparisons with intraarterial and mercury manometer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S; Wenzel, R R; di Matteo, C; Meier, B; Lüscher, T F

    1998-12-01

    Accurate measurement of arterial blood pressure is of great importance for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. Because of the chronic nature of antihypertensive drug therapy, the involvement of the patient in blood pressure control is desirable. Such an involvement, however, is only feasible if simple, user-friendly, and precise blood pressure measurement devices are available. In this study we tested a new wrist cuff oscillometric blood pressure measurement device in 100 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Blood pressures were simultaneously taken intraarterially (axillary artery) and with a mercury manometer and stethoscope or noninvasive measurement device (OMRON R3). Intraarterial measurements were directly compared with two measurements taken in random order with either an arm cuff mercury manometer or the wrist cuff device. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure as assessed with the mercury manometer was higher, especially when compared with the intraarterial and the wrist cuff values, which were comparable. Correlations of blood pressure values with intraarterial measurement were 0.86 systolic and 0.75 diastolic (P mercury manometer measurements. Reproducibility of both measurements was good for the wrist cuff device ([systolic/diastolic]: r = 0.94/0.92; P mercury manometer (r = 0.97/0.88; P mercury manometer were higher than intraarterial values and those of the wrist cuff. Both noninvasive devices overestimated high diastolic values.

  2. MR Imaging and US of the Wrist Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Benjamin; Sampath, Srihari C; Sampath, Srinath C; Motamedi, Kambiz

    2016-10-01

    The tendons of the wrist are commonly symptomatic. They can be injured, infected, or inflamed. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful tools for evaluating the wrist. Pathologic conditions of the wrist tendons include de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinopathy, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, infectious synovitis, tendon tears, hydroxyapatite deposition disease, intersection syndrome, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, and fibroma of the tendon sheath. In this article, we review the normal appearance of the wrist tendons, discuss relevant anatomy, and give an overview of common pathologic conditions affecting the wrist tendons. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  3. Quantitative analysis of wrist electrodermal activity during sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Sano, Akane; Picard, Rosalind W.; Stickgold, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We present the first quantitative characterization of electrodermal activity (EDA) patterns on the wrists of healthy adults during sleep using dry electrodes. We compare the new results on the wrist to the prior findings on palmar or finger EDA by characterizing data measured from 80 nights of sleep consisting of 9 nights of wrist and palm EDA from 9 healthy adults sleeping at home, 56 nights of wrist and palm EDA from one healthy adult sleeping at home, and 15 nights of wrist EDA from 15 hea...

  4. The relationship between physical factors (Wrist ratio and electrophysiologic factors of median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliaiy Gh

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is considered by researchers because of its high prevalence, and several studies have been done to find the causes and factors which increase the chance for the syndrome. These studies have shown relationships between this syndrome with some physical parameters like wrist dimensions, weight and systemic conditions. There is no investigation on risk factors in CTS in our country. So the main goal of this research is to find and introduce predisposing factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods: Seventy patients and 33 controls 22 to 70 years old were studied. Standard methods for median and ulnar nerve studies were used and questionnaires included physical measurements, history of diseases and personal information were completed for each person. Results: Patients had higher wrist ratio (mean difference, 0.0267, P<0.001, weight (mean difference: 6.098, P<0.001 and body mass index (mean difference: 3.376, P<0.001. Regression analysis showed strong positive relation between wrist ratio and median latencies. The strongest correlation was found between wrist ratio and median minus ulnar distal sensory latencies (Y2=0.4014, P<0.0001. No relation was found between weight and body mass index with median latencies. Seventy-nine percent of patients and 48.5% of controls had wrist ratio of 0.7 or greater (P<0.05. Seventy-two percent of patients with repetetive hand activities and 78% with associated conditions had wrist ratio of 0.7 or greater. Seventy-six percent had wrist ratio less than 0.7. No relationship was found between obesity, diabetes, thyroid disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, taking oral contraceptive, hysterectomy, oophorectomy, menopause and repetetive hand activities with involvement of carpal tunnel syndrome. Discussion: Wrist dimensions seem to be an important predictor for carpal tunnel syndrome also in patients with associated conditions. If individuals with squarer wrists are involved in special conditions

  5. Wrist posture affects hand and forearm muscle stress during tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jin; Chen, Hua; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-11-01

    Non-neutral wrist posture is a risk factor of the musculoskeletal disorders among computer users. This study aimed to assess internal loads on hand and forearm musculature while tapping in different wrist postures. Ten healthy subjects tapped on a key switch using their index finger in four wrist postures: straight, ulnar deviated, flexed and extended. Torque at the finger and wrist joints were calculated from measured joint postures and fingertip force. Muscle stresses of the six finger muscles and four wrist muscles that balanced the calculated joint torques were estimated using a musculoskeletal model and optimization algorithm minimizing the squared sum of muscle stress. Non-neutral wrist postures resulted in greater muscle stresses than the neutral (straight) wrist posture, and the stress in the extensor muscles were greater than the flexors in all conditions. Wrist extensors stress remained higher than 4.5 N/cm² and wrist flexor stress remained below 0.5 N/cm² during tapping. The sustained high motor unit recruitment of extensors suggests a greater risk than other muscles especially in flexed wrist posture. This study demonstrated from the perspective of internal tissue loading the importance of maintaining neutral wrist posture during keying activities.

  6. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wei-Min; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Shih-Ching; Tan, Sun-Yen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods] Wrist injuries caused by fatigue at work, improper exercise, and other conditions are very common. Therefore, the reconstruction of wrist joint function is an important issue. The efficacy of a newly developed integrated wrist joint rehabilitation game using a Blobo bluetooth ball with C# software installed was tested in wrist rehabilitation (Flexion, Extension, Ulnar Deviation, Radial Deviation). [Results] Eight subjects with normal wrist function participated in a test of the system's stability and repeatability. After performing the Blobo bluetooth ball wrist physical therapy training, eight patients with wrist dysfunction experienced approximately 10° improvements in range of motion (ROM) of flexion extension, and ulnar deviation and about 6° ROM improvement in radial deviation. The subjects showed progress in important indicators of wrist function. [Conclusion] This study used the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist physical therapy training and the preliminary results were encouraging. In the future, more diverse wrist or limb rehabilitation games should be developed to meet the needs of physical therapy training.

  7. Scapholunate kinematics of asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists using four-dimensional CT examinations: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demehri, Shadpour; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Morelli, John N.; Thakur, Uma; Eng, John [Johns Hopkins University, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lifchez, Scott D.; Shores, Jaimie T. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Means, Kenneth R. [MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, The Curtis National Hand Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Using four-dimensional CT scan (4DCT), we aimed at showing the kinematics of scapholunate (SL) interval in asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists with inconclusive radiographic findings. This is an IRB approved, HIPPA compliant, retrospective study. Patients suspected of SL interosseous ligament (SLIL) injuries were referred for further evaluation of chronic wrist pain (>3 months). Twelve wrists (11 subjects) with chronic symptoms and inconclusive plain radiographs and 10 asymptomatic wrists (in 10 different subjects) were scanned using 4DCT. The minimum SL interval was measured during three wrist motions: relaxed-to-clenched fist, flexion-to-extension, and radial-to-ulnar-deviation. Changes were recorded using double-oblique multiplanar reformation technique. We extracted the normal limits of the SL interval as measured by dynamic CT scanning during active motion in asymptomatic wrists. In asymptomatic wrists, the average SL interval was observed to be smaller than 1 mm during all motions. In symptomatic wrists, during exams performed with clenched fist (SL interval (mean ± SD) = 2.53 ± 1.19 mm), extension (2.54 ± 1.48 mm) or ulnar deviation (2.06 ± 1.12 mm), the average SL interval was more than 2 mm. In contrast to symptomatic wrists, no significant change in SL interval measurements was detected during wrist motions in asymptomatic wrists. There was a mild to moderate correlation between SL interval change and presence/absence of symptoms (point-biserial correlation coefficients: 0.29-0.55). In patients with wrist pain suspicious for SLIL injury and inconclusive radiographs, SL interval increase can be detected with 4DCT in the symptomatic wrist compared to the asymptomatic wrist. (orig.)

  8. Robot-aided assessment of wrist proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo eCappello

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Impaired proprioception severely affects the control of gross and fine motor function. However, clinical assessment of proprioceptive deficits and its impact on motor function has been difficult to elucidate. Recent advances in haptic robotic interfaces designed for sensorimotor rehabilitation enabled the use of such devices for the assessment of proprioceptive function.Purpose. This study evaluated the feasibility of a wrist robot system to determine proprioceptive discrimination thresholds for two different DoFs of the wrist. Specifically, we sought to accomplish three aims: first, to establish data validity; second, to show that the system is sensitive to detect small differences in acuity; third, to establish test-retest reliability over repeated testing.Methodology. Eleven healthy adult subjects experienced two passive wrist movements and had to verbally indicate which movement had the larger amplitude. Based on a subject’s response data a psychometric function was fitted and the wrist acuity threshold was established at the 75% correct response level. A subset of five subjects repeated the experimentation three times (T1, T2 and T3 to determine the test-retest reliability.Results. Mean threshold for wrist flexion was 2.15°± 0.43° and 1.52°± 0.36° for abduction. Encoder resolutions were 0.0075° (flexion-extension and 0.0032° (abduction-adduction. Motor resolutions were 0.2° (flexion-extension and 0.3° (abduction-adduction. Reliability coefficients were rT2-T1=0.986 and rT3-T2=0.971.Conclusions. We currently lack established norm data on the proprioceptive acuity of the wrist to establish direct validity. However, the magnitude of our reported thresholds are physiological plausible and well in line with available threshold data obtained at the elbow joint. Moreover, system has high resolution and is sensitive enough to detect small differences in acuity. Finally, the system produces reliable data over repeated

  9. Ulnar conduction block at the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, P

    1999-10-01

    Two cases of ulnar nerve lesions at the wrist are reported. The lesions had an acute onset and exclusively impaired the ulnar motor deep branch. The coexistence of carpal tunnel syndrome in each case allowed an early diagnosis but was somewhat misleading. In both cases, the use of classic motor and sensory conduction studies did not provide clear abnormalities that would have precisely determined the site of the nerve lesion. In both cases, only palmar stimulation of the ulnar motor deep branch showed an important conduction block. This electrodiagnostic finding showed definitively the site of the ulnar nerve lesion at the wrist and excluded proximal ulnar nerve lesions or C8-T1 radiculopathy. In both cases recovery occurred without surgery.

  10. Activities of Daily Life (ADL Recognition using Wrist-worn Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rajesh Kanna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Activity recognition has become the necessity of smart homes, future factories, and surveillance. Activities independent of body posture predominantly exhibiting gestures involving both arm and the wrist motion supports the use of the wearable sensors for data acquisition. This paper uses an algorithm based prediction method to recognize the Activities of Daily Life (ADL involving activities like mobility, feeding, and functional transfers. The classification of the various activities were carried out by using decision tree – J48 algorithm from the acquired dataset.

  11. Ulnar nerve entrapment at wrist associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozke, E; Dortcan, N; Kocer, A; Cetinkaya, M; Akyuz, G; Us, O

    2003-11-01

    In this study, ulnar nerve entrapments at the wrist were investigated using nerve conduction studies in cases with established diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Cases with cervical radiculopathy and polyneuropathy as well as patients with ulnar nerve entrapment at elbow were excluded from the study. Fifty-three cases (46 females, seven males) whose ages ranged between 20 and 72 years (mean: 49.31 +/- 13.78) were evaluated. Among 53 cases, 12 (22.6%) bilateral and 41 (77.3%) unilateral CTS were detected. Totally 65 wrists evaluated and prolongation of median nerve wrist-3rd digit distal sensory latencies (DSL; N: 59; 90.7%) and wrist-abductor pollicis brevis distal motor latencies (N: 48; 73.8%) were seen. In six wrists, diagnoses were established with the detection of an increase in the differences between wrist-4th digit DSL of median and ulnar nerve. This test was used if other test results were in normal limits. Prolongation of ulnar nerve wrist-5th digit DSL were found in 12 wrists (18.4%) in cases with CTS. Among these 12 wrists mild (N: 2), moderate (N: 7) and severe (N: 3) CTS were detected. Ulnar nerve motor conduction studies provided normal results. In conclusion, we are in the opinion that for the detection of associated ulnar nerve wrist entrapments, ulnar nerve conduction studies paying special attention to DSL convey importance in established cases with CTS.

  12. Two-Armed, Mobile, Sensate Research Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberger, J. F.; Roberts, W. Nelson; Ryan, David J.; Silverthorne, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The Anthropomorphic Robotic Testbed (ART) is an experimental prototype of a partly anthropomorphic, humanoid-size, mobile robot. The basic ART design concept provides for a combination of two-armed coordination, tactility, stereoscopic vision, mobility with navigation and avoidance of obstacles, and natural-language communication, so that the ART could emulate humans in many activities. The ART could be developed into a variety of highly capable robotic assistants for general or specific applications. There is especially great potential for the development of ART-based robots as substitutes for live-in health-care aides for home-bound persons who are aged, infirm, or physically handicapped; these robots could greatly reduce the cost of home health care and extend the term of independent living. The ART is a fully autonomous and untethered system. It includes a mobile base on which is mounted an extensible torso topped by a head, shoulders, and two arms. All subsystems of the ART are powered by a rechargeable, removable battery pack. The mobile base is a differentially- driven, nonholonomic vehicle capable of a speed >1 m/s and can handle a payload >100 kg. The base can be controlled manually, in forward/backward and/or simultaneous rotational motion, by use of a joystick. Alternatively, the motion of the base can be controlled autonomously by an onboard navigational computer. By retraction or extension of the torso, the head height of the ART can be adjusted from 5 ft (1.5 m) to 6 1/2 ft (2 m), so that the arms can reach either the floor or high shelves, or some ceilings. The arms are symmetrical. Each arm (including the wrist) has a total of six rotary axes like those of the human shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints. The arms are actuated by electric motors in combination with brakes and gas-spring assists on the shoulder and elbow joints. The arms are operated under closed-loop digital control. A receptacle for an end effector is mounted on the tip of the wrist and

  13. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 1: Dorsal wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprian Olchowy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is superior to other imaging methods in many aspects, such as multidimensional character of imaging, possibility of dynamic evaluation and precise assessment of soft tissues. Moreover, it is a safe and relatively inexpensive method, broadly available and well-tolerated by patients. A correctly conducted ultrasound examination of the wrist delivers detailed information concerning the condition of tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves and vessels. However, the knowledge of anatomy is crucial to establish a correct ultrasound diagnosis, also in wrist assessment. An ultrasound examination of the wrist is one of the most common US examinations conducted in patients with rheumatological diseases. Ultrasonographic signs depend on the advancement of the disease. The examination is equally frequently conducted in patients with pain or swelling of the wrist due to non-rheumatological causes. The aim of this publication was to present ultrasound images and anatomic schemes corresponding to them. The correct scanning technique of the dorsal part of the wrist was discussed and some practical tips, thanks to which highly diagnostic images can be obtained, were presented. The f ollowing anatomical structures should be visualized in an ultrasound examination of the dorsal wrist: distal radio-ulnar joint, radiocarpal joint, midcarpal joint, carpometacarpal joints, dorsal radiocarpal ligament, compartments of extensor tendons, radial artery, cephalic vein, two small branches of the radial nerve: superfi cial and deep, as well as certain midcarpal ligaments, particularly the scapholunate ligament and lunotriquetral ligament. The paper was distinguished in 2014 as the “poster of the month” (poster number C-1896 during the poster session of the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna.

  14. New developments in prosthetic arm systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujaklija I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Vujaklija,1 Dario Farina,1 Oskar C Aszmann2 1Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems, Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Göttingen, Germany; 2Christian Doppler Laboratory for Restoration of Extremity Function, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Absence of an upper limb leads to severe impairments in everyday life, which can further influence the social and mental state. For these reasons, early developments in cosmetic and body-driven prostheses date some centuries ago, and they have been evolving ever since. Following the end of the Second World War, rapid developments in technology resulted in powered myoelectric hand prosthetics. In the years to come, these devices were common on the market, though they still suffered high user abandonment rates. The reasons for rejection were trifold – insufficient functionality of the hardware, fragile design, and cumbersome control. In the last decade, both academia and industry have reached major improvements concerning technical features of upper limb prosthetics and methods for their interfacing and control. Advanced robotic hands are offered by several vendors and research groups, with a variety of active and passive wrist options that can be articulated across several degrees of freedom. Nowadays, elbow joint designs include active solutions with different weight and power options. Control features are getting progressively more sophisticated, offering options for multiple sensor integration and multi-joint articulation. Latest developments in socket designs are capable of facilitating implantable and multiple surface electromyography sensors in both traditional and osseointegration-based systems. Novel surgical techniques in combination with modern, sophisticated hardware are enabling restoration of dexterous upper limb

  15. Wrist Rehabilitation Assisted by an Electromyography-Driven Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Robot After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Ling; Tong, Raymond Kai-yu; Ho, Newmen S K; Xue, Jing-jing; Rong, Wei; Li, Leonard S W

    2015-09-01

    Augmented physical training with assistance from robot and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may introduce intensive motor improvement in chronic stroke. To compare the rehabilitation effectiveness achieved by NMES robot-assisted wrist training and that by robot-assisted training. This study was a single-blinded randomized controlled trial with a 3-month follow-up. Twenty-six hemiplegic subjects with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to receive 20-session wrist training with an electromyography (EMG)-driven NMES robot (NMES robot group, n = 11) and with an EMG-driven robot (robot group, n = 15), completed within 7 consecutive weeks. Clinical scores, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Modified Ashworth Score (MAS), and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were used to evaluate the training effects before and after the training, as well as 3 months later. An EMG parameter, muscle co-contraction index, was also applied to investigate the session-by-session variation in muscular coordination patterns during the training. The improvement in FMA (shoulder/elbow, wrist/hand) obtained in the NMES robot group was more significant than the robot group (P application in the treatment could bring more improvements in the distal motor functions and faster rehabilitation progress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Reconstructing the rheumatoid wrist: a utility analysis comparing total wrist fusion and total wrist arthroplasty from the perspectives of rheumatologists and hand surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Christi M; Oppenheimer, Adam J; Chung, Kevin C

    2010-03-01

    Rheumatologists and hand surgeons have historically demonstrated strikingly divergent attitudes toward the benefits of surgical intervention, either total wrist fusion or total wrist arthroplasty, for the rheumatoid wrist. A utility analysis was conducted to compare a national random sample of hand surgeons and rheumatologists regarding their opinions about surgical management of severe rheumatoid wrist disease. A web-based trade-off utility survey was developed, and participants were presented with survey scenarios comparing well-controlled rheumatoid arthritis with operative and non-operative management. Utility values were calculated for each scenario, and a decision analytic model was constructed. Utility values for rheumatologists and hand surgeons did not differ significantly for any scenario. Total wrist arthroplasty was associated with the highest expected gain in quality-adjusted life-years for each subgroup. This decision analytic model demonstrates similar opinions between two subspecialties that have historically demonstrated divergent attitudes towards rheumatoid hand surgery.

  17. Wrist dermatitis: contact allergy to neoprene in a keyboard wrist rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R C; Elston, D M

    1997-09-01

    A case of allergic contact dermatitis to a keyboard wrist rest containing neoprene is reported. The patient, who had a history of sensitivity to rubber products, developed an acute vesicular reaction of the palmar aspects of her distal wrists, followed by eczematous patches of her extremities and face. Treatment with prednisone, a 3-week tapering dose (60, 40, 20 mg), cleared the dermatitis. The widespread uses of neoprene are discussed and suggest that neoprene will become a common source of contact dermatitis as the potential sources of exposure increase.

  18. Rehabilitation of the wrist and hand following sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Carrie A; Krause, Michelle; Brown, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In sports, wrist and hand injuries are commonplace. Too often, injuries to these areas can be under-treated and left for further complications to arise. While some injuries to the wrist and hand can be treated conservatively with immediate return to play, others require a more in-depth assessment prior to return to play. This article describes the most common wrist and hand injuries in sport, and provides information related to current treatment approaches.

  19. EFFECTS OF WRIST WEIGHING IN REDUCING UPPER LIMB TREMORS IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBELLAR LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Priya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: An intentional tremor is one of the most untreated causes in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Upper limb tremors decreases the performance of many activities of daily life Thus treatment of patients with tremor probably implies better functional ability. It is one of the major areas of concern to improve functional independence hence, this study proposed to know the effects of wrist weighing in reducing upper limb tremors in cerebellar injury patients. Materials and Methods: A total number of 21 patients with various abnormalities of cerebellum were selected depending on selection criteria. These patients were randomly divided into two groups. One group was treated with wrist weighing by using Velcro weight cuffs for 15 minutes along with conventional physiotherapy for 5 days a week for 2 months & other group is treated with conventional physiotherapy for 5 days in a week for 2 months. The objectives were tested by using tremor rating scale and nine hole peg test. The values are collected before and after the treatment Results: In the group treated with wrist weighing the improvement in the tremor rating scale is very significant (p: 0.0001 and in nine hole peg test is extremely significant (p: 0.0001. In conventional therapy group the improvement in the tremor rating scale is not significant (p: 0.0051 and in nine hole peg test is very significant (p: 0.0002. Conclusion: Incorporation of wrist weighing along with conventional therapy reduced the intensity of upper limb tremors in patients with cerebellar injuries but both the treatments are effective in improving upper limb functions. KEY WORDS: Intentional tremor, Rehabilitation, Wrist weighing

  20. Personal technique for wrist dorsal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, A; Leigheb, M; Russomando, A; Landi, A

    2014-09-24

    In hand disorders surgical procedures are more and more widely used and often it's necessary to approach the wrist by the dorsal way. Beneath anatomy of this region is well known, there is still room enough to develop new surgical exposure techniques mostly related to physiology and biomechanics. Our goals are to present an innovative surgical dorsal exposure of the wrist, to show its use for different problems solving, and to evaluate its mini-invasive and functional outcome. Our inedited surgical technique is presented. Since November 1999 to February 2008, this technique has been used by the same surgeon in 60 cases for different pathologies and procedures: 14 SNAC-SLAC wrists III-IV treated by proximal row resection and Resurface-Capitate Pyrocarbon Implant (RCPI), 2 Fenton syndromes by bone graft and RCPI, 6 SNACSLAC II by proximal row resection +/- radial styloidectomy, 2 SLAC III by scaphoidectomy and capito-lunate arthrodesis, 12 scapho-lunate recent dissociations by ligamentoplasty (double approach), 4 scapho-lunate inveterate dissociations by Cuenod Saffar-Romano modified technique and 4 by synthetic ligaments, 1 fracture of the scaphoid proximal pole by synthesis-revascularization-S.L.ligament reconstruction, 15 Kienbock's diseases revascularized by II m.c. artery +/- radial osteotomy. Patients have been evaluated at follow up through the DASH disability questionnaire, the Mayo score for the force, ROM, pain, satisfaction grade. Results are good and encouraging for these applications. In conclusion this new technique with its limited exposure permits an early mobilization with a lower risk of stiffness and can be considered mini-invasive.

  1. Wrist-worn pervasive gaze interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Lund, Haakon; Biermann, Florian;

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses gaze interaction for smart home control, conducted from a wrist-worn unit. First we asked ten people to enact the gaze movements they would propose for e.g. opening a door or adjusting the room temperature. On basis of their suggestions we built and tested different versions...... selection. Their subjective evaluations were positive with regard to the speed of the interaction. We conclude that gaze gesture input seems feasible for fast and brief remote control of smart home technology provided that robustness of tracking is improved....

  2. Periprosthetic osteolysis after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Literature Review Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO) after second- or third-generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA), with or without evident loosening of the implant components, has previously been reported in the literature, but rarely in a systematic way. Purpose The purpose....... Conclusion Periprosthetic loosening is frequent following a TWA. In our series it was not necessarily associated with implant loosening and seemed to stabilize within 3 years. Close and continued observation is, however, recommended. Level of Evidence Therapeutic IV....

  3. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, C.

    1983-02-25

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated.

  4. Motor control impairment of the contralateral wrist in patients with unilateral chronic wrist pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulders, MJC; Kreulen, M; Hage, JJ; Ritt, MJPF; Mulder, T

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of the quality of fine motor control in patients with unilateral chronic wrist pain seldom focuses on the possibility that control of movements is effector independent at the cerebral level. This mechanism may be involved in an impairment of motor function in the unaffected wri

  5. The arthritic wrist. II--the degenerative wrist: indications for different surgical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulan, J; Bacle, G; de Bodman, C; Najihi, N; Richou, J; Simon, E; Saint-Cast, Y; Obert, L; Saraux, A; Bellemère, P; Dréano, T; Le Bourg, M; Le Nen, D

    2011-06-01

    For the patient (and the surgeon) the ideal wrist is one that has good mobility, however very often the optimal surgical treatment is one that provides effective pain relief. The patient must be informed of the potential complications and limitations of each procedure. The patient's psychological profile and functional requirements will determine how well he/she adapts to the changes. Also, each surgeon has beliefs and personal experiences that influence the treatment decision and final result. Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and the Watson procedure are two reference operations for osteoarthritis secondary to scapholunate instability and scaphoid non-union (SLAC and SNAC). Beyond the early complications and drawbacks specific to each, they provide good results that are maintained over time. PRC, which can be performed up to Stage II, is mainly indicated in patients with moderate functional demands, while the Watson procedure is more often done on a patient who performs manual labour, as long as the radiolunate joint space is maintained. Complete denervation is effective in three out of four cases and preserves the remaining mobility. Because of its low morbidity, the procedure can be suggested in patients with a mobile wrist and low functional demands or in older patients, independent of their wrist mobility. Total wrist fusion is not only a rescue procedure. For a young patient who performs heavy manual labour with extensive osteoarthritis and progressive forms of Kienböck's disease, this procedure provides the greatest chance of returning to work and not being socially outcast. The role of osteochondral autografts, implants and wrist prostheses in the treatment arsenal need to be better defined.

  6. Profiling wrist pulse from skin surface by Advanced Vibrometer Interferometer Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hao-Xiang; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2017-02-01

    With global trends in population aging, the need to decrease and prevent the onset of cardiovascular disease has drawn a great attention. The traditional cuff-based upper arm sphygmomanometer is still the standard method to retrieve blood pressure information for diagnostics. However, this method is not easy to be adapted by patients and is not comfortable enough to perform a long term monitoring process. In order to correlate the beating profile of the arterial pulse on the wrist skin, an Advanced Vibrometer Interferometer Device (AVID) is adopted in this study to measure the vibration amplitude of skin and compare it with blood pressure measured from the upper arm. The AVID system can measure vibration and remove the directional ambiguity by using circular polarization interferometer technique with two orthogonal polarized light beams. The displacement resolution of the system is nearly 1.0 nm and the accuracy is experimentally verified. Using an optical method to quantify wrist pule, it provides a means to perform cuff-less, noninvasive and continuous measurement. In this paper, the correlations between the amplitude of skin vibration and the actual blood pressure is studied. The success of this method could potentially set the foundation of blood pressure monitor system based on optical approaches.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for the wrist joint of the coal miners in vibration department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.Z.; Liu, R.L.; Hu, S.D.; Zhang, W.; Xu, W.X.; Ge, L.X. [Central Hospital of Zaozhuang Mine Corporation, Zaozhuang (China)

    2006-04-15

    To study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the wrist joint of coal miners who work in excavation and vibration department. Forty-three coal miners with the hand-arm vibration disease served as the observation group while 20 workers who were not working in the vibration department acted as the control group. The patients in the observation group were divided into five subgroups according to the time when they received vibration. The regularity of the development of signs and symptoms of MRI was observed and analyzed. The hydroarthrosis was most found in MRI. There were significant difference in hydroarthrosis osteoporosis and osteomyelitis between the observation group and the control group. The edema of bone marrow and the avascular necrosis of ossa carpi were found only in the observation group and not found in the control group. The hydroarthrosis and the edema of bone marrow occurred most in the early stage of vibration. The signal in the edema of the bone marrow of the distal end of the radius was decreased in the GE sequence with the specificity. Changes in the wrist joint occur in the early stage of the vibration work, and can be found in the MRI. The edema of the bone marrow of the distal end of the radius is of great value in the diagnosis of the hand-arm vibration disease.

  8. [Shortening arthrodesis of three wrist bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delattre, O; Dupont, P; Reau, A F; Rouvillain, J L; Mousselard, H; Catonné, Y

    1997-01-01

    In advanced cases of wrist osteoarthritis with lesions of the radio-scaphoid and mediocarpal joints, and when a proximal row carpectomy is not possible because of lesions of the head of the capitate, we suggest a new technique: The hamate-capitate-lunate shortening arthrodesis with a scaphoid-triquetral resection. The good results observed with proximal row carpectomies, and particularly their long-term reliability, have encouraged us on this new path. Effectively, this operation takes the concept of proximal row carpectomy one step further by reconstructing the head of the capitate with the lunate whose proximal articular surface is often not deteriorated even in very advanced cases of radio and mediocarpal osteoarthritis. The two theoretical concepts of this operation are the shortening of the carpus and respect of the physiological congruence of the radio-lunate joint, the goal being obtain similar results those with proximal row carpectomy, particularly concerning mobility. We present our first two cases with this technique. This new procedure is an alternative to the four bone arthrodesis, particularly in SLAC wrist sequellae when they have evolved to the stage of radio and mediocarpal osteoarthritis.

  9. Polish Adaptation of Wrist Evaluation Questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Piotr; Wawrzyniak-Bielęda, Anna; Romanowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Questionnaires evaluating hand and wrist function are a very useful tool allowing for objective and systematic recording of symptoms reported by the patients. Most questionnaires generally accepted in clinical practice are available in English and need to be appropriately adapted in translation and undergo subsequent validation before they can be used in another culture and language. The process of translation of the questionnaires was based on the generally accepted guidelines of the International Quality of Life Assessment Project (IQOLA). First, the questionnaires were translated from English into Polish by two independent translators. Then, a joint version of the translation was prepared collectively and translated back into English. Each stage was followed by a written report. The translated questionnaires were then evaluated by a group of patients. We selected 31 patients with wrist problems and asked them to complete the PRWE, Mayo, Michigan and DASH questionnaires twice at intervals of 3-10 days. The results were submitted for statistical analysis. We found a statistically significant (pquestionnaires. A comparison of the PRWE and Mayo questionnaires with the DASH questionnaire also showed a statistically significant correlation (pquestionnaires was successful and that the questionnaires may be used in clinical practice.

  10. A method to qualitatively assess arm use in stroke survivors in the home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Kaspar; Gonzenbach, Roman; Wachter, Susanne; Luft, Andreas; Gassert, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Wearable sensor technology has enabled unobtrusive monitoring of arm movements of stroke survivors in the home environment. However, the most widely established method, based on activity counts, provides quantitative rather than qualitative information on arm without functional insights, and is sensitive to passive arm movements during ambulatory activities. We propose a method to quantify functionally relevant arm use in stroke survivors relying on a single wrist-worn inertial measurement unit. Orientation of the forearm during movements is measured in order identify gross arm movements. The method is validated in 10 subacute/chronic stroke survivors wearing inertial sensors at 5 anatomical locations for 48 h. Measurements are compared to conventional activity counts and to a test for gross manual dexterity. Duration of gross arm movements of the paretic arm correlated significantly better with the Box and Block Test ([Formula: see text]) than conventional activity counts when walking phases were included ([Formula: see text]), and similar results were found when comparing ratios of paretic and non-paretic arms for gross movements and activity counts. The proposed gross arm movement metric is robust against passive arm movements during ambulatory activities and requires only a single-sensor module placed at the paretic wrist for the assessment of functionally relevant arm use.

  11. Osteoarthritis of the Wrist STT Joint and Radiocarpal Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronit Wollstein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of wrist osteoarthritis (OA lags behind that of other joints, possibly due to the complexity of wrist biomechanics and the importance of ligamentous forces in the function of the wrist. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal (STT OA is common, but its role in wrist clinical pathology and biomechanics is unclear. We identified the prevalence of radiographic STT joint OA in our hand clinic population and defined the relationship between STT and radiocarpal OA in wrist radiographs. One hundred consecutive wrist clinical and radiographic exams were retrospectively reviewed. Radiographs were evaluated for the presence and stage of OA. The mean age was 61.3 (±14.5 years. The radiographic occurrence of STT joint OA was 59% and of radiocarpal (RC OA was 29%. Radiographic STT and RC joint OA were inversely related. Tenderness over the STT joint in physical exam was not associated with OA in the STT or other joints. STT OA in our series was not related to wrist pain. These findings support the discrepancy between radiographic and cadaver findings and clinically significant OA in this joint. The inverse relationship between STT and RC OA, as seen in scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC wrist, requires further biomechanical study.

  12. Osteoarthritis of the Wrist STT Joint and Radiocarpal Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollstein, Ronit; Clavijo, Julio; Gilula, Louis A

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of wrist osteoarthritis (OA) lags behind that of other joints, possibly due to the complexity of wrist biomechanics and the importance of ligamentous forces in the function of the wrist. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal (STT) OA is common, but its role in wrist clinical pathology and biomechanics is unclear. We identified the prevalence of radiographic STT joint OA in our hand clinic population and defined the relationship between STT and radiocarpal OA in wrist radiographs. One hundred consecutive wrist clinical and radiographic exams were retrospectively reviewed. Radiographs were evaluated for the presence and stage of OA. The mean age was 61.3 (±14.5) years. The radiographic occurrence of STT joint OA was 59% and of radiocarpal (RC) OA was 29%. Radiographic STT and RC joint OA were inversely related. Tenderness over the STT joint in physical exam was not associated with OA in the STT or other joints. STT OA in our series was not related to wrist pain. These findings support the discrepancy between radiographic and cadaver findings and clinically significant OA in this joint. The inverse relationship between STT and RC OA, as seen in scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrist, requires further biomechanical study.

  13. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3780 Section 888.3780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  14. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Young Sim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31. An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18. When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment.

  15. 1st place, PREMUS best paper competition: workplace and individual factors in wrist tendinosis among blue-collar workers--the San Francisco study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Carisa; Eisen, Ellen A; Goldberg, Robert; Krause, Niklas; Rempel, David

    2011-03-01

    Workplace studies have linked hand/wrist tendinosis to forceful and repetitive hand exertions, but the associations are not consistent. We report findings from a prospective study of right wrist tendinosis among blue-collar workers. Workers (N=413) at four industries were followed for 28 months with questionnaires and physical examinations every 4 months to identify incident cases of right wrist tendinosis. Exposure assessment of force and repetition were based on field measurements and video analysis to determine repetition rate and the percent time (% time) in heavy pinch (>1 kg-force) or power grip (>4 kg-force). All exposure variables were measured at the level of the individual and task. For workers responsible for >1 task, a time-weighted average exposure was calculated based on task hours per week. A proportional hazards model was used to assess the relationship between exposures and incidence of wrist tendinosis. During the 481 person-years of follow-up, there were 26 incident cases of right wrist tendinosis [incidence rate (IR) 5.40 cases per 100 person-years]. Adjusting for age, gender, and repetition, wrist tendinosis was associated with % time spent in heavy pinch [hazard ratio (HR) 5.01, 95% CI 1.27-19.79). Composite exposure measure American Conference of Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value (ACGIH-TLV) for hand activity level (HR 3.95, 95% CI 1.52-10.26) was also associated with the outcome for the medium-exposure group using video-based total repetition rate. The workplace factors predicting wrist tendinosis were time-weighted average values of % time spent in heavy pinch and the ACGIH-TLV for Hand Activity Level. The % time spent in power grip was not a significant predictor, nor were any measures of repetition. An exposure-response relationship was observed for the % time spent in heavy pinch. These findings may improve programs for preventing occupational wrist tendinosis.

  16. Wrist and forearm postures and motions during typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serina, E R; Tal, R; Rempel, D

    1999-07-01

    Awkward upper extremity postures and repetitive wrist motions have been identified by some studies as risk factors for upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders during keyboard work. However, accurate body postures and joint motions of typists typing on standardized workstations are not known. A laboratory study was conducted to continuously measure wrist and forearm postures and motions of 25 subjects while they typed for 10-15 min at a standard computer workstation adjusted to the subjects' anthropometry. Electrogoniometers continuously recorded wrist and forearm angles. Joint angular velocities and accelerations were calculated from the postural data. The results indicate that wrist and forearm postures during typing were sustained at non-neutral angles; mean wrist extension angle was 23.4 +/- 10.9 degrees on the left and 19.9 +/- 8.6 degrees on the right. Mean ulnar deviation was 14.7 +/- 10.1 degrees on the left and 18.6 +/- 5.8 degrees on the right. More than 73% of subjects typed with the left or right wrist in greater than 15 degrees extension and more than 20% typed with the left or right wrist in greater than 20 degrees ulnar deviation. Joint angles and motions while typing on an adjusted computer workstation were not predictable based on anthropometry or typing speed and varied widely between subjects. Wrist motions are rapid and are similar in magnitude to wrist motions of industrial workers performing jobs having a high risk for developing cumulative trauma disorders. The magnitude of the dynamic components suggests that wrist joint motions may need to be evaluated as a risk factor for musculoskeletal disorders during typing.

  17. Classification of Phantom Finger, Hand, Wrist, and Elbow Voluntary Gestures in Transhumeral Amputees With sEMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrasse, Nathanael; Nicol, Caroline; Touillet, Amelie; Richer, Florian; Martinet, Noel; Paysant, Jean; de Graaf, Jozina Bernardina

    2017-01-01

    Decoding finger and hand movements from sEMG electrodes placed on the forearm of transradial amputees has been commonly studied by many research groups. A few recent studies have shown an interesting phenomenon: simple correlations between distal phantom finger, hand and wrist voluntary movements and muscle activity in the residual upper arm in transhumeral amputees, i.e., of muscle groups that, prior to amputation, had no physical effect on the concerned hand and wrist joints. In this study, we are going further into the exploration of this phenomenon by setting up an evaluation study of phantom finger, hand, wrist and elbow (if present) movement classification based on the analysis of surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals measured by multiple electrodes placed on the residual upper arm of five transhumeral amputees with a controllable phantom limb who did not undergo any reinnervation surgery. We showed that with a state-of-the-art classification architecture, it is possible to correctly classify phantom limb activity (up to 14 movements) with a rather important average success (over 80% if considering basic sets of six hand, wrist and elbow movements) and to use this pattern recognition output to give online control of a device (here a graphical interface) to these transhumeral amputees. Beyond changing the way the phantom limb condition is apprehended by both patients and clinicians, such results could pave the road towards a new control approach for transhumeral amputated patients with a voluntary controllable phantom limb. This could ease and extend their control abilities of functional upper limb prosthetics with multiple active joints without undergoing muscular reinnervation surgery.

  18. Pointing with the wrist: a postural model for Donders' law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolo, Domenico; Widjaja, Ferdinan; Esmaeili, Mohammad; Burdet, Etienne

    2011-07-01

    The central nervous system uses stereotypical combinations of the three wrist/forearm joint angles to point in a given (2D) direction in space. In this paper, we first confirm and analyze this Donders' law for the wrist as well as the distributions of the joint angles. We find that the quadratic surfaces fitting the experimental wrist configurations during pointing tasks are characterized by a subject-specific Koenderink shape index and by a bias due to the prono-supination angle distribution. We then introduce a simple postural model using only four parameters to explain these characteristics in a pointing task. The model specifies the redundancy of the pointing task by determining the one-dimensional task-equivalent manifold (TEM), parameterized via wrist torsion. For every pointing direction, the torsion is obtained by the concurrent minimization of an extrinsic cost, which guarantees minimal angle rotations (similar to Listing's law for eye movements) and of an intrinsic cost, which penalizes wrist configurations away from comfortable postures. This allows simulating the sequence of wrist orientations to point at eight peripheral targets, from a central one, passing through intermediate points. The simulation first shows that in contrast to eye movements, which can be predicted by only considering the extrinsic cost (i.e., Listing's law), both costs are necessary to account for the wrist/forearm experimental data. Second, fitting the synthetic Donders' law from the simulated task with a quadratic surface yields similar fitting errors compared to experimental data.

  19. Isolated ulnar shaft fractures. Comparison of treatment by a functional brace and long-arm cast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Hölmich, P; Orsnes, T;

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study, we randomly allocated 39 patients with isolated fractures of the lower two-thirds of the ulnar shaft to treatment either by a prefabricated functional brace or a long-arm cast. Significantly better wrist function and a higher percentage of satisfied patients were found in ...

  20. Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Jakub; Uuskoski, Maria; Machek, Jan; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2017-07-25

    Wearable sensors enable long-term monitoring of health and wellbeing indicators. An objective evaluation of sensors' accuracy is important, especially for their use in health care. The aim of this study was to use a wrist-worn optical heart rate (OHR) device to estimate heart rate (HR), energy expenditure (EE), and maximal oxygen intake capacity (VO2Max) during running and to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated parameters (HR, EE, and VO2Max) against golden reference methods. A total of 24 healthy volunteers, of whom 11 were female, with a mean age of 36.2 years (SD 8.2 years) participated in a submaximal self-paced outdoor running test and maximal voluntary exercise test in a sports laboratory. OHR was monitored with a PulseOn wrist-worn photoplethysmographic device and the running speed with a phone GPS sensor. A physiological model based on HR, running speed, and personal characteristics (age, gender, weight, and height) was used to estimate EE during the maximal voluntary exercise test and VO2Max during the submaximal outdoor running test. ECG-based HR and respiratory gas analysis based estimates were used as golden references. OHR was able to measure HR during running with a 1.9% mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). VO2Max estimated during the submaximal outdoor running test was closely similar to the sports laboratory estimate (MAPE 5.2%). The energy expenditure estimate (n=23) was quite accurate when HR was above the aerobic threshold (MAPE 6.7%), but MAPE increased to 16.5% during a lighter intensity of exercise. The results suggest that wrist-worn OHR may accurately estimate HR during running up to maximal HR. When combined with physiological modeling, wrist-worn OHR may be used for an estimation of EE, especially during higher intensity running, and VO2Max, even during submaximal self-paced outdoor recreational running.

  1. Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uuskoski, Maria; Machek, Jan; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2017-01-01

    Background Wearable sensors enable long-term monitoring of health and wellbeing indicators. An objective evaluation of sensors’ accuracy is important, especially for their use in health care. Objective The aim of this study was to use a wrist-worn optical heart rate (OHR) device to estimate heart rate (HR), energy expenditure (EE), and maximal oxygen intake capacity (VO2Max) during running and to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated parameters (HR, EE, and VO2Max) against golden reference methods. Methods A total of 24 healthy volunteers, of whom 11 were female, with a mean age of 36.2 years (SD 8.2 years) participated in a submaximal self-paced outdoor running test and maximal voluntary exercise test in a sports laboratory. OHR was monitored with a PulseOn wrist-worn photoplethysmographic device and the running speed with a phone GPS sensor. A physiological model based on HR, running speed, and personal characteristics (age, gender, weight, and height) was used to estimate EE during the maximal voluntary exercise test and VO2Max during the submaximal outdoor running test. ECG-based HR and respiratory gas analysis based estimates were used as golden references. Results OHR was able to measure HR during running with a 1.9% mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). VO2Max estimated during the submaximal outdoor running test was closely similar to the sports laboratory estimate (MAPE 5.2%). The energy expenditure estimate (n=23) was quite accurate when HR was above the aerobic threshold (MAPE 6.7%), but MAPE increased to 16.5% during a lighter intensity of exercise. Conclusions The results suggest that wrist-worn OHR may accurately estimate HR during running up to maximal HR. When combined with physiological modeling, wrist-worn OHR may be used for an estimation of EE, especially during higher intensity running, and VO2Max, even during submaximal self-paced outdoor recreational running. PMID:28743682

  2. Broken Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helps your body absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from fatty fish, such as salmon; fortified foods, such as milk and orange juice; and from sun exposure. Talk to your doctor about how much calcium and vitamin D you need. Exercise for bone strength. Weight- ...

  3. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist clinical evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheurecker, G

    2001-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: in 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG...

  4. Treatment of wrist deformities in children with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya A Kochenova

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Patients with segmental lesions of the spinal cord at the С6-С7 and С5-С8 level were associated with restoration of active wrist extension up to the neutral position or more and were expected to achieve significant improvement of hand function. Patients with spinal cord lesions at the C5-Th1 level exhibited significant lesions of the muscles, along with bone deformities. Consequently, surgical treatment could only achieve functional wrist position with minimal improvement of hand function. Using differential approaches in the treatment of wrist contracture that are selected by determining the level of spinal cord lesion will enable physicians to predict the outcome and improve the function and appearance of the wrist.

  5. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    WEI-MIN HSIEH; YUH-SHYAN HWANG; SHIH-CHING CHEN; SUN-YEN TAN; CHIH-CHEN CHEN; YU-LUEN CHEN

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods...

  6. Hyperstaticity for ergonomie design of a wrist exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Mohammad; Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Dailey, Wayne; Burdet, Etienne; Campolo, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    Increasing the level of transparency in rehabilitation devices has been one of the main goals in robot-aided neurorehabilitation for the past two decades. This issue is particularly important to robotic structures that mimic the human counterpart's morphology and attach directly to the limb. Problems arise for complex joints such as the human wrist, which cannot be accurately matched with a traditional mechanical joint. In such cases, mechanical differences between human and robotic joint cause hyperstaticity (i.e. overconstraint) which, coupled with kinematic misalignments, leads to uncontrolled force/torque at the joint. This paper focuses on the prono-supination (PS) degree of freedom of the forearm. The overall force and torque in the wrist PS rotation is quantified by means of a wrist robot. A practical solution to avoid hyperstaticity and reduce the level of undesired force/torque in the wrist is presented, which is shown to reduce 75% of the force and 68% of the torque.

  7. Intraneural fibroma of the median nerve at the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Anthony M; Folpe, Andrew L; Wenger, Doris E; Spinner, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Distal median neuropathy from carpal tunnel syndrome is the most well known lesion affecting the median nerve. Mass lesions may affect the nerve at the wrist. We present to our knowledge the first histologically confirmed case of an intraneural fibroma.

  8. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline M Ferreira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05. A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32. Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary.

  9. Intrasynovial lipoma causing trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Shinji; Kodama, Narihito; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Triggering of the flexor tendon at the wrist is rare. We report a case of intrasynovial lipoma that caused a trigger wrist. As far as we know it is unique in that the intrasynovial lipoma simultaneously caused carpal tunnel syndrome. The massive tenosynovitis and adhesion of flexors tendons after the locking of the intrasynovial lipoma may have resulted from inflammation caused by attrition within the carpal tunnel.

  10. [Saarland Growth Study: analyses of body composition of children, aged 3 to 11 years. Measurement of height, weight, girth (abdomen, upper arm, calf) and skinfolds (triceps, biceps, subscapular,suprailiacal, abdominal) and bioelectric impedance (BIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinand, C; Müller, S; Zabransky, S; Danker-Hopfe, H

    2000-01-01

    This study aimed to set up current reference charts of anthropometric data in the Saarland. Only national and international data were available to be compared but no former Saarland charts could be found. In the period between 1994 and 1995 we investigated children of 3 to 11 years in a cross-sectional study. Therefore we measured body height, weight, circumferences, skinfolds and bioelectrical impedance (BIA). No significant gender differences were found for body height and weight. Boys of all groups of age showed bigger abdominal circumferences than girls of the same age. On the other hand upper-arm and calf-girth of younger girls were larger than that from boys. In higher age groups circumferences become rather equal. The skinfolds of Saarland girls are thicker than those of boys. The urban rural comparison indicated no significant differences. Nor was any social divergence found among the aforementioned parameters. Regarding height Saarland children are seen to be similar or somewhat shorter than those examined in national or international studies. By the way, in higher percentiles the children in our study were heavier. Thus high BMI values of our study are bigger compared with former studies. According to the definition of obesity by the ECOG almost 20 to 30% of our children are obese. The older children become the higher is the percentage of obesity. Comparing girls and boys, bioelectrical impedance shows higher values for girls. In higher age classes resistance levels gets smaller, in boys more so than in girls. Body fat estimated by a formula based on BIA test parameters yielded negative values. So we propose the use of sex- and age-specific raw charts of BIA test parameters.

  11. Use of an arm weight-bearing combined with upper-limb reaching apparatus to facilitate motor paralysis recovery in an incomplete spinal cord injury patient: a single case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoei, Takashi; Kawahira, Kazumi; Fukuda, Hidefumi; Sihgenobu, Keizo; Shimodozono, Megumi; Ogura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Training using an arm weight-bearing device combined with upper-limb reaching apparatus to facilitate motor paralysis recovery, named the “Reaching Robot”, as well as Repetitive Facilitation Exercise were applied to a patient with severe impairment of the shoulder and elbow due to incomplete spinal cord injury and the effects were examined. [Subjects and Methods] A 66-year-old man with incomplete spinal cord injury participated in an upper extremity rehabilitation program involving a Reaching Robot. The program was comprised of active motor suspension, continuous low amplitude neuromuscular electrical stimulation and functional vibratory stimulation, as well as Repetitive Facilitation Exercise combined with continuous low amplitude neuromuscular electrical stimulation. This protocol used a crossover design following an A1-B1-A2-B2. “A” consisted of 2 weeks of Repetitive Facilitation Exercise, and “B” consisted of 2 weeks of Reaching Robot training. [Results] Improvements were observed after all sessions. Active range of motion for shoulder flexion improved after 2 weeks of Reaching Robot sessions only. There were no adverse events. [Conclusion] Reaching Robot training for severe paretic upper-extremity after incomplete spinal cord injury was a safe and effective treatment. Reaching Robot training may be useful for rehabilitation of paretic upper-extremity after incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:28210068

  12. Scaphocapitolunate arthrodesis and radial styloidectomy: a treatment option for posttraumatic degenerative wrist disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausmeyer, Melissa; Fernandez, Diego

    2012-11-01

    Longstanding scaphoid nonunion, scaphoid malunion, and chronic scapholunate dissociation result in malalignment of the carpal bones, progressive carpal collapse, instability, and osteoarthritis of the wrist. The most commonly used procedures to treat scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are the four-corner fusion (4CF) and the proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Here we describe a different treatment option: radial styloidectomy and scaphocapitolunate (SCL) arthrodesis. This treatment option is chosen in an effort to maintain the joint contact surface and load transmission across the radiocarpal joint. Twenty patients were treated by the senior author (DLF) with this method with a mean follow-up of 4.6 years. Pain decreased in all patients, and 13 patients were pain-free postoperatively. The average Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores decreased from 44 preoperatively to 23 postoperatively. One patient's course was complicated by nonunion, which was successfully treated with revision of the SCL arthrodesis. On follow-up radiographs, no patient had progressive osteoarthritis. This method preserves the normal ulnar-sided joints of the carpus, which are sacrificed during 4CF, and maintains a more physiologic joint surface for radiocarpal load sharing.

  13. Classification of hand and wrist tasks of unknown force levels using muscle synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoufi, B; Kamavuako, E N; Hudgins, B; Englehart, K

    2015-08-01

    Muscle synergies have been proposed as a way for the central nervous system (CNS) to simplify the generation of motor commands and they have been shown to explain a large portion of the variation in the muscle patterns across a variety of conditions. However, whether human subjects are able to control prostheses proportionally with a small set of synergies has not been tested directly. Here we investigated if muscle synergies can be used to identify different wrist and hand motions. We recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity from eight arm muscles while the subjects exerted seven different intensity levels during the motions when performing seven classes of hand and wrist motion. From these data we extracted the muscle synergies and classified the tasks associated to each contraction intensity profile by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). We compared the performance obtained using muscle synergies with the performance of using the mean absolute values (MAV) as a feature. Also, the consistency of extracted muscle synergies was studied across intensity variations. While the synergies showed relative consistency particularly across closer intensity levels, average classification results generated with the synergies were less accurate than MAVs. These results indicate that although the performance of muscle synergies was very close to MAVs, they do not provide additional information for task identification across different exerted intensity levels.

  14. Phantom hand and wrist movements in upper limb amputees are slow but naturally controlled movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graaf, J B; Jarrassé, N; Nicol, C; Touillet, A; Coyle, T; Maynard, L; Martinet, N; Paysant, J

    2016-01-15

    After limb amputation, patients often wake up with a vivid perception of the presence of the missing limb, called "phantom limb". Phantom limbs have mostly been studied with respect to pain sensation. But patients can experience many other phantom sensations, including voluntary movements. The goal of the present study was to quantify phantom movement kinematics and relate these to intact limb kinematics and to the time elapsed since amputation. Six upper arm and two forearm amputees with various delays since amputation (6months to 32years) performed phantom finger, hand and wrist movements at self-chosen comfortable velocities. The kinematics of the phantom movements was indirectly obtained via the intact limb that synchronously mimicked the phantom limb movements, using a Cyberglove® for measuring finger movements and an inertial measurement unit for wrist movements. Results show that the execution of phantom movements is perceived as "natural" but effortful. The types of phantom movements that can be performed are variable between the patients but they could all perform thumb flexion/extension and global hand opening/closure. Finger extension movements appeared to be 24% faster than finger flexion movements. Neither the number of types of phantom movements that can be executed nor the kinematic characteristics were related to the elapsed time since amputation, highlighting the persistence of post-amputation neural adaptation. We hypothesize that the perceived slowness of phantom movements is related to altered proprioceptive feedback that cannot be recalibrated by lack of visual feedback during phantom movement execution.

  15. Design and fuzzy logic control of an active wrist orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ergin; Dogan, Erdi

    2017-08-01

    People who perform excessive wrist movements throughout the day because of their professions have a higher risk of developing lateral and medial epicondylitis. If proper precautions are not taken against these diseases, serious consequences such as job loss and early retirement can occur. In this study, the design and control of an active wrist orthosis that is mobile, powerful and lightweight is presented as a means to avoid the occurrence and/or for the treatment of repetitive strain injuries in an effective manner. The device has an electromyography-based control strategy so that the user's intention always comes first. In fact, the device-user interaction is mainly activated by the electromyography signals measured from the forearm muscles that are responsible for the extension and flexion wrist movements. Contractions of the muscles are detected using surface electromyography sensors, and the desired quantity of the velocity value of the wrist is extracted from a fuzzy logic controller. Then, the actuator system of the device comes into play by conveying the necessary motion support to the wrist. Experimental studies show that the presented device actually reduces the demand on the muscles involved in repetitive strain injuries while performing challenging daily life activities including extension and flexion wrist motions.

  16. Applying Space Technology to Enhance Control of an Artificial Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Diane; Donovan, William H.; Novy, Mara; Abramczyk, Robert

    1997-01-01

    numerical coefficients or weights. Although the function development may require much computational time and many training cases, the resulting discrimination functions can run in realtime on modest computers. These results suggest that myoelectric signals might be a feasible teleoperation medium, allowing an operator to use his or her own hand and arm as a master to intuitively control an anthropomorphic robot in a remote location such as outer space.

  17. Three-arm Stereocomplexed PPO-PDLA-PLLA Copolymer with High Molecular Weight%高分子量立构复合结晶的三枝化PPO-PDLA-PLLA 嵌段共聚物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 马艳; 李远翔; 范仲勇

    2014-01-01

    Three-arm poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) was used as a macroinitiator for the ring-opening poly-merization(ROP) of D-lactide to obtain three-arm poly( propylene oxide)-block-poly(D-lactic acid) ( PPO-PDLA). PPO-PDLA copolymer was then reacted with stannous octoate [Sn(Oct) 2 ] to obtain Sn(Oct) end-capped PPO-PDLA[PPO-PDLA-Sn(Oct)]. The PPO-PDLA-Sn(Oct) can be used as an efficient macroinitia-tor for the ROP of L-lactide to synthesize three-arm PPO-PDLA-PLLA at 130 ℃, which reduces the occurrence of hydrolysis and transesterification reaction. PPO-PDLA-PLLA copolymers with high molecular weight were synthesized by this novel and simple method. The results show that the composite of PPO-PDLA-PLLA can be easily tuned by controlling the feed ratio of L-lactide and D-lactide, and the stereoregularity of PPO-PDLA-PLLA is high. Moreover, the stereocomplexes of PPO-PDLA-PLLA can survive melting to reform the stereo-complex crystallites.%以三枝化低不饱和度聚环氧丙烷(PPO)引发 D-丙交酯(D-LA)逐步开环聚合,合成了三枝化聚环氧丙烷-聚右旋乳酸(PPO-PDLA)共聚物。用辛酸亚锡 Sn(Oct)2与 PPO-PDLA 端羟基反应进行 Sn(Oct)封端,制备了三枝化 PPO-PDLA-Sn(Oct)预聚物。再于130℃下,以其作为大分子引发剂与 L-丙交酯(L-LA)开环聚合,合成了分子量>105的三枝化 PPO-PDLA-PLLA 嵌段共聚物。活性端基的引入,降低了聚合反应温度,从而降低了聚合中的酯交换或热降解反应发生的概率。实现了高分子量 PPO-PDLA-PLLA 嵌段共聚物的合成。结构测试结果表明,合成的嵌段共聚物具有分子结构易控及立构规整度高等特点。在结晶-熔融-再结晶重复热处理下,三枝化 PPO-PDLA-PLLA 嵌段共聚物仅发生立构复合聚乳酸结晶,且结晶能力稳定。

  18. Wrist ultrasound analysis of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated 42 wrists using the semi-quantitative scales power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS and gray scale ultrasound (GSUS with scores ranging from 0 to 3 and correlated the results with clinical, laboratory and radiographic data. Twenty-one patients (17 women and 4 men with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were enrolled in the study from September 2008 to July 2009 at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. The average disease duration was 14 months. The patients were 66.6% Caucasians and 33.3% non-Caucasians, with a mean age of 42 and 41 years, respectively. A dorsal longitudinal scan was performed by ultrasound on the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using GE LOGIQ XP-linear ultrasound and a high frequency (8-10 MHz transducer. All patients were X-rayed, and the Larsen score was determined for the joints, with grades ranging from 0 to V. This study showed significant correlations between clinical, sonographic and laboratory data: GSUS and swollen right wrist (r = 0.546, GSUS of right wrist and swelling of left wrist (r = 0.511, PDUS of right wrist and pain in left wrist (r = 0.436, PDUS of right wrist and C-reactive protein (r = 0.466. Ultrasound can be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of synovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis mainly when the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor are negative, and can lead to an early change in the therapeutic decision.

  19. Redundancy resolution of a human arm for controlling a seven DOF wearable robotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunchul; Miller, Levi Makaio; Al-Refai, Aimen; Brand, Moshe; Rosen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The human arm including the shoulder, elbow, wrist joints and exclusion scapular motion has 7 Degrees of Freedom (DOF) while positioning of the wrist in space and orientating the palm is a task that requires 6 DOF. As such it includes one more DOF than is needed to complete the task. Given the redundant nature of the arm, multiple arm configurations can be used to complete a task, which is expressed mathematically by none unique solution for the inverse kinematics. Despite this mathematical difficulty, the motor control provides a unique solution for the arm redundancy as the arm is moved in space. Resolving this redundancy is becoming critical as the human interacts with a wearable robotic system(exoskeleton) which includes the same redundancy as the human arm. Therefore, the inverse kinematics solution resolving the redundancy of these two coupled systems must be identical in order to guarantee a seamless integration. The redundancy of the arm can be formulated kinematically by defining the swivel angle - the rotation angle of the plane including the upper and lower arm around a virtual axis connecting the shoulder and wrist joints which are fixed in space. Analyzing reaching tasks recorded with a motion capture lab indicates that the swivel angle is selected such that when the elbow joint is flexed, the palm points the head. Based on these experimental results, selecting the point around the center of the head as a stationary target allows to calculate the swivel angle and in that way to resolve the human arm redundancy. Experimental results indicated that by using the proposed redundancy resolution criteria the error between the predicted swivel angle and the actual swivel angle adopted by the motor control system is less then 5 Deg. This criterion or a synthesis of several additional criteria may improve the synergistic relationships between an operator and a wearable robotic system.

  20. Desensitizing the posterior interosseous nerve alters wrist proprioceptive reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, Elisabet; Persson, Jonas K E

    2010-07-01

    The presence of wrist proprioceptive reflexes after stimulation of the dorsal scapholunate interosseous ligament has previously been described. Because this ligament is primarily innervated by the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) we hypothesized altered ligamento-muscular reflex patterns following desensitization of the PIN. Eight volunteers (3 women, 5 men; mean age, 26 y; range 21-28 y) participated in the study. In the first study on wrist proprioceptive reflexes (study 1), the scapholunate interosseous ligament was stimulated through a fine-wire electrode with 4 1-ms bipolar pulses at 200 Hz, 30 times consecutively, while EMG activity was recorded from the extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris, with the wrist in extension, flexion, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation. After completion of study 1, the PIN was anesthetized in the radial aspect of the fourth extensor compartment using 2-mL lidocaine (10 mg/mL) infiltration anesthesia. Ten minutes after desensitization, the experiment was repeated as in study 1. The average EMG results from the 30 consecutive stimulations were rectified and analyzed using Student's t-test. Statistically significant changes in EMG amplitude were plotted along time lines so that the results of study 1 and 2 could be compared. Dramatic alterations in reflex patterns were observed in wrist flexion, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation following desensitization of the PIN, with an average of 72% reduction in excitatory reactions. In ulnar deviation, the inhibitory reactions of the extensor carpi ulnaris were entirely eliminated. In wrist extension, no differences in the reflex patterns were observed. Wrist proprioception through the scapholunate ligament in flexion, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation depends on an intact PIN function. The unchanged reflex patterns in wrist extension suggest an alternate proprioceptive pathway for this position. Routine excision of

  1. Lower levels of cannabinoid 1 receptor mRNA in female eating disorder patients: association with wrist cutting as impulsive self-injurious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Marc; Eberlein, Christian; de Zwaan, Martina; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge

    2012-12-01

    The cannabinoid 1 (CB 1) receptor as the primary mediator of the endocannabinoid (EC) system was found to play a role in eating disorders (EDs), depression, anxiety, and suicidal behavior. The CB 1 receptor is assumed to play a crucial role in the central reward circuitry with impact on body weight and personality traits like novelty-seeking behavior. In a previous study we found higher levels of CB 1 receptor mRNA in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) compared to healthy control women (HCW). The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible influence of the EC and the CB 1 receptor system on wrist cutting as self-injurious behavior (SIB) in women with EDs (n=43; AN: n=20; BN: n=23). Nine ED patients with repetitive wrist cutting (AN, n=4; BN, n=5) were compared to 34 ED patients without wrist cutting and 26 HCW. Levels of CB 1 receptor mRNA were determined in peripheral blood samples using quantitative real-time PCR. ED patients with self-injurious wrist cutting exhibited significantly lower CB 1 receptor mRNA levels compared with ED patients without wrist cutting and HCW. No significant differences were found between ED patients without a history of wrist cutting and HCW. Furthermore, a negative association was detected between CB 1 receptor mRNA levels and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting a down-regulation of CB 1 receptor mRNA in patients with EDs and wrist cutting as SIB. Due to the small sample size, our results should be regarded as preliminary and further studies are warranted to reveal the underlying mechanisms.

  2. [The activity of muscles of the shoulder girdle and shoulder during the constant isometric efforts of the wrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchaka, I V; Lehedza, O V; Dornovs'kyĭ, M; Horkovenko, A V; Khorievin, V I

    2014-01-01

    Electromyogramms (EMG) of eight muscles of the arm were analyzed in 11 healthy men aged 25-40 years during equal magnitude isometric efforts created by wrist. Subjects had to track cursor that moved around on the screen at a constant speed (16 degrees/s) in a horizontal plane. Thus, the subject slowly changed the direction of generation of efforts, while its amplitude remained constant. It was established that during creation of the static efforts equal in all directions, the extensors activity was mainly in the areas of extension of shoulder and elbow joints, whereas the flexor activity was observed in all directions with maximum, which corresponded to the arm bending. It is assumed that muscular activity is organized on the principle of the synergies that are clearly related to the task and beyond it can not exist.

  3. [Four corner fusion in patients with wrist arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Alonso, María Francisca; Viñas-Silva, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Scapholunate advance collapse (SLAC) and Scaphoid nonunion advance collapse (SNAC), are the two most common patterns of postraumatic wrist arthritis. SLAC wrist develops after attenuation, either traumatically or atraumatically, of the scapholunate ligament. Atraumatic causes of SLAC wrist include calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, reumathoid arthritis, neuropathic diseases, and b2-microglobulin asociated amyloid deposition diseases. On the other hand, SNAC wrist develops following a scahpoid fracture that has progressed to a nonunion. Both of these processes lead to abnormal joint kinematics, since the lunate is unrestrained by the distal scaphoid and, therefore, assumes an extended posture. Over time, this may result in Dorsal intercalated segment instability (DISI) deformity, which invariably progresses to degenerative arthritis of the radioescaphoid articulation, followed by carpal collapse and midcarpal arthritis. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the functional outcome and pain relief in SLAC/SNAC wrist, after four corner fusion. This study was made in 52 patients of the Hospital de Traumatología y Ortopedia Lomas Verdes, these patients undergone four corner fusion surgery, in a period january 2007 to december 2014. We used Quick Dash Questionary to evaluate functional outcome and pain relief in these patients.

  4. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Filippo, Massimo [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)], E-mail: massimo.defilippo@unipr.it; Pogliacomi, Francesco [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Bertellini, Annalisa [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Araoz, Philip A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Averna, Raffaele; Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Corradi, Maurizio; Costantino, Cosimo [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio [Department of Radiological and Histopathological Sciences, Policlinic S.Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  5. [Non-traumatic osteoarthritis of the wrist: chondrocalcinosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, S

    2003-12-01

    Post-traumatic arthritis of the wrist is a common disorder, mostly after scapho lunate or scaphoid injury. Some patients in our experience and in literature have no known trauma, are bilateral and have a mean age much higher than usual post-traumatic cases. Radiological (during an often-extensive medical history) and biological studies of these patients led us to think there is a form of chondrocalcinosis of the wrist, with a four stages evolution, similar to SLAC and SNAC wrist but with often no scapho lunate gap, vertical embedding of the scaphoid in the radius and chalky incrustation of the joint. We called that form of dislocation of the carpus: scaphoid chondrocalcinosis advanced collapse or SCAC wrist. Surgical treatment of advanced cases is described. Scaphoidectomy and resection of triquetrum are performed, associated with hamato-luno-capitate fusion. Other rare forms are described and literature (mostly radiological and rheumatological because these patients are often been mistaken as SLAC wrist) is studied.

  6. In vivo Estimation of Human Forearm and Wrist Dynamic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyungbin; Chang, Pyung-Hun; Kang, Sang

    2016-05-27

    It is important to estimate the 3 degree-of-freedom (DOF) impedance of human forearm and wrist (i.e., forearm prono-supination, and wrist flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation) in motor control and in the diagnosis of altered mechanical resistance following stroke. There is, however, a lack of methods to characterize 3 DOF impedance. Thus, we developed a reliable and accurate impedance estimation method, the distal internal model based impedance control (dIMBIC)-based method, to characterize the 3 DOF impedance, including cross-coupled terms between DOFs, for the first time. Its accuracy and reliability were experimentally validated using a robot with substantial nonlinear joint friction. The 3 DOF human forearm and wrist impedance of 8 healthy subjects was reliably characterized, and its linear behavior was verified. Thus, the dIMBIC-based method can provide us with 3 DOF forearm and wrist impedance regardless of nonlinear robot joint friction. It is expected that, with the proposed method, the 3 DOF impedance estimation can promote motor control studies and complement the diagnosis of altered wrist and forearm resistance post stroke by providing objective impedance estimates, including cross-coupled terms.

  7. Damping of the wrist joint during voluntary movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, T E; Cloutier, C

    1998-10-01

    Damping characteristics of the musculoskeletal system were investigated during rapid voluntary wrist flexion movements. Oscillations about the final position were induced by introducing a load with the characteristics of negative damping, which artificially reduced the damping of the wrist. Subjects responded to increases in the negatively damped load by stronger cocontraction of wrist flexor and extensor muscles during the stabilization phase of the movement. However, their ability to counteract the effects of the negatively damped load diminished as the negative damping increased. Consequently, the number and frequency of oscillations increased. The oscillations were accompanied by phase-locked muscle activity superimposed on underlying tonic muscle activation. The wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased with the increased cocontraction that accompanied more negatively damped loads, although changes in the damping coefficient were less systematic than the stiffness. Analysis of successive half-cycles of the oscillation revealed that the wrist stiffness and damping coefficient increased, despite decreasing muscle activation, as oscillation amplitude and velocity declined. This indicates that the inverse dependence of the damping coefficient on oscillation velocity contributes significantly to damping of joint motion. It is suggested that this property helps to offset a negative contribution to damping from the stretch reflex.

  8. Foot Length, Chest Circumference, and Mid Upper Arm Circumference Are Good Predictors of Low Birth Weight and Prematurity in Ethnic Minority Newborns in Vietnam: A Hospital-Based Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Nguyen Thi

    Full Text Available The evaluation of tools to accurately identify low birth weight (LBW and/or premature newborns in resource-limited countries is a research priority. We explored the use of foot length, chest circumference, and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC measured within 24 h as diagnostic tools for identifying newborns who are LBW, premature, or both; and compared measurements taken at birth with those taken at five days of age.An observational study was undertaken in Hoa Binh Province General Hospital, Vietnam, in ethnic minority newborns. Birth weight, foot length, chest circumference, and MUAC were measured within 24 h of birth and in a subset of 200, were repeated on day five of life. Gestational age was estimated using the New Ballard Score. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves and optimal cut-points (the point with the highest sensitivity and specificity where the sensitivity was at least 0.8 were calculated, for predicting prematurity, LBW, and both. Measurements within 24 h and at five days of life were compared.485 newborns were recruited. Chest circumference and MUAC measured within 24 h of birth were found to be highly predictive of LBW (both yielding area under the curve [AUC] of 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-0.99, and performed marginally better than foot length (AUC 0.94, 95%CI 0.92-0.96. The optimal cut-points for measurements within 24 h of birth were ≤ 7.4 cm for foot length; ≤ 30.4 cm for chest circumference; and ≤ 9.0 cm for MUAC. There was statistical evidence that anthropometric measurements taken within 24 h of birth were higher than measurements on day five (p<0.02 for all anthropometric measurements but the magnitude of these differences was small (at most 2mm.All measurements taken within 24 h of birth were good predictors of LBW, prematurity and both. Differences in measurements taken within 24 h and on day five were not clinically relevant. Further research will ensure that the application of these measures is

  9. Nonparetic arm force does not overinhibit the paretic arm in chronic poststroke hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimyan, Michael A; Perez, Monica A; Auh, Sungyoung; Tarula, Erick; Wilson, Matthew; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether nonparetic arm force overinhibits the paretic arm in patients with chronic unilateral poststroke hemiparesis. Case-control neurophysiological and behavioral study of patients with chronic stroke. Research institution. Eighty-six referred patients were screened to enroll 9 participants (N=9) with a >6 month history of 1 unilateral ischemic infarct that resulted in arm hemiparesis with residual ability to produce 1Nm of wrist flexion torque and without contraindication to transcranial magnetic stimulation. Eight age- and handedness-matched healthy volunteers without neurologic diagnosis were studied for comparison. Not applicable. Change in interhemispheric inhibition targeting the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1) during nonparetic arm force. We hypothesized that interhemispheric inhibition would increase more in healthy controls than in patients with hemiparesis. Healthy age-matched controls had significantly greater increases in inhibition from their active to resting M1 than patients with stroke from their active contralesional to resting ipsilesional M1 in the same scenario (20%±7% vs -1%±4%, F1,12=6.61, P=.025). Patients with greater increases in contralesional to ipsilesional inhibition were better performers on the 9-hole peg test of paretic arm function. Our findings reveal that producing force with the nonparetic arm does not necessarily overinhibit the paretic arm. Though our study is limited in generalizability by the small sample size, we found that greater active contralesional to resting ipsilesional M1 inhibition was related with better recovery in this subset of patients with chronic poststroke. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of the long term use of a computer on median, ulnar and radial sensory nerves in the wrist region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belgin Bamac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Repetitive microtrauma or overuse injuries may often affect upper extremities of the long term computer users. The aim of this study was to compare sensory nerve conduction velocities (SNCV for median, radial and ulnar nerves in the wrist of computer users with the same parameters in controls who do not use computers regularly. Material and Methods: Twenty one male computer users (age: mean (M = 28.3 years ± standard deviation (SD = 7.5 years and 21 male control subjects (age: M±SD = 24.1±4.6 years were recruited for the study. Limb length and the perimeters of the dominant arm and forearm were measured for each subject. The neurophysiological study consisted of measuring sensory nerve conduction of the median, ulnar and radial nerves. Results: The sensory conduction velocities of both median and ulnar nerves were significantly delayed in the dominant arm of the computer users compared to the controls. In addition, sensory conduction velocity of the median nerve was significantly delayed in the dominant extremity of the computer users compared to their non-dominant extremity. Conclusions: This study shows that computer users have a tendency toward developing median and ulnar sensory nerve damage in the wrist region. Mechanism of delayed SNCV in the median and ulnar nerves may be due to sustained extension and ulnar deviation of the wrist during computer mouse use and typing. Reduced SNCV changes were more apparent on the dominant side of the median nerve. This may indicate the increased neural deficits related to an increased use of the dominant side. Further investigation is needed to determine how to reduce potential risk factors at this stage in order to prevent development of median or ulnar neuropathy in the long term computer users.

  11. Use of Condition-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Clinical Trials among Patients with Wrist Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. McPhail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper aimed to identify condition-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in clinical trials among people with wrist osteoarthritis and summarise empirical peer-reviewed evidence supporting their reliability, validity, and responsiveness to change. Methods. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials among people with wrist osteoarthritis was undertaken. Studies reporting reliability, validity, or responsiveness were identified using a systematic reverse citation trail audit procedure. Psychometric properties of the instruments were examined against predefined criteria and summarised. Results. Thirteen clinical trials met inclusion criteria. The most common patient-reported outcome was the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand questionnaire (DASH. The DASH, the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ, the Patient Evaluation Measure (PEM, and the Patient-Reported Wrist Evaluation (PRWE had evidence supporting their reliability, validity, and responsiveness. A post-hoc review of excluded studies revealed the AUSCAN Osteoarthritis Hand Index as another suitable instrument that had favourable reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Conclusions. The DASH, MHQ, and AUSCAN Osteoarthritis Hand Index instruments were supported by the most favourable empirical evidence for validity, reliability, and responsiveness. The PEM and PRWE also had favourable empirical evidence reported for these elements. Further psychometric testing of these instruments among people with wrist osteoarthritis is warranted.

  12. Validation of a new formula for predicting body weight in a Mexican population with overweight and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Quiroz-Olguín

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Body weight measurement is of critical importance when evaluating the nutritional status of patients entering a hospital. In some situations, such as the case of patients who are bedridden or in wheelchairs, these measurements cannot be obtained using standardized methods. We have designed and validated a formula for predicting body weight. Objectives: To design and validate a formula for predicting body weight using circumference-based equations. Methods: The following anthropometric measurements were taken for a sample of 76 patients: weight (kg, calf circumference, average arm circumference, waist circumference, hip circumference, wrist circumference and demispan. All circumferences were taken in centimeters (cm, and gender and age were taken into account. This equation was validated in 85 individuals from a different population. The correlation with the new equation was analyzed and compared to a previously validated method. Results: The equation for weight prediction was the following: Weight = 0.524 (WC - 0.176 (age + 0.484 (HC + 0.613 (DS + 0.704 (CC + 2.75 (WrC - 3.330 (if female -140.87. The correlation coefficient was 0.96 for the total group of patients, 0.971 for men and 0.961 for women (p < 0.0001 for all measurements. Conclusion: The equation we developed is accurate and can be used to estimate body weight in overweight and/or obese patients with mobility problems, such as bedridden patients or patients in wheelchairs.

  13. [Comparative outcome assessment of the wrist joint--mediocarpal partial arthrodesis and total arthrodesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmer, H; Wiemer, P; Kalb, K

    2000-11-01

    Total wrist fusion still represents the main treatment for severe posttraumatic disorders of the wrist due to longstanding scaphoid nonunion (SNAC-wrist) or scapholunate dissociation (SLAC-wrist). During the last decade, midcarpal fusion has become more and more popular as it preserves motion. The question, however, remained if the preserved motion is of real benefit from a patient point of view, as complete pain relief is rare following this type of limited wrist fusion. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome of both treatments with the modified Cooney wrist score and the DASH questionnaire. Between 1993 and 1997, 138 patients with progressive carpal collapse were treated either by midcarpal fusion (97) or total wrist fusion (41). Overall satisfaction was high in both groups with 86% (midcarpal fusion) and 84% (total wrist fusion). The traditional wrist score (70 versus 52 points) and the DASH questionnaire (33 versus 45 points) revealed the superiority of midcarpal fusion. The correlation between the wrist score and the DASH was statistically high (p wrist fusion for treatment of progressive carpal collapse (SLAC- and SNAC-wrist). The DASH represents a sensitive tool to evaluate the outcome of salvage procedures for treatment of disorders of the wrist.

  14. Signs of muscle thixotropy during human ballistic wrist joint movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, H W

    2005-11-01

    A study was conducted on healthy subjects to determine whether voluntary ballistic wrist flexion movements are influenced by immediately preceding conditioning of the forearm muscles. Single rapid wrist flexion movements were made in response to an auditory "Go" signal. Rectified surface EMG was recorded from wrist flexors and extensors, and joint position was measured by a goniometer. The movements were preceded (2-3 s) by four different conditioning routines: 40-s rest (Rest), 10-s voluntary alternating wrist joint flexion and extension movements (Osc), and 10 s of 25 degrees weak isometric wrist extensor (Ext) or flexor contractions (Flex). When subjects made ballistic movements after Osc compared with Rest, peak velocity was higher (P = 0.02) and movement time shorter (P = 0.06), but there was no difference (P = 0.83) in motor reaction time (time between the onset of the first agonist burst and movement onset). If the movements were preceded by Ext compared with Flex, motor reaction time was longer (P = 0.01), indicating a longer electromechanical delay. There were no indications that postconditioning differences in agonist or antagonist muscle activity could explain the results. It was also demonstrated that, after Rest, peak velocity was lower (P < 0.01) for the first than for the second of a series of repetitive ballistic movements. The observations corresponded to results from passive experiments in which the median nerve was electrically stimulated. In conclusion, history-dependent (thixotropic) changes in skeletal muscle resistance seem to have implications for voluntary ballistic wrist movements. The study also provided evidence that muscle conditioning influences the central nervous reaction time preceding ballistic contractions.

  15. Quantitative analysis of wrist electrodermal activity during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Akane; Picard, Rosalind W; Stickgold, Robert

    2014-12-01

    We present the first quantitative characterization of electrodermal activity (EDA) patterns on the wrists of healthy adults during sleep using dry electrodes. We compare the new results on the wrist to the prior findings on palmar or finger EDA by characterizing data measured from 80 nights of sleep consisting of 9 nights of wrist and palm EDA from 9 healthy adults sleeping at home, 56 nights of wrist and palm EDA from one healthy adult sleeping at home, and 15 nights of wrist EDA from 15 healthy adults in a sleep laboratory, with the latter compared to concurrent polysomnography. While high frequency patterns of EDA called "storms" were identified by eye in the 1960s, we systematically compare thresholds for automatically detecting EDA peaks and establish criteria for EDA storms. We found that more than 80% of the EDA peaks occurred in non-REM sleep, specifically during slow-wave sleep (SWS) and non-REM stage 2 sleep (NREM2). Also, EDA amplitude is higher in SWS than in other sleep stages. Longer EDA storms were more likely to occur in the first two quarters of sleep and during SWS and NREM2. We also found from the home studies (65 nights) that EDA levels were higher and the skin conductance peaks were larger and more frequent when measured on the wrist than when measured on the palm. These EDA high frequency peaks and high amplitude were sometimes associated with higher skin temperature, but more work is needed looking at neurological and other EDA elicitors in order to elucidate their complete behavior.

  16. Hand and Wrist Injuries in Boxing and the Martial Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Benjamin Todd; Lehman, Thomas P; Rayan, Ghazi

    2017-02-01

    Hand and wrist injuries in martial arts are typically a reflection of the combat nature of this discipline. In striking sports, the axial load mechanism of injury is common and causes fractures and dislocations; in grappling sports, sprain injuries and degenerative changes predominate. There is clear evidence to support that hand protection reduces the risk of hand injury. Traditional training in martial arts on proper technique and target selection in striking sports reduces the risk of hand injury, and is an important component of hand and wrist injury prevention.

  17. Combined Treatment of Wrist and Trapeziometacarpal Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzenegger, Thomas; Leclercq, Caroline; Masmejean, Emmanuel; Lenoir, Hubert; Harir, Amir; Coulet, Bertrand; Chammas, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined thumb basal and wrist joint arthritis (excluding scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis) is rare considering the frequency of arthritis of either joint alone. Combined surgical treatment has never been described in the literature. Furthermore, the scaphoidectomy common to all interventions for Watson stage 2 or 3 wrist arthritis theoretically makes it impossible to perform a trapeziectomy for thumb basal joint arthritis. Question/Purpose The aim of this study was to present and analyze the results of two types of surgical treatment when both wrist and thumb arthritis was present. Materials and Methods Our retrospective series included 11 patients suffering from Eaton Stage III thumb basal joint arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) II and III-type wrist arthritis. Five patients (group A) underwent trapeziectomy and palliative surgery for their wrist with conservation of the distal pole of the scaphoid (one proximal row carpectomy [PRC] and four four-corner fusions), and six (group B) patients had a trapeziometacarpal arthroplasty either with PRC (two cases) or four-corner arthrodesis (four cases) including total scaphoidectomy. Results The mean follow-up was 57 months. The overall visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain was 1.5 at rest, with no difference between the trapeziectomy and arthroplasty groups. The average Kapandji score was 9.3 (9 in group A and 9.5 in group B). The flexion/extension range of motion for the wrist was 64° following four-corner arthrodesis and 75° following PRC. Only one case of algodystrophy was observed. The radiological analysis revealed no complications. Discussion This study shows that thumb basal joint arthritis and SLAC type wrist arthritis may be treated by combined treatment during the same intervention without any complications. The results of palliative surgery for the wrist, either with trapeziectomy or with a trapeziometacarpal arthroplasty, are comparable. With a trapeziectomy, the

  18. Combined Treatment of Wrist and Trapeziometacarpal Joint Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzenegger, Thomas; Leclercq, Caroline; Masmejean, Emmanuel; Lenoir, Hubert; Harir, Amir; Coulet, Bertrand; Chammas, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Background Combined thumb basal and wrist joint arthritis (excluding scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis) is rare considering the frequency of arthritis of either joint alone. Combined surgical treatment has never been described in the literature. Furthermore, the scaphoidectomy common to all interventions for Watson stage 2 or 3 wrist arthritis theoretically makes it impossible to perform a trapeziectomy for thumb basal joint arthritis. Question/Purpose The aim of this study was to present and analyze the results of two types of surgical treatment when both wrist and thumb arthritis was present. Materials and Methods Our retrospective series included 11 patients suffering from Eaton Stage III thumb basal joint arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) II and III-type wrist arthritis. Five patients (group A) underwent trapeziectomy and palliative surgery for their wrist with conservation of the distal pole of the scaphoid (one proximal row carpectomy [PRC] and four four-corner fusions), and six (group B) patients had a trapeziometacarpal arthroplasty either with PRC (two cases) or four-corner arthrodesis (four cases) including total scaphoidectomy. Results The mean follow-up was 57 months. The overall visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain was 1.5 at rest, with no difference between the trapeziectomy and arthroplasty groups. The average Kapandji score was 9.3 (9 in group A and 9.5 in group B). The flexion/extension range of motion for the wrist was 64° following four-corner arthrodesis and 75° following PRC. Only one case of algodystrophy was observed. The radiological analysis revealed no complications. Discussion This study shows that thumb basal joint arthritis and SLAC type wrist arthritis may be treated by combined treatment during the same intervention without any complications. The results of palliative surgery for the wrist, either with trapeziectomy or with a trapeziometacarpal arthroplasty, are comparable. With a trapeziectomy, the

  19. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of California-Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  20. Imaging of radial wrist pain. I. Imaging modalities and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Griffith, James F.; Ng, Alex Wing Hung [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Wong, Clara Wing Yee [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2014-06-15

    Radial wrist pain is a common clinical complaint. The relatively complex anatomy in this region, combined with the small size of the anatomical structures and occasionally subtle imaging findings, can pose problems when trying to localize the exact cause of pain. To fully comprehend the underlying pathology, one needs a good understanding of both radial-sided wrist anatomy and the relative merits of the different imaging techniques used to assess these structures. In part I of this review, these aspects will be discussed. (orig.)

  1. Simplified approach to MR image quantification of the rheumatoid wrist: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamishima, Tamotsu; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo City (Japan); Tanimura, Kazuhide; Aoki, Yuko; Shimizu, Masato; Matsuhashi, Megumi; Fukae, Jun [Hokkaido Medical Center for Rheumatic Diseases, Sapporo City, Hokkaido (Japan); Kosaka, Naoki [Tokeidai Memorial Hospital, Sapporo City, Hokkaido (Japan); Kon, Yujiro [St. Thomas' Hospital, Lupus Research Unit, The Rayne Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    To determine an optimal threshold in a simplified 3D-based volumetry of abnormal signals in rheumatoid wrists utilizing contrast and non-contrast MR data, and investigate the feasibility and reliability of this method. MR images of bilateral hands of 15 active rheumatoid patients were assessed before and 5 months after the initiation of tocilizumab infusion protocol. The volumes of abnormal signals were measured on STIR and post-contrast fat-suppressed T1-weighted images. Three-dimensional volume rendering of the images was used for segmentation of the wrist by an MR technologist and a radiologist. Volumetric data were obtained with variable thresholding (1, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, and 2 times the muscle signal), and were compared to clinical data and semiquantitative MR scoring (RAMRIS) of the wrist. Intra- and interobserver variability and time needed for volumetry measurements were assessed. The volumetric data correlated favorably with clinical parameters almost throughout the pre-determined thresholds. Interval differences in volumetric data correlated favorably with those of RAMRIS when the threshold was set at more than 1.5 times the muscle signal. The repeatability index was lower than the average of the interval differences in volumetric data when the threshold was set at 1.5-1.75 for STIR data. Intra- and interobserver variability for volumetry was 0.79-0.84. The time required for volumetry was shorter than that for RAMRIS. These results suggest that a simplified MR volumetric data acquisition may provide gross estimates of disease activity when the threshold is set properly. Such estimation can be achieved quickly by non-imaging specialists and without contrast administration. (orig.)

  2. Surgical Simulations Based on Limited Quantitative Data: Understanding How Musculoskeletal Models Can Be Used to Predict Moment Arms and Guide Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jennifer A; Bednar, Michael S; Murray, Wendy M

    2016-01-01

    The utility of biomechanical models and simulations to examine clinical problems is currently limited by the need for extensive amounts of experimental data describing how a given procedure or disease affects the musculoskeletal system. Methods capable of predicting how individual biomechanical parameters are altered by surgery are necessary for the efficient development of surgical simulations. In this study, we evaluate to what extent models based on limited amounts of quantitative data can be used to predict how surgery influences muscle moment arms, a critical parameter that defines how muscle force is transformed into joint torque. We specifically examine proximal row carpectomy and scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion, two common surgeries to treat wrist osteoarthritis. Using models of these surgeries, which are based on limited data and many assumptions, we perform simulations to formulate a hypothesis regarding how these wrist surgeries influence muscle moment arms. Importantly, the hypothesis is based on analysis of only the primary wrist muscles. We then test the simulation-based hypothesis using a cadaveric experiment that measures moment arms of both the primary wrist and extrinsic thumb muscles. The measured moment arms of the primary wrist muscles are used to verify the hypothesis, while those of the extrinsic thumb muscles are used as cross-validation to test whether the hypothesis is generalizable. The moment arms estimated by the models and measured in the cadaveric experiment both indicate that a critical difference between the surgeries is how they alter radial-ulnar deviation versus flexion-extension moment arms at the wrist. Thus, our results demonstrate that models based on limited quantitative data can provide novel insights. This work also highlights that synergistically utilizing simulation and experimental methods can aid the design of experiments and make it possible to test the predictive limits of current computer simulation techniques.

  3. 78 FR 68905 - Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Wrist Conditions Disability...

  4. A rare case of bilateral complex wrist injury in a professional motocross rider

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedrazzini, Alessio; Tocco, Silvio; Vaienti, Enrico; Ceccarelli, Francesco; Pogliacomi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We describe the treatment of a 29 year-old professional motocross rider, who sustained a perilunate dislocation in his right wrist and a distal radius fracture and dorsal dislocation of his left wrist during a race...

  5. MiniSAR composite gimbal arm development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klarer, Paul Richard; Winscott, Mark (Orion International, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-01-01

    An exploratory effort in the application of carbon epoxy composite structural materials to a multi-axis gimbal arm design is described. An existing design in aluminum was used as a baseline for a functionally equivalent redesigned outer gimbal arm using a carbon epoxy composite material. The existing arm was analyzed using finite element techniques to characterize performance in terms of strength, stiffness, and weight. A new design was virtually prototyped. using the same tools to produce a design with similar stiffness and strength, but reduced overall weight, than the original arm. The new design was prototyped using Rapid Prototyping technology, which was subsequently used to produce molds for fabricating the carbon epoxy composite parts. The design tools, process, and results are discussed.

  6. Improved orthopedic arm joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Joint permits smooth and easy movement of disabled arm and is smaller, lighter and less expensive than previous models. Device is interchangeable and may be used on either arm at the shoulder or at the elbow.

  7. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of muscles, joints, tendons, and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm ... a fall, or an accident. Types of arm injuries include Tendinitis and bursitis Sprains Dislocations Broken bones ...

  8. Clinical and radiological manifestations of the rheumatoid wrist after the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momohara, Shigeki; Mamizuka, Kyoko; Yonemoto, Kouichi; Tomatsu, Taisuke; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to investigate the clinical and radiological results of the Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure for the rheumatoid wrist. One hundred and eight rheumatoid wrists in 98 patients were operated on in our institute from 1992 to 2000, and in 82 wrists we used the S-K procedure. In other cases, synovectomy alone was performed on 16 wrists, and partial and total arthrodeses were performed concurrently on 5 wrists each. Carpal bones and/or radiocarpal joints in which the union could not be assessed radiologically were found in 49 wrists (59.8%) after the S-K procedure, and among them there was definite non-fusion of the carpal bone and radiocarpal joints in 29 wrists (35.4%). However, definite fusion of carpal bones and/or radiocarpal joints was found in 33 wrists (40.2%). The formation of carpal bones and partial radiocarpal fusion with some mobility was detected in some cases. Therefore, the S-K procedure may stabilize the carpus in the rheumatoid wrist to some extent while maintaining a functionally important range of motion and relieving pain. However, it does not stop the disease process and cannot reestablish or maintain carpal height. We concluded that the S-K procedure is the treatment of choice for the rheumatoid wrist, and if the wrist is unstable, as seen with arthritis mutilans, we then perform either radio-lunate partial arthrodesis or total wrist arthrodesis.

  9. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3800 Section 888.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  10. Flexor carpi ulnaris tenotomy alone does not eliminate its contribution to wrist torque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Bruin; M.J.C. Smeulders; M. Kreulen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle tenotomy and transfer to the extensor side of the wrist are common procedures used to improve wrist position and dexterity in patients with cerebral palsy. Our aim was to determine whether this muscle still influences wrist torque even after tenotomy of its di

  11. Evolution of robotic arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of surgical robotics is in the development of the robotic arm. This is a thorough review of the literature on the nature and development of this device with emphasis on surgical applications. We have reviewed the published literature and classified robotic arms by their application: show, industrial application, medical application, etc. There is a definite trend in the manufacture of robotic arms toward more dextrous devices, more degrees-of-freedom, and capabilities beyond the human arm. da Vinci designed the first sophisticated robotic arm in 1495 with four degrees-of-freedom and an analog on-board controller supplying power and programmability. von Kemplen's chess-playing automaton left arm was quite sophisticated. Unimate introduced the first industrial robotic arm in 1961, it has subsequently evolved into the PUMA arm. In 1963 the Rancho arm was designed; Minsky's Tentacle arm appeared in 1968, Scheinman's Stanford arm in 1969, and MIT's Silver arm in 1974. Aird became the first cyborg human with a robotic arm in 1993. In 2000 Miguel Nicolalis redefined possible man-machine capacity in his work on cerebral implantation in owl-monkeys directly interfacing with robotic arms both locally and at a distance. The robotic arm is the end-effector of robotic systems and currently is the hallmark feature of the da Vinci Surgical System making its entrance into surgical application. But, despite the potential advantages of this computer-controlled master-slave system, robotic arms have definite limitations. Ongoing work in robotics has many potential solutions to the drawbacks of current robotic surgical systems.

  12. Estimation of hand and wrist muscle capacities in rock climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Berton, Eric

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the hand and wrist muscle capacities among expert rock climbers and compared them with those of non-climbers. The objective was to identify the adaptations resulting from several years of climbing practice. Twelve climbers (nine males and three females) and 13 non-climber males participated in this study. Each subject performed a set of maximal voluntary contractions about the wrist and the metacarpo-phalengeal joints during which net joint moments and electromyographic activities were recorded. From this data set, the muscle capacities of the five main muscle groups of the hand (wrist flexors, wrist extensors, finger flexors, finger extensors and intrinsic muscles) were estimated using a biomechanical model. This process consisted in adjusting the physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) and the maximal muscle stress value from an initial generic model. Results obtained from the model provided several new pieces of information compared to the analysis of only the net joint moments. Particularly, the capacities of the climbers were 37.1 % higher for finger flexors compared to non-climbers and were similar for finger extensor and for the other muscle groups. Climbers thus presented a greater imbalance between flexor and extensor capacities which suggests a potential risk of pathologies. The practice of climbing not only increased the strength of climbers but also resulted in specific adaptations among hand muscles. The proposed method and the obtained data could be re-used to optimize the training programs as well as the rehabilitation processes following hand pathologies.

  13. Muscle recruitment variations during wrist flexion exercise: MR evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, J. L.; Watumull, D.; Bertocci, L. A.; Nurenberg, P.; Peshock, R. M.; Payne, J. A.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many exercise protocols used in physiological studies assume homogeneous and diffuse muscle recruitment. To test this assumption during a "standard" wrist flexion protocol, variations in muscle recruitment were assessed using MRI in eight healthy subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Variations were assessed by comparing the right to the left forearms and the effect of slight (15 degrees) pronation or supination at the wrist. RESULTS: Postexercise imaging showed focal regions of increased signal intensity (SI), indicating relatively strong recruitment, most often in entire muscles, although occasionally only in subvolumes of muscles. In 15 of 26 studies, flexor carpi radialis (FCR) showed more SI than flexor carpi ulnaris, while in 11 studies SI in these muscles increased equivalently. Relatively greater FCR recruitment was seen during pronation and/or use of the nondominant side. Palmaris longus, a wrist flexor, did not appear recruited in 4 of 11 forearms in which it was present. A portion of the superficial finger flexor became hyperintense in 89% of studies, while recruitment of the deep finger flexor was seen only in 43%. CONCLUSION: Inter- and intraindividual variations in forearm muscle recruitment should be anticipated in physiological studies of standard wrist flexion exercise protocols.

  14. Coordinate systems for the carpal bones of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, James C; Upal, Mohammad A; Crisco, Joseph J

    2007-01-01

    The eight small and complexly shaped carpal bones of the wrist articulate in six degrees of freedom with each other and to some extent with the radius and the metacarpals. With the increasing number and sophistication of studies of the carpus, a standardized definition for a coordinate system for each the carpal bones would aid in the reporting and comparison of findings. This paper presents a method for defining and constructing a coordinate system specific to each of the eight carpal bones based upon the inertial properties of the bone, derived from surface models constructed from three-dimensional (3-D) medical image volumes. Surface models from both wrists of 5 male and 5 female subjects were generated from CT image volumes in two neutral wrist positions (functional and clinical). An automated algorithm found the principal inertial axes and oriented them according to preset conditions in 85% of the bones, the remaining bones were corrected manually. Six of the eight carpal bones were significantly more extended in the functional neutral position than in the clinical neutral position. Gender had no significant effect on carpal bone posture in either wrist position. Correlations between the 3-D carpal posture and the commonly used 2-D clinical radiographic carpal angles are established. 3-D coordinate systems defined by the anatomy of the carpal bone, such as the ones presented here, are necessary to completely describe 3-D changes in the posture of the carpal bones.

  15. Radiographic indices in one hundred fifty normal Iranian wrists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ghahramani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Radiography is the most widely available imaging modality. Precise evaluations of wrist x-ray can help diagnosis and evaluate the prognosis of many wrist disorders. Methods: We measured length, angles and indices in 150 posteroanterior and lateral wrist x-rays to determine normal dimensions and variations according to age and sex. All x-rays were made with standard exposure, with the wrist and forearm in a neutral position. Results: The average carpal height ratio was 0.52±0.03 with the Youm method and 1.5±0.09 with the Nattrass method. Mean ulnar variance was +0.99±1.6 mm and mean radial inclination was 25±4 degrees. The average radial tilt was 10±5.1 degrees. Mean scapholunate angle was 50±8.4 degrees (normal range 40 -60. Conclusion: Carpal height, third metacarpal and capitate length were smaller in women than in men. There was a significant positive relationship between all dimensions. Our data base may be used to follow-up in conditions such as carpal instability, osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis, as well as for clinical research.

  16. New wrist bones of the Malagasy giant subfossil lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, M W; Simons, E L; Jungers, W L

    2000-05-01

    Recently discovered wrist bones of the Malagasy subfossil lemurs Babakotia radofilai, Palaeopropithecus ingens, Mesopropithecus dolichobrachion, and Megaladapis madagascariensis shed new light on the postcranial morphologies and positional behaviors that characterized these extinct primates. Wrist bones of P. ingens resemble those of certain modern hominoids in having a relatively enlarged ulnar head and dorsally extended articular surface on the hamate, features related to a large range of rotation at the inferior radioulnar and midcarpal joints. The scaphoid of P. ingens is also similar to that of the extant tree sloth Choloepus in having an elongate, palmarly directed tubercle forming a deep radial margin of the carpal tunnel for the passage of large digital flexors. In contrast, wrist remains of Megaladapis edwardsi and M. madagascariensis exhibit traits observed in the hands of extant pronograde, arboreal primates; these include a dorsopalmarly expanded pisiform and well-developed "spiral" facet on the hamate. Moreover, Megaladapis spp. and Mesopropithecus dolichobrachion possess bony tubercles (e.g., scaphoid tubercle and hamate hamulus) forming the carpal tunnel that are relatively similar in length to those of modern pronograde lemurs. Babakotia and Mesopropithecus differ from Megaladapis in exhibiting features of the midcarpal joint related to frequent supination and radioulnar deviation of the hand characteristic of animals that use vertical and quadrumanous climbing in their foraging behaviors. Comparative analysis of subfossil lemur wrist morphology complements and expands upon prior inferences based on other regions of the postcranial skeleton, and suggests a considerable degree of locomotor and postural heterogeneity among these recently extinct primates.

  17. Robotic Mirror Therapy System for Functional Recovery of Hemiplegic Arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beom, Jaewon; Koh, Sukgyu; Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Wonshik; Kim, Yoonjae; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-08-15

    Mirror therapy has been performed as effective occupational therapy in a clinical setting for functional recovery of a hemiplegic arm after stroke. It is conducted by eliciting an illusion through use of a mirror as if the hemiplegic arm is moving in real-time while moving the healthy arm. It can facilitate brain neuroplasticity through activation of the sensorimotor cortex. However, conventional mirror therapy has a critical limitation in that the hemiplegic arm is not actually moving. Thus, we developed a real-time 2-axis mirror robot system as a simple add-on module for conventional mirror therapy using a closed feedback mechanism, which enables real-time movement of the hemiplegic arm. We used 3 Attitude and Heading Reference System sensors, 2 brushless DC motors for elbow and wrist joints, and exoskeletal frames. In a feasibility study on 6 healthy subjects, robotic mirror therapy was safe and feasible. We further selected tasks useful for activities of daily living training through feedback from rehabilitation doctors. A chronic stroke patient showed improvement in the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale and elbow flexor spasticity after a 2-week application of the mirror robot system. Robotic mirror therapy may enhance proprioceptive input to the sensory cortex, which is considered to be important in neuroplasticity and functional recovery of hemiplegic arms. The mirror robot system presented herein can be easily developed and utilized effectively to advance occupational therapy.

  18. Adaptive gravity and joint stiffness compensation methods for force-controlled arm supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobo Prat, J.; Keemink, Arvid Quintijn Leon; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Stienen, Arno; Veltink, Petrus H.; Braun, D.; Yu, H.; Campolo, D.

    2015-01-01

    People with muscular weakness can benefit from arm supports that compensate the weight of their arms. Due to the disuse of the arms, passive joint stiffness increases and providing only gravity compensation becomes insufficient to support the arm function. Hence, joint stiffness compensation is also

  19. Left shoulder pain in a violinist, related to extensor tendon adhesions in a small scar on the back of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijnse, J N A L; Rietveld, A B M

    2013-04-01

    A female professional orchestra violin player, age 54, with an 8-year history of severe left shoulder problems, presented with reproducible, acute, incapacitating left shoulder pain when playing the lowest violin string. This complaint was found caused by compensatory left arm positions for unnoticed finger extensor excursion limitations in a well-healed scar bed from two dorsal wrist ganglion operations 11 and 13 years before. Immediately after extensor tendon mobilization in the scar bed, the patient could assume a normal playing position, which was pain free, and could return to orchestral duties without further major shoulder complaints (follow-up of 10 years). The case study presents finger extensor excursion limitations at the wrist as an unusual extra-regional risk factor for a shoulder complaint and analyses the biomechanics linking these limitations to the complaint. The case illustrates the importance of long-term post-operative hand surgery rehabilitation in musicians.

  20. Comparison of regression models for estimation of isometric wrist joint torques using surface electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several regression models have been proposed for estimation of isometric joint torque using surface electromyography (SEMG signals. Common issues related to torque estimation models are degradation of model accuracy with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. This work compares the performance of the most commonly used regression models under these circumstances, in order to assist researchers with identifying the most appropriate model for a specific biomedical application. Methods Eleven healthy volunteers participated in this study. A custom-built rig, equipped with a torque sensor, was used to measure isometric torque as each volunteer flexed and extended his wrist. SEMG signals from eight forearm muscles, in addition to wrist joint torque data were gathered during the experiment. Additional data were gathered one hour and twenty-four hours following the completion of the first data gathering session, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of passage of time and electrode displacement on accuracy of models. Acquired SEMG signals were filtered, rectified, normalized and then fed to models for training. Results It was shown that mean adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra2 values decrease between 20%-35% for different models after one hour while altering arm posture decreased mean Ra2 values between 64% to 74% for different models. Conclusions Model estimation accuracy drops significantly with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. Therefore model retraining is crucial for preserving estimation accuracy. Data resampling can significantly reduce model training time without losing estimation accuracy. Among the models compared, ordinary least squares linear regression model (OLS was shown to have high isometric torque estimation accuracy combined with very short training times.

  1. Carpal tunnel and transverse carpal ligament stiffness with changes in wrist posture and indenter size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael W R; Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P; Keir, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of loading and posture on mechanical properties of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL). Ten fresh-frozen cadaver arms were dissected to expose the TCL and positioned in the load frame of a servo-hydraulic testing machine, equipped with a load cell and custom made indenters. Four cylindrical indenters (5, 10, 20, and 35 mm) loaded the TCL in three wrist postures (30° extension, neutral and 30° flexion). Three loading cycles with a peak force of 50 N were applied at 5 N/s for each condition. The flexed wrist posture had significantly greater TCL stiffness (40.0 ± 3.3 N/mm) than the neutral (35.9 ± 3.5 N/mm, p = 0.045) and extended postures (34.9 ± 2.8 N/mm, p = 0.025). TCL stiffness using the 10 and 20 mm indenters was larger than the 5 mm indenter. Stiffness was greatest with the 20 mm indenter, which had the greatest indenter contact area on the TCL. The 35 mm indenter covered the carpal bones, compressed the carpal tunnel and produced the lowest stiffness. The complexity of the TCL makes it an important part of the carpal tunnel and the mechanical properties found are essential to understanding mechanisms of carpal tunnel syndrome. 

  2. The application of an external wrist extension force reduces electromyographic activity of wrist extensor muscles during gripping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elk, N. van; Faes, M.C.; Degens, H.; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Lint, J.A. de; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Experimental repeated-measures study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different extension forces applied to the palm of the hand on electromyographic (EMG) activity of the wrist extensor muscles during hand gripping. BACKGROUND: Lateral epicondylitis is usually caused by repeti

  3. Estimation of daily energy expenditure in pregnant and non-pregnant women using a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hees, Vincent T; Renström, Frida; Wright, Antony; Gradmark, Anna; Catt, Michael; Chen, Kong Y; Löf, Marie; Bluck, Les; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Wareham, Nicholas J; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Søren; Franks, Paul W

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have compared the validity of objective measures of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in pregnant and non-pregnant women. PAEE is commonly estimated with accelerometers attached to the hip or waist, but little is known about the validity and participant acceptability of wrist attachment. The objectives of the current study were to assess the validity of a simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn accelerometer (GENEA, Unilever Discover, UK) to estimate PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to evaluate participant acceptability. Non-pregnant (N = 73) and pregnant (N = 35) Swedish women (aged 20-35 yrs) wore the accelerometer on their wrist for 10 days during which total energy expenditure (TEE) was assessed using doubly-labelled water. PAEE was calculated as 0.9×TEE-REE. British participants (N = 99; aged 22-65 yrs) wore accelerometers on their non-dominant wrist and hip for seven days and were asked to score the acceptability of monitor placement (scored 1 [least] through 10 [most] acceptable). There was no significant correlation between body weight and PAEE. In non-pregnant women, acceleration explained 24% of the variation in PAEE, which decreased to 19% in leave-one-out cross-validation. In pregnant women, acceleration explained 11% of the variation in PAEE, which was not significant in leave-one-out cross-validation. Median (IQR) acceptability of wrist and hip placement was 9(8-10) and 9(7-10), respectively; there was a within-individual difference of 0.47 (p<.001). A simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer adds significantly to the prediction of energy expenditure in non-pregnant women and is scored acceptable by participants.

  4. Estimation of daily energy expenditure in pregnant and non-pregnant women using a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T van Hees

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies have compared the validity of objective measures of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women. PAEE is commonly estimated with accelerometers attached to the hip or waist, but little is known about the validity and participant acceptability of wrist attachment. The objectives of the current study were to assess the validity of a simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn accelerometer (GENEA, Unilever Discover, UK to estimate PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to evaluate participant acceptability. METHODS: Non-pregnant (N = 73 and pregnant (N = 35 Swedish women (aged 20-35 yrs wore the accelerometer on their wrist for 10 days during which total energy expenditure (TEE was assessed using doubly-labelled water. PAEE was calculated as 0.9×TEE-REE. British participants (N = 99; aged 22-65 yrs wore accelerometers on their non-dominant wrist and hip for seven days and were asked to score the acceptability of monitor placement (scored 1 [least] through 10 [most] acceptable. RESULTS: There was no significant correlation between body weight and PAEE. In non-pregnant women, acceleration explained 24% of the variation in PAEE, which decreased to 19% in leave-one-out cross-validation. In pregnant women, acceleration explained 11% of the variation in PAEE, which was not significant in leave-one-out cross-validation. Median (IQR acceptability of wrist and hip placement was 9(8-10 and 9(7-10, respectively; there was a within-individual difference of 0.47 (p<.001. CONCLUSIONS: A simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer adds significantly to the prediction of energy expenditure in non-pregnant women and is scored acceptable by participants.

  5. The effect of wrist immobilization on performance of the Jebsen Hand Function Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, J D; Trombly, C A

    1983-03-01

    Eighteen normal subjects participated in a study designed to monitor the effect of wrist motion on the time required to complete manual tasks from the Jebsen Hand Function Test. Activities were performed with the wrist free and with the wrist immobilized by a commercially available splint. The results showed a statistically significant increase in time to do the tasks during immobilization when compared to the free condition. There was great variation in patterns of motion between individuals. Treatment implications include individual consideration of position of wrist immobilization for splinting, proper length and fit of splint designed to immobilize, and the importance of practice in tasks following loss of wrist motion.

  6. Continuous Estimation of Wrist Torque from Surface EMG Signals Using Path-dependent Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Li-zhi; ZHANG Ding-guo; SHENG Xin-jun; ZHU Xiang-yang

    2014-01-01

    Continuous estimation of wrist torque from surface electromyography (EMG) signals has been studied by some research institutes. Hysteresis effect is a phenomenon in EMG force relationship. In this work, a path-dependent model based on hysteresis effect was used for continuously estimating wrist torque from surface EMG signals. The surface EMG signals of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) were collected along with wrist torque of flexion/extension degree-of-freedom. EMG signal of FCU was used to estimate the torque of wrist flexion and EMG signal of ECR to estimate the torque of wrist extension. The existence of hysteresis effect has been proven either during wrist flexion or extension on all subjects. And the estimation performance of path-dependent model is much better than the overall model. Thus, the path-dependent model is suitable to improve the wrist torque's estimation accuracy.

  7. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression.

  8. Efficacy of kinesiology taping for recovery from occupational wrist disorders experienced by a physical therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this paper was to report the efficacy of kinesiology taping for recovery from wrist pain and limited range of motion (ROM) in a physical therapist with repetitive strain injuries. [Subjects] A 32 year-old male physical therapist developed recurring severe pain in the dominant wrist and limited active ROM with extremely painful supination. [Methods] The kinesiology tape was applied to the lumbricals, musculi interossei dorsales, palmares, the wrist extensor and flexor muscles, and the wrist joint for 3 weeks for an average of 10 h/day. [Results] After application of the kinesiology tape, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale and Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation scores decreased, and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale score increased in comparison with the initial score. [Conclusion] Repeated kinesiology taping of the wrist muscles and joint could be an effective method for recovery from occupational wrist disorders experienced by physical therapists.

  9. Effect of Wrist Deviation on Median Nerve Cross-Sectional Area at Proximal Carpal Tunnel Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yeap LOH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders among computer users. Computer users exhibit various wrist angles while typing. Dynamic changes of wrist angle may cause different degrees of median nerve compression. The objective of this study was thus to investigate the effects of the combination of wrist flexion-extension with wrist deviation on median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA.Methods:  Eight right-handed participants were recruited in this study. Both wrists were examined by sonographic ultrasound (US at the proximal carpal tunnel level in the transverse plane. A total of nine wrist positions were examined, including wrist neutral (WN, wrist flexion (WF30°, and wrist extension (WE30°, together with three wrist deviation conditions, namely, without radial deviation (RD and ulnar deviation (UD, with maximal RD and with maximal UD. MNCSA was measured by tracing method with ImageJ.Results: Paired t-test showed a significant difference of WN MNCSA between the dominant hand (7.93 ± 0.63 mm2 and the non-dominant hand (6.98 ± 0.42 mm2 (P<0.001. Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA (handedness as an independent factor showed that WF30° and WE30° caused significant differences of MNCSA when compared with WN (P<0.001. However, wrist RD/UD did not have a significant interaction with the changes of MNCSA in WN, WF and WE positions.Conclusion: The results indicate a significant reduction of MNCSA when WN changed to WF and WE. Wrist RD and UD did not cause significant changes of MNCSA at different wrist positions. Keywords: Median nerve, Ultrasound, Wrist active holding, Nerve deformation

  10. Postoperative Physical Therapy Management of Tendon Transfer for Digital/Wrist Extension Due to Multifocal Motor Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Steve

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive motor nerve disorder characterized by muscle weakness in the extremities. Muscle imbalance and weakness can become so severe that the involved extremity can be rendered nonfunctional. The purpose of this case report is to describe the physical therapy postoperative management of a patient who underwent a multiple tendon transfer to correct the loss of digital/wrist extension of the right upper extremity. Case Description A 38-year-old woman with a medical diagnosis of multifocal motor neuropathy, which caused muscle imbalance and weakness in the right hand, underwent a multiple tendon transfer to correct the loss of digit and wrist extension. The pronator teres was transferred and attached to the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis. The palmaris longus was transferred and attached to the extensor pollicis longus. The flexor carpi radialis was transferred and attached to the extensor digitorum communis. The patient underwent static and dynamic splinting and a modified tendon transfer protocol starting at 3 weeks and ending at 16 weeks postsurgery. The patient attended therapy 1 to 3 times a week, depending on protocol stage and need for skilled therapy intervention. Outcomes Patient-reported outcome measures included the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) survey to monitor the return of function and the numeric pain-rating scale to assess pain. At the initial evaluation (3 weeks postsurgery), the patient's DASH score was 87.5 and her pain score was 7/10. At discharge (16 weeks postsurgery), the patient's DASH score was 37.5 and her pain score was 0/10. Strength impairment was monitored with hydraulic hand dynamometers and manual muscle testing. At discharge, her hand grip strength was 4.5 kg, her key pinch strength was 4.1 kg, and her 3-jaw pinch strength was 2.3 kg. Manual muscle testing grades were 5/5 for elbow extension/flexion, 4/5 for forearm pronation

  11. A randomized controlled trial of surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation applied early after acute stroke: effects on wrist pain, spasticity and contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Shweta; Rosewilliam, Sheeba; Hermens, Hermie; Roffe, Christine; Jones, Peter; Pandyan, Anand David

    2013-07-01

    To investigate effects of surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation applied early after stroke to the wrist and finger extensor muscles on upper limb pain, spasticity and contractures in patients with no functional arm movement. Secondary analysis from a Phase II, randomized, controlled, single-blind study. An acute hospital stroke unit. Patients with no useful arm function within six weeks of a first stroke. Patients were randomized to treatment (30-minute sessions of surface neuromuscular stimulation to wrist and finger extensors and 45 minutes of physiotherapy) or control (45 minutes of physiotherapy) groups. All patients had access to routine care. Treatment was given for six weeks from recruitment. Ninety patients (49% male, median age 74 years (range 32-98), median time since stroke onset three weeks (range one to six weeks)) were included. Treatment compliance was variable (mean 28%). The treatment prevented the development of pain (mean difference in rate of change 0.4 units/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09 to 0.6). Treatment may have prevented a deterioration in contractures (quantified by measuring passive range of movement) in severely disabled patients (mean rate of deterioration -0.5 deg/week; 95% CI -0.9 to -0.06). There were no significant changes in stiffness and spasticity. Surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation reduces pain in stroke patients with a non-functional arm. There was some evidence that treatment with electrical stimulation was beneficial in reducing contractures. Treatment had no effect on spasticity.

  12. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    OpenAIRE

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthropla...

  13. Kinematics and Dynamics of an Asymmetrical Parallel Robotic Wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guanglei

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces an asymmetrical parallel robotic wrist, which can generate a decoupled unlimited-torsion motion and achieve high positioning accuracy. The kinematics, dexterity, and singularities of the manipulator are investigated to visualize the performance contours of the manipulator....... Using the method of Lagrange multipliers and considering all the mobile components, the equations of motion of the manipulator are derived to investigate the dynamic characteristics efficiently. The developed dynamic model is numerically illustrated and compared with its simplified formulation to show...

  14. A virtual reality system for arm and hand rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Chee Kian; Chen, I.-Ming; Yeo, Song Huat

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a virtual reality (VR) system for upper limb rehabilitation. The system incorporates two motion track components, the Arm Suit and the Smart Glove which are composed of a range of the optical linear encoders (OLE) and the inertial measurement units (IMU), and two interactive practice applications designed for driving users to perform the required functional and non-functional motor recovery tasks. We describe the technique details about the two motion track components and the rational to design two practice applications. The experiment results show that, compared with the marker-based tracking system, the Arm Suit can accurately track the elbow and wrist positions. The repeatability of the Smart Glove on measuring the five fingers' movement can be satisfied. Given the low cost, high accuracy and easy installation, the system thus promises to be a valuable complement to conventional therapeutic programs offered in rehabilitation clinics and at home.

  15. Evolution of robotic arms

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of surgical robotics is in the development of the robotic arm. This is a thorough review of the literature on the nature and development of this device with emphasis on surgical applications. We have reviewed the published literature and classified robotic arms by their application: show, industrial application, medical application, etc. There is a definite trend in the manufacture of robotic arms toward more dextrous devices, more degrees-of-freedom, and capabilities beyond th...

  16. Wrist proprioceptive acuity: A comprehensive robot-aided assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Leonardo; Contu, Sara; Konczak, Juergen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Proprioception is the sense of the body awareness. Proprioceptive deficits represent frequent consequences of several neurological conditions like stroke, Parkinson's disease and others. The assessment of such somatosensory function is crucial, although the available clinical tests are not sensitive enough. The human wrist is a crucial joint for many activities of daily living and to address the lack of its characterization in terms of proprioceptive acuity the authors in previous studies proposed a novel method that combined the use of a 3-DoF robot and a threshold haunting paradigm. Further experiments were performed to characterize the proprioceptive acuity of the dominant wrist for adduction, extension, pronation and supination by using a 2-alternative-forced-choice test. The acuity thresholds obtained from six subjects (mean values ± standard deviation of 1.65±0.39 for extension, 1.13±0.34 for adduction, 1.90±0.58 for pronation and 1.70±0.30 for supination) were finally combined with the ones harvested in the previous studies for flexion and abduction in order to build the first comprehensive database of human wrist proprioceptive acuity.

  17. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Nagy, Ladislav [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  18. The carpal stretch test at the rheumatoid wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Matsusita, Kazuhiko; Arai, Takeshi; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic changes of the carpus for rheumatoid wrists in patients who underwent the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure by examining the clinical results and comparing pre- and postoperative radiographic measurements. We studied 43 wrists in 37 patients who showed vertical laxity in the radiocarpal and midcarpal joint on preoperative carpal stretch test. Pain was improved in all patients and the forearm rotation angles of the wrist were significantly improved after the operation. The carpal collapse ratio was significantly reduced after the operation. The carpal collapse reduction rate was significantly greater in the group with than that in the group without midcarpal joint vertical laxity on the carpal stretch test. Although the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure was not sufficiently effective in preventing carpal collapse, it did have a protective effect against ulnar carpal shift. The results of our study showed that vertical laxity of the midcarpal joint was the risk factor of the carpal collapse after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

  19. Development of wrist rehabilitation robot and interface system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ikuo; Matsui, Miki; Inagawa, Naohiro; Hachisuka, Kenji; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Akiko; Saeki, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a practical wrist rehabilitation robot for hemiplegic patients. It consists of a mechanical rotation unit, sensor, grip, and computer system. A myoelectric sensor is used to monitor the extensor carpi radialis longus/brevis muscle and flexor carpi radialis muscle activity during training. The training robot can provoke training through myoelectric sensors, a biological signal detector and processor in advance, so that patients can undergo effective training of extention and flexion in an excited condition. In addition, both-wrist system has been developed for mirror effect training, which is the most effective function of the system, so that autonomous training using both wrists is possible. Furthermore, a user-friendly screen interface with easily recognizable touch panels has been developed to give effective training for patients. The developed robot is small size and easy to carry. The developed aspiring interface system is effective to motivate the training of patients. The effectiveness of the robot system has been verified in hospital trails.

  20. Flexible and static wrist units in upper limb prosthesis users: functionality scores, user satisfaction and compensatory movements

    OpenAIRE

    Deijs, Marieke; Bongers, R.M.; Ringeling-van Leusen, N. D. M.; van der Sluis, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background The current study examines the relevance of prosthetic wrist movement to facilitate activities of daily living or to prevent overuse complaints. Prosthesis hands with wrist flexion/extension capabilities are commercially available, but research on the users’ experiences with flexible wrists is limited. Methods In this study, eight transradial amputees using a myoelectric prosthesis tested two prosthesis wrists with flexion/extension capabilities, the Flex-wrist (Otto Bock) and Mult...

  1. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  2. The leading joint hypothesis for spatial reaching arm motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambike, Satyajit; Schmiedeler, James P

    2013-02-01

    The leading joint hypothesis (LJH), developed for planar arm reaching, proposes that the interaction torques experienced by the proximal joint are low compared to the corresponding muscle torques. The human central nervous system could potentially ignore these interaction torques at the proximal (leading) joint with little effect on the wrist trajectory, simplifying joint-level control. This paper investigates the extension of the LJH to spatial reaching. In spatial motion, a number of terms in the governing equation (Euler's angular momentum balance) that vanish for planar movements are non-trivial, so their contributions to the joint torque must be classified as net, interaction or muscle torque. This paper applies definitions from the literature to these torque components to establish a general classification for all terms in Euler's equation. This classification is equally applicable to planar and spatial motion. Additionally, a rationale for excluding gravity torques from the torque analysis is provided. Subjects performed point-to-point reaching movements between targets whose locations ensured that the wrist paths lay in various portions of the arm's spatial workspace. Movement kinematics were recorded using electromagnetic sensors located on the subject's arm segments and thorax. The arm was modeled as a three-link kinematic chain with idealized spherical and revolute joints at the shoulder and elbow. Joint torque components were computed using inverse dynamics. Most movements were 'shoulder-led' in that the interaction torque impulse was significantly lower than the muscle torque impulse for the shoulder, but not the elbow. For the few elbow-led movements, the interaction impulse at the elbow was low, while that at the shoulder was high, and these typically involved large elbow and small shoulder displacements. These results support the LJH and extend it to spatial reaching motion.

  3. Rheumatoid wrist deformity and risk of extensor tendon rupture evaluated by 3DCT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hajime; Abe, Asami; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi; Horizono, Hidehiro; Ishii, Katsushi; Seki, Eiko [Niigata Rheumatic Center, Department of Rheumatology, Shibata city, Niigata (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    Extensor tendon rupture on the dorsum of the wrist is commonly seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It causes immediate dysfunction of the hand and surgical reconstruction is usually required. The purpose of this study was to clarify the risk of extensor tendon rupture by quantifying wrist deformity on three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) images. Three-dimensional CT images of 108 wrists in 102 patients with RA and 38 wrists in 38 healthy volunteers were analyzed retrospectively. All of the rheumatoid wrists had caused persistent pain for more than 6 months despite ongoing medical treatment. Extensor tendon rupture was noted in 49 wrists in 47 patients, and no rupture was noted in 59 wrists in 56 patients. The dorsal subluxation ratio (DSR) of the ulnar head and the carpal supination angle (CSA) were measured utilizing a new technique. The average DSR and CSA in the rupture group (n = 49), the non-rupture group (n = 59), and the normal wrist group (n = 38) were 37%, 19%, and 26%, and 15 , 11 , and 6 respectively. The cut-off values for extensor tendon rupture in the wrists of patients with RA were 32% (sensitivity; 70%, specificity; 75%) in the DSR, and 14 (71%, 68%) in the CSA. By utilizing 3DCT imaging of the rheumatoid wrist, these parameters can help improve our ability to predict extensor tendon rupture. (orig.)

  4. Predição de peso ao nascimento pela ultra-sonografia tridimensional usando o volume do braço fetal: resultados preliminares Prediction of birth weight by three-dimensional ultrasonography using fetal upper arm volume: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Fragoso Vieira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar a acurácia do volume do braço fetal aferido pela ultra-sonografia tridimensional (USG3D na predição de peso ao nascimento. MÉTODOS: realizou-se um estudo prospectivo, do tipo corte transversal, com 25 gestantes sem anormalidades estruturais ou cromossomopatias. Os parâmetros bidimensionais (diâmetro biparietal, circunferência abdominal e comprimento do fêmur e o volume do braço fetal pela USG3D foram avaliados em até 48 horas antes do parto. Para o cálculo do volume do braço fetal, utilizou-se o método multiplanar, por meio de múltiplos planos seqüenciais com intervalos de 5,0 mm. Realizaram-se regressões polinomiais para se determinar a melhor equação de predição de peso fetal. A acurácia desta nova fórmula foi comparada com as fórmulas bidimensionais de Shepard e Hadlock. RESULTADOS: o volume do braço fetal foi altamente correlacionado com o peso ao nascimento (r=0,83; p0,05. Em relação à fórmula de Hadlock, apenas o erro médio foi menor, mas não estatisticamente significante (p>0,05. CONCLUSÕES: o volume do braço fetal aferido pela USG3D mostrou acurácia similar às fórmulas bidimensionais na predição do peso ao nascimento. Há necessidade de estudos com maiores casuísticas para se comprovar esses achados.PURPOSE: to evaluate the accuracy of fetal upper arm volume, using three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS, in the prediction of birth weight. METHODS: this prospective cross-sectional study involved 25 pregnancies without structural or chromosomal anomalies. Bidimensional parameters (biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference and femur length and the 3DUS fetal upper arm volume were obtained in the last 48 hours before delivery. The multiplanar method, using multiple sequential planes with 5.0-mm intervals, was used to calculate fetal upper arm volume. Polynomial regressions were used to determine the best equation in the prediction of fetal weight. The accuracy of this new formula was

  5. Conceptual design main progress of EAST Articulated Maintenance Arm (EAMA) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Shanshuang, E-mail: shiss@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland); Song, Yuntao; Cheng, Yong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Villedieu, Eric; Bruno, Vincent [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Feng, Hansheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Huapeng [Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland); Wang, Peng [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Hao, Zhiwei; Li, Yang; Wang, Kun; Pan, Hongtao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • EAST Articulated Maintenance Arm (EAMA) system is being collaboratively developed by ASIPP and CEA-IRFM. • Conceptual design for a 3-DOF wrist end effector with gripper has been finished. • Kinematic design can reach 90% of the workspace inside EAST tokamak vessel. • A prototype of EAMA arm segment has been built to validate the design. - Abstract: EAST articulated maintenance arm (EAMA) system is being collaboratively developed by ASIPP and CEA-IRFM for the purpose of remote inspection and simple maintenance operations in EAST vacuum vessel during physical experiments without breaking the ultra-high vacuum condition. The EAMA system design is based on a similar articulated inspection arm robot successfully demonstrated in Tore Supra in 2008. In order to better meet EAST configurations and maintenance requirements, optimized mechanisms and dimensions are considered for EAMA robot as upgrades. Besides, the segmented arm is equipped with a 3-DOF wrist end effector and gripper for gripping operation as well as inspection. Some calculations and simulations on statics, kinematics and workspace of EAMA have been presented to validate the feasibility. This paper introduces the overall design of the EAMA robot and presents implementation progress.

  6. ARM Mentor Selection Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop several highly instrumented ground stations to study cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer. In 2003, the ARM Program became a national scientific user facility, known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. This scientific infrastructure provides for fixed sites, mobile facilities, an aerial facility, and a data archive available for use by scientists worldwide through the ARM Climate Research Facility—a scientific user facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as lead mentors. Lead mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They must also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets. The ARM Climate Research Facility is seeking the best overall qualified candidate who can fulfill lead mentor requirements in a timely manner.

  7. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of ‘Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. Methods and analysis This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. Ethics and dissemination This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. Trial

  8. A rare case of bilateral complex wrist injury in a professional motocross rider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzini, Alessio; Tocco, Silvio; Vaienti, Enrico; Ceccarelli, Francesco; Pogliacomi, Francesco

    2016-04-15

    We describe the treatment of a 29 year-old professional motocross rider, who sustained a perilunate dislocation in his right wrist and a distal radius fracture and dorsal dislocation of his left wrist during a race. Both wrists were treated acutely during a single operating session. Surgery consisted in open reduction, k-wire fixation and mini-anchor repair of the scapho-lunate and luno-triquetrium ligaments on the right wrist, while closed reduction and percutaneous k-wire fixation was used in the left wrist. Follow-up at 6 months has shown satisfying radiological and functional outcomes in both wrists. The rider ultimately returned to motocross 5 months following surgery.

  9. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation of wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Pahwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and direct magnetic resonance (MR arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. Materials and Methods: T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2, 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard. Results: Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopy/open surgery: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears.

  10. EMG-Based Continuous and Simultaneous Estimation of Arm Kinematics in Able-Bodied Individuals and Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the potential biological signals for human-machine interactions (brain, nerve, and muscle signals, electromyography (EMG widely used in clinical setting can be obtained non-invasively as motor commands to control movements. The aim of this study was to develop a model for continuous and simultaneous decoding of multi-joint dynamic arm movements based on multi-channel surface EMG signals crossing the joints, leading to application of myoelectrically controlled exoskeleton robots for upper-limb rehabilitation. Twenty subjects were recruited for this study including 10 stroke subjects and 10 able-bodied subjects. The subjects performed free arm reaching movements in the horizontal plane with an exoskeleton robot. The shoulder, elbow and wrist movements and surface EMG signals from six muscles crossing the three joints were recorded. A non-linear autoregressive exogenous (NARX model was developed to continuously decode the shoulder, elbow and wrist movements based solely on the EMG signals. The shoulder, elbow and wrist movements were decoded accurately based only on the EMG inputs in all the subjects, with the variance accounted for (VAF > 98% for all three joints. The proposed approach is capable of simultaneously and continuously decoding multi-joint movements of the human arm by taking into account the non-linear mappings between the muscle EMGs and joint movements, which may provide less effortful control of robotic exoskeletons for rehabilitation training of individuals with neurological disorders and arm impairment.

  11. Chronic transscaphoid, transcapitate perilunate fracture dislocation of the wrist: Fenton's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, A; Ozben, H; Russomando, A; Petit, A

    2013-04-01

    The authors report about chronic Fenton's syndrome. This rare injury of the wrist is characterized by scapho-capitate fracture accompanied by 180° rotation of the head of capitate and associated perilunate dislocation. Two patients suffering from chronic Fenton's syndrome were treated with pyrocarbon capitate resurfacing prosthesis. Patients were evaluated according to the wrist range of motion, Mayo modified wrist and DASH scores. In conclusion, prosthetic surgery may achieve satisfactory results for this rare and diagnostically challenging syndrome.

  12. A Comparison of Sleep Scored from Electroencephalography to Sleep Scored by Wrist Actigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    actigraphy in insomnia. S . 15(4): 293-301. Kripke, D. F., Mullaney, D. J., Messin, S., and Wyborney, V. G. 1978. Wrist actigraphic measures of sleep and...Cl•anificatiort) (U) A Comparison of Sleep Scored from Electroencephalography to Sleep Scored by Wrist Actigraphy 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) J.L. Caldwell...how much rest soldiers receive, various methods of monitoring activity have been used. One unobtrusive method is to use wrist activity monitors

  13. Correlation between elite male Iranian gymnast’s wrist injuries and their anthropometric characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasempour, Hadi; Rajabi, Reza; ALIZADEH, Mohammad Hossein; Nikro, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: In gymnastics, wrists are under considerable force that causes various injuries. The influences of various risk factors have not been studied sufficiently to date to reduce the wrist injuries of gymnasts. The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between anthropometric characteristics and the wrist injuries of elite male gymnasts who took part in the Iranian Premier League and Division One in 2012. Methods: This was a cross-sectional correlation study concerning t...

  14. The effects of a 12-week program of static upper extremity weight bearing exercises on weight bearing in children with hemiplegic type of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jayaraman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The  major  objective  of  this  study  was  to  quantify  the  effects  of a  12-week  program  of  weight  bearing  exercises  on  weight  borne  through  the hand and grip pressures in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. This study also sought to monitor the change in spasticity immediately following weight-bearing  exercises.  A  quasi-experimental,  one  group  pre-test,  post-test  study  was used. Eleven children with hemiplegic type of cerebral palsy from a special school in KwaZulu Natal participated after fully informed written consent. The intervention consisted of a 12-week program of weight bearing. The Tekscan Grip system was used to quantify weight borne through the hand during extended arm prone and quadruped positions and whilst holding a pencil and a tumbler. The modified Ashworth grading of spasticity was used to monitor spasticity. The data was analysed using the random effects GLS model Wald Chi Square test. Significant increases in contact pressure in extended arms prone (p=0,012 and quadruped (p=0,002 and when holding a pencil (p=0,045 was noted post-test compared to pre-test. Significant increases in contact area of the hand was also noted in prone (p=0,000, quadruped (p=0, 03 at assessment 7 and when holding a pencil (p=0,035.  A significant decrease in spasticity during elbow extension (p=0,004, and wrist flexion (p=0,026 and extension (p=0,004 was noted. An overall significant effect of static weight bearing exercises on weight borne through the hands, grip strength and spasticity justifies the use of static weight-bearing in therapy.

  15. Three-dimensional display of peripheral nerves in the wrist region based on MR diffusion tensor imaging and maximum intensity projection post-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wen Quan, E-mail: dingwenquan1982@163.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Xue Jun, E-mail: zxj0925101@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Tang, Jin Bo, E-mail: jinbotang@yahoo.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Gu, Jian Hui, E-mail: gujianhuint@163.com [Department of Hand Surgery, Hand Surgery Research Center, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu (China); Jin, Dong Sheng, E-mail: jindongshengnj@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Province Official Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • 3D displays of peripheral nerves can be achieved by 2 MIP post-processing methods. • The median nerves’ FA and ADC values can be accurately measured by using DTI6 data. • Adopting 6-direction DTI scan and MIP can evaluate peripheral nerves efficiently. - Abstract: Objectives: To achieve 3-dimensional (3D) display of peripheral nerves in the wrist region by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) post-processing methods to reconstruct raw images acquired by a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scan, and to explore its clinical applications. Methods: We performed DTI scans in 6 (DTI6) and 25 (DTI25) diffusion directions on 20 wrists of 10 healthy young volunteers, 6 wrists of 5 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, 6 wrists of 6 patients with nerve lacerations, and one patient with neurofibroma. The MIP post-processing methods employed 2 types of DTI raw images: (1) single-direction and (2) T{sub 2}-weighted trace. The fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the median and ulnar nerves were measured at multiple testing sites. Two radiologists used custom evaluation scales to assess the 3D nerve imaging quality independently. Results: In both DTI6 and DTI25, nerves in the wrist region could be displayed clearly by the 2 MIP post-processing methods. The FA and ADC values were not significantly different between DTI6 and DTI25, except for the FA values of the ulnar nerves at the level of pisiform bone (p = 0.03). As to the imaging quality of each MIP post-processing method, there were no significant differences between DTI6 and DTI25 (p > 0.05). The imaging quality of single-direction MIP post-processing was better than that from T{sub 2}-weighted traces (p < 0.05) because of the higher nerve signal intensity. Conclusions: Three-dimensional displays of peripheral nerves in the wrist region can be achieved by MIP post-processing for single-direction images and T{sub 2}-weighted trace images for both DTI6 and DTI25

  16. Daily physical activity patterns from hip- and wrist-worn accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiroma, Eric J; Schepps, M A; Harezlak, J

    2016-01-01

    .9 (5.5) years) were asked to wear accelerometers in a free-living environment for 7 d at three different wear locations; one on each wrist and one on the right hip. During waking hours, wrist-worn accelerometers consistently produced higher median activity counts, about 5 × higher, as well as wider...... variability compared to hip-worn monitors. However, the shape of the accrual pattern curve over the course of the day for the hip and wrist are similar; there is a spike in activity in the morning, with a prolonged tapering of activity level as the day progresses. The similar patterns of hip and wrist...

  17. The influence of wrist posture on the time and frequency EMG signal measures of forearm muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Liu, Danuta; Bartuzi, Paweł

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates how altering wrist posture influences the relationship between the time and frequency measures of the electromyography (EMG) signal of extensor digitorum communis (EDC) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU). Thirteen participants exerted handgrip force related to maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in four tests: 20%MVC and 50%MVC in neutral wrist posture and 20%MVC in full wrist flexion and extension. EMG measurements from EDC and FCU were used to calculate normalized values of amplitude (nRMS) and mean and median frequency of the power spectrum (nMPF, nMF). During muscle shortening (wrist flexion for FCU and wrist extension for EDC) nRMS was approximately twofold higher than in neutral posture for FCU and fourfold for EDC. All measures obtained at 20%MVC in neutral posture were significantly different from 20%MVC in wrist flexion for FCU and 20%MVC in wrist extension for EDC (pMVC and 20%MVC at neutral posture (nRMS) were significant for both muscles, although in nMPF and nMF for EDC only. Muscle shortening changed the pattern of statistical significance when the time and frequency domain measures were compared, whereas muscle lengthening did not. It can be concluded that muscle shortening caused by altering wrist posture influences the relationship between the time and frequency measures in both muscles. This suggests that in studies using EMG in different wrist postures, changes in the relationship between the time and the frequency measures should be considered.

  18. A flexure-based wrist for needle-sized surgical robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losey, Dylan P.; York, Peter A.; Swaney, Philip J.; Burgner, Jessica; Webster, Robert J.

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel flexure-based wrist design intended for use with needle-sized robotic manipulators. It is designed to be mounted at the tip of a traditional surgical needle, deployed through an endoscope working channel, or attached to the tip of a concentric tube robot. In all these applications, the wrist enables dexterity in small spaces. The wrist consists of two stacked flexure joints that are actuated by thin pull wires. In this paper we present the design of the wrist, its kinematics, and an experimental evaluation of the relationship between actuation force and tip displacement conducted using a scale model.

  19. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moradi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness.

  20. MVACS Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, R.; Slostad, J.; Bon, B.; Braun, D.; Brill, R.; Buck, C.; Fleischner, R.; Haldeman, A.; Herman, J.; Hertzel, M.; hide

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) Robotic Arm is to support to the other MVACS science instruments by digging trenches in the Martian soil; acquiring and dumping soil samples into the thermal evolved gas analyzer (TEGA); positioning the Soil Temperature Probe (STP) in the soil: positioning the Robotic Arm Air Temperature Sensor (RAATS) at various heights above the surface, and positioning the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) for taking images of the surface, trench, soil samples, magnetic targets and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace.

  1. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moradi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness.

  2. Compressive neuropathies related to ganglions of the wrist and hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Jayaram, Vijay; Nairn, David S

    2014-01-01

    Ganglions of the wrist and hand causing compressive neuropathies are rare clinical entities. Compression of the ulnar and median nerves in their respective fibro-osseous tunnels lead to characteristic patterns of motor and/or sensory deficits, which are directly related to the location of the lesion. We present a unique case of a "dumbbell" shaped ganglion invading both Guyon's canal and the carpal tunnel causing a dual compressive neuropathy of the ulnar and median nerve. We discuss the patho-anatomy, clinical assessment, investigation and surgical treatment of this condition.

  3. Entrance surface dose according to dose calculation: Head and wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ho Jin [Dept. Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Song, Jong Nam; Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study were compared with the direct measurement and indirect dose methods through various dose calculation in head and wrist. And, the modified equation was proposed considering equipment type, setting conditions, tube voltage, inherent filter, added filter and its accompanied back scatter factor. As a result, it decreased the error of the direct measurement than the existing dose calculation. Accordingly, diagnostic radiography patient dose comparison would become easier and radiographic exposure control and evaluation will become more efficient. The study findings are expected to be useful in patients' effective dose rate evaluation and dose reduction.

  4. A comparison of noninvasive blood pressure measurement on the wrist with invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Helmut; Mandadi, Goutham; Pulley, Debra; Eagon, J Chris; Mascha, Edward; Nutter, Benjamin; Kurz, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    In morbidly obese patients, oscillometric blood pressure measurements with an upper-arm cuff are often difficult to perform. The alternative method, invasive blood pressure monitoring, can be difficult to place and is associated with risks. A wrist-mounted blood pressure-monitoring device, the Vasotrac, provides accurate blood pressure measurements in lean patients. Even in the obese, wrist morphology remains relatively unchanged. We thus assessed the degree to which blood pressure measurements with the Vasotrac on the wrist and cuff measurements agree with invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring. We evaluated 22 morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery lasting 3.8+/-1.1 h. Intraoperative blood pressure was simultaneously measured using the Vasotrac mounted on one wrist; an arterial catheter was inserted in the opposite radial artery, and an oscillometric cuff was positioned on the upper arm. Preoperative patient comfort was evaluated on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 being most uncomfortable, just after the first oscillometric cuff inflation. Values from the Vasotrac and arterial catheter were recorded at 5-s intervals. Bias, precision, and clinically acceptable agreement were calculated between the two continuous monitoring devices and between the arterial catheter and the cuff measurements, with the arterial catheter providing the reference value. The patients' age was 44.3+/-9.5 years (mean+/-SD), body mass index was 66.7+/-13.8 kg/m2, and arm circumference was 48.6+/-7.5 cm. Patients found the Vasotrac more comfortable than the oscillometric device [1.7+/-1.8 vs 5.3+/-0.5 (P=0.009)]. A total of 40,411 pairs of values from the Vasotrac and arterial catheter were recorded. Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (95% CI) for mean arterial blood pressure measured between the arterial line and the Vasotrac was 0.74 (0.67, 0.82). The bias (mean error) was -0.25 mmHg; however, the Bland-Altman limits where 95% of individual pressure differences are

  5. Ulnar-sided wrist pain after four-corner fusion in a previously-asymptomatic ulnar positive wrist: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hyun Sik; Jeon, Su Ha; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Scaphoid excision and four-corner fusion is one of the treatment choices for patients who have stage II or III SLAC (scapholunate advanced collapse)/SNAC (scaphoid non-union advanced collapse) wrist arthritis. We report a case of ulnar-sided wrist pain which occurred after four-corner fusion for stage II SNAC wrist with a previously-asymptomatic ulnar positive variance, and was successfully treated by ulnar shortening osteotomy. This case highlights a possible coincidental pathology of the ulnocarpal joint in the setting of post-traumatic radiocarpal arthrosis.

  6. Anatomical peculiarities of sensory tracts of the wrist median nerve pedicled with nutrient vessels transferring to bridge wrist ulnar nerve defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sixin Ouyang; Zhenshan Peng; Jianguo Tan; Tianhong Peng; Jianzhong Xiao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Translocation or transplantation of nerve stem has good effect;however, nervous function of donator is completely lost. If some nerve stem is damaged, sensory tracts are intercepted from the near nerve stem by nutrient vessels to regard as neural graft for transferring and bridging which may repair injured nerve and decrease neural functional loss of donator.OBJECTIVE: To observe anatomical peculiarities on sensory tracts of wrist median nerve pedicled with nutrient vessels transferring to bridge wrist ulnar nerve defect, and to investigate its feasibility.DESIGN: Duplicated and measured design.SETTING: Anatomy Department of Medical College affiliated to Nanhua University.MATERIALS: A total of 14 samples of upper limbs were selected from adult unnamed corpse and volunteers.METHODS: The experiment was completed at the Clinical Application Anatomy Laboratory of Medical College affiliated to Nanhua University from September to November 2005. Samples were perfused with red emulsion through artery to observe length, fibrous bands and blood supply of median nerve and ulnar nerve at wrist. Boundary of median nerve at wrist ranged from superficial site between flexor carpi radialis and palmaris longus to branch of common palmar digital nerves. Ulnar nerve at wrist ranged from branch of back of the hand to site of common palmar digital nerves. Proximal boundary of the two nerves was crossed from 1/8 to 2/8 region of forearm. Samples of upper limbs from 1 case were selected to simulate operation on sensory tracts of wrist median nerve pedicled with nutrient vessels transferring to bridge wrist ulnar nerve.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anatomical peculiarities on sensory tracts of wrist median nerve pedicled with nutrient vessels transferring to bridge wrist ulnar nerve defect.RESULTS: ① The length of wrist median nerves was 7.8 (7.5-8.1) cm. There were 19 to 27 nerve tracts in it and the majority belonged to sensory tracts on the ulnar side, in which non

  7. Electrical stimulation and blood flow restriction increase wrist extensor cross-sectional area and flow meditated dilatation following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Timmons, Mark K; Dolbow, David R; Bengel, Justin; Fugate-Laus, Kendall C; Michener, Lori A; Gater, David R

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and blood flow restricted (BFR) exercise on wrist extensors cross-sectional area (CSA), torque and hand functions compared NMES only in individuals with incomplete tetraplegia. The acute effect of an acute bout of NMES with BFR on flow mediated dilation (FMD) was compared with BFR only. Nine men completed 6 weeks twice weekly of bilateral NMES training of the wrist extensor muscles. The right forearm received NMES + BFR (30 % above the resting systolic blood pressure), while the left forearm received NMES only. The CSA of the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles was measured on ultrasound images. Torque was measured isometrically and hand function with grasp and release test. Another eight men with SCI received NMES+BFR to the right forearm, while the left forearm received BFR only. Immediately, the FMD of the brachial artery was measured. Following training, the ECRL CSA was 17 % greater in the NMES+BFR forearm (mean difference = 0.6 cm(2), p = 0.003) compared with the NMES only. The NMES+BFR had a 15 % increase in ECRL CSA (mean increase = 0.58 cm(2), p = 0.048). FMD increased (p = 0.05) in the exercise arm (12 ± 3 %) compared with the control arm (6.5 ± 6 %). NMES training with BFR is a strategy that can increase skeletal muscle size. NMES with and without BFR can improve wrist strength and hand function. The acute effects of NMES+BFR may suggest that an increase in FMD may partially contribute to skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  8. An Elastica Arm Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Bosi, F; Corso, F Dal; Bigoni, D

    2015-01-01

    The concept of 'deformable arm scale' (completely different from a traditional rigid arm balance) is theoretically introduced and experimentally validated. The idea is not intuitive, but is the result of nonlinear equilibrium kinematics of rods inducing configurational forces, so that deflection of the arms becomes necessary for the equilibrium, which would be impossible for a rigid system. In particular, the rigid arms of usual scales are replaced by a flexible elastic lamina, free of sliding in a frictionless and inclined sliding sleeve, which can reach a unique equilibrium configuration when two vertical dead loads are applied. Prototypes realized to demonstrate the feasibility of the system show a high accuracy in the measure of load within a certain range of use. It is finally shown that the presented results are strongly related to snaking of confined beams, with implications on locomotion of serpents, plumbing, and smart oil drilling.

  9. Dynamics of Robotic Arm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abhishek Chavan; Abhishek Bhuskute; Anmol Jain; Neha Shinde; M B Salunke

    2014-01-01

    ...'. Autonomous Systems are self-governed and does not require any manual interventions. This paper presents an overview of previous developments and the working of Robotic arms along with its mathematical aspects...

  10. Arm CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the arm area, called ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    world war, a nuclear inferno , for over 40 years. A sober assessment of the situation in world politics was conducted at the meet- ing of the...there is success in stopping the arms race, or those forces accelerating the arms race and driving humanity to the edge of a nuclear inferno will gain...dialogue with all forces fighting against a nuclear inferno , affirmed by the Warsaw Pact countries, is being seen more and more as the only practicable

  12. Extensor tendon rupture and three-dimensional computed tomography imaging of the rheumatoid wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Asami; Ishikawa, Hajime; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi [Niigata Rheumatic Center, Department of Rheumatology, Shibata, Niigata (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Extensor tendon rupture on the dorsum of the wrist is commonly seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The diagnosis of tendon rupture is usually straightforward, but it is sometimes difficult in the hand with complex deformity. The purposes of this study were to investigate the reliability of three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) imaging of extensor tendons in the rheumatoid wrist and in the normal wrist and to clarify the validity of its clinical application to the diagnosis of tendon rupture in the rheumatoid wrist. Preoperative 3DCT images of 48 wrists of 45 patients with RA and 3DCT images of 38 wrists of 38 healthy volunteers were reviewed retrospectively by six orthopaedic surgeons who were unaware of all other study data. Extensor tendon rupture was verified by operation on 20 rheumatoid wrists. Regarding interobserver and intra-observer reliabilities of 3DCT imaging of the extensor tendons, agreement with respect to tendon rupture in this study group was high, and Cohen's kappa ({kappa}) coefficient was variable, depending on the individual tendon. Positive predictive value (PPV) of tendon rupture in the extensor digiti minimi (EDM), extensor digitorum communis (EDC) V and IV and extensor pollicis longs (EPL) tendons was more than 60%, but those for the other extensor tendons were less than 50%. Negative predictive value (NPV) was more than 96% in all extensor tendons, in both rheumatoid and normal wrists. Extensor tendons in normal and rheumatoid wrists were well depicted by 3DCT imaging. In the rheumatoid wrists, extensors of the ring and little fingers and the thumb were depicted more accurately than those to the other fingers. 3DCT imaging was clinically applicable to wrists for which it was difficult to diagnose by physical examination a definite cause for the loss of extension of the fingers. (orig.)

  13. Hello to Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This image highlights the hidden spiral arms (blue) that were discovered around the nearby galaxy NGC 4625 by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image is composed of ultraviolet and visible-light data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red. As the image demonstrates, the lengthy spiral arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light while bright in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light. The youthful arms are also very long, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far. Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own. The armless companion galaxy seen below NGC 4625 is called NGC 4618. Astronomers do not know why it lacks arms but speculate that it may have triggered the development of arms in NGC 4625.

  14. Hello to Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This image highlights the hidden spiral arms (blue) that were discovered around the nearby galaxy NGC 4625 by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image is composed of ultraviolet and visible-light data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red. As the image demonstrates, the lengthy spiral arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light while bright in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light. The youthful arms are also very long, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far. Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own. The armless companion galaxy seen below NGC 4625 is called NGC 4618. Astronomers do not know why it lacks arms but speculate that it may have triggered the development of arms in NGC 4625.

  15. A New Myohaptic Instrument to Assess Wrist Motion Dynamically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Manto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological assessment of joint properties and voluntary motion in neurological patients remains a challenge. This is typically the case in cerebellar patients, who exhibit dysmetric movements due to the dysfunction of cerebellar circuitry. Several tools have been developed, but so far most of these tools have remained confined to laboratories, with a lack of standardization. We report on a new device which combines the use of electromyographic (EMG sensors with haptic technology for the dynamic investigation of wrist properties. The instrument is composed of a drivetrain, a haptic controller and a signal acquisition unit. Angular accuracy is 0.00611 rad, nominal torque is 6 N·m, maximal rotation velocity is 34.907 rad/sec, with a range of motion of –1.0472 to +1.0472 rad. The inertia of the motor and handgrip is 0.004 kg·m². This is the first standardized myohaptic instrument allowing the dynamic characterization of wrist properties, including under the condition of artificial damping. We show that cerebellar patients are unable to adapt EMG activities when faced with an increase in damping while performing fast reversal movements. The instrument allows the extraction of an electrophysiological signature of a cerebellar deficit.

  16. A new myohaptic instrument to assess wrist motion dynamically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Van Den Braber, Niels; Grimaldi, Giuliana; Lammertse, Piet

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiological assessment of joint properties and voluntary motion in neurological patients remains a challenge. This is typically the case in cerebellar patients, who exhibit dysmetric movements due to the dysfunction of cerebellar circuitry. Several tools have been developed, but so far most of these tools have remained confined to laboratories, with a lack of standardization. We report on a new device which combines the use of electromyographic (EMG) sensors with haptic technology for the dynamic investigation of wrist properties. The instrument is composed of a drivetrain, a haptic controller and a signal acquisition unit. Angular accuracy is 0.00611 rad, nominal torque is 6 N·m, maximal rotation velocity is 34.907 rad/sec, with a range of motion of -1.0472 to +1.0472 rad. The inertia of the motor and handgrip is 0.004 kg·m2. This is the first standardized myohaptic instrument allowing the dynamic characterization of wrist properties, including under the condition of artificial damping. We show that cerebellar patients are unable to adapt EMG activities when faced with an increase in damping while performing fast reversal movements. The instrument allows the extraction of an electrophysiological signature of a cerebellar deficit.

  17. A New Myohaptic Instrument to Assess Wrist Motion Dynamically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Van Den Braber, Niels; Grimaldi, Giuliana; Lammertse, Piet

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiological assessment of joint properties and voluntary motion in neurological patients remains a challenge. This is typically the case in cerebellar patients, who exhibit dysmetric movements due to the dysfunction of cerebellar circuitry. Several tools have been developed, but so far most of these tools have remained confined to laboratories, with a lack of standardization. We report on a new device which combines the use of electromyographic (EMG) sensors with haptic technology for the dynamic investigation of wrist properties. The instrument is composed of a drivetrain, a haptic controller and a signal acquisition unit. Angular accuracy is 0.00611 rad, nominal torque is 6 N·m, maximal rotation velocity is 34.907 rad/sec, with a range of motion of −1.0472 to +1.0472 rad. The inertia of the motor and handgrip is 0.004 kg·m2. This is the first standardized myohaptic instrument allowing the dynamic characterization of wrist properties, including under the condition of artificial damping. We show that cerebellar patients are unable to adapt EMG activities when faced with an increase in damping while performing fast reversal movements. The instrument allows the extraction of an electrophysiological signature of a cerebellar deficit. PMID:22319293

  18. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  19. [Synopsis of wrist pathology. Xeroradiography vs digital radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C

    1990-09-01

    Pathologic conditions of the wrist involve both musculoskeletal structures (bones and joints) and soft tissues, of which fat pads are an important diagnostic aid to recognize various disorders. The authors report their 5-year experience with Xeroradiography in the diagnosis of various pathologic conditions (e.g., inflammatory, degenerative, and tumoral conditions) of the wrist. The importance of Xeroradiography was emphasized, in the past, because of its characteristic technical properties, especially in demonstrating lower-density tissues tumors. The main advantage of Xeroradiography is the physical phenomenon known as edge effect, which increases image contrast at the borders. Other differences between xeroradiography and conventional radiography are: broader recording latitude of the former, together with its higher resolution power (100 lines/mm), and high exposition power (which makes repeats useless). Thus, Xeroradiography allows the contemporary depiction of various and different structures and densities--e.g., bones and soft tissues. Unfortunately, radiation dose to the patient is higher during Xeroradiography than during conventional radiography. That is why digital radiography has nowadays replaced Xeroradiography. In fact, the former provides images that are comparable with those obtained by means of conventional radiography and--sometimes--even with xeroradiographic images. Moreover, the use of digital radiography allows radiation dose to the patient to be markedly reduced, whereas recording latitude remains the same.

  20. Macrobend optical sensing for pose measurement in soft robot arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareh, Sina; Noh, Yohan; Li, Min; Ranzani, Tommaso; Liu, Hongbin; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a pose-sensing system for soft robot arms integrating a set of macrobend stretch sensors. The macrobend sensory design in this study consists of optical fibres and is based on the notion that bending an optical fibre modulates the intensity of the light transmitted through the fibre. This sensing method is capable of measuring bending, elongation and compression in soft continuum robots and is also applicable to wearable sensing technologies, e.g. pose sensing in the wrist joint of a human hand. In our arrangement, applied to a cylindrical soft robot arm, the optical fibres for macrobend sensing originate from the base, extend to the tip of the arm, and then loop back to the base. The connectors that link the fibres to the necessary opto-electronics are all placed at the base of the arm, resulting in a simplified overall design. The ability of this custom macrobend stretch sensor to flexibly adapt its configuration allows preserving the inherent softness and compliance of the robot which it is installed on. The macrobend sensing system is immune to electrical noise and magnetic fields, is safe (because no electricity is needed at the sensing site), and is suitable for modular implementation in multi-link soft continuum robotic arms. The measurable light outputs of the proposed stretch sensor vary due to bend-induced light attenuation (macrobend loss), which is a function of the fibre bend radius as well as the number of repeated turns. The experimental study conducted as part of this research revealed that the chosen bend radius has a far greater impact on the measured light intensity values than the number of turns (if greater than five). Taking into account that the bend radius is the only significantly influencing design parameter, the macrobend stretch sensors were developed to create a practical solution to the pose sensing in soft continuum robot arms. Henceforward, the proposed sensing design was benchmarked against an electromagnetic

  1. The influence of the gait-related arm swing on elevation gain measured by sport watches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammann Rahel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The elevation gain is an important contributor to the total workload in endurance sports. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the arm swing on elevation gain in three sport watches (Garmin® Forerunner 910XT, Polar® RS800CX and Suunto® Ambit2 on a flat 400 m outdoor track. Altogether, a total of 120 repetitions of 1,200 m were performed at self-selected speeds corresponding to strolling, walking, jogging and running. During the assessment two devices of each sport watch, one secured on the hip and one on the wrist, were worn by the participants. A small but significant (effect size = .39; p < .001 influence of the arm swing on elevation was revealed in all sport watches. Elevation indication errors recorded on the wrist were significantly larger than the ones recorded on the hip (4.0-7.4 vs. 1.2-5.7 m per 1,200 m; p < .05. Furthermore, when wearing the devices on the wrist, errors in elevation indication increased when gait speed increased. Users should be aware that wearing the devices on the hip can significantly decrease measurement errors. This might be especially relevant for activities with high dynamics, such as jogging and running.

  2. Accuracy in Wrist-Worn, Sensor-Based Measurements of Heart Rate and Energy Expenditure in a Diverse Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbina, Anna; Mattsson, C Mikael; Waggott, Daryl; Salisbury, Heidi; Christle, Jeffrey W; Hastie, Trevor; Wheeler, Matthew T; Ashley, Euan A

    2017-05-24

    The ability to measure physical activity through wrist-worn devices provides an opportunity for cardiovascular medicine. However, the accuracy of commercial devices is largely unknown. The aim of this work is to assess the accuracy of seven commercially available wrist-worn devices in estimating heart rate (HR) and energy expenditure (EE) and to propose a wearable sensor evaluation framework. We evaluated the Apple Watch, Basis Peak, Fitbit Surge, Microsoft Band, Mio Alpha 2, PulseOn, and Samsung Gear S2. Participants wore devices while being simultaneously assessed with continuous telemetry and indirect calorimetry while sitting, walking, running, and cycling. Sixty volunteers (29 male, 31 female, age 38 ± 11 years) of diverse age, height, weight, skin tone, and fitness level were selected. Error in HR and EE was computed for each subject/device/activity combination. Devices reported the lowest error for cycling and the highest for walking. Device error was higher for males, greater body mass index, darker skin tone, and walking. Six of the devices achieved a median error for HR below 5% during cycling. No device achieved an error in EE below 20 percent. The Apple Watch achieved the lowest overall error in both HR and EE, while the Samsung Gear S2 reported the highest. In conclusion, most wrist-worn devices adequately measure HR in laboratory-based activities, but poorly estimate EE, suggesting caution in the use of EE measurements as part of health improvement programs. We propose reference standards for the validation of consumer health devices (http://precision.stanford.edu/).

  3. Patterns of disease progression in the rheumatoid wrist : A longterm followup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, RM; van Jaarsveld, CHM; Hofman, DM; Helders, PJM; Bijlsma, JWJ

    1999-01-01

    Objective, To identify different patterns of disease manifestation and changes in the rate of progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the wrist.Methods. Forty wrists, with normal baseline radiographs, of 20 patients with RA were evaluated by means of a retrospective radiographic review for a per

  4. 78 FR 36643 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900--NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW...

  5. 78 FR 36307 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW...

  6. Reconstructed animation from four-phase grip MRI of the wrist with ulnar-sided pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, T; Wada, T; Iba, K; Aoki, M; Tamakawa, M; Yamashita, T

    2013-09-01

    In order to visualize dynamic variations related to ulnar-sided wrist pain, animation was reconstructed from T2* coronal-sectioned magnetic resonance imaging in each of the four phases of grip motion for nine wrists in patients with ulnar pain. Eight of the nine wrists showed a positive ulnar variance of less than 2 mm. Ulnocarpal impaction and triangular fibrocartilage complex injury were assessed on the basis of animation and arthroscopy, respectively. Animation revealed ulnocarpal impaction in four wrists. In one of the four wrists, the torn portion of the articular disc was impinged between the ulnar head and ulnar proximal side of the lunate. In another wrist, the ulnar head impacted the lunate directly through the defect in the articular disc that had previously been excised. An ulnar shortening osteotomy successfully relieved ulnar wrist pain in all four cases with both ulnocarpal impaction and Palmer's Class II triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. This method demonstrated impairment of the articular disc and longitudinal instability of the distal radioulnar joint simultaneously and should be of value in investigating dynamic pathophysiology causing ulnar wrist pain.

  7. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a... as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, and is limited to those prostheses intended for use with bone...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  11. Prediction of Energy Expenditure from Wrist Accelerometry in People with and without Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Motl, Robert W.; Foley, John T.; Fernhall, Bo

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between energy expenditure and wrist accelerometer output during walking in persons with and without Down syndrome (DS). Energy expenditure in metabolic equivalent units (METs) and activity-count rate were respectively measured with portable spirometry and a uniaxial wrist accelerometer in 17 persons with DS…

  12. EMPress: Practical Hand Gesture Classification with Wrist-Mounted EMG and Pressure Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, Jess; McNeill, Charlie; Fraser, Mike;

    2016-01-01

    movements, that pressure is suited to sensing wrist and forearm rotations, and their combination is significantly more accurate for a range of gestures than either technique alone. The technique is well suited to existing wearable device forms such as smart watches that are already mounted on the wrist....

  13. Overuse wrist injuries in young athletes: What do sports physicians consider important signals and functional limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kox, Laura S; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Opperman, Jip; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; Maas, Mario; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2017-02-21

    This study's objective was to collect items from experienced sports physicians, relating to the presence and severity of overuse wrist injuries in young athletes, for developing a measurement instrument for signals of overuse wrist injury. Seven Dutch elite sports physicians involved in guidance and treatment of young athletes in wrist-loading sports (gymnastics, tennis, judo, field hockey, volleyball and rowing) participated in a focus group. They discussed signals and limitations related to overuse wrist injuries in young athletes. Data were coded and categorised into signals and limitations with subcategories, using an inductive approach. Of the resulting 61 signals and limitations in nineteen (sub)categories, 20 were considered important, forming a comprehensive item set for identifying overuse wrist injury in young athletes. Signals such as pain, "click", crepitations, swelling and limited range of motion were marked useful for early identification of overuse wrist injury. Limitations in movement and performance were considered indicative of severe overuse injury but less relevant for initial injury identification. The focus group provided 17 important signals and 3 important limitations indicative of overuse wrist injury. These provide the basis for a valid measurement instrument for identifying overuse wrist injury in young athletes, with equal emphasis on pain and on other symptoms.

  14. Scaphoid dislocation associated with axial carpal dissociation during volar flexion of the wrist: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Kohei; Wada, Takuro; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    We present the first report of a patient with an isolated scaphoid dislocation with axial carpal dissociation sustained during volar flexion of the wrist. The scaphoid was dislocated to the radial side of the radial styloid process and was slightly shifted to the dorsal side. It was shown that the position of the wrist played an irrelevant role for occurring scaphoid dislocation.

  15. A rare cause of ulnar-side wrist pain: Ganglion cyst of the triquetrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan Senturk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing chronic wrist pain may sometimes be challenging and the differential diagnoses include many conditions (traumatic, rheumatoid, neoplasms, etc.. This report describes a case of chronic wrist pain due to intraosseous ganglion cyst of triquetrum. The wrist pain had lasted for 6 months and was not relieved by conservative treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intraosseous ganglion cyst. The triquetrum was tender on palpation. After curettage and grafting of the cyst, and 6 months of follow-up, the patient was free of complaints with full range of motion of the wrist. Although mostly asymptomatic, intraosseous ganglion cysts should be kept in mind when assessing wrist pain. [Hand Microsurg 2017; 6(2.000: 87-89

  16. How repeated 15-minute assertiveness training sessions reduce wrist cutting in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Masaya

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine a possible treatment for patients with borderline personality disorder who have wrist-cutting syndrome, a condition characterized by repeated, superficial wrist cutting in a non-suicidal fashion. Within the current healthcare system in Japan, the average amount of time a doctor can spend with a psychiatric outpatient is about 8 to 15 minutes. We, therefore, examined whether repeated 15-minute psychotherapy sessions to improve patient assertiveness would be effective for reducing wrist cutting and possibly other forms of self-mutilation. We treated 13 patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and wrist-cutting syndrome with assertiveness training during 15-minute, biweekly therapy sessions over a course of one to four years. At the conclusion of psychotherapeutic treatment, 69% of outpatients showed a statistically significant reduction in wrist-cutting behavior.

  17. Acute ulnar neuropathy at the wrist: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkin, Gülten; Uysal, Hilmi; Keleş, Işik; Aybay, Canan; Ozel, Sumru

    2006-12-01

    Acute ulnar neuropathy at the wrist is an extremely uncommon condition, at times requiring a high index of suspicion for the diagnosis. Clinical presentations of ulnar nerve lesions at the wrist and hand show variations due to the complex anatomic course of the nerve in distal sites. We report a case of acute ulnar neuropathy at the wrist caused by a ganglion in Guyon's canal, being initially misinterpreted as flexor tenosynovitis. The accurate diagnosis of selective distal motor neuropathy of ulnar nerve was made electrophysiologically. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well defined soft tissue mass consistent with a ganglion, compressing the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. Entrapment neuropathies are one of the common conditions handled by physiatrists. Ulnar nerve lesions at the wrist should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of patients with wrist or hand pain. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful method in the anatomical evaluation of acute focal neuropathies.

  18. Arm To Arm Interface Using Embedded C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanraj.C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Embedded systems are the most emerging field in these recent years. In this paper a different number of ARM processors (LPC2148 and LPC2378 are interconnected using C for distributed services. N numbers of processors are connected as the network and each processing devices are interlinked with each other, so that the each data that is processed by the devices and it can be used by the other device to activate their entire process. All the processed data’s are communicated to other device through Xbee interface card. LPC2148 and LPC2378 ARM processors are used in this prototype and winXtalk is used as a software terminal window. In this paper, the ultimate benefits of multiple processor interactions related to the embedded applications and design issues of processor interconnection are discussed. The features of multiple processor interaction in inter process communication and executions of embedded multitasking are also discussed. In modern embedded computing platform, embedded processor used in various applications like home automation, industrial control, medical system, access control, etc. In this paper, using embedded processor interactions, the several data communication is established.

  19. Requesting wrist radiographs in emergency department triage: developing a training program and diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streppa, Joanna; Schneidman, Valerie; Biron, Alain D

    2014-01-01

    Crowding is extremely problematic in Canada, as the emergency department (ED) utilization is considerably higher than in any other country. Consequently, an increase has been noted in waiting times for patients who present with injuries of lesser acuity such as wrist injuries. Wrist fractures are the most common broken bone in patients younger than 65 years. Many nurses employed within EDs are requesting wrist radiographs for patients who present with wrist complaints as a norm within their working practice. Significant potential advantages can ensue if EDs adopt a triage nurse-requested radiographic protocol; patients can benefit from a significant time-saving of 36% in ED length of stay (M. Lindley-Jones & B. J Finlayson, 2000)— when nurses initiated radiographs in triage. In addition, the literature suggests that increased rates of patient and staff satisfaction may be achieved, without compromising quality of radiographic request or quality of service (W. Parris,S. McCarthy, A. M. Kelly, & S. Richardson, 1997). Studies have shown that nurses are capable of requesting appropriate radiographs on the basis of a preset protocol. As there are no standardized set of rules for assessing patients, presenting with suspected wrist fractures, a training program as well as a diagnostic algorithm was developed to prepare emergency nurses to appropriately request wrist radiographs. The triage nurse-specific training program includes the following topics: wrist anatomy and physiology, commonly occurring wrist injuries, mechanisms of injury, physical assessment techniques, and types of radiographic images required. The triage nurse algorithm includes the clinical decision-making process. Providing triage nurses with up-to-date evidence-based educational material not only allowed triage nurses to independently assess and request wrist radiographs for patients with potential wrist fractures but also strengthening the link between competent nursing care and better patient

  20. Physical and psychosocial factors associated with wrist or hand pain among Australian hospital-based nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawera, Inoka K; Hoe, Victor C W; Kelsall, Helen L; Urquhart, Donna M; Sim, Malcolm R

    2013-02-01

    To assess the personal, physical and psychosocial factors associated with wrist or hand pain in Australian hospital-based nurses. Wrist or hand pain, associated disability and sickness absence, demographic, occupational, physical, psychosocial and personal factors among nurses working for three hospitals in Melbourne, Australia, were assessed in a cross-sectional study. Factors associated with wrist or hand pain in the past month were assessed using logistic regression. This analysis was based on 1111 participants. The prevalence of wrist or hand pain in the past month was 15.3%. Repeated movements of the wrist or finger >4 h (OR 2.63, 95% CI 1.80 to 3.84), high job strain (1.54, 1.04 to 2.28), job insecurity (1.55, 1.04 to 2.28), somatisation tendency (2.73, 1.75 to 4.26), pain catastrophising (1.56, 1.03 to 2.37), better mental (0.97, 0.95 to 0.99) and physical (0.96, 0.94-0.98) health and well-being were associated with wrist or hand pain in the past month, after adjusting for possible confounding factors. When all significant factors were examined in the same model, repeated movements of the wrist or finger >4 h (2.50, 1.71 to 3.67), somatisation (2.61, 1.65 to 4.13) and better physical health and well-being (0.96, 0.94 to 0.99) remained independently associated with wrist or hand pain in the past month. This study highlights that wrist or hand pain is prevalent in hospital nurses. Workplace physical factors and personal factors were associated with wrist or hand pain. Further longitudinal investigation is needed to examine the predictive nature of these factors.

  1. Armed conflict and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Michael; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Armed conflict has a major impact on child health throughout the world. One in six children worldwide lives in an area of armed conflict and civilians are more likely to die than soldiers as a result of the conflict. In stark contrast to the effect on children, the international arms trade results in huge profits for the large corporations involved in producing arms, weapons and munitions. Armed conflict is not inevitable but is an important health issue that should be prevented.

  2. The usefulness of whole body bone mineral densitometry in the osteopenia of preterm infants: comparison with the wrist radiography and biochemical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Bong Jin; Huh, Jin Do; Shin, Sang Bum; Cheon, Byung Kook; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin Univ. Gospel Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jeong Mi; Jeon, Seong Sook [Ilsin Christian Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of whole body bone mineral densitometry in the diagnosis of frequent osteopenia of preterm infants by comparison with the wrist radiographs and biochemical parameters. From January 1995 to January 1996, we obtained whole body bone mineral density(BMD) studies using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DXA) and wrist radiographs of 39 preterm infants. They were divided into three groups according to birth weight, under 1500g, 1501g to 2000g and above 2000g, and four grades of skeletal change, as seen on wrist radiography, according to the scoring method of Koo et al. Groups of birth weight and grades of skeletal change were then correlated with whole body BMD and biochemical parameters. For comparison, normal data were obtained from 13 infants born at full term. Data were analyzed by one way analysis of variation(ANOVA) and correlation and regression analysis. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Whole body BMDs were significantly lower in the more premature and smaller birth weight infants(r=0.77, p=0.0000), and in the higher grade of skeletal change(r-0.5276, p=0.0000). Aggravated skeletal changes were found in infants with lower birth weight(r= -0.3822, p=0.01). Interobserver variation in grading skeletal change was 42.9%, and intraobserver variation was 18.4%. Biochemical parameters such as serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, parathromone, calcitonin and 25-hydroxy-vitamine D did not vary significantly according to either birth weight or skeletal change(p > 0.05). Premature osteopenia is more effectively diagnosed by measuring whole body BMD using DXA than by grading radiographical skeletal change or by biochemical parameters.

  3. A wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network for human arm motion tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel method for arm flexion/extension angles measurement using wireless ultrasonic sensor network. The approach uses unscented Kalman filter and D-H kinematical chain model to retrieve the joint angles. This method was experimentally validated by calculating the 2-dimensional wrist displacements from one mobile, placed on the point of subject's wrist, and four anchors. The performance of the proposed ultrasonic motion analysis system was bench-marked by commercial camera motion capture system. The experimental results demonstrate that a favorable performance of the proposed system in the estimation of upper limb motion. The proposed system is wireless, easy to wear, to use and much cheaper than current camera system. Thus, it has the potential to become a new and useful tool for routine clinical assessment of human motion.

  4. Mechanical Design, Control Choices and first Return of Use of a Prosthetic Arm

    CERN Document Server

    Thomann, Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    In the world of upper limb prostheses, few companies dominate the majority of the market. They propose different kinds of hand, wrist and elbow prostheses but their control is often difficult to understand by the patients. We have decided to develop new myoelectric prosthetic arm (elbow, wrist and hand) by axing our development on the use of new technologies and facility of use for the patient. In this paper, we are explaining in details the different kinds of prostheses currently proposed to the amputees, their advantages and their drawbacks, the descriptions of the patients' needs and the possible improvements of the product. We will develop the designing choices of our prosthesis and the movements it can realize. Then we will explain the simplified control of the product by the patient and its first reactions. Finally, we will conclude by the news ideas and the next researches to concretize.

  5. Weight Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anger Weight Management Weight Management Smoking and Weight Healthy Weight Loss Being Comfortable in Your Own Skin Your Weight Loss Expectations & Goals Healthier Lifestyle Healthier Lifestyle Physical Fitness Food & Nutrition Sleep, Stress & Relaxation Emotions & Relationships HealthyYouTXT ...

  6. Special aspects of wrist arthritis management for SLAC and SNAC wrists using midcarpal arthrodesis: results of bilateral operations and conversion to total arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohritz, Andreas; Gohla, Thomas; Stutz, Nicolas; Moser, Veith; Koch, Hilmar; Krimmer, Hermann; Lanz, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Although midcarpal wrist arthrodesis is recognized as a standard procedure to treat scapholuate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) of the wrist, little has been reported about patients with bilateral involvement and the number, cause, and results of failed cases requiring conversion to total wrist arthrodesis. This study investigated the results of 20 patients with bilateral procedures and of 22 patients who underwent total wrist fusion after failed midcarpal arthrodesis out of an overall group of 907 patients treated by this method during a 12-year period. Of these, 16 bilateral and 20 converted cases were reexamined after an average of 48 months and 42 months, respectively. Patients after bilateral midcarpal arthrodesis experienced a pain reduction by an average of 54% of the preoperative pain values at rest and by 56% at stress on the visual analog scale (scale range: 0 to 100) and from intolerable (3.7) to pain only during stress (1.9) on the verbal scale (scale range: I to 4). A mean arc of wrist extension and flexion of 53 degrees on the right and 49 of the left wrist was preserved. The mean DASH score was 45 points and 70% of the patients felt impaired only during certain activities. Total arthrodesis reduced pain in 18 of 20 reexamined wrists by 67% of the previous values after the failed partial arthrodesis at rest and by 46% at stress on the visual analog scale andfrom intolerable pain (3.7) to pain only during stress (2.1) on the verbal scale. Seven of the 20 reexamined patients noted complete pain relief at rest and two also under stress conditions. The DASH score averaged 39 points. A mean Krimmer score of 46 points and a mean Buck-Gramcko and Lohman evaluation of 6 points represented a satisfactory result. Grip strength of the operated hand averaged 53% of the opposite side. Subjectively, 30% felt impaired only during certain activities, 55%felt considerably and 15% strongly limited in daily life. However, all but

  7. Robotic Arm Unwrapped

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken shortly after NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander touched down on the surface of Mars, shows the spacecraft's robotic arm in its stowed configuration, with its biobarrier successfully unpeeled. The 'elbow' of the arm can be seen at the top center of the picture, and the biobarrier is the shiny film seen to the left of the arm. The biobarrier is an extra precautionary measure for protecting Mars from contamination with any bacteria from Earth. While the whole spacecraft was decontaminated through cleaning, filters and heat, the robotic arm was given additional protection because it is the only spacecraft part that will directly touch the ice below the surface of Mars. Before the arm was heated, it was sealed in the biobarrier, which is made of a trademarked film called Tedlar that holds up to baking like a turkey-basting bag. This ensures that any new bacterial spores that might have appeared during the final steps before launch and during the journey to Mars will not contact the robotic arm. After Phoenix landed, springs were used to pop back the barrier, giving it room to deploy. The base of the lander's Meteorological Station can be seen in this picture on the upper left. Because only the base of the station is showing, this image tells engineers that the instrument deployed successfully. The image was taken on landing day, May 25, 2008, by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Wear particles and osteolysis in patients with total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Toxværd, Anders; Bansal, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    tissue, the level of chrome and cobalt ions in the blood, and the possible role of infectious or rheumatoid activity in the development of PPO. METHODS: Biopsies were taken from the implant-bone interphase in 13 consecutive patients with total wrist arthroplasty and with at least 3 years' follow...... of the radiolucent zone. The blood levels of chrome and cobalt ions were normal. There was no evidence of infectious or rheumatoid activity. CONCLUSIONS: Polyethylene wear has been accepted as a major cause of osteolysis in total hip arthroplasty, and metallic debris has also been cited to be an underlying cause....... However, our hypothesis that polyethylene debris correlated with the degree of PPO could not be confirmed. Also, metallic debris and infectious or rheumatoid activity did not correlate with PPO. TYPE OF STUDY/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic I....

  9. Cartilage cell proliferation in degenerative TFCC wrist lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglaub, Frank; Thomas, Susanne B; Wolf, Maya B; Dragu, Adrian; Kroeber, Markus W; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Horch, Raymund E

    2010-08-01

    The central zone of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) of the wrist is thought to be avascular and is generally considered to lack any healing potential. The purpose of this study was to investigate, if cartilage cells of degenerative disc lesions possess any healing or proliferation potential and whether ulna length plays a significant role in the proliferation process. Cells positive for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were found in all specimens. Specimens of patients with ulna positive variance showed a decreased number of PCNA positive cells than specimens of patients with either negative or neutral ulna variance. We found that cartilage cells of Palmer type 2C lesions undergo mitotic cell division, thus exhibiting proliferation capability. It could not be shown that ulnar length is significantly correlated with the number of PCNA positive cells.

  10. Three-corner wrist fusion using memory staples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riet, Roger P; Bain, Gregory I

    2006-12-01

    Scapholunate dissociation with advanced collapse (SLAC), scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC), and lunotriquetral advanced collapse (LTAC) of the carpus are challenging problems. Various treatment options have been described. We describe a technique of 3-corner wrist fusion, using memory staples. The scaphoid and triquetrum are resected, and the capitate is fused to the lunate. Articular cartilage is removed from the capitolunate joint, and the bones are shaped to conforming surfaces. Bone graft from the resected triquetrum and scaphoid is used to increase fusion rate and a dynamic compressive fixation force is applied due to the unique properties of the memory staples. The main advantages of this procedure include the following: retained anatomical articulation between the lunate and the lunate fossa on the radius, improved ulnar deviation due to the resection of the triquetrum, and an excellent fusion rate between the lunate and capitate due to the dynamic fixation, the conforming surfaces, and the use of autologous bone graft.

  11. A Novel, Open Access Method to Assess Sleep Duration Using a Wrist-Worn Accelerometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T van Hees

    Full Text Available Wrist-worn accelerometers are increasingly being used for the assessment of physical activity in population studies, but little is known about their value for sleep assessment. We developed a novel method of assessing sleep duration using data from 4,094 Whitehall II Study (United Kingdom, 2012-2013 participants aged 60-83 who wore the accelerometer for 9 consecutive days, filled in a sleep log and reported sleep duration via questionnaire. Our sleep detection algorithm defined (nocturnal sleep as a period of sustained inactivity, itself detected as the absence of change in arm angle greater than 5 degrees for 5 minutes or more, during a period recorded as sleep by the participant in their sleep log. The resulting estimate of sleep duration had a moderate (but similar to previous findings agreement with questionnaire based measures for time in bed, defined as the difference between sleep onset and waking time (kappa = 0.32, 95%CI:0.29,0.34 and total sleep duration (kappa = 0.39, 0.36,0.42. This estimate was lower for time in bed for women, depressed participants, those reporting more insomnia symptoms, and on weekend days. No such group differences were found for total sleep duration. Our algorithm was validated against data from a polysomnography study on 28 persons which found a longer time window and lower angle threshold to have better sensitivity to wakefulness, while the reverse was true for sensitivity to sleep. The novelty of our method is the use of a generic algorithm that will allow comparison between studies rather than a "count" based, device specific method.

  12. Electromyographic investigation of hypnotic arm levitation: differences between voluntary arm elevation and involuntary arm levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Burkhard; Schiebler, Philipp; Piesbergen, Christoph; Hagl, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Thirty-three volunteers were randomly exposed to 3 conditions: hypnotic arm levitation, holding up the arm voluntarily without hypnosis, and imagined arm lifting without hypnosis. Trapezius, deltoid, extensor digitorum, flexor digitorum profundus, biceps brachii, and triceps brachii muscles were measured. Strain and muscle activity during lifting and holding up the right arm for 3 minutes were used as dependent variables. During hypnotic arm levitation, the total muscle activity was lower than during holding it up voluntarily (p levitation.

  13. A Bioinspired 10 DOF Wearable Powered Arm Exoskeleton for Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Kanti Manna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed exoskeleton device (Exorn has ten degrees of freedom to control joints starting from shoulder griddle to wrist to provide better redundancy, portability, and flexibility to the human arm motion. A 3D conceptual model is being designed to make the system wearable by human arm. All the joints are simple revolute joints with desired motion limit. A Simulink model of the human arm is being developed with proper mass and length to determine proper torque required for actuating those joints. Forward kinematics of the whole system has been formulated for getting desired dexterous workspace. A proper and simple Graphical User Interface (GUI and the required embedded system have been designed for providing physiotherapy lessons to the patients. In the literature review it has been found that researchers have generally ignored the motion of shoulder griddle. Here we have implemented those motions in our design. It has also been found that people have taken elbow pronation and supination motion as a part of shoulder internal and external rotation though both motions are quite different. A predefined resolved motion rate control structure with independent joint control is used so that all movements can be controlled in a predefined way.

  14. Bionics Solution to Learn the Arm Reaching with Collision Avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gorce

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a learning model that simulates the control of an anthropomorphic arm kinematics motion. The objective is to reach and grasp a static prototypic object placed behind different kinds of obstacle in size and position. The network, composed of two generic neural network modules, learns to combine multi-modal arm-related information (trajectory parameters as well as obstacle-related information (obstacle size and location. Our simulation was based on the notion of Via Point, which postulates that the motion planning that is divided into specific successive position of the arm. In order to determine these special points, an experimental protocol has been built and pertinent parameters have been integrated to the model. According to these studies, we propose an original method that takes into account the previous learning modules to determine the entire trajectory of the wrist in order to reach the same object placed behind two successive obstacles. The aim of this approach is to understand better the impact of experience in a task realisation and show that learning can be performed from previous initiation. Some results (applied to obstacle avoidance task show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  15. Arm trajectories and writing strategy in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiappedi Matteo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of elementary writing skills in children is usually obtained with high resolution (and high cost techniques or with low resolution pen-and-paper tests. In this observational study we tested a quantitative method to obtain normative data to describe arm movement during a writing precursor gesture. Methods We recruited 226 healthy children (mean age 9,1 years [range: 6.3 – 11.4 years], attending primary schools belonging to the “Istituto Comprensivo” of Rivanazzano Terme (Pavia. We asked to drive a cursor through a polygonal path (labyrinth projected in front of them using a wireless mouse. Dartfish™ video analysis software was used to elaborate images and Excel™, MedCalc™ and Statistica 7™ to analyze values of shoulder, elbow and wrist ranges of motion, arm trajectories, execution times and gesture accuracy. Results Differences seen in motor strategies, when divided according to attended class, suggest a proximal-distal maturation of motor control. Obtained values were not significantly correlated with variables such as gender, ethnicity or cognitive functioning. Conclusions This type of approach to a study of arm movement during childhood represents a valid alternative to other tests, considering that it can differentiate children who perform similarly in the VMI test and is non-invasive, low-cost and easily reproducible.

  16. Transverse ultrasound assessment of median nerve deformation and displacement in the human carpal tunnel during wrist movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexiang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Passe, Sandra M; Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, are aggravated by wrist motion, but the effect of these motions on median nerve motion are unknown. To better understand the biomechanics of the abnormal nerve, it is first necessary to understand normal nerve movement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel level on transverse ultrasound images during different wrist movements, to have a baseline for comparison with abnormal movements. Dynamic ultrasound images of both wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were obtained during wrist maximal flexion, extension and ulnar deviation. To simplify the analysis, the initial and final shape and position of the median nerve were measured and analyzed. The circularity of the median nerve was significantly increased and the aspect ratio and perimeter were significantly decreased in the final image compared with the first image during wrist flexion with finger extension, wrist flexion with finger flexion and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (p nerve displacement vector between finger flexion, wrist flexion with finger extension and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (all p's nerve motion in wrist flexion with finger extension (2.36 ± 0.79 normalized units [NU]), wrist flexion with finger flexion (2.46 ± 0.84 NU) and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (2.86 ± 0.51 NU) were higher than those in finger flexion (0.82 ± 0.33 NU), wrist extension with finger extension (0.77 ± 0.46 NU) and wrist extension with finger flexion (0.81 ± 0.58 NU) (p ulnar deviation could induce significant transverse displacement and deformation of the median nerve.

  17. Interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3. Fetal pathology and exclusion of the gene for beta-galactosidase-1 (GLB-1) from 3(p11----p14.2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Coerdt, W; Hahnemann, N

    1988-01-01

    A de novo interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3 was prenatally diagnosed in a male fetus, karyotype 46,XY,del(3)(pter----p14.2::p11----qter). The fetus had craniofacial dysmorphisms, a single transverse palmar crease, ulnar deviation in the wrists, cardiovascular anomalies, a sli...

  18. Evaluation and diagnosis of wrist pain: a case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Ramsey; Mirabelli, Mark H

    2013-04-15

    Patients with wrist pain commonly present with an acute injury or spontaneous onset of pain without a definite traumatic event. A fall onto an outstretched hand can lead to a scaphoid fracture, which is the most commonly fractured carpal bone. Conventional radiography alone can miss up to 30 percent of scaphoid fractures. Specialized views (e.g., posteroanterior in ulnar deviation, pronated oblique) and repeat radiography in 10 to 14 days can improve sensitivity for scaphoid fractures. If a suspected scaphoid fracture cannot be confirmed with plain radiography, a bone scan or magnetic resonance imaging can be used. Subacute or chronic wrist pain usually develops gradually with or without a prior traumatic event. In these cases, the differential diagnosis is wide and includes tendinopathy and nerve entrapment. Overuse of the muscles of the forearm and wrist may lead to tendinopathy. Radial pain involving mostly the first extensor compartment is commonly de Quervain tenosynovitis. The diagnosis is based on history and examination findings of a positive Finkelstein test and a negative grind test. Nerve entrapment at the wrist presents with pain and also with sensory and sometimes motor symptoms. In ulnar neuropathies of the wrist, the typical presentation is wrist discomfort with sensory changes in the fourth and fifth digits. Activities that involve repetitive or prolonged wrist extension, such as cycling, karate, and baseball (specifically catchers), may increase the risk of ulnar neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic tests identify the area of nerve entrapment and the extent of the pathology.

  19. Usefulness of interposition arthroplasty in the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for rheumatoid wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sakahashi, Hisashi; Hirose, Kazuya; Ishima, Takumi; Ishii, Seiichi

    2004-01-01

    The aim of synovectomy combined with the Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure for the treatment of a rheumatoid wrist is to obtain a stable painless wrist that retains sufficient mobility for function. However, loss of motion occurs postoperatively in most cases. In our study of 59 rheumatoid patients, the results of the transposition of distal strips of retinaculum into the radiocarpal and ulnocarpal joints for interposition arthroplasty to maintain wrist motion (interposition group), and transposition below the extensors to provide a gliding surface (SK group) were evaluated. The distal end of the ulna was fixed to the radius with poly-L-lactic acid screws, and a proximal strip of retinaculum was placed above the extensors after synovectomy of the rheumatoid wrist. Clinical symptoms, radiographic changes, and postoperative complications were assessed 3-9 years (mean 5.9 years) postoperatively. Patients in the interposition group showed better postoperative results, including wrist motion, than those of patients in the SK group. Both procedures resulted in only minor complications such as superficial skin necrosis, hematoma, and superficial infection. We concluded that interposition arthroplasty combined with the S-K procedure using a distal strip of retinaculum might be a safe and appropriate method for wrist reconstruction following synovectomy of a rheumatoid wrist.

  20. The influence of elbow joint kinematics on wrist speed in cricket fast bowling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Kane Jytte; Alderson, Jacqueline Anne; Elliott, Bruce Clifford; Mills, Peter Michael

    2015-01-01

    This modelling study sought to describe the relationships between elbow joint kinematics and wrist joint linear velocity in cricket fast bowlers, and to assess the sensitivity of wrist velocity to systematic manipulations of empirical joint kinematic profiles. A 12-camera Vicon motion analysis system operating at 250 Hz recorded the bowling actions of 12 high performance fast bowlers. Empirical elbow joint kinematic data were entered into a cricket bowling specific "Forward Kinematic Model" and then subsequently underwent fixed angle, angular offset and angle amplification manipulations. A combination of 20° flexion and 20° abduction at the elbow was shown to maximise wrist velocity within the experimental limits. An increased elbow flexion offset manipulation elicited an increase in wrist velocity. Amplification of elbow joint flexion-extension angular displacement indicated that, contrary to previous research, elbow extension range of motion and angular velocity at the time of ball release were negatively related to wrist velocity. Some relationships between manipulated joint angular waveforms and wrist velocity were non-linear, supporting the use of a model that accounts for the non-linear relationships between execution and outcome variables in assessing the relationships between elbow joint kinematics and wrist joint velocity in cricket fast bowlers.

  1. A radiographic evaluation of temporomandibular and hand (Metacarpophalangeal) / wrist joints of patients with adult rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Seema; Gharote, Harshkant; Jose, Renju

    2012-01-01

    Background: A review of literature revealed that, although the involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients is not uncommon, variation in presentation persist. Comparative studies of bony changes in the right and left TMJ with the right and left peripheral hand (Metacarpophalangeal-MCP)/wrist joints have not been done, to the best of our knowledge. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the temporomandibular and hand (MCP) and wrist joints of fifteen rheumatoid arthritis patients were evaluated with questionnaires, clinical and lab assessment and radiographically using conventional radiographs and computed tomography. Students t-test was applied for the statistical analysis of the data obtained and a P value of 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Comparisons between the right TMJ with right MCP/wrist joint and left TMJ with left MCP/wrist joint did not reveal statistically significant results. Radiographically, flattening and erosions were the common manifestations. MCP joints were more affected than the wrist, but whenever the wrist was involved, it was more likely to be bilaterally affected. Conclusions: Although the TMJ showed osseous changes of a higher grade than the hand (MCP) and wrist joints radiographically, it was observed that patients were more aware of the peripheral joint discomfort. There were no significant differences between TMJ and peripheral joints on both right and left sides. PMID:23814559

  2. Effects of handle angle and work orientation on hammering: I. Wrist motion and hammering performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmarklin, R W; Marras, W S

    1989-08-01

    This research investigated the range of wrist motion characteristics associated with the ergonomic principle of "bending the tool and not the wrist" as applied to the hammer. It is thought that bending the tool reduces angular wrist motion, which has been shown in the literature to be a risk factor in hand/wrist disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome and tenosynovitis. Hammer handles angled at 0 (straight), 20, and 40 deg were investigated in this study. For novices, hammer handles bent at 20 and 40 deg resulted in less total ulnar deviation than straight hammers. However, there was a trade-off in beginning and ending positions of the wrist in that the angled hammers reduced ulnar deviation at the impact position but increased radial deviation at the starting position of a hammer stroke. Handle angle did not significantly affect hammering performance. Wrist motion was affected minimally by hammering orientation, but hammering performance was significantly worse in the wall orientation compared with the bench orientation. This research suggests that for novice users, hammers with handles bent in the range of 20 to 40 deg could possibly decrease the incidence of hand/wrist disorders caused by hammering.

  3. The effect of strapping on the motor performance of the ankle and wrist joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauranen, K; Siira, P; Vanharanta, H

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of strapping on different components of motor performance of wrist and ankle joints. The subjects were 14 healthy volunteers (12 females, two males), aged 21-33 years, with no known previous injuries of the ankle and wrist joints. The measurements were made with the HPM/BEP system and Isokinetic Lido Active Multi-joint system. First, the subjects performed the test without strapping and then, on the following day, with strapped right wrist and ankle joints. The strapping of the wrist increased the simple reaction time by 9%, choice reaction time by 9% and decreased the wrist tapping speed by 21%. Wrist strength decreased in flexion (180 degrees/s) by 14% and ulnar deviation (180 degrees/s) by 8%. The strapping of the ankle increased the simple reaction time by 12%, choice reaction time by 9% and decreased foot tapping speed by 14%. Ankle strength in plantar flexion decreased in 60 degrees/s by 22% and 180 degrees/s by 14% and in inversion in 60 degrees/s by 28% and 180 degrees/s by 15%. These results suggest the strapping of ankle and wrist joints reduces motor performance in the above-mentioned directions as measured by the following parameters: simple reaction time, choice reaction time, tapping speed, and muscle strength.

  4. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    34military activities, whether in the armed forces, their civilian sectors, or in the ’defence’ indus- try". In another paper Professor Carl Sagan ...spurring the development of new weapons. Star Wars is a case in point. As Carl Sagan puts it, the idea is doomed: "SDI is ruinously expensive, it can

  5. ARM : abstract rewriting machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F.T. Kamperman; H.R. Walters (Pum)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTerm rewriting is frequently used as implementation technique for algebraic specifications. In this paper we present the abstract term rewriting machine (ARM), which has an extremely compact instruction set and imposes no restrictions on the implemented TRSs. Apart from standard

  6. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    like tired runners exposed to the sights of millions of viewers. The fear of oxygen starvation was handled by the U.S. President on several levels...and to present the U.S. attitudes as the only way out of the maze of the arms race. It is an attempt to push through the old principles of U.S

  7. Worldwide Report, Arms Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-12

    thai, in the long run one cannot oven tell to willy frandi’and fgon fahr . ’r’ho Soviets arc thus evoking the suspicion that they are playing dirty...material resources and the knowledge of scientists in combatting diseases , if the resources were spent on it that are taken up by the arms race

  8. Robotic Arm End Effector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Image illustrates the tools on the end of the arm that are used to acquire samples, image the contents of the scoop, and perform science experiments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-31

    Bonn RHEINISCHER MERKUR /CHRIST UND WELT, 12 Oct 85) . 14 GDR Commentary on Geneva Talks (Various sources,various dates) 19 Military...USSR GENEVA TALKS FRG DEFENSE UNDERSECRETARY SUPPORTS U.S. VIEW ON ARMS CONTROL Bonn RHEINISCHER MERKUR /CHRIST UND WELT in German 12 Oct 85 p 3

  10. Arms Trafficking and Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    chronology of the intensification of violence in the area, see Noche Y Niebla: Panorama De Derechos Humanos Y Violencia Politica En Colombia, Bogotá...Arms, London, UK: Zed Books, 2000, pp. 155–178. Noche Y Niebla: Panorama De Derechos Humanos Y Violencia Politica En Colombia, Bogotá: Cinep & Justicia

  11. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Joint-Stock Company"] [Text] A constituent conference of the "Ural- Kosmos " closed joint-stock company [aktsionernoye obshchestvo zakrytogo tipa] has...due to be destroyed under arms cuts. Their warheads will be replaced by communications satellites. The founders of the "Ural- Kosmos " company note

  12. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Soviet Laser Expert (N. G. Bazov Interview; CAMBIO 16, 11-18 Feb 85) 86 Unnamed General Urges French ’Star Wars’ Effort (Hoplites; LE MONDE, 6...1024 85 JPRS-TAC-85-002 1 April 1985 SPACE ARMS SPANISH MAGAZINE CITES SOVIET LASER EXPERT PM211619 [Editorial Report] Madrid CAMBIO 16 in Spanish

  13. The Potential Risk Factors Relevant to Lateral Epicondylitis by Wrist Coupling Posture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ya Lee

    Full Text Available The use of awkward wrist postures and unskilled techniques might induce lateral epicondylitis. This study thus investigated the effects of wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity on the dynamic performances of the wrist muscles during the coupling posture via a custom-made bi-planar isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty subjects were recruited to perform the isokinetic testing. We measured the muscle strengths and activities for the wrist extensors and flexors during concentric and eccentric contractions at three movement velocities, 30°s-1, 90°s-1, and 180°s-1, combined with three wrist postures, neutral position (NP, radial deviation (RD, and ulnar deviation (UD. The root mean square (RMS of the electromyographic signal in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC, normalized peak torque of extensors, and ratio of normalized peak torque between wrist extensors and flexors, were all greater in the NP than RD and UD in both contractions. The ratio of RMS between EDC and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS had a significantly greater value in RD than UD during the concentric contraction. The EDC showed significantly higher activity at the fast velocity in both contractions. Nevertheless, a significantly higher RMS of the electromyographic signal between EDC and FDS and the ratio of strength between wrist extensors and flexors were found at slow velocity in both contractions. The wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity of the wrist joint should thus be considered as influential factors which might alter the dynamic performances, and may result in further injury of the elbow joint.

  14. The Potential Risk Factors Relevant to Lateral Epicondylitis by Wrist Coupling Posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Ya; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Chien-Ju; Jou, I-Ming; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Su, Fong-Chin

    2016-01-01

    The use of awkward wrist postures and unskilled techniques might induce lateral epicondylitis. This study thus investigated the effects of wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity on the dynamic performances of the wrist muscles during the coupling posture via a custom-made bi-planar isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty subjects were recruited to perform the isokinetic testing. We measured the muscle strengths and activities for the wrist extensors and flexors during concentric and eccentric contractions at three movement velocities, 30°s-1, 90°s-1, and 180°s-1, combined with three wrist postures, neutral position (NP), radial deviation (RD), and ulnar deviation (UD). The root mean square (RMS) of the electromyographic signal in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC), normalized peak torque of extensors, and ratio of normalized peak torque between wrist extensors and flexors, were all greater in the NP than RD and UD in both contractions. The ratio of RMS between EDC and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) had a significantly greater value in RD than UD during the concentric contraction. The EDC showed significantly higher activity at the fast velocity in both contractions. Nevertheless, a significantly higher RMS of the electromyographic signal between EDC and FDS and the ratio of strength between wrist extensors and flexors were found at slow velocity in both contractions. The wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity of the wrist joint should thus be considered as influential factors which might alter the dynamic performances, and may result in further injury of the elbow joint. PMID:27171198

  15. Real-time estimation of 3D human arm motion from markerless images for human-machine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Siddharth; Kofman, Jonathan

    2003-10-01

    Vision-based motion tracking is commonly used in surveillance, human-machine interfaces in robotics and automation, virtual and augmented reality applications and biomechanics. Most techniques require markers, use a predefined motion sequence or user-intervention for initialization, and do not process in real-time. This paper describes the implementation of a vision-based non-invasive technique for markerless real-time tracking of human-arm motion. Human-arm motion is tracked by processing images from two calibrated cameras in real-time to estimate the position of the 3D joint centers of the wrist and elbow, and determine the orientation of the hand from the 3D positions of the index finger and thumb. Tracking of the hand and arm was carried out without any prior knowledge of subject's arm length, texture, width and distance from the camera.

  16. Non-consent to a wrist-worn accelerometer in older adults: the role of socio-demographic, behavioural and health factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Hassani

    Full Text Available Accelerometers, initially waist-worn but increasingly wrist-worn, are used to assess physical activity free from reporting-bias. However, its acceptability by study participants is unclear. Our objective is to assess factors associated with non-consent to a wrist-mounted accelerometer in older adults.Data are from 4880 Whitehall II study participants (1328 women, age range = 60-83, requested to wear a wrist-worn accelerometer 24 h every day for 9 days in 2012/13. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health-related factors were assessed by questionnaire and weight, height, blood pressure, cognitive and motor function were measured during a clinical examination.210 participants had contraindications and 388 (8.3% of the remaining 4670 participants did not consent. Women, participants reporting less physical activity and less favorable general health were more likely not to consent. Among the clinical measures, cognitive impairment (Odds Ratio = 2.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-4.00 and slow walking speed (Odds Ratio = 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.86 were associated with higher odds of non-consent.The rate of non-consent in our study of older adults was low. However, key markers of poor health at older ages were associated with non-consent, suggesting some selection bias in the accelerometer data.

  17. Salvage of a post-traumatic arthritic wrist using the scaphoid as an osteochondral graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, A; Ozben, H; Russomando, A

    2014-09-01

    The authors describe a case of post-traumatic wrist arthritis with an osteochondral defect in the scaphoid fossa of the radius. The patient was treated with proximal row carpectomy, radial styloidectomy and reconstruction of the defect using the proximal half of the scaphoid as an autologous osteochondral graft. Pain relief was achieved while wrist motion and strength were improved. The carpal bones are a source of osteochondral grafts and can be used to expand the indications of motion-preserving wrist salvage procedures.

  18. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaar, Annelie; Maas, Mario; Rijn, Rick R. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105, AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Walenkamp, Monique M.J.; Bentohami, Abdelali; Goslings, J.C. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steyerberg, Ewout W. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jager, L.C. [University of Amsterdam, Emergency Department, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sosef, Nico L. [Spaarne Hospital, Department of Surgery, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Velde, Romuald van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Hilversum (Netherlands); Ultee, Jan M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, Niels W.L. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maasstadziekenhuis Rotterdam, Department of Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  19. COMPARING PUMA ROBOT ARM WITH THE HUMAN ARM MOVEMENTS; AN ALTERNATIVE ROBOTIC ARM SHOULDER DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa BOZDEMİR; ADIGÜZEL, Esat

    1999-01-01

    Using the robotic arms instead of human power becomes increasingly widespread nowadays. Widening of the robotic arms usage field is parallel to improvement of movement capability of it. In this study PUMA Robotic Arm System that is a developed system of the robotic arms was compared with a human arm due to movement. A new joint was added to PUMA Robotic Arm System to have the movements similar to the human shoulder joint. Thus, a shoulder was designed that can make movements through the sides...

  20. Modernization of African Armed Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa.......Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa....

  1. Star Formation in Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    The origin and types of spiral arms are reviewed with an emphasis on the connections between these arms and star formation. Flocculent spiral arms are most likely the result of transient instabilities in the gas that promote dense cloud formation, star formation, and generate turbulence. Long irregular spiral arms are usually initiated by gravitational instabilities in the stars, with the gas contributing to and following these instabilities, and star formation in the gas. Global spiral arms triggered by global perturbations, such as a galaxy interaction, can be wavemodes with wave reflection in the inner regions. They might grow and dominate the disk for several rotations before degenerating into higher-order modes by non-linear effects. Interstellar gas flows through these global arms, and through the more transient stellar spiral arms as well, where it can reach a high density and low shear, thereby promoting self-gravitational instabilities. The result is the formation of giant spiral arm cloud complexes,...

  2. Effect of Tendon Vibration on Hemiparetic Arm Stability in Unstable Workspaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan O Conrad

    Full Text Available Sensory stimulation of wrist musculature can enhance stability in the proximal arm and may be a useful therapy aimed at improving arm control post-stroke. Specifically, our prior research indicates tendon vibration can enhance stability during point-to-point arm movements and in tracking tasks. The goal of the present study was to investigate the influence of forearm tendon vibration on endpoint stability, measured at the hand, immediately following forward arm movements in an unstable environment. Both proximal and distal workspaces were tested. Ten hemiparetic stroke subjects and 5 healthy controls made forward arm movements while grasping the handle of a two-joint robotic arm. At the end of each movement, the robot applied destabilizing forces. During some trials, 70 Hz vibration was applied to the forearm flexor muscle tendons. 70 Hz was used as the stimulus frequency as it lies within the range of optimal frequencies that activate the muscle spindles at the highest response rate. Endpoint position, velocity, muscle activity and grip force data were compared before, during and after vibration. Stability at the endpoint was quantified as the magnitude of oscillation about the target position, calculated from the power of the tangential velocity data. Prior to vibration, subjects produced unstable, oscillating hand movements about the target location due to the applied force field. Stability increased during vibration, as evidenced by decreased oscillation in hand tangential velocity.

  3. Increasing cognitive load attenuates right arm swing in healthy human walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Tim; Easthope, Christopher S.; Filli, Linard; Lőrincz, Lilla; Schrafl-Altermatt, Miriam; Brugger, Peter; Linnebank, Michael; Curt, Armin; Zörner, Björn; Bolliger, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human arm swing looks and feels highly automated, yet it is increasingly apparent that higher centres, including the cortex, are involved in many aspects of locomotor control. The addition of a cognitive task increases arm swing asymmetry during walking, but the characteristics and mechanism of this asymmetry are unclear. We hypothesized that this effect is lateralized and a Stroop word-colour naming task-primarily involving left hemisphere structures-would reduce right arm swing only. We recorded gait in 83 healthy subjects aged 18-80 walking normally on a treadmill and while performing a congruent and incongruent Stroop task. The primary measure of arm swing asymmetry-an index based on both three-dimensional wrist trajectories in which positive values indicate proportionally smaller movements on the right-increased significantly under dual-task conditions in those aged 40-59 and further still in the over-60s, driven by reduced right arm flexion. Right arm swing attenuation appears to be the norm in humans performing a locomotor-cognitive dual-task, confirming a prominent role of the brain in locomotor behaviour. Women under 60 are surprisingly resistant to this effect, revealing unexpected gender differences atop the hierarchical chain of locomotor control.

  4. Robotic Arm of Rover 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    JPL engineers examine the robotic arm of Mars Exploration Rover 1. The arm is modeled after a human arm, complete with joints, and holds four devices on its end, the Rock Abrasion Tool which can grind into Martian rocks, a microscopic imager, and two spectrometers for elemental and iron-mineral identification.

  5. ARM User Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder, LR

    2010-06-22

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to, among other things, determine how to organize the exponentially growing data within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, and identify users’ preferred data analysis system. The survey findings appear to have met this objective, having received approximately 300 responses that give insight into the type of work users perform, usage of the data, percentage of data analysis users might perform on an ARM-hosted computing resource, downloading volume level where users begin having reservations, opinion about usage if given more powerful computing resources (including ability to manipulate data), types of tools that would be most beneficial to them, preferred programming language and data analysis system, level of importance for certain types of capabilities, and finally, level of interest in participating in a code-sharing community.

  6. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-12

    Paris AFP 29 Jan] 40 FRANCE Potential of Iraqi CBW, Nuclear Arms Evaluated [E. Marcuse ; L’EXPRESS INTERNATIONAL 18 Jan] 40 Firm Denies...18 Jan 91 p 13 [Article by Elie Marcuse : "Iraq’s Dirty Weapons"] [Excerpts] [passage omitted] There are three possible actions in Iraq’s battle...example, culture media for breeding plague, cholera, and anthrax. Even minor quan- tities of mycotoxins, which can cause cancer even when strongly

  7. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161. In order- ing, it is recommended that the JPRS number, title, date and author, if applicable, of publication be...Road, Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS-TAC-86-025 14 March 1986 WORLDWIDE REPORT ARMS CONTROL CONTENTS U.S.-USSR GENEVA TALKS, USSR: Possibility for...34Vreyma" newscast] [Excerpts] A Moscow premiere. Our correspondent reports: The audience is hurrying to a premiere at the Moscow Satire Theater. What

  8. Kiikuv maja / Anu Arm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arm, Anu

    2006-01-01

    Eesti Kunstiakadeemia esimese kursuse arhitektuuriüliõpilaste II semestri töö. Juhendaja arhitekt Andres Alver, ehitamise Pedaspeale organiseeris suvepraktika juhendaja arhitekt Jaan Tiidemann. Autor Anu Arm, kaasa töötasid ja valmis ehitasid: Ott Alver, Maarja Elm, Mari Hunt, Alvin Järving, Marten Kaevats, Riho Kerge, Reedik Poopuu, Anu Põime, Helen Rebane, Kaisa Saarva, Martin Tago, Reet Volt. Valmis: 19. VIII 2006

  9. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    SINMUN in Korean 19 Jan 90 p 2 [ Editorial : "Arms Reduction Amid East-West Reconcil- iation"] [Text] It appears that with the end of cold-war, the...Navigation Radar Deployment PY1701143090 La Paz La Red Panamericana in Spanish 1130 GMT 17 Jan 90 [Text] Aeronautics Minister Luis Gonzales...airspace and that it can guarantee our sovereignty. Aeronautics Military Under Secretary Installed PY1701125290 La Paz La Red Panamericana in

  10. Kiikuv maja / Anu Arm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arm, Anu

    2006-01-01

    Eesti Kunstiakadeemia esimese kursuse arhitektuuriüliõpilaste II semestri töö. Juhendaja arhitekt Andres Alver, ehitamise Pedaspeale organiseeris suvepraktika juhendaja arhitekt Jaan Tiidemann. Autor Anu Arm, kaasa töötasid ja valmis ehitasid: Ott Alver, Maarja Elm, Mari Hunt, Alvin Järving, Marten Kaevats, Riho Kerge, Reedik Poopuu, Anu Põime, Helen Rebane, Kaisa Saarva, Martin Tago, Reet Volt. Valmis: 19. VIII 2006

  11. Sauvé-Kapandji procedure in a patient with wrist disarticulation: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hyun Sik; Chung, Myung Ki; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The advantage of preserving the distal radioulnar joint in wrist disarticulation is that full forearm rotation is possible if the joint is intact, which improves the capability of the amputee. The Sauvé-Kapandji procedure has been performed to treat rheumatoid or post-traumatic chronic instability and/or arthritis of the distal radioulnar joint. We report a patient with wrist disarticulation that presented to us with limited supination of the wrist due to an injured distal radioulnar joint. We performed the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure, and the patient could regain functional supination of the forearm without losing the ulnar styloid flare that improved prosthetic suspension. This case suggests that the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure can be performed to maintain the advantage of wrist disarticulation even when the initial trauma involves an irreparable injury of the distal radioulnar joint.

  12. MRI features in de Quervain`s tenosynovitis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glajchen, N. [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Schweitzer, M. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain`s stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain`s synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain`s disease. De Quervain`s tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis in persons with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoun-Seung Kang, MD, PhD, CPO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis (WDFHO is a device used to restore hand function in persons with tetraplegic spinal cord injury by furnishing three-point prehension. We assessed the effectiveness and biomechanical properties of the WDFHO in 24 persons with cervical 6 or 7 tetraplegia who have severely impaired hand function. This study introduces a mechanical operating model to assess the efficiency of the WDFHO. Experimental results showed that pinch force increased significantly (p < 0.001 after using the WDFHO and was found to positively correlate with the strength of wrist extensor muscles (r = 0.41, p < 0.001. However, when the strength of the wrist extensors acting on the WDFHO was greater, the reciprocal wrist and finger motion that generates three-point prehension was less effective (r = 0.79, p < 0.001. Reliable and valid biomechanical evaluation of the WDFHO could improve our understanding of its biomechanics.

  14. [Post-traumatic carpal collapse (SLAC- and SNAC-wrist)--stage classification and therapeutic possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmer, H; Krapohl, B; Sauerbier, M; Hahn, P

    1997-09-01

    Longstanding scaphoid nonunion or scapholunate ligament injuries can lead to carpal collapse. SLAC-wrist (scapholunate advanced collapse) following scapholunate dissociation and SNAC-wrist (scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse) after missed fusion of scaphoid fracture should be differentiated. Severity of degenerative changes is classified by three stages. In stage I where arthrosis is limited to the radial styloid reconstructive procedures of the scaphoid or scapholunate ligament are the treatment of choice. In stage II including arthrosis of the radioscaphoid joint and stage III with additional arthrosis in the midcarpal joint these procedures are excluded. Salvage procedures preserving wrist mobility like midcarpal fusion or proximal row carpectomy are preferable to total wrist fusion which represents the last line of defence.

  15. A new plate for partial wrist fusions: results in midcarpal arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, D M

    2011-05-01

    Partial wrist fusions are commonly performed for various degenerative conditions. In this series 30 wrists had a scaphoidectomy and midcarpal arthrodesis performed with a new plate. The most common indications were SLAC and SNAC wrists. In 24 cases a four-corner arthrodesis was done and in the other six the triquetrum was not included. Mean follow-up was 3 years. Mean flexion was 31° and extension 35°. Union was achieved in all wrists despite movement being commenced early. The plates proved straightforward to use, allowing some latitude in placement. This series confirms that scaphoidectomy and midcarpal arthrodesis is a useful salvage procedure and that these plates are suitable for that purpose.

  16. USE OF TECHNOLOGIES OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE MICROSURGERY IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH WRIST PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Kutyanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the results of treatment of 44 patients with injuries and tumors of wrist. The main aims of microsurgical interventions in such patients were replacement of bone defects (40,9%, replacement of skin defects (25,0%, and also elimination of contractures of wrist joint and fingers (20,5%. At the same time high frequency of use of bony flaps was caused mostly not by the need in replacement of defects of bones, but by the need in stabilization of wrist joint aiming to create the conditions for normal function of fingers. It has been stated that the use of technologies of plastic and reconstructive microsurgery in patients with wrist pathology is not the main factor determing the good result of treatment. The good result of treatment is mainly determined by the condition of fingers, not only appropriate surgical treatment but also adequate rehabilitation helps them achieve their necessary function.

  17. Imaging of Sports-related Hand and Wrist Injuries: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockenpot, Eric; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Demondion, Xavier; Chantelot, Christophe; Cotten, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Hand and wrist injuries are common occurrences in amateur and professional sports and many of them are sport-specific. These can be divided into two categories: traumatic injuries and overuse injuries. The aim of this article is to review the most common hand and wrist sports-related lesions. Acute wrist injuries are predominantly bone fractures, such as those of the scaphoid, hamate hook, and ulnar styloid. Ligament lesions are more challenging for radiologists and may lead to carpal instability if undiagnosed. Overuse wrist injuries are mainly represented by tendinous disorders, with De Quervain syndrome and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon disorders being the most common among them; however, there are other possible disorders such as impaction syndromes, stress fractures, and neurovascular lesions. Finally, finger lesions, including closed-tendon injuries (mallet and boutonniere injuries, jersey finger, and boxer's knuckle), flexor pulley injuries, and skier's thumb, should also be detected. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  18. Clinical Study on the Wrist-Ankle Acupuncture Treatment for 30 Cases of Diabetic Peripheral Neuritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanisms of wrist-ankle acupuncture for prevention and treatment of diabetic peripheral neuritis. Methods: Ninety cases of diabetic peripheral neuritis were randomly divided into 3groups, and treated respectively with wrist-ankle acupuncture, body-acupuncture, and the western routine medical treatment, with 30 cases in each of the groups; and therapeutic effects and laboratory results compared. Results: It is proved that the therapeutic effects of the wrist-ankle acupuncture group and body acupuncture group were significantly superior to those of the control group, with no significant differences between the former two groups. Conclusion: Wrist-ankle acupuncture has the actions of improving the metabolisms of blood sugar and blood-lipid, lowering down blood viscosity, and restoring the functions of peripheral nerve cells, thus giving definite therapeutic effects for diabetic peripheral neuritis.

  19. [Bilateral hand salvage of subtotal left hand amputation and complex right wrist destruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernekamp, J-F; Bigdeli, A K; Engel, H; Kneser, U; Kremer, T; Pelzer, M

    2016-06-01

    Complex injuries of the hand and wrist lead to severe loss of function. Complex trauma of the upper extremities may lead to severe disabilities and therefore meticulous reconstruction is of utmost importance to enable good functional outcome and to assure an adequate quality of life. We demonstrate the case of a patient who suffered from complex bilateral injuries at the wrist level including a subtotal amputation of the left hand and third degree open wrist destruction on the contralateral side. Due to the immediate bilateral operation including the unilateral use of an osteocutaneous free fibula flap, both hands could be salvaged in this case. Severe hand and wrist injuries also require intensive postoperative treatment including intensive physiotherapy, occupational therapy, pain therapy and psychological support to achieve a good functional result.

  20. A three-dimensional quantitative analysis of carpal deformity in rheumatoid wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimitsu, S; Murase, T; Hashimoto, J; Oka, K; Sugamoto, K; Yoshikawa, H; Moritomo, H

    2007-04-01

    We have measured the three-dimensional patterns of carpal deformity in 20 wrists in 20 rheumatoid patients in which the carpal bones were shifted ulnarwards on plain radiography. Three-dimensional bone models of the carpus and radius were created by computerised tomography with the wrist in the neutral position. The location of the centroids and rotational angle of each carpal bone relative to the radius were calculated and compared with those of ten normal wrists. In the radiocarpal joint, the proximal row was flexed and the centroids of all carpal bones translocated in an ulnar, proximal and volar direction with loss of congruity. In the midcarpal joint, the distal row was extended and congruity generally well preserved. These findings may facilitate more positive use of radiocarpal fusion alone for the deformed rheumatoid wrist.

  1. Biomechanical evaluation of wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis in persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yeoun-Seung; Park, Yoon-Ghil; Lee, Bum-Suk; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2013-01-01

    The wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis (WDFHO) is a device used to restore hand function in persons with tetraplegic spinal cord injury by furnishing three-point prehension. We assessed the effectiveness and biomechanical properties of the WDFHO in 24 persons with cervical 6 or 7 tetraplegia who have severely impaired hand function. This study introduces a mechanical operating model to assess the efficiency of the WDFHO. Experimental results showed that pinch force increased significantly (p < 0.001) after using the WDFHO and was found to positively correlate with the strength of wrist extensor muscles (r = 0.41, p < 0.001). However, when the strength of the wrist extensors acting on the WDFHO was greater, the reciprocal wrist and finger motion that generates three-point prehension was less effective (r = 0.79, p < 0.001). Reliable and valid biomechanical evaluation of the WDFHO could improve our understanding of its biomechanics.

  2. Phoenix Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A vital instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is the robotic arm, which will dig into the icy soil and bring samples back to the science deck of the spacecraft for analysis. In September 2006 at a Lockheed Martin Space Systems clean room facility near Denver, spacecraft technician Billy Jones inspects the arm during the assembly phase of the mission. Using the robotic arm -- built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena -- the Phoenix mission will study the history of water and search for complex organic molecules in the ice-rich soil. The Phoenix mission is led by Principal Investigator Peter H. Smith of the University of Arizona, Tucson, with project management at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and development partnership with Lockheed Martin Space Systems. International contributions for Phoenix are provided by the Canadian Space Agency, the University of Neuchatel (Switzerland), the University of Copenhagen, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Cross-arm replantation for traumatic bilateral upper extremity amputations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kailu; Zhong, Gang; Yin, Jiahui; Xiang, Zhou; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo

    2011-02-01

    A 40-year-old woman had her right extremity avulsed at the proximal upper arm level and the wrist and hand of her left extremity irretrievably injured in a traffic accident. The right distal forearm was surgically amputated and replanted onto the stump of the left distal forearm. New strategy for nerve repair was applied and the function recovery of the cross-replanted hand was favorable. We thought that cross-extremity replantation was indicated when the patient suffered from bilateral total or subtotal amputation at different levels and orthotopic replantation was impossible.

  4. Wrist Ultrasonography vs. Electrophysiological Studies in the Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Hashemi Attar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nIntroduction: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is caused by compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. It is characterized by pain or paresthesia in areas innervated by the median nerve. Electrophysiological studies are gold standard diagnostic tests for CTS. The objective of this study was to compare ultrasonography and electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of CTS. "nMaterials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 100 wrists of 50 consecutive patients referred to 22-Bahman hospital (Mashhad with the clinical diagnosis of CTS from spring 2007 to summer 2008. These patients suspicious for CTS in at least one of their wrists (based on their complaints and neurological examination including Tinel’s test and Phallen test, were referred for electrophysiological studies including nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. All the patients underwent ultrasonography of both wrists within a week after electrophysiological studies. Ultrasonographies were performed by a radiologist using a high frequency (12 MHz linear probe (PHILIPS Envisor C. The cross sectional area of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel. Measurements equal or more than 10 mm2 were considered as the CTS. Ultrasonographic findings and also clinical examination (Tinel’s test and Phalen’s test were compared with electrophysiological studies (as the gold standard diagnostic test for each wrist separately. "nResults: Of the 100 wrists (50 patients, 53 wrists were diagnosed as CTS based on the electrophysiological studies. Ninety one percent of the wrists with CTS were in female patients. The mean age was 52.1 years (23-75 years. There was no predisposing factor for most cases; however, 6% were affected by diabetes, 6% by hypertriglyceridemia, and 2% by hypothyroidism. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of clinical examination (Tinel’s test and Phalen’s test were 59%, 88

  5. Evidence of wrist proprioceptive reflexes elicited after stimulation of the scapholunate interosseous ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, Elisabet; Persson, Jonas K E; Werner, Michael; Ljung, Björn-Ove

    2009-04-01

    Recent publications on the sensory innervation of wrist ligaments have challenged our understanding of ligaments as mere passive restraints in wrist stability. Mechanoreceptors in ligaments have a role in signaling joint perturbations, in which the afferent information is believed to influence periarticular muscles. The scapholunate interosseous ligament is one of the most richly innervated ligaments in the wrist. The purpose of our study was to investigate the possible existence of a wrist proprioceptive reflex, by which afferent information elicited in the scapholunate interosseous ligament was hypothesized to influence the muscles moving the wrist joint. Nine volunteers (4 women and 5 men; mean age, 26 years; range, 21-28 years) participated in this study. Using ultrasound guidance, a fine-wire electrode was inserted into the dorsal scapholunate interosseous ligament and stimulated with four 1-ms pulses at 200 Hz. Electromyographic activities in extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles were recorded using surface electrodes with the wrist actively positioned in isometric extension, flexion, and radial and ulnar deviation. The average EMGs from 30 consecutive stimulations were rectified and analyzed using the Student's t-test to compare the prestimulus (t(1)) and poststimulus (t(2)) EMG activities. Statistically significant changes in poststimulus EMG activity (t(1)- t(2)) were observed at various time intervals. Within 20 ms, an excitation was seen in the flexor carpi radialis and flexor carpi ulnaris in extension, radial and ulnar deviation, and in extensor carpi radialis brevis in flexion. Co-contractions between agonist and antagonist muscles were observed, with peaks around 150 ms after stimulus. We present evidence of wrist ligamento-muscular reactions. The early-onset reactions may serve in a joint-protective manner, and later co-contractions indicate a supraspinal control of wrist

  6. [Surgical treatment possibilities of advanced carpal collapse (SNAC/SLAC wrist)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbier, M; Bickert, B; Tränkle, M; Kluge, S; Pelzer, M; Germann, G

    2000-07-01

    Longstanding and untreated scaphoid fractures and scapholunate dissociations lead to painful destruction of the wrist with carpal collapse. The severity of degenerative arthrosis is classified in three stages and can be treated adequate operatively. SNAC wrist (scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse) after failed fusion of the scaphoid and SLAC wrist (scapholunate advanced collapse) after scapholunate dissociation should be differentiated. The reconstruction of the scaphoid or scapholunate ligament in stage II and III is no reasonable option. Motion preserving procedures such as proximal row carpectomy or midcarpal arthrodesis are preferable in this situation. Thirty-one male patients (average 41 years) were treated for SNAC or SLAC wrist with midcarpal arthrodesis. All patients were reexamined, the mean follow-up was 15 months. Grip strength was measured with the Dexter-System, pain was evaluated by a visual analogue scale (VAS 0-100). Patients' daily activities and general quality of life were estimated with the DASH-questionnaire. Pain was reduced to 50% compared to the preoperative situation. Grip strength improved to 60% of the opposite side. Active range of motion reached 50% of the contralateral wrist. Total DASH-score reached 39.0. Nonunion at the fusion site necessitated additional surgery in four patients resulting in total wrist arthrodesis. 80% of the patients returned to their original occupation. Midcarpal fusion is a reliable procedure for treating the difficult condition of advanced carpal collapse if proper realignment of the carpus is performed. The DASH-score reflects the subjective impressions of the patients in daily life and justifies the choice of a salvage procedure preserving wrist mobility. Total wrist fusion represents the last line of defense.

  7. Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Chirag M; Stern, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) are the two most common patterns of posttraumatic wrist arthritis. This review discusses the etiology and clinical evaluation, as well as up-to-date treatment options, for both of these conditions. Classic as well as newer innovative techniques are discussed with clinical outcomes in order to provide an evidence-based review of the world's literature on SLAC/SNAC wrist.

  8. Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Chirag M.; Stern, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) are the two most common patterns of posttraumatic wrist arthritis. This review discusses the etiology and clinical evaluation, as well as up-to-date treatment options, for both of these conditions. Classic as well as newer innovative techniques are discussed with clinical outcomes in order to provide an evidence-based review of the world’s literature on SLAC/SNAC wrist.

  9. Hip and Wrist Accelerometer Algorithms for Free-Living Behavior Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Staudenmayer, John; Lanckriet, Gert

    2016-05-01

    Accelerometers are a valuable tool for objective measurement of physical activity (PA). Wrist-worn devices may improve compliance over standard hip placement, but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for measuring PA in free-living settings. Traditional cut-point methods for accelerometers can be inaccurate and need testing in free living with wrist-worn devices. In this study, we developed and tested the performance of machine learning (ML) algorithms for classifying PA types from both hip and wrist accelerometer data. Forty overweight or obese women (mean age = 55.2 ± 15.3 yr; BMI = 32.0 ± 3.7) wore two ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (right hip, nondominant wrist; ActiGraph, Pensacola, FL) for seven free-living days. Wearable cameras captured ground truth activity labels. A classifier consisting of a random forest and hidden Markov model classified the accelerometer data into four activities (sitting, standing, walking/running, and riding in a vehicle). Free-living wrist and hip ML classifiers were compared with each other, with traditional accelerometer cut points, and with an algorithm developed in a laboratory setting. The ML classifier obtained average values of 89.4% and 84.6% balanced accuracy over the four activities using the hip and wrist accelerometer, respectively. In our data set with average values of 28.4 min of walking or running per day, the ML classifier predicted average values of 28.5 and 24.5 min of walking or running using the hip and wrist accelerometer, respectively. Intensity-based cut points and the laboratory algorithm significantly underestimated walking minutes. Our results demonstrate the superior performance of our PA-type classification algorithm, particularly in comparison with traditional cut points. Although the hip algorithm performed better, additional compliance achieved with wrist devices might justify using a slightly lower performing algorithm.

  10. Defining occult injuries of the distal forearm and wrist in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvey, Michael; Patel, S; Avisar, Erez; White, W J; Sorene, E

    2016-06-01

    The nonspecific terms "wrist sprain" and "suspected occult bony injury" are frequently documented as diagnoses in occult paediatric wrist injuries. To date, however, no one has accurately defined their true underlying pathology. The primary objective of this study was to identify the true pathoanatomy of occult acute paediatric wrist injuries. Our secondary objective was to compare our findings with existing adult data in order to determine any population differences that might be clinically relevant. We performed a single-centre retrospective case series evaluating MRI findings in acute paediatric wrist injuries presenting to the hand injury unit between 2011 and 2014. All patients underwent standardised radiographs of the wrist and, where clinically indicated, of the scaphoid. Where no bony anomaly was identified, MRI scanning was offered. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to calculate the agreement between clinical and MRI diagnosis. 57 patients met the final inclusion criteria. Occult fractures and bony contusions comprised the majority of the pathologies, at 36.5 and 35.0 %, respectively. There were no cases of isolated soft-tissue injury. MRI effected management change in 35.1 % of cases. Paediatric wrists demonstrated differences in injury pattern and distribution when compared to an adult population. This study defines for the first time the true pathology of occult paediatric wrist injuries. The current definition of a wrist sprain was not applicable to a single case and therefore appears to be inappropriate for use in the paediatric population. A precise knowledge of the likely pathology facilitates accurate information delivery whilst reducing parental uncertainty and treatment variation.

  11. Gouty wrist arthritis causing carpal tunnel syndrome--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkandar, M F; Sapuan, J; Singh, R; Abdullah, S

    2012-06-01

    A 63 year old male with a history of gout and hypertension presented with carpal tunnel syndrome. He gave history of bilateral wrist pain associated with numbness over the median nerve distribution of the hand. Tinels sign and Phalens test were positive with no obvious thenar muscle wasting on examination. Tophaceous deposits in the flexor tendons and within the synovium of the wrist joint was seen during surgery and this established gout as the cause of median nerve entrapment in this patient.

  12. Delayed ulnar neuropathy at the wrist following open carpal tunnel release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingree, Matthew J; Bosch, E Peter; Liu, Patrick; Smith, Benn E

    2005-03-01

    Open carpal tunnel release is a common and successful treatment of median neuropathy at the wrist (carpal tunnel syndrome). We report a case of delayed ulnar neuropathy at the wrist with onset 2 months after open carpal tunnel release. Clinical findings, electrophysiological studies, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical exploration demonstrated ulnar nerve compression at Guyon's canal resulting from translocation of the carpal tunnel contents. To our knowledge, this is an unreported complication of open carpal tunnel release that merits wide appreciation.

  13. Foreign body penetrations of hand and wrist: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocaoğlu, Emre; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Özalp, Burhan; Akhmedov, Anvar; Doğan, Yunus; Kozanoğlu, Erol; Mete, Fethi Sarper; Erer, Metin

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant practical knowledge and experience on foreign body penetration injuries to the hand and/or wrist, deficient management and complications can still be encountered, and ignorance of its causative and eventual social aspects unfortunately is a substantial fact. This study aims to cover the clinical and social properties and the management of these kinds of injuries. A retrospective analysis of 86 patients requiring evaluation and treatment in a Hand Surgery Division of a university hospital was performed. The median age was 32 (min: 4, max: 63). Industrial workers constituted the largest occupational group (n=22, 25.6%). Twenty-three (26.7%) of the cases were elective admissions. Thirteen (15.1%) patients had various comorbidities, and five (5.8%) had psychiatric diagnoses at the time of the injury. The index finger was the most frequent site of injury (n=29, 33.7%). General anesthesia was not necessary for the management of 94.2% of the cases. In 26 (30%) of the patients, neural, tendinous or osseous damage was observed. Twenty-four (30%) patients were included in a postoperative hand physiotherapy program. The practically well-known general features of the issue and those aspects that may still be overlooked currently are reevaluated herein, in light of our observational data.

  14. A Wrist-Worn Thermohaptic Device for Graceful Interruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Jalaliniya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal haptics is a potential system output modality for wearable devices that promises to function at the periphery of human attention. When adequately combined with existing attention-governing mechanisms of the human mind, it could be used for interrupting the human agent at a time when the negative influence on the ongoing activity is minimal. In this article we present our self-mitigated interruption concept (essentially a symbiosis of artificial external stimuli tuned to existing human attention management mechanisms and perform a pilot study laying the ground for using a wrist-worn thermohaptic actuator for self-mitigating interruption. We then develope a prototype and perform an insightful pilot study. We frame our empirical thermohaptic experimental work in terms of Peripheral Interaction concepts and show how this new approach to Human-Computer Interaction relates to the Context-Aware-systems-inspired approach “Egocentric Interaction” aimed at supporting the design of envisioned Wearable Personal Assistants intended to, among other things, help human perception and cognition with the management of interruptions.

  15. Autologous Blood Injection and Wrist Immobilisation for Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Massy-Westropp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored the effect of autologous blood injection (with ultrasound guidance to the elbows of patients who had radiologically assessed degeneration of the origin of extensor carpi radialis brevis and failed cortisone injection/s to the lateral epicondylitis. Methods. This prospective longitudinal series involved preinjection assessment of pain, grip strength, and function, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Patients were injected with blood from the contralateral limb and then wore a customised wrist support for five days, after which they commenced a stretching, strengthening, and massage programme with an occupational therapist. These patients were assessed after six months and then finally between 18 months and five years after injection, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Results. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed the study, showing significant improvement in pain; the worst pain decreased by two to five points out of a 10-point visual analogue for pain. Self-perceived function improved by 11–25 points out of 100. Women showed significant increase in grip, but men did not. Conclusions. Autologous blood injection improved pain and function in a worker’s compensation cohort of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, who had not had relief with cortisone injection.

  16. Solar powered wrist worn acquisition system for continuous photoplethysmogram monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieffenderfer, James P; Beppler, Eric; Novak, Tristan; Whitmire, Eric; Jayakumar, Rochana; Randall, Clive; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Bozkurt, Alper

    2014-01-01

    We present a solar-powered, wireless, wrist-worn platform for continuous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters during the activities of daily life. In this study, we demonstrate the capability to produce photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals using this platform. To adhere to a low power budget for solar-powering, a 574 nm green light source is used where the PPG from the radial artery would be obtained with minimal signal conditioning. The system incorporates two monocrystalline solar cells to charge the onboard 20 mAh lithium polymer battery. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is used to tether the device to a smartphone that makes the phone an access point to a dedicated server for long term continuous storage of data. Two power management schemes have been proposed depending on the availability of solar energy. In low light situations, if the battery is low, the device obtains a 5-second PPG waveform every minute to consume an average power of 0.57 mW. In scenarios where the battery is at a sustainable voltage, the device is set to enter its normal 30 Hz acquisition mode, consuming around 13.7 mW. We also present our efforts towards improving the charge storage capacity of our on-board super-capacitor.

  17. Armed conflict and child health

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Michael; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Armed conflict has a major impact on child health\\ud throughout the world. One in six children worldwide lives\\ud in an area of armed conflict and civilians are more likely\\ud to die than soldiers as a result of the conflict. In stark\\ud contrast to the effect on children, the international arms\\ud trade results in huge profits for the large corporations\\ud involved in producing arms, weapons and munitions.\\ud Armed conflict is not inevitable but is an important\\ud health issue that should be...

  18. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chao; Dong, Hongjuan; Chu, Hong; Lu, Zuneng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] To prospectively assess the effectiveness of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) by using clinical scores and nerve conduction studies (NCS). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-one patients enrolled in the study were clinically evaluated by a symptom severity scale (SSS) and functional status scale (FSS), and were electrophysiologically evaluated by conventional NCS; distal motor latency (DML), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and difference in sensory latency between the median and ulnar nerves (ΔDSL) were measured. Subjects were treated with wrist splinting. Patients who showed no improvement in symptoms were treated with other conservative treatments, the remaining patients continued to wear splints. SSS, FSS, and NCS were evaluated after splinting as well. [Results] The follow-up was completed in 20 patients (31 wrists) with splinting. SSS and FSS decreased, the DML shortened and ΔDSL decreased significantly after splinting for 3.03 ± 1.16 months. There were significant correlations between SSS and DML, SCV of wrist digit 2, and SCV of wrist digit 4. No correlations were found between SSS and ΔDSL, and FSS and the parameters of NCS. [Conclusion] Neutral wrist nocturnal splinting is effective in at least short term for CTS patients. There is a weak correlation between clinical scores and NCS, which suggests that both approaches should be used to effectively assess the therapeutic effect of CTS treatment.

  19. SHOCK-ABSORBING EFFECTS OF VARIOUS PADDING CONDITIONS IN IMPROVING EFFICACY OF WRIST GUARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Jung Kim

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of wrist guards has limited efficacy in preventing wrist injuries during falling in many sports activities. The objectives of this study were to measure the ground reaction force of the hand under simulated impact of the forearm and hand complex with different padding conditions of wrist guards and to analyze their impact force attenuation and maximum energy absorption for improved functional efficiency. A total of 15 subjects, wearing a commercial wrist guard, participated in a cable-released hand impact experiment to test four different conditions on the volar aspect of the hand, which include a wrist guard without a volar splint (bare hand, with a volar splint (normal use, with a volar splint and additional viscoelastic polymeric padding, and a volar splint and additional air cell padding. The ground reaction force and acceleration of the hand were measured using a force platform mounted on an anti-vibration table and a miniature accelerometer, respectively. Additional padding on the bare hand could substantially improve the maximum energy absorption by more than 39%, with no differences with each other. However, only the air cell padding could simultaneously improve the impact force attenuation by 32% compared with the bare hand impact without compromising the maximum energy absorption. It is recommended that common wrist guard design should provide more compliant padding in the volar aspect to improve the impact force attenuation through optimal material selection and design

  20. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Tat, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s), and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression.

  1. WRIST FORCE SENSOR'S DYNAMIC PERFORMANCE CALIBRATION BASED ON NEGATIVE STEP RESPONSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hongmei

    2008-01-01

    Negative step response experimental method is used in wrist force sensor's dynamic performance calibration. The exciting manner of negative step response method is the same as wrist force sensor's load in working. This experimental method needn't special experiment equipments. Experiment's dynamic repeatability is good. So wrist force sensor's dynamic performance is suitable to be calibrated by negative step response method. A new correlation wavelet transfer method is studied. By wavelet transfer method, the signal is decomposed into two dimensional spaces of time-frequency. So the problem of negative step exciting energy concentrating in the low frequency band is solved. Correlation wavelet transfer doesn't require that wavelet primary function be orthogonal and needn't wavelet reconstruction. So analyzing efficiency is high. An experimental bench is designed and manufactured to load the wrist force sensor orthogonal excitation force/moment. A piezoelectric force sensor is used to setup soft trigger and calculate the value of negative step excitation. A wrist force sensor is calibrated. The pulse response function is calculated after negative step excitation and step response have been transformed to positive step excitation and step response. The pulse response function is transferred to frequency response function. The wrist force sensor's dynamic characteristics are identified by the frequency response function.

  2. Sonography of Non-neoplastic Disorders of the Hand and Wrist Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Draghi, Anna Guja; Draghi, Ferdinando

    2017-07-14

    Tendon disorders commonly cause hand and wrist disability and curtail the performance of work-related duties or routine tasks. Imaging is often needed for diagnosis, but it requires knowledge of the complex anatomic structures of the tendons of the hand and wrist as well as familiarity with related disorders. This review article aims to provide medical professionals with guidelines for the sonographic assessment of the tendons of hand and wrist and related disorders. Sonographic features of tendon disorders affecting the hand and wrist are described here, specifically: infectious tenosynovitis; tendon rupture or tearing; stenosing forms of tenosynovitis such as De Quervain disease and trigger finger; intersection syndrome; insertional tendinopathy; several forms of tendinous instability such as extensor carpi ulnaris instability, climber finger, and boxer knuckle; and tendinopathy in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Postsurgical evaluation of the hand and wrist tendons is also discussed, including the healthy and pathologic appearances of operated tendons as well as impingement from orthopedic hardware. In conclusion, sonography is effective in assessing the tendons of the hand and wrist and related disorders and represents a valuable tool for diagnosis. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N. Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s, flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s, and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s. Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s than with force (3.56 cm/s. A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression.

  4. Visual estimation of pro-supination angle is superior to wrist or elbow angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Shai; Apt, Elad; Kandel, Leonid; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Zinger, Gershon

    2015-05-01

    To examine our hypothesis that the accuracy of visual estimation, while measuring the angles of forearm, wrist and elbow, may vary between the different angles, and that this may depend on the experience of the observer. A slide show comprising of clinical photos and radiographs of different elbow, forearm and wrist angles was presented to 164 attending orthopedic surgeons, orthopedic residents and medical students who made a visual estimation of the different joints' angles. Forearm pronation was found to be estimated most accurately (mean 6.1°) while radiographs of wrist flexion (mean 12°) and photos of wrist extension (mean 16°) were estimated the least accurately. Specialists estimated angles more accurately than residents and both were more accurate than students, regardless of the estimated joint. The accuracy of visual estimation of a joint's angle depends on the specific joint viewed. Experience in the practice of orthopedic surgery (and not only upper extremity surgery) will improve the accuracy of estimation in general. Regarding the elbow, forearm and wrist, the results of our study suggest that a goniometer should be used whenever an accuracy of up to 10° is important, and for measuring wrist flexion and extension.

  5. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chao; Dong, Hongjuan; Chu, Hong; Lu, Zuneng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To prospectively assess the effectiveness of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) by using clinical scores and nerve conduction studies (NCS). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-one patients enrolled in the study were clinically evaluated by a symptom severity scale (SSS) and functional status scale (FSS), and were electrophysiologically evaluated by conventional NCS; distal motor latency (DML), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and difference in sensory latency between the median and ulnar nerves (ΔDSL) were measured. Subjects were treated with wrist splinting. Patients who showed no improvement in symptoms were treated with other conservative treatments, the remaining patients continued to wear splints. SSS, FSS, and NCS were evaluated after splinting as well. [Results] The follow-up was completed in 20 patients (31 wrists) with splinting. SSS and FSS decreased, the DML shortened and ΔDSL decreased significantly after splinting for 3.03 ± 1.16 months. There were significant correlations between SSS and DML, SCV of wrist digit 2, and SCV of wrist digit 4. No correlations were found between SSS and ΔDSL, and FSS and the parameters of NCS. [Conclusion] Neutral wrist nocturnal splinting is effective in at least short term for CTS patients. There is a weak correlation between clinical scores and NCS, which suggests that both approaches should be used to effectively assess the therapeutic effect of CTS treatment. PMID:27630413

  6. A structurally decoupled mechanism for measuring wrist torque in three degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lizhi; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Dingguo

    2015-10-01

    The wrist joint is a critical part of the human body for movement. Measuring the torque of the wrist with three degrees of freedom (DOFs) is important in some fields, including rehabilitation, biomechanics, ergonomics, and human-machine interfacing. However, the particular structure of the wrist joint makes it difficult to measure the torque in all three directions simultaneously. This work develops a structurally decoupled instrument for measuring and improving the measurement accuracy of 3-DOF wrist torque during isometric contraction. Three single-axis torque sensors were embedded in a customized mechanical structure. The dimensions and components of the instrument were designed based on requirement of manufacturability. A prototype of the instrument was machined, assembled, integrated, and tested. The results show that the structurally decoupled mechanism is feasible for acquiring wrist torque data in three directions either independently or simultaneously. As a case study, we use the device to measure wrist torques concurrently with electromyography signal acquisition in preparation for simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control of prostheses.

  7. Diagnosis of distal radioulnar joint subluxation in patients with rheumatoid wrist by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henmi, Shunichi; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Akita, Shosuke; Kuroda, Yusuke; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Subluxation of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is associated with extensor tendon rupture in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it remains difficult to quantitatively evaluate DRUJ subluxation in RA wrist. We devised a new method for assessing DRUJ subluxation. This study investigated whether the new method, known as the RA subluxation ratio (RASR), or a conventional method was superior for detecting extensor tendon rupture in the RA wrist. Thirty-five RA wrists and 10 wrists of healthy volunteers were scanned using computed tomography. The RA wrists were divided into a tendon rupture group and a nonrupture group. The dorsal surface of the distal radius from Lister's tubercle to the ulnar aspect of the distal radius maintains a planar surface in the RA wrist. Therefore, we defined the RASR as the extent of dorsal subluxation of the ulna relative to this plane. We quantified subluxation of the DRUJ by using the RASR or the modified radioulnar line method, and compared the two methods. The RASR was 0.440 in the rupture group, 0.333 in the nonrupture group, and 0.106 in the healthy volunteers. The RASR was significantly higher than the modified radioulnar line method in the sensitivity of diagnosing tendon rupture.

  8. Wrist joint moments of walker-assisted gait:a study of biomechanics and instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    While walkers are commonly prescribed to improve patient stability and ambulatory ability,quantitativestudy of the biomechanical and functional requirements for effective walker use is limited.To investigate the changesin wrist joint moments that occur with the use of a standard walker,a strain gauge-based walker instrumentation system was developed for the measurement of wrist joint moments.This walker dynamometer was integrated with an upper extremity biomechanical model.Preliminary system data were collected for twelve healthy,right-handed young adultsfollowing informed consent.Bilateral upper extremity kinematic data were acquired with a six-camera motion analysis system.Internal joint moments at the wrist were determined in the three clinical planes using the inverse dynamics method.Results showed that during a walker-assisted gait there were several typical demands of wrist abductor,adductor,flexor and external rotator.An interesting " bare phase " of wrist joint moments was also found in phaseangle[-30°,30°] of gait cycle.Complete description of wrist joint moments during walker-assisted gait may provide insight into walker use parameters and rehabilitative strategies.

  9. A Clinical Trial with Brazilian Arnica (Solidago chilensis Meyen) Glycolic Extract in the Treatment of Tendonitis of Flexor and Extensor Tendons of Wrist and Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ary Gomes; Machado, Elbe Rodrigues; de Almeida, Leonardo Mendes; Nunes, Ricardo Marcelo Menezes; Giesbrecht, Patrícia Caldeira Pena; Costa, Regina Mamed; Costa, Helber B; Romão, Wanderson; Kuster, Ricardo Machado

    2015-06-01

    One of the Brazilian arnicas, Solidago chilensis Meyen, is a species of the Asteraceae family. This plant is known by this common name because it shares remarkably similar organoleptic properties with the genus Arnica L., also within the family Asteraceae. We examined the effectiveness of the S. chilensis fluid extract used externally for treating tendinitis of flexor and extensor tendons of wrist and hand in placebo-controlled double-blind clinical pharmacological studies. This study was approved by the Ethical Committee for Scientific Research in Human Beings at University Vila Velha-UVV. Two daily skin applications on the arm skin of a gel cream containing a 5% glycolic plant extract were administered to eight volunteers for 21 days. Among the volunteers, one of their arms was used as the placebo group, and the other one was used as a test group. Statistical data analyses demonstrated a significant reduction in the perception of pain in the arms in the test group, when it was compared to those receiving only the placebo.

  10. Motion-preserving wrist reconstruction using a microsurgical medial femur condylus bone graft and radio-scapho-lunate (RSL limited fusion after osteomyelitis following open distal radius fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmann, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This case presents the microsurgical management in the rare situation after sequestering osteomyelitis of the distal radius to achieve both bony stability and partially preserved wrist motion. A 38-year-old patient underwent after sequestrectomy microsurgical reconstruction using a medial femoral condyle as a prerequisite for simultaneous motion-preserving radio-scapho-lunate (RSL fusion. As a result, 11 months postoperatively, a good functional result was achieved with range of motion of 60° in extension/flexion and 40° in ulnar/radial deviation and grip strength of 12 kg correspondeding to 33% of the dominant contralateral side. Upper extremity usability as measured by Disability of Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire improved from preoperative 24 to after the reconstruction and enabled the patient to resume his work without pain.

  11. Expertise-dependent modulation of muscular and non-muscular torques in multi-joint arm movements during piano keystroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, S; Kinoshita, H

    2008-10-02

    The problem of skill-level-dependent modulation in the joint dynamics of multi-joint arm movements is addressed in this study using piano keystroke performed by expert and novice piano players. Using the measured kinematic and key-force data, the time varying net, gravitational, motion-dependent interaction (INT), key-reaction (REA), and muscular (MUS) torques at the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints were computed using inverse dynamics techniques. INTs generated at the elbow and wrist joints, but not those at the MP joint, were greater for the experts as compared with the novices. REA at the MP joint, but not at the other joints, was less for the experts as compared with the novices. The MUSs at the MP, wrist, and elbow joints were smaller, and that at the shoulder joint was larger for the experts as compared with the novices. The experts also had a lesser inter-strike variability of key striking force and key descending velocity as compared with the novices. These findings indicated that the relationship among the INT, REA, and MUS occurring at the joints of the upper-extremity differed between the expert and novice piano players, suggesting that the organization of multi-joint arm movement is modulated by long-term motor training toward facilitating both physiological efficiency and movement accuracy.

  12. AES i ARM procesori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela D. Protić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Potreba za zaštitom informacija dovodi do velikih problema u izradi prenosivih uređaja kojima su limitirani snaga, memorija i energija. Ukoliko se takvim uređajima dodaju koprocesori, koji treba da obavljaju funkcije kriptozaštite, njihove se dimenzije povećavaju, pojavljuje se nefleksibilnost pa cena uređaja raste i do nekoliko puta. Na drugoj strani, algoritmi za zaštitu podataka su često memorijski zahtevni, a zbog velikog broja operacija koje je potrebno izvršavati u procesima šifrovanja i dešifrovanja, koprocesori često uspore rad osnovnog procesora. Za jedan od standarda za kriptozaštitu, AES, NIST je prihvatio Rijndaelov blokovski algoritam sa dužinom ulaznog i izlaznog bloka od 128 b, i dužinama šifarskog ključa od 128 b, 192 b i 256 b. Zbog karakteristika male potrošnje, 32-bitske arhitekture i brzog izvršavanja instrukcija, ARM procesori mogu da realizuju kriptozaštitu podataka, između ostalog i AES-om, a da ne opterete glavne procese u sistemima u kojima se koriste. Tehnologija ARM-a zaštićena je kao intelektualna svojina, pa je veliki broj proizvođača koristi za razvoj sopstvenih proizvoda, što je rezultovalo činjenicom da je u svetu proizvedeno preko 2 milijarde čipova koji su bazirani na ovoj tehnologiji. U radu su prikazane mogućnosti za poboljšanja u izvršenju algoritma AES primenom najnovijih verzija ARM procesora.

  13. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    put their feet on the table.... But that Is not the USSR’s problem. It is not for the USSR to teach the rules of etiquette vh~nh are broken in the...34 /12858 CSO: 5200/2634 • 138 - RELATED ISSUES LABOR PARTY DISTRICT CONGRESS: BAN NUCLEAR ARMED SHIPS Oslo AFTENPOSTEN in Norwegian 27 Jan 86 p 3 [Article...that countries which send warships into Norwegian ports should guarantee that these ships are not carry- ing nuclear weapons. The requirement would

  14. Phoenix Robotic Arm Rasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This photograph shows the rasp protruding from the back of the scoop on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm engineering model in the Payload Interoperability Testbed at the University of Arizona, Tucson. This is the position the rasp will assume when it drills into the Martian soil to acquire an icy soil sample for analysis. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Weight Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Weight Management English English Español Weight Management Obesity is a chronic condition that affects more ... Liver (NASH) Heart Disease & Stroke Sleep Apnea Weight Management Topics About Food Portions Bariatric Surgery for Severe ...

  16. Measurement of arm blood pressure using different oscillometry manometers compared to auscultatory readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Majid; Rotenberg, Daniel Kaminski; Nielsen, Jesper Kent; Wiinberg, Niels; Nielsen, Poul Ebbe

    2003-01-01

    Five different semiautomatic manometers were tested, where oscillometry is the measuring principle. Three of the manometers (Omron R4, A&D UB 322 and Braun) were wrist manometers, where the occluding cuff is placed around the volar surface of the wrist. Two of the manometers (A&D UA 777 and Omron M4) measure on the upper arm. The investigation included 72 patients with systolic blood pressure (SBP) ranging between 110 and 200, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between 62 and 114 mmHg. Forty-five of the subjects were on antihypertensive medication when the manometer tests were carried out. Each of the manometers was tested with double measurements of blood pressure against 2 x 2 auscultatory measurements done before and after the semiautomatic readings. The auscultatory measurements are all performed by the same observer, who was blinded for the measurements with semiautomatic manometers. The mean difference between the oscillometric recordings compared to auscultatory measurements varied from +1.2 to -8.5 mmHg for SBP and from -0.5 to -8.3 mmHg for DBP. However, the interindividual differences varied considerable with standard deviation of the difference varying from 8 to 18 mmHg for SBP with the highest values for wrist manometers. Concerning DBP, the standard deviation of difference for all five manometers was between 6 and 8 mmHg, with the highest values for wrist manometers. None of the tested manometers fulfilled the criteria for grading A or B in the previously introduced grading by the British Hypertension Society. To conclude, the upper-arm manometers have a measuring accuracy for SBP a little higher than that of the wrist manometers, while there is no bigger difference in the measuring accuracy of DBP. The most important point is that the measuring accuracy in a single patient is unpredictable. If home readings are prepared, a test of the accuracy against auscultatory recordings should be done in every single patient. In the clinical wards, it is

  17. Robust heart rate estimation using wrist-type photoplethysmographic signals during physical exercise: an approach based on adaptive filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallet, Sibylle; Vesin, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals are easily corrupted by motion artifacts when the subjects perform physical exercise. This paper introduces a two-step processing scheme to estimate heart rate (HR) from wrist-type PPG signals strongly corrupted by motion artifacts. Adaptive noise cancellation, using normalized least-mean-square algorithm, is first performed to attenuate motion artifacts and reconstruct multiple PPG waveforms from different combinations of corrupted PPG waveforms and accelerometer data. An adaptive band-pass filter is then used to track the common instantaneous frequency component (i.e. HR) of the reconstructed PPG waveforms. The proposed HR estimation scheme was evaluated on two datasets, composed of records from running subjects and subjects performing different kinds of arm/forearm movements and resulted in average absolute errors of 1.40  ±  0.60 and 4.28  ±  3.16 beats-per-minute for these two datasets, respectively. Importantly, the proposed method is fully automatic, induces an average estimation delay of 0.93 s, and is therefore suitable for real-time monitoring applications.

  18. Validation of the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 wrist blood pressure measuring devices in adults according to the International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunkan, Sekip; Ilman, Nevzat; Altunkan, Erkan

    2007-04-01

    A variety of automatic blood measurement devices with diverse features have been introduced to the medical markets recently. Among these devices, models that measure at the wrist have become increasingly popular in self measurements. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 wrist blood pressure devices against the mercury sphygmomanometer in adults according to the International Protocol criteria. Fifty-four patients over 30 years of age were studied and classified based on the International Protocol range. Blood pressure measurements at the wrist with the Samsung SBM-100A and Microlife BP 3BU1-5 were compared with the results obtained by two trained observers using a mercury sphygmomanometer. Nine sequential blood pressure measurements were taken. A total of 33 participants with randomly distributed arm circumferences were selected for both of the validation studies. During each validation study, 99 measurements were obtained for comparison from 33 participants. The first phase was performed on 15 participants and if the device passed this phase, 18 more participants were selected. Mean discrepancies and standard deviations of the device-sphygmomanometer were 0.9+/-9.2 and -2.7+/-9.3 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and -1.4+/-8.0 mmHg and 1.4+/-5.7 for diastolic blood pressure in the Samsung and Microlife study groups, respectively. The Samsung SBM-100A passed Phase 1 in 15 participants. Despite the fact that Microlife BP 3BU1-5 passed Phase 1 for diastolic pressure, it failed according to the systolic pressure criteria. Eighteen patients were added and Phase 2 was continued, in which Samsung SBM-100A failed to meet the criteria of Phases 2.1 and 2.2 for adults in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. It was found that the Microlife BP 3BU1-5 does not meet the criteria of either of Phases 2.1 and 2.2 for systolic blood pressure and Phase 2.2 for diastolic blood pressure. In this study, Samsung SBM

  19. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Apoptotic pathways in degenerative disk lesions in the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglaub, Frank; Thomas, Susanne B; Kroeber, Markus W; Dragu, Adrian; Fellenberg, Jörg; Wolf, Maya B; Horch, Raymund E

    2009-12-01

    Degenerative articular disk perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) of the wrist could result from chronic loading of the ulnocarpal joint. Apoptosis played a crucial role in fibrocartilage cell loss, and the purpose of this study was to clarify which apoptotic pathway was involved in the development of degenerative disk lesions. We also investigated whether ulna length played an etiologic role in the occurrence of fibrocartilage cell loss. Included in the study were 17 patients with degenerative articular disk tears of the TFC (Palmer type 2C). After arthroscopic debridement of the TFC, histologic sections were examined to assess the presence of apoptosis. Apoptosis was determined by use of caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, Fas ligand and BID (BH3 interacting domain death) agonist were applied for immunohistochemical analysis. Cells positive for caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, Fas ligand, and BID were found in all specimens. The number of cells positive for caspase 3 and BID was significantly increased in specimens from patients with an ulna-positive variance. In contrast, for cells positive for caspase 8, caspase 9, and Fas ligand, no significant difference was found between specimens from patients with an ulna-positive variance and those from patients with an ulna-neutral/ulna-negative variance. The extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways are involved in the development of degenerative disk lesions. Fibrocartilage cell loss occurs mainly through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. The accumulation of apoptotic cells is not significantly different between the 3 zones of the TFC. It could be verified that ulna length is correlated with fibrocartilage cell loss. Ulnar shortening is a valuable treatment option for degenerative TFC lesions. Knowledge of the specific apoptotic pathway that is causing degenerative disk lesions is critical in selecting the appropriate and most beneficial therapeutic treatment to halt

  1. Evaluation of a compact portable DEXA unit for wrist densitometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mares, T.; Bonovas, G.; Larcos, G. [Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Recently, a number of manufacturers have introduced compact, portable DEXA units in order to facilitate osteoporosis screening in remote communities and on an in-office basis. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the Norland-Stratec (pDEXA) compared to measurements obtained using a conventional densitometer (Norland XR-36). We recruited 61 adults (3 men, 58 women) with mean age 54 years (range: 19-76) referred for clinical assessment of BMD. Most patients had medications (n=39; 64%) or disorders (n=48;79%) known to interfere with bone mineral metabolism. Subjects underwent bone densitometry of the lumbar spine, (AP; L2-4) femoral neck and distal radius/ulna of the nondominant forearm using the Norland XR-36, with the wrist subsequently re-scanned on pDEXA. Four subjects also underwent 5 scans each on the pDEXA. Mean BMD for the distal radius/ulna was 0.30g/cm2 (range: 0.17 - 0.539/cm2; XR-36) vs 0.319/cm2 (range: 0.18-0.56 g/cm2; pDEXA), r = 0.98 (SEE = 0.07). Mean BMC for the distal radius/ulna was 1.229 (range: 0.67-2.59; XR-36) vs 1.289 (range:0.74-2.69; pDEXA), r = 0.97 (SEE= 0.08). The CV for pDEXA was 0.8% (BMD) and 2.5% (BMC). Thus, we conclude that pDEXA has excellent in-vivo reproducibility, with good correlation of BMD and BMC with standard densitometers

  2. X-Armed Bandits

    CERN Document Server

    Bubeck, Sébastien; Stoltz, Gilles; Szepesvari, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    We consider a generalization of stochastic bandits where the set of arms, $\\cX$, is allowed to be a generic measurable space and the mean-payoff function is "locally Lipschitz" with respect to a dissimilarity function that is known to the decision maker. Under this condition we construct an arm selection policy, called HOO hierarchical optimistic optimization), with improved regret bounds compared to previous results for a large class of problems. In particular, our results imply that if $\\cX$ is the unit hypercube in a Euclidean space and the mean-payoff function has a finite number of global maxima around which the behavior of the function is locally H\\"older continuous with a known exponent, then the expected of HOO regret is bounded up to a logarithmic factor by $\\sqrt{n}$, i.e., the rate of growth of the regret is independent of the dimension of the space. We also prove the minimax optimality of our algorithm when the dissimilarity is a metric.

  3. Some mechanical design aspects of the European Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooy, Peter J.; Mandersloot, Wart M.; Bentall, Richard H.

    1995-01-01

    The European Robotic Arm (ERA) is a contribution to the Russian Segment of the International Space Station Alpha. It will start operating on the Russian Segment during the assembly phase. ERA is designed and produced by a large industrial consortium spread over Europe with Fokker Space & Systems as prime contractor. In this paper, we will describe some of the overall design aspects and focus on the development of several mechanisms within ERA. The operation of ERA during the approach of its end effector towards the grapple interface and the grapple operation is discussed, with a focus on mechanisms. This includes the geometry of the end effector leading edge, which is carefully designed to provide the correct and complete tactile information to a torque-force sensor (TFS). The data from this TFS are used to steer the arm such that forces and moments are kept below 20 N and 20 N.m respectively during the grappling operation. Two hardware models of the end effector are built. The problems encountered are described as well as their solutions. The joints in the wrists and the elbow initially used a harmonic drive lubricated by MoS2. During development testing, this combination showed an insufficient lifetime in air to survive the acceptance test program. The switch-over to a system comprising planetary gearboxes with grease lubrication is described. From these development efforts, conclusions are drawn and recommendations are given for the design of complex space mechanisms.

  4. MRI findings of the wrist in patients with multiple osteonecrosis in large joints of the extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Shinobu; Ebata, Tatsuki; Abe, Kazuhiro [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Imai, Katsumi; Rokkaku, Tomoyuki

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated MRI findings of the wrist in patients who had multiple osteonecrosis in the large joints of their extremities (hips, knees, shoulders, and ankles) and compared these with the clinical symptoms and radiographical findings. Sixty wrists of 30 patients (3 males and 27 females) with multiple osteonecrosis were studied. Subjects ranged in age from 16 to 59 years. Their primary diseases were SLE in 24 patients, alcoholic osteonecrosis in two, Sjoegren`s syndrome in one, dermatomyositis in one, leukemia in one, and MCTD in one patient. Using MRI, we found osteonecrosis in seven wrists of four patients. Lesions were seen in six scaphoids of three patients, in two lunates of two patients, and in one capitate. We noted a reduced range of motion in three of the seven wrists with osteonecrosis. Two of the seven complained at wrist pain at motion, although three wrists were symptom free. Radiographically, an abnormality was recognized in two of the seven wrists. Generally, osteonecrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck`s disease) is more frequent than that of the scaphoid (Preiser`s disease). However in the present series, we found a higher osteonecrosis rate of the scaphoid than the lunate, using MRI. The discrepancy can be explained by the vascularity. In 1986, Gelberman reported that the scaphoid, the capitate, and 8% of the lunate had either vessels entering only one surface or large areas of bone that were dependent on a single vessel. The present study is consistent with these anatomical features. In other words, the present results demonstrated that Kienboeck`s disease can be induced not only by a deficient blood supply but also by some additional factors. (author)

  5. Arm Swing as a Potential New Prodromal Marker of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelman, Anat; Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Thaler, Avner; Giladi-Yacobi, Eytan; Gurevich, Tanya; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Raymond, Deborah; Doan, Nancy; Bressman, Susan B.; Marder, Karen S.; Alcalay, Roy N.; Rao, Ashwini K.; Berg, Daniela; Brockmann, Kathrin; Aasly, Jan; Waro, Bjørg Johanne; Tolosa, Eduardo; Vilas, Dolores; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Giladi, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reduced arm swing is a well-known clinical feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD), often observed early in the course of the disease. We hypothesized that subtle changes in arm swing and axial rotation may also be detectable in the prodromal phase. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the LRRK2-G2019S mutation, arm swing, and axial rotation in healthy nonmanifesting carriers and noncarriers of the G2019S mutation and in patients with PD. Methods A total of 380 participants (186 healthy nonmanifesting controls and 194 PD patients) from 6 clinical sites underwent gait analysis while wearing synchronized 3-axis body-fixed sensors on the lower back and bilateral wrists. Participants walked for 1 minute under the following 2 conditions: (1) usual walking and (2) dual-task walking. Arm swing amplitudes, asymmetry, variability, and smoothness were calculated for both arms along with measures of axial rotation. Results A total of 122 nonmanifesting participants and 67 PD patients were carriers of the G2019S mutation. Nonmanifesting mutation carriers walked with greater arm swing asymmetry and variability and lower axial rotation smoothness under the dual task condition when compared with noncarriers (P < .04). In the nonmanifesting mutation carriers, arm swing asymmetry was associated with gait variability under dual task (P = .003). PD carriers showed greater asymmetry and variability of movement than PD noncarriers, even after controlling for disease severity (P < .009). Conclusions The G2019S mutation is associated with increased asymmetry and variability among nonmanifesting participants and patients with PD. Prospective studies should determine if arm swing asymmetry and axial rotation smoothness may be used as motor markers of prodromal PD. PMID:27430880

  6. Treatment of a little finger synovial cyst by repair of an opening in the wrist capsule: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Heras-Palou, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    As synovial fluid from the wrist may leak into the ulnar bursa and from there into the flexor synovial sheath in the little finger, the origin of a synovial cyst of the pulp of the little finger may be in the wrist. Here we present the surgical treatment of a patient with a synovial cyst of the pulp of the little finger by surgery of the wrist and palm of the hand after failed conservative treatment.

  7. A haptic device for wrist and elbow rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the devices for rehabilitation applications has been increasing. And the devices before have proved that they might assist in and quantify the rehabilitation for upper limb disability caused by stroke. This paper is to introduce rehabilitation application of a haptic device based on virtual reality technology, which is compact, portable, and modular. The focus here is a device with force feedback designed to provide five degrees of freedom, which are rotation, opposition, translation, pitch, and yaw. With five degrees of freedom above, the device can help individuals with arm weakness do their exercise and make patients achieve favorable rehabilitation efficacy during their upper limb rehabilitation.

  8. Weighted Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, Margareta; Branzei, Simina; Loker, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate clustering in the weighted setting, in which every data point is assigned a real valued weight. We conduct a theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in each of the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterising the precise conditions under which such algorithms react to weights, and classifying clustering methods into three broad categories: weight-responsive, weight-considering, and weight-robust. Our analysis raises several interesting questions and can be directly mapped to the classical unweighted setting.

  9. Does a Comparison View Improve the Reliability of Staging Wrist Osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Berg, Paul W L; Drijkoningen, Tessa; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2017-09-01

    Radiological grading of wrist osteoarthritis associated with scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) can be difficult. A comparison radiograph of the contralateral healthy wrist and an educational training in the various SNAC stages may improve reliability. Our purposes were to evaluate the difference in the reliability: (1) between observers who rate SNAC wrists with and without a comparison radiograph; and (2) between observers who receive training prior to ratings and those who do not. In this cross-sectional survey study, 82 fully trained orthopedic or hand surgeons rated anteroposterior radiographs of 19 patient wrists following a scaphoid nonunion based on SNAC stages 0 to 4. Observers were randomized online in 4 groups: one group rated unilateral views without training, a second group unilateral views with training, a third group bilateral views without training, and a fourth group bilateral views with training. Training included a 1-page clarification of the SNAC stages. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. There was no significant difference between agreement between observers who rated unilateral radiographs (κ = 0.55) and who rated bilateral radiographs (κ = 0.58) ( P = .14), nor between agreement between observers who received training (κ = 0.59) and who did not (κ = 0.54) ( P = .058). The use of an additional comparison view and/or training does not seem to be clinically relevant in SNAC staging. There is room for improvement in the way we assess patients with SNAC wrists.

  10. Utilization of orthopaedic services for hand and wrist conditions in a capitated population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, C Craig; O'Connor, Daniel P; Pierce, Peggy; Brinker, Mark R

    2004-01-01

    The utilization of orthopaedic services (office visits and surgery) to treat hand and wrist conditions is not well known. In this study, we report the utilization rates for patients referred for orthopaedic treatment of hand and wrist conditions in a large population of individuals enrolled in a capitated insurance plan. The study population consisted of individuals enrolled, between January 1998 and December 2001, in a capitated insurance plan that had an annual average membership of 135,188 during that period. This plan was serviced by an independent physician association of sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons who were responsible for all orthopaedic care. Data were collected prospectively in a centralized database as patients with various hand or wrist conditions were referred for orthopaedic services. Odds ratios were used to compare gender-specific and age-specific utilization rates. Overall utilization rates were 18.06 office visits and 6.47 surgical procedures per 1000 members per year. The most frequent hand or wrist conditions were fractures, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendinitis or tenosynovitis, and ganglion or synovial cysts. These four diagnoses accounted for 70% of all office visits and 71% of all surgical cases. Across all age groups, males had a significantly higher rate of utilization of office visits (p hand or wrist condition, and nearly half will require surgery.

  11. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  12. Long-term results of the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure in the rheumatoid wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Miklós; Papp, Levente; Lenkei, Balázs; Károlyi, Zoltán

    2013-12-01

    This retrospective long-term study evaluates the clinical and radiological results of the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure in rheumatoid wrists. Fourteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had undergone a Sauvé-Kapandji procedure were examined 10 to 16.5 years after surgery. Range of motion and grip strength were measured. The patients' complaints related with instability of the ulnar stump, the residual pain in the wrist, and the function of the operated hand were assessed. The review also included a radiological examination. Pain was found to have decreased and the gripping strength of the hand to have increased in all the patients. The range of wrist rotation was significantly improved. On radiographs, there were no signs of increased ulnar translation of the carpus. We noted no instance of subluxation or dislocation of the ulnar stump. In this long-term evaluation, the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure was found to provide long-term improvement of the function of the wrist-hand complex, by eliminating the distal radio-ulnar joint which is a major source of pain in the rheumatoid wrist.

  13. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments.

  14. Preliminary analysis of non-dominant proprioceptive acuity and interlimb asymmetry in the human wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contu, Sara; Cappello, Leonardo; Konczak, Jurgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Proprioception provides information about limb configuration which are essential for planning and controlling its posture and movement. Asymmetries in the way dominant and non-dominant limbs exploit proprioceptive information have been previously evaluated, with contradictory results due to the difference in the employed methodology. A measure of proprioceptive acuity that does not reflect the influence of one limb on the other consists in the evaluation of the psychophysical threshold. This metric, evaluated separately for each limb and involving only passive movements, reflects a reliable measure of proprioceptive acuity. The aim of this work is to first evaluate the proprioceptive acuity of the non-dominant wrist joint in flexion/extension and adduction/abduction and to compare these results to the acuity of the dominant wrist. Data were collected during a unidirectional 2-alternative-forcedchoice test performed by six right-handed subjects. We found acuity of 1.31°, 1.26°, 1.33° and 1.63° respectively for abduction, adduction, extension and flexion of the non-dominant wrist. Acuity of the dominant wrist was assessed for five of the subjects for abduction and flexion and resulted lower (mean values were respectively 1.64° and 2.14°). The preliminary results suggest a leading role of the non-dominant wrist in the processing of the proprioceptive feedback.

  15. Wrist arthroscopy: a prospective analysis of 53 post-traumatic carpal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennwald, G R; Zdravkovic, V

    1997-09-01

    We carried out a prospective study of 53 consecutive patients who had sustained a serious wrist injury. Patients who presented with a previous condition or who had undergone surgery to the wrist were excluded. History, clinical findings, standard radiographs and arthrography were correlated with the uninjured side and with arthroscopic findings. The radiolunate (RL) angle of the injured wrist differed significantly from that of the "normal" wrist (p = 0.088). POssible correlations within the whole group were studied by multivariate analysis, particularly k-means clustering, a procedure which enables the detection of natural groups. We found that ligamentous tears at the triquetrum in the midcarpal joint significantly (p = 0.004) affected the equilibrium of the proximal row defined by clustering with the RL and scapholunate (SL) angles. The use of multivariate analysis techniques in combination with cross tabulation for the surgery of intracarpal ligamentous abnormalities seen at arthroscopy might help us to define better the function of the ligaments of the wrist. These findings, of little help in daily practice, might be important for clinical research.

  16. Inflammatory arthritis-like and other MR findings in wrists of asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, P.L.; Page, P.J.; McColl, G.J. [University of Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Radiology Department, Parkville (Australia)

    2006-10-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in the wrists of asymptomatic subjects that might be confused with pathologic findings. MR examination of the dominant wrist was performed in 30 asymptomatic volunteers aged 22-49 years using pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in the coronal and axial planes. The bases of the metacarpals, the carpus and the distal radius and ulna were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists for lesions, notches, blood vessels and synovial enhancement. There were 24 bright osseous lesions (erosions, intraosseous ganglia, oedema or cysts) in 14 subjects. Intraosseous blood vessels were seen in all but one wrist examined, most commonly in the capitate and lunate bones. Enhancement was present in 26 of 27 notches identified at the base of the second metacarpal and less commonly in the capitate, hamate and triquetral notches. A small joint effusion was present in 14 subjects. Joint or soft-tissue enhancement was identified in 16 wrists. Many MR abnormalities and variants may be detected in the wrists of asymptomatic subjects. Many of these could be confused with pathologic findings usually associated with inflammatory arthritis. (orig.)

  17. Robotic Arm Biobarrier Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on the 14th Martian day of the mission (June 7, 2008), shows the cable that held the Robotic Arm's biobarrier in place during flight has snapped. The cable's springs retracted to release the biobarrier right after landing. To the lower right of the image a spring is visible. Extending from that spring is a length of cable that snapped during the biobarrier's release. A second spring separated from the cable when it snapped and has been photographed on the ground under the lander near one of the legs. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Robotic Arm Biobarrier Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on the 14th Martian day of the mission (June 7, 2008), shows the cable that held the Robotic Arm's biobarrier in place during flight has snapped. The cable's springs retracted to release the biobarrier right after landing. To the lower right of the image a spring is visible. Extending from that spring is a length of cable that snapped during the biobarrier's release. A second spring separated from the cable when it snapped and has been photographed on the ground under the lander near one of the legs. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. The Neanderthal lower arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    Neanderthal forearms have been described as being very powerful. Different individual features in the lower arm bones have been described to distinguish Neanderthals from modern humans. In this study, the overall morphology of the radius and ulna is considered, and morphological differences among Neanderthals, Upper Paleolithic Homo sapiens and recent H. sapiens are described. Comparisons among populations were made using a combination of 3D geometric morphometrics and standard multivariate methods. Comparative material included all available complete radii and ulnae from Neanderthals, early H. sapiens and archaeological and recent human populations, representing a wide geographical and lifestyle range. There are few differences among the populations when features are considered individually. Neanderthals and early H. sapiens fell within the range of modern human variation. When the suite of measurements and shapes were analyzed, differences and similarities became apparent. The Neanderthal radius is more laterally curved, has a more medially placed radial tuberosity, a longer radial neck, a more antero-posteriorly ovoid head and a well-developed proximal interosseous crest. The Neanderthal ulna has a more anterior facing trochlear notch, a lower M. brachialis insertion, larger relative mid-shaft size and a more medio-lateral and antero-posterior sinusoidal shaft. The Neanderthal lower arm morphology reflects a strong cold-adapted short forearm. The forearms of H. sapiens are less powerful in pronation and supination. Many differences between Neanderthals and H. sapiens can be explained as a secondary consequence of the hyper-polar body proportions of the Neanderthals, but also as retentions of the primitive condition of other hominoids.

  20. Mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) performance versus weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESEARCH. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2017; 30(2):49–54 ... South African children (0–59 months) with acute malnutrition. Natisha Dukhia* , Benn ... to diarrhoea.12 Often diarrhoea and undernutrition manifest concurrently in children. ..... all clinics to detect malnutrition cases as well as provide follow-up and ...

  1. The application of precisely controlled functional electrical stimulation to the shoulder, elbow and wrist for upper limb stroke rehabilitation: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadmore, Katie L; Exell, Timothy A; Hallewell, Emma; Hughes, Ann-Marie; Freeman, Chris T; Kutlu, Mustafa; Benson, Valerie; Rogers, Eric; Burridge, Jane H

    2014-06-30

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) during repetitive practice of everyday tasks can facilitate recovery of upper limb function following stroke. Reduction in impairment is strongly associated with how closely FES assists performance, with advanced iterative learning control (ILC) technology providing precise upper-limb assistance. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of extending ILC technology to control FES of three muscle groups in the upper limb to facilitate functional motor recovery post-stroke. Five stroke participants with established hemiplegia undertook eighteen intervention sessions, each of one hour duration. During each session FES was applied to the anterior deltoid, triceps, and wrist/finger extensors to assist performance of functional tasks with real-objects, including closing a drawer and pressing a light switch. Advanced model-based ILC controllers used kinematic data from previous attempts at each task to update the FES applied to each muscle on the subsequent trial. This produced stimulation profiles that facilitated accurate completion of each task while encouraging voluntary effort by the participant. Kinematic data were collected using a Microsoft Kinect, and mechanical arm support was provided by a SaeboMAS. Participants completed Fugl-Meyer and Action Research Arm Test clinical assessments pre- and post-intervention, as well as FES-unassisted tasks during each intervention session. Fugl-Meyer and Action Research Arm Test scores both significantly improved from pre- to post-intervention by 4.4 points. Improvements were also found in FES-unassisted performance, and the amount of arm support required to successfully perform the tasks was reduced. This feasibility study indicates that technology comprising low-cost hardware fused with advanced FES controllers accurately assists upper limb movement and may reduce upper limb impairments following stroke.

  2. A Kinematic Calibration Process for Flight Robotic Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Curtis L.; Robinson, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) robotic arm is ten times more massive than any Mars robotic arm before it, yet with similar accuracy and repeatability positioning requirements. In order to assess and validate these requirements, a higher-fidelity model and calibration processes were needed. Kinematic calibration of robotic arms is a common and necessary process to ensure good positioning performance. Most methodologies assume a rigid arm, high-accuracy data collection, and some kind of optimization of kinematic parameters. A new detailed kinematic and deflection model of the MSL robotic arm was formulated in the design phase and used to update the initial positioning and orientation accuracy and repeatability requirements. This model included a higher-fidelity link stiffness matrix representation, as well as a link level thermal expansion model. In addition, it included an actuator backlash model. Analytical results highlighted the sensitivity of the arm accuracy to its joint initialization methodology. Because of this, a new technique for initializing the arm joint encoders through hardstop calibration was developed. This involved selecting arm configurations to use in Earth-based hardstop calibration that had corresponding configurations on Mars with the same joint torque to ensure repeatability in the different gravity environment. The process used to collect calibration data for the arm included the use of multiple weight stand-in turrets with enough metrology targets to reconstruct the full six-degree-of-freedom location of the rover and tool frames. The follow-on data processing of the metrology data utilized a standard differential formulation and linear parameter optimization technique.

  3. Layers of Experience Using "Arms"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laurinda; Coles, Alf; Ball, Derek; Morton, Pat; Coles, Matt; Ordman, Louise; Orr, Barry; Lam, Tung Ken

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the authors' personal accounts and their experiences in working on mathematics using "arms." "Arms" is an idea that first appeared as a program written by John Warwick and David Wooldridge in an ATM publication "Some Lessons in Mathematics with a Microcomputer," 1983. The introduction to…

  4. Development and validation of a computer-based learning module for wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, M C; Alewijnse, J V; Mathoulin, C; Liverneaux, P; Tuijthof, G J M; Schijven, M P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a computer-based module for wrist arthroscopy to which a group of experts could consent. The need for such a module was assessed with members of the European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS). The computer-based module was developed through several rounds of consulting experts on the content. The module's learning enhancement was tested in a randomized controlled trial with 28 medical students who were assigned to the computer-based module group or lecture group. The design process led to a useful tool, which is supported by a panel of experts. Although the computer based module did not enhance learning, the participants did find the module more pleasant to use. Developing learning tools such as this computer-based module can improve the teaching of wrist arthroscopy skills.

  5. Development of an Underactuated 2-DOF Wrist Joint using McKibben PAMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S. P.; Jain, S.; Ramasubramanian, S. N.; Johnson, B. V.; Dwivedy, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, model of an underactuated 2-DOF wrist joint with pneumatically actuated muscles is proposed. For the joint, McKibben-type artificial muscles are used in parallel configuration for the actuation. For each Degree of Freedom (DOF) one agonist-antagonist pair arrangement is usually used with a pulley mechanism. A mathematical model of wrist joint is derived using conventional forward kinematic analysis. The static model relating pressure in the muscle with the orientation of the wrist joint is obtained by combining the experimental data and mathematical model. Regulation of pressure can be achieved by pulse width modulation control of on/off solenoid valves. A set of free vibration experiments are done for the dynamic identification of the muscle characteristics.

  6. [The principal mechanisms of age-related involution of wrist bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Fedulova, M V; Iurchenko, M A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the general mechanisms underlying age-specific changes in the bone tissue of the wrists by the assessment of the signs of their ageing on X-ray images. Roentgenograms of the left wrist of 261 men and 333 women at the age varying from 18 to 90 years were analysed by the planigraphic technique with the use of a scoring system for the estimation of the severity of the signs of ageing (osteoporosis, osteophytes). The study has shown that the signs of ageing in wrist bones become apparent approximately 4-6 years after the completion of ossification. The age-specific changes in the bones are characterized by a strong sexual dimorphism while both the rate of appearance and the intensity of expression of the markers of bone ageing depend on their localization on the radius and phalanges.

  7. Frequency and spectrum of abnormalities in the bone marrow of the wrist: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, F.; Schweitzer, M.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Li Xiaoxian (Dept. of Radiology, Tangshan Gongren Hospital, Tangshan (China)); Malat, J. (Department of Radiology, Naples Radiologists, Naples (Italy)); Hussain, S.M. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1999-06-01

    Objective. To describe the frequency of marrow abnormalities on wrist MR imaging and the MR findings of these various abnormalities.Design and patients. Five hundred and nineteen patients were studied at 1.5 T. Two observers recorded the presence and location of avascular necrosis, occult fractures and arthritic edema [focal osteoarthritis, ulnolunate abutment, rheumatoid arthritis, septic arthritis, gouty arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC)].Results and conclusion. One hundred and eighty-seven (36%) patients demonstrated marrow abnormalities in the wrist, of which 101 were diagnosed as arthritis [64 (34%) as focal osteoarthritis, 17 (9%) as ulnolunate abutment, 15 (8%) as rheumatoid arthritis, 2 as septic arthritis, 2 as SLAC, and 1 as gouty arthritis]. Seventy-two patients had occult fractures and in 27 patients avascular necrosis was seen. MR imaging can reveal various abnormalities in bone marrow of the wrist when findings on radiography are normal or equivocal. (orig.) With 17 figs., 13 refs.

  8. The Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for posttraumatic wrist disorders: further experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, L A; Van Ransbeeck, H

    2000-06-01

    A prospective survey was conducted to evaluate the outcome of the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for posttraumatic wrist disorders. Eighty four patients were treated, all with posttraumatic disorders of the distal radioulnar joint, 73 as an isolated procedure, 11 in combination with another wrist procedure. There was significant pain decrease and high patient satisfaction (74%). The range of motion increased in the flexion/extension arc from 109 degrees to 124 degrees (p = 0.006) and, in those with limited forearm rotation, from 71 degrees to 134 degrees (p = 0.006). According to the Mayo Clinic wrist score, we obtained 20 excellent, 34 good, 18 fair and 12 poor results. Complications were rare.

  9. In-vivo three-dimensional carpal bone kinematics during flexion-extension and radio-ulnar deviation of the wrist: Dynamic motion versus step-wise static wrist positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Foumani; S.D. Strackee; R. Jonges; L. Blankevoort; A.H. Zwinderman; B. Carelsen; G.J. Streekstra

    2009-01-01

    An in-vivo approach to the measurement of three-dimensional motion patterns of carpal bones in the wrist may have future diagnostic applications, particularly for ligament injuries of the wrist. Static methods to measure carpal kinematics in-vivo only provide an approximation of the true kinematics

  10. Early diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: comparison of digit 1 with wrist and distoproximal ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K R; Rotta, F; Romano, J; Ayyar, D R

    2001-01-01

    Our objective in this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the median sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) from digit 1 to wrist with those of the distoproximal (D/P) ratio of the median SNCV from palm to digit 3/palm to wrist in the diagnosis of mild carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) by using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. To achieve this objective, we studied prospectively (January 1997-October 1998) 370 patients referred for CTS. One hundred forty-two patients (38.4%) with moderate to severe CTS and 15 patients (4.1%) with multiple (> or = 3) compressive neuropathies in upper limbs with subclinical peripheral neuropathy were excluded. The remaining 213 patients (302 hands with mild CTS; 167 women; mean age, 50 y +/- 12 y) and 38 controls (71 hands; 25 women; mean age, 47 y +/- 13 y) had median and ulnar nerve conduction studies. ROC curves were constructed for median SNCV digit 1 to wrist and median SNCV D/P ratio from the patients' and controls' data. The median SNCV at or = 1.12, corresponding to an optimal cutoff point on ROC curve, discriminated 67.2% of mild CTS from controls with specificity of 97.2%. Of the 10.3% (31/302) of hands in which digit 1 to wrist was within normal limits at the selected optimal cutoff value ( or = 1.12), and 3.3% (10/302) had a normal electrophysiologic examination. The likelihood ratio (true-positive ratio to false-positive ratio, assessing the discriminative power of a test) of the median SNCV digit 1 to wrist, at an optimal point on ROC curve (63.9), was higher than that of the median SNCV D/P ratio (23.9, chi2 = 36.9, P wrist is more sensitive than the median SNCV D/P ratio in the diagnosis of mild CTS.

  11. Contribution of arthroscopy in case of septic appearance arthritis of the wrist: a nine cases series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, A; Lebailly, F; Zemirline, A; Hendriks, S; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2013-09-01

    Septic arthritis of the wrist is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency. Synovectomy and lavage by arthrotomy is often followed by stiffness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic contribution of emergency arthroscopic synovectomy with intraarticular lavage. Nine patients were operated on for wrist pathology with septic appearance. All had signs of local inflammation, three showed locoregional inflammation, three were febrile. In one patient several joints were involved. Seven patients presented with inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. All patients underwent emergency surgery using radiocarpal joint puncture, arthroscopic exploration, intraarticular lavage and synovectomy at both the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The results were evaluated by pain, Quick DASH, grip strength, and wrist range of motion. In three cases, joint fluid appeared clear, in three it was turbid, and in three purulent. Gram stain and culture revealed bacteria in four cases. Synovitis was radiocarpal four times, radiocarpal and midcarpal once. In one case, there was radiocarpal and midcarpal chondritis. Average pain was 5.3/10 preoperatively and 2/10 at the last clinical follow-up visit. Mean grip strength was 23.3 kg on the involved side vs. 33.5 kg on the opposite one. Mean flexion was 55° for the involved wrist vs. 68°; mean extension was 52° for the affected wrist vs. 59°. No patient was reoperated on. In all cases, there was no sign of local inflammation, regional lymphadenopathy or systemic infection at the last follow-up. One patient died of colon metastatic cancer. Another patient developed a severe Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS1). Our results suggest three principles of management of wrist arthritis with septic appearance: extended surgical indication, emergency operation and arthroscopic procedure.

  12. The use of navigation forces for assessment of wrist arthroscopy skills level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, Miryam C; van Baalen, Sophie J; Horeman, Tim; Liverneaux, Philippe; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M

    2014-05-01

    Purpose To provide an efficient learning process, feedback on performance is crucial. In skills laboratories, it is possible to measure the skills and progression of skills of the trainees objectively. This requires metrics that represent the learning curve of the trainee, which were investigated for wrist arthroscopy. The research questions were: What are the forces used by novices during wrist arthroscopy?What aspects of these navigation forces are discriminative for the wrist arthroscopy skills level?Methods A cadaver wrist was mounted in a custom-made distraction device mounted in front of a force platform (ForceTrap). Eleven novices were invited to perform two tasks on the wrist: Insertion of the scope through the 3-4 portal and the hook through the 6R portal, and visualization of the hook in the center of the imageNavigation through the wrist from radial to ulnar with probing and visualization of five predefined landmarksThe second task was repeated 10 times. The absolute force (F abs) and the direction of force were measured. The angle α is defined in the vertical plane, and the angle β in the horizontal plane. Results The median F abs used by novices remained below the force threshold as defined from the expert data (7.3 N). However, the direction of the applied forces by novices in both planes was not consistent with expert data and showed a wider range. Also, there was no improvement after more trials. Conclusion Our study suggests by the absence of a learning curve for the novices and a significant difference between novices and experts that novices can benefit from feedback on the magnitude and direction of forces to improve their performance.

  13. Distinct Thalamo-Cortical Controls for Shoulder, Elbow, and Wrist during Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloozerova, Irina N; Stout, Erik E; Sirota, Mikhail G

    2013-01-01

    Recent data from this laboratory on differential controls for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist exerted by the thalamo-cortical network during locomotion is presented, based on experiments involving chronically instrumented cats walking on a flat surface and along a horizontal ladder. The activity of the following three groups of neurons is characterized: (1) neurons of the motor cortex that project to the pyramidal tract (PTNs), (2) neurons of the ventrolateral thalamus (VL), many identified as projecting to the motor cortex (thalamo-cortical neurons, TCs), and (3) neurons of the reticular nucleus of thalamus (RE), which inhibit TCs. Neurons were grouped according to their receptive field into shoulder-, elbow-, and wrist/paw-related categories. During simple locomotion, shoulder-related PTNs were most active in the late stance and early swing, and on the ladder, often increased activity and stride-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically remained similar on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing, and on the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration. In the VL, shoulder-related neurons were more active during the transition from swing-to-stance. Elbow-related cells tended to be more active during the transition from stance-to-swing and on the ladder often decreased their activity and increased modulation. Wrist-related neurons were more active throughout the stance phase. In the RE, shoulder-related cells had low discharge rates and depths of modulation and long periods of activity distributed evenly across the cycle. In sharp contrast, wrist/paw-related cells discharged synchronously during the end of stance and swing with short periods of high activity, high modulation, and frequent sleep-type bursting. We conclude that thalamo-cortical network processes information related to different segments of the

  14. Carpal kinematics in quadrupedal monkeys: towards a better understanding of wrist morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daver, Guillaume; Berillon, Gilles; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide new data on carpal kinematics in primates in order to deepen our understanding of the relationships between wrist morphology and function. To that end, we provide preliminary data on carpal kinematics in seven species of quadrupedal monkeys that have not been previously investigated in this regard (cercopithecoids, n = 4; ceboids, n = 3). We radiographed wrists from cadavers at their maximum radial and ulnar deviations, as well as at maximum flexion and extension. We took angular measurements to quantify the contribution of the mobility of the two main wrist joints (antebrachiocarpal and midcarpal) with respect to total wrist mobility. We also recorded qualitative observations. Our quantitative results show few clear differences among quadrupedal monkeys for radioulnar deviation and flexion-extension: all the primates studied exhibit a greater midcarpal mobility (approximately 54-83% of the total range of motion) than antebrachiocarpal mobility; however, we identified two patterns of carpal kinematics that show the functional impact of previously recognised morphological variations in quadrupedal monkeys. Firstly, qualitative results show that the partition that divides the proximal joint of the wrist in ceboids results in less mobility and more stability of the ulnar part of the wrist than is seen in cercopithecoids. Secondly, we show that the olive baboon specimen (Papio anubis) is characterised by limited antebrachiocarpal mobility for extension; this effect is likely the result of a radial process that projects on the scaphoid notch, as well as an intraarticular meniscus. Because of these close relationships between carpal kinematics and morphology in quadrupedal monkeys, we hypothesise that, to some extent, these functional tendencies are related to their locomotor hand postures.

  15. Automatic Recognition of Activities of Daily Living utilizing Insole Based and Wrist Worn Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Bries, Matthew; Swibas, Tracy; Melanson, Edward; Sazonov, Edward

    2017-08-01

    Automatic recognition of activities of daily living (ADL) is an important component in understanding of energy balance, quality of life and other areas of health and well-being. In our previous work, we had proposed an insole based activity monitor - SmartStep, designed to be socially acceptable and comfortable. The goals of the current study were: first, validation of SmartStep in recognition of a broad set of ADL; second, comparison of the SmartStep to a wrist sensor and testing these in combination; third, evaluation of SmartStep accuracy in measuring wear non-compliance and a novel activity class (driving); fourth, performing the validation in free living against a well-studied criterion measure (ActivPAL, PAL Technologies); and fifth, quantitative evaluation of the perceived comfort of SmartStep. The activity classification models were developed from a laboratory study consisting of 13 different activities under controlled conditions. Leave-one-out cross validation showed 89% accuracy for the combined SmartStep and wrist sensor, 81% for the SmartStep alone, and 69% for the wrist sensor alone. When household activities were grouped together as one class, SmartStep performed equally well compared to the combination of SmartStep and wrist-worn sensor (90% vs 94%) whereas the accuracy of the wrist sensor increased marginally (73% from 69%). SmartStep achieved 92% accuracy in recognition of non-wear and 82% in recognition of driving. Participants then were studied for a day in free-living conditions. The overall agreement with ActivPAL was 82.5% (compared to 97% for the laboratory study). The SmartStep scored the best on the perceived comfort reported at the end of the study. These results suggest that insole-based activity sensors may present a compelling alternative or companion to commonly used wrist devices.

  16. Arménie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Verdier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available L’Arménie est une petite république du Caucase, à la limite sud–est de l’Europe, qui a gagné son autonomie en 1990 après l’ouverture du bloc soviétique. Le nouveau Ministère du Patrimoine a sollicité la coopération de la France pour mettre en place une nouvelle politique culturelle. Tout d’abord, une évaluation sur place de la situation dans les domaines des monuments historiques, de l’archéologie et de l’Inventaire a permis d’envisager les réponses à proposer. Pour la demande d’informatisation des dossiers d’inventaire déjà réalisés sous l’autorité de l’Académie de Saint–Petersbourg, nous avons proposé de former des chercheurs arméniens aux méthodes et techniques de l’Inventaire général. L’accueil d’une stagiaire pendant trois mois au service régional de l’Inventaire de Haute–Normandie a été suivi par la mise en place d’un équipement informatique à Yérévan, puis par l’accueil et la formation de techniciens informaticiens et photographes arméniens. De retour dans leur pays ils ont commencé à remettre en place un service d’inventaire dont le programme comprend la création d’une base de données patrimoniales, le recensement de la ville de Yérévan, la numérisation d’images pour la publication d’un indicateur du patrimoine et la préparation de dossiers de protection au titre du patrimoine mondial.The Armenian heritage comprises both archaeological remains of towns destroyed by never–ending wars and a number of old churches from the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, was founded three thousand years ago and is one of Europe’s oldest capitals. From 1925 it has developed according to an ambitious urban planning project. After the major political upheavals of 1991, a special ministry was created to look after the architectural and movable heritage of the country and to promote the Armenian national identity. A mission in Yerevan was

  17. Weight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obese. Achieving a healthy weight can help you control your cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. It ... use more calories than you eat. A weight-control strategy might include Choosing low-fat, low-calorie ...

  18. Active range of motion outcomes after reconstruction of burned wrist and hand deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ahmed M; Mahboub, Tarek A; Ibrahim Fouad, Amr; Azari, Kodi; Khalil, Haitham H; McCarthy, James E

    2016-06-01

    This works aim is to evaluate the efficacy of skin grafts and flaps in reconstruction of post-burn hand and wrist deformities. A prospective study of 57 burn contractures of the wrist and dorsum of the hand was performed. Flaps were used only if there was a non-vascularized structure after contracture release, otherwise a skin graft was used. Active range of motion (ROM) was used to assess hand function. The extension deformity cohort uniformly underwent skin graft following contracture release with a mean improvement of 71 degrees (p6 months. Early release of burn contracture is advisable to avoid deep structure contracture.

  19. Myoelectric Signals from Paretic Wrist Extensor Controlling Electrical Stimulation of the Same Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, Thorsen; Fin, Biering-Sørensen; Hansen, Steffen Duus

    1996-01-01

    A device for enhancement of the grip in C5/6 spinal cord lesioned tetraplegics is under development. It uses the myoelectric signal from the paretic wrist extensor for control of electrical stimulation of the same muscle. The tetraplegics shall with the device be able to obtain a passive grip...... between the thumb an the index finger by extension of the wrist. Surface electrodes are used for myoelectric recording and stimulation. Main problems are filtering of the recorded signal and stimulation. Solutions to these problems are addressed and discussed....

  20. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the wrist joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F; Lassere, M

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis are illustr......This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis...

  1. The use of a pyrocarbon capitate resurfacing implant in chronic wrist disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, A; Ozben, H; Russomando, A

    2014-07-01

    The present study describes the technique and results of proximal row carpectomy with resection of the head of the capitate and replacement with a pyrocarbon capitate resurfacing implant. The major indication for surgical treatment was arthritic changes on the head of the capitate. Patients were assessed by range of motion, grip strength, pain and functional scoring, and radiographic studies. In most patients, wrist function was improved and pain relief was obtained. This surgical procedure may represent a good alternative to total and partial wrist arthrodesis.

  2. A Conceptual Project of a Device for Human Wrist Functional Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, B.; Olinski, M.; Wudarczyk, S.; Gronowicz, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the paper, the problems of devices supporting functional rehabilitation of a human wrist were addressed. A literature review and a description of selected devices together with an indication of their advantages and disadvantages were conducted. The biomechanical structure of a human wrist was analyzed. On this basis and after taking into consideration ranges of motion of the selected joints the concept of a new mechanism was developed. A 3D model of the device was built in the Autodesk Inventor system. For the purpose of simulations another model was developed in the MSC Adams system. Issues of drives and sensors selection, as well as requirements for the control system, were examined.

  3. WRIST-ANKLE ACUPUNCTURE FOR ANALGESIA IN TREATING SOME COMMON DISEASES IN ATHLETES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xin

    2006-01-01

    @@ With gradual generalization of acupuncture-moxibustion therapy in developed countries, an increasing attention has been paid to its application in the athletic field. Wrist-ankle acupuncture is a kind of shallow acupuncture, by which 6 points in the wrist and ankle regions are selected and punctured for treating diseases related to individual parts of the body. It is a kind of information therapy concerning biological hologram regularities. The analgesic effects of the therapy in treating some common diseases in 64 athletes are reported as follows.

  4. Fungal arthritis of the wrist caused by Candida parapsilosis during infliximab therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Miura, Toshiki; Morita, Euan; Morizaki, Yutaka; Uehara, Kosuke; Ohe, Takashi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2012-11-01

    A 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis, who had been treated with infliximab, presented with uncontrollable wrist arthritis. Fungal arthritis caused by Candida parapsilosis was confirmed by examining her aspirated joint fluid. Her infliximab therapy was interrupted, and antifungal therapy with fluconazole was started. After the fungal infection had been ameliorated, surgical debridement and arthrodesis of the wrist joint were conducted, and her symptoms completely resolved. Although fungal arthritis is rare, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of exacerbated monoarthritis in patients treated with biological agents.

  5. Gyroscope vs. accelerometer measurements of motion from wrist PPG during physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Casson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many wearable devices include PPG (photoplethysmography sensors for non-invasive heart rate monitoring. However, PPG signals are heavily corrupted by motion interference, and rely on simultaneous motion measurements to remove the interference. Accelerometers are used commonly, but cannot differentiate between acceleration due to movement and acceleration due to gravity. This paper compares measurements of motion using accelerometers and gyroscopes to give a more complete estimate of wrist motion. Results show the two sensor signals are very different, with low correlations present. When used in a wrist PPG heart rate algorithm gyroscope motion estimates obtain better performance in half of the cases.

  6. Capitolunate arthrodesis maintaining carpal height for the treatment of SNAC wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannikas, D; Dimitrios, G; Karageorgos, A; Athanasios, K; Karabasi, A; Ageliki, K; Syggelos, S; Spiridon, S

    2010-03-01

    The clinical and radiological results of a modified midcarpal fusion technique for scaphoid nonunion advance collapse were retrospectively studied in eight patients. All had partial resection of the proximal part of the fractured scaphoid, limited radial styloidectomy, scaphocapitate and lunocapitate arthrodesis, using a block of iliac crest graft to maintain carpal height. All united without complications and wrist motion, grip strength and carpal height were improved postoperatively. The modified Mayo wrist score at follow-up was 70%. Three patients continued to have some pain and one patient had a poor result.

  7. [Carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger wrist" revealing a tendinous sheath fibroma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhima, M A; Ait Essi, F; Abkari, I; Najeb, Y; Fikry, T

    2014-02-01

    The tendinous sheath fibroma (TSF) is a rare benign tumor, exceptionally responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger" wrist: we found this association less than ten times in the English and French literature. We report the case of a 63-year-old right-handed carpenter who featured a triggering phenomenon of the right wrist during the flexion-extension movements and compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel, secondary to a TSF of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The diagnosis was suspected at the sonography and MRI, the tumor was excised and proven histologically to be a TSF. One year later, the patient remained free of symptoms.

  8. Hyperparathyroidism-related extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist: a general review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Satoshi; Hidalgo-Diaz, Juan Jose; Prunières, Guillaume; Facca, Sybille; Bodin, Frédéric; Boucher, Stéphanie; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tenosynovitis often occurs accompanying with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, trauma, mycobacterium and dialysis-related amyloidosis. However, there is no recognition of extensor tenosynovitis accompanying with hyperparathyroidism. The purpose of this general review was to describe the clinical condition and to report the results of surgical intervention in the extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist related to hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism is thought to be a rare disease in adult. Although renal symptoms are the commonest symptom, musculoskeletal complaints also occur in hyperparathyroidism. From our general review, hyperparathyroidism deserves consideration in the differential diagnosis of extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist.

  9. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  10. Birth Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... baby, taken just after he or she is born. A low birth weight is less than 5.5 pounds. A high ... weight is more than 8.8 pounds. A low birth weight baby can be born too small, too early (premature), or both. This ...

  11. Elderly kendo (Japanese fencing) player with Kienböck's disease in one wrist and Preiser's disease in the other wrist: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Norimasa; Masuko, Tatsuya; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Minami, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Elderly patients suffering from avascular necrosis of a carpal bone in both wrists are extremely rare. We report a case of an elderly kendo (Japanese fencing) competitor who sustained Preiser's disease in the left hand following the occurrence of Kienböck's disease in the right hand. The current case demonstrates the importance of raising awareness of these diseases as potential sports-related problems in the elderly.

  12. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: Value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Theumann, Nicolas [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent [Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Clinique Longeraie and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Avenue de la Gare 9, 1003 Lausanne (Switzerland); Richarme, Delphine [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Becce, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.becce@chuv.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. Results: With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0 mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). Conclusion: The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces.

  13. Transverse ultrasound assessment of median nerve deformation and displacement in the human carpal tunnel during wrist movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wang (Yuexiang); C. Zhao; S.M. Passe (Sandra); A. Filius (Anika); A.R. Thoreson (Andrew); P. An (Ping); P.C. Amadio (Peter )

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, are aggravated by wrist motion, but the effect of these motions on median nerve motion are unknown. To better understand the biomechanics of the abnormal nerve, it is first necessary to und

  14. Flexible and static wrist units in upper limb prosthesis users : functionality scores, user satisfaction and compensatory movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deijs, Marieke; Bongers, R. M.; Ringeling-van Leusen, N. D. M.; van der Sluis, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The current study examines the relevance of prosthetic wrist movement to facilitate activities of daily living or to prevent overuse complaints. Prosthesis hands with wrist flexion/extension capabilities are commercially available, but research on the users' experiences with flexible wri

  15. Flexible and static wrist units in upper limb prosthesis users : functionality scores, user satisfaction and compensatory movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deijs, M; Bongers, R M; Ringeling-van Leusen, N D M; van der Sluis, C K

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current study examines the relevance of prosthetic wrist movement to facilitate activities of daily living or to prevent overuse complaints. Prosthesis hands with wrist flexion/extension capabilities are commercially available, but research on the users' experiences with flexible wri

  16. Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Hand-Wrist and Cervical Vertebrae Radiography for the Determination of Skeletal Age

    OpenAIRE

    Hoseini; Zamaheni; Bashizadeh Fakhar; Akbari; Chalipa; Rahmati

    2016-01-01

    Background Prediction of skeletal growth is necessary for growth modification and surgical orthodontic treatments and is usually done by assessing skeletal maturity indicators in hand-wrist radiographs. The use of growth stages of cervical vertebrae in lateral cephalograms has been suggested to avoid overexposure. Objectives This study seeks to assess the degree of agreement between hand-wrist and cervical vertebrae maturation sta...

  17. Effects of Neoprene Wrist/Hand Splints on Handwriting for Students with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome: A Single System Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Lauren; Wesley, Alison; Wallen, Margaret; Bundy, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Pain associated with hypermobility of wrist and hand joints can contribute to decreased handwriting output. This study examined the effectiveness of a neoprene wrist/hand splint in reducing pain and increasing handwriting speed and endurance for students with joint hypermobility syndrome. Methods: Multiple baseline, single system design…

  18. Combined pre-injection wrist and ankle MRI protocol and steroid joint injections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Graham, T.B. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Precise localization of affected compartments of the wrist and ankle in children with an established diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is clinically challenging. The purpose of this paper is to describe our experience utilizing a pre-injection MRI protocol of the wrist and ankle for localizing disease activity followed by fluoroscopically guided joint injections in children with JIA. (orig.)

  19. Transverse ultrasound assessment of median nerve deformation and displacement in the human carpal tunnel during wrist movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wang (Yuexiang); C. Zhao; S.M. Passe (Sandra); A. Filius (Anika); A.R. Thoreson (Andrew); P. An (Ping); P.C. Amadio (Peter )

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, are aggravated by wrist motion, but the effect of these motions on median nerve motion are unknown. To better understand the biomechanics of the abnormal nerve, it is first necessary to und

  20. Carpal tunnel syndrome: a case-control study evaluating its relationship with body mass index and hand and wrist measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J E; Davis, T R C

    2008-08-01

    This case-control study investigated the associations between the body mass index (BMI), hand and wrist measurements and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The hands and wrists of 50 patients with CTS and 50 age- and sex-matched controls were measured. The right and left wrist indices (wrist depth/wrist width) were significantly greater in CTS patients (mean = 0.71. SD = 0.04) than in the controls (mean = 0.69 SD = 0.04). The hand index (hand length/palm width) and BMI were not significantly different in the two groups. The hand, but not the wrist, index was found to correlate with the BMI. These results provide some support for a causative association between wrist morphometry, as measured by the wrist index, and CTS, but this difference is too small to be of diagnostic value in clinical or epidemiological practice. The results could also suggest that the previously reported association between CTS and the hand index may be secondary to differences in the BMI.

  1. ARM Soc Based Enotebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranita C Bawankar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, electronic media has grown very fast replacing papers, tape devices, books, etc. The new technologies provide large number of data into single device, fast searching options and more readability than ever. As eBooks are replacing books; we are proposing ENotebook system in which user can write as he did in notebook, save, searches and then reread content. This paper presents design and development of ENotebook using ARM7. The system uses touch screen to get input data and operations like save, delete, open & close of data file. All data sensed by touch screen is digitized by internal ADCs of LPC2148 microcontroller which gives low power platform with fast execution. The output is shown on graphical LCD. Whatever user writes on screen it may need to save for future use. The content of such hand written data will be in graphical/pictorial form hence required large of memory for storage. We can provide external memory using pen drive, memory card, EEPROM etc. in this system we are using SD card interfacing through SPI port.

  2. Arm rotated medially with supination – the ARMS variant: description of its surgical correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melcher Sonya E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients who have suffered obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI have a high incidence of musculoskeletal complications stemming from the initial nerve injury. The presence of muscle imbalances and contractures leads to typical bony changes affecting the shoulder, including the SHEAR (Scapular Hypoplasia, Elevation and Rotation deformity. The SHEAR deformity commonly occurs in conjunction with Medial Rotation Contracture (MRC of the arm. OBPI also causes muscle imbalances at the level of the forearm, that lead to a fixed supination deformity (SD in a small number of patients. Both MRC and SD will cause severe functional limitations without surgical intervention. Methods Fourteen OBPI patients were diagnosed with MRC of the shoulder and SD of the forearm along with SHEAR deformity during a 16 month study period, with eight patients available to long-term follow-up (age range 2.2 – 18 years. Surgical correction of the MRC was performed as a triangle tilt or humeral osteotomy depending on the age of the child, after which, the patients were treated with a radial osteotomy to correct the fixed supination deformity. Function was assessed using the modified Mallet scale, examination of apparent supination and appearance of the extremity at rest. Results Significant functional improvements were observed in patients with surgical reconstruction. Mallet score increased by an average of 5.2 (p Conclusion The simultaneous presence of two opposing deformities in the same limb will visually offset each other at the level of the wrist and hand, giving the false impression of neutral positioning of the limb. In reality, the neutral-appearing position of the hand indicates a fixed supination posture of the forearm in the face of a medial rotation contracture of the shoulder. Both of these deformities require surgical attention, and the presence of concurrent MRC and SD should be monitored for in OBPI patients.

  3. X-ray characteristics of wrists in calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease. Is pseudogout a major cause of scapholunate advanced collapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Y; Yoshida, M; Tamaki, T

    1997-10-01

    Deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals has been considered to be a cause of scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrist. The aim of this study was to look at X-ray changes in wrist joints affected by CPPD crystal deposition disease and to determine whether crystal deposition is a cause of SLAC wrist. A total of 150 wrists of 78 patients with CPPD crystal deposition disease were examined. In our population of Japanese patients with CPPD crystal deposition disease, the incidence of SLAC wrist was very low, and no case of Stage III SLAC wrist was found. We therefore conclude that SLAC wrist is not a radiographic characteristic of CPPD crystal deposition disease and that pyrophosphate crystal deposition cannot be a major cause of SLAC wrist.

  4. Effects of Aging on Arm Swing during Gait: The Role of Gait Speed and Dual Tasking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Mirelman

    Full Text Available Healthy walking is characterized by pronounced arm swing and axial rotation. Aging effects on gait speed, stride length and stride time variability have been previously reported, however, less is known about aging effects on arm swing and axial rotation and their relationship to age-associated gait changes during usual walking and during more challenging conditions like dual tasking. Sixty healthy adults between the ages of 30-77 were included in this study designed to address this gap. Lightweight body fixed sensors were placed on each wrist and lower back. Participants walked under 3 walking conditions each of 1 minute: 1 comfortable speed, 2 walking while serially subtracting 3's (Dual Task, 3 walking at fast speed. Aging effects on arm swing amplitude, range, symmetry, jerk and axial rotation amplitude and jerk were compared between decades of age (30-40; 41-50; 51-60; 61-77 years. As expected, older adults walked slower (p = 0.03 and with increased stride variability (p = 0.02. Arm swing amplitude decreased with age under all conditions (p = 0.04. In the oldest group, arm swing decreased during dual task and increased during the fast walking condition (p<0.0001. Similarly, arm swing asymmetry increased during the dual task in the older groups (p<0.004, but not in the younger groups (p = 0.67. Significant differences between groups and within conditions were observed in arm swing jerk (p<0.02, axial rotation amplitude (p<0.02 and axial jerk (p<0.001. Gait speed, arm swing amplitude of the dominant arm, arm swing asymmetry and axial rotation jerk were all independent predictors of age in a multivariate model. These findings suggest that the effects of gait speed and dual tasking on arm swing and axial rotation during walking are altered among healthy older adults. Follow-up work is needed to examine if these effects contribute to reduced stability in aging.

  5. Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment, Year 15 (North Arm) and Year 3 (South Arm) (2006) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, E.U.; Sebastian, D.; Andrusak, G.F. [Fish and Wildlife Science and Allocation, Ministry of Environment, Province of British Columbia

    2009-07-01

    that is required for optimal phytoplankton growth discrete depth water sampling occurred in 2006 to measure more accurately changes in the nitrate concentrations. As expected there was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, thus supporting the strategy of increasing the nitrogen loading in both arms. These in-season changes emphasize the need for an adaptive management approach to ensure the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio does not decrease below 15:1 (weight:weight) during the fertilizer application period. Phytoplankton composition determined from the integrated samples (0-20m) was dominated by diatoms, followed by cryptophytes and chrysophytes. The contribution of cryptophytes to total biomass was higher in 2006 than in 2005. Cryptophytes, considered being edible biomass for zooplankton and Daphnia spp., increased in 2006. Phytoplankton in the discrete depth samples (2, 5, 10, 15 and 20m) demonstrated a clear north to south gradient in average phytoplankton density and biomass among the three stations sampled, with highest values at the North Arm station (KLF 2) and lowest values in the most southern station in the South Arm (KLF 7). Populations were dominated by flagellates at all stations and depths in June and July, then dominated by diatoms in August and September in the North and South arms of the lake. There were no large bluegreen (cyanobacteria) populations in either arm of the lake in 2006. Seasonal average zooplankton abundance and biomass in both the main body of the lake and in the West Arm increased in 2006 compared to 2005. Zooplankton density was numerically dominated by copepods and biomass was dominated by Daphnia spp. The annual average mysid biomass data at deep stations indicated that the North Arm of Kootenay Lake was more productive than the South Arm in 2006. Mysid densities increased through the summer and declined in the winter; mean whole lake values remain within prefertilization densities. Kokanee escapement to Meadow Creek

  6. “Remotion” Total Wrist Arthroplasty: Preliminary Results of a Prospective International Multicenter Study of 215 Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzberg, Guillaume; Boeckstyns, Michel Ernest Henri; Sorensen, Allan Ibsen

    2012-01-01

    preoperative and postoperative reports of "ReMotion" TWA at regular intervals. The cases of 7 centers with more than 15 inclusions were considered for this article. A total of 215 wrists were included. In the rheumatoid arthritis (RA; 129 wrists) and nonrheumatoid arthritis (non-RA; 86 wrists) groups......, there were respectively 5 and 6% complications requiring implant revision with a survival rate of 96 and 92%, respectively, at an average follow-up of 4 years. Within the whole series, only one dislocation was observed in one non-RA wrist. A total of 112 wrists (75 rheumatoid and 37 nonrheumatoid) had more...... than 2 years of follow-up (minimum: 2 years, maximum: 8 years). In rheumatoid and non-RA group, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score improved by 48 and 54 points, respectively, and QuickDASH score improved by 20 and 21 points, respectively, with no statistical differences. Average postoperative arc...

  7. ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, DL

    2013-03-13

    The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as Instrument Mentors. Instrument Mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets.

  8. Taxation, stateness and armed groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kasper; Vlassenroot, Koen; Marchais, Gauthier

    2016-01-01

    rackets, to the material reciprocation of the recognition of rights. Focusing on the taxation practices of armed groups, the article argues that taxation is at the core of armed groups’ production of public authority and citizenship, and that their modes of taxation are based on long-standing registers...... of authority and practices of rule that originate in the colonial era. In particular, the article shows that by appealing to both local customary and national forms of political community and citizenship, armed groups are able to assume public authority to tax civilians. However, their public authority may...

  9. Use of upper arm anthropometry, upper arm muscle area-by-height (UAMAH and midupper- arm-circumference (MUAC-for-height as indicators of body composition and nutritional status among children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath Sampriti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Upper arm anthropometry has a potential role to provide useful estimations of body composition and nutritional status. Aims of the present cross-sectional study were to assess body composition and nutritional status of rural school-going children using upper arm anthropometric measures such as upper arm muscle area-by-height (UAMAH and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC for-height. The present cross-sectional study was conducted among 1281 children of West Bengal, India (boys 619, girls 662 aged 5-12 years and selected using a stratified random sampling method. Anthropometric measurements of height, weight, MUAC and triceps skinfold (TSF were recorded. Body composition and nutritional status were assessed using upper arm muscle area (UMA, upper arm fat area (UFA, UAMAH and MUAC-forheight. Age-sex-specific overall adiposity in TSF, UFA, arm fat index and upper-arm fat area estimates were higher among girls than boys (p0.05. Upper arm anthropometric measures, UAMAH and MUAC-for-height are useful for assessment of body composition and nutritional status among children.

  10. The European Robotic Arm: A High-performance Mechanism Finally on Its Way to Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruijssen, H. J.; Ellenbroek, M.; Henderson, M.; Petersen, H.; Verzijden, P.; Visser, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and qualification of the European Robotic Arm (ERA), which is planned to be launched by the end of 2015. After years of changes, a shift of launcher and new loads, launch preparation is underway. The European Robotic Arm ERA has been designed and manufactured by Dutch Space and its subcontractors such as Astrium, SABCA and Stork with key roles for the mechanical aspects. The arm was originally designed to be launched by the STS (mounted on a Russian module for the ISS) in 2001. However, due to delays and the STS disaster, a shift was made to the Russian Proton rocket. ERA will be launched on the Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM). This module, which is now planned for launch to the ISS in 2015, will carry the ERA. The symmetrical design of the arm with a complete 3 degree-of-freedom wrist and general-purpose end effector on both sides, allows ERA to relocate on the station by grappling a new base point and releasing the old one, and move to different working locations.

  11. ARMin III – Arm Therapy Exoskeleton with an Ergonomic Shoulder Actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Nef

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation robots have become important tools in stroke rehabilitation. Compared to manual arm training, robot-supported training can be more intensive, of longer duration and more repetitive. Therefore, robots have the potential to improve the rehabilitation process in stroke patients. Whereas a majority of previous work in upper limb rehabilitation robotics has focused on end-effector-based robots, a shift towards exoskeleton robots is taking place because they offer a better guidance of the human arm, especially for movements with a large range of motion. However, the implementation of an exoskeleton device introduces the challenge of reproducing the motion of the human shoulder, which is one of the most complex joints of the body. Thus, this paper starts with describing a simplified model of the human shoulder. On the basis of that model, a new ergonomic shoulder actuation principle that provides motion of the humerus head is proposed, and its implementation in the ARMin III arm therapy robot is described. The focus lies on the mechanics and actuation principle. The ARMin III robot provides three actuated degrees of freedom for the shoulder and one for the elbow joint. An additional module provides actuated lower arm pro/supination and wrist flexion/extension. Five ARMin III devices have been manufactured and they are currently undergoing clinical evaluation in hospitals in Switzerland and in the United States.

  12. Mechanical energy generation and transfer in the racket arm during table tennis topspin backhands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2016-06-01

    The ability to generate a high racket speed and a large amount of racket kinetic energy on impact is important for table tennis players. The purpose of this study was to understand how mechanical energy is generated and transferred in the racket arm during table tennis backhands. Ten male advanced right-handed table tennis players hit topspin backhands against pre-impact topspin and backspin balls. The joint kinetics at the shoulder, elbow and wrist of the racket arm was determined using inverse dynamics. A majority of the mechanical energy of the racket arm acquired during forward swing (65 and 77% against topspin and backspin, respectively) was due to energy transfer from the trunk. Energy transfer by the shoulder joint force in the vertical direction was the largest contributor to the mechanical energy of the racket arm against both spins and was greater against backspin than against topspin (34 and 28%, respectively). The shoulder joint force directed to the right, which peaked just before impact, transferred additional energy to the racket. Our results suggest that the upward thrust of the shoulder and the late timing of the axial rotation of the upper trunk are important for an effective topspin backhand.

  13. Psychometric properties of two questionnaires in the context of total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Merser, Søren

    2014-01-01

    evaluated the Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation. RESULTS: Internal consistency and reproducibility were very high (Cronbach's alpha 0.96/0.97; Spearman's rho 0.90/ 0.91; intraclass coefficient 0.91/0.92), and there were no floor or ceiling effects. The responsiveness of the QuickDASH was high (standardised...

  14. Usefulness of absorbable screws in the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Oda, H; Tanaka, S; Kuga, Y; Yamamoto, M; Nishikawa, T; Juji, T; Shimizu, M

    2002-06-01

    Abstract  In the Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction, the distal end of the ulna is fixed to the radius with screws. Recently, absorbable screws have increasingly been used instead of metal ones. However, the clinical usefulness of absorbable screws in S-K procedures for rheumatoid patients is still unknown. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the effect of absorbable screws in this procedure by comparing their clinical results with those of metal screws. Poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) absorbable screws were used in 23 wrists, and metal screws were used in 20 wrists. We evaluated the presence of general or local reactions to PLLA, the stability of the ulnar head, the time to bone union, changes in the shape of the distal ulna, and the presence of bone resorption around the screws. There were no complications with the use of PLLA screws, and their fixation stability was adequate to form sufficient bone union. In five cases in the metal screw group, bone resorption around the screws occurred between 1 and 2 years after surgery. Bone resorption around the PLLA screws was not observed. We conclude that absorbable screws may be more useful than metal screws in the S-K procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction.

  15. A radiographic evaluation of temporomandibular and hand (Metacarpophalangeal / wrist joints of patients with adult rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Kurup

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the TMJ showed osseous changes of a higher grade than the hand (MCP and wrist joints radiographically, it was observed that patients were more aware of the peripheral joint discomfort. There were no significant differences between TMJ and peripheral joints on both right and left sides.

  16. Psychometric properties of two questionnaires in the context of total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Merser, Søren

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patient-rated outcome measures are frequently used to assess the results of total wrist arthroplasty, but their psychometric properties have not yet been evaluated in this group of patients. The purpose of our study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Danish Quick...

  17. 78 FR 44625 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... 17, 2013 (78 FR 36307), inviting the public to comment on a proposed information collection titled ``Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16.'' On June 18, 2013 (78 FR 36643... corrects that error by withdrawing the FR notice that published on June 18, 2013 (FR Doc 2013-14412)....

  18. ТREATMENT STRATEGY OF FLEXION CONTRACTURE OF THE WRIST JOINT IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Владимир Александрович Новиков

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of study was to assess the effectiveness of transplantation of m. flexor carpi ulnaris tendon on the place of m. extensor carpi radialis brevis / longus (Green operation to eliminate the deficit of active wrist joint extension in children with cerebral palsy. Materials and methods. The present study is based on a survey of children with cerebral palsy with affected upper limb. The main criterion for selection of patients was the presence of active extension deficit in the wrist joint, both isolated and in combination with other contractures of the upper limb joints. Total 22 patients with spastic forms of cerebral palsy were examined. Results and conclusions. Green operation is a good method of surgical treatment of active extension deficit in the wrist joint in patients with cerebral palsy. In the presence of moderately severe contractures in the wrist joint, serial casting can eliminate them completely. Presence of a fixed pronation contracture of the forearm is a factor that reduces the effectiveness of FCU transplantation. Pronation contracture should be corrected before or during Green surgery. FCU transplantation is effective for children of any age, but its effectiveness is reduced from 12 years old.

  19. Dynamic sonographic measurements at the carpal tunnel inlet: Reliability and reference values in healthy wrists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Filius (Anika); J.-W.H. Korstanje (Jan-Wiebe); R.W. Selles (Ruud); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.P. Slijper

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Reliability and reference values are not well-established for most dynamic sonographic measurements of the median nerve (MN) and flexor tendons that may be used for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: Wrists of 20 healthy participants were imaged using ultraso

  20. Abnormal surface EMG during clinically normal wrist movement in cervical dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P. M.; Leenders, K. L.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; de Jong, B. M.; Kuiper, A. J.; Maurits, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether patients with cervical dystonia (CD) have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts. Eight healthy controls and eight CD patients performed a flexion-extension movement of the right wrist. Movement execution was recorded by surface electromyography (EMG) from fore

  1. Effects of circumferential rigid wrist orthoses in rehabilitation of patients with radius fracture at typical site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of orthoses is a questionable rehabilitation method for patients with the distal radius fracture at typical site. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the rehabilitation on patients with radius fracture at the typical site, who wore circumferential static wrist orthoses, with those who did not wear them. Methods. Thirty patients were divided into 3 equal groups, 2 experimental groups, and 1 control group. The patients in the experimental groups were given the rehabilitation program of wearing serially manufactured (off-the-shelf, as well as custom-fit orthoses. Those in the control group did not wear wrist orthoses. Evaluation parameters were pain, edema, the range of the wrist motion, the quality of cylindrical, spherical, and pinch-spherical grasp, the strength of pinch and hand grasp, and patient's assessment of the effects of rehabilitation. Results. No significant difference in the effects of rehabilitation on the patients in experimental groups as opposed to control group was found. Patients in the first experimental group, and in control group were more satisfied with the effects of rehabilitation, as opposed to the patients in the second experimental group (p<0,05. Conclusion. The effects of circumferential static wrist orthoses in the rehabilitation of patients with distal radius fracture at the typical site were not clinically significant. There was no significant difference between the custom and off-the-shelf orthoses.

  2. Association between Computer Use and Entrapment Neuropathies in the Wrist Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, S.; Bamac, B.; Colak, T.; Ozbek, A.

    2013-01-01

    There is general consensus in the literature that computer use is often associated with an increased prevalence of hand and wrist disorders. Symptoms may be associated with specific clinical entities such as peripheral nerve entrapment. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and vibration threshold in the hand of computer users have been…

  3. Detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures by a wireless wrist accelerometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; Polster, T.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the clinical reliability of a wrist-worn, wireless accelerometer sensor for detecting generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). Seventy-three consecutive patients (age 6-68 years; median 37 years) at risk of having GTCS and who were admitted to the long-term video-elec...

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: MRI has been proposed as the imaging method of choice to evaluate the long-term outcome in patients with early arthritis. The role of dynamic MRI, performed at presentation, in predicting the outcome of patients with early arthritis has been addressed in the present study. Methods: 39 patients with early arthritis, involving at least one wrist, were studied with clinical visits and laboratory investigations, every 3 months. Dynamic MRI was performed with a low-field (0.2T, extremity-dedicated machine (Artoscan, Esaote, Genova, Italy equipped with a permanent magnet and with a dedicated hand and wrist coil. During the intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA, twenty consecutive fast images of 3 slices of the wrist were acquired. The synovial contrast enhancement ratio was calculated both as rate of early enhancement (REE per second during the first 55” and as relative enhancement (RE at t seconds. Results: In our cohort of patients, REE and RE were significantly lower than those observed in a historical cohort of 36 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. In univariate analysis, low RE predicted complete remission of arthritis. In multivariate analysis, fulfillment of RA criteria during follow-up was predicted by high RE. The need for immunosuppressive treatment at the end of follow-up was predicted by both low RE and high REE. Conclusions: Dynamic MRI may be used to predict several outcomes of early arthritis involving the wrist

  5. Role of Scaphoid in the Abduction and Adduction Movements of Wrist Joint

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    Sadik I Shaikh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a carpal bone scaphoid has an important role in wrist movements. Wrist joint is a synovial modified ellipsoid joint where movements like flexion, extension and adduction, abduction take place around two axes (transverse and antero-posterior. These movements at the wrist joint are associated with considerable range of movements at the mid carpal joint, as same group of muscles act on both of these joints. Methodology: A study has been done amongst 120 persons at the tertiary care hospital during the period from 2006-07 to detect the important movements of scaphoid bone specially during the abduction and adduction of wrist joint (which occur in association with the intercarpal joints and also to detect whether such movements have any speciality in the population. Results: In fully abducted position, it was 45o among 53.3% subjects and the average among all the subjects was 60o. So, the degree of abduction was 30o. The extent of movement was more in adduction (ie, 1.90 cm - 1.03 cm = 0.87 cm than in abduction (ie, 1.03 cm - 0.72 cm = 0.31cm. Conclusion: It was found in this study that the scaphoid acts as a link bone between the two rows of carpal bones and prevents the buckling of midcarpal joint especially of the capitato- lunate joint interface. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(3.000: 253-256

  6. Tactile spatial acuity is reduced by skin stretch at the human wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Frederick W J; Idrees, Raheel; Spilioti, Diamantina X; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2010-10-22

    The skin is an elastic organ that is continuously distorted as our limbs move. The hypothesis that the precision of human tactile localisation is reduced when the skin is stretched, with concurrent expansion of receptive fields (RFs) was tested. Locognosic acuity over the dorsal wrist area was quantified during application of background stretch by (a) Wrist-Bend (skin stretch combined with non-cutaneous proprioceptor activation) and (b) Skin-Pull (skin stretch alone). Participants identified the perceived direction (distal or proximal) of brief test stimuli, applied along a 7-point linear array, relative to a central reference locus. Performance was significantly reduced during the large amplitude compared to the small amplitude of tonic skin stretch, but there was no effect of stretch mode (Wrist-Bend, Skin-Pull), nor was the effect of stretch amplitude modulated by the mode of stretch. Locognosic acuity was poorer than baseline accuracy for the large amplitude skin stretches, for both application modes, but did not differ significantly from baseline for either of the small amplitude stretches. We interpret these observations as corroborating the long-held assumption that tactile localisation is primarily dependent upon the RF dimensions, and associated innervation densities, of regional touch units. The finding that performance was reduced to a similar extent under Skin-Pull and Wrist-Bend conditions suggests that non-cutaneous proprioceptors had rather little tonic modulatory effect.

  7. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraux, A; Lefebvre, G; Pansini, V; Aucourt, J; Vandenbussche, L; Demondion, X; Cotten, A

    2014-06-01

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment.

  8. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  9. Four-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in the wrist: proof of feasibility in a cadaveric model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Shian-Chao; Berger, Richard A. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Orthopedics Biomechanics Laboratory, Rochester, MN (United States); Primak, Andrew N.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, CT Innovation Center, Rochester, MN (United States); Schmidt, Bernhard [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    High-resolution real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the moving wrist may provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of joint instability. The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of using retrospectively gated spiral computed tomography (CT) to perform four-dimensional (4D) imaging of the moving wrist joint. A cadaver forearm from below the elbow was mounted on a motion simulator which performed radioulnar deviation of the wrist at 30 cycles per minute. An electronic trigger from the simulator provided the ''electrocardiogram'' (ECG) signal required for gated reconstructions. Four-dimensional and 3D images were compared by a blinded observer for image quality and presence of artifacts. Image quality of 4D images was found to be excellent at the extremes of radial and ulnar deviation (end-motion phases). Some artifacts were seen in mid-motion phases. 4D CT musculoskeletal imaging is feasible. Four-dimensional CT may allow clinicians to assess functional (dynamic) instabilities of the wrist joint. (orig.)

  10. Post-traumatic Median Nerve Neuroma in Wrist. A Case Report and brief review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Aslan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Distal median nerve masses may be developed post-traumatic or non-traumatic. In this paper, we aim to present a 52 year old female case with a postraumatic neuroma of the median nerve in the left wrist. Case Report: A 52-year-old female patient had accidental incised wound over her left wrist which was primarily sutured. She presented 6 months later with unrelieved pain and growing swelling at the wrist. USG showed solid mass of size 2×3 cms. Intraoperatively the mass was seen to arise from medial nerve and careful excision was done protecting the nerve. At one year follow up the patient is relived of her symptoms with no sensorimotor deficit. Conclusion: Post traumatic neuroma present as unrelieved pain and progressive swelling. A high index of suspicion should be kept in cases of wound that are primarily sutured over an area with superficial nerves. Careful excision of the lesion is very effective in relieving patients symptoms Keywords: Neuroma, wrist, median nerve, nerve ınjury.

  11. Eccentric wrist extensor contractions and the force velocity relationship in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, R P; Pearson, N; Stymiest, P

    1986-01-01

    The torque produced by the wrist extensors during maximal isometric and isokinetic eccentric contractions has been investigated. The torque produced by eccentric contractions was measured at three different velocities: 0.36, 0.93, and 1.64 cmlsec. The speeds of contraction were generated by a specially designed apparatus, consisting of a gear drive and an electric motor that would maintain its speed irrespective of the load applied. Tenison produced by the wrist extensors was measured using a load cell. The results indicated that eccentric contractions of the wrist extensors exceed those produced by isometric contractions. The force-velocity relationship during eccentric contractions was determined to be different from that during concentric contractions. Force values were found to increase as the velocity of eccentric contraction increased. No signficant effect of wrist joint angle on torque values was found, nor was there an interaction effect of velocity and joint angle. The implications for rehabilitation of these findings are outlined. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1986;8(6):288-293.

  12. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenarius, Derk M.F.; Eldevik, Petter [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  13. Elimination of hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment in children needing orthodontic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Khal, Hessa A.; Wong, Ricky W.K.; Rabie, A.B.M. [University of Hong Kong, Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-03-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the validity of the cervical vertebra maturation (CVM) method as an indicator of skeletal age during the circumpubertal period by correlating the CVM method with the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method in an attempt to eliminate the need for hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment. Hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 400 Chinese were randomly selected. The age for girls was between 10 years and 15 years and for boys it was between 12 years and 17 years, so that they were within the circumpubertal period. The CVM was assessed by a method developed by Baccetti and co-workers, whereas hand-wrist maturation was assessed by Fishman's method. The CVM was significantly correlated with HWM skeletal age. (Spearman's r boys = 0.9206, girls = 0.9363). All the patients in cervical vertebra stage 3 (CVS3) of CVM corresponded to skeletal maturation indicator 2 (SMI2) or SMI3 stages of HWM (around the peak of the growth spurt). The method error was insignificant. CVM is a valid indicator of skeletal growth during the circumpubertal period. This work will provide dental practitioners with information on jaw growth modification therapy. (orig.)

  14. The distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap for wrist defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki Durga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the wrist with exposed tendons, joints, nerves and bone represents a challenge to plastic surgeons, and such defects necessitate flap coverage to preserve hand functions and to protect its vital structures. We evaluated the use of a distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap in patients with volar soft tissue defects around the wrist. Materials and Methods: Between June 2004 and June 2006, seven patients of soft tissue defects on the volar aspect of the wrist underwent distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap. Out of seven patients, five were male and two patients were female. This flap was used in the reconstruction of the post road traffic accident defects in four patients and post electric burn defects in three patients. Flap was raised on one or two perforators and was rotated to 180°. Results: All flaps survived completely. Donor sites were closed primarily without donor site morbidity. Conclusion: The distally-based island Ulnar artery perforator flap is convenient, reliable, easy to manage and is a single-stage technique for reconstructing soft tissue defects of the volar aspect of the wrist. Early use of this flap allows preservation of vital structures, decreases morbidity and allows for early rehabilitation.

  15. An examination of the vibration transmissibility of the hand-arm system in three orthogonal directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to enhance the understanding of the vibration transmission in the hand-arm system in three orthogonal directions (X, Y, and Z). For the first time, the transmitted vibrations distributed on the entire hand-arm system exposed in the three orthogonal directions via a 3-D vibration test system were measured using a 3-D laser vibrometer. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. This study confirms that the vibration transmissibility generally decreased with the increase in distance from the hand and it varied with the vibration direction. Specifically, to the upper arm and shoulder, only moderate vibration transmission was measured in the test frequency range (16 to 500 Hz), and virtually no transmission was measured in the frequency range higher than 50 Hz. The resonance vibration on the forearm was primarily in the range of 16-30 Hz with the peak amplitude of approximately 1.5 times of the input vibration amplitude. The major resonance on the dorsal surfaces of the hand and wrist occurred at around 30-40 Hz and, in the Y direction, with peak amplitude of more than 2.5 times of the input amplitude. At higher than 50 Hz, vibration transmission was effectively limited to the hand and fingers. A major finger resonance was observed at around 100 Hz in the X and Y directions and around 200 Hz in the Z direction. In the fingers, the resonance magnitude in the Z direction was generally the lowest, and the resonance magnitude in the Y direction was generally the highest with the resonance amplitude of 3 times the input vibration, which was similar to the transmissibility at the wrist and hand dorsum. The implications of the results are discussed.

  16. Kashin-Beck disease in children: radiographic findings in the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, W. [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section and Osteoporosis and Arthritis Research Group, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wang, Y. [Beijing Ji Shui Tan Hospital, Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Beijing (China); Jiang, Y.; Cheng, X. [Beijing Ji Shui Tan Hospital, Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Beijing (China); Wang, L.; Genant, H.K. [Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section and Osteoporosis and Arthritis Research Group, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2002-04-01

    Objective: To characterize the features and prevalence of radiographic abnormalities of the wrist in children with Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) and to determine whether the presence of radiographic abnormalities in the wrist correlates with the severity of KBD. Design and patients: Two hundred and eight posteroanterior radiographs of the right hand (including wrist) in children with KBD, ranging in age from 4 to 11 years (mean age 7.7 years), from endemic areas of China were reviewed. Carpal bony margins were evaluated for blurring, thinning, irregularity with and without sclerosis, interruption, depression or destruction. The radiocarpal, intercarpal and carpometacarpal joints were assessed for widening or narrowing. The severity of the disease was graded using the hand criteria from the Chinese Radiographic Criteria of KBD Diagnosis, which classifies the following five types according to the location of the hand involved: I, metaphysis; II, diaphysis; III, I+II; IV, metaphysis and epiphysis; V, II+IV. Results: Of the 208 children, 95 had abnormalities in the hand but not in the wrist; 108 had both hand and wrist abnormalities; only five had abnormal wrist findings without any hand abnormalities. Of the 108 cases with wrist abnormalities, all the carpal bones were involved in 33 cases, of which the hand types were either IV or V. However, any individual carpal bone, or combination of bones, may become involved. The carpal bones most likely to show abnormalities were the capitate and the hamate (93%), followed by the triquetrum (31%), the lunate (9%), the scaphoid (6%), and the trapezoid and the trapezium (5%). The pisiform bones were not evaluated because they cannot be seen on the overlapping posteroanterior radiographs. The most commonly involved carpal joint was the midcarpal joint (42%). Conclusions: Recognizing carpal abnormalities on radiographs is helpful for the diagnosis of KBD and the evaluation of the severity of the disease. The more severe the KBD, the

  17. Unequal-Arms Michelson Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Michelson interferometers allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the phase stability of the laser light injected into their two almost equal-length arms. If, however, the two arms are unequal, the laser fluctuations can not be removed by simply recombining the two beams. This is because the laser jitters experience different time delays in the two arms, and therefore can not cancel at the photo detector. We present here a method for achieving exact laser noise cancellation, even in an unequal-arm interferometer. The method presented in this paper requires a separate readout of the relative phase in each arm, made by interfering the returning beam in each arm with a fraction of the outgoing beam. By linearly combining the two data sets with themselves, after they have been properly time shifted, we show that it is possible to construct a new data set that is free of laser fluctuations. An application of this technique to future planned space-based laser interferometer detector3 of gravitational radiation is discussed.

  18. Bistable Head Positioning Arm Latch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Ken; Endo, Juro; Mita, Masahiro; Abelein, Nathan

    A simple, low cost, yet effective device has been developed for immobilizing the head-arm assembly in a disk drive or similar mechanism during power-off conditions. The latching scheme also provides a consistent means of releasing the head-arm assembly from the immobilized position upon power up of the disk drive. The latch uses no electrical power in either immobilized or released state. This design is immune to extreme torque and linear shock forces applied to the disk drive case. The latch system can use the energy stored in the spinning disks to drive the head-arm assembly toward a safe position while simultaneously arming the latch mechanism to secure the head-arm assembly in the safe position upon arrival. A low energy five msec pulse of current drives the latch from one state to the other. Solenoids as presently used in latch mechanisms are bulky, expensive, have variable force characteristics, and often generate contaminants. The latch described in this paper is expected to replace such solenoids. It may also replace small magnet latches, which have limited latch force and apply unwanted torque to a proximate head positioning arm.

  19. Separating bedtime rest from activity using waist or wrist-worn accelerometers in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Dustin J; Xu, Zhiyi; Choi, Leena; Acra, Sari; Chen, Kong Y; Buchowski, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    Recent interest in sedentary behavior and technological advances expanded use of watch-size accelerometers for continuous monitoring of physical activity (PA) over extended periods (e.g., 24 h/day for 1 week) in studies conducted in natural living environment. This approach necessitates the development of new methods separating bedtime rest and activity periods from the accelerometer recordings. The goal of this study was to develop a decision tree with acceptable accuracy for separating bedtime rest from activity in youth using accelerometer placed on waist or wrist. Minute-by-minute accelerometry data were collected from 81 youth (10-18 years old, 47 females) during a monitored 24-h stay in a whole-room indirect calorimeter equipped with a force platform covering the floor to detect movement. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the accelerometer cut points for rest and activity. To examine the classification differences, the accelerometer bedtime rest and activity classified by the algorithm in the development group (n = 41) were compared with actual bedtime rest and activity classification obtained from the room calorimeter-measured metabolic rate and movement data. The selected optimal bedtime rest cut points were 20 and 250 counts/min for the waist- and the wrist-worn accelerometer, respectively. The selected optimal activity cut points were 500 and 3,000 counts/min for waist and wrist-worn accelerometers, respectively. Bedtime rest and activity were correctly classified by the algorithm in the validation group (n = 40) by both waist- (sensitivity: 0.983, specificity: 0.946, area under ROC curve: 0. 872) and wrist-worn (0.999, 0.980 and 0.943) accelerometers. The decision tree classified bedtime rest correctly with higher accuracy than commonly used automated algorithm for both waist- and wrist-warn accelerometer (all prest from activity in youth.

  20. Distinct thalamo-cortical controls for shoulder, elbow, and wrist during locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N. Beloozerova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent data from this laboratory on differential controls for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist exerted by the thalamo-cortical network during locomotion is presented, based on experiments involving chronically instrumented cats walking on a flat surface and along a horizontal ladder. The activity of the following three groups of neurons is characterized: 1 neurons of the motor cortex that project to the pyramidal tract (PTNs, 2 neurons of the ventrolateral thalamus (VL, many identified as projecting to the motor cortex (thalamo-cortical neurons, TCs, and 3 neurons of the reticular nucleus of thalamus (RE, which inhibit TCs. Neurons were grouped according to their receptive field into shoulder-, elbow-, and wrist/paw-related categories. During simple locomotion, shoulder-related PTNs were most active in the late stance and early swing, and on the ladder, often increased activity and step-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically remained similar on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing, and on the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration.In the VL, shoulder-related neurons were more active during transition from swing to stance. Elbow-related cells tended to be more active during transition from stance to swing and on the ladder often decreased their activity and increased modulation. Wrist-related neurons were more active throughout the stance phase. In the RE, shoulder-related cells had low discharge rates and depths of modulation and long periods of activity distributed evenly across the cycle. In contrast, wrist/paw-related cells discharged synchronously during end of stance and swing with short periods of high activity, high modulation, and frequent sleep-type bursting. We conclude that thalamo-cortical network processes information related to different segments of the forelimb