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Sample records for weevil coleoptera curculionidae

  1. Pollination of Anthurium (Araceae) by derelomine flower weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

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    Franz, Nico M

    2007-03-01

    Cyclanthura flower weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Derelomini) are identified for the first time as pollinators of multiple species of Anthurium (Araceae) in Costa Rica. The weevils are present on the inflorescences in small numbers during the pistillate and staminate phase of anthesis, and consume plant tissues and pollen. The individuals of one species of Cyclanthura can visit several Anthurium species within the same locality. They also engage in reproductive activities and are likely to oviposit into the flowers. The mating strategies suggest that sperm precedence selects males that are able to secure their position as the last partner prior to oviposition.

  2. Pollination of Anthurium (Araceae by derelomine flower weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Nico M Franz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyclanthura flower weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Derelomini are identified for the first time as pollinators of multiple species of Anthurium (Araceae in Costa Rica. The weevils are present on the inflorescences in small numbers during the pistillate and staminate phase of anthesis, and consume plant tissues and pollen. The individuals of one species of Cyclanthura can visit several Anthurium species within the same locality. They also engage in reproductive activities and are likely to oviposit into the flowers. The mating strategies suggest that sperm precedence selects males that are able to secure their position as the last partner prior to oviposition. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (1: 269-277. Epub 2007 March. 31.Por primera vez se informa que algunos curculiónidos de flores de Cyclanthura (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Derelomini polinizan varias especies de Anthurium (Araceae en Costa Rica. Los curculiónidos están presentes en las inflorescencias en pequeñas cantidades durante la fase pistilada y estaminada de la antesis, y consumen tejidos de la planta y polen. Los individuos de una especie de Cyclanthura pueden visitar varias especies de Anthurium en la misma localidad ; también se ocupan en actividades reproductivas y probablemente ovipositan en las flores. Las estrategias de apareamiento sugieren que la competencia a nivel de gametos selecciona favorablemente al último macho en la secuencia de apareamiento de la hembra, pues éste deposita su semen justo antes de que ella oviposite.

  3. Temperature influences on diapause induction and survival in the boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), has been the most important pest of cotton (Gossypium spp.) wherever it occurs. Although eradication programs in the U.S. have reduced the range of this pest, the weevil remains an intractable problem in subtropical Tex...

  4. Abundance and frequency of the Asiatic oak weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and defoliation on American, Chinese, and hybrid chestnut ( Castanea )

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    Ashley E. Case; Albert (Bud) Mayfield; Stacy L. Clark; Scott E. Schlarbaum; Barbara C. Reynolds

    2016-01-01

    The Asiatic oak weevil, Cyrtepistomus castaneus Roelofs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a nonnative defoliator of trees in the Fagaceae family in the United States but has not been studied on Castanea species in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Planted trees of Castanea dentata (...

  5. Susceptibility of the filbertworm (Cydia latiferreana, Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and filbert weevil (Curculio occidentalis, Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to entomopathogenic nematodes.

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    Bruck, Denny J; Walton, Vaughn M

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the susceptibility of the two primary direct insect pests of hazelnuts in Oregon to three species of entomopathogenic nematodes. The entomopathogenic nematodes (Heterorhabditis marelatus Pt. Reyes, Steinernema carpocapsae All and Steinernema kraussei L137) were used in laboratory soil bioassays to determine their virulence against filbertworm, Cydia latiferreana (Walsingham) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and filbert weevil, Curculio occidentalis (Casey) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). All three nematode species were infective in laboratory bioassays. Infectivity ranged from 73-100% and 23-85% for filbertworm and filbert weevil, respectively. Field results were similar to those found in the laboratory with filbertworm larvae being more susceptible to nematode infection.

  6. Reproductive Plasticity of an Invasive Insect Pest, Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

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    Huang, Yunshang; Ao, Yan; Jiang, Mingxing

    2017-10-16

    Reproductive plasticity is a key determinant of species invasiveness. However, there are a limited number of studies addressing this issue in exotic insects. The rice water weevil Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), which is native to North America, is one of the most invasive insect pests in east Asia. In this study, we investigated the reproductive status of first-generation females (progeny of overwintered weevils) from five geographic regions in southern and northern China in the field, and reproductive status and ovipositional features of females provided with suitable host plants in the laboratory after collection. Under field conditions, a proportion of females oviposited, while the rest remained in diapause from all three southern regions investigated, but reproductive development did not take place in females from the two northern regions, where the weevil produces only one generation per year. However, when fed host plants in the laboratory, females from all regions laid eggs. They typically had a very short ovipositional period (3-6 d on average on rice at a temperature of 27°C), laid a low number of eggs, and did not die soon after oviposition; this was different from common reproductive females. We concluded that first-generation L. oryzophilus females, which largely enter diapause after emergence, are highly plastic in their reproductive performance and are ready to reproduce under favorable conditions. Our results indicate the significance of their reproductive plasticity for geographic spread and population development. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Blueberry Cultivars Differ in Susceptibility to the Elephant Weevil, Orthorhinus cylindrirostris (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

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    Murdoch, Gregory; Clift, Alan D; Mansfield, Sarah

    2017-10-01

    The accumulated damage from elephant weevil larvae, Orthorhinus cylindrirostris (F.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces blueberry yield and shortens the productive lifespan of blueberry plants by several years. Selective breeding to develop pest-resistant blueberry cultivars is a possible control option, but the relationship between O. cylindrirostris populations, plant damage, and blueberry yield has not been described. A field survey of 17 blueberry cultivars was conducted on a commercial farm to measure O. cylindrirostris populations (emergence holes and adult numbers) and yield from plants of different ages (2-12 yr). Blueberry plants accumulated damage over time, that is, older plants tended to have more O. cylindrirostris emergence holes than younger plants. All cultivars received some level of O. cylindrirostris attack but this did not always lead to yield losses. Newer cultivars that have been in production since 2000 were less susceptible to O. cylindrirostris than older cultivars. Removal of highly susceptible cultivars from commercial blueberry farms may reduce O. cylindrirostris populations. There is potential for selective breeding to increase plant resistance to O. cylindrirostris if the specific resistance mechanisms can be identified in blueberry. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. New records of Paracrias Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae as parasitoids on weevil larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae in Brazil, with the description of a new species

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    Luciano Palmieri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paracrias strii Schauff, 1985 and P. ceratophaga Palmieri & Hansson sp. nov. are first record in Brazil and both are associated with Ceratopus Schoenherr larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae reared from syconia of two species of fig-trees. Both Paracrias species are diagnosed and illustrated. Males of P. ceratophaga sp. nov. are described. The association of Paracrias with weevil larvae is briefly discussed.

  9. Systemic insecticides for control of black vine weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in container- and field-grown nursery crops.

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    Reding, Michael E; Persad, Anand B

    2009-06-01

    Black vine weevils, Otiorhynchus sulcatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), are serious pests of container- and field-grown nursery crops. Management programs usually target the larval stage in container-grown plants and the adults in field-grown plants. We tested several new systemic insecticides for efficacy against black vine weevil in container-grown Sedum spp. and field-grown Taxus spp. In 2006 and 2007, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and chlorantraniliprole were applied as surface drenches to containerized Sedum plants, and suppression of larval densities and adult feeding were evaluated. Sedum leaf bioassays were used to further examine the influence of clothianidin, dinotefuran, and chlorantraniliprole on adult feeding. In 2006, pots were infested with adult black vine weevil 1 d after treating, and in 2007 pots were infested 1 or 43 d after treating. All three insecticides significantly reduced the numbers of larvae in 2006, but not in 2007, because of low numbers of larvae in the untreated control plants. Dinotefuran and clothianidin reduced feeding by adult black vine weevil on containerized Sedum plants, resulting in more blossoms, fewer damaged leaves, and a lower percentage of leaves damaged compared with control plants. In bioassays with detached leaves, all three insecticides reduced feeding compared with control plants. Efficacy and timing of clothianidin, imidacloprid, and acephate soil drenches and imidacloprid and acephate soil injections were evaluated for black vine weevil control over a 1-yr period in field-grown Taxus plants. All insecticide treatments significantly reduced the numbers of larvae in field-grown Taxus plants compared with control plants; and all but the spring acephate drench improved the appearance of the Taxus (foliar rating) plants compared with untreated plants. All of the tested insecticides showed potential for preventing infestations of black vine weevil larvae and reducing feeding by the adults in ornamental plants.

  10. Bio-ecology and integrated management of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in the region of Valencia (Spain)

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    Dembilio, Óscar; Jacas Miret, Josep Anton

    2012-01-01

    The invasive red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is one of the most destructive pests of palms in the world. It is widely distributed in all continents and has been reported on 26 palm species belonging to 16 different genera. In the Mediterranean basin, R. ferrugineus has become the major pest of palms, mainly Phoenix canariensis hort. ex Chabaud, an endemic palm to the Canary Islands widely used as ornamental. In this manuscript we summarize the r...

  11. Host plant phenology affects performance of an invasive weevil, Phyllobius oblongus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in a northern hardwood forest.

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    Coyle, David R; Jordan, Michelle S; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2010-10-01

    We investigated how host plant phenology and plant species affected longevity, reproduction, and feeding behavior of an invasive weevil. Phyllobius oblongus L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is common in northern hardwood forests of the Great Lakes Region. Adults emerge in spring, feed on foliage of woody understory plants, and oviposit in the soil. Preliminary data indicate that adults often feed on sugar maple, Acer saccharum Marshall, foliage early in the season, then feed on other species such as raspberry, Rubus spp. Whether this behavior reflects temporal changes in the quality of A. saccharum tissue or merely subsequent availability of later-season plants is unknown. We tested adult P. oblongus in laboratory assays using young (newly flushed) sugar maple foliage, old (2-3 wk postflush) sugar maple foliage, and raspberry foliage. Raspberry has indeterminate growth, thus always has young foliage available for herbivores. Survival, oviposition, and leaf consumption were recorded. In performance assays under no-choice conditions, mated pairs were provided one type of host foliage for the duration of their lives. In behavioral choice tests, all three host plants were provided simultaneously and leaf area consumption was compared. Adults survived longer on and consumed greater amounts of young maple and raspberry foliage than old maple foliage. P. oblongus preferred young maple foliage to old maple foliage early in the season, however, later in the growing season weevils showed less pronounced feeding preferences. These results suggest how leaf phenology, plant species composition, and feeding plasticity in host utilization may interact to affect P. oblongus population dynamics.

  12. Systemic insecticides reduce feeding, survival, and fecundity of adult black vine weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on a variety of ornamental nursery crops.

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    Reding, Michael E; Ranger, Christopher M

    2011-04-01

    Systemic activity of the neonicotinoids clothianidin, dinotefuran, and thiamethoxam and the anthranilic diamide chlorantraniliprole was tested against adult black vine weevils, Otiorhynchus sulcatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), on Astilbe, Euonymus, Heuchera, Rhododendron, Sedum, and Taxus. Insecticide treatments were applied to the soilless substrate of containerized plants. Bioassays were conducted 12 or 13, 26, and 42 d after treatment (DAT) and ran for 7 d; and feeding, mortality, and weight gain or loss by weevils were evaluated. Foliage was removed from test plants and then placed in arenas with adult black vine weevils. The neonicotinoids reduced feeding and weight gain by adult black vine weevils on most plant species with residual activity 42 DAT on some plant species. At 12 DAT, mortality was caused by the three neonicotinoids on Astilbe and by thiamethoxam on Sedum; and at 26 DAT dinotefuran caused mortality on Astilbe. Chlorantraniliprole reduced feeding on Taxus at 12 DAT, with no activity detected in other bioassays. Another set of bioassays was conducted to examine survival and fecundity of adult black vine weevils during prolonged feeding on Heuchera and Taxus systemically treated with dinotefuran or thiamethoxam. Bioassay procedures were similar to those described above, except they ran continuously for 56 d. Prolonged feeding on dinotefuran and thiamethoxam treated Heuchera and Taxus resulted in high mortality of adult black vine weevils and reduced fecundity. These studies show that the systemic activity of neonicotinoids is influenced by plant species and that systemic neonicotinoids have the potential to suppress black vine weevil populations in containerized nursery crops.

  13. Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea from Lorestan province, western Iran

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    Ghahari H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fauna of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae from Lorestan province, western Iran is studied in this paper. A total 56 species from 19 genera and 5 subfamilies (including, Curculioninae, Ceutorhynchinae, Entiminae, Hyperinae, Lixinae were collected.

  14. Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) from Lorestan province, western Iran

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    Ghahari H.; Arzanov Y.G.

    2012-01-01

    The fauna of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) from Lorestan province, western Iran is studied in this paper. A total 56 species from 19 genera and 5 subfamilies (including, Curculioninae, Ceutorhynchinae, Entiminae, Hyperinae, Lixinae) were collected.

  15. Revision and phylogeny of the Caribbean weevil genus Apotomoderes Dejean, 1834 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae

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    Nico Franz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The weevil genus Apotomoderes Dejean, 1834 (Curculionidae: Entiminae: Geonemini is revised, including a redescription of the only previously known species, A. lateralis (Gyllenhal, 1834, and descriptions of five new species: A. anodontos sp. n., A. menocrater sp. n., A. sotomayorae sp. n., A. chariedris sp. n., and A. hadroprion sp. n. The monophyly of Apotomoderes is supported by multiple synapomorphic character states including the two-segmented labial palps, a postocular constriction on the head, a sexually dimorphic, globular pronotum in males, and the presence of setae in the dorsal subapical region of the aedeagus. In addition, all species of Apotomoderes except A. anodontos have a large, knife-like cuticular tooth on the profemur and a toothed ridge along the anteromesal margin of the protibia. Illustrations of external and internal morphological traits are provided, along with a key to the six constituent species. A cladistic analysis of 12 taxa (6 outgroup, 6 ingroup and 22 characters yielded a single most parsimonious cladogram (L=33, CI=75, RI=90 with the topology (A. anodontos, (A. menocrater, (A. sotomayorae, (A. lateralis, (A. chariedris, A. hadroprion. A species of Artipus Sahlberg (Naupactini was placed as the most immediate relative of Apotomoderes; however, the state of phylogenetic knowledge of Caribbean entimine weevil is still too incomplete to warrant any higher level rearrangements. All species of Apotomoderes occur on Hispaniola with the exception of A. sotomayorae which is endemic to Mona Island, Puerto Rico. A historical biogeographic reconstruction yielded the taxon-area cladogram (southwestern Dominican Republic, (eastern Dominican Republic, Mona Island, suggesting two successive eastbound colonization events in the Miocene/Pliocene, originating from the southern Hispaniola peninsula. Reliable host plant records are unavailable although adults of A. menocrater have been found on allspice (Pimenta Lindley; Myrtaceae

  16. Gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae perjudiciales para "frutos rojos" en la Argentina Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae harmful for berry fruits in Argentina

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    M. Guadalupe Del Rio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se registraron seis especies de gorgojos de rostro corto de la subfamilia Entiminae que causan daños en cultivos de frutos rojos, en la Argentina. Tres de ellas son exóticas y se distribuyen a lo largo de los bosques patagónicos: Otiorhynchus ovatus (Linnaeus, O. rugosostriatus (Goeze y O. sulcatus (Fabricius(Otiorhynchini; otras tres son nativas y habitan en la zona norte y central del país: Hyphantus sulcifrons Boheman (Anypotactini, Naupactusxanthographus (Germary N. cervinus Boheman (Naupactini. Las larvas viven en el suelo y se alimentan de la superficie externa de las raíces de sus plantas hospedadoras, causan daños más importantes que los adultos, los cuales se alimentan principalmente sobre el follaje. Los principales objetivos de esta contribución son: aportar una clave, diagnosis y fotografías de los hábitos de las seis especies para facilitar su correcta determinación; brindar datos sobre su distribución, plantas hospedadoras y biología, y citar la especie O. ovatus por primera vez para la Argentina, asociada con cultivos de arándano y frutilla.Six species of broad nosed weevils of the subfamily Entiminae are recorded as harmful for berries in Argentina. Three of them are exotic and distributed along the Patagonian forests: Otiorhynchus ovatus (Linnaeus, O. rugosostriatus (Goeze and O. sulcatus (Fabricius(Otiorhynchini and three are native and range in the northern and central areas of this country: Hyphantus sulcifrons Boheman (Anypotactini, Naupactusxanthographus (Germarand N. cervinus Boheman (Naupactini. Larvae live in soil and bore externally on the roots of their host plants, causing more damage than adults that usually feed on the leaves. The main objectives of this contribution are: to give a dichotomous key, diagnoses and habitus photographs for the identification of the six species; to provide information on their geographic distributions, host plants and biology; and to bring the first record of O. ovatus for

  17. A model for long-distance dispersal of boll weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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    Westbrook, John K.; Eyster, Ritchie S.; Allen, Charles T.

    2011-07-01

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis (Boheman), has been a major insect pest of cotton production in the US, accounting for yield losses and control costs on the order of several billion US dollars since the introduction of the pest in 1892. Boll weevil eradication programs have eliminated reproducing populations in nearly 94%, and progressed toward eradication within the remaining 6%, of cotton production areas. However, the ability of weevils to disperse and reinfest eradicated zones threatens to undermine the previous investment toward eradication of this pest. In this study, the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model was used to simulate daily wind-aided dispersal of weevils from the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of southern Texas and northeastern Mexico. Simulated weevil dispersal was compared with weekly capture of weevils in pheromone traps along highway trap lines between the LRGV and the South Texas / Winter Garden zone of the Texas Boll Weevil Eradication Program. A logistic regression model was fit to the probability of capturing at least one weevil in individual pheromone traps relative to specific values of simulated weevil dispersal, which resulted in 60.4% concordance, 21.3% discordance, and 18.3% ties in estimating captures and non-captures. During the first full year of active eradication with widespread insecticide applications in 2006, the dispersal model accurately estimated 71.8%, erroneously estimated 12.5%, and tied 15.7% of capture and non-capture events. Model simulations provide a temporal risk assessment over large areas of weevil reinfestation resulting from dispersal by prevailing winds. Eradication program managers can use the model risk assessment information to effectively schedule and target enhanced trapping, crop scouting, and insecticide applications.

  18. De snuitkever Pachyrhinus lethierryi nieuw voor Nederland (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

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    Heijerman, Th.

    2008-01-01

    Pachyrhinus lethierryi, a new species of weevil for the Dutch fauna (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Pachyrhinus lethierryi is reported for the first time from the Netherlands. Many specimens were collected from Chamaecyparus x leylandii on several localities in the province of Zeeland. This weevil seems

  19. Effects of covering highland banana stumps with soil on banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) oviposition

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    Masanza, M.; Gold, C.S.; Huis, van A.; Ragama, P.E.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of covering post-harvest banana stumps with soil on banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) oviposition levels was investigated at three locations, Sendusu, Kawanda Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) and Ntungamo district of southwestern Uganda. In the first experiment

  20. Non-constant thermal regimes enhance overwintering success and accelerate diapause development for Smicronyx fulvus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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    Recent populations of the red sunflower seed weevil, Smicronyx fulvus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) have been inconsistent or declining, particularly in North Dakota. Consequently, field and laboratory research on weevil biology, including development of resistant germplasm, have been limited....

  1. Root weevils of artificial forests in Ukraine steppe area (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cleonini

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    Volovnik S. V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven species of root weevils (Cleonini: were found in man-made forests in the steppe of Ukraine. They are Asproparthenis punctiventris, Bothynoderes affinis, Bothynoderes declivis, Cleonis pigra, Cyphocleonus dealbatus, Pachycerus segnis, Temnorhinus strabus. All these species were registered in open habitats, namely forest borders, glades, sides of the roads, slopes, and connected with plants from Asteraceae, Chenopodiacea, Boraginaceae. If beet plantations situated near artificial forests then A. punctiventris, B. affinis, B. declivis could damage them in case of mass reproduction. C.dealbatus is a potential pest of the ornamental camoniles. Literary data as to real damage caused to artificial forests by root weevils need to be proved.

  2. Diapause in the Boll Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): Seasonal Occurrence in Mississippi Populations

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    Terence L. Wagner; Eric J. Villavaso

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the diapause response among boll weevils collected as immatures in squares at different times of the summer and held under simulated field photoperiods and temperatures of northern Mississippi. The percentage of adults exhibiting prediapause increased seasonally, starting with the 1st generation in July and achieving a maximal rate of 96.7% late in...

  3. Starvation-induced morphological responses of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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    Status of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, as a pest of cotton (Gossypium spp.) in the United States has diminished because of progress by eradication programs. However, this pest remains of critical importance in South America, and intractable populations in extreme South Texas ...

  4. Dispersal of the cotton boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in South America: evidence of RAPD analysis.

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    Scataglini, M A; Confalonieri, V A; Lanteri, A A

    2000-01-01

    RAPD technique provides useful information on the geographic origin and dispersal of the boll weevil Anthonomus grandis in South America. Nine populations from Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Mexico and USA were analyzed. Weevils were captured on native plants (Misiones province, Argentina) and on cotton cultures, except the sample from the United States (USDA laboratory-reared colony). A sample of the 'Peruvian square weevil', A. vestitus, from Ecuador, was included in the analysis in order to compare interspecific variation. The four primers used in the analysis revealed 41 'anonymous loci'. The neighbor-joining tree based on Nei's distances and values of Nm (migrants per generation), indicate that genetic similarity between samples from Tecomán (Mexico) and Puerto Iguazú (Argentina), is higher than among remaining South American populations. This result supports an hypothesis of natural occurrence of the boll weevil in South America, prior to extensive cotton cultivation. Population outbreaks of the species would be associated with increase of agricultural lands.

  5. Virulence of entomopathogenic nematodes to pecan weevil larvae, Curculio caryae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in the laboratory.

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    Shapiro-Ilan, D I

    2001-02-01

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecans in the Southeast. Entomopathogenic nematodes have been shown to be pathogenic toward the larval stage of this pest. Before this research, only three species of nematodes had been tested against pecan weevil larvae. In this study, the virulence of the following nine species and 15 strains of nematodes toward fourth-instar pecan weevil was tested: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar (Baine, HP88, Oswego, NJ1, and Tf strains), H. indica Poinar, Karunakar & David (original and Homl strains), H. marelatus Liu & Berry (IN and Point Reyes strains), H. megidis Poinar, Jackson & Klein (UK211 strain), H. zealandica Poinar (NZH3 strain), Steinernema riobrave Cabanillas, Poinar & Raulston (355 strain), S. carpocapsae (Weiser) (All strain), S. feltiae (Filipjev) (SN strain), and S. glaseri (Steiner) (NJ43 strain). No significant difference in virulence was detected among nematode species or strains. Nematode-induced mortality was not significantly greater than control mortality (in any of the experiments conducted) for the following nematodes: H. bacteriophora (Baine), H. zealandica (NZH3), S. carpocapsae (All), S. feltiae (SN), S. glaseri (NJ43), and S. riobrave (355). All other nematodes caused greater mortality than the control in at least one experiment. Heterorhabditis megidis (UK211) but not H. indica (original) displayed a positive linear relationship between nematode concentration and larval mortality. Results suggested that, as pecan weevil larvae age, they may have become more resistant to infection with entomopathogenic nematodes.

  6. Biochemical properties of digestive carbohydrases from the sugar beet weevil, Lixus incanescens (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Seyed Mohammad Ahsaei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The sugar beet weevil, Lixus incanescens B., is one of the most important pests of sugar beet plant in Iran. The petioles and leaves of sugar beet are attacked by larvae and adults of the sugar beet weevil. Chemical application is currently used for controlling the pest. Digestion in the alimentary canal of the sugar beet weevil is facilitated by some carbohydrases. Results of the in vitro studies indicated the presence of alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and beta-galactosidase in the digestive tract of the pest. Highest activities of alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and beta-galactosidase were at pH 5, pH 5 and pH 4, respectively. No significant alpha-glucosidase and alpha-galactosidase activity was detected in the pest's digestive system. Optimum temperatures for alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and beta-galactosidase activity were determined at 45, 50 and 40 oC, respectively. alpha-amylase was more stable under acidic condition (pH 4 to pH 6 than under highly acidic and alkaline condition. Na+ and K+ increased alpha-amylase activity, but sodium dodecyl sulfate significantly decreased amylase activity. Also, the activity of alpha-amylase was inhibited by the other compounds such as MgCl2, CaCl2 and EDTA. Zymogram analysis using native-PAGE revealed one band of alpha-amylase activity in Lixus incanescens. High activity of carbohydrases in the digestive system of adults was determined and further researches are needed to be applied to design new strategies for controlling the sugar beet weevil based on natural carbohydrase inhibitors.

  7. Biological Control of the Pecan Weevil, Curculio caryae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), with Entomopathogenic Nematodes.

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    Smith, M T; Georgis, R; Nyczepir, A P; Miller, R W

    1993-03-01

    Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) strain A11, S. feltiae (Filipjev) strain SN, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar strains HP88 and Georgia were tested for their efficacy as biological control agents of the pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), in pecan orchard soil-profile containers under greenhouse conditions. Percentage C. caryae parasitism by S. carpocapsae and H. bacteriophora strain HP88 and Georgia was consistently poor when applied either prior to or following C. caryae entry into the soil, suggesting that these nematode species and (or) their enterobacteria are poor biological control agents of weevil larvae. Soil taken 21 days following application of S. carpocapsae or H. bacteriophora strain HP88 induced a low rate of infection of Galleria mellonella larvae, whereas soil that had been similarily treated with H. bacteriophora strain Georgia induced a moderate rate of infection. Percentage C. caryae parasitism by S. feltiae was consistently low when applied following C. caryae entry into the soil and was inconsistent when applied as a barrier prior to entry of weevil larvae into the soil. Soil taken 21 days following application of S. feltiae induced a high rate of infection of G. mellonella larvae.

  8. Cotton harvest at 40% versus 75% boll-splitting on yield and economic return under standard and proactive boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) spray regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showler, A T; Robinson, J R C

    2008-10-01

    The standard practice of two or three preemptive insecticide applications at the start of pinhead (1-2-mm-diameter) squaring followed by threshold-triggered (when 10% of randomly selected squares have oviposition punctures) insecticide applications for boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), control does not provide reliable protection of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., lint production. This study, conducted during 2004 and 2005, showed that three to six fewer spray applications in a "proactive" approach, in which spraying began at the start of large (5.5-8-mm-diameter) square formation and continued at approximately 7-d intervals while large squares were abundant, resulted in fewer infested squares and 1.4- to 1.7-fold more lint than the standard treatment. Fewer sprays and increased yield made proactive spraying significantly more profitable than the standard approach, which resulted in relatively low or negative economic returns. Harvest at 75% boll-split in the proactive spray regime of 2005 resulted in four-fold greater economic return than cotton harvested at 40% boll-split because of improved protection of large squares and the elimination of late-season sprays inherent to standard spray regime despite the cost of an extra irrigation in the 75% boll-split treatments. The earlier, 40% harvest trigger does not avoid high late-season boll weevil pressure, which exerts less impact on bolls, the predominant form of fruiting body at that time, than on squares. Proactive spraying and harvest timing are based on an important relationship between nutrition, boll weevil reproduction, and economic inputs; therefore, the tactic of combining proaction with harvest at 75% boll-split is applicable where boll weevils are problematic regardless of climate or region, or whether an eradication program is ongoing.

  9. Systematics of the Holarctic species of the weevil genus Cleopomiarus Pierce (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Roberto Caldara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Holarctic species of Cleopomiarus Pierce, 1919 (Curculionidae, Curculioninae, Mecinini are revised. Two North American and 19 Palaearctic species are recognized as valid. Three of the latter are new to science: C. afghanus sp. nov. (Afghanistan, C. caucasicus sp. nov. (Armenia, and C. reitteri sp. nov. (Algeria, Morocco. Cleopomiarus ruscinonensis (Roudier & Tempère, 1966, described as subspecies of C. longirostris Gyllenhal, 1838, is raised to species (stat. nov.. The following new synonymies are proposed: Cleopomiarus distinctus (Boheman, 1845 (= Miarus dictamnophilus Zherichin, 1996 syn. nov.; Cleopomiarus flavoscutellatus (Morimoto, 1959 (= Miarus tapirus Korotyaev, 1999 syn. nov.; Cleopomiarus graminis (Gyllenhal, 1813 (= Miarus dulcinasutus Kangas, 1976 syn. nov.; = Miarus jakowlewi Faust, 1895 syn. nov.; = Miarus scutellaris subsp. mequignoni Hoffmann, 1939 syn. nov.. Miarus hispidulus Reitter, 1907 and M. hispidus Bovie, 1909 are again placed in synonymy with Cleopomiarus hispidulus (LeConte, 1876. The lectotypes of the following taxa are designated: Cionus micros Germar, 1824, Cionus plantarum Germar, 1824, Gymnetron distinctus Boheman, 1845, Gymnetron longirostris Gyllenhal, 1838, Miaromimus schatzmayri Solari, 1947, Miarus degorsi Abeille de Perrin, 1906, Miarus fuscopubens Reitter, 1907, Miarus graminis var. subfulvus Reitter, 1907, Miarus graminis var. subuniseriatus Reitter, 1907, Miarus hispidulus Reitter, 1907, Miarus jakowlewi Faust, 1895, Miarus longirostris ssp. mandschuricus Voss, 1952, Miarus medius Desbrochers des Loges, 1893, Miarus vestitus Roelofs, 1875. A key to the species, diagnoses of species groups, descriptions or redescriptions, notes on type specimens, synonymies, comparative notes, distribution, bionomics when available, phylogenenetic observations, and drawings of body, rostra, terminalia and other useful characters for taxonomy are provided.

  10. A survey of the weevils of Ukraine. Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Platypodinae and Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulina, Tatyana; Mandelshtam, Mikhail; Petrov, Alexander; Nazarenko, Vitalij; Yunakov, Nikolai

    2015-01-22

    Our knowledge of Ukrainian bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae) is summarized as a baseline for future studies of the fauna, with a checklist including information on distribution, host trees, biology and taxonomy. One hundred twenty-two species are recorded from Ukraine, of which seven are recorded for the first time. One species is recorded for the first time from Europe. Previous records of 24 species are considered dubious and requiring confirmation. In contrast to the Palaearctic Catalogue (Knížek 2011b), we consider Anisandrus maiche to be first described by Kurentsov (1941) rather than by Eggers (1942); A. maiche (Eggers, 1942) is a junior synonym of A. maiche (Kurentsov, 1941). 

  11. Basic bio-ecological parameters of the invasive red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in Phoenix canariensis under Mediterranean climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembilio, O; Jacas, J A

    2011-04-01

    The invasive red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), is one of the most destructive pests of palms in the world. Since its detection in the Mediterranean Basin, the ornamental Phoenix canariensis Hort. ex Chabaud has become its main host. This study was aimed at determining the life cycle of R. ferrugineus in live P. canariensis palms. Egg lethal temperature threshold and thermal constant were determined in the laboratory and resulted in 13.1°C and 40.4 degree days (DD), respectively. A semi field assay was carried out in a mesh enclosure where living P. canariensis palms were artificially infested with neonate larvae at one-month intervals from June 2008 to May 2009 under natural conditions. Infested palms were dissected at different time intervals. Maximum mortality rates for R. ferrugineus were observed for palms infested either in December or January (100%), whereas those infested from April through September showed maximum survival rates. Mean monthly temperatures below 10.3°C were lethal for neonate larvae, as 4.5°C were for older immature stages. All recovered larvae could be classed according to one of 13 instars. A thermal constant of 666.5 DD was estimated for complete larval development. Pupal develoment required an additional 282.5 DD. Based on these results and on the temperatures from 46 climatic stations selected in the Iberian Peninsula, less than one generation per year can be expected in areas with mean annual temperature below 15°C and more than two where mean annual temperature is above 19°C.

  12. Ecology and phenology of the boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on an unusual wild host, Hibiscus pernambucensis, in southeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzaluz, I O; Jones, R W

    2001-12-01

    The phenology and ecology of Hibiscus pernambucensis Arruda and its interaction and importance in maintaining populations of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, were studied over a period of 3 yr in the Soconusco Region of the state of Chiapas, Mexico. H. pernambucensis is a small tree of Neotropical distribution, restricted to lowland areas, and generally associated with halophytic vegetation. This species is found exclusively along the shores of brackish estuaries, in or near mangrove swamps in southeastern Mexico. In this region, H. pernambucensis has a highly seasonal flowering pattern in which the greatest bud production occurs shortly after the start of the rainy season in May and the highest fruit production occurs in July and August. Boll weevil larvae were found in buds of H. pernambucensis during all months but February and densities of buds and weevils were highest from May through September. The percentage of buds infested with boll weevil larvae rarely exceeded 30%. Because plant densities and reproductive output of H. pernambucensis is relatively low and, consequently, the number of oviposition and larval development sites for boll weevils is limited, the importance of this plant as a source of boll weevils with potential of attacking commercial cotton is minimal in comparison with the quantity produced in cultivated cotton. However, the plant could be important as a reservoir of boll weevils in areas of boll weevil quarantine and eradication programs. The factors and circumstances that may have led to this apparent recent host shift of the boll weevil in this region are discussed.

  13. Effects of Temperature and Adult Diet on Development of Hypertrophied Fat Body in Prediapausing Boll Weevil (Coleoptera Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terence L. Wagner; Eric J. Villavaso

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the effects of temperature and adult diet on the development of hypertrophied fat bodies in prediapausing adult boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman. Simulation models derived from this work are used to estimate the minimal ages at which male and female boll weevils exhibit diapause morphology, based on conditions...

  14. Phoretic uropodine mites (Acari: Mesostigmata associated with the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Iran

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    V.R. Farmahiny Farahani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During an investigation on phoretic mite associates of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, in Sistan and Balouchestan Province of Iran, two uropodine species were collected and identified as Centrouropoda almerodai (Uropodidae and Uroobovella marginata (Dinychidae. This is the first record of the genus Centrouropoda from Iran and the first record of phoretic mites associated with this weevil from the country.

  15. Is the Invasive Species Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) (Argentine Stem Weevil) a Threat to New Zealand Natural Grassland Ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Barbara I P; Barton, Diane M; Philip, Bruce A; Ferguson, Colin M; Goldson, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Listronotus bonariensis (Argentine stem weevil) is a stem-boring weevil that has become a major pasture pest in New Zealand, and cool climate turf grass in Australia. This species is also frequently found in native tussock grassland in New Zealand. Laboratory and field trials were established to determine the risk posed to both seedlings and established plants of three native grass species compared to what happens with a common host of this species, hybrid ryegrass (L. perenne X L. multiflorum). Adult weevil feeding damage scores were higher on Poa colensoi and Festuca novae-zelandiae than Chionochloa rigida. Oviposition was lower on P. colensoi than hybrid ryegrass, and no eggs were laid on F. novae-zelandiae. In field trials using the same four species established as spaced plants L. bonariensis laid more eggs per tiller in ryegrass in a low altitude pasture site than in ryegrass in a higher altitude site. No eggs were found on the three native grass species at the tussock sites, and only low numbers were found on other grasses at the low altitude pasture site. Despite this, numbers of adult weevils were extracted from the plants in the field trials. These may have comprised survivors of the original weevils added to the plants, together with new generation weevils that had emerged during the experiment. Irrespective, higher numbers were recovered from the tussock site plants than from those from the pasture site. It was concluded that L. bonariensis is likely to have little overall impact, but a greater impact on native grass seedling survival than on established plants.

  16. Pissodes castaneus (De Geer, 1775) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), the bark pine weevil: a pest or a biological indicator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson Tadeu Iede; Wilson Reis Filho; Susete Rocio C. Penteado; Scheila Messa. Zaleski

    2011-01-01

    The risk of introduction of exotic forest pests is a global problem, evidenced by records of interceptions even in countries that have a quite effective system of plant protection. The banded pine weevil, Pissodes castaneus, is native to Europe and North Africa and was introduced into Argentina and Uruguay and recently into Brazil where it was first...

  17. Evidence for the presence of a female produced sex pheromone in the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavior-modifying chemicals such as pheromones and kairomones have great potential in pest management. Studies reported here investigated chemical cues involved in mating and aggregation behavior of banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus, a major insect pest of banana in every country where bananas a...

  18. Effects of crop sanitation on banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera : Curculionidae), populations and crop damage in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masanza, M.; Gold, C.S.; Huis, van A.; Ragama, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    Crop sanitation, i.e. destruction of crop residues, has been hypothesized to lower banana weevil damage by removing adult refuges and breeding sites. Although it has been widely recommended to farmers, limited data are available to demonstrate the efficacy of this method. The effects of crop

  19. Is the invasive species Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae (Argentine stem weevil a threat to New Zealand natural grassland ecosystems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ingeborg Patricia Barratt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listronotus bonariensis (Argentine stem weevil is a stem-boring weevil that has become a major pasture pest in New Zealand, and cool climate turf grass in Australia. This species is also frequently found in native tussock grassland in New Zealand. Laboratory and field trials were established to determine the risk posed to both seedlings and established plants of three native grass species compared to what happens with the most common host of this species, Lolium perenne (ryegrass. Adult weevil feeding damage scores were higher on Poa colensoi and Festuca novae-zelandiae than Chionochloa rigida. Oviposition was lower on P. colensoi than L. perenne, and no eggs were laid on F. novae-zealandiae. In field trials using the same four species established as spaced plants L. bonariensis laid more eggs per tiller in L. perenne in a low altitude pasture site than in ryegrass in a higher altitude site. No were eggs found on the three native grass species at the tussock sites, and only low numbers were found on other grasses at the low altitude pasture site. Despite this, numbers of adult weevils were extracted from the plants in the field trials. These may have comprised survivors of the original weevils added to the plants, together with naturally occurring individuals arising from the next field generation. Irrespective, higher numbers were recovered from the tussock site plants than from those from the pasture site. It was concluded that L. bonariensis is likely to have a greater impact on native grass seedling survival than on established plants.

  20. [Influence of fruit size of Camellia meiocarpa on growth of oil tea weevil, Curculio chinensis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-wen; He, Li-hong; Ma, Ling; Xia, Jiao; Zeng, Ai-ping

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between mature larval mass of oil tea weevil (Curculio chinensis) and fruit volume of its host plant oil tea (Camellia meiocarpa) was fitted with Logistic equation in order to understand the restriction of host fruit size on large larval growth and development of the weevil. The results showed that the larval mass increased with the increasing host fruit volume, which was in good conformity with the Logistic model. The weevil larval growth followed the principle of diminishing marginal utility, and it could be divided into two periods, the fast-growing period (3.216 cm3, one larva per fruit; >4.747 cm3, two larvae per fruit). The minimum fruit size threshold was 1500 cm3 for one larva per fruit, and 2.539 cm3 for two larvae per fruit. The temporal pattern that the mature larvae exited from their host fruits was established, the number of larvae escaping from their host fruits decreased daily after the fruit collection, and the larval escaping peak largely appeared from 6:00 to 10:00 AM with 43.9% of total escaping number, and especially from 7:00 to 8:00 AM with 21.1% of total escaping number. The bigger the larvae, the earlier exited from their host fruits. The restriction of fruit size on growth and development of oil tea weevil was observed, and it should be a behavioral adaptation strategy to increase the offspring' s fitness for the parental weevil adults to oviposit on the bigger fruits.

  1. Biology and host preferences of Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a possible biocontrol agent for Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Reichert; M.T. Johnson; E. Chacon; R.S. Anderson; T.A. Wheeler

    2010-01-01

    The introduced plant Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) poses a grave threat to Hawaii's native ecosystems and biodiversity. One potential candidate for classical biological control is Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae), a stem-boring weevil from Central and South America. This weevil...

  2. Evaluation of Certain Plant Leaf Powders and Aqueous Extracts against Maize Weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Awoke Yohannes; Genet Asayew; Getachew Melaku; Mulugeta Derbew; Sirgota Kedir; Nagappan Raja

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate powders and aqueous extracts of Melia azedarach, Mentha piperita, Phytolacca dodecandra, Schinus molle and Xanthium strumarium leaves against maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais. Repellent activity of plant powders were evaluated by mixing 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10 g of powder per 100 g of clean uninfested maize seeds individually in separate plastic container. The numbers of insects moving outside the container were recorded at 24 h and 48 h post exposur...

  3. Insecticidal activity of alpha-cypermethrin against small banded pine weevil Pissodes castaneus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in forest plantations and thickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokocka Aleksandra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris plantations and thickets damaged by biotic and abiotic factors are particularly attractive to small-banded pine weevil Pissodes castaneus, whose larvae excavate feeding tunnels in the stems of young trees, causing their death. There are no chemical methods that can be applied to protect forest plantations and thickets against this pest. Therefore, the studies were undertaken aimed at the assessment of the efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin used to reduce the numbers of this pest within restock areas. The scope of work included laboratory and field estimation of insecticidal activity of alpha-cypermethrin.

  4. Morphology of salivary gland and distribution of dopamine and serotonin on red palm weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayah, A. S. Nurul; Wahida, O. Nurul; Shafinaz, M. N. Norefrina; Idris, A. G.

    2013-11-01

    The Red Palm Weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier, 1790) is insect pest to plants of the family Palmaceae. No study has been reported on the digestive mechanism of Red Palm Weevil (RPW). Salivary glands are responsible in the feeding regulation of insect while serotonin and dopamine play a significant role in the regulation of this gland. It is great to see the morphology of the salivary gland and how dopamine and serotonin possibly play their role in this gland. Two variation of RPW, striped and spotted RPW were chosen. The morphology of the gland of both RPW variants examined by using light microscopy was found to be a tubular type. Immunohistochemical analysis conducted showed that serotonin and dopamine in both variations did not innervate the glands suggesting they are not act as neurotransmitter. However, it can be detected on few areas within the glands. This suggests that serotonin and dopamine may act as a hormone because there is no evidence on the nerve fibers. The role of these biogenic amines in the salivary gland of RPW needs further investigation. Hopefully the data would help in understanding the mechanism of salivary glands control by biogenic amines in RPW specifically and insects with sucking mouthpart generally.

  5. Integrative Taxonomy, Phylogeny, and New Species of the Weevil Genus Onyxacalles Stüben (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae

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    Peter E. Stüben

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular phylogeny of the western Palearctic weevil genus Onyxacalles Stüben, 1999 is presented, combining two mitochondrial genes (COI and 16S in a Bayesian analysis. Based on molecular data, Onyxacalles pyrenaeus Boheman, 1844 is transferred into the genus Kyklioacalles Stüben 1999 (K. fausti group and—in an integrative taxonomy framework—the interaction between morphology and molecular analysis is illustrated. The species of Onyxacalles s. str. are assigned to three new species groups, O. henoni, O. luigionii, and O. portusveneris groups. The distribution of the related species in the Mediterranean area is illustrated with values of COI and 16S p-distances. Three new species are described and distinguished from their related species: Onyxacalles nuraghi Stüben sp.n. from Italy (Sardinia, Onyxacalles torre Stüben and Astrin sp. n. from France (Corsica and Onyxacalles vilae Stüben sp. n. from Croatia (Velebit Mts.. A catalogue of all 20 species of Onyxacalles is given, and a key is finally presented combined with image stacking of the habitus and aedeagus for all species.

  6. Austromonticola, a new genus of broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae from montane areas of New Zealand

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    Samuel D. J. Brown

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Austromonticola gen. n. is proposed for a group of eight New Zealand alpine broad-nosed weevil species, all of which are here described: A. atriarius sp. n. (type locality: Umbrella Mountains, Central Otago, A. caelibatus sp. n. (type locality: Ohau Range, Mackenzie, A. furcatus sp. n. (type locality: Old Man Range, Central Otago, A. inflatus sp. n. (type locality: Hawkdun Range, Central Otago, A. planulatus sp. n. (type locality: St Marys Range, Central Otago, A. postinventus sp. n. (type locality: Kirkliston Range, South Canterbury, A. mataura sp. n. (type locality: Mt Dick, Otago Lakes and A. rotundus sp. n. (type locality: Old Man Range, Central Otago. All species occur exclusively above 1000 m elevation in the mountains of Central Otago and South Canterbury in the South Island. A phylogeny of the genus, including six outgroups, was inferred from 33 morphological characters. It resolved the genus as monophyletic, and revealed two strongly supported clades within Austromonticola. DNA sequences of four gene regions were obtained from five species. Of these, the 3' end of COI proved to be the most suitable for the identification of specimens. Females of all species have diagnostic secondary sexual structures on the elytra and ventrites. These structures are hypothesised to have evolved to assist with oviposition in and beside cushion plants or by selection for structures to mitigate the costs to females of prolonged mating.

  7. Evaluation of pseudostem trapping as a control measure against banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, C S; Gold, C S; Okech, S H; Nokoe, S

    2002-02-01

    Controlled studies to determine the efficacy of pseudostem trapping in reducing adult populations of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar), were conducted under farmer conditions in Ntungamo district, Uganda. Twenty-seven farms were stratified on the basis of C. sordidus population density (estimated by mark and recapture methods) and divided among three treatments: (i) researcher-managed trapping (one trap per mat per month): (ii) farmer-managed trapping (trap intensity at discretion of farmer); and (iii) controls (no trapping). Intensive trapping (managed by researchers) resulted in significantly lower C. sordidus damage after one year. Over the same period, C. sordidus numbers declined by 61% on farms where trapping was managed by researchers, 53% where farmers managed trapping and 38% on farms without trapping; however, results varied greatly among farms and, overall, there was no significant effect of trapping on C. sordidus numbers. Moreover, there was only a weak relationship between the number of C. sordidus removed and the change in population density. Trapping success appeared to be affected by management levels and immigration from neighbouring farms. Although farmers were convinced that trapping was beneficial, adoption has been low due to resource requirements.

  8. Evaluation of Pathogenicity of the Fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana in Hazelnut Weevil (Curculio nucum L., Coleoptera, Curculionidae) Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yunqing; Liu, Ting; Zhao, Yixin; Geng, Wanting; Chen, Longtao; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-12-01

    The nut weevil (Curculio nucum) is one of the most important and widespread pests in hazelnut orchards. In order to screen entomopathogenic fungal strains with high virulence against C. nucum, the growth rate, sporulation, and cumulative mortality of different Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana strains were investigated, and the process by which M. anisopliae CoM 02 infects C. nucum larvae was observed using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth rate and sporulation of different fungal strains significantly differed. Thirteen days after inoculation with M. anisopliae CoM 02, the cumulative mortality of C. nucum larvae reached 100 %, which was considerably higher than that of the other five strains. As the most virulent of the six test strains, the cadaver rate, LT50, and LT90 of M. anisopliae CoM 02 were 93.4 %, 7.05 and 11.90 days, respectively. Analysis of the infection process by scanning electron microscopy showed that the spore attachment, hyphal germination, hyphal rapid growth, and sporulation of M. anisopliae CoM 02 occurred on the 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 11th day after inoculation, respectively, indicating that the infection cycle takes approximately 11 days. This finding suggests that the highly virulent M. anisopliae plays an important role in the biocontrol of C. nucum in China.

  9. Effect of temperature on the termination of prolonged larval diapause in the chestnut weevil Curculio sikkimensis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Morio

    2005-12-01

    Adults of the chestnut weevil Curculio sikkimensis emerged over a 3-year period under laboratory and quasi-field conditions due to a prolonged diapause that occurred at the mature larval stage. Variable proportions of the larvae remained in diapause after a single cold (5 degrees C) treatment of 120 days. Extension of the chilling period to as long as 540 days did not increase the percentage of diapause termination, and excessively long chilling actually reduced the percentage. Chilling was not indispensable to the termination of larval diapause. Diapause intensity was very high and variable, and more than 1000 days at 20 degrees C was necessary to reactivate all diapause larvae. When the diapause larvae were exposed to cycles of low (5 degrees C for 120 days) and high (20 degrees C for 240 days) temperatures, the percentage of diapause termination reached 100% after two or three such cycles. Thus, the prolonged diapause of C. sikkimensis has characteristics similar to the common short winter diapause in other insects, but has unique characteristics that ensure polymodal reactivation over several years.

  10. Toxicity of lemon grass Cymbopogon citratus powder and methanol extract against rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Osaigbokan Uwamose

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the toxicity potential of lemon grass [Cymbopogon citratus (C. citratus] products against adult rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae. Methods: Lemon grass (C. citratus leaves were sundried for 7 days, pulverized and sieved using 0.5 mm mesh size to obtain fine powders. About 500 g of the powder were dissolved in 1000 mL of 90% methanol to produce the extract. The powder and extract were used for the bioassay. The powder was tested at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 g/10 g rice grains, respectively. The toxic potential of the extract of concentration of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mg/mL were evaluated using the filter paper method. The experiment was setup on a completely randomized design using three replicates per treatment. Results: The results indicated significant difference (F = 7.450; df = 3.15; P < 0.05 in mean percentage mortality after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h exposure with the powder compared with the control. Significantly (F = 5.519; df = 3.15; P < 0.05 higher percentage adult mortality was also observed in the extract after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h exposure compared with the control. The LC50 value of the powder was 4.91 g/10 g of rice while the LT50 was 160.51 h. The LC50 value of the extract was 2.16 mg/20 mL of methanol with an LT50 of 75.10 h. The methanol extract of C. citratus showed the highest mortality compared to the powder which was less toxic. Conclusions: The study showed that C. citratus products are promising insecticides and can be used effectively in the management of Sitophilus oryzae in storage..

  11. and Xylopia aetiopica (Annonaceae) on maize weevil Sitophilus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contribution of different constituents to the toxicity of the essential oil constituents of Vernonia amygdalina (Compositae) and Xylopia aetiopica (Annonaceae) on maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

  12. Presence and significance of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins associated with the Andean weevil Premnotrypes vorax (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SilvioAlejandro López-Pazos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Andean weevil Premnotrypes vorax represents an important cause of damage to Colombian potato crops. Due to the impact of this plague on the economy of the country, we searched for new alternatives for its biological control, based on the entomopathogenic bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis. A total of 300 B. thuringiensis strains obtained from potato plantations infested with P. vorax were analyzed through crystal morphology, SDS-PAGE, PCR and bioassays. We used site- directed mutagenesis to modify the Cry3Aa protein. Most of the B. thuringiensis isolates had a bipyramidal crystal morphology. SDS-PAGE analyses had seven strains groups with σ-endotoxins from 35 to 135 kDa. The genes cry 2 and cry 1 were significantly more frequent in the P. vorax habitat (PCR analyses. Three mutant toxins, 1 (D354E, 2 (R345A, ∆Y350, ∆Y351, and 3 (Q482A, S484A, R485A, were analyzed to assess their activity against P. vorax larvae. Toxicity was low, or absent, against P. vorax for isolates, wild type cry 3Aa and cry 3Aa mutants. The genetic characterization of the collection provides opportunities for the selection of strains to be tested in bioassays against other insect pests of agricultural importance, and for designing Cry proteins with improved insecticidal toxicity. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (4: 1235-1243. Epub 2009 December 01.El gorgojo andino Premnotrypes vorax es una causa importante de daño en los cultivos colombianos de este tubérculo. Debido al impacto que esta plaga tiene sobre la economía del país, nos interesamos en buscar alternativas nuevas para el control biológico de P. vorax, basadas en la bacteria entomopatógena Bacillus thuringiensis. Se recolectaron un total de 300 cepas de B. thuringiensis a partir de plantaciones de papa infestadas con P. vorax, las cuales fueron analizadas por medio de la morfología del cristal, SDS-PAGE, PCR y ensayos biológicos. La mayoría de los aislamientos de B. thuringiensis presentaron cristales

  13. (coleoptera: curculionidae) to beauveria bassiana and metarhizium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    SUSCEPTIBILITY OF SITOPHILUS ZEAMAIS (MOSTCH.) (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE) TO BEAUVERIA BASSIANA AND METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE. Addis Teshome1 and Tadele Tefera 2, ∗. 1 Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Bako Research Centre, PO Box 2003, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 2 Department ...

  14. Design and deployment of semiochemical traps for capturing Anthonomus rubi Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Lygus rugulipennis Poppius (Hetereoptera: Miridae) in soft fruit crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fountain, Michelle T.; Baroffio, Catherine; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2017-01-01

    Strawberry blossom weevil (SBW), Anthonomus rubi Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and European tarnished plant bug (ETB), Lygus rugulipennis Poppius (Hetereoptera: Miridae), cause significant damage to strawberry and raspberry crops. Using the SBW aggregation pheromone and ETB sex pheromone we...

  15. Advances in the use of Trapping Systems for Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): Traps and Attractants

    OpenAIRE

    Vacas González, Sandra; Primo Millo, Jaime; Navarro-Llopis, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Given the social importance related to the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), efforts are being made to develop new control methods, such as the deployment of trapping systems. In this work, the efficacy of a new black pyramidal trap design (Picusan) has been verified in comparison with white and black buckets. In addition, the attractant and synergistic effect of ethyl acetate (EtAc) at different release levels has been evaluated under field condi...

  16. Boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) response to and volitilization rates of grandlure when combined with varying doses of eugenol in the extended-life pheromone lure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll weevil extended-life pheromone lures, impregnated with 25 mg grandlure and 30 mg eugenol, are replacing standard pheromone lures (10 mg grandlure) in boll weevil eradication programs, to increase the changing interval from 2 weeks, to 3 or 4 weeks, which reduces labor and material costs. The a...

  17. Genetic Profiling to Determine Potential Origins of Boll Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Captured in a Texas Eradication Zone: Endemicity, Immigration, or Sabotage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five specimens of adult boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis, were captured nearly simultaneously in pheromone traps clustered near Lubbock, TX, in the Southern High Plains/Caprock eradication zone in late summer 2006. No boll weevils had been captured in this zone or neighboring zones to the north earl...

  18. (Cosmopolites sordidus Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    establishment and multiplication of the weevils, this was necessary before assesment for corm damage would begin. Weevil traps were laid in two blocks and ..... Graduate School of Cornell University. Ogenga-Latigo, M.W. and Masanza, M. 1996. Comparative control of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus, by the ...

  19. Alternative food sources and over wintering feeding behavior of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis boheman (coleoptera: curculionidae) under the tropical conditions of central Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Paulina de A.; Sujii, Edison R.; Pires, Carmen S.S.; Fontes, Eliana M.G. [EMBRAPA Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia (CENARGEN), Brasilia, DF (Brazil)], e-mail: paulina723@hotmail.com, e-mail: sujii@cenargen.embrapa.br, e-mail: cpires@cenargen.embrapa.br, e-mail: eliana@cenargen.embrapa.br; Diniz, Ivone R. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Dept. de Zoologia], e-mail: irdiniz@unb.br; Medeiros, Maria A. de; Branco, Marina C. [EMBRAPA Hortalicas, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)], e-mail: medeiros@cnph.embrapa.br, e-mail: marina@cnph.embrapa.br; Salgado-Labouriau, Maria L. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia], e-mail: mlea@unb.br

    2010-01-15

    The boll weevil causes serious damage to the cotton crop in South America. Several studies have been published on this pest, but its phenology and behavior under the tropical conditions prevailing in Brazil are not well-known. In this study the feeding behavior and main food sources of adult boll weevils throughout the year in Central Brazil was investigated. The digestive tract contents of insects captured in pheromone traps in two cotton fields and two areas of native vegetation (gallery forest and cerrado sensu stricto) were analyzed. The insect was captured all through the year only in the cerrado. It fed on pollen of 19 different plant families, on Pteridophyta and fungi spores and algae cysts. Simpson Index test showed that the cerrado provided greater diversity of pollen sources. In the beginning of the cotton cycle, the plant families used for pollen feeding were varied: in cotton area 1, the weevil fed on Poaceae (50%), Malvaceae and Smilacaceae (25% each); in cotton area 2 the pollen sources were Malvaceae (50%), Asteraceae (25%) and Fabaceae and Clusiaceae (25% each); in the cerrado they were Chenopodiaceae (67%) and Scheuchzeriaceae (33%). No weevils were collected in the gallery forest in this period. After cotton was harvested, the family Smilacaceae was predominant among the food plants exploited in all the study areas. These results help to explain the survivorship of adult boll weevil during cotton fallow season in Central Brazil and they are discussed in the context of behavioral adaptations to the prevailing tropical environmental conditions. (author)

  20. Olfactory responses of banana weevil predators to volatiles from banana pseudostem tissue and synthetic pheromone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinzaara, W.; Gold, C.S.; Dicke, M.; Huis, van A.

    2005-01-01

    As a response to attack by herbivores, plants can emit a variety of volatile substances that attract natural enemies of these insect pests. Predators of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) such as Dactylosternum abdominale (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae) and

  1. The distribution of the invasive pest, rice water weevil Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is expanding in Europe: First record in the Balkans, confirmed by CO1 DNA barcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the first report of the invasive rice pest, rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel) in the Balkans. Adult specimens were collected in flooded rice fields in the principal rice-growing region of Central Macedonia, Greece during July-August, 2016. Morphological identification was...

  2. Composition and seasonal phenology of a nonindigenous root-feeding weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) complex in northern hardwood forests in the Great Lakes Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. A. Pinski; W. J. Mattson; K. F. Raffa

    2005-01-01

    Phyllobius oblongus (L.), Polydrusus sericeus (Schaller), and Sciaphilus asperatus (Bonsdorff) comprise a complex of nonindigenous root-feeding weevils in northern hardwood forests of the Great Lakes region. Little is known about their detailed biology, seasonality, relative abundance, and distribution patterns....

  3. Effects of insecticides and defoliants applied alone and in combination for control of overwintering boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis; Coleoptera: Curculionidae)--laboratory and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Shoil M; Sappington, Thomas W; Elzen, Gary W; Norman, John W; Sparks, Alton N

    2004-09-01

    In laboratory, greenhouse and field tests, we determined the effects of combining full rates of the defoliants tribufos and thidiazuron and the herbicide thifensulfuron-methyl with half rates of the insecticides lambda-cyhalothrin or azinphos-methyl, and the combination of tribufos and thidiazuron, both in half rates, on mortality of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman and on the quality of defoliation. Tribufos, 0.47 kg ha(-1) and tribufos, 0.235 kg ha(-1) + thidiazuron, 0.125 kg ha(-1) exhibited a slightly toxic effect to boll weevil, while tribufos, 0.47 kg ha(-1) + lambda-cyhalothrin, 0.019 kg ha(-1), tribufos, 0.47 kg ha(-1) + azinphos-methyl, 0.14 kg ha(-1), and tribufos, 0.235 kg ha(-1) + thidiazuron, 0.125 kg ha(-1) + azinphos-methyl, 0.14 kg ha(-l), provided control of boll weevil as good as or better than full-rate azinphos-methyl or lambda-cyhalothrin alone owing to synergistic effects. Thidiazuron or thifensulfuron-methyl alone or in combination with insecticides did not affect boll weevil mortality. Treatment with tribufos + thidiazuron, both at half rate, significantly increased defoliation compared to full rates of tribufos or thidiazuron alone, and provided adequate defoliation for approximately the same cost per hectare.

  4. Field efficacy of Imidacloprid and Steinernema carpocapsae in a chitosan formulation against the Red Palm Weevil Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Phoenix canariensis

    OpenAIRE

    Dembilio, Óscar; Llácer, Elena; Martínez de Altube, María del Mar; Jacas Miret, Josep Anton

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The invasive red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier), has become the major pest of palms in the Mediterranean Basin. Chemical control against this species is difficult because of its cryptic habits and is mainly based on the repeated application of large quantities of synthetic insecticides. The aim of this work has been to evaluate in the field the efficacy of imidacloprid (Confidor 240 OD) and Steinernema carpocapsae Weiser with chitosan (Biorend R Palm...

  5. Colonization of Artificially Stressed Black Walnut Trees by Ambrosia Beetle, Bark Beetle, and Other Weevil Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Indiana and Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sharon E; Juzwik, Jennifer; English, James T; Ginzel, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a new disease of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) in the eastern United States. The disease is caused by the interaction of the aggressive bark beetle Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman and the canker-forming fungus, Geosmithia morbida M. Kolarik, E. Freeland, C. Utley & Tisserat, carried by the beetle. Other insects also colonize TCD-symptomatic trees and may also carry pathogens. A trap tree survey was conducted in Indiana and Missouri to characterize the assemblage of ambrosia beetles, bark beetles, and other weevils attracted to the main stems and crowns of stressed black walnut. More than 100 trees were girdled and treated with glyphosate (Riverdale Razor Pro, Burr Ridge, Illinois) at 27 locations. Nearly 17,000 insects were collected from logs harvested from girdled walnut trees. These insects represented 15 ambrosia beetle, four bark beetle, and seven other weevil species. The most abundant species included Xyleborinus saxeseni Ratzburg, Xylosandrus crassiusculus Motschulsky, Xylosandrus germanus Blandford, Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, and Stenomimus pallidus Boheman. These species differed in their association with the stems or crowns of stressed trees. Multiple species of insects were collected from individual trees and likely colonized tissues near each other. At least three of the abundant species found (S. pallidus, X. crassiusculus, and X. germanus) are known to carry propagules of canker-causing fungi of black walnut. In summary, a large number of ambrosia beetles, bark beetles, and other weevils are attracted to stressed walnut trees in Indiana and Missouri. Several of these species have the potential to introduce walnut canker pathogens during colonization. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Phylogeography and sister group of Lupangus, a new genus for three new flightless allopatric forest litter weevils endemic to the Eastern Arc Mountains, Tanzania (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Molytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasily V. Grebennikov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports discovery of a new genus Lupangus gen. n. with three new flightless weevils endemic to the forests of the Eastern Arc Mountains in Tanzania: L. asterius sp. n. (East Usambara; the type species, L. jason sp. n. (Uluguru and L. orpheus sp. n. (Udzungwa. Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic analyses using parts of mitochondrial (COI, nuclear ribosomal (28S genes, as well as the nuclear spacer region (ITS2 from 46 terminals grouped together the reciprocally monophyletic Lupangus (3 terminals and Typoderus (3 terminals, with all three clades strongly supported. Phylogenetic analysis of 32 COI-5’ sequences recovered Lupangus species as reciprocally monophyletic, with L. orpheus being the sister to the rest. Internal phylogeny within both L. jason and L. orpheus are geographically structured, while that of L. asterius is not. Temporal analysis of Lupangus evolution using COI-5’ data assessed under slow and fast substitution rate schemes estimated separation of mitochondrial lineages leading to three Lupangus species at about 7–8 Ma and about 1.9–2.1 Ma, respectively. Temporal analyses consistently failed to suggest correlation between the timing of Lupangus evolution and the late Pleistocene climatic fluctuations, thus rejecting the hypothesis of faunal interchanges during the wettest periods of the last million years. Applicability of flightless weevils for dispersal-vicariance analysis is reviewed, and their mostly undocumented and taxonomically entangled diversity in the Tanzanian Eastern Arc Mountains is briefly highlighted.

  7. Feromônios de agregação em curculionidae (insecta: coleoptera e sua implicação taxonômica Aggregation pheromone in curculionidae (insecta: coleoptera and their taxonomic implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Giuliano Ambrogi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pheromones of the weevils has been the most studied and used so far for Coleoptera species. The majority of reported weevil pheromones is produced by males and usually attract both sexes. The identified pheromone compounds are classified in two categories: ten-carbon compounds with terpenoid branching and compounds of various sizes, apparently of fatty-acid origin. These pheromone structural categories are consistent within subfamilies. This review aims to give an overview of the aggregation pheromones identified for Curculionidae pests, describing the relationship of the molecules structural pattern among subfamilies, and propose an identification key based on the structure of the pheromone components.

  8. The resistance of hazel (Corylus avellana L. to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L., Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Part I. Evaluation of the resistance of several cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Piskornik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the course of 5 year investigations (1981-1985 considerable differences were found in the resistance of 24 hazel cultivars to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L.. The resistance was determined on the basis of the percentage of nuts damaged by larvae in the total yield. Six classes of resistance were established, from class I - very resistant cultivars, to class VI - very susceptible cultivars. In feeding experiments a positive correlation, significant at the 1% and 5% level was found between the frequency of beetle feeding on hazel fruitlets during the time of oviposition (July, and the class of resistance of cultivars; a negative correlation between these parameters was found in August, i.e. during hatching and development of larvae in the nuts. In July the beetles fed more readily and more frequently on nuts of susceptible cultivars, whereas they avoided them in August, i.e. in the period when larvae developed in many fruits of these cultivars.

  9. Assessment of electron beam-induced DNA damage in larvae of chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) using comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoriki, Setsuko; Hasan, Mahbub; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Imamura, Taro; Hayashi, Toru

    2006-02-01

    Effect of electron beam treatment on DNA damage in mature larvae of chestnut weevil Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) was assessed using single-cell gel electrophoresis (DNA comet assay). Electrons at acceleration voltages of 0 (control), 300, 750, 1000, and 1500 kV at radiation doses of 1 and 4 kGy were used. Electron beam-treated chestnut larvae showed typical DNA fragmentation, compared with cells from non-treated ones which showed a more intact DNA. Investigations using the comet assay showed that the parameters including tail length, tail moment, olive tail moment as well as the quota of DNA damage at both the doses were significantly larger than the control batch larvae. Thus, this technique could contribute to analytical identification of an effective disinfestation and quarantine treatment.

  10. Assessment of electron beam-induced DNA damage in larvae of chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) using comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoriki, Setsuko [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan)]. E-mail: setsuko@nfri.affrc.go.jp; Hasan, Mahbub [Laboratory for Stored Product Protection, Department of Zoology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Miyanoshita, Akihiro [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Imamura, Taro [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Hayashi, Toru [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan)

    2006-02-15

    Effect of electron beam treatment on DNA damage in mature larvae of chestnut weevil Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) was assessed using single-cell gel electrophoresis (DNA comet assay). Electrons at acceleration voltages of 0 (control), 300, 750, 1000, and 1500 kV at radiation doses of 1 and 4 kGy were used. Electron beam-treated chestnut larvae showed typical DNA fragmentation, compared with cells from non-treated ones which showed a more intact DNA. Investigations using the comet assay showed that the parameters including tail length, tail moment, olive tail moment as well as the quota of DNA damage at both the doses were significantly larger than the control batch larvae. Thus, this technique could contribute to analytical identification of an effective disinfestation and quarantine treatment.

  11. Field efficacy of imidacloprid and Steinernema carpocapsae in a chitosan formulation against the red palm weevil Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Phoenix canariensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembilio, Oscar; Llácer, Elena; Martínez de Altube, María del Mar; Jacas, Josep A

    2010-04-01

    The invasive red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier), has become the major pest of palms in the Mediterranean Basin. Chemical control against this species is difficult because of its cryptic habits and is mainly based on the repeated application of large quantities of synthetic insecticides. The aim of this work has been to evaluate in the field the efficacy of imidacloprid (Confidor 240 OD) and Steinernema carpocapsae Weiser with chitosan (Biorend R Palmeras) as soil and stipe treatments respectively, alone or in combination, against this pest. All treatments significantly reduced the mean number of immature stages of R. ferrugineus per palm. However, there were no significant differences among the different treatments considered. Efficacies ranged from 83.8 to 99.7% for the mean number of immature stages found in the palms and resulted in a significant increase in palm survival compared with the untreated control (75.0-90.0% versus 16.5% respectively). Both imidacloprid and S. carpocapsae in a chitosan formulation proved highly effective against R. ferrugineus in the field, and their efficacies did not significantly change when used in combination.

  12. Evaluation of freshly prepared juice from garlic (Allium sativum L. as a biopesticide against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwachukwu Ifeanyi Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Freshly prepared garlic (Allium sativum L. juice, containing the antimicrobial allicin, was evaluated as a possible grain pro-tectant against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motsch.. Each experiment was set out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD with four replications, and there was a control treatment. Adult mortality and weight loss percentage were investigated. There was an observed increase in adult mortality following days of exposure in all treatments. Statistically significant (p < 0.05 reduced grain loss was also observed in all the treatments when compared with the control. The juice samples were freshly prepared from an indigenous Nigerian garlic cultivar (GUN and a cultivar purchased from a supermarket in Germany (GAG. These garlic juice samples exhibited lethal effects causing at least 90% adult mortality in contact toxicity tests. The amount of allicin in GUN was 1.88 mg/ml according to High Pressure Liquids Chromatography (HPLC analysis, while the amount of allicin in GAG was 3.50 mg/ml. This study highlights the potential of A. sativum containing allicin for biorational control of maize grains against S. zeamais infestation and damage.

  13. Susceptibility of different developmental stages of large pine weevil Hylobius abietis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to entomopathogenic fungi and effect of fungal infection to adult weevils by formulation and application methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Minshad A; Butt, Tariq M

    2012-09-15

    The large pine weevil, Hylobius abietis, is a major pest in European conifer forests causing millions of Euros of damage annually. Larvae develop in the stumps of recently felled trees; the emerging adults feed on the bark of seedlings and may kill them. This study investigated the susceptibility of different developmental stages of H. abietis to commercial and commercially viable isolates of entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium and Beauveria. All the developmental stages of H. abietis can be killed by Metarhizium robertsii, Metarhizium brunneum, and Beauveria bassiana. The most virulent isolate of M. robertsii ARSEF4556 caused 100% mortality of pupae, larvae and adults on day 4, 6 and 12, respectively. This strain was further tested against adult weevils in different concentrations (10(5)-10(8) conidia cm(-2) or ml(-1)) using two types of fungal formulation: 'dry' conidia and 'wet' conidia (suspended in 0.03% aq. Tween 80) applied on different substrates (tissue paper, peat and Sitka spruce seedlings). 'Dry' conidia were more effective than 'wet' conidia on tissue paper and on spruce or 'dry' conidia premixed in peat. The LC(50) value for 'dry' conidia of isolate ARSEF4556 was three folds lower than 'wet' conidia on tissue paper. This study showed that 'dry' conidia are more effective than 'wet' conidia, causing 100% adult mortality within 12 days. Possible strategies for fungal applications are discussed in light of the high susceptibility of larvae and pupae to fungal pathogen. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phenylphenalenones Accumulate in Plant Tissues of Two Banana Cultivars in Response to Herbivory by the Banana Weevil and Banana Stem Weevil

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Hölscher; Andreas Buerkert; Bernd Schneider

    2016-01-01

    Phenylphenalenone-type compounds accumulated in the tissues of two banana cultivars—Musa acuminata cv. “Grande Naine” (AAA) and Musa acuminata × balbisiana Colla cv. “Bluggoe” (ABB)—when these were fed on by the banana weevil (Cosmopolites sordidus (Germ.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)) and the banana stem weevil (Odoiporus longicollis (Oliver) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)). The chemical constituents of the banana material were separated by means of chromatographic techniques and identified by N...

  15. Attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Strom; Smith S.L.; Brownie C.

    2013-01-01

    Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi Greville and Balfour, is a dominant yellow pine and important overstory component of forests growing on diverse sites from southwestern Oregon to Baja California to western Nevada. The Jeffrey pine beetle, Dedroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is monophagous on Jeffrey...

  16. A coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    One hundred years ago, one of the most significant biological invasions of an agricultural insect pest in the Americas was initiated. Endemic to Africa, the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was accidentally introduced to Brazil in 1913 and years later invaded coffe...

  17. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musa spp. EN COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEPULVEDA-CANO PAULA

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN

    Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

    Palabras clave: picudos, plátano, banano, Polytus, Colombia.

    ABSTRACT

    This synopsis is about beetle’s subfamily Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated to plantain and banana crops. Additionally keys illustrated for the species of the country are offered. Six species associated to these cultures are registered: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

    Key words: weevils, plantain, banana, Polytus, Colombia.

  18. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.; Rigon, L.; Menk, R.-H.; Arfelli, F.; Foerster, L. A.; Rosado-Neto, G. H.

    2010-08-01

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures ( Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  19. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoennicke, M.G., E-mail: mhonnicke@bnl.go [NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica-UFPR, Curitiba (Brazil); Rigon, L. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy); Menk, R.-H. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCPa, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Arfelli, F. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy); Dipartamento di Fisica-Universita di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Foerster, L.A.; Rosado-Neto, G.H. [Departamento de Zoologia-UFPR, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2010-08-21

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures (Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  20. Phenylphenalenones Accumulate in Plant Tissues of Two Banana Cultivars in Response to Herbivory by the Banana Weevil and Banana Stem Weevil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Hölscher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenylphenalenone-type compounds accumulated in the tissues of two banana cultivars—Musa acuminata cv. “Grande Naine” (AAA and Musa acuminata × balbisiana Colla cv. “Bluggoe” (ABB—when these were fed on by the banana weevil (Cosmopolites sordidus (Germ. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and the banana stem weevil (Odoiporus longicollis (Oliver (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. The chemical constituents of the banana material were separated by means of chromatographic techniques and identified by NMR spectroscopy. One new compound, 2-methoxy-4-phenylphenalen-1-one, was found exclusively in the corm material of “Bluggoe” that had been fed on by the weevils.

  1. Fruit Damage Patterns Caused by Ovipositing Females of Conotrachelus dimidiatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Guava Trees

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    Felipe Tafoya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the damage patterns produced by females of the guava weevil Conotrachelus dimidiatus Champion, 1904 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, according to the position of the damaged fruit in guava trees Psidium guajava L. in Calvillo, Aguascalientes, Mexico. The trees were subdivided in eight zones, and during one year the level of fruit lesions due to oviposition was registered. Results showed a higher level of damage in the upper and external zone of the trees (P≤.05. We found no significant differences in damage between the four cardinal points (P≥.05. During the year, the level of damage was recorded and was higher in the months of August and September (P≤.05 associated with rainfall (0.86, P=.06 and increase in temperature (0.84, P=.03. The most susceptible fruits were in the size range of 2.1–4.0 cm (polar diameter. The information from this study will be used to design and establish effective control strategies for the guava weevil, taking into account location of the most susceptible fruits, seasonality of the pest, and the abiotic factors.

  2. Volatiles released from Vaccinium corymbosum were attractive to Aegorhinus superciliosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in an olfactometric bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Leonardo; Mutis, Ana; Ceballos, Ricardo; Lizama, Marcelo; Pardo, Fernando; Perich, Fernando; Quiroz, Andrés

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of host volatiles in the relationship between a blueberry plant Vaccinium corymbosum L. and the raspberry weevil Aegorhinus superciliosus (Guérin) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), the principal pest of blueberry in the south of Chile. Volatiles from the aerial part of different phenological stages of the host were collected on Porapak Q and analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Several chemical groups were identified including green leaf volatiles, aromatic compounds, and terpenes. The olfactometric responses of A. superciliosus toward different odor sources were studied in a four-arm olfactometer. Blueberry shoots at the phenological stages of fruit set, and blue-pink fruit color elicited the greatest behavioral responses from weevils. Five compounds (2-nonanone, eucalyptol, R- and S-limonene, and 4-ethyl benzaldehyde) elicited an attractant behavioral response from A. superciliosus. The results suggest the host location behavior of A. superciliosus could be mediated by volatiles derived from V. corymbosum. This work has identified a number of compounds with which it is possible to develop a lure for the principal pest of blueberry in southern Chile.

  3. Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Andréa Roveré Franz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Stored grains are subject to losses in quality nutritional value and in sanitation from the time they are stored to the time they are consumed. Botanical insecticides may offer an alternative solution for pest control. The objective was to test the insecticidal properties of the essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus (leaf, Zingiber officinale (root and Mentha sp. (leaf. The efficacy of these oils was tested to control the rice weevil, S. oryzae, using hydrodistillation. Chemical analysis of the essential oils was carried out by gas chromatography. Major components of C. citratus were geranial (48% and neral (31%, of Z. officinale were α-zingibereno (13%, geranial (16%, neral (10% and α-farneseno (5% and of Mentha sp. was menthol (92%. Bioassays were carried out by fumigation and topical application. In topical application assays, the essential oil of C. citratus had greater toxicity (LC50 0.027 µL mL-1 and shorter exposure time than the oils of the other two plants. After 24 h and 48 h, 70% and 100% mortality of S. oryzae occurred, respectively. In fumigation assays, essential oil of Z. officinale had a lower LC50 (1.18 µL cm-2 and 70% mortality after 24 h exposure. Therefore, we recommend the use of essential oils of C. citratus and Z. officinale to control the rice weevil S. oryzae.

  4. Roles of host plants in boll weevil range expansion beyond tropical Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    New findings on boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), biology and ecology have had repercussions on the current level of understanding about short- and long-range boll weevil dispersal, and range expansion from its original tropical Mesoamerican habitat. The w...

  5. Screening Sitka spruce for resistance to weevil damage in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    René I. Alfaro; John N. King

    2012-01-01

    The white pine weevil, Pissodes strobi (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), has serious impacts on Sitka (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carrière), Engelmann (P. engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.), and white spruce (P. glauca (Moench) Voss) plantations in British Columbia (BC), Canada. This weevil attacks...

  6. Effect of mulching on banana weevil movement relative to pheromone traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinzaara, W.; Gold, C.S.; Dicke, M.; Huis, van A.; Ragama, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    Banana weevil (Cosmopolites sordidus) is a major pest in East Africa causing yield losses of up to 14 metric tonnes per hectare annually. A study was conducted in Uganda to determine the effect of mulching on banana (Musa spp. L.) weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae),

  7. effect of age, female mating status and density on the banana weevil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    journal

    were conducted to determine whether the response of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar). (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to its aggregation pheromone was influenced by age, female mating status and weevil density. Laboratory bioassays were conducted using a double pitfall olfactometer, while a bucket ...

  8. Effect of age, female mating status and density on the banana weevil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to determine whether the response of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to its aggregation pheromone was influenced by age, female mating status and weevil density. Laboratory bioassays were conducted using a double ...

  9. Olfactory responses of the vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus, to tree odours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van R.W.H.M.; Visser, J.H.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    A Y-tube olfactometer and a still-air olfactometer were developed to determine the attractiveness of several host plants for the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus (F.); Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Odours of weevil-damaged yew (Taxus baccata) and spindle trees (Euonymus fortunei) are attractive to

  10. Key to larvae of the South American subfamilies of weevils (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea Clave para larvas de las subfamilias sudamericanas de gorgojos (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

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    ADRIANA E. MARVALDI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea from South America are classsified into seven families and 28 subfamilies as follows: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae and Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae and Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae and Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae and Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae, Mesoptiliinae (= Magdalidinae, Molytinae, Baridinae, Lixinae, Conoderinae (= Zygopinae, Cossoninae, Scolytinae and Platypodinae. A dichotomous key for the larval stage is provided for identification of the families and subfamilies of Curculionoidea present in South America. The key is based on external morphological characters and contains data on larval feeding habitsLos gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea de Sudamérica están clasificados en siete familias y 28 subfamilias como se muestra a continuación: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae y Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae y Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae y Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae y Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae, Mesoptiliinae (= Magdalidinae, Molytinae, Baridinae, Lixinae, Conoderinae (= Zygopinae, Cossoninae, Scolytinae y Platypodinae. Se brinda una clave dicotómica para el estado de larva de Curculionoidea en Sudamérica, para su determinación a nivel de familias y subfamilias. La clave está basada sobre caracteres morfológicos externos y se presentan además datos de hábitos alimentarios

  11. Three Boll Weevil Diapause Myths in Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    The boll weevil, Anthonmus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), originated in Mesoamerica but its contemporary distribution extends from the United States Cotton Belt to Argentina, throughout which it is a serious pest of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. While research on the boll weev...

  12. (coleoptera: curculionidae) to beauveria bassiana and metarhizium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais was conducted under laboratory with the objectives of identifying the most virulent locally available fungal isolates, and determining the dose mortality response. The pathogenicity (virulence) of the entomopathogenic fungi was determined using LT50 and percent mortality at the conidial ...

  13. Leptographium bhutanense sp. nov., associated with the root collar weevil Hylobitelus chenkupdorjii on Pinus wallichiana in Bhutan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.D.; Jacobs, K.; Kirisits, T.; Chhetri, D.B.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Leptographium spp. are commonly associated with bark beetles and weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and some are important tree pathogens. In a recent survey of diseases and insect pests of conifer trees in Bhutan, the root collar weevil, Hylobitelus chenkupdorjii was found girdling young

  14. Método de diagnóstico para el monitoreo de resistencia a insecticidas en poblaciones de "picudo del algodonero", Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae A diagnostic test for insecticide resistance monitoring in "cotton boll weevil" Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Stadler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El control de las poblaciones de Anthonomus grandis Boheman, por debajo de su umbral de daño económico durante el ciclo del cultivo del algodón, se realiza en forma efectiva hasta el momento, a través de insecticidas de síntesis. La presión selectiva de las aplicaciones extensivas e intensivas de insecticidas hace imperativa la detección temprana de focos de resistencia a los mismos, en función de un correcto manejo del fenómeno. Se desarrolló un método de diagnóstico de resistencia para A. grandis a partir de la técnica "vial test", que fue adaptada en forma de "kit" para el monitoreo rápido y sencillo de los focos de resistencia en el campo. La toxicidad (CL99, para calcular la concentración discriminante (CD del insecticida y la preparación del "kit", se obtiene a partir de bioensayos de laboratorio con una cepa normal susceptible de A. grandis. Se determinó la vida media de los insecticidas dentro de los viales por CIPAC MT 46, para establecer una fecha de vencimiento del "kit". La CD y el método en su conjunto fueron validados a través de ensayos a campo. El "kit", usado en el monitoreo de resistencia en el campo, fue especialmente diseñado para ser utilizado en las condiciones geográficas, económicas y socio-culturales presentes en la región algodonera argentina. La implementación de esta técnica permitirá conseguir la información necesaria, y así obtener una apropiada alternancia de insecticidas. Como consecuencia, se prevé una reducción de impacto ambiental de las prácticas agronómicas en el control de plagas en algodón.The in-season control of the cotton boll weevil Anthonomus grandis Boheman is done by insecticide application, which so far is the only effective way to reduce boll weevil populations to levels below economic significance. The extensive and intensive control actions with insecticides cause selective pressure on pest populations. Thus, to achieve an accurate insecticide resistance

  15. Olfactory responses of banana weevil predators to volatiles from banana pseudostem tissue and synthetic pheromone

    OpenAIRE

    Tinzaara, W.; Gold, C.S.; Dicke, M.; Huis, van, A.

    2005-01-01

    As a response to attack by herbivores, plants can emit a variety of volatile substances that attract natural enemies of these insect pests. Predators of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) such as Dactylosternum abdominale (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae) and Pheidole megacephala (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), are normally found in association with weevil-infested rotten pseudostems and harvested stumps. We investigated whether these predators are attracted to...

  16. The resistance of hazel (Corylus avellana to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L.- Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Part II. The physicochemical characteristics of the pericarp and dynamics of nut development and cultivar resistance to the pest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Piskornik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant differences were found among the 22 studied hazel cultivars (Corylus avellana L. in their resistance to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L. which is the main pest of this crop in Europe. The study investigated the relationships between the resistance of the cultivars to the pest and the physicochemical properties of the pericarp, i.e. the lignification dynamics, changes in thickness and hardness during nut development and the rate of nutlet development. Correlation analysis showed that there was no dependence between the physicochemical properties of the pericarp and the resistance of the hazel cultivars to the hazelnut weevil. Nut development dynamics were also found to be unrelated to resistance to the pest. Laboratory feeding experiments showed that during the initial feeding phase and at the time the insect searches for an oviposition site, it seems to prefer cultivars with the largest nutlets. However, in the period of intensive oviposition, traits other than nutlet size seem to be decisive for the beetles choice of cultivar.

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy of an insecticidal paint based on chlorpyrifos and pyriproxyfen in a microencapsulated formulation against Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llácer, E; Dembilio, O; Jacas, J A

    2010-04-01

    The weevil Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an important pest of palms. It has recently colonized the Mediterranean Basin where it is a serious problem on ornamental Phoenix canariensis (hort. ex Chabaud) palms. The efficacy of an insecticidal paint based on chlorpyrifos and pyriproxyfen in a microencapsulated formulation (Inesfly IGR FITO, Industrias Químicas Inesba S.L., Paiporta, Spain) against this weevil has been studied. Laboratory results proved that pyriproxyfen has no effect against R. ferrugineus when applied in this microencapsulated formulation. Semifield trials dismissed Inesfly IGR FITO as a curative insecticide but showed the potential of this product in the preventative control of R. ferrugineus in palms. One single application could prevent infestation for up to 6 mo with a mean efficacy of 83.3%.

  18. Between-season attraction of cotton boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae adults by its aggregation pheromone Atração de adultos do bicudo do algodoeiro, Anthonomus grandis Boh. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae por seu feromônio de agregação na entressafra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedson Desidério Fernandes

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate the attractiveness of boll weevil adults by its aggregation pheromone under winter field conditions. Two experimental fields were utilized at "Casa Branca", SP, Brazil. For each one, three areas were established near the refuge vegetation, sparated 500 m from each other. Each area was divided in three sub-areas or blocks of 100 m² to receive pheromone applications (2.5 g per block. In addition to the pre-application counting, five additional evaluations were carried out after the pheromone applicaton. Ten randomized sampling points per block were considered in each evaluation process. A. grandis adults responded immediately to the pheromone applications, and were captured for 14 days . The highest level of attractiveness was observed 24 hours after application. The application of the boll weevil aggregation pheromone during winter could increase the predation by natural enemies, due to the increase of prey availability. Chemical control can be recommended 24 hours after pheromone applications in small plots as a between-season strategy for the suppression of boll weevil adults.O presente estudo teve como objetivo investigar a atratividade do bicudo do algodoeiro ao seu feromônio de agregação em período de inverno. Foram utilizados dois campos experimentais no município de Casa Branca, SP. Em cada um destes, foram estabelecidas três áreas separadas de aproximadamente 500 metros, sempre próximas à vegetação de refúgio. Cada área foi dividida em três sub-áreas ou blocos de 100 m² para receber a aplicação do feromônio (2,5 g por bloco. Foi realizada uma contagem de bicudos adultos no solo antes, e mais cinco após a aplicação de feromônio. Em cada bloco, foram observadas dez parcelas aleatórias, para a avaliação dos bicudos. Os adultos de A. grandis foram atraídos imediatamente após a aplicação do feromônio, sendo capturados por mais de 14 dias após. O índice mais

  19. Development and Life History of Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae on Cereal Crops

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    James Adebayo Ojo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, is one of the most destructive pests of stored cereals. Knowledge of the life history and biology is important to the development of an integrated pest management program. Investigation was carried out on developmental biology of S. zeamais on four main cereal crops, maize, rice, sorghum, and millet, under laboratory conditions. Egg incubation, oviposition periods, and larval instar development were not different significantly among the food hosts. Number of eggs laid varied significantly among the cereal grains; mean fecundity was highest on maize (67.2±3.16 and lowest on millet (53.8±0.17. Number of immature (larva and pupa and adult stages varied significantly among the cereal grains. There exist four larval instars with a varied mean head capsule width, with a mean total instar larval developmental period of 23.1, 22.2, 22.2, and 21.6 d on maize, rice, sorghum, and millet, respectively. There was linear relationship and significant correlation between the stages of larval development and head capsule width. The mean developmental period from egg to adult varied, being highest on maize (34.7 d and lowest on sorghum (33.5 d.

  20. Ciclo biológico, comportamiento y censo del picudo del camu camu, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en Pucallpa, Perú Biological cycle, behavior and census of camu camu weevil, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, in Pucallpa, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Perez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El picudo, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995, es una de las plagas mas importantes del camu camu Myrciaria dubia H.B.K. Mc Vaugh en la Amazonía Peruana. El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar el ciclo biológico de este insecto bajo condiciones de laboratorio y describir su comportamiento y fluctuación en condiciones de campo en Pucallpa, Ucayali, Perú. El porcentaje de eclosión de larvas fue de 87%, la duración del periodo de incubación de los huevos fue de 5,5±0,9 (4 a 7 días, del estado larval en el fruto 22,2±1,9 (20 a 25 días y en el suelo (fase pre-pupa, 54,4±5,5 (46 a 67 días, del periodo pupal 11,8±0,9 (9 a 13 días y la longevidad del adulto fue de 51,8±18,9 (9 a 75 días. Los adultos se alimentaron de frutos de diferentes diámetros y estados de maduración y de botones florales, ramas tiernas y flores. No se registró la presencia de adultos de C. dubiae en frutos secos, ni en la base del tallo, sino en ritidomas. La mayor actividad de alimentación y de reproducción de los adultos fue entre 18:30 a 22:00 h. Los adultos fueron observados en el cultivo durante todo el año, encontrándose con mayor frecuencia en los meses de enero a marzo en pisos bajos inundables y entre octubre a diciembre en tierra firme no inundable, coincidiendo con la fase de floración y fructificación de la planta.Camu camu weevil Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 is a one of the main pests of camu camu (Myrciaria dubia H.B.K. Mc Vaugh in Peruvian Amazonia. The aim of this study was to determine the biological cycle of this insect under laboratory conditions, to describe its behavior and population numbers under field conditions in Pucallpa, Ucayali, Peru. The percentage of hatching was 87%; the egg incubation period was 5.5±0.9 (4 to 7 days; the length of the larval stage inside the fruit was 22.2±1.9 (20 to 25 days, and the length larval stage (pre-pupa underground was 54.4±5.5 (46 to 67 days. The length of pupal period was 11.8

  1. Track analysis of the Neotropical Entimini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Romo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Track analysis of the Neotropical Entimini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae. Distributional patterns of the species belonging to the tribe Entimini from the Neotropical region were analyzed. Based on a track analysis of 22 species of Entimus, Rhigus, and Phaedropus, for which distributional data were available, two generalized tracks were found. One is located in northern Brazil, corresponding to the Amazonian subregion, and is determined by Phaedropus candidus and Rhigus speciosus. The other is located in southern Brazil, corresponding to the Parana subregion, and is determined by Entimus imperialis, E. excelsus, Phaedropus togatus, Rhigus dejeanii, R. faldermanni, R. horridus, R. lateritus, R. nigrosparsus, and R. tribuloides. The development of the Chacoan subregion is hypothesized to have been the dynamic vicariant event that fragmented the former Amazonian-Parana forest.Análisis de trazos de Entimini Neotropical (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae. Se analizaron los patrones de distribución de la tribu Entimini en la región Neotropical. Con base en un análisis de los trazos de 22 especies de Entimus, Rhigus y Phaedropus, para los cuales se contaba con datos de distribución, se hallaron dos trazos generalizados. Uno se localiza en el norte de Brasil, en la subregión Amazónica, y está sustentado por Phaedropus candidus y Rhigus speciosus. El otro se localiza en el sur de Brasil, en la subregión Paranaense, y está sustentado por Entimus imperialis, E. excelsus, Phaedropus togatus, Rhigus dejeanii, R. faldermanni, R. horridus, R. lateritus, R. nigrosparsus y R. tribuloides. Se hipotetiza que el desarrollo de la subregión Chaqueña constituyó el evento de vicarianza dinámica que fragmentó el antiguo bosque Amazónico-Paranaense.

  2. Potential of seed dusts of Jatropha curcas L., Thevetia peruviana (Pers., and Piper guineense Schumach. against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in storage of corn grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukpai Oninye M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory evaluation was carried out to determine the efficacy and phytochemical composition of powdered seeds of Physic nut Jatropha curcas, Yellow oleander Thevetia peruviana and West African black pepper Piper guineense at different dosages (2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 g for the management of Sitophilus zeamais. Treatments were mixed with 50 g of maize and infested with 10 adult S. zeamais in 200 ml air-tight glass vials and kept under ambient conditions (25-30°C and 70-90 RH for a period of 28 days in August 2015. The trial was laid out in a completely randomized design in four replicates. Results from data analyses showed that treated maize grains in storage recorded significantly (P < 0.05 higher mean mortality levels of adult S. zeamais than the untreated controls. However, there were no significant differences in mean mortality of the weevil at 7, 14, 21 and 28 DAT, except on those stored only for 1 DAT. Batches treated with higher doses (10.0, 7.5, 5.0 g suffered a higher total mortality of adult S. zeamais; this was significantly (P < 0.05 higher compared with treatments using smaller dosages (2.5 and 0.0 g. Phytochemical analysis of treatments revealed high levels of alkaloids, tannins and phenols in all the plant extracts. The flavonoid contents were also high in Piper guineense and Permethrin, but lower in Jatropha curcas and Thevetia peruviana. These compounds are known to possess insecticidal properties that may have been responsible for the mortality of Sitophilus zeamais.

  3. Effect of mulching on banana weevil movement relative to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L.) weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), movement relative to pheromone-baited traps. Three treatments were used to create different mulching levels: banana without mulch (control), banana with thin mulch (< 6 cm thick), and banana with thick mulch (15 cm thick). Pheromone traps

  4. A Role for Intercept Traps in the Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) IPM Strategy at Ornamental Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) cause significant damage to ornamental nursery tree crops throughout the Eastern U. S. Depending on surrounding habitat, some nurseries can undergo large influxes of ambrosia beetles from the forest to susceptible nursery stock. Eth...

  5. Host boring preferences of the tea shot-hole borer Euwallacea fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The non-native shot-hole borer, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), was discovered in Florida’s avocado production area in Homestead in 2010. It is a highly polyphagous ambrosia beetle that carries Fusarium fungal symbionts. In susceptible host trees, the fung...

  6. Behavioral assays for evaluating host preferences of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, the exotic ambrosia beetle, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) was first discovered in Florida avocado groves. Introduction of its symbiotic Fusarium spp. fungi into galleries in the xylem tissue results in Fusarium-dieback disease. Unlike most ambros...

  7. Influence of temperature on spring flight initiation for southwestern ponderosa pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. L. Gaylord; K. K. Williams; R. W. Hofstetter; J. D. McMillin; T. E. Degomez; M. R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Determination of temperature requirements for many economically important insects is a cornerstone of pest management. For bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), this information can facilitate timing of management strategies. Our goals were to determine temperature predictors for flight initiation of three species of Ips bark beetles...

  8. Characterization of an Aggregation Pheromone in Hylesinus pruinosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Shepherd; Brian Sullivan; Bradley Hoosier; JoAnne Barrett; Tessa Bauman

    2010-01-01

    We conducted laboratory and field bioassays to characterize the pheromone system of an ash bark beetle, Hylesinus pruinosus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). Solitary females in newly initiated galleries in ash logs produced (+)-exo-brevicomin, whereas male beetles paired with females produced (+)-endo-brevicomin, lesser quantities of...

  9. Diversity of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attracted to avocado, lychee, and essential oil lures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and native Persea species (redbay, swampbay). As part...

  10. A novel semiochemical tool for protecting Pinus contorta from mortality attributed to Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Fettig; A. S. Munson; M. Reinke; A. Mafra-Neto

    2015-01-01

    Verbenone (4,6,6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1]hept-3-en-2-one) is an antiaggregant of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a notable forest insect capable of causing extensive levels of tree mortality in western North America. Several formulations of verbenone are registered...

  11. Variation in enantiospecific attraction of Ips avulsus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to the pheromone ipsdienol in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Miller; Jeremy Allison

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, we tested the responses of the small southern pine engraver, Ips avulsus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), to multiple-funnel traps baited with (+)-, (-)-, and (+/-)- ipsdienol. Three experiments were conducted in Georgia with all traps co-baited with one of the following lure combinations, respectively: experiment 1, ipsenol; experiment 2, lanierone and...

  12. Lack of genetic differentiation in aggressive and secondary bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Allender; Karen M. Clancy; Tom E. DeGomez; Joel D. McMillin; Scott A. Woolbright; Paul Keim; David M. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) play an important role as disturbance agents in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) forests of Arizona. However, from 2001 to 2003, elevated bark beetle activity caused unprecedented levels of ponderosa pine mortality. A better understanding of the population structure of these...

  13. A small-bolt method for screening tree protectants against bark beetles (coleoptera: curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.L. Strom; L.M. Roton

    2009-01-01

    A simple, small-bolt method was developed and refi ned for evaluating and screening treatments being considered as prophylactics against bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae). Using this method, 4 insecticide products (3 active ingredients) were evaluated against the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, intermittently during a period...

  14. Biology, ecology, and management of Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are two of the most damaging non-native ambrosia beetle pests in ornamental tree nurseries. Adult females tunnel into the stems and branches of host trees to create galleries with bro...

  15. Rearing redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), on semi-artifical media

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Lake Maner; James Hanula; S. Kristine Braman

    2014-01-01

    Semi-artificial diets consisting of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng,; Laurales: Lauraceae) sawdust and various nutrients were tested for rearing Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in vitro. Comparison of 2 media, modified and standard, adapted from Biedermann et al. (2009) showed that the more...

  16. Integrating kaolin clay for ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) management in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are an important pest problem at ornamental tree nurseries. Available chemical measures are not completely effective, and due to the length of the beetle dispersal period and product breakdown, repeated treatments can become costly in ...

  17. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musaspp. EN COLOMBIA Dryophthorinae Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Associted to Platain and Banana crops (Musaspp. in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULA A SEPÚLVEDA-CANO

    Full Text Available Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.This synopsis is about beetle&#’;s subfamily Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated to plantain and banana crops. Additionally keys illustrated for the species of the country are offered. Six species associated to these cultures are registered: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

  18. Lufenuron impact upon Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) midgut and its reflection in gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Hilton Nobre; da Cunha, Franklin Magliano; Cruz, Glaucilane Santos; D'assunção, Carolline Guimarães; Rolim, Guilherme Gomes; Barros, Maria Edna Gomes; Breda, Mariana Oliveira; Teixeira, Alvaro Aguiar Coelho; Teixeira, Valéria Wanderley

    2017-04-01

    The insecticide Match® (lufenuron), one of the main insect growth regulators used in pest control, has been presented as a viable alternative against the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), by inhibiting chitin synthesis. Thus, this study aimed to examine whether Match® interferes in the synthesis of the peritrophic matrix, leading to changes in the midgut epithelium, resulting in nutritional deficiency and reflecting, thereby, in the gametogenesis process of A. grandis. Floral cotton buds were immersed in the insecticide solution (800μL of Match®+200mL of distilled water) and offered to the adult insects. The midguts of the insects were evaluated after 24 and 120h after feeding. The gonads were evaluated after 120h. The results showed that Match®, in both evaluation periods, induced histopathological alterations such as disorganization, vacuolization and desquamation of the midgut epithelium; histochemical modifications in the distribution patterns of carbohydrates, although without quantitative changes; and a strong decrease in protein levels. No apoptosis were observed, however, there was an increase in the number of regenerative cell nests. In the testicles, a reduction in the amount of spermatozoids and reduced carbohydrate levels were observed, but no difference in protein levels. The ovarioles presented structural disorganization of follicular cells, yolk reduction and decrease in protein levels, however, no change in carbohydrates levels was noted. Therefore, it is concluded that Match® performs histopathologic and histochemical alterations in the midgut epithelium and the gonads of A. grandis adults, reflecting in the gametogenesis process, presenting itself as a promising tool in the management of this pest on cotton crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A multilayer micromechanical model of the cuticle of Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Jansen, M; Singh, Sudhanshu S; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Franz, Nico M

    2016-08-01

    Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a weevil species common throughout the southwestern United States that uses its rostrum - a very slender, curved, beak-like projection of the head - to excavate tunnels in plant organs (such as acorns) for egg laying (oviposition). Once the apical portion of the rostrum has been inserted into the preferred substrate for oviposition, the female begins rotating around the perimeter of the hole, elevating her head by extending the fore-legs, and rotating the head in place in a drilling motion. This action causes significant elastic deformation of the rostrum, which will bend until it becomes completely straight. To better understand the mechanical behavior of the cuticle as it undergoes deformation during the preparation of oviposition sites, we develop a comprehensive micro/macro model of the micromechanical structure and properties of the cuticle, spanning across all cuticular regions, and reliably mirroring the resultant macroscale properties of the cuticle. Our modeling approach relies on the use of multi-scale, hierarchical biomaterial representation, and employs various micromechanical schemata - e.g., Mori-Tanaka, effective field, and Maxwell - to calculate the homogenized properties of representative volume elements at each level in the hierarchy. We describe the configuration and behavior of this model in detail, and discuss the theoretical implications and limitations of this approach with emphasis on future biomechanical and comparative evolutionary research. Our detailed account of this approach can thereby serve as a methodological template for exploring the biomechanical behavior of new insect structures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Species Relationships in the Genus Bryodaemon (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacławik, Beniamin; Skalski, Tomasz; Lachowska-Cierlik, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Establishing reliable taxonomy and phylogeny of similar, evolutionarily young species is among the greatest challenges in biology. Clearly the best approach is to use a combination of informative traits, including molecular markers and morphometric measurements. The objective of this study was to verify the taxonomy and phylogeny of four morphologically similar Carpathian species of Bryodaemon Podlussany, 1998 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Species relationships were studied using three molecular markers: two nuclear (ITS-2 and EF1-α) and one mitochondrial (COI, barcoding marker). We also took morphometric measurements of 35 taxonomically derived characteristics of body parts and genital apparatus. The potential presence of apomorphic features also was determined. We then compared our results with data concerning the ecology and geography of previously studied species. Our analyses confirmed the monophyly ofthis group and established a phylogeny for the genus. We propose that B. hanakii is the earliest derived species, based on morphometric measurements, apomorphies and the EF-lα phylogeny. The pattern ofnucleotide variation in this marker also indicates that B. rozneri and B. boroveci are the youngest species. This hypothesis is consistent with geographical ranges and ecological preferences of Carpathian Bryodaemon species. We also considered an alternative hypothesis based on the COI gene tree which indicated that B. rozneri was the oldest species. However, this arrangement is inconsistent with our morphological data.

  1. Olfactory antennal responses of the black vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus) to plant volatiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van R.W.H.M.; Visser, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Electroantennograms (EAGs) were recorded from the vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus F. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to a broad range of volatile plant compounds. The response profile is restricted to a small number of volatiles that evoke substantial EAGs. Large EAG responses were particularly found

  2. Effect of crop sanitation on banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) populations and associated damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masanza, M.

    2003-01-01

    The banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a serious pest of bananas. However, its ecology is not well elucidated especially in East Africa where plantations are up to 50 years old and are under various management and cropping systems. No single

  3. Rediscovery and redescription of Centrodora damoni (Girault) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) from Australia, an egg parasitoid of Gonipterus spp (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), after nearly a century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Samantha E; Valente, Carlos; Gonçalves, Catarina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Centrodora is a relatively common and widespread genus of morphologically diverse species, and is the most polyphagous genus known within the Aphelinidae, attacking eggs of insects in addition to pupae of Diptera and Hymenoptera, and nymphs of Hemiptera (Polaszek 1991). There are currently about 60 valid species in the genus, but given its morphological and biological diversity, some elevation of species-groups and subgenera to genus-level might be useful in future. Centrodora is represented in Australia by twelve species (Noyes 2015). New information Centrodora damoni (Girault) is redescribed and diagnosed from recently collected specimens reared from the eucalyptus weevil Gonipterus sp. near scutellatus Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) from Tasmania, Australia. A lectotype is designated from a syntype specimen. PMID:27226747

  4. Molecular markers detect cryptic predation on coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by silvanid and laemophloeid flat bark beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei(Coleoptera: Curculionidae)(Ferrari), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and has been recently introduced in Hawai’i, first detected in the state in 2010. Adult silvanid flat bark beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and adult laemoph...

  5. The life history and immature stages of the weevil Anthonomus monostigma Champion (Coleoptera: Curculiondidae) on Miconia calvescens DC (Melastomataceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduardo Chacón-Madrigal; M.Tracy Johnson; Paul. Hanson

    2012-01-01

    We describe and illustrate the life history and immature stages of Anthonomus monostigma Champion (Curculionidae: Curculioninae: Anthonomini). This weevil is a fruit borer in Miconia calvescens DC (Melastomataceae), a Neotropical tree that is invasive in Pacific islands. The larva has three instars, and development from egg to...

  6. Faunistic Studies on Species of Buprestidae, Cerambycidae and Curculionidae (Coleoptera in Karabük Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göksel Tozlu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to determine fauna of the families of Buprestidae, Cerambycidae and Curculionidae (Coleoptera in the province of Karabük. Field investigations were conducted in central Province, Eskipazar, Ovacık, Safranbolu, and Yenice districts in 2008 and 2009. Totally 40 species and subspecies were determined belonging to Buprestidae (11 species, Cerambycidae (20 and Curculionidae (9 families in this study. Of the species, Chalcophora mariana (Linnaeus, Anthaxia nigrojubata nigrojubata Roubal, Buprestis haemorrhoidalis araratica Marseul, Buprestis octoguttata Linnaeus, Prionus coriarius (Linnaeus, Rhagium inquisitor (Linnaeus, Chlorophorus robustior Pic, Purpuricenus budensis (Gotz, Larinus latus (Herbst and Larinus syriacus Gyllenhal are having higher population than others. In this study, while nearly all species belonging to Buprestidae and Cerambycidae are forest pest, species of the Curculionidae except for Pissodes piceae (Illiger are important potential biological control agents for some weeds in the tribe Cardueae (Asteraceae.

  7. Micromorphology of the elytral cuticle of beetles, with an emphasis on weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kamp, Thomas; Riedel, Alexander; Greven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    The elytral cuticle of 40 beetle species, comprising 14 weevils (Curculionoidea) and 26 representatives of other taxa, is examined. All weevils and 18 other species have an endocuticle with prominent macrofibers, which corresponds to a modified pseudo-orthogonal cuticle. Angles between successive layers of macrofibers range between 30° and 90°, but are constantly less than 60° in weevils. In all Curculionoidea, as well as in one buprestid and one erotylid species exo- and endocuticle are densely interlocked. In the weevil Sitophilus granarius, transmission electron microscopy revealed vertical microfibrils extending from the exocuticle between the macrofibers of the underlaying endocuticle. Vertical microfibrils connecting successive macrofiber layers of the endocuticle were observed in S. granarius and Trigonopterus nasutus. Distinct cuticular characters are traced on a beetle phylogeny: the angles between unidirectional endocuticle layers; the presence and the shape of endocuticular macrofibers; and the interlocking of exo- and endocuticle. While character traits seem to be more or less randomly distributed among Coleoptera, the Curculionoidea have a uniform groundplan: The "weevil-specific" combination of characters includes 1) interlocking of exo- and endocuticle, 2) an endocuticle with distinct ovoid macrofibers embedded in a matrix and 3) comparatively small angles between successive endocuticular layers. Thus, phylogenetic constraints appear equally important to functional factors in the construction of the weevil elytron. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musa spp. EN COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULA A. SEPÚLVEDA-CANO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

  9. Enhancing dissemination of Beauveria bassiana with host plant base incision trapfor the management of the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinzaara, W.; Emudong, P.; Nankinga, C.; Tushemereirwe, W.; Kagezi, G.H.; Gold, C.S.; Dicke, M.; Huis, van A.; Karamura, E.

    2015-01-01

    The banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an important pest of highland banana in East and central Africa. It causes yield loss of up to 100% in heavily infested fields. Studies were carried out in Uganda to evaluate the efficacy of the the plant base incision

  10. Establishment and dispersal of the biological control weevil Rhinoncomimus latipes on mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen C. Lake; Judith Hough-Goldstein; Kimberley J. Shropshire; Vincent D' Amico

    2011-01-01

    Mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross (Polygonaceae), is an annual vine from Asia that has invaded the eastern US where it can form dense monocultures and outcompete other vegetation in a variety of habitats. The host-specific Asian weevil Rhinoncomimus latipes Korotyaev (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was first...

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of Steinernema carpocapsae against the Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus in Phoenix canariensis

    OpenAIRE

    Llácer, Elena; Martínez de Altube, María del Mar; Jacas Miret, Josep Anton

    2009-01-01

    The red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), is an important pest of palms. It has recently colonized the Mediterranean Basin, where it is a serious problem on ornamental Phoenix canariensis (Chabaud) palms. The efficacy of Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) in a chitosan formulation (Biorend R®) against this weevil in a semi-field trial including both preventative and curative assays has been studied. Our results prove the p...

  12. Detection and quantification of Leptographium wageneri, the cause of black-stain root disease, from bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North California using regular and real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Schweigkofler; William J. Otrosina; Sheri L. Smith; Daniel R. Cluck; Kevin Maeda; Kabir G. Peay; Matteo Garbelotto

    2005-01-01

    Black-stain root disease is a threat to conifer forests in western North America. The disease is caused by the ophiostomatoid fungus Leptographium wageneri (W.B. Kendr.) M.J. Wingf., which is associated with a number of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and weevil species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). We developed a polymerase chain reaction test...

  13. The gut microbiota of larvae of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Oliver (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The red palm weevil (RPW) Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is one of the major pests of palms. The larvae bore into the palm trunk and feed on the palm tender tissues and sap, leading the host tree to death. The gut microbiota of insects plays a remarkable role in the host life and understanding the relationship dynamics between insects and their microbiota may improve the biological control of insect pests. The purpose of this study was to analyse the diversity of the gut microbiota of field-caught RPW larvae sampled in Sicily (Italy). Results The 16S rRNA gene-based Temporal Thermal Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) of the gut microbiota of RPW field-trapped larvae revealed low bacterial diversity and stability of the community over seasons and among pools of larvae from different host trees. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region confirmed low complexity and assigned 98% of the 75,564 reads to only three phyla: Proteobacteria (64.7%) Bacteroidetes (23.6%) and Firmicutes (9.6%) and three main families [Enterobacteriaceae (61.5%), Porphyromonadaceae (22.1%) and Streptococcaceae (8.9%)]. More than half of the reads could be classified at the genus level and eight bacterial genera were detected in the larval RPW gut at an abundance ≥1%: Dysgonomonas (21.8%), Lactococcus (8.9%), Salmonella (6.8%), Enterobacter (3.8%), Budvicia (2.8%), Entomoplasma (1.4%), Bacteroides (1.3%) and Comamonas (1%). High abundance of Enterobacteriaceae was also detected by culturing under aerobic conditions. Unexpectedly, acetic acid bacteria (AAB), that are known to establish symbiotic associations with insects relying on sugar-based diets, were not detected. Conclusions The RPW gut microbiota is composed mainly of facultative and obligate anaerobic bacteria with a fermentative metabolism. These bacteria are supposedly responsible for palm tissue fermentation in the tunnels where RPW larvae thrive and might have a key role in the insect

  14. Diapause in the Boll Weevil (Coleopetra: Curculionidae) : Life-Stage Sensitivity to Enviromental Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terence L. Wagner; Eric J. Villavaso; Jefferey L. Willers

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the diapause response in naturally occurring boll weevils under field and simulated field environments of north Mississippi. Squares containing early-stage weevils were collected in July, August, and September and subsamples from each group were installed into similar dynamic environments in the laboratory. In this manner, some weevils experienced...

  15. Synergism between demethylation inhibitor fungicides or gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators and bifenthrin in a pyrethroid-resistant population of Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoutar, D; Cowles, R S; Requintina, E; Alm, S R

    2010-10-01

    In 2007-2008, the "annual bluegrass weevil," Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a serious pest of Poa annua L. (Poales: Poaceae) on U.S. golf courses, was shown to be resistant to two pyrethroids, bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. In 2008, we showed that bifenthrin resistance was principally mediated by oxidase detoxification (cytochrome P450 [P450]). P450s can be inhibited by demethylation inhibitor fungicides and gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators, both of which are commonly used on golf courses. We tested these compounds for synergistic activity with bifenthin against a pyrethroid-resistant population of L. maculicollis. The LD50 value for bifenthrin was significantly reduced from 87 ng per insect (without synergists) to 9.6-40 ng per insect after exposure to the fungicides fenarimol, fenpropimorph, prochloraz, propiconazole, and pyrifenox and the plant growth regulators flurprimidol, paclobutrazol, and trinexapac-ethyl. Simulated field exposure with formulated products registered for use on turf revealed enhanced mortality when adult weevils were exposed to bifenthrin (25% mortality, presented alone) combined with field dosages of propiconizole, fenarimol, flurprimidol, or trinexapac-ethyl (range, 49-70% mortality).

  16. Role of Ipsdienol, Ipsenol, and cis-Verbenol in chemical ecology of Ips avulsus, Ips calligraphus, and Ips grandicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy D. Allison; Jessica I. McKenney; Daniel R. Miller; Matthew L. Gimmel

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stressed or damaged pine (Pinus sp.) trees in the southeastern United States are often colonized simultaneously by three southern Ips species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): small southern pine engraver, Ips avulsus (Eichhoff); sixspined ips, Ips calligraphus (Germar); and...

  17. Rearing Xyleborus volvulus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Media Containing Sawdust from Avocado or Silkbay, with or without Raffaelea lauricola (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like other ambrosia beetles, Xyleborus volvulus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) lives in a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with fungi that serve as food source. Until recently, X. volvulus was not considered a pest, and none of its symbionts were considered plant pathogens. However, recent ...

  18. Olfactometer responses of plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to host plant volatiles, synthetic grandisoic acid, and live conspecifics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of pome and stone fruit, but will also attack other fruits. Males produce the aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid; emitting only the (+)- enantiomer which is attractive to both sexes of the univoltine an...

  19. Influence of elevation on bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) community structure and flight periodicity in ponderosa pine forests of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly K. Williams; Joel D. McMillin; Tom E. DeGomez; Karen M. Clancy; Andy Miller

    2008-01-01

    We examined abundance and flight periodicity of five Ips and six Dendroctonus species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) among three different elevation bands in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex. Lawson) forests of northcentral Arizona. Bark beetle populations were monitored at 10 sites in each of three elevation...

  20. The historical role of Ips hauseri (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the spruce forest of Ile-Alatausky and Medeo National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Mukhamadiev; A. Lynch; C. O' Connor; A. Sagitov; N. Ashikbaev; I. Panyushkina

    2014-01-01

    On 17 May and 27 June 2011 severe cyclonic storms damaged several hundred hectares of spruce forest (Picea schrenkiana) in the Tian Shan Mountains. Bark beetle populations increased rapidly in dead and damaged trees, particularly Ips hauseri, I. typographus, I. sexdentatus, and Piiyogenesperfossus (all Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and there is concern about the...

  1. Efficacy of two insecticides for protecting loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) from subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordon L. Burke; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn; Jackson P. Audley; Kamal JK. Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Tests were conducted on two insecticides (carbaryl and bifenthrin) for excluding subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae) from loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.). Two trap designs (single- and double-pane windows) and two trapping heights (1.5 and 4m) were also evaluated for maximizing beetle catches.

  2. Flight periodicity of the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Colorado, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Willis C. Schaupp; Lee Pederson

    2011-01-01

    There are about 500 species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the United States (Wood 1982). A number of them are important disturbance agents in forested ecosystems, occasionally creating large tracts of dead trees. One eruptive species is the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins, which utilizes Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga...

  3. Behavioral Responses of Plum Curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Different Enantiomer Concentrations and Blends of the Synthetic Aggregation Pheromone Grandisoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Virginia; Chouinard, Gérald; Lucas, Éric; Cormier, Daniel; Leskey, Tracy C; Wright, Starker E; Zhang, Aijun; Pichette, André

    2015-04-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is an important pest of fruit in North America. Males produce an aggregation pheromone (grandisoic acid) that attracts both sexes of the northern univoltine and the southern multivoltine strains. Grandisoic acid ((1R,2S)-1-methyl-2-(1-methylethenyl)-cyclobutaneacetic acid) is a chiral molecule containing one chiral center. A synthetic racemic mixture will contain two optical isomers that are mirror images of each other with equal amounts of (+)- and (-)-enantiomeric isomers. Male plum curculio only produce the (+) enantiomer. Some enantiomers can have antagonistic effects on the attraction of weevils to pheromones. An understanding of the effect of both enantiomers on the behaviour of plum curculio is needed to develop more efficient trap baits. Behavioural bioassays were conducted in a dual-choice still-air vertical olfactometer using a quantity of 1.5 ml of both (+) and (-) synthetic enantiomers and the racemic mixture of grandisoic acid with live female responders to determine which concentration and enantiomeric purity is the most attractive and if there is an antagonistic effect of the unnatural (-) enantiomer. Results indicated that plum curculio were attracted to low concentrations of the (+) enantiomer at 72% enantiomeric excess, but that strains were attracted to different concentrations of the (+) enantiomer (2×10(-7) mg/ml for univoltine, 2×10(-9) mg/ml for multivoltine). © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Susceptibility of Two Sitophilus species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae to Essential Oils from Foeniculum vulgare and Satureja hortensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Ebadollahi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the insecticidal activity of essential oils from Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare (Apiaceae, and Summer savory, Satureja hortensis (Lamiaceae, against two stored-product insects. Essential oils from two species of plants were obtained by Clevenger-type water distillation and their fumigant toxicities were tested against adults of the wheat weevil, Sitophilus granarius and rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (Curculionidae. The mortality was determined after 24 and 48 hrs from beginning of exposure. LC50 values of each essential oil were estimated for each insect species. Fumigation bioassays revealed that essential oils from two plants had strong insecticidal activity on experimental insects. LC50 values indicated that S. granarius was more susceptible than S. oryzae to essential oils at the exposure time 24 and 48 hrs. The mortality effect of S. hortensis oil was lower than F. vulgare oil. The LC50 values decreased with the duration of exposure to the essential oil concentrations. In all case, responses varied according to plant material, concentration, and exposure time. These results indicated that essential oils from S. hortensis and F. vulgare could be applicable to the management of stored product insects to decrease ecologically detrimental effects of utilization synthetic insecticides.

  5. Influence of temperature on spring flight initiation for southwestern ponderosa pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord, M L; Williams, K K; Hofstetter, R W; McMillin, J D; Degomez, T E; Wagner, M R

    2008-02-01

    Determination of temperature requirements for many economically important insects is a cornerstone of pest management. For bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), this information can facilitate timing of management strategies. Our goals were to determine temperature predictors for flight initiation of three species of Ips bark beetles, five species of Dendroctonus bark beetles, and two genera of bark beetle predators, Enoclerus spp. (Coleoptera: Cleridae) and Temnochila chlorodia (Mannerheim) (Coleoptera: Ostomidae), in ponderosa pine forests of northcentral Arizona. We quantified beetle flight activity using data loggers and pheromone-baited funnel traps at 18 sites over 4 yr. Ambient air temperature was monitored using temperature data loggers located in close proximity to funnel traps. We analyzed degree-day accumulation and differences between minimum, average, and maximum ambient temperature for the week before and week of first beetle capture to calculate flight temperature thresholds. Degree-day accumulation was not a good predictor for initiation of beetle flight. For all species analyzed other than D. adjunctus Blandford, beetles were captured in traps only when springtime temperatures exceeded 15.0 degrees C. D. adjunctus was collected when maximum temperatures reached only 14.5 degrees C. Once initial flights had begun, beetles were often captured when maximum ambient air temperatures were below initial threshold temperatures. Maximum and average air temperatures were a better predictor for beetle flight initiation than minimum temperature. We establish a temperature range for effective monitoring of bark beetles and their predators, and we discuss the implications of our results under climate change scenarios.

  6. Olfactory responses of banana weevil predators to volatiles from banana pseudostem tissue and synthetic pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinzaara, W; Gold, C S; Dicke, M; van Huis, A

    2005-07-01

    As a response to attack by herbivores, plants can emit a variety of volatile substances that attract natural enemies of these insect pests. Predators of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) such as Dactylosternum abdominale (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae) and Pheidole megacephala (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), are normally found in association with weevil-infested rotten pseudostems and harvested stumps. We investigated whether these predators are attracted to such environments in response to volatiles produced by the host plant, by the weevil, or by the weevil plant complex. We evaluated predator responses towards volatiles from banana pseudostem tissue (synomones) and the synthetic banana weevil aggregation pheromone Cosmolure+ in a two-choice olfactometer. The beetle D. abdominale was attracted to fermenting banana pseudostem tissue and Cosmolure+, whereas the ant P. megacephala was attracted only to fermented pseudostem tissue. Both predators were attracted to banana pseudostem tissue that had been damaged by weevil larvae irrespective of weevil presence. Adding pheromone did not enhance predator response to volatiles from pseudostem tissue fed on by weevils. The numbers of both predators recovered with pseudostem traps in the field from banana mats with a pheromone trap were similar to those in pseudostem traps at different distance ranges from the pheromone. Our study shows that the generalist predators D. abdominale and P. megacephala use volatiles from fermented banana pseudostem tissue as the major chemical cue when searching for prey.

  7. Dimorfismo Sexual de Onchoscelis germari (Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Marliton Barreto

    2012-12-01

    Abstract. Onchoscelis germari (Boheman is a weevil species associated with Simarouba amara Aubl (Simaroubaceae, commonly named “caixeta”. Sixty three specimens were collected and observed in laboratory for sexual dimorphism differences. The following morphological aspects were observed and illustrated: 1 rostrum of males more rough, coarse and with more dense punctures, tricarinate at the basal 2/3, and covered with erect scales from its base to near middle; rostrum of females smoother, with fine and sparse punctures, only the median longitudinal distinct, and only the base covered by erect scales; 2 males with antenna inserted near the apex of rostrum; and near the middle in females; 3 sternal channel of males flatter, with its lateral margins only indicated or absent in the prosternum; the sternal channel of the females deeper, with its lateral margins more prominent; 4 the eighth abdominal tergite of males visible and distinct; while in the females covered by the seventh abdominal tergite.

  8. Flight phenologies of the southeastern Ips species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and some associated Coleoptera in central and southern Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeller, Erich N; Allison, Jeremy D

    2013-12-01

    A year-long flight phenology study was undertaken from 15 July 2009 to 7 July 2010 in central and southeastern Louisiana to estimate the temporal flight patterns of the three southeastern Ips species: Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), Ips avulsus (Eichhoff), and Ips calligraphus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) as well as some of their predatory and phloem-feeding coleopteran associates. The southeastern Ips species play important roles as decomposers in forest ecosystems, but can cause ecological and economic damage during epidemic population phases. In total, 282,761 individuals of the three southeastern Ips species were collected using Ips pheromone-baited multiple funnel traps during the study period. Two major Ips activity peaks were observed during 16 September to 7 October of 2009 and 24 March to 15 April of 2010. In total, 9,139 associated Coleoptera were also collected. Greater than 95% of the total number of associated Coleoptera collected were represented by histerids from the genus Platysoma (4,487; 49.1% of total), the trogossitid Temnoscheila virescens (F.) (2,107; 23.1%), cerambycids from the genus Monochamus (1,013; 11.1%), and Acanthocinus obsoletus (Olivier) (743; 8.1%), and the clerid Thanasimus dubius (F.) (477; 5.2%). Results showed that the associates fell into four temporal groups: the winter and spring active species T. dubius; the spring active species Rhagium inquisitor (L.) and histerids from the genus Platysoma; the spring and summer active species T. virescens, Buprestis lineata F., and Monochamus carolinensis (Olivier); and the summer through fall active species A. obsoletus and Monochamus titillator (F.).

  9. Key to higher taxa of South American weevils based on adult characters (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea Clave de taxones superiores de gorgojos sudamericanos basada en caracteres de los adultos (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA E. MARVALDI

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea from South America are currently classified in the following families and subfamilies: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae and Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae and Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae and Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae and Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae, Mesoptiliinae (= Magdalidinae, Molytinae, Baridinae, Lixinae, Conoderinae (= Zygopinae, Cossoninae, Scolytinae and Platypodinae. In the present contribution we bring a dichotomous key for the identification of seven families and 28 subfamilies of Curculionoidea from South America, and for 21 tribes of the highly heterogeneous subfamilies Curculioninae and Molytinae. These tribes are Curculionini Anthonomini, Ceutorhynchini, Derelomini, Otidocephalini, Erodiscini, Camarotini, Piazorhinini, Prionobrachiini, Smicronychini, Rhamphini and Tychiini, within Curculioninae; and Hylobiini, Pissodini, Conotrachelini, Cleogonini, Sternechini, Pacholenini, Cholini, Petalochilini and Amalactini, within Molytinae. Most of them have been classified as subfamilies in traditional schemes. The key is mainly based on external morphological characters, but also includes data on genitalia, mouth parts and other biological features. Definitions and illustrations of diagnostic characters used in the key are providedLos gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea de América del Sur se clasifican actualmente en las siguientes familias y subfamilias: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae y Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae y Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae y Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae y Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae

  10. Survival of Seasonal Flooding in the Amazon by the Terrestrial Insect Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien & Couturier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a Pest of the Camu-Camu Plant, Myrciaria dubia (Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, C; Couturier, G; Fine, P V A

    2014-08-01

    The weevil Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien & Couturier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a pest of an economically important Amazonian fruit tree Myrciaria dubia (Myrtaceae). This tree grows in seasonally flooded environments, and how weevil larvae survive flooding has not been studied. From December 2004 to May 2009, five experiments were conducted in natural conditions and in the laboratory, with the aim of understanding the mechanisms that allow the survival of C. dubiae larvae in seasonal floods in Amazonia. The larvae of C. dubiae were kept under water for over 93 days. Older instars exposed to periodic circulation of water survived better than younger instars in addition to all larvae that were kept continuously under uncirculated water. Individuals that were collected from plots of M. dubia located in flooded soils and non-flooded soils did not exhibit statistically significant differences in their levels of survival indicating that the variation in survival of flooding events is due to phenotypic plasticity of the species and not to local adaptation by the populations in different environments. We speculate that larvae can survive floods without major physiological changes as larvae appear to obtain oxygen from water by cutaneous diffusion, assisted by caudal movements.

  11. Aquatic weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea assembly response to the different ecological conditions in artificial lakes in central Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial stagnant aquatic ecosystems such as reservoirs, are suitable for monitoring the succession of biocenoses because they are usually formed by rearrangement of the former current river ecosystems. The weevil assembly, as part of such a dynamic biocenose, develops following host macrophytes. In the frame of weevil fauna studies realized during 2001 and 2002 in wet habitats beside four artificial lakes in Central Serbia (Gruža, Grošnica, Šumarice and Bubanj, the aquatic adults from 13 species, divided into two families, Eryrhinidae (Tanysphyrus lemnae and Notaris scirpi and Curculionidae (Bagous bagdatensis, B. collignensis, B. lutulentus, Pelenomus canaliculatus, P. comari, P. waltoni, Phytobius leucogaster, Rhinoncus castor, R. inconspectus, R. pericarpius and R. perpendicularis, were collected. The quantitative and qualitative picture of the studied aquatic weevil assemblies, as well as indices of similarity among them, are given and related to the dimensions and ecological characteristics of studied aquatic systems (particularly the level of eutrophication. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 1252

  12. Xyleborus bispinatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) reared on artificial media using sawdust from avocado or silkbay in presence or absence of the laurel wilt pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xyleborus bispinatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was reported in Florida for the first time in 2013. Previously, it was unrecognized and not distinguished from the morphologically similar Xyleborus ferrugineus (F.). Like other members of the tribe Xyleborini, X. ferrugineus (and possibly X....

  13. Nonhost angiosperm volatiles and verbenone protect individual ponderosa pines from attack by western pine beetle and red turpentine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Christopher P. Dabney; Stepehen R. McKelvey; Dezene P.W. Huber

    2008-01-01

    Nonhost angiosperm volatiles (NAV) and verbenone were tested for their ability to protect individual ponderosa pines, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex. Laws., from attack by western pine beetle (WPB), Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, and red turpentine beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae). A combination of (

  14. Evaluation of lure combinations containing essential oils and volatile spiroketals for detection of host-seeking Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) vectors the fungal pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola) that causes laurel wilt, a disease responsible for widespread mortality of trees in the Lauraceae in the southeastern U.S. Early detection of in...

  15. Efficacy of “Verbenone Plus” for protecting ponderosa pine trees and stands from Dendroctonus brevicomis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attack in British Columbia and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Stephen R. McKelvey; Christopher P. Dabney; Dezene P.W. Huber; Cameron C. Lait; Donald L Fowler; John H. Borden

    2012-01-01

    The western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a major cause of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson, mortality in much of western North America. We review several years of research that led to the identification of Verbenone Plus, a novel four-component...

  16. Entomopathogenic fungi as a biological control agents for the vector of the laurel wilt disease, the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle (RAB), Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) vectors the fungal pathogen, Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt (LW), a lethal disease of trees in the family Lauraceae, including the most commercially important crop in this family, avocado, Pe...

  17. Efficacy of traps, lures, and repellents for Xylosandrus compactus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and other ambrosia beetles on Coffea arabica plantations and Acacia koa nurseries in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. G. Burbano; M.G. Wright; N.E. Gillette; S. Mori; N. Dudley; N. Jones; M. Kaufmann

    2012-01-01

    The black twig borer, Xylosandrus compactus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a pest of coffee and many endemic Hawaiian plants. Traps baited with chemical attractants commonly are used to capture ambrosia beetles for purposes of monitoring, studying population dynamics, predicting outbreaks, and mass trapping to reduce damage...

  18. Effect of trap type, trap position, time of year, and beetle density on captures of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Hanula; Michael Ulyshen; Scott Horn`

    2011-01-01

    The exotic redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), and its fungal symbiont Raffaellea lauricola Harrington, Fraedrich, and Aghayeva are responsible for widespread redbay, Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng., mortality in the southern United States. Effective traps and lures are needed to monitor spread of the beetle and...

  19. Variation in effects of Conophthorin on catches of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ethanol-baited traps in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Miller; K.J. Dodds; E.R. Hoebeke; T.M. Poland; E.A. Willhite

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, we examined the effects of conophthorin on flight responses of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) tomultiple-funnel traps baited with ethanol in Georgia,Michigan, New Hampshire, and Oregon. Adventive species (¼exotic, nonnative, immigrant, introduced) accounted for 91.4% of total catches of ambrosia beetles. Conophthorin increased catches...

  20. Biology of two members of the Euwallacea fornicatus species complex (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), recently invasive in the U.S.A., reared on an ambrosia beetle artificial diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Diet and rearing protocols were developed for two members of the cryptic Euwallacea fornicatus species complex, polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) and tea shot hole borer (TSHB) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), using sawdust from boxelder Acer negundo and avocado Persea americana. 2. Bio...

  1. Developing a Degree-Day Model to Predict Billbug (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Seasonal Activity in Utah and Idaho Turfgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Madeleine M; Powell, James A; Ramirez, Ricardo A

    2017-10-01

    Billbugs are native pests of turfgrass throughout North America, primarily managed with preventive, calendar-based insecticide applications. An existing degree-day model (lower development threshold of 10°C, biofix 1 March) developed in the eastern United States for bluegrass billbug, Sphenophorus parvulus (Gyllenhal; Coleoptera: Curculionidae), may not accurately predict adult billbug activity in the western United States, where billbugs occur as a species complex. The objectives of this study were 1) to track billbug phenology and species composition in managed Utah and Idaho turfgrass and 2) to evaluate model parameters that best predict billbug activity, including those of the existing bluegrass billbug model. Tracking billbugs with linear pitfall traps at two sites each in Utah and Idaho, we confirmed a complex of three univoltine species damaging turfgrass consisting of (in descending order of abundance) bluegrass billbug, hunting billbug (Sphenophorus venatus vestitus Chittenden; Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and Rocky Mountain billbug (Sphenophorus cicatristriatus Fabraeus; Coleoptera: Curculionidae). This complex was active from February through mid-October, with peak activity in mid-June. Based on linear regression analysis, we found that the existing bluegrass billbug model was not robust in predicting billbug activity in Utah and Idaho. Instead, the model that best predicts adult activity of the billbug complex accumulates degree-days above 3°C after 13 January. This model predicts adult activity levels important for management within 11 d of observed activity at 77% of sites. In conjunction with outreach and cooperative networking, this predictive degree-day model may assist end users to better time monitoring efforts and insecticide applications against billbug pests in Utah and Idaho by predicting adult activity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  2. Cross-resistance Patterns to Insecticides of Several Chemical Classes Among Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Populations With Different Levels of Resistance to Pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostromytska, Olga S; Wu, Shaohui; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M

    2018-02-09

    The annual bluegrass weevil (ABW), Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most damaging golf course insect pest in eastern North America. Heavy reliance on synthetic insecticides against this pest has led to widespread problems in controlling ABW with pyrethroid resistance already reported from populations in southern New England. This study evaluated the degree and scope of ABW resistance, determined existing cross-resistance patterns, and confirmed laboratory findings under greenhouse conditions. The susceptibility of 10 ABW populations to insecticides of different chemical classes was assessed in topical, feeding, and greenhouse assays. The level of susceptibility to pyrethroids varied significantly among populations (LD50s ranging 2.4-819.1 ng per insect for bifenthrin and 1.1-362.7 ng for λ-cyhalothrin in the topical assay). Three populations were relatively susceptible to pyrethroids, and seven populations had moderate to high resistance levels (RR50 for bifenthrin ranging 30.5-343.1). The toxicity of chlorpyrifos (RR50s ranging 3.3-15.3), spinosad (RR50s 2.4-7.7), clothianidin (RR50s 4.2-9.7), and indoxacarb (RR50s 2.8-9.7) was decreased for the pyrethroid-resistant populations. Toxicity data for bifenthrin and chlorpyrifos obtained under more realistic greenhouse conditions confirmed laboratory observations, indicating that the topical assay is an accurate method of detection and measurement of resistance level. The current study expanded the previously known geographic range of ABW pyrethroid resistance to include the New York metropolitan area, New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania and provided clear evidence of cross-resistance not only within the pyrethroid class but also to several other chemical classes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Danos de Conotrachelus dubiae (Coleoptera: curculionidae) em frutos de camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia) na Amazônia Central

    OpenAIRE

    Sidney Alberto do Nascimento Ferreira; Daniel Felipe de Oliveira Gentil; Neliton Marques da Silva

    2003-01-01

    No Brasil, a ocorrência de Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) em camu-camu [Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K.) McVaugh, Myrtaceae] tinha sido constatada somente em populações naturais. Relata-se sua ocorrência em um cultivo experimental, onde se avaliou os danos de C. dubiae em frutos de camu-camu, em diferentes graus de amadurecimento, entre 1999 e 2003. Os danos causados pela larva aumentaram com o amadurecimento dos frutos, havendo maior comprometimento da polpa do fruto ...

  4. A novel β-fructofuranosidase in Coleoptera: Characterization of a β-fructofuranosidase from the sugarcane weevil, Sphenophorus levis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedezzi, Rafael; Fonseca, Fernando P P; Santos Júnior, Célio Dias; Kishi, Luciano T; Terra, Walter R; Henrique-Silva, Flávio

    2014-12-01

    β-fructofuranosidases or invertases (EC 3.2.1.26) catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose into fructose and glucose. β-fructofuranosidases have been widely described in microorganisms, but were not known in the animal kingdom until very recently. There are studies reporting lepidopteran β-fructofuranosidases, but no β-fructofuranosidase gene sequence or encoding transcript has previously been identified in beetles. Considering the scarcity of functional studies on insect β-fructofuranosidases and their apparent non-occurrence among coleopterans, the aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and characterize a β-fructofuranosidase transcript identified in a cDNA library from the sugarcane weevil, Sphenophorus levis (Curculionidae). To validate that the β-fructofuranosidase sequence (herein denominated Sl-β-fruct) is indeed encoded by the S. levis genome, PCRs were performed using genomic DNA extracted from the larval fat body as well as DNA from the midgut with microbial content. Amplification of Sl-β-fruct gene using larval fat body DNA indicated its presence in the insect's genomic DNA. The Sl-β-fruct gene was cloned in Pichia pastoris to produce the recombinant enzyme (rSl-β-fruct). Molecular weight of the recombinant protein was about 64 kDa, indicating possible glycosylation, since the theoretical weight was 54.8 kDa. The substrate specificity test revealed that rSl-β-fruct hydrolyzes sucrose and raffinose, but not melibiose or maltose, thereby confirming invertase activity. The pH curve revealed greatest activity at pH 5.0, demonstrating rSl-β-fruct to be an acidic β-fructofuranosidase. Quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the production of mRNA only occurs in the midgut and reaches the greatest expression level in 30-day-old larvae, which is the expected pattern for digestive enzymes. Chromatography of glycosidases from S. levis midguts showed two enzymes acting as β-fructofuranosidase, indicating the presence of a

  5. Bulk de novo mitogenome assembly from pooled total DNA elucidates the phylogeny of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Conrad P D T; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Jordal, Bjarte H; Emerson, Brent C; Vogler, Alfried P

    2014-08-01

    Complete mitochondrial genomes have been shown to be reliable markers for phylogeny reconstruction among diverse animal groups. However, the relative difficulty and high cost associated with obtaining de novo full mitogenomes have frequently led to conspicuously low taxon sampling in ensuing studies. Here, we report the successful use of an economical and accessible method for assembling complete or near-complete mitogenomes through shot-gun next-generation sequencing of a single library made from pooled total DNA extracts of numerous target species. To avoid the use of separate indexed libraries for each specimen, and an associated increase in cost, we incorporate standard polymerase chain reaction-based "bait" sequences to identify the assembled mitogenomes. The method was applied to study the higher level phylogenetic relationships in the weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea), producing 92 newly assembled mitogenomes obtained in a single Illumina MiSeq run. The analysis supported a separate origin of wood-boring behavior by the subfamilies Scolytinae, Platypodinae, and Cossoninae. This finding contradicts morphological hypotheses proposing a close relationship between the first two of these but is congruent with previous molecular studies, reinforcing the utility of mitogenomes in phylogeny reconstruction. Our methodology provides a technically simple procedure for generating densely sampled trees from whole mitogenomes and is widely applicable to groups of animals for which bait sequences are the only required prior genome knowledge. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Susceptibility of fruit from diverse apple and crabapple germplasm to attack by plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Clayton T; Leskey, Tracy C; Forsline, Philip L

    2007-10-01

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is an important apple, Malus domestica Borkh., pest that significantly hinders sustainable apple production in eastern North America. The potential for host plant resistance to plum curculio among apple germplasm has never been rigorously evaluated. Thus, studies were conducted to assess the susceptibility of a number of exotic and domestic Malus accessions housed at the USDA Plant Genetic Resources Unit (PGRU) "core" collection in Geneva, NY. Contrary to earlier published reports and promising data from a field assessment in 2005, these results suggest that there is probably little potential for genetic resistance to plum curculio among the Malus germplasm collection evaluated. More specifically, four Malus hybrid selections that have previously been released with claims of plum curculio resistance were shown to be susceptible to plum curculio attack. Because there are additional accessions housed at PGRU outside of the core collection that are currently classified as resistant, further studies are necessary to evaluate the true resistance qualities of these releases. It is also important to clarify such discrepancies in both the USDA online Germplasm Resources Information Network and in the horticultural literature. Although other Malus species exhibited some variability in fruit susceptibility, none could be classified as being truly resistant to plum curculio attack by any definition that would have relevance to commercial production and sale of apples.

  7. Biological responses of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Steinernema carpocapsae (Nematoda: Steinernematidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manachini, Barbara; Schillaci, Domenico; Arizza, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier 1790) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is becoming a serious problem in Mediterranean areas where it is well-adapted, and now is present even in the United States (California). The infestations are primarily in urban areas where chemical control is not advisable and million of Euros are spent to control it. The effects of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) on mortality, growth, as well as the immune activity of R. ferrugineus larvae, were investigated. R. ferrugineus mortality exhibited a positive trend with the dosage and duration of exposure to S. carpocapsae. The median lethal dose and median lethal time, important to optimize the treatments, were calculated. S. carpocapsae also had a detrimental effect on R. ferrugineus weight. In vivo and in vitro effects of S. carpocapsae on the phagocytic responses of R. ferrugineus hemocytes also were recorded. S. carpocapsae was not encapsulated by R.ferrugineus hemocytes. After 24 h, the number of hemocytes recorded in treated larvae was reduced. To investigate the defensive abilities of R. ferrugineus humoral and cellular immune systems, specifically against the bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila (Enterobacteraceae), the minimum inhibitory concentration that inhibits bacterial growth was measured. This is the first time that this technique is applied to entomopathogenic bacteria.

  8. Impact of Cultivation and Subsequent Burial on Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Conotrachelus nenuphar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, William B.; Nelson, Peter N.; Grieshop, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of cultivation as a potential management strategy for codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in apple orchards. Cocooned codling moth pupae and thinning apples infested with plum curculio larvae were cultivated over in the field. Emergence, percent burial, damage to buried fruit, and depth of burial was recorded. In the laboratory, both insects were buried at variable depths in sand and potting soil and emergence was measured. A greater proportion of plum curculio larvae buried in infested fruit under laboratory conditions survived to adulthood compared with unburied infested fruit, down to 15 cm. No codling moth adults emerged from under 1 cm or more of sand. Buried codling moth larvae experienced drastically reduced survival to adulthood compared with unburied larvae. These results indicate that strip cultivation may negatively impact codling moth diapausing larvae and pupae on the ground, but not likely to negatively impact plum curculio in infested dropped apples. PMID:26470248

  9. Cold Tolerance of Mountain Pine Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Eggs From the Historic and Expanded Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiker, K P; Smith, G D; Humble, L M

    2017-10-01

    Winter mortality is expected to be a key factor determining the ability of mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), to expand its range in Canada. We determined the mortality rate and supercooling points of eggs from the beetle's historic range in southern British Columbia as well as the recently expanded range in north-central Alberta and tested if eggs require an extended period of chilling to reach their maximum cold tolerance. We found no effect of population source or acclimation time on egg cold tolerance. Although 50% of eggs can survive brief exposure to -20.5 °C (LT50), storage at 0.3 °C and -7.5 °C for 59 d resulted in 50% and 100% mortality, respectively. Our results indicate that eggs suffer significant prefreeze mortality and are not well-adapted to overwintering: eggs are unlikely to survive winter throughout much of the beetle's range. Our results provide information that can be used to help model the climatic suitability of mountain pine beetle, including how changes in seasonality associated with new or changing climates may affect winter survival. In addition to lower lethal temperatures, it is critical that the duration of exposure to sublethal cold temperatures are considered in a comprehensive index of cold tolerance and incorporated into survival and population models. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. ATIVIDADE INSETICIDA DE ÓLEOS VEGETAIS SOBRE Sitophilus zeamais MOTS. (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE EM MILHO ARMAZENADO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Leandro Braga de Castro Coitinho

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oils of andiroba (Carapa guianensis Aubl., copaiba (Copaifera sp., Eucaliptus globulus Labill. and Eucaliptus citriodora Hook., neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss, eugenol, souari nut (Caryocar brasiliense Camb., rosemary (Lippia gracillis HBK., and cedar (Cedrela fissilis Vell. were evaluated in adults of Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. In the non-choice test, 20 g of corn grains per plot were treated with 50¿L of each oil and homogenized for two minutes. The plot was infested with eight 0 to 15 days-old S. zeamais adults. The E. globulus, eugenol, rosemary, and neem oils caused 100% mortality in S. zeamais adults. Except for copaiba, all oils caused mortality above 87% and the reduction in emergence of 100%. In the free-choice tests, arenas consisting of two plastic containers symmetrically interconnected to a central box by two plastic tubes were used. Twenty grams of non-treated corn (control were placed in one of the boxes and the same amount of grain treated with 50¿L of each oil comprised the other treatment. Sixteen non-sexed S. zeamais adults (0-15 days old were released in the central box. The rosemary, E. citriodora, eugenol and copaiba oils were the most repellent for S. zeamais adults, with repellence percentage varying from 97.3 to 87.7. Rosemary, andiroba, neem, and cedar reduced S. zeamais emergence in 100%, while the reduction caused by the other oils ranged from 72.7 to 97.9%.

  11. Lack of genetic differentiation in aggressive and secondary bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Christopher J; Clancy, Karen M; Degomez, Tom E; McMillin, Joel D; Woolbright, Scott A; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M

    2008-06-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) play an important role as disturbance agents in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) forests of Arizona. However, from 2001 to 2003, elevated bark beetle activity caused unprecedented levels of ponderosa pine mortality. A better understanding of the population structure of these species will facilitate analysis of their dispersal patterns and improve management strategies. Here, we use fluorescently labeled amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP) analysis to resolve genetic variation among and within sampling locations in northcentral Arizona of Ips pini (Say), Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, and D. frontalis Zimmermann. We generated genetic fingerprints for >500 beetle specimens and analyzed genetic diversity. For all species, gene flow estimates among sampling locations were high, and significant population subdivision was not discernible across a large portion of ponderosa pine forests in Arizona. However, a weak relationship was detected with I. pini population structure and elevation. Because of the lack of genetic differentiation detected throughout the large study area, our findings suggest these insects are capable of long distance dispersal and exhibit a high degree of gene flow across a broad region. We conclude that our results are consistent with strong dispersal patterns and large population sizes of all three species.

  12. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to four bark beetle pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longwa; Clarke, Stephen R; Sun, Jianghua

    2009-04-01

    The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has caused extensive mortality of Pinus tabuliformis Carrière in north central China. The electrophysiological and behavioral activities of the four bark beetle pheromones, frontalin, exo-brevicomin, trans-verbenol, and cis-verbenol, singly or in combination with host-produced kairomones, were tested on red turpentine beetles. Both sexes showed a consistent electrophysiological response to the four test compounds. In Y-tube olfactometer bioassays, walking red turpentine beetles selected the host compound (+)-3-carene over any of the test compounds, but significantly higher numbers chose each tested pheromone over a blank control. The four compounds, tested singly or in combination, were not attractive to red turpentine beetles in field trapping studies in 2006 and 2007 and also did not significantly increase trap catch when combined with (+)-3-carene. Frontalin, alone or in combination with exo-brevicomin and trans-verbenol, significantly reduced the attractiveness of (+)-3-carene in 2006 but not in 2007. The possible roles of the pheromones in host and mate finding and selection are discussed.

  13. Naturally-Occurring Entomopathogenic Fungi on Three Bark Beetle Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavimira A. Draganova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae belong to one of the most damaging groups of forest insects and the activity of their natural enemies –pathogens, parasitoids,parasites or predators suppressing their population density,is of great importance. Biodiversity of entomopathogenic fungi on bark beetles in Bulgaria has been investigated sporadically. The aim of this preliminary study was to find, identify and study morphological characteristics of fungal entomopathogens naturally-occurring in populations of three curculionid species – Ips sexdentatus Boern, Ips typographus (L. and Dryocoetes autographus (Ratz.. Dead pest adults were found under the bark of Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies trees collectedfrom forests in the Maleshevska and Vitosha Mountains. Fungal pathogens were isolated into pure cultures on SDAY (Sabouraud dextrose agar with yeast extract and were identified based on morphological characteristics both on the host and in a culture.Morphological characteristics of the isolates were studied by phenotypic methods. The fungal isolates obtained from dead adults of Ips sexdentatus, Ips typographus and D. autographus were found to belong to the species Beauveria bassiana (Bals. – Criv. Vuillemin,Beauveria brongniartii (Saccardo Petch and Isaria farinosa (Holmsk. Fries (anamorph Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes: Hypocreales, Cordycipitaceae. Morphological traits of the isolates are described.

  14. Laboratory evaluation of flight performance of the plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Kaufmann, C; Scherm, H

    2006-12-01

    Flight performance of laboratory-reared adults of the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was investigated under controlled conditions by using a flight mill system. Across all insects tested (n=198), median values of total distance traveled, total flight time, and maximum uninterrupted flight time were 122.7 m day(-1), 23.5 min day(-1), and 2.0 min, respectively. The latter result indicates that flight occurred primarily in short bursts. Although females had a significantly higher body mass than males, there were no significant differences in flight performance between the two sexes. Flight during the first 24-h test period (especially the first 6 h) was dominated by escape behavior, i.e., elevated levels of activity presumably associated with attempts by the insects to regain freedom of movement; during the second 24 h, flight activity was very limited throughout the late morning and afternoon, increased around sunset, and remained high during the night. All flight performance variables decreased linearly and significantly with insect age over the age range tested (2-16 d after emergence). Nutritional status also had a significant effect, whereby insects that had been provided with apples as a food source for 2 d after emergence showed considerably improved flight performance compared with those that had been given no food or only water during the same period. There was no significant effect of mating status on flight performance of male or female insects.

  15. Curative activity of insecticides against plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in tart cherries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Eric J; Vandervoort, Christine; Wise, John C

    2009-10-01

    Tart cherry, Prunus cerasus L. variety Montmorency, fruit were infested with plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and treated with insecticides to target late instars, neonates, and eggs. The organophosphates azinphos-methyl and phosmet and the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam reduced larval emergence rates by >90% for all life stage targets; after >30 d, few surviving larvae were found inside fruit. Acetamiprid and thiacloprid also had curative activity and yielded >75% reductions in emergence and few surviving larvae in the fruit after >30 d. The juvenile hormone analog pyriproxyfen reduced larval emergence, but 66% of fruit that was treated to target late-instars still had live larvae inside of them after >30 d. Novaluron, chlorantraniliprole, and esfenvalerate had no curative activity. Indoxacarb had limited curative activity, and all targeted life stages had larval emergence. Internal and external residues were analyzed and are discussed in relation to their penetration and curative potential. The curative activity of azinphos-methyl has played an important role in meeting federal standards for infestation-free tart cherries at processing. Regulatory changes are eliminating the use of this compound, and new integrated pest management programs for plum curculio will need to address the loss of azinphos-methyl's curative activity.

  16. Odor-baited trap trees: a novel management tool for plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskey, Tracy C; Piñero, Jaime C; Prokopy, Ronald J

    2008-08-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), one of the most important pests of apple (Malus spp.) in eastern and central North America, historically has been managed in New England apple orchards by three full block insecticide applications. Efforts to reduce insecticide inputs against plum curculio include perimeter row sprays, particularly after petal fall, to control immigrating adults. The odor-baited trap tree approach represents a new reduced input strategy for managing plum curculio based on the application of insecticides to a few perimeter-row trap trees rather than the entire perimeter row or full orchard block. Here, we compared the efficacy of a trap tree approach with perimeter row treatments to manage populations after petal fall in commercial apple orchards in 2005 and 2006. Injury was significantly greater in trap trees compared with unbaited perimeter row treated trees in both years of the study. In 2005, heavy rains prevented growers from applying insecticide applications at regular intervals resulting in high injury in nearly all blocks regardless of type of management strategy. In 2006, both the trap-tree and perimeter-row treatments prevented penetration by immigrating populations and resulted in economically acceptable levels of injury. The trap tree management strategy resulted in a reduction of approximately 70% total trees being treated with insecticide compared with perimeter row sprays and 93% compared with standard full block sprays.

  17. Impact of Cultivation and Subsequent Burial on Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Conotrachelus nenuphar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, William B; Nelson, Peter N; Grieshop, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of cultivation as a potential management strategy for codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in apple orchards. Cocooned codling moth pupae and thinning apples infested with plum curculio larvae were cultivated over in the field. Emergence, percent burial, damage to buried fruit, and depth of burial was recorded. In the laboratory, both insects were buried at variable depths in sand and potting soil and emergence was measured. A greater proportion of plum curculio larvae buried in infested fruit under laboratory conditions survived to adulthood compared with unburied infested fruit, down to 15 cm. No codling moth adults emerged from under 1 cm or more of sand. Buried codling moth larvae experienced drastically reduced survival to adulthood compared with unburied larvae. These results indicate that strip cultivation may negatively impact codling moth diapausing larvae and pupae on the ground, but not likely to negatively impact plum curculio in infested dropped apples. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  18. Danos de Conotrachelus dubiae (Coleoptera: curculionidae em frutos de camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia na Amazônia Central Damage of camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia fruits by Conotrachelus dubiae (Coleoptera: curculionidae in Central Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Alberto do Nascimento Ferreira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, a ocorrência de Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em camu-camu [Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K. McVaugh, Myrtaceae] tinha sido constatada somente em populações naturais. Relata-se sua ocorrência em um cultivo experimental, onde se avaliou os danos de C. dubiae em frutos de camu-camu, em diferentes graus de amadurecimento, entre 1999 e 2003. Os danos causados pela larva aumentaram com o amadurecimento dos frutos, havendo maior comprometimento da polpa do fruto (30 a 90% do que das sementes (7%. A incidência desse inseto pode implicar em perdas quantitativas significativas na produção de camu-camu.In Brazil, the occurrence of Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in camu-camu [Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K. McVaugh, Myrtaceae] had only been verified in natural populations. This report describes its occurrence in an experimental cultivation, where damage of camu-camu fruits by C. dubiae at different ripening stages was evaluated between 1999 and 2003. The damage caused by the larva increased with the degree of ripening of the fruits, with greater damage of fruit pulp (30 to 90% than to seeds (7%. The incidence of this insect may cause significant quantitative losses in the camu-camu production.

  19. Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using MseI-N as primer, the enriched products were amplified, and then purified with a multifunctional DNA extraction kit (Bioteke Corporation, Beijing, China). The purified products were ligated into pMD19-T vector (Takara,. Dalian, China) and used to transform Escherichia coli strain. TOP10. Six hundred and eighty clones ...

  20. Effects of Hermetic Storage on Adult Sitophilus oryzae L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Acoustic Activity Patterns and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, A W; Mankin, R W; Smith, B W; Baributsa, D

    2017-10-16

    Hermetic storage is of interest to farmers and warehouse managers as a method to control insect pests in small storage facilities. To develop improved understanding of effects of hermetic storage on insect pest activity and mortality over time, oxygen levels, acoustic signals, and observations of visual movement were recorded from replicates of 25, 50, and 100 adult Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) hermetically sealed in 500- and 1,000-ml glass jars. Recordings were done for 28 d; twice daily for the first 6 d and twice weekly thereafter. Insect sounds were analyzed as short bursts (trains) of impulses with spectra that matched average spectra (profiles) of previously verified insect sound impulses. Oxygen consumption was highest in treatments of 100 insects/500-ml jar and lowest in 25/1000-ml jars. The rates of bursts per insect, number of impulses per burst, and rates of burst impulses per insect decreased as the residual oxygen levels decreased in each treatment. Activity rates <0.02 bursts s-1, the acoustic detection threshold, typically occurred as oxygen fell below 5%. Mortality was observed at 2% levels. The time to obtain these levels of insect activity and oxygen depletion ranged from 3-14 d depending on initial infestation levels. Acoustic detection made it possible to estimate the duration required for reduction of insect activity to levels resulting in negligible damage to the stored product under hermetic conditions. Such information is of value to farmers and warehouse managers attempting to reduce pest damage in stored crops. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  1. Impact of temperature on plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) responses to odor-baited traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskey, Tracy C; Zhang, Aijun

    2007-04-01

    In 2005, captures of overwintered adult plum curculios, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in standard black masonite pyramid traps deployed in apple (Malus spp.) orchards from half-inch green until fruit reached 7 mm and baited with known attractants did not result in significant captures compared with unbaited traps as they had in 2003 and 2004. These baits included the synthetic aggregation pheromone, grandisoic acid (GA) alone, a six-component synthetic host plant volatile combination (6-Tree) identified from foliar and woody tissues of a Stanley plum tree in combination with GA (6-Tree+GA), and the synthetic fruit volatile benzaldehyde (BEN) in combination with GA (BEN+GA). In 2005, the average daily temperature was below 13 degrees C, much cooler than in 2003 and 2004. We hypothesized that plum curculio could not discriminate between baited and unbaited traps because of reduced release rates of odor-bait stimuli due to their temperature-driven release system. From data collected from 2003 to 2005, we found that plum curculio captures in traps baited with GA alone, 6-Tree+GA, and BEN+GA were significantly related to temperature. We created a predictive model to determine the level of activity, i.e., trap captures in baited traps compared with unbaited traps, we would expect to observe at a particular temperature for these same odor stimuli. Our models predicts that at temperatures between approximately 11 to 13 degrees C we would expect to see no difference between captures in baited and unbaited traps. For captures in odor-baited traps to reach twice those in unbaited traps, our model predicts that temperatures must reach 19.2 degrees C for GA alone, 18.5 degrees C for 6-Tree+GA, and 15.8 degrees C for BEN+GA.

  2. Field evaluation of traps and lures for monitoring plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Alabama peaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akotsen-Mensah, Clement; Boozer, Robert; Fadamiro, Henry Y

    2010-06-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a key pest of peaches, Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, in North America. We evaluated the effectiveness of two widely used trap types (pyramid versus Circle traps) and commercially available synthetic lures for monitoring the pest in two peach orchards in Alabama during 2008 and 2009. The lures evaluated alone or in combinations included benzaldehyde (BZ) (a component of fruit odor), plum essence (PE) (a mixture of fruit odor extracted from food grade plum), and grandisoic acid (GA) (a male-produced aggregation pheromone of plum curculio). In general, pyramid traps captured more plum curculio adults than Circle traps, particularly during the first generation. Trap performance was improved numerically by the addition of BZ, PE, or GA alone (single lures) and was significantly enhanced by the addition of the combined BZ + PE lure. In both first and second generations, the combined BZ + PE lure increased plum curculio captures (significant in some trials) over unbaited traps and traps baited with single lures by approximately 1.5-21-fold and had the highest response indices (RIs), which is indicative of high attractiveness. The combined BZ + GA lure and the three-component BZ + PE + GA lure also captured numerically more plum curculio adults than unbaited traps or traps baited with single lures but the differences were rarely significant. Analysis of ratios of interaction suggests the possibility of synergistic interactions between BZ and PE and between BZ and GA; however, additive effects were concluded due to high sample errors. These results are discussed in relation to the physicochemical properties of the lures and the potential of using baited monitoring traps to aid plum curculio management decisions in peach orchards.

  3. Control of Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus Maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), Using Natural Plant Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiroesele, Bamphitlhi; Thomas, Kesegofetse; Seketeme, Seipati

    2014-12-31

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of natural products on the reproduction and damage of Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil, on cowpea seeds at Botswana College of Agriculture in Gaborone, Botswana. The cowpea variety Blackeye was used in the study. Fifty grams of each plant product (garlic, peppermint and chilies) was added to 500 g of the cowpea seeds. Findings of this experiment revealed that chilies and garlic had negative effects on cowpea weevils for all parameters measured. Peppermint also showed significant reduction in the F₁ progeny of the cowpea weevils but with less effect on weevils than garlic and chilies. The results indicate that these plant products have the potential to protect cowpea seeds from cowpea weevils' damage compared to when the seeds are left or stored unprotected. They should, therefore, be included in pest management strategies for cowpea weevil in grains stored on-farm in rural tropical and subtropical regions.

  4. Control of Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus Maculatus (F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae, Using Natural Plant Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamphitlhi Tiroesele

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of natural products on the reproduction and damage of Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil, on cowpea seeds at Botswana College of Agriculture in Gaborone, Botswana. The cowpea variety Blackeye was used in the study. Fifty grams of each plant product (garlic, peppermint and chilies was added to 500 g of the cowpea seeds. Findings of this experiment revealed that chilies and garlic had negative effects on cowpea weevils for all parameters measured. Peppermint also showed significant reduction in the F1 progeny of the cowpea weevils but with less effect on weevils than garlic and chilies. The results indicate that these plant products have the potential to protect cowpea seeds from cowpea weevils’ damage compared to when the seeds are left or stored unprotected. They should, therefore, be included in pest management strategies for cowpea weevil in grains stored on-farm in rural tropical and subtropical regions.

  5. Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae infesting mango trees (Mangifera indica L. in Southern Thailand, with two new species recorded for Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisut Sittichaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen species of ambrosia beetles and two bark beetle belonging to the curculionid subfamilies Scolytinae andPlatypodinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae were collected from three infested mango trees (Mangifera indica L. in theresearch orchards of the Faculty of Natural Resources, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla Province. Two species,Arixyleborus grandis (Schedl and Xyleborinus sculptilis (Schedl, are recorded for the first time in Thailand.

  6. Obrieniolus, a new monotypic genus of Naupactini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae from the Peruvian Andes and its phylogenetic placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Rio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new monotypic genus of Naupactini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Obrieniolus del Río is described based on the new species Obrieniolus robustus del Río, endemic to Peru. This genus is easily recognized by the black, denuded and shiny integument, with imbricate microsculpture and the rounded body, with short, cordiform and moderately convex elytra. According to a cladistic analysis based on 69 continuous and discrete morphological characters, the new genus is the sister taxon of a group formed by Amitrus Schoenherr, Trichocyphus Heller, Amphideritus Schoenherr, Asymmathetes Wibmer & O’Brien and Galapaganus Lanteri. The paper includes habitus photographs, line drawings of genitalia, mouthparts, and other external features of taxonomic value, and a dichotomous key to the genera of Naupactini distributed in the South American Transition Zone.

  7. Repellent Effect and Metabolite Volatile Profile of the Essential Oil of Achillea millefolium Against Aegorhinus nodipennis (Hope) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampe, J; Parra, L; Huaiquil, K; Mutis, A; Quiroz, A

    2015-06-01

    Aegorhinus nodipennis (Hope) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an important native pest in fruit crops that is mainly found in European hazelnut fields in the south of Chile. We investigated the behavioral response of A. nodipennis to volatile compounds released from the essential oil of Achillea millefolium and its main constituent using olfactometric bioassays. Gas chromatographic and mass spectral analysis of the A. millefolium essential oil revealed the presence of 11 compounds. Monoterpene β-thujone (96.2%) was the main component of the oil. Other compounds identified were α-thujone, 1,8-cineole, p-cymene, and 4-terpineol, all with percentages below 1%. Both A. millefolium essential oil and thujone exhibited a repellent activity against this insect at the higher doses tested (285.7 ng/cm(2)), demonstrating their potential as repellents for this species.

  8. Seasonal shifts in accumulation of glycerol biosynthetic gene transcripts in mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordie D. Fraser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Winter mortality is a major factor regulating population size of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. Glycerol is the major cryoprotectant in this freeze intolerant insect. We report findings from a gene expression study on an overwintering mountain pine beetle population over the course of 35 weeks. mRNA transcript levels suggest glycerol production in the mountain pine beetle occurs through glycogenolytic, gluconeogenic and potentially glyceroneogenic pathways, but not from metabolism of lipids. A two-week lag period between fall glycogen phosphorylase transcript and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript up-regulation suggests that gluconeogenesis serves as a secondary glycerol-production process, subsequent to exhaustion of the primary glycogenolytic source. These results provide a first look at the details of seasonal gene expression related to the production of glycerol in the mountain pine beetle.

  9. Seasonal shifts in accumulation of glycerol biosynthetic gene transcripts in mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Jordie D; Bonnett, Tiffany R; Keeling, Christopher I; Huber, Dezene P W

    2017-01-01

    Winter mortality is a major factor regulating population size of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Glycerol is the major cryoprotectant in this freeze intolerant insect. We report findings from a gene expression study on an overwintering mountain pine beetle population over the course of 35 weeks. mRNA transcript levels suggest glycerol production in the mountain pine beetle occurs through glycogenolytic, gluconeogenic and potentially glyceroneogenic pathways, but not from metabolism of lipids. A two-week lag period between fall glycogen phosphorylase transcript and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript up-regulation suggests that gluconeogenesis serves as a secondary glycerol-production process, subsequent to exhaustion of the primary glycogenolytic source. These results provide a first look at the details of seasonal gene expression related to the production of glycerol in the mountain pine beetle.

  10. Hylurgops Palliatus (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), An Eurasian Bark Beetle New to North America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoebeke, ERichard; Acciavatti, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    ..., Ohio, and Pennsylvania. This bark beetle was collected from baited Lindgren funnel traps, part of a USDA, Forest Service and APHIS National Early Detection Pilot Project surveying ports for exotic Curculionidae: Scolytinae...

  11. Basil oil fumigation increases radiation sensitivity in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) oil was tested against the stored product pest rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae(L.). Adult weevils were exposed to seven different concentrations of basil oil ranging from 0.12 µl/ml-0.60 µl/ml in Petri dishes and mortality was assessed at 3,4 and...

  12. Control of Cowpea Weevil, Callosobruchus Maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), Using Natural Plant Products

    OpenAIRE

    Bamphitlhi Tiroesele; Kesegofetse Thomas; Seipati Seketeme

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of natural products on the reproduction and damage of Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil, on cowpea seeds at Botswana College of Agriculture in Gaborone, Botswana. The cowpea variety Blackeye was used in the study. Fifty grams of each plant product (garlic, peppermint and chilies) was added to 500 g of the cowpea seeds. Findings of this experiment revealed that chilies and garlic had negative effects on cowpea weevils for al...

  13. Population fluctuation of Sternechus subsignatus Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae at its different development stages associated with soybean crop cycle in Tucumán, Argentina Fluctuación poblacional de Sternechus subsignatus Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en sus diferentes estados de desarrollo asociados con el ciclo del cultivo de soja en Tucumán, R. Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guillermina Socías

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Soybean stalk weevil Sternechus subsignatus Boheman 1836 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae population fluctuation was assessed during a three-year period in Northwestern Argentina (NOA. Both population fluctuation of adults, eggs and active larvae on soybean [Glycine max (L Merr] host plants, as well as overwintering forms in soil (larvae, pupae and adults, were recorded. S. subsignatus is a univoltine species, so its life cycle is annual and comprises an active phase, when the pest attacks soybean crops and another dormancy phase, when it remains buried in the soil. Adults were first observed in the crop from late November up to early March. From then onwards, S. subsignatus development stages where it remained associated with the host plant took place at definite times. The eggs appeared on plants from mid-January to the end of March. Larval period lasted from the end of January to the end of April, when larvae jumped onto the ground and buried themselves to spend the winter. Pupae were observed towards the end of September, and adults first appeared as October was drawing to a close. A new cicle began, with adults emerging in late November or early December. Thus, it was observed that S. subsignatus in the NOA region presents a single annual generation.La dinámica poblacional del picudo del tallo de la soja Sternechus subsignatus Boheman 1836 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae fue evaluada durante un periodo de estudio de tres años en el Noroeste Argentino (NOA. Se registró la fluctuación de adultos, huevos y larvas activas en el hospedero soja, además de las formas hibernantes en suelo, larva, pupa y adulto. El ciclo de vida de S. subsignatus es anual y comprende una fase activa, asociada al cultivo de la soja [Glycine max (L Merr], y otra fase de latencia, durante la cual la plaga permanece en el suelo, sin entrar en contacto con el cultivo. Los primeros adultos se observan en campo desde finales de noviembre y hasta los primeros días de marzo. A

  14. Molecular Markers Detect Cryptic Predation on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Silvanid and Laemophloeid Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in Coffee Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sheina B; Yoneishi, Nicole M; Brill, Eva; Geib, Scott M; Follett, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide. It was first detected in Hawai'i in 2010. Two predatory beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and Leptophloeus sp. (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae), have been observed in H. hampei-infested coffee. Under laboratory conditions, colony-reared C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. prey upon all life stages of H. hampei. However, the H. hampei life cycle occurs almost exclusively within a coffee bean obscured from direct observation. Thus, it is unknown if C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. consume H. hampei as prey in the wild. To demonstrate predation of H. hampei by C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp., a molecular assay was developed utilizing species-specific primers targeting short regions of the mitochondrial COI gene to determine species presence. Using these primers, wild C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. were collected and screened for the presence of H. hampei DNA using PCR. Analysis of collections from five coffee farms revealed predation of C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. on H. hampei. Further laboratory testing showed that H. hampei DNA could be detected in predators for as long as 48 h after feeding, indicating the farm-caught predators had preyed on H. hampei within 2 d of sampling. This study demonstrates the utility of molecular markers for the study of the ecology of predators and prey with cryptic behavior, and suggests C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. might be useful biocontrol agents against H. hampei. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Taxonomic redescription and biological notes on Diaugia angusta (Diptera, Tachinidae): parasitoid of the palm boring weevils Metamasius ensirostris and M. hemipterus (Coleoptera, Dryophthoridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Silvio Shigueo; Pavarini, Ronaldo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Diaugia angusta Perty, 1833 is a Neotropical species of Tachinidae (Diptera) reported here as a parasitoid of Metamasius ensirostris (Germar, 1824) and Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) in Brazil. Several species of Dryophthoridae and Curculionidae cause damage to bromeliad and palm species, and most are regarded as pests. In the present study, the male and female of Diaugia angusta are morphologically characterized and illustrated to provide a means for the identification of this parasitoid. Data obtained from preliminary field research show that natural parasitism of Metamasius pupae by Diaugia angusta varies by year but can reach nearly 30%. A network of parasitoid-host interactions among tachinid parasitoids and coleopteran hosts reported as bromeliad and palm pests (Dryophthoridae and Curculionidae) in the Americas indicates that the species of the tribe Dexiini sensu lato (including Diaugia angusta) might be promising as biological control agents of these pests. PMID:21594164

  16. Tipos de Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea depositados en la colección entomológica del Museo de La Plata Types of Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea housed at the Museo de La Plata entomological collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía A. Lanteri

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta contribución referida al material tipo de Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea depositado en la colección entomológica del Museo de La Plata, actualiza la información sobre los tipos depositados durante los últimos diez años. Los 111 tipos examinados en este trabajo corresponden a 52 especies asignadas a las siguientes subfamilias: Curculioninae (5 spp., Cryptorhynchinae (8 spp., Cyclominae (4 spp., Entiminae (31 spp., y Erirhininae (4 spp.. Los autores de las especies son C. Bordón, W. Clark, K. Heller, A. Lanteri, J. Morrone, C. O'Brien, P. Posadas, F. Ocampo, y G. Wibmer. Se brinda el nombre válido y el original de cada especie, la referencia bibliográfica correspondiente, la categoría de tipo de cada espécimen, su número de código de acuerdo con las reglas de la colección, el sexo de los especímenes si está indicado, toda la información registrada en las etiquetas, y datos adicionales sobre las condiciones de conservación de los ejemplares.This contribution about types of Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea housed at the Museo de La Plata (MLP, updates the information on the material incorporated to the collection during the last ten years. The 111 types examined herein, correspond to 52 species assigned to the following subfamilies: Curculioninae (5 spp., Cryptorhynchinae (8 spp., Cyclominae (4 spp., Entiminae (31 spp., and Erirhininae (4 spp.. The authors of the species are C. Bordón, W. Clark, K. Heller, A. Lanteri, J. Morrone, C. O'Brien, P. Posadas, F. Ocampo, and G. Wibmer. The information provided is as follows: valid and original names of each species, bibliographic references, category of the types, code-numbers according to the rules of the MLP collection, sex of the specimens when it is determined, data on the labels (exact transcription, and additional information on the conservation of the type specimens.

  17. Host-associated genetic differentiation in a seed parasitic weevil Rhinusa antirrhini (Coleptera: Curculionidae) revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vera, Gerardo; Mitrović, Milana; Jović, Jelena; Tosevski, Ivo; Caldara, Roberto; Gassmann, Andre; Emerson, Brent C

    2010-06-01

    Plant feeding insects and the plants they feed upon represent an ecological association that is thought to be a key factor for the diversification of many plant feeding insects, through differential adaptation to different plant selective pressures. While a number of studies have investigated diversification of plant feeding insects above the species level, relatively less attention has been given to patterns of diversification within species, particularly those that also require plants for oviposition and subsequent larval development. In the case of plant feeding insects that also require plant tissues for the completion of their reproductive cycle through larval development, the divergent selective pressure not only acts on adults, but on the full life history of the insect. Here we focus attention on Rhinusa antirrhini (Curculionidae), a species of weevil broadly distributed across Europe that both feeds on, and oviposits and develops within, species of the plant genus Linaria (Plantaginaceae). Using a combination of mtDNA (COII) and nuclear DNA (EF1-alpha) sequencing and copulation experiments we assess evidence for host associated genetic differentiation within R. antirrhini. We find substantial genetic variation within this species that is best explained by ecological specialisation on different host plant taxa. This genetic differentiation is most pronounced in the mtDNA marker, with patterns of genetic variation at the nuclear marker suggesting incomplete lineage sorting and/or gene flow between different host plant forms of R. antirrhini, whose origin is estimated to date to the mid-Pliocene (3.77 Mya; 2.91-4.80 Mya).

  18. Response to host volatiles by native and introduced populations of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in North America and China.  Journal of Chemical Ecology 33: 131-146.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Erbilgin; S.R. Mori; J.H. Sun; J.D. Stein; D.R. Owen; L.D. Merrill; R. Campos Bolande; os; K.F. Raffa; T. Mendez Montiel; D.L. Wood; N.E.  Gillette

    2007-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) have specialized feeding habits, and commonly colonize only one or a few closely related host genera in their geographical ranges. The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, has a broad geographic distribution in North America and exploits volatile cues from a wide variety of pines...

  19. Effects of the diet on the microbiota of the red palm weevil (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Montagna

    Full Text Available Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, also known as the red palm weevil, is regarded as the major pest of palm trees. Although studies of the microbiota associated with this species have been performed in recent years, little attention has been dedicated to the influence of the diet in shaping the host bacterial community. Here, we investigated the influence of food sources (i.e. palm tissues vs apple based substrate on the microbial diversity associated with RPW, which was compared with the microbiota associated with wild individuals of the sister species Rhynchophorus vulneratus. The bacterial characterization was performed using a culture independent approach, i.e. the 16S rRNA pyrotag, and a culture dependent approach for a subset of the samples, in order to obtain bacterial isolates from RPW tissues. The bacterial community appeared significantly influenced by diet. Proteobacteria resulted to be the most abundant clade and was present in all the specimens of the three examined weevil groups. Within Proteobacteria, Enterobacteriaceae were identified in all the organs analysed, including hemolymph and reproductive organs. The apple-fed RPWs and the wild R. vulneratus showed a second dominant taxon within Firmicutes that was scarcely present in the microbiota associated with palm-fed RPWs. A comparative analysis on the bacteria associated with the palm tissues highlighted that 12 bacterial genera out of the 13 identified in the plant tissues were also present in weevils, thus indicating that palm tissues may present a source for bacterial acquisition.

  20. Effects of the Diet on the Microbiota of the Red Palm Weevil (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae)

    KAUST Repository

    Montagna, Matteo

    2015-01-30

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, also known as the red palm weevil, is regarded as the major pest of palm trees. Although studies of the microbiota associated with this species have been performed in recent years, little attention has been dedicated to the influence of the diet in shaping the host bacterial community. Here, we investigated the influence of food sources (i.e. palm tissues vs apple based substrate) on the microbial diversity associated with RPW, which was compared with the microbiota associated with wild individuals of the sister species Rhynchophorus vulneratus. The bacterial characterization was performed using a culture independent approach, i.e. the 16S rRNA pyrotag, and a culture dependent approach for a subset of the samples, in order to obtain bacterial isolates from RPW tissues. The bacterial community appeared significantly influenced by diet. Proteobacteria resulted to be the most abundant clade and was present in all the specimens of the three examined weevil groups. Within Proteobacteria, Enterobacteriaceae were identified in all the organs analysed, including hemolymph and reproductive organs. The apple-fed RPWs and the wild R. vulneratus showed a second dominant taxon within Firmicutes that was scarcely present in the microbiota associated with palm-fed RPWs. A comparative analysis on the bacteria associated with the palm tissues highlighted that 12 bacterial genera out of the 13 identified in the plant tissues were also present in weevils, thus indicating that palm tissues may present a source for bacterial acquisition.

  1. Economic injury level for the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) using attractive traps in Brazilian coffee fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, F L; Picanço, M C; Campos, S O; Bastos, C S; Chediak, M; Guedes, R N C; Silva, R S

    2011-12-01

    The currently existing sample procedures available for decision-making regarding the control of the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are time-consuming, expensive, and difficult to perform, compromising their adoption. In addition, the damage functions incorporated in such decision levels only consider the quantitative losses, while dismissing the qualitative losses. Traps containing ethanol, methanol, and benzaldehyde may allow cheap and easy decision-making. Our objective was to determine the economic injury level (EIL) for the adults of the coffee berry borer by using attractant-baited traps. We considered both qualitative and quantitative losses caused by the coffee borer in estimating the EILs. These EILs were determined for conventional and organic coffee under high and average plant yield. When the quantitative losses caused by H. hampei were considered alone, the EILs ranged from 7.9 to 23.7% of bored berries for high and average-yield conventional crops, respectively. For high and average-yield organic coffee the ELs varied from 24.4 to 47.6% of bored berries, respectively. When qualitative and quantitative losses caused by the pest were considered together, the EIL was 4.3% of bored berries for both conventional and organic coffee. The EILs for H. hampei associated to the coffee plants in the flowering, pinhead fruit, and ripening fruit stages were 426, 85, and 28 adults per attractive trap, respectively.

  2. Efficacy of two systemic insecticides injected into loblolly pine for protection against southern pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosman, Donald M; Clarke, Stephen R; Upton, William W

    2009-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of systemic insecticides emamectin benzoate and fipronil for preventing mortality of individual loblolly pines, Pinus taeda L., as a result of attacks by southern pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) for two consecutive years in Mississippi (2005-2006) and Alabama (2006-2007). Trees were injected once in the spring of 2005 (Mississippi) or 2006 (Alabama) and then were baited with species-specific bark beetle lures several weeks later. The southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, was the target species but was changed to Ips spp. in Mississippi (but not Alabama) the second year because of few southern pine beetle attacks on baited trees. Single injections of emamectin benzoate were effective in reducing tree mortality caused by bark beetles compared with untreated checks. Although less effective overall, fipronil also significantly reduced tree mortality from southern pine beetle compared with the checks during the second year in Alabama. Tree mortality continued well after the lures had been removed. Evaluations of bolts taken from experimental trees killed in 2006 indicated that emamectin benzoate effectively prevented parent bark beetle gallery construction and that fipronil significantly reduced lengths of galleries constructed by adult beetles, brood development, and emergence, compared with checks. In contrast, neither insecticide treatment prevented the bark beetles from inoculating blue stain fungi, Ophiostoma spp., into treated trees.

  3. Impact of trap architecture, adjacent habitats, abiotic factors, and host plant phenology on captures of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Gérald; Chouinard, Gérald; Vincent, Charles; Cormier, Daniel

    2007-06-01

    Pyramid traps, 2.44 m and 3.66 m in height, were compared with standard-sized pyramid traps, 1.22 m in height, to assess the impact of trap architecture on captures of adult plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in two apple (Malus spp.) orchards and a blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) planting. The effects of adjacent habitat (organic orchard versus wooded areas), abiotic factors, and phenological stages of apple also were assessed to determine whether these variables influenced trap captures. Standard-sized pyramidal traps captured significantly more adults than larger trap variants. In the apple orchards, most adults (70-80%) were captured before petal fall with the exception of blocks adjacent to the organic orchard (25%). Significantly more adults were captured along the edge of an apple orchard (managed using an integrated pest management strategy) facing an organic apple orchard (76%) than along the edge facing wooded areas (24%). There was a significant positive correlation between daily trap captures and mean daily temperatures before petal fall in apple orchards.

  4. An annotated checklist of Platypodinae and Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Roger A; Ghahari, Hassan; Sanguansub, Sunisa

    2016-04-07

    We provide an annotated checklist of species of bark and ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Platypodinae and Scolytinae) recorded from Iran, with information on distribution, host trees, biology and taxonomy. Two species of Platypodinae and 79 species of Scolytinae are recorded. Hypothenemus crudiae (Panzer, 1791), Scolytus koenigi Schevyrew, 1890 and Xyleborus monographus Fabricius, 1792 are recorded for the first time from Iran. Previous records of three further species are considered dubious and require confirmation.

  5. NOTES ON THE TAXONOMY OF TWO LITTLE KNOWN TAXA OF CURCULIO LINNAEUS, 1758 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Caldara; Michael Košťál; Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Two actions preserve taxal nomenclatural stability within Curculionidae in accordance with the Code. Following the provisions of ICZN Article 23.9.1 Curculio pellitus (Boheman, 1843) (formerly Balaninus) becomes a nomen protectum and Curculio gulosus Fabricius, 1792 a nomen oblitum; Curculio villosus Fabricius, 1781 becomes a nomen protectum and Curculio cerasorum Fabricius, 1775 a nomen oblitum. Having met the conditions of ICZN Article 74 and Article 75, the lectotypes of Curculio gulosus F...

  6. Predation by Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae) on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Hawaii coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee berry borer(CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and a new invasive pest in Hawaii. Adult flat bark beetles, mainly Leptophloeus sp.(75%) and Cathartus quadricollis(21%) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae and Silvanidae, respectively), were found feeding in CBB-infested c...

  7. Effect of Bait Quantity and Trap Color on the Trapping Efficacy of the Pheromone Trap for the Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus

    OpenAIRE

    Abuagla, Abdullah Mohamed; Al-Deeb, Mohammad Ali

    2012-01-01

    The red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Curculionidae: Coleoptera), is not native to the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Since its arrival in 1985, it has been causing major damage to date palm trees. A primary control strategy has been the use of pheromone baited traps. The objectives of this study were to determine the quantity of bait, and the best trap color, to obtain the maximum catch of R. ferrugineus under field conditions in the UAE. Traps with 100, 300, or 500 g of dat...

  8. Sitona lineatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Feeding on Pisum sativum L. Affects Soil and Plant Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo, Héctor A.; Herle, Carolyn E.; Lupwayi, Newton Z.

    2015-01-01

    Adults of Sitona lineatus (pea leaf weevil, PLW) feed on foliage of several Fabaceae species but larvae prefer to feed on nodules of Pisum sativum L. and Vicia faba L. Indirectly, through their feeding on rhizobia, weevils can reduce soil and plant available nitrogen (N). However, initial soil N can reduce nodulation and damage by the weevil and reduce control requirements. Understanding these interactions is necessary to make integrated pest management recommendations for PLW. We conducted a greenhouse study to quantify nodulation, soil and plant N content, and nodule damage by weevil larvae in relation to soil N amendment with urea, thiamethoxam insecticide seed coating and crop stage. PLWs reduced the number of older tumescent (multilobed) nodules and thiamethoxam addition increased them regardless of other factors. Nitrogen amendment significantly increased soil available N (>99% nitrate) as expected and PLW presence was associated with significantly lower levels of soil N. PLW decreased plant N content at early flower and thiamethoxam increased it, particularly at late flower. The study illustrated the complexity of interactions that determine insect herbivory effects on plant and soil nutrition for invertebrates that feed on N-fixing root nodules. We conclude that effects of PLW on nodulation and subsequent effects on plant nitrogen are more pronounced during the early growth stages of the plant. This suggests the importance of timing of PLW infestation and may explain the lack of yield depression in relation to this pest observed in many field studies. Also, pea crops in soils with high levels of soil N are unlikely to be affected by this herbivore and should not require insecticide inputs. PMID:26106086

  9. Laboratory and field efficacy of entomopathogenic fungi for the management of the sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius (Coleoptera: Brentidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Gadi V P; Zhao, Zihua; Humber, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    The sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius (F.) (Coleoptera: Brentidae), is one of the most important pests of sweet potatoes in the world. With free trade between the United States and the U.S.-controlled Mariana Islands, C. formicarius has spread along with this commodity. Because of the cryptic nature of the larvae and nocturnal activity of the adults, and the cancellation of long-residual pesticides, this pest has become increasingly difficult to control. Therefore, the present study sought to explore and to compare the effectiveness of Metarhizium brunneum F52 (90ml a.i./ha), Beauveria bassiana GHA (40ml a.i./ha), spinosad (90g a.i./ha), azadirachtin (1484ml a.i./ha), B. bassiana+M. brunneum (20ml a.i./ha+45ml a.i./ha), B. bassiana+azadirachtin (20ml a.i./ha+742ml a.i./ha), B. bassiana+spinosad (20ml a.i./ha+45ml a.i./ha), M. brunneum+azadirachtin (45ml a.i./ha+742ml a.i./ha) and M. brunneum+spinosad (45ml a.i./ha+45 grams a.i./ha) in controlling this pest in both the laboratory and the field. The treatment with B. bassiana+M. brunneum was the most effective in reducing tuber damage by C. formicarius, producing the highest yields. The most adult cadavers were found in plots treated with the combination of two fungi. This combined fungal formulation appears to be appropriate for the practical control of C. formicarius on sweet potatoes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitoring attack and flight activity of Xylosandrus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): the influence of temperature on activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Michael E; Ranger, Christopher M; Oliver, Jason B; Schultz, Peter B

    2013-08-01

    Wood-boring ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), including Xylosandrus spp., are key pests in ornamental nurseries. Knowledge of their activity in spring is important for nursery growers to effectively time their protective sprays. We measured the reliability of ethanol-baited bottle traps for monitoring emergence of overwintered Xylosandrus spp. in ornamental nurseries. Detection of initial flight activity by traps was compared with initial attacks on ethanol-injected trap trees. To develop tools for forecasting Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) activity, the relationships between temperature and their attack and flight activity were examined, and the bloom sequence of ornamental plants was examined as phenological indicators of X. germanus emergence in Ohio. Captures of X. germanus coincided with attacks on trap trees on seven of eight occasions over 2 yr in four nurseries. Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motshulsky) were detected in only one nursery and captures coincided with attacks each year. There was a strong relationship between maximum daily temperatures 20 and 21degrees C and X. germanus attack and flight activity. No attack or flight activity were detected in a monitoring period unless there were 1 or 2 d of at least 20 degrees C. Emergence of X. germanus always began after and within 6 d of full bloom on Cornelian cherry dogwood, and usually after and within 4 d of first bloom on Norway maple and full bloom on border forsythia. The traps or phenological indicators can be used by growers to monitor emergence of X. germanus to time their initial protective sprays. The relationship between X. germanus activity and temperature can be used by growers to make decisions on timing subsequent treatments.

  11. Simple and Efficient Trap for Bark and Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Facilitate Invasive Species Monitoring and Citizen Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, M S; Hulcr, J; Šigut, M; Lucky, A

    2015-06-01

    Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae & Platypodinae) are among the most damaging forest pests worldwide, and monitoring is essential to damage prevention. Unfortunately, traps and attractants that are currently used are costly, and agencies rely on limited field personnel for deployment. The situation can be greatly aided by 1) the development of cost-effective trapping techniques, and 2) distribution of the effort through the Citizen Science approach. The goal of this study was to test a simple, effective trap that can be made and deployed by anyone interested in collecting bark and ambrosia beetles. Three trap types made from 2-liter soda bottles and, separately, four attractants were compared. Simple, one-window traps performed comparably at capturing species in traps painted or with multiple windows. A comparison of attractants in two-window traps found that 95% ethanol attracted the highest number of species but that Purell hand sanitizer (70% ethanol) and then Germ-X hand sanitizer (63% ethanol) were also effective. A perforated zip-top plastic bag containing Purell hanging over a trap filled with automobile antifreeze attracted the fewest species and individual specimens. Overall, >4,500 bark and ambrosia beetles, including 30 species were captured, representing a third of the regional species diversity. More than three quarters of the specimens were nonnative, representing nearly half of the known regional exotic species. These results suggest that simple one-window soda bottle traps baited with ethanol-based hand sanitizer will be effective and inexpensive tools for large-scale monitoring of bark and ambrosia beetles. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Virulência de nematóides entomopatogênicos (Nematoda: Rhabditida a Sphenophorus levis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Fernando Henrique Carvalho Giometti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O bicudo da cana-de-açúcar, Sphenophorus levis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, é uma importante praga de solo dos canaviais no Estado de São Paulo, ocasionando prejuízos de até 30 t de cana/ha/ano. Visando ao controle biológico desta praga, esse estudo teve por objetivo avaliar a virulência de 17 isolados de nematóides entomopatogênicos do gênero Steinernema e Heterorhabditis contra adultos de S. levis, e o efeito dos quatro nematóides mais virulentos em três dosagens cada um. A pesquisa foi realizada em condições de laboratório, sendo realizados quatro ensaios para o estudo de virulência. Os nematóides selecionados como mais virulentos em cada teste foram S. brazilense IBCB n6, Heterorhabditis sp. IBCB n10, Heterorhabditis sp. IBCB n24 e Heterorhabditis sp. IBCB n44, sendo os únicos que diferenciaram significativamente das respectivas testemunhas com 45%, 40%, 20% e 31% de mortalidade do inseto na concentração de 240 juvenis infectivos (JI/inseto. No teste de dose, os isolados de Heterorhabditis identificados como IBCB n10, IBCB n24 e IBCB n44 destacaram-se quanto à virulência para os adultos do bicudo da cana-de-açúcar, diferindo significativamente da testemunha na maior dose avaliada (1200 JI/inseto com níveis de mortalidade do inseto de 60%, 65,7% e 74,3% respectivamente.

  13. Precise and low-cost monitoring of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pest activity in pyramid traps with cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, R D; Gage, S H; Whalon, M E

    2014-04-01

    Incorporating camera systems into insect traps potentially benefits insect phenology modeling, nonlethal insect monitoring, and research into the automated identification of traps counts. Cameras originally for monitoring mammals were instead adapted to monitor the entrance to pyramid traps designed to capture the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Using released curculios, two new trap designs (v.I and v.II) were field-tested alongside conventional pyramid traps at one site in autumn 2010 and at four sites in autumn 2012. The traps were evaluated on the basis of battery power, ease-of-maintenance, adaptability, required-user-skills, cost (including labor), and accuracy-of-results. The v.II design fully surpassed expectations, except that some trapped curculios were not photographed. In 2012, 13 of the 24 traps recorded every curculio entering the traps during the 18-d study period, and in traps where some curculios were not photographed, over 90% of the omissions could be explained by component failure or external interference with the motion sensor. Significantly more curculios entered the camera traps between 1800 and 0000 hours. When compared with conventional pyramid traps, the v.I traps collected a similar number of curculios. Two observed but not significant trends were that the v.I traps collected twice as many plum curculios as the v.II traps, while at the same time the v.II traps collected more than twice as many photos per plum curculio as the v.I traps. The research demonstrates that low-cost, precise monitoring of field insect populations is feasible without requiring extensive technical expertise.

  14. Field efficacy against the hazelnut weevil, Curculio nucum and short-term persistence of entomopathogenic nematodes

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    L. Batalla-Carrera

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The hazelnut weevil, Curculio nucum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae is a pest affecting hazelnut orchards in Europe, with an important economical repercussion. Its potential control, short-term field persistence and the vertical distribution of native entomopathogenic nematode strains were tested in Muntanyes de Prades, Tarragona (NE Iberian Peninsula over two consecutive years. Steinernema feltiae strain D114, Steinernema sp. strain D122 and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora strain DG46 were used in summer and spring applications at a dosage of 5·105 IJs m-2. The three nematode species reduced the hazelnut weevil population, ranging from 32% to 88% efficacy, without significant differences in efficacy or between the two applications. Persistence evaluation was carried out during 9 weeks for S. feltiae (D114, Steinernema sp. (D122 and H. bacteriophora (DG46 and showed all species capable of lasting for this period. Nematodes and larval vertical distribution was assessed. Most of the hazelnut weevil stayed within the first 25 cm although some were found as deep as 40 cm. Entomopathogenic nematodes were found along all 40 cm depth. This study proves the suitability of entomopathogenic nematodes to control the hazelnut weevil.

  15. NOTES ON THE TAXONOMY OF TWO LITTLE KNOWN TAXA OF CURCULIO LINNAEUS, 1758 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Roberto Caldara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two actions preserve taxal nomenclatural stability within Curculionidae in accordance with the Code. Following the provisions of ICZN Article 23.9.1 Curculio pellitus (Boheman, 1843 (formerly Balaninus becomes a nomen protectum and Curculio gulosus Fabricius, 1792 a nomen oblitum; Curculio villosus Fabricius, 1781 becomes a nomen protectum and Curculio cerasorum Fabricius, 1775 a nomen oblitum. Having met the conditions of ICZN Article 74 and Article 75, the lectotypes of Curculio gulosus Fabricius, 1792 and Curculio cerasorum Fabricius, 1775, and the neotype of Curculio villosus Fabricius, 1781 are designated. The following new synonymy is proposed: Curculio pellitus (Boheman, 1843 = Curculio gulosus Fabricius 1792 n. syn. and the synonymy Curculio villosus Fabricius, 1781 = Curculio cerasorum Fabricius, 1775 is confirmed

  16. Insecticidal activity of 2-tridecanone against the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae

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    Yussef F.B. Braga

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2-tridecanone vapor on the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus development was determined. Seeds of cowpea were infested with adults and exposed to different doses of 2-tridecanone isolated from Pilocarpus microphyllus Stapf ex Holm, a plant species native from northeastern Brazil. The pure monoterpene was evaluated both undiluted as well as in the dilutions 1:10, 1:100 and 1:1,000 (v/v. The following parameters of the cowpea weevil life cycle were analyzed in response to decreasing doses of 2-tridecanone: number of eggs laid, percentage of egg hatching on seeds, percentage of adult emergence, adult weight at emergence, mean developmental time and number of adults emerged. Vapor of 2-tridecanone caused a significant (P O efeito dos vapores da 2-tridecanona sobre o caruncho do feijão-de-corda (Callosobruchus maculatus foi avaliado. Sementes de feijão-de-corda infestados com insetos adultos foram expostas a diferentes doses de 2-tridecanona isolada de Pilocarpus microphyllus, uma espécie nativa do Nordeste do Brasil. O monoterpeno puro foi utilizado nas diluições 1:10, 1:100 e 1:1000 (v/v. Os parâmetros da biologia do inseto foram analisados em função da resposta a doses decrescentes de 2-tridecanona: número de ovos postos por fêmea, percentagem de eclosão de ovos, percentagem de emergência de adultos, peso dos adultos recém-emergidos, tempo médio de desenvolvimento e número total de ovos emergidos. Diferenças significativas (P < 0.05 entre as doses de 2-tridecanona testadas foram observadas, para quatro dos seis parâmetros biológicos analisados. Os resultados obtidos indicaram que a 2-tridecanona é tóxica para C. maculatus, reduzindo significativamente (P < 0.05 o número de insetos emergidos após a infestação. Esse efeito foi causado principalmente pela significativa redução observada na eclosão dos ovos expostos ao vapor da substância.

  17. Flutuação Populacional de Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em Plantios de Palma de Óleo em Roraima

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    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como objetivo avaliar a flutuação populacional de Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em plantios de Elaeis guineensis Jacq, em ecossistemas de savana e floresta no estado de Roraima. A pesquisa foi desenvolvida durante o período de janeiro de 2011 a fevereiro de 2012 nos campos experimentais da Embrapa Roraima: Monte Cristo e Caroebe, numa área de 2 hectares com a cultura da Palma de Óleo, em cada campo. Foram distribuídas armadilhas iscadas com roletes de cana-de-açúcar e feromônio de agregação para captura dos insetos no entorno dos plantios. Ocorreu flutuação de R. palmarum com picos populacionais nos meses de julho e agosto no ecossistema de savana e de abril a setembro no ambiente de floresta. A população de R. palmarum foi menor em meses de baixa precipitação pluviométrica nos dois ambientes avaliados com a Palma de Óleo em Roraima Population Fluctuation of Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Plantations of Oil Palm in Roraima Abstract. This research aimed to evaluate the population fluctuation Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Elaeis guineensis Jacq plantations in forest and savanna ecosystems in the state of Roraima. The research was conducted during the period from January 2011 to February 2012 in the experimental field of Embrapa Roraima: Monte Cristo and Caroebe in an area of 2 hectares with culture Oil Palm in each field. Traps baited with rollers cane sugar and aggregation pheromone for capturing insects in the vicinity of the plantations were distributed. Fluctuation occurred R. palmarum with population peaks in the months of July and August in the savanna ecosystem and from April to September in the forest environment. The population of R. palmarum was lower in months of low rainfall in the two environments assessed with a palm-oil-in Roraima.

  18. Screening of extracts of leaves and stems of Psychotria spp. (Rubiaceae) against Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) for maize protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Wagner de Souza; Grazziotti, Geisel Hudson; de Souza Júnior, Amauri Alves; de Sousa Freitas, Silvia; Consolaro, Hélder Nagai; Ribeiro, Paulo Eduardo de Aquino; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2013-11-01

    Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are important economic pests of corn, Zea mays (Poaceae). Psychotria spp. (Rubiaceae) plants are rich in secondary metabolites that could be toxic against such pests. We have screened extracts from four species of Psychotria abundant in the Cerrado (Savannah-type) biome of Brazil for the toxicity to two insects. We found that extracts from leaves and stems had significant effects on the hatching rate, parameters of caterpillar body (weight and length and width of head capsule), repellency, and mortality of these two pests, although the effects varied according to the Psychotria species and plant source (stem or leaf). Extracts of the stems of Psychotria hoffmannseggiana and of Psychotria capitata were more toxic to S. zeamais and the stems of Psychotria goyazensis to S. frugiperda; therefore, such extracts could have the potential for use in integrated pest management schemes.

  19. Simulação do dano causado por larvas de Oryzophagus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae a cultivares de arroz irrigado

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    Martins José Francisco da Silva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Oryzophagus oryzae (Costa Lima, 1936 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae é a praga-chave da cultura do arroz irrigado na Região Sul do Brasil. As larvas causam os principais danos ao cortarem drasticamente as raízes das plantas. Dois experimentos sobre simulação do dano larval foram realizados testando um equipamento cujo componente principal é uma lâmina metálica em forma de U, para corte das raízes. Raízes das cultivares BR-Irga 414 e Bluebelle, de ciclo biológico curto, e suscetíveis ao inseto e BR-Irga 410 e Dawn, de ciclo médio e resistentes, foram submetidas aos tratamentos de (1 corte artificial, com o simulador, (2 corte natural, pelas larvas e (3 sem corte, artificial ou natural, protegidas com inseticida. A simulação foi praticada na fase vegetativa das plantas, 31 dias pós-irrigação por inundação, época do pico da população larval nas raízes. Avaliaram-se dados sobre comprimento, peso de matéria seca e volume de raízes, imediatamente após a aplicação do tratamento de simulação e na pré-emissão de panículas, população larval em plantas submetidas ao dano natural, e produtividade de grãos. Na avaliação efetuada imediatamente após a simulação, em todas as cultivares, não ocorreu diferença entre índices de dano às raízes resultantes do uso do simulador e da alimentação de larvas. Na fase de pré-emissão das panículas, os índices de recuperação do sistema radicular das plantas submetidas aos danos natural e artificial, também foram similares. As cultivares de ciclo médio apresentaram maior recuperação dos tecidos radiculares e menor perda de produtividade de grãos, confirmando o maior grau de resistência a O. oryzae. Concluiu-se que o método de simulação é aplicável em pesquisas sobre resistência de arroz ao inseto, principalmente na identificação de genótipos tolerantes.

  20. The genus Prothrombosternus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae) rediscovered: a male from Rubeho Mountains, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Vasily V

    2016-09-26

    A male specimen of the monotypic weevil genus, Prothrombosternus Voss, 1965, so far known on the basis of only five syntypes from Mt. Meru and Mt. Hanang, Tanzania, is reported from the Rubeho Mountains, Tanzania. The lectotype of Prothrombosternus tarsalis Voss, 1965 is designated using a male from Mt. Meru. The Rubeho specimen shares the same external and genital morphological characters with the lectotype (both extensively illustrated) and, therefore, both are considered conspecific. The DNA barcode of the Rubeho specimen is publicly available at dx.doi.org/10.5883/DS-PROTHRO. All six known specimens of Prothrombosternus are flightless and were found by sifting leaf litter at elevations between 1833-2500 m in wet Afromontane forests. The genus is, therefore, thought to be restricted to this highly fragmented habitat threatened by human encroachment. Presence of the genus on both geologically old (Rubeho Mountains; >10Ma) and young (Mt. Meru and Mt. Hanang volcanoes, <2Ma) forested highlands suggests presently unknown means of dispersal. The phylogenetic position of the genus is unknown and its taxonomic placement in Cycloterini cannot be presently tested.

  1. Identification of pigmented Serratia marcescens symbiotically associated with Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrascia, Maria; Pazzani, Carlo; Valentini, Franco; Oliva, Marta; Russo, Valentina; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Porcelli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    To characterize red pigment-producing bacteria (RPPB) regularly released during oviposition by red palm weevil (RPW), RPPB were recovered from eggs deposited in apples supplied as substrate for oviposition. The presence of RPPB was also detected from gut, the reproductive apparatus of dissected adult and virgin insects and from pupal cases collected within infested palms. RPPB were also identified all along the tissue of these palms. Analysis of the 16S rDNA, gyrB, rpoB, recA, and groEL sequences assigned RPPB to the species Serratia marcescens. RPPB exhibited an antimicrobial activity assessed by the agar well diffusion method against a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we first report the identification of a red pigment-producing S. marcescens as extracellular symbiont of RPW. Route of transmission, detection within different organs, and a wide spread along the infested palm tissue, suggested S. marcescens is present as extracellular symbiont in different developmental stages of the RPW. Additionally, the antimicrobial activity exhibited versus Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., and Lysinibacillus spp., reported as insect pathogens and potential candidates for biocontrol agents, could ascribe for S. marcescens a potential protective role. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Respiratory metabolic responsiveness during the pupal stage of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to certain plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bream, A S; Ghoneim, K S; Tanani, M A; Nassar, M I

    2001-01-01

    The prepupae of Rhynchophorus ferrugineous were topically applied with one of three dose-levels (0.1, 0.005 or 0.001 microgram/insect) of Jojoba oil (Joj) or azadirachtin (Azt). The daily O2 consumption and CO2 respiratory output were determined and the respiratory quotient (RQ) was calculated. After Joj treatments, O2 consumption of early- and late pupae increased as the dose-level was decreased. The respiration curve did not assume an U-shaped pattern as common in the pupal stage of many insect species. Also, an inhibitory action of Azt on the pupal respiration has been clearly exhibited. A similar result of the respiration curve was observed by Azt. All dose levels of Joj, but only the higher two ones of Azt, suppressed the CO2 release. Both botanicals inhibited the RQ during the pupal stage. However, all RQ mean values of treated or control pupae were 0.7.

  3. Effects of herbivory by Diaprepes abbreviatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larvae on four woody ornamental plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cliff G; Mannion, Catharine; Schaffer, Bruce

    2009-06-01

    The hypothesis that herbivory by Diaprepes root weevil larvae reduces leaf gas exchange and biomass was tested on buttonwood (Conocarpus erectus L.), Surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.), mahogany (Swietenia mahagoni Jacq.), and pond apple (Annona glabra L). For Surinam cherry, net CO2 assimilation, transpiration, and stomatal conductance, but not internal CO2 concentration (collectively referred to as leaf gas exchange values), were 7-32% higher in noninfested than infested plants. For buttonwood, all four gas exchange values were 10-54% higher for noninfested than infested plants 3 h after infestation with large, seventh-instar larvae. However, by 4 wk after this infestation, net CO2 assimilation, transpiration, and stomatal conductance, but not internal CO2 concentration, were 11-37% higher for infested than for noninfested plants. For mahogany and pond apple, there were few or no significant differences in leaf gas exchange values between infested and noninfested plants. For all species, mean shoot and root fresh and dry weights were higher for noninfested than infested plants, with the differences most significant for buttonwood (37-85% higher), followed by Surinam cherry (37-143% higher), mahogany (49-84% higher), and pond apple (24-46% higher), which had no significant differences. There were significant differences among plant species in mean head capsule widths, thus larval instars, of larvae recovered from soil with the largest larvae from Surinam cherry (2.59 +/- 0.19 mm) and the smallest from mahogany (2.29 +/- 0.06 mm). Based on differences in leaf gas exchange and plant biomass between infested and noninfested plants of the four species tested, buttonwood and Surinam cherry are the most vulnerable to feeding by Diaprepes larvae followed by mahogany then pond apple.

  4. Susceptibility and Immune Defence Mechanisms of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae against Entomopathogenic Fungal Infections

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    Abid Hussain

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Insects infected with entomopathogenic fungi, experience physiological changes that influence their growth and immune defence. The potential of nine isolates of entomopathogenic fungi was evaluated after determining percent germination and relative conidial hydrophobicity. However, nutritional indices were evaluated after immersing eighth-instar Rhynchophorus ferrugineus larvae into each isolate suspension (1 × 107 conidia/mL. The results showed that isolates B6884 and M9374 had 44.51% and 39.02% higher conidial hydrophobicity compared with isolate I03011 (least virulent. The results of nutritional index assays revealed a significant reduction in growth indices after infection with different isolates. Compared with control, B6884 and M9374 greatly decreased larval growth by reducing the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (36%–47% and Efficacy of conversion of digested food (50%–63%. Furthermore, only isolate B6884 induced 100% mortality within 12 days. Compared with control, isolate I03011, possessing the lowest conidial hydrophobicity, only reduced 0.29% of the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (ECI and 0.48% of the efficacy of conversion of digested food (ECD. Similarly, transcriptomic analysis of genes related to the Red palm weevil (RPW immune response, including pathogen recognition receptors (C-type lectin and endo-beta-1,4-glucanse, signal modulator (Serine protease-like protein, signal transductors (Calmodulin-like protein and EF-hand domain containing protein and effectors (C-type lysozyme, Cathepsin L., Defensin-like protein, Serine carboxypeptidase, and Thaumatin-like protein, was significantly increased in larval samples infected with B6884 and M9374. These results suggest that for an isolate to be virulent, conidial hydrophobicity and germination should also be considered during pathogen selection, as these factors could significantly impact host growth and immune defence mechanisms.

  5. Taxonomy and cladistics of the group of genera related to Cyrtomon Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Naupactini

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    ANALÍA A. LANTERI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En esta contribución se actualiza la información taxonómica y geográ- fica sobre cinco géneros de gorgojos (Curculionidae: Entiminae: Naupactini dis- tribuidos en Argentina, Brasil, Bolivia, Paraguay y Uruguay. Como resultado de un análisis cladístico basado en 48 caracteres morfológicos y 18 taxones terminales (dos del grupo externo y 16 del grupo en estudio se obtuvo un árbol de máxima parsimonia con dos subgrupos principales, uno formado por Mendozella Hustache como taxón hermano de Cyrtomon Schoenherr, y otro por Lamprocyphopsis Lan- teri, Priocyphopsis Lanteri y Priocyphus Hustache. De acuerdo con este resultado Cyrtomon hirsutus (Hustache es la especie hermana de Mendozella curvispinis (Hustache, en consecuencia se estableció la nueva combinación Mendozella hir - suta (Hustache, y se establece que el género Mendozella incluye actualmente dos especies, ambas distribuidas en Mendoza, Argentina. Cyrtomon se recuperó como grupo monofilético con seis species, C. gibber (Pallas, C. pistor (Boheman, C. luridus (Boheman, C. inhalatus (Germar, C. ovalipennis (Hustache y C. glaucus (Bovie. Priocyphus es monofilético e incluye cinco species, P. bosqi Hustache, P. hustachei Kuschel, P. inops Kuschel, P. kuscheli Lanteri y la especie nueva Prio- cyphus cordobensis; Lamprocyphopsis incluye dos especies, L. viridinitens (Kus- chel y L. paraguayensis Lanteri; y Priocyphopsis es monotípico, con la especie tipo P. humeridens (Hustache como grupo hermano de Priocyphus . Se brindan diagnosis de todos los géneros, una clave para la identificación de todas las espe- cies y fotografías de hábitos, en la mayoría de los casos de sus ejemplares tipo. Se ilustran los caracteres diagnósticos de la cabeza y rostro, tibias anteriores y genita- lia con dibujos lineales. Se describen por primera vez los genitales de la hembra de Mendozella hirsuta y los genitales masculinos de Priocyphus kuscheli.

  6. Elucidating the Common Generalist Predators of Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in an Organic Apple Orchard Using Molecular Gut-Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jason M; Szendrei, Zsofia; Grieshop, Matthew

    2016-06-24

    Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), plum curculio, is a serious direct pest of North American tree fruit including, apples, cherries, peaches and plums. Historically, organophosphate insecticides were used for control, but this tool is no longer registered for use in tree fruit. In addition, few organically approved insecticides are available for organic pest control and none have proven efficacy as this time. Therefore, promoting biological control in these systems is the next step, however, little is known about the biological control pathways in this system and how these are influenced by current mechanical and cultural practices required in organic systems. We used molecular gut-content analysis for testing field caught predators for feeding on plum curculio. During the study we monitored populations of plum curculio and the predator community in a production organic apple orchard. Predator populations varied over the season and contained a diverse assemblage of spiders and beetles. A total of 8% of all predators (eight Araneae, two Hemiptera, and six Coleoptera species) assayed for plum curculio predation were observed positive for the presence of plum curculio DNA in their guts, indicating that these species fed on plum curculio prior to collection Results indicate a number of biological control agents exist for this pest and this requires further study in relation to cultural practices.

  7. Pectinases from Sphenophorus levis Vaurie, 1978 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): putative accessory digestive enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Danilo Elton; de Paula, Fernando Fonseca Pereira; Rodrigues, André; Henrique-Silva, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall in plants offers protection against invading organisms and is mainly composed of the polysaccharides pectin, cellulose, and hemicellulose, which can be degraded by plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). Such enzymes are often synthesized by free living microorganisms or endosymbionts that live in the gut of some animals, including certain phytophagous insects. Thus, the ability of an insect to degrade the cell wall was once thought to be related to endosymbiont enzyme activity. However, recent studies have revealed that some phytophagous insects are able to synthesize their own PCWDEs by endogenous genes, although questions regarding the origin of these genes remain unclear. This study describes two pectinases from the sugarcane weevil, Sphenophorus levis Vaurie, 1978 (Sl-pectinases), which is considered one of the most serious agricultural pests in Brazil. Two cDNA sequences identified in a cDNA library of the insect larvae coding for a pectin methylesterase (PME) and an endo-polygalacturonase (endo-PG)-denominated Sl-PME and Sl-endoPG, respectively-were isolated and characterized. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction expression profile for both Sl-pectinases showed mRNA production mainly in the insect feeding stages and exclusively in midgut tissue of the larvae. This analysis, together Western blotting data, suggests that Sl-pectinases have a digestive role. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Sl-PME and Sl-endoPG sequences are closely related to bacteria and fungi, respectively. Moreover, the partial genomic sequences of the pectinases were amplified from insect fat body DNA, which was certified to be free of endosymbiotic DNA. The analysis of genomic sequences revealed the existence of two small introns with 53 and 166 bp in Sl-endoPG, which is similar to the common pattern in fungal introns. In contrast, no intron was identified in the Sl-PME genomic sequence, as generally observed in bacteria. These

  8. Does white clover (Trifolium repens abundance in temperate pastures determine Sitona obsoletus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae larval populations?

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    Mark Richard McNeill

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine if host plant abundance determined the size of clover root weevil (CRW Sitona obsoletus larval populations, a study was conducted over four years in plots sown in ryegrass (Lolium perenne (cv. Nui sown at either 6 or 30 kg/ha and white clover (Trifolium repens sown at a uniform rate of 8 kg/ha. This provided a range of % white clover content to investigate CRW population establishment and impacts on white clover survival. Larval sampling was carried out in spring (October when larval densities are near their spring peak at Lincoln (Canterbury, New Zealand with % clover measured in autumn (April and spring (September of each year. Overall, mean larval densities measured in spring 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 were 310, 38, 59 and 31 larvae m-2, respectively. There was a significant decline in larval populations between 2012 and 2013, but spring populations were relatively uniform thereafter. The mean % white clover measured in autumns of 2012 to 2015 was 17, 10, 3 and 11%, respectively. In comparison, mean spring % white clover from 2012 to 2015, averaged c. 5% each year. Analysis relating spring (October larval populations to % white clover measured in each plot in autumn (April found the 2012 larval population to be statistically significantly larger in the ryegrass 6 kg/ha plots than 30 kg/ha plots. Thereafter, sowing rate had no significant effect on larval populations. From 2013 to 2015, spring larval populations had a negative relationship with the previous autumn % white clover with the relationship highly significant for the 2014 data. When CRW larval populations in spring 2013 to 2015 were predicted from the 2013 to 2015 autumn % white clover, respectively, based on their positive relationship in 2012, the predicted densities were substantially larger than those observed. Conversely, when 2015 spring larval data and % clover was regressed against 2012-2014 larval populations, observed densities tended to be higher than predicted

  9. Variation in C:N:S stoichiometry and nutrient storage related to body size in a holometabolous insect (Curculio davidi) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Small, Gaston E; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Donger; Li, Hongwang; Liu, Chunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Body size can be an important factor controlling consumer stoichiometry. In holometabolous insects, body size is typically associated with nutrient storage. Consumer stoichiometry is known to vary within species across a range of body sizes; however, the contribution of nutrient storage to this variation is not well understood. We used the fifth-instar larvae of the oak weevil (Coleoptera: Curculio davidi Fairmaire), which is characterized by a high capacity for nutrient storage, to investigate the effect of shifts in nutrient storage with body mass on variations in larva stoichiometry. Our results showed that weevil larvae with larger body mass had a lower carbon (C) content, reflecting decreases in the sequestration rate of C-rich lipids. Larger larvae had elevated concentrations of nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and protein. The similar patterns of variation in elemental composition and macromolecule storage with body weight indicate that the shift in nutrient storage is the main factor causing the variation in larval stoichiometry with body weight. This finding was further supported by the low variation in residual larval biomass C, N, and S concentrations after lipid extraction. These results help decipher the physiological mechanism of stoichiometric regulation in growing organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  10. Atividade inseticida do óleo essencial de Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. & K. Shum (Bignoneaceae sobre Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Insecticide activity of the essencial oil Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. & K. Shum (Bignoneaceae on Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Murilo Fazolin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O óleo essencial extraído de folhas frescas de Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur.& K. Shum por destilação de arraste a vapor foi avaliado quanto à toxicidade a Sitophilus zeamais Motsch., principal praga do milho armazenado. Papel de filtro e grãos de milho foram impregnados pelo óleo para se avaliar o efeito por via de contato (papel-filtro e fumigação, respectivamente. Para avaliação do efeito da aplicação tópica 0,5 µl das diferentes concentrações do óleo foram aplicadas em adultos do inseto. A partir de uma ampla faixa de concentrações, foram determinadas as mais promissoras para os bioensaios definitivos. Na determinação das dose/concentrações-letais (DL50 e CL50 foi utilizada a análise de Probit, realizando-se também, uma análise de regressão linear conjunta de todos os dados de mortalidade. O óleo de T. nocturnum foi considerado tóxico para S. zeamais baseado nos seguintes valores: CL50 de 14,1 ng.cm-2 e CL50 de 1.321,6 ng.g-1 de grãos para os efeitos de contacto (papel-filtro e fumigação, respectivamente, e DL50 de 14,7 µg.mg-1 de inseto para efeito tópico. Porcentagens de mortalidade próximas a 100 % foram obtidas nas concentrações de: 2 e 5 % (m/v (contato, 3 4, e 5 % (m/v (fumigação e 10 % (m/v para o efeito de aplicação tópica. O presente estudo mostrou que o ácido cianídrico, liberado do óleo essencial de T. nocturnum por hidrólise, pode ter atividade inseticida para S. zeamais e que concentrações acima de 4 % (m/v são promissoras no controle do inseto.Insecticidal activities of Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. & K. Shum (Bignoneaceae essential oil against Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. The essential oil extracted from fresh leaves of the Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur.& K. Shum by steam distillation, was tested against maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motsch.. Filter paper and maize grains impregnation was employed, for contact and fumigant

  11. On-farm management practices against rice root weevil (Echinocnemus oryzae Marshall

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    Rakesh Pandey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice is the staple food of over half the world's population and occupies almost one-fifth of the global cropland under cereals. The rice root weevil, Echinocnemus oryzae Marshall, (Coleoptera: Curculionidae has posed a problem in paddy cultivation areas in India. The damage by this root weevil results in a significant decrease in root and shoot biomass and ultimately the yield of rice plants. Studies were conducted to test the effective management practices of rice root weevil using a seedling treatment with chlorpyriphos alone and in combination with a soil application of chlorpyriphos, fipronil and cartap hydrochloride during 2013 and 2014. The benefit:cost (B:C ratio was also determined from the marketable yield and cost of treatments incurred in the technology to justify the economic viability of the appropriate technology management against E. oryzae. Reductions in tillers/hill (35.2% and 26.27% and, in panicles/hill (44.0% and 31.96% were observed during 2013 and 2014, respectively. The least number of root weevils (3.67 and 3.13 were observed in comparison to no root weevil management practice (23.53 and 32.53 during 2013 and 2014, respectively, from the treatment of seedlings prior to transplanting with chlorpyriphos at 3 mL/L of water followed by soil application with cartap hydrochloride at 20 kg/ha. The highest numbers of tillers/hill (25.00 and 23.60, numbers of panicles/hill (20.00 and 19.40, yield (5.41 t/ha and 4.57 t/ha and B:C ratio (1.75 and 1.48 were also observed from the same treatment during 2013 and 2014, respectively.

  12. Recent developments in the use of acoustic sensors and signal processing tools to target early infestations of red palm weevil (Coleopter: Curculionidae) in agricultural environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much of the damage caused by red palm weevil larvae to date palms, ornamental palms, and palm offshoots could be mitigated by early detection and treatment of infestations. Acoustic technology has potential to enable early detection, but the short, high-frequency sound impulses produced by red palm ...

  13. Minimal effective dose of phosphine to control the cashew root borer, Marshallius bondari Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Dose mínima efetiva de fosfina no controle da broca-da-raiz do cajueiro, Marshallius bondari Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Ervino Bleicher

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine, in field conditions, the minimal of phosphine effective dose for the cashew root borer control. Three experiments were set up at three different periods: August, October and November, 1994, to control the cashew root borer, Marshallius bondari Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, in Piaui State, Brazil. One, two, three and six phosphine tablets of three gram each, per plant were tested. In the August essay, phosphine was inefficient to control the borer. In the October essay, control was achieved using as little as 2 tablets per plant and in November with one tablet per plant to control the adult borers in the soil. Higher efficiency was achieved when treatment was applied far away from the last rain, in other words, as soil dries out.Objetivou-se determinar, em condições de campo, a dose mínima de fosfina para o controle da broca da raiz do cajueiro. Foram instalados 3 experimentos em épocas distintas, sendo o primeiro em agosto, o segundo em outubro e o terceiro em novembro de 1994 para o controle de Marshallius bondari Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em cajueiro, Anacardium occidentale L. no município de Pio IX, Estado do Piauí. Foram testadas 1; 2; 3 e 6 pastilhas de fosfina na forma de fosfeto de alumínio, de 3 gramas cada, por planta. No ensaio conduzido em agosto nenhum tratamento foi eficiente para o controle de brocas adultas no solo. No ensaio instalado em outubro, a fosfina foi eficiente a partir de duas pastilhas por planta e no ensaio de novembro a partir de uma pastilha por planta para o controle de adultos no solo. A eficiência foi tanto maior quanto maior foi o tempo decorrido após a última chuva, estando, portanto, o solo mais seco.

  14. Large-scale confirmatory tests of a phytosanitary irradiation treatment against Sternochetus frigidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Philippine mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obra, Glenda B; Resilva, S S; Follett, P A; Lorenzana, L R J

    2014-02-01

    The mango pulp weevil, Sternochetus frigidus (F.), is an important quarantine pest preventing the export of mangoes from the Philippines to the United States and other countries. Previously, a radiation dose of 100 Gy was proposed for phytosanitary treatment of S. frigidus based on dose-response studies with larvae, pupae, and adult weevils. To validate an irradiation treatment, large-scale confirmatory tests were conducted with adults (the most radiation-tolerant stage) in mangoes at 100 and 150 Gy. After treatment, adults were removed from fruit, sexed, and mated in pairs to observe any reproduction. At 100 Gy, adults laid a small number of eggs but none of the eggs hatched. At 150 Gy (measured doses 96.7-164.1 Gy),4,559 treated weevils laid no eggs, indicating that this dose caused complete sterility. Irradiation treatment with a minimum absorbed dose of 165 Gy will therefore provide quarantine security for S. frigidus in exported Philippine mangoes.

  15. Distribución de los barrenadores de la semilla del aguacate Conotrachelus aguacatae Barber y C. perseae Barber (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) en los Municipios de Tacámbaro, Tocumbo, Cotija, Susupuato y Ziracuaretiro, Michoacán.

    OpenAIRE

    Francia Rico, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    La presencia de los barrenadores de la semilla del aguacate Conotrachelus aguacatae Barber y C. perseae Barber (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) en México, ha provocado restricciones fitosanitarias para la exportación del aguacate, situación que afecta principalmente al estado de Michoacán. Dada la importancia de la plaga, se propuso conocer el patrón de distribución actual de los barrenadores de la semilla del aguacate a través del uso del Sistema de Posicionamiento Global (GPS...

  16. Control of Pecan Weevil With Microbial Biopesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Cottrell, Ted E; Bock, Clive; Mai, Kim; Boykin, Debbie; Wells, Lenny; Hudson, William G; Mizell, Russell F

    2017-09-23

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a key pest of pecans Carya illinoinensis ([Wangenh.] K. Koch) (Fagales: Juglandaceae). Control recommendations rely on broad spectrum chemical insecticides. Due to regulatory and environmental concerns, effective alternatives for C. caryae control must be sought for pecan production in conventional and organic systems. We explored the use of microbial biopesticides for control of C. caryae in Georgia pecan orchards. Three experiments were conducted. The first investigated an integrated microbial control approach in an organic system at two locations. Three microbial agents, Grandevo (based on byproducts of the bacterium Chromobacterium subtsugae Martin, Gundersen-Rindal, Blackburn & Buyer), the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser), and entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, were applied to each treatment plot (0.6 ha) at different times during the season. A second experiment compared the effects of S. carpocapsae and B. bassiana applied as single treatments relative to application of both agents (at different times); survival of C. caryae was assessed approximately 11 mo after larvae were added to pots sunk in an organic pecan orchard. In a conventional orchard (with 1.0 ha plots), the third experiment compared Grandevo applications to a commonly used regime of chemical insecticides (carbaryl alternated with a pyrethroid). All experiments were repeated in consecutive years. The combined pest management tactic (experiment 1) reduced C. caryae infestation relative to non-treated control plots in both locations in 2014 and one of the two locations in 2015 (the other location had less than 1% infestation). In experiment 2, no differences among combined microbial treatments, single-applied microbial treatments or different numbers of application were observed, yet all microbial treatments reduced C. caryae survival relative to the control. In the third

  17. Timing and host plant associations in the evolution of the weevil tribe Apionini (Apioninae, Brentidae, Curculionoidea, Coleoptera) indicate an ancient co-diversification pattern of beetles and flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sven; Friedman, Ariel L L; Astrin, Jonas J; Gottsberger, Brigitte; Letsch, Harald

    2017-02-01

    Host plant shifts of insects can lead to a burst of diversification driven by their arrival in a new adaptive zone. In this context, our study aims to explore timing and patterns in the evolution of the weevil tribe Apionini (Brentidae, Curculionoidea, Coleoptera), particularly in relation to affiliations with their host plants. The classification of Apionini is difficult because of their relatively uniform appearance. Most taxa live mono- or oligophagously on members of Asteraceae or Fabaceae, but many are associated with other plant families, like Lamiaceae, Malvaceae and Polygonaceae. However, a comprehensive hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the tribe Apionini is still missing. In the present study, we reconstructed trees and estimated divergence times among tribes. These results were further used to reconstruct the ancestral host plant use in Apionini weevils and to infer if the divergence timing of putative subtribes corresponds with the occurrence and radiation of their specific host plant groups. Phylogenetic analyses confirm the monophyly of most subtribes, with the exceptions of Oxystomatina, Kalcapiina and Aspidapiina. The subribe Aplemonina is inferred to be sister to all remaining Apionini. Divergence time estimates indicate the first occurrence of Apionini in the Upper Cretaceous and a simultaneous occurrence of several families of flowering plants and the occupation by Apionini weevil herbivores. These conspicuous coincidences support either an ancient co-diversification scenario or an escalating diversification in weevils induced by the radiation of flowering plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of ipsdienol, ipsenol, and cis-verbenol in chemical ecology of Ips avulsus, Ips calligraphus, and Ips grandicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Jeremy D; McKenney, Jessica L; Miller, Daniel R; Gimmel, Matthew L

    2012-06-01

    Stressed or damaged pine (Pinus sp.) trees in the southeastern United States are often colonized simultaneously by three southern Ips species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): small southern pine engraver, Ips avulsus (Eichhoff); sixspined ips, Ips calligraphus (Germar); and eastern fivespined ips, Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff). All three species mediate colonization of host material with volatile pheromones. All of the southern Ips produce cis-verbenol, and either ipsdienol or ipsenol, and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated that all three southern Ips are able to detect all three compounds. This study examined the role of ipsdienol, ipsenol, and cis-verbenol in the chemical ecology of the southern Ips in Georgia and Louisiana. The most attractive blends of pheromones, with the fewest number of components, were ipsdienol plus ipsenol for I. avulsus, cis-verbenol plus ipsdienol for I. calligraphus, and either cis-verbenol plus ipsenol or ipsdienol plus ipsenol for I. grandicollis. Cross-attraction of I. grandicollis to the pheromone blend most attractive to I. avulsus was observed. Although the presence of heterospecific pheromone reduced the catches of all three species (i.e., the tertiary blend captured fewer beetles than the most attractive binary blends) in both states (significantly in two cases), high numbers of all three species were still captured in traps baited with all three compounds. These results suggest that the pheromones cis-verbenol, ipsdienol, and ipsenol can be combined for monitoring all three species of the southern Ips simultaneously.

  19. Mattesia weiseri sp. nov., a new neogregarine (Apicomplexa: Lipotrophidae) pathogen of the great spruce bark beetle, Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Mustafa; Radek, Renate

    2015-08-01

    A new neogregarine pathogen of the great spruce bark beetle, Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is described based on light microscopy and ultrastructural characteristics. The pathogen infects the fat body and the hemolymph of the beetle. The infection was nonsynchronous so that different developmental stages could be observed simultaneously in the hemolymph. All life stages from sporozoite to oocyst of the pathogen including micronuclear and macronuclear merozoites were detected. The sporozoites measured about 8.7 × 1.9 μm and trophozoites, 11.9 × 3.3 μm. Micronuclear merozoites seen in the hemolymph were motile, elongate, slightly broader at the anterior pole, and measured 18.4 × 2.0 μm. Macronuclear merozoites had a size of ca. 16.4 × 2.3 μm. Gametogamy results in the formation of two paired oocysts within a gametocyst. The lemon-shaped oocyst measured 10.9 × 6.1 μm and had a very thick wall (375-450 nm). All morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of the life cycle stages indicate that the described neogregarine in D. micans is clearly different from known Mattesia species infecting bark beetles, and from any other described Mattesia spp. Therefore, we create a new species, Mattesia weiseri sp. nov.

  20. Influence of age and diet on the performance of Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Jaime Gómez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of age and feeding on the performance of Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae, a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera, Curculionidae was investigated in the laboratory. Groups of female parasitoids were subject to the following treatments: a group fed during one, five and ten days after emergence of adults with coffee borer larvae; another group fed only with honey solution during five days after emergence; and as a control, a third group was kept without food for five days. At the end of each treatment, survivorship, parasitoid activity (walking and flying capacity in an arena, search capacity for finding coffee borer-infested berries, host feeding and oviposition (on immature hosts, were assessed. Unfed females showed a significant decrease in survivorship compared to individuals that were fed. The type of meal (insects or honey did not significantly influence parasitoid activity, search and oviposition capacities. Females fed with honey solution significantly consumed less immature coffee borers. Younger females (one day old walked and flew out of the arena significantly faster than older ones (5 and 10 days old. Implications of these results are discussed on the performance of C. stephanoderis as a biological control agent of the coffee berry borer.

  1. Evaluations of Insecticides and Fungicides for Reducing Attack Rates of a new invasive ambrosia beetle (Euwallacea Sp., Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Infested Landscape Trees in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatough Jones, Michele; Kabashima, John; Eskalen, Akif; Dimson, Monica; Mayorquin, Joey S; Carrillo, Joseph D; Hanlon, Christopher C; Paine, Timothy D

    2017-08-01

    A recently discovered ambrosia beetle with the proposed common name of polyphagous shot hole borer (Euwallacea sp., Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is reported to attack >200 host tree species in southern California, including many important native and urban landscape trees. This invasive beetle, along with its associated fungi, causes branch dieback and tree mortality in a large variety of tree species including sycamore (Platanus racemosa Nutt.). Due to the severity of the impact of this Euwallacea sp., short-term management tools must include chemical control options for the arboriculture industry and private landowners to protect trees. We examined the effectiveness of insecticides, fungicides, and insecticide-fungicide combinations for controlling continued Euwallacea sp. attacks on previously infested sycamore trees which were monitored for 6 mo after treatment. Pesticide combinations were generally more effective than single pesticide treatments. The combination of a systemic insecticide (emamectin benzoate), a contact insecticide (bifenthrin), and a fungicide (metconazole) provided some level of control when applied on moderate and heavily infested trees. The biological fungicide Bacillus subtilis provided short-term control. There was no difference in the performance of the three triazole fungicides (propiconazole, tebuconazole, and metconazole) included in this study. Although no pesticide combination provided substantial control over time, pesticide treatments may be more effective when trees are treated during early stages of attack by this ambrosia beetle. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adult mortality and associated fruit injury after exposure to field-aged insecticides on tart cherry branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Eric J; Vandervoort, Christine; Wise, John C

    2010-08-01

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), adults were exposed to field-aged residues of thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, indoxacarb, or azinphos-methyl on tart cherry, Prunus cerasus L. variety Montmorency. At 1, 3, 7, and 14 d postapplication, fruit were sampled for chemical residues, and bioassays were used to assess beetle mortality and plant tissue injury. Azinphos-methyl had lethal activity within 1 d of exposure at all postapplication intervals and significant fruit protection extended to 14 d postapplication. All of the neonicotinoids had lethal activity at 3 d posttreatment, with acetamiprid activity extending to 7 d. Antifeedant and oviposition deterrent effects were seen with thiamethoxam and thiacloprid; damage incidence was significantly reduced in the absence of significant beetle mortality or intoxication. Thiamethoxam and acetamiprid penetrated into leaf and fruit tissue and were detected in the interior tissues at 14 d postapplication, but interior thiacloprid residues were not detected after day 1. Indoxacarb provided some fruit protection out to 7 d postapplication, and 14-d-old residues intoxicated beetles, but the slow action of this compound allowed significant damage to occur before beetles were incapacitated. Indoxacarb was only detected as a surface residue after the first day postapplication. These data on the plant-insect-chemistry interactions will support use and management decisions as compounds with acute contact activity are phased out.

  3. Biological Control Against the Cowpea Weevil (Callosobruchus Chinensis L., Coleoptera: Bruchidae) Using Essential Oils of Some Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Fatiha Righi Assia; Kada Righi; Khelil Anouar; Pujade-Villar Juli

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is a valuable foodstuff but unfortunately this legume is prone to insect attacks from the chick pea weevil (Callosobruchus chinensis L.). This serious pest damages the chickpea and causes decreases in the yield and in the nutritional quality. Biological control is being used to deal with this problem. We tried different doses of the essential oils of three new medicinal plants, namely Salvia verbenaca L., Scilla maritima L., and Artemisia herba-alba Asso to limit...

  4. Insecticidal activity of floral, foliar, and root extracts of Tagetes minuta (Asterales: Asteraceae) against adult mexican bean weevils (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David K. Weaver; Carl D. Wells; Florence V. Dunkel; Wolfgang Bertsch; Sharlene E. Sing; Shobha Sriharan

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine speed of action and toxicities of extracts of Tagetes minuta L., a source of naturally occurring insecticidal compounds. LC50 values for male and female Mexican bean weevils, Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman), were determined for floral, foliar, and root extracts of T. minuta. The 24-h LC50 values ranged from 138 μ g/cm2 for males...

  5. Acoustical detection of early instar Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Canary Island date palm Phoenix canariensis (Arecales: Arecaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The red palm weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier), is of international concern due to destructive larval feeding within palm trees. Originating from tropical Asia, RPW has spread throughout the eastern hemisphere where it has become a significant economic pest to the ornamental and date...

  6. First record of Otibazo (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae) outside of Japan, with description of a new species from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Vasily V; Pham, Hong Thai

    2014-10-03

    A new species of wingless leaf litter weevil, Otibazo polyphemus sp. n., is described from Tam Dao, northern Vietnam. This is the fourth named species in the genus, with its three other species known only from Japan. Habitus and genitalia of the male holotype are illustrated and DNA barcoding data are provided. 

  7. Laboratory virulence of entomopathogenic nematodes to two ornamental plant pests, Corythucha ciliata (Hemiptera: Tingidae) and Stethobaris nemesis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we evaluated the potential of entomopathogenic nematodes to control two important ornamental pests: 1) Corythucha ciliata, a native lace bug that attacks the foliage of sycamore trees, and 2) the recently described exotic pest, Stethobaris nemesis, a weevil that attacks amaryllis leave...

  8. Trials on the Timing of Chemical Control of Lentil weevil, Bruchus lentis Frӧlich (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae in Lentil Field in Gachsaran Region (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Saeidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The lentil weevil, Bruchus lentis Frӧlich, (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae is the most serious pest of lentil in Iran. Economic losses due to this pest reach up to 40% of the lentil crop. Over a two-year study (2012 and 2013 in Agricultural Research Station of Gachsaran Region, best timing of chemical control of B. lentis was determined. A field experiment with cultivation of lentil Sina variety Lens culinaris Medik was conducted in a randomized complete block design with five treatments and three replications. The treatments consisted of spraying four times (respectively, during the early flowering, 10 days after the first spraying, 10 days after the second spraying; 10 days after the third spraying and control (without spraying. For the spraying from Endosulfan insecticide EC50% at ratio one liter per hectare was used. Three samples were taken from the pods and totally 150 pods from each replicate for contaminations of seeds were investigated. After the determination of the percent of seeds contamination, results were statistically analysed. Based on the results obtained, first spray treatment, with the mean contamination of 15.45% and second spray treatment with the mean contamination of 12.25% had the highest impact on reducing contamination lentil seeds to B. lentis and between them there was no statistically significant difference and were in one group. Therefore, spraying one time during the early flowering until 15 days after it was the best time to control of B. lentis.

  9. Field evaluation of Bt cotton crop impact on nontarget pests: cotton aphid and boll weevil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujii, E R; Togni, P H B; de A Ribeiro, P; de A Bernardes, T; Milane, P V G N; Paula, D P; Pires, C S S; Fontes, E M G

    2013-02-01

    Bt cotton plants expressing Cry1Ac protein have high specificity for the control of lepidopteran larvae. However, studies conducted in several countries have shown these plants have a differential impact on nontarget herbivores. The aim of this study was to compare the colonization rates and population abundance of the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in plots of Bt (Nuopal) and non-Bt cotton (Delta Opal) in an experimental field in Brasilia, DF, Brazil. No difference was observed in the preference and colonization by winged aphids to plants from the two treatments. There was no significant difference in abundance of wingless aphids or in the production of winged aphids between treatments. Apparently, the parameters that control factors such as fecundity, survival, and dispersal were similar on both Bt and non-Bt plants. Monitoring of plants for coccinellids, a specialist predator of aphids, and ants that act on the dispersal of aphids among plants showed no significant difference between Bt and non-Bt plants, supporting the inference above. Regarding the effect on boll weevil, there was also no significant difference between treatments in the total number of fruiting structures attacked in each plot, the percentage of fruiting structures attacked per plant or on the number of weevils emerging from fruits with boll weevil damage from egg-laying, when damaged fruit samples were held in the laboratory. Based on these results, we conclude that there is no impact of Bt cotton crop expressing Cry1Ac on the nontarget herbivores tested under field conditions.

  10. Infestation of Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Carica spp. and Vasconcella spp. genotypes; Infestacao de Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) em genotipos de Carica spp. e Vasconcella spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fancelli, Marilene; Sanches, Nilton F.; Dantas, Jorge L.L.; Caldas, Ranulfo C. [EMBRAPA Mandioca e Fruticultura Tropical, Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil)]. E-mail: fancelli@cnpmf.embrapa.br; Morales, Cinara F.G. [Fundacao Estadual de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (FEPAGRO), Ijui, RS (Brazil)

    2008-09-15

    The papaya borer weevil, Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall), is generally considered a secondary pest, but it has been reported in high infestations in Northeast Brazil. This work aimed at evaluating the occurrence of P. papayanus and reporting its infestation level in papaya genotypes kept at the germplasm bank of EMBRAPA Cassava and Tropical Fruits (Cruz das Almas, Bahia, Brazil). The number of larvae, pupae and adults found in each plant of 65 Carica spp. genotypes and of three Vasconcella spp. genotypes was registered in three to five plants of each genotype, by cutting the exsudating trunks lengthwise. Papaya borer weevil was found in C. papaya and V. cauliflora but not in those of V. quercifolia. Among the evaluated genotypes, 52.4% of those belonging to the Solo group were infested, against 25.0% of the Formosa group. Larval infestation was the best criterion for sorting out genotypes concerning this insect infestation. This is also the first occurrence of the papaya borer weevil . (author)

  11. The elytro-tergal stridulatory apparatus of the genus Bondarius Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera, Curculionidae Aparelho estridulatório élitro-tergal do gênero Bondarius Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Germano H. Rosado-Neto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The elytro-tergal stridulatory organ that occurs in Bondarius Rosado-Neto, 2006 a genus of the tribe Sternechini (Curculionidae, Molytinae is described and illustrated. The stridulatory apparatus is present both in male and female and is composed by the file, a narrow elevated carina which is transversely multistriate located at the apical third of the internal side near the suture of left elytron, and by the plectrum, a narrow striate area located transversely at the dorso-apical margin of the abdominal tergite 7.O aparelho estridulatório do tipo élitro-tergal que ocorre em Bondarius Rosado-Neto, 2006 um gênero da tribo Sternechini (Curculionidae, Molytinae é descrito e ilustrado. O aparelho estridulatório presente em machos e fêmeas é composto pelo file, uma carena multiestriada, estreita e elevada, localizada transversalmente no terço apical do élitro esquerdo, na margem interna, próximo a sutura elitral, e pelo plectrum, uma área estreita e estriada localizada transversalmente na margem dorso-apical do tergito abdominal 7.

  12. Migration and dispersal of Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in South America Migración y dispersión de Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en América del Sur

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    Teodoro Stadler

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the dispersal of Anthonomus grandis Boheman, the cotton boll weevil, in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia, exploring the ecological and physiological factors that have made the dispersal and establishment of this insect in South America so successful. The boll weevil's phenotypic plasticity is represented by its flexible developmental time, its multivoltine life cycle with several overlapping generations, its capacity to feed on pollen from diverse botanical families as well as from non pollen food sources and its ability to migrate and disperse aided by winds. These characteristics make it a key pest for cotton. Probable overwintering «hot spots» for the boll weevil were identified in Misiones-Argentina, where large numbers of prediapausing weevils concentrate after arrival from newly harvested cotton fields in Paraguay, probably attracted by citrus orchards volatiles. The boll weevil's facultative quiescence is always relative to environmental adverse conditions. This suggests that overwintering in the boll weevil can be defined as «oligopause», an intermediate form of diapause. Since its introduction to Brazil in 1983, until 2006, it has spread southwest at an average of 61 km year-1 towards Argentina. However, it took the boll weevil approximately ten years to move 250 km between Paraguay and the main cotton growing area in Argentina. This slower progress is probably due to the actions taken by the Argentine government through the boll weevil eradication program. The arrival of the boll weevil at the cotton cropping areas in Paraguay and Argentina reinforces the fact that the boll weevil should finally be included in an integrated cotton pest management program jointly with other major cotton pests.El presente estudio sobre la dispersión de Anthonomus grandis Boheman, el picudo del algodonero, en Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay y Bolivia, explora las características ecológicas y fisiológicas que han permitido a

  13. Primeiro registro de Chalcodermus bicolor (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em plantios de eucalipto First record of Chalcodermus bicolor in eucalypt plantations

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    Rodolfo Molinário de Souza

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou relatar, pela primeira vez, o ataque de um besouro podador em plantios de clones híbridos de eucalipto (Eucalyptus urophylla vs. E. grandis, localizados nos Estados da Bahia e do Espírito Santo. A espécie foi determinada como sendo Chalcodermus bicolor Fiedler, 1936 (Curculionidae: Molytinae. A fêmea poda os ponteiros e constrói um pequeno orifício onde deposita um único ovo, logo abaixo do ponto de incisão. O eucalipto é o primeiro hospedeiro relatado para esta espécie de besouro.This research aimed to record, for the first time, the damage caused by a pruner beetle on hybrid eucalypts cloned trees (Eucalyptus urophylla vs. E. grandis, located in Bahia and Espírito Santo States, Brazil. The specie was determined as Chalcodermus bicolor Fiedler, 1936 (Curculionidae: Molytinae. The female prunes the tree shoot and lays a single egg inside a small hole, just below the incision point. Eucalypt is the first host recorded to this pruner beetle specie.

  14. Antennal transcriptome analysis of the chemosensory gene families in the tree killing bark beetles, Ips typographus and Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus, and the North American mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), are severe pests of coniferous forests. Both bark beetle species utilize aggregation pheromones to coordinate mass-attacks on host trees, while odorants from host and non-host trees modulate the pheromone response. Thus, the bark beetle olfactory sense is of utmost importance for fitness. However, information on the genes underlying olfactory detection has been lacking in bark beetles and is limited in Coleoptera. We assembled antennal transcriptomes from next-generation sequencing of I. typographus and D. ponderosae to identify members of the major chemosensory multi-gene families. Results Gene ontology (GO) annotation indicated that the relative abundance of transcripts associated with specific GO terms was highly similar in the two species. Transcripts with terms related to olfactory function were found in both species. Focusing on the chemosensory gene families, we identified 15 putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), 6 chemosensory proteins (CSP), 3 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 43 odorant receptors (OR), 6 gustatory receptors (GR), and 7 ionotropic receptors (IR) in I. typographus; and 31 putative OBPs, 11 CSPs, 3 SNMPs, 49 ORs, 2 GRs, and 15 IRs in D. ponderosae. Predicted protein sequences were compared with counterparts in the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, the cerambycid beetle, Megacyllene caryae, and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. The most notable result was found among the ORs, for which large bark beetle-specific expansions were found. However, some clades contained receptors from all four beetle species, indicating a degree of conservation among some coleopteran OR lineages. Putative GRs for carbon dioxide and orthologues for the conserved antennal IRs were included in the identified receptor sets. Conclusions The protein families important for

  15. Antennal transcriptome analysis of the chemosensory gene families in the tree killing bark beetles, Ips typographus and Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin N; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Keeling, Christopher I; Bengtsson, Jonas M; Yuen, Macaire M S; Li, Maria; Hillbur, Ylva; Bohlmann, Jörg; Hansson, Bill S; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2013-03-21

    The European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus, and the North American mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), are severe pests of coniferous forests. Both bark beetle species utilize aggregation pheromones to coordinate mass-attacks on host trees, while odorants from host and non-host trees modulate the pheromone response. Thus, the bark beetle olfactory sense is of utmost importance for fitness. However, information on the genes underlying olfactory detection has been lacking in bark beetles and is limited in Coleoptera. We assembled antennal transcriptomes from next-generation sequencing of I. typographus and D. ponderosae to identify members of the major chemosensory multi-gene families. Gene ontology (GO) annotation indicated that the relative abundance of transcripts associated with specific GO terms was highly similar in the two species. Transcripts with terms related to olfactory function were found in both species. Focusing on the chemosensory gene families, we identified 15 putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), 6 chemosensory proteins (CSP), 3 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 43 odorant receptors (OR), 6 gustatory receptors (GR), and 7 ionotropic receptors (IR) in I. typographus; and 31 putative OBPs, 11 CSPs, 3 SNMPs, 49 ORs, 2 GRs, and 15 IRs in D. ponderosae. Predicted protein sequences were compared with counterparts in the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, the cerambycid beetle, Megacyllene caryae, and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. The most notable result was found among the ORs, for which large bark beetle-specific expansions were found. However, some clades contained receptors from all four beetle species, indicating a degree of conservation among some coleopteran OR lineages. Putative GRs for carbon dioxide and orthologues for the conserved antennal IRs were included in the identified receptor sets. The protein families important for chemoreception have now been identified in

  16. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Anthribidae, Brentidae, Dryophthoridae, Brachyceridae, and Curculionidae, with additions to the fauna of Quebec, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

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    Webster, Reginald P; Anderson, Robert S; Sweeney, Jon D; Demerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    We report 63 species of Curculionoidea that are new to New Brunswick (three species of Anthribidae, four species of Brentidae, three species of Dryophthoridae, three species of Brachyceridae, 50 species of Curculionidae). Among these are 27 species (two Anthribidae, two Brenthidae, one Brachyceridae, 22 Curculionidae) that are also newly recorded for the Maritime provinces, and one species, Plesiobaris disjuncta Casey (Curculionidae) that is newly recorded for Canada from New Brunswick and Quebec. Bagous planatus LeConte is reinstated to the faunal list of New Brunswick. Two species of Curculionidae are newly recorded from Nova Scotia and the Maritime provinces, and two others are reported for the first time for Prince Edward Island.

  17. Proteomics indicators of the rapidly shifting physiology from whole mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, adults during early host colonization.

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    Caitlin Pitt

    Full Text Available We developed proteome profiles for host colonizing mountain pine beetle adults, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. Adult insects were fed in pairs on fresh host lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud, phloem tissue. The proteomes of fed individuals were monitored using iTRAQ and compared to those of starved beetles, revealing 757 and 739 expressed proteins in females and males, respectively, for which quantitative information was obtained. Overall functional category distributions were similar for males and females, with the majority of proteins falling under carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, structure (cuticle, muscle, cytoskeleton, and protein and amino acid metabolism. Females had 23 proteins with levels that changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20, including chaperones and enzymes required for vitellogenesis. In males, levels of 29 proteins changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20, including chaperones as well as motor proteins. Only two proteins, both chaperones, exhibited a significant change in both females and males with feeding. Proteins with differential accumulation patterns in females exhibited higher fold changes with feeding than did those in males. This difference may be due to major and rapid physiological changes occurring in females upon finding a host tree during the physiological shift from dispersal to reproduction. The significant accumulation of chaperone proteins, a cytochrome P450, and a glutathione S-transferase, indicate secondary metabolite-induced stress physiology related to chemical detoxification during early host colonization. The females' activation of vitellogenin only after encountering a host indicates deliberate partitioning of resources and a balancing of the needs of dispersal and reproduction.

  18. Evaluation of Lure Combinations Containing Essential Oils and Volatile Spiroketals for Detection of Host-Seeking Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, D; Montgomery, Wayne S; Narvaez, Teresa I; Deyrup, Mark A; Kendra, Paul E

    2017-08-01

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), vectors the fungal pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola) that causes laurel wilt, a disease responsible for widespread mortality of trees in the Lauraceae in the southeastern United States. Early detection of incipient vector populations may allow for management practices that could successfully mitigate damage. Developing new, highly effective attractants is a priority for improving sensitivity of early detection efforts. In this study, two field tests were conducted to evaluate combinations of commercially available bark and ambrosia beetle lures for enhanced attraction of host-seeking female X. glabratus. In addition, lures were compared for capture of nontarget scolytine beetles. In the first experiment, traps baited with a combination of cubeb oil, conophthorin, chalcogran, and ethanol captured greater numbers of X. glabratus than cubeb oil alone, the current standard attractant. However, this combination lure resulted in higher nontarget scolytine captures than with the cubeb lure. In the second field test, an oil enriched in the sesquiterpene α-copaene caught significantly more X. glabratus than other lures currently available for monitoring this pest. There were no differences in efficacy between cubeb oil lures produced by two different manufacturers, and a combination lure containing copaiba and cubeb oils did not increase captures over the cubeb lure alone. Results of these two tests suggest that increased sensitivity for detection of X. glabratus may be achieved with a multicomponent lure that incorporates α-copaene, spiroketals, and low release of ethanol. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Trap Style, Bait, and Height Deployments in Black Walnut Tree Canopies Help Inform Monitoring Strategies for Bark and Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingeman, William E; Bray, Alicia M; Oliver, Jason B; Ranger, Christopher M; Palmquist, Debra E

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge about which bark and ambrosia beetle species are active and at what heights in black walnut canopies is not well understood. Neither is the role of these beetles in spreading Thousand Cankers Disease. To assist with future planned research, which will assess the extent to which these beetle species are associated with Geosmithia morbida Kolařík, Freeland, Utley, and Tisserat (Ascomycota: Hypocreales: Bionectriaceae), experiments were undertaken to monitor bark and ambrosia beetles in urban landscapes and parks in Tennessee between 2011 and 2013. Within mature walnut tree canopies, sticky panel, modified soda bottle, and Lindgren traps were deployed at different heights, with and without ethanol as an attractant and with and without walnut stem sections, or in situ limbs that had been girdled or injection with ethanol to simulate stressed tree tissues. Bark and ambrosia beetle species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) collected in greatest abundance included Ambrosiodmus rubricollis (Eichhoff), Ambrosiophilus atratus (Eichhoff), Cnestus mutilatus (Blandford), Dryoxylon onoharaense (Murayama), Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff), Monarthrum fasciatum (Say), Monarthrum mali (Fitch), Xyleborinus saxesenii (Ratzeburg), Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, Xyleborus ferrugineus (Fabricius), Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky), and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford). C. mutilatus, X. saxesenii, and X. crassiusculus were more active higher in trees than most other species and were strongly attracted to ethanol via all means of lure deployment. C. mutilatus, which were captured from April through October and increased in abundance across the 3-yr study, were most abundant in late May with a second activity period in late August. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The effects of gamma radiation on the reproduction of the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera - Bruchidae

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    Ghogomu, TR.

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus F. was carried out to study its effects on reproduction. Complete sterility of males and females is obtained when treated as adults with 10 krad. At lower doses the female is more susceptible than the male. The fecundity is affected and at doses above 100 krad death occurs before the female lays all her mature eggs. The sterility induced is observed in the reduction in percentage of egg hatch, but mortality after hatching is negligible. When females are exposed to substerilizing doses as pupae or adults, the fertility on the first day of oviposition is significantly reduced and those treated as adults are the most affected. On the second day there is improvement in fertility.

  1. Assessment of bacterial endosymbiont diversity in Otiorhynchus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae larvae using a multitag 454 pyrosequencing approach

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    Hirsch Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weevils of the genus Otiorhynchus are regarded as devastating pests in a wide variety of horticultural crops worldwide. So far, little is known on the presence of endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp.. Investigation of endosymbiosis in this genus may help to understand the evolution of different reproductive strategies in these weevils (parthenogenesis or sexual reproduction, host-symbiont interactions, and may provide a future basis for novel pest management strategy development. Here, we used a multitag 454 pyrosequencing approach to assess the bacterial endosymbiont diversity in larvae of four economically important Otiorhynchus species. Results High-throughput tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing of a bacterial 16S rDNA fragment was used to characterise bacterial communities associated with different Otiorhynchus spp. larvae. By sequencing a total of ~48,000 PCR amplicons, we identified 49 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs as bacterial endosymbionts in the four studied Otiorhynchus species. More than 90% of all sequence reads belonged either to the genus Rickettsia or showed homology to the phylogenetic group of “Candidatus Blochmannia” and to endosymbionts of the lice Pedicinus obtusus and P. badii. By using specific primers for the genera Rickettsia and “Candidatus Blochmannia”, we identified a new phylogenetic clade of Rickettsia as well as “Candidatus Nardonella” endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp. which are closely related to “Candidatus Blochmannia” bacteria. Conclusions Here, we used multitag 454 pyrosequencing for assessment of insect endosymbiotic communities in weevils. As 454 pyrosequencing generates only quite short sequences, results of such studies can be regarded as a first step towards identifying respective endosymbiotic species in insects. In the second step of our study, we analysed sequences of specific gene regions for a more detailed phylogeny of selected endosymbiont genera

  2. Biological Control Against the Cowpea Weevil (Callosobruchus Chinensis L., Coleoptera: Bruchidae Using Essential Oils of Some Medicinal Plants

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    Fatiha Righi Assia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. is a valuable foodstuff but unfortunately this legume is prone to insect attacks from the chick pea weevil (Callosobruchus chinensis L.. This serious pest damages the chickpea and causes decreases in the yield and in the nutritional quality. Biological control is being used to deal with this problem. We tried different doses of the essential oils of three new medicinal plants, namely Salvia verbenaca L., Scilla maritima L., and Artemisia herba-alba Asso to limit the damage of the chick pea weevil pest, and to protect consumer’s health. To determine the effect and efficiency of the oil, the tests were conducted using the different biological parameters of fertility, longevity, and fecundity, under controlled temperature and relative humidity (28°C and 75%. The effectiveness of organic oils was demonstrated. We tested these oils on the germination of seeds. The obtained results showed that the tested plant oils have a real organic insecticide effect. The essential oil of Artemisia proved most effective as a biocide; achieving a mortality rate of 100%. A significant reduction in longevity was observed under the effect of 30 μl of S. maritima (1.3 days and S. verbenaca (2.8, 4.6 days, respectively, for males and females compared to 8 and 15 days for the control. For fecundity, an inhibition of oviposition was obtained using 30 μl of Salvia and Scilla essential oils. The test on the seed germination using different essential oils, showed no damage to the germinating seeds. The germination rate was 99%. These findings suggest that the tested plants can be used as a bioinsecticide for control of the C. chinensis pest of stored products.

  3. Infectivity of Steinernema carpocapsae and S. feltiae to Larvae and Adults of the Hazelnut Weevil, Curculio nucum: Differential Virulence and Entry Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla-Carrera, Laia; Morton, Ana; Shapiro-Ilan, David; Strand, Michael R; García-Del-Pino, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the existing susceptibility differences of the hazelnut weevil, Curculio nucum L. (Coleoptera:, Curculionidae) to entomopathogenic nematodes by assessing the main route of entry of the nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae strain B14 and S. feltiae strain D114, into larvae and adult insects, as well as host immune response. Our results suggested that S. carpocapsae B14 and S. feltiae D114 primarily entered adult insects and larvae through the anus. Larvae were more susceptible to S. feltiae D114 than S. carpocapsae B14 and adults were highly susceptible to S. carpocapsae B14 but displayed low susceptibility to S. feltiae D114. Penetration rate correlated with nematode virulence. We observed little evidence that hazelnut weevils mounted any cellular immune response toward S. carpocapsae B14 or S. feltiae D114. We conclude the differential susceptibility of hazelnut weevil larvae and adults to S. carpocapsae B14 and S. feltiae D114 primarily reflected differences in the ability of these two nematodes to penetrate the host.

  4. Effect of Simulated Anthonomus signatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Injury on Strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa) Grown in Southeastern Plasticulture Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhie, Douglas; Burrack, Hannah J

    2017-02-01

    Female strawberry bud weevils (Anthonomus signatus Say) oviposit in developing flower buds of strawberries (Fragaria spp.), caneberries (Rubus spp.), and red bud (Cercis canadensis). After laying a single egg, weevils will girdle or "clip" the buds at the pedicel, killing the bud and preventing fruit development. This injury is of concern to commercial strawberry growers, who typically assume the loss of one clipped bud is the loss of one average sized fruit, causing the economic threshold to be set extremely low. There is evidence of compensation in some cultivars of strawberries, but research has previously only been conducted in perennial strawberry production. The majority of strawberries in the southeastern United States are grown in annual plasticulture systems. We assessed the ability of five strawberry cultivars commonly grown in annual plasticulture to compensate for A. signatus injury by removing buds at different growth stages. There was no effect of bud removal on total yield in any of the cultivars tested. Harvest timing was affected by simulated A. signatus damage in some cultivars, which may be an important consideration for direct market strawberry growers. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The structure of rice weevil pectin methylesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, David C; Behnke, Craig A; Pappan, Kirk; Shen, Zicheng; Reese, John C; Reeck, Gerald R; Stenkamp, Ronald E

    2014-11-01

    Rice weevils (Sitophilus oryzae) use a pectin methylesterase (EC 3.1.1.11), along with other enzymes, to digest cell walls in cereal grains. The enzyme is a right-handed β-helix protein, but is circularly permuted relative to plant and bacterial pectin methylesterases, as shown by the crystal structure determination reported here. This is the first structure of an animal pectin methylesterase. Diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution some time ago for this crystal form, but structure solution required the use of molecular-replacement techniques that have been developed and similar structures that have been deposited in the last 15 years. Comparison of the structure of the rice weevil pectin methylesterase with that from Dickeya dandantii (formerly Erwinia chrysanthemi) indicates that the reaction mechanisms are the same for the insect, plant and bacterial pectin methylesterases. The similarity of the structure of the rice weevil enzyme to the Escherichia coli lipoprotein YbhC suggests that the evolutionary origin of the rice weevil enzyme was a bacterial lipoprotein, the gene for which was transferred to a primitive ancestor of modern weevils and other Curculionidae. Structural comparison of the rice weevil pectin methylesterase with plant and bacterial enzymes demonstrates that the rice weevil protein is circularly permuted relative to the plant and bacterial molecules.

  6. Entomogenous nematodes: a field study for biological control of Curculio elephas Gyl. (Coleoptera Curculionidae); Nematodi entomoparassiti: una prova di impiego in campo della lotta contro il balanino del castagno, Curculio elephas Gyl. (Coleoptera Curculionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapagnani, M.R.; Caffarelli, V.; Letardi, A.; Barlattani, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Lazzari, L.; Ruggeri, L. [BIOERRE, Crespellano, Bologna (Italy); Lelli, L.

    1999-02-01

    Biological control of chestnut weevil (Curculio elephas Gyl.) using entomogenous nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) was investigated under field conditions. Experiments of infectivity, soil persistence and mobility of the infective juveniles stage of the nematodes were carried out through laboratory tests. Experimental results on developing infectivity process if entomogenous nematodes, have shown both inhibition at low temperature (average value 12 C) and mechanic barrier of weevil pupal envelope. Use of dispersal media as water or peat, was not relevant on experimental results. Further researches are required to test low temperature-resistant strain. [Italiano] Vengono riportati i risultati di uno studio di lotta biologica contro il balanino del castagno (Curculio elephas Gyl.) realizzato utilizzando ceppi di nematodi entomoparassiti (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae). Sono stati monitorati, in campo, l`andamento dell`infestazione del balanino del castagno, l`efficacia del trattamento e l`andamento della temperatura sia climatica che nel terreno a due diverse profondita`. Nel corso dello studio e` stata controllata periodicamente, con prove di laboratorio, la persistenza nel terreno e la capacita` infettiva dei nematodi utilizzati. Lo studio ha messo in evidenza la difficolta` da parte dei nematodi di esplicare la propria azione di entomoparassiti in condizioni di temperatura media attorno ai 12 C e di superare la barriera fisica operata dalla celletta entro cui si impupa il balanino. Il mezzo utilizzato per la dispersione dei nematodi (acqua o torba) risulta essere indifferente rispetto al risultato ottenuto. L`esperienza ha evidenziato l`interesse, in questo tipo di lotta, alla sperimentazione di ceppi di nematodi resistenti alle basse temperature.

  7. Biogeografía histórica de la familia Curculionidae (Coleoptera en las subregiones Subantártica y Chilena Central Historical biogeography of family Curculionidae (Coleoptera on Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions

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    Paula Posadas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de los patrones de distribución y la información filogenética de 71 especies de Curculionidae, distribuidas en las subregiones Subantártica y Chilena Central, aplicando los métodos biogeográficos de los árboles reconciliados y análisis de parsimonia de Brooks (BPA, resulta en un único cladograma general de áreas: ((Chile Central (Maule, Bosque Valdiviano (Islas Malvinas (Páramo Magallánico, Bosque Magallánico. La aplicación del análisis de dispersión-vicarianza (DIVA muestra que el evento vicariante más frecuente es el que separa las Islas Malvinas de las otras dos provincias subantárticas meridionales. Por otra parte, de acuerdo con los resultados del DIVA, se evidencia que las relaciones entre el Maule, Bosque Valdiviano y Chile Central no se deberían a eventos de vicarianza sino a eventos de dispersión, ya que el 61% del total de los eventos de dispersión implica a estas tres áreas. Aún más, los eventos de dispersión más frecuentes implican al Maule, ya sea en relación con Chile Central o con el Bosque Valdiviano, por lo que se deduce que la aparente complejidad de las relaciones biogeográficas del Maule podría estar relacionada con dichos eventos de dispersión.The application of the historical biogeographic techniques of reconciled trees and Brooks parsimony analysis (BPA to the distributional and phylogenetic information of 71 species of Curculionidae ranged in the Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions results in a single general area cladogram: ((Central Chile (Maule, Valdivian Forest (Malvinas Islands (Magellanic Moorland, Magellanic Forest. The application of dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA to the same data set shows as the most frequent vicariant event the split of Islas Malvinas from the two southern Subantarctic provinces. In addition, DIVA results evidenced that the relationship among Maule, Valdivian Forest, and Central Chile did not arise from vicariance events (common history

  8. [Occurrence of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) in pet food traded in the Metropolitan Region of Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Eduardo H L; Alves, Leucio C; Faustino, Maria A da G; Machado, Erilane de C L

    2008-01-01

    With the purpose of verifying the occurrence of insect pests in dog food commercialized in the Metropolitan Region of Recife, samples from 15 different pet stores were submitted to the extraction of insects in a Berlese-Tullgren apparatus. Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Tenebrionidae) (55.2%) was the most frequent specie followed by Oryzaephilus surinamensis (L.) (Cucujidae) (31.3%), Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius) (Bostrichidae) (8.9%) and Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius) (Anobiidae) (4.7%), all from Coleoptera. Recife showed the highest rate of infestation (53.6%), followed by Olinda (34.4%) and Jaboatão dos Guararapes (12.0%). The infestation by coleopters in the region occurs with high frequency and may represent a threat mainly in commercialized products in bulk.

  9. The Gut Entomotype of Red Palm Weevil Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae and Their Effect on Host Nutrition Metabolism

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    Abrar Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For invasive insects, the potential roles of gut microbiota in exploiting new food resources and spreading remain elusive. Red palm weevil (RPW, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier, is an invasive destructive pest which feeds on nutrient-poor tender tissues and has caused extensive mortality of palm trees. The microbes associated with insects can improve their nutrition assimilation. However, experimental evidence on the interactions between RPW and its gut microbiota is still absent. The aim of this study is to determine the dynamics changes and the bacterial entomotype in the RPW gut and its potential physiological roles. Here, we confirmed RPW harbors a complex gut microbiota mainly constituted by bacteria in the families Enterobacteriaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Entomoplasmataceae, and Streptococcaceae. RPW gut microbiota exhibited a highly stable microbial community with low variance in abundance across different life stages and host plants. Furthermore, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae was markedly increased but that of Acetobacteraceae was reduced significantly after administration of antibiotics. Although no significant effects were found on the body weight gain of RPW larvae, these alterations dramatically decreased the concentration of hemolymph protein and glucose while that of hemolymph triglyceride increased. In the gut of wild-caught RPW larvae, seven bacterial species in the genera Klebsiella, Serratia, Enterobacter, and Citrobacter were shown to have an ability to degrade cellulose. Together, RPW accommodate a stable gut microbiota which can degrade plant polysaccharides and confer their host optimal adaptation to its environment by modulating its metabolism.

  10. Evaluation of an oil dispersion formulation of imidacloprid as a drench against Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) in young palm trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llácer, Elena; Negre, María; Jacas, Josep A

    2012-06-01

    The red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier), is a phytophagous insect that feeds on soft succulent tissues of most palm species and is considered the main palm pest in the Middle East and the Mediterranean Basin. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of imidacloprid oil dispersion (OD) as a drench in preventive and curative treatments against R. ferrugineus in Phoenix canariensis, Washingtonia robusta, Washingtonia filifera and Trachycarpus fortunei. Levels of infestation were highest in P. canariensis. There was no infestation in W. filifera. Mean efficacies of 100 and 94% were obtained in preventive and curative treatments respectively. High efficacies in preventive treatments (mean 95.4%) lasted for up to 45 days after application. The high efficacies and persistence of imidacloprid OD applied as a drench in young palms show the potential of this product for the management of R. ferrugineus. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Efficacy and Cost of Trap-Bait Combinations for Capturing Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Ornamental Palm Polycultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murguía-González, J; Landero-Torres, I; Leyva-Ovalle, O R; Galindo-Tovar, M E; Llarena-Hernández, R C; Presa-Parra, E; García-Martínez, M A

    2017-07-28

    Ornamental palms are an economically important component of international trade yet have recently experienced yield losses in Mexico due to red ring and bud rot diseases, which are spread by Rhynchophorus palmarum L. Considering that massive capture is a common strategy to control this pest and the cost of commercial traps and baits could be inaccessible for small farmers, an inexpensive trap-bait combination is desired. In this study, 16 trap-bait combinations for capturing R. palmarum were assessed in ornamental palm polycultures over the course of 1 year. An expensive yellow bucket trap combined with aggregation pheromone + insecticide + banana was compared with inexpensive, handmade trap-bait combinations. A total of 4712 weevils were collected in all traps, of which 52.7% were male and 47.3% female. The efficacy of the handmade trap made from a colorless polyethylene bottle and baited with banana + pineapple + sugarcane + sugarcane molasses was similar to that of the yellow bucket trap baited with aggregation pheromone + insecticide + banana. These two trap-bait combinations remained effective even when the R. palmarum population significantly decreased during the dry, warm season. The affordable handmade trap baited with food attractants and without insecticides was highly efficient in capturing R. palmarum and therefore represents an effective tool for monitoring weevil populations. As ornamental crops have recently gained greater economic importance in the studied region, the use of a novel and cheap trap-bait combination could offer great benefits to producers and form part of the integrated management of R. palmarum.

  12. Tempo-Spatial Dynamics of Adult Plum Curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Based on Semiochemical-Baited Trap Captures in Blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Cumplido, Johnattan; Leskey, Tracy C; Holdcraft, Robert; Zaman, Faruque U; Hahn, Noel G; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar

    2017-06-01

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), has become an important pest of highbush blueberries in the northeastern United States. Here, we conducted experiments in 2010-2013 to compare the efficacy of semiochemical-baited traps for C. nenuphar versus conventional (beating cloth) sampling methods in blueberries, and to understand the seasonal abundance and distribution of C. nenuphar adults within and among blueberry fields using these traps. Black pyramid traps baited with the C. nenuphar aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid and the fruit volatile benzaldehyde caught three to four times more adults than unbaited traps without causing an increase in injury to berries in neighboring bushes. Numbers of adult weevils caught in traps correlated with those on bushes (beating cloth samples), indicating that trap counts can predict C. nenuphar abundance in the field. Early in the season, traps placed 20 m from field edges near a forest caught higher C. nenuphar numbers than traps placed at farther distances, suggesting movement of overwintered weevils from outside fields. Using a trapping network across multiple fields in an organic farm, we found evidence of C. nenuphar aggregation in "hotspots"; early in the season, C. nenuphar numbers in traps were higher in the middle of fields, and there was a correlation between these numbers and distance from the forest in 2013 but not in 2012. These results show that semiochemical-baited traps are effective in capturing C. nenuphar adults in blueberries, and that these traps should be placed in the interior of fields preferably, but not exclusively, near wooded habitats to maximize their efficacy. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. El cardón Pachycereus pringlei, nuevo hospedero para Scyphophorus acupunctatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en Baja California Sur, México The giant cardon cactus Pachycereus pringlei, a new host for Scyphophorus acupunctatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Maya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el primer registro de una cactácea, Pachycereus pringlei (cardón, especie dominante del matorral xerófilo de la península de Baja California, como hospedero de Scyphophorus acupunctatus (picudo del agave. A partir de observaciones y la recolección de individuos adultos y larvas, se pudo establecer que el picudo del agave causa al menos 3 tipos de daño al cardón: 1, barrenado en la región apical de los brazos por los adultos; 2, consumo de la médula de los brazos por las larvas, que puede ser tan extenso que ocasiona la muerte del cardón y 3, perforaciones en diversos sitios de los brazos, por donde las larvas eliminan los desechos, que pueden ser entrada de otros parásitos o que por lo menos dejan cicatrices en forma de tumor. El éxito de este insecto en el cardón podría representar una amenaza para las poblaciones naturales de esta cactácea e incluso para los servicios ambientales de los matorrales xerófilos.This is the first record of a cactus, Pachycereus pringlei (giant cardon, which is a dominant species of the xerophyllous scrub in the Baja California peninsula, as a host of Scyphophorus acupunctatus (agave weevil. Based on observations and the sampling of adults and larvae, it was possible to establish that this weevil causes at least 3 types of damage to the cardon: 1, drilling of the tip of the branches by adults; 2, consumption of the branch medulla by larvae, which can be so extended that could cause the cardon’s death, and 3, perforations in the branches, used by larvae to eliminate wastes, that could serve as entrance to other pests and remain as tumor-like scars. The success that this insect seems to have by using the giant cardon cactus as host represents a threat to its natural populations and even to the xerophillous scrub environmental services.

  14. A new species of Diapus Chapuis from South-West China and North Thailand (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Platypodinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knížek, M; Beaver, R A; Liu, L-Y

    2015-12-16

    The genus Diapus Chapuis was erected (Chapuis 1865) for four species of pinhole borer (Curculionidae: Platypodinae) from the Oriental region and New Guinea. It was distinguished from other platypodine genera primarily by the widely separated procoxae (Chapuis 1865). Hopkins (1914) designated Diapus quadrispinatus Chapuis, 1865 as the type species of the genus. The genus is currently placed in the platypodine tribe Tesserocerini, subtribe Diapodina (Alonso-Zarazaga & Lyal 2009). Only two genera are included in the Diapodina, Diapus and Genyocerus Motschulsky (Alonso-Zarazaga & Lyal 2009, Jordal 2015). Diapus is distinguished from Genyocerus by the following characters (Wood 1993, Beaver & Liu 2007): 1. In Diapus, the scutellum is narrower and more sunken, not flush with the elytral surface posteriorly as it is in Genyocerus. 2. The mycangial pores of Diapus are sometimes fused to form a transverse or crescentic bar on each side of the midline of the pronotum. This does not occur in Genyocerus. 3. The antennal club of Diapus sometimes has a median testaceous strip lacking sensillae on the anterior face. This strip is never present in Genyocerus. 4. The males of Diapus never possess a membranous extension of the apical margin of the fourth abdominal ventrite, present in some species of Genyocerus. 5. The females of Diapus often bear deciduous mandibular appendages, which are never present in Genyocerus (Beaver & Liu 2007).

  15. Attraction of Sphenophorus levis Vaurie adults (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to vegetal tissues at different conservation levels; Atracao de adultos de Sphenophorus levis Vaurie (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) a fragmentos vegetais em diferentes estados de conservacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giron-Perez, Katherine; Nakano, Octavio; Silva, Amanda C; Oda-Souza, Melissa [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia e Acarologia], e-mail: entomologa@ymail.com, e-mail: onakano@esalq.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    The occurrence of the sugarcane weevil Sphenophorus levis Vaurie is important in sugarcane in some regions in Brazil. Damage is caused by the larvae as they bore into the nodes and can reach 30 ton/ha/year. Many control alternatives have been attempted, but none were satisfactory, except for the use of toxic baits. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize their efficiency or to propose new techniques. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the attractiveness of adults of S. levis to sugarcane nodes and pineapple peelings in an 'Y' tube olfactometer. The sugarcane internodes were treated with 10% molasses, and tested after different periods of fermentation (24, 48 e 72h), at different times of the day (diurnal and nocturnal) and with both sexes. These tests were carried out in order to correlate the response of S. levis to ethyl acetate and ethanol release as a result of the fermentation process. The release of both compounds was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data indicated that sugarcane internodes mixed with 10% molasses fermented for 24h and 48h were the most attractive to S. levis (up to 90%). Pineapple peelings attracted 62.5% of the tested insects. The olfactory response was higher during the day, and no differences were found between the sexes. The production of ethanol in all plant substrates was higher than ethyl acetate, but we could not establish a clear correlation with the insect response to baits. (author)

  16. Fumigant toxicity of volatile natural products from Korean spices and medicinal plants towards the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S E; Lee, B H; Choi, W S; Park, B S; Kim, J G; Campbell, B C

    2001-06-01

    The fumigant toxicity of various volatile constituents of essential oils extracted from sixteen Korean spices and medicinal plants towards the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae L (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was determined. The most potent toxicity was found in the essential oil from Mentha arvensis L. var piperascens (LC50 = 45.5 microliters litre-1 air). GC-MS analysis of essential oil from M arvensis showed it to be rich in menthol (63.2%), menthone (13.1%) and limonene (1.5%), followed in abundance by beta-pinene (0.7%), alpha-pinene (0.6%) and linalool (0.2%). Treatment of S oryzae with each of these terpenes showed menthone to be most active (LC50 = 12.7 microliters litre-1 air) followed by linalool (LC50 = 39.2 microliters litre-1 air) and alpha-pinene (LC50 = 54.9 microliters litre-1 air). Studies on inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity of S oryzae showed menthone to have a nine-fold lower inhibitory effect than menthol, despite menthone being 8.1-fold more toxic than menthol to the rice weevil. Different modes of toxicity of these monoterpenes towards S oryzae are discussed.

  17. Molecular and Morphological Tools to Distinguish Scyphophorus acupunctatus Gyllenhal, 1838 (Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae): A New Weevil Pest of the Endangered Century Plant, Agave eggersiana from St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Lourdes Chamorro; Joshua Persson; Christian W. Torres-Santana; Jeff Keularts; Sonja J. Scheffer; Matthew L. Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The agave snout weevil (AGW) or sisal weevil, Scyphophorus acupunctatus Gyllenhal is here reported for the first time in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) where it threatens Agave eggersiana Trel., a USVI endemic and endangered century-plant. We provide molecular, morphological, and behavioral characters to successfully distinguish the two known Scyphophorus...

  18. Entomopathogens Associated to Citrus and Their Pathogenicity on Compsus viridivittatus Guérin-Méneville (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Andrea Zuluaga Cárdenas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available C. viridivittatus, citrus weevil distributed throughoutthe coffee maker and Andean region of Colombia. Thelarvae feed on roots and adults on leaves and flowers. On three citrus farms of the Valley were isolate and evaluated fungi and entompathogenic nematodes M. anisopliaeand B. bassiana and Steinernema sp. and Heterorabditis sp. on larvae of C. viridivittatus 26, 36, 48 and 53 days of age. In 120 from 132 soil samples were found 21 fungi and none nematodes. Commercial B. bassiana B9 and B10 caused 100 % adult mortality in a time of 4.3 and 4 days. M. anisopliae M6 y M7 caused 94 % and 97 % of mortality to the 4.3 and 5 days. Steinernema sp. UNS09 caused 65 % of mortality on larvae of 48 and 53 days of age, seven days later. No were differences between UNS09 Steinernema and Heterorhabditis UNH16. Steinernema sp. UNS09 caused 85.7 % of mortality on 53 days larvae and 81.9 % and 81.1 % to larvae of 36 and 26 days. Heterorhabditis sp. UNH16 killed larvae of 36, 26 and 56 days was 79 %, 81 % and 75.4 % seven days later. In conclusion, fungi and nematodes can be an alternative to management of C. viridivittatus larvae.

  19. Cleonini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Lixinae) are monophyletic and flightless: tribe overview, rampant adult homoplasy and illustrated global diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzanov, Yuri G; Grebennikov, Vasily V

    2017-10-03

    We summarize knowledge of the weevil tribe Cleonini worldwide, including its monophyly, relationships, distribution, biology, immature stages, economic significance and paleontology. We score adult morphological characters for 79 of a total of 96 extant genus-group Cleonini taxa considered valid to date. The resulting matrix contains 121 parsimoniously informative characters scored for 145 ingroup (Cleonini) and 29 outgroup terminals. Maximum Parsimony (MP) and Bayesian Inference (BI) analyses consistently recover monophyletic Lixinae and Cleonini. Relationships within the latter remain unresolved with either 47 (BI) or 37 (MP) branches radiating from the tribe's most recent common ancestor. Most of the speciose genera of Cleonini emerge as monophyletic in both BI and MP analyses (generic names followed by the number of terminals, then by BI posterior probability / MP bootstrap): Adosomus (5, 94/77), Asproparthenis (6, 99/98), Chromonotus (6, 98/85), Cleonis (3, 64/76), Coniocleonus (10, 95/41), Conorhynchus (5, 95/51), Cyphoclenus (4, 65/76), Maximus (4, 84/68), Mecaspis (4, 95/91), Scaphomorphus (4, 90/84), Temnorhinus (8, 99/62) and Xanthochelus (6, 84/71). The genera Pseudocleonus (6, -/26) and Stephanocleonus (22, -/23) are not recovered in BI and weakly supported in MP. No genera are here added to, or removed from, Cleonini. We suggest that adult morphology of Cleonini was subject to widespread homoplasy obscuring the phylogenetic signal of morphological characters. Unlike the rest of Lixinae, all extant Cleonini are hypothesised to be flightless, even though often being macropterous. All 145 ingroup terminals are illustrated in three standard views; images of the type species of 15 of the 17 genus-group taxa that are not represented in our analysis are provided.

  20. Flightless Notaris (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Brachycerinae: Erirhinini) in Southwest China: monophyly, mtDNA phylogeography and evolution of habitat associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Vasily V; Kolov, Sergey V

    2016-04-26

    This paper reports the recent discovery of flightless populations of weevils of the genus Notaris in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces of China. Specimens were found in the middle or high altitude mountains (2440-4195 m), by either sifting leaf litter in the deciduous forest and among alpine Rhododendron shrubs, or by turning rocks in the alpine zone. These finds extend southwards the Asian range of this Holarctic genus and report its highest altitudinal records. DNA barcodes of 127 specimens were phylogenetically analysed, of them 42 are those of newly discovered Notaris from Southwest China. The genera Notaris and Tournotaris consistently formed a clade, with Tournotaris nested inside Notaris in Maximum Parsimony (MP) and Maximum Likelihood (ML) analysis. The newly discovered flightless Notaris from Southwest China were either monophyletic (MP) or paraphyletic with respect to volant Holarctic N. aethiops (ML); the latter placement being likely an artefact. A strict linear molecular clock approach suggests a pre-Pliocene separation of Notaris populations in Southwest China. Habitat associations of these high-altitude flightless Notaris contrast sharply with that of the predominantly volant lowland riparian Notaris and other Erirhinini. We hypothesis that evolution of habitat selection in Notaris went from lowland riparian, to high altitude (via uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent regions of Central Asia), and then to forest leaf litter (via subsequent erosions of isolated mountains such as Emei Shan in Sichuan losing the alpine zone and forcing Notaris into the forest floor). Taxonomic uncertainty of Asian Notaris is addressed and remains unresolved due to uninformative morphology and conflicting DNA signal. Identities of two obscure and likely closely related species, Notaroides brevirostris and Notaris kozlovi from nearby SE Qinghai and NW Sichuan, respectively, are discussed and illustrated. Pending further research, all reported flightless Notaris from

  1. Posición taxonómica de Acrotomopus atropunctellus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae y descripción del daño producido en el cultivo de caña de azúcar en la Argentina Taxonomic position of Acrotomopus atropunctellus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and description of damages to sugar cane crops in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Pilar Pérez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acrotomopus atropunctellus (Boheman (Curculionidae: Molytinae: Cholini es una especie de picudo, endémica de la Argentina, que habita principalmente en la provincia biogeográfica de las Yungas; citada como perjudicial para la caña de azúcar en 1929. Hasta hace una década, no se habían producido nuevos reportes de daños, sin embargo, el aumento de la superficie cultivada con caña ha provocado el resurgimiento de la plaga. Morfológicamente, esta especie se asemeja a Acrotomopus wagneri Hustache, distribuida en la provincia biogeográfica del Chaco. Su biología es similar a la de otras especies de la tribu Cholini con larvas minadoras de cañas. Las hembras oviponen en las porciones basal y media de los plantines. Las larvas cavan galerías descendentes hasta alcanzar la cepa para pasar allí el invierno y reducen paulatinamente el rebrote de la caña en las siguientes temporadas. Los adultos producen perforaciones de pequeño diámetro y bordes ásperos en los brotes, macollos, tallos y nervadura central de las hojas. Se brinda una clave dicotómica para separar A. atropunctellus de las otras tres especies del género, todas presentes en la Argentina (A. wagneri, A. microspilotus (Pascoe y A. obtusus (Hustache y se describen los rasgos principales de su ciclo biológico y de los daños ocasionados en cultivos de caña de la provincia de Tucumán. El trabajo incluye fotografías de hábito de las cuatro especies de Acrotomopus, y de la larva y los daños ocasionados por A. atropunctellus.Acrotomopus atropunctellus (Boheman (Curculionidae: Molytinae: Cholini is a weevil species endemic to Argentina, mainly inhabiting the biogeographic province of the Yungas. It was first reported as harmful to sugar cane in 1929. Damages were not cited again until a decade ago, when the species became a serious pest due to the increased sugar cane production. This species is morphologically similar to A. wagneri Hustache that occurs in the Chacoan

  2. A PCR-Based Diagnostic System for Differentiating Two Weevil Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) of Economic Importance to the Chilean Citrus Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, C; Olivares, N; Luppichini, P; Hinrichsen, P

    2015-02-01

    A PCR-based method was developed to identify Naupactus cervinus (Boheman) and Naupactus xanthographus (Germar), two curculionids affecting the citrus industry in Chile. The quarantine status of these two species depends on the country to which fruits are exported. This identification method was developed because it is not possible to discriminate between these two species at the egg stage. The method is based on the species-specific amplification of sequences of internal transcribed spacers, for which we cloned and sequenced these genome fragments from each species. We designed an identification system based on two duplex-PCR reactions. Each one contains the species-specific primer set and a second generic primer set that amplify a short 18S region common to coleopterans, to avoid false negatives. The marker system is able to differentiate each Naupactus species at any life stage, and with a diagnostic sensitivity to 0.045 ng of genomic DNA. This PCR kit was validated by samples collected from different citrus production areas throughout Chile and showed 100% accuracy in differentiating the two Naupactus species. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Colonization of artificially stressed black walnut trees by ambrosia beetle, bark beetle, and other weevil species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Indiana and Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon E. Reed; Jennifer Juzwik; James T. English; Matthew D. Ginzel

    2015-01-01

    Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a new disease of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) in the eastern United States. The disease is caused by the interaction of the aggressive bark beetle Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman and the canker-forming fungus, Geosmithia morbida M. Kolarik, E. Freeland, C. Utley &...

  4. Volatile and within-needle terpene changes to Douglas-fir trees associated with Douglas-fir beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. D. Giunta; Justin Runyon; M. J. Jenkins; M. Teich

    2016-01-01

    Mass attack by tree-killing bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) brings about large chemical changes in host trees that can have important ecological consequences. For example, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) attack increases emission of terpenes by lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.), affecting foliage flammability with...

  5. Cholini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae housed in the Invertebrate Collection of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Manaus, Brazil Cholini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Molytinae depositados na Coleção de Invertebrados do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Luís Leitão Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazilian Amazonia, Cholini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Molytinae is represented by 53 species distributed in seven genera: Ameris Dejean, 1821; Cholus Germar, 1824; Homalinotus Sahlberg, 1823; Lobaspis Chevrolat, 1881; Odontoderes Sahlberg, 1823; Ozopherus Pascoe, 1872 and Rhinastus Schoenherr, 1825. This work documents the species of Cholini housed in the Invertebrate Collection of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Manaus, Brazil and gives the geographical and biological data associated with them. A total of 186 Cholini specimens were identified as belonging to 14 species (13 from Brazilian Amazonia and five genera (Cholus, Homalinotus, Odontoderes, Ozopherus and Rhinastus. Only 24% of the Cholini species reported from Brazilian Amazonia are actually represented in the INPA collection, underscoring the need for a more systematical collecting based on available biological information. The known geographical distribution was expanded for the following species: Cholus granifer (Chevrolat, 1881 for Brazil; C. pantherinus (Olivier, 1790 for Manaus (Amazonas; Cholus parallelogrammus (Germar, 1824 for Piraquara (Paraná; Homalinotus depressus (Linnaeus, 1758 for lago Janauacá (Amazonas and rio Tocantins (Pará; H. humeralis (Gyllenhal, 1836 for Novo Airão, Coari (Amazonas and Porto Velho (Rondônia; H. nodipennis (Chevrolat, 1878 for Carauari, Lábrea (Amazonas and Ariquemes (Rondônia; H. validus (Olivier, 1790 for rio Araguaia (Brasil, Manaus (Amazonas, rio Tocantins (Pará, Porto Velho and BR 364, Km 130 (Rondônia; Odontoderes carinatus (Guérin-Méneville, 1844 for Manaus (Amazonas; O. spinicollis (Boheman, 1836 for rio Uraricoera (Roraima; and Ozopherus muricatus Pascoe, 1872 for lago Janauacá (Amazonas. Homalinotus humeralis is reported for the first time from "urucuri" palm, Attalea phalerata Mart. ex Spreng.Na Amazônia brasileira, Cholini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Molytinae é representada por 53 espécies, distribu

  6. Flight Dynamics and Abundance of Ips sexdentatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae in Different Sawmills from Northern Spain: Differences between Local Pinus radiata (Pinales: Pinaceae and Southern France Incoming P. pinaster Timber

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    Sergio López

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2009, the windstorm “Klaus” struck the southern part of France, affecting 37.9 million m3 of maritime pine Pinus pinaster Aiton (Pinales: Pinaceae. This breeding plant material favored the outbreak of Ips sexdentatus (Börner (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae. As much of this timber is imported to the Basque Country (northern Spain, a potential risk to conifer stands is generated, due to the emergence of the incoming beetles. Thus, flight dynamics and beetle abundance were compared in different sawmills, according to the timber species (either local P. radiata D. Don or imported P. pinaster. A maximum flight peak of I. sexdentatus was observed in mid-June in P. pinaster importing sawmills, whereas a second lighter peak occurred in September. In contrast, only a maximum peak in mid-June was observed in P. radiata inhabiting beetles, being significantly smaller than in local P. pinaster trading sawmills. In addition, significant differences were found between imported P. pinaster and P. radiata regarding the number of insects beneath the bark. The development of IPM strategies for controlling I. sexdentatus populations is recommended, due to the insect abundance found in P. pinaster imported timber.

  7. Virulencia, producción y desplazamiento de nematodos entomopatógenos sobre larvas del picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en laboratorio.

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    Adriana Sáenz Aponte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The guava weevil Conotrach­elus psidii Marshall is a major pest affecting guava cultiva­tion in Santander, Colombia; it causes serious losses in the quality and the volume of fruit produced. Biological control is a viable option for pest management; entomo­pathogenic nematodes (EPNs, particularly, have shown good results (63-90% mortality in controlling fourth in­star larvae of the guava weevil. In this study we evaluated the effect of seven species of EPNs isolated in Colom­bia: Steinernema websteri JCL006, Steinernema sp. 1 JCL024, Steinernema sp. 2 JCL007, Steinernema sp. 3 JCL027, S. co­lombiense SNI0198, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora HNI0100 and Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708 on fourth instar larvae of the guava weevil in laboratory conditions, and measured the production and the displacement of the most viru­lent. Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708 induced mortality of 85%, Steinernema sp. 1 JCL024 75% and S. colombiense SNI0198 55%, the other species of EPNs, less than 25% mortality. Increased production of JI by weevil larva was recorded in Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708, which also showed greater recognition capability when the host was C. psidii.

  8. Morphological, molecular and biological evidence reveal two cryptic species in Mecinus janthinus Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a successful biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (Lamiales, Plantaginaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivo Tosevski; Roberto Caldara; Jelena Jovic; Gerardo Hernandez-Vera; Cosimo Baviera; Andre Gassmann; Brent C. Emerson

    2011-01-01

    A combined morphological, molecular and biological study shows that the weevil species presently named Mecinus janthinus is actually composed of two different cryptic species: M. janthinus Germar, 1821 and M. janthiniformis Tosevski & Caldara sp.n. These species are morphologically distinguishable from each other by a few very subtle morphological characters. On...

  9. as Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... Blend effects in the toxicity of the essential oil constituents of Ocimum kilmandscharicum and Ocimum kenyense (Labiateae) on two Post-harvest insect pests. Phytochemistry 57: 385-391. Bekele AJ (2002). Evaluation of the toxicity potential of Milletia ferruginea (Hochest) Baker against Sitophilus zeamais ...

  10. Mutantes morfológicos de algodoeiro herbáceo como fonte de resistência ao bicudo Morphological mutants of upland cotton as source of boll weevil resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco das Chagas Vidal Neto

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos de três características morfológicas mutantes de linhagens de algodoeiro herbáceo (Gossypium hirsutum L. r. latifolium Hutch., isoladas ou combinadas no mesmo genótipo, como fonte de resistência ao bicudo, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, 1843 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. O experimento foi conduzido em campo, sob infestação natural, com delineamento de blocos ao acaso e arranjo fatorial 2´3 com um tratamento adicional, com quatro repetições. Em teste com chance de escolha, a característica bráctea frego foi a que apresentou maior redução no dano de oviposição pelo bicudo (34,71%, em relação ao equivalente normal. A folha "okra" reduziu o dano apenas quando associada à bráctea frego (40%. A combinação das três características mutantes na mesma planta proporcionou a menor porcentagem de botões com dano de oviposição (23,13%.This work aimed to evaluate the effects of three morphological mutants of upland cotton lines (Gossypium hirsutm L. r. latifolium Hutch., isolated or in combination in the same cotton genotype, as a source of resistance to boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, 1843 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. The experiment was carried out in the field, under natural infestation, with a completely randomized block design arranged in a factorial 2´3 plus an additional treatment, with four replications. In a multiple choice test, the character mutant frego bract presented the higher reduction on boll weevil oviposition damage (34.71%, in relation to the normal equivalent. The okra leaf reduced the boll weevil damage only when associated with frego bract (40%. The combination of the three mutant characters in the same plant presented the least square percent with oviposition damage (23.13%.

  11. Survival and development of a stored-product pest, Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and its natural enemy, the parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), on transgenic Bt maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lise S; Lövei, Gábor L; Székács, András

    2013-05-01

    The effect of transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) containing a lepidopteran-specific Bt toxin on a stored-product pest, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, and its parasitoid, Lariophagus distinguendus Förster, was examined in the laboratory to test the impact of transgenic maize on stored-product pests and their biological control. Weevils were not harmfully affected by transgenic Bt maize in their development characteristics (development time, body mass), and females emerging from transgenic maize kernels were larger. However, significantly fewer parasitoid females emerged from weevils that developed in transgenic kernels, although parasitoids did not develop more slowly and were not different in size or mass from their conspecifics emerging from hosts in non-transgenic maize kernels. The emergence of female parasitoids was reduced in transgenic Bt maize, and this effect cannot be explained by the known lepidopteran-specific toxicity of Bt Cry1Ab toxin. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Study on the Tribe Ochyromerini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) from East Asia I, Descriptions of New Species of the Genera Endaeus and Endaenidius

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Katsura

    1995-01-01

    This is the first part of our systematic study on the tribe Ochyromerini (=Endaeini) from East Asia with descriptions of 28 new species of the weevils in the genera Endaeus Schoenherr and Endaenidius Morimoto as follows: Endaeus albolineatus sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus niger sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus zonatus sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus robustus sp. nov. (Thailand), Endaeus longipes sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus formosanus sp. nov. (Taiwan), Endaeus elongatus sp. nov. (Taiwan),...

  13. Susceptibility and possible resistance mechanisms in the palm species Phoenix dactylifera, Chamaerops humilis and Washingtonia filifera against Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier, 1790) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangelosi, B; Clematis, F; Curir, P; Monroy, F

    2016-06-01

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, known as the Red Palm Weevil (RPW), is reported as a pest of up to 40 palm species. However, the susceptibility degree and the defense mechanisms of these species against this weevil are still poorly known. In Europe, the RPW is a major pest of Phoenix canariensis while other palm species, including the congeneric Phoenix dactylifera, seem to be less suitable hosts for this insect. The aim of our study was to compare the defensive response of P. dactylifera, Chamaerops humilis and Washingtonia filifera against R. ferrugineus and try to define the mechanisms of resistance that characterize these species. Bioassays were carried out to evaluate the mortality induced on RPW larvae by extracts from the leaf rachis of the studied palm species. Tests at semi-field scale were also conducted, based either on forced palm infestation, with larvae of RPW, or on natural infestation, with adult females. Rachis extracts from C. humilis and W. filifera caused 100% larval mortality after 2 days of exposure, while extracts of P. dactylifera did not impair larval survival. Independently of the effect of the leaf extracts, the weevils were unable to naturally infest the three palm species, although larval survival was high after forced infestation of the plants. We concluded that the observed lack of infestation of P. dactylifera by RPW is due to factors other than antibiosis. In W. filifera and C. humilis, although the presence of antixenosis mechanisms cannot be excluded, resistance to R. ferrugineus seems to rely on the presence of antibiosis compounds.

  14. Modified alpha-amylase activity among insecticide-resistant and -susceptible strains of the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, K V G; Silva, L B; Reis, A P; Oliveira, M G A; Guedes, R N C

    2010-09-01

    Fitness cost is usually associated with insecticide resistance and may be mitigated by increased energy accumulation and mobilization. Preliminary evidence in the maize weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) suggested possible involvement of amylases in such phenomenon. Therefore, alpha-amylases were purified from an insecticide-susceptible and two insecticide-resistant strains (one with fitness cost [resistant cost strain], and the other without it [resistant no-cost strain]). The main alpha-amylase of each strain was purified by glycogen precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography (>or=70-fold purification, cost strain exhibited higher activity towards starch and lower inhibition by acarbose and wheat amylase inhibitors. Opposite results were observed for the alpha-amylase from the resistant cost strain. Although the alpha-amylase from the resistant cost strain exhibited higher affinity to starch (i.e., lower K(m)), its V(max)-value was the lowest among the strains, particularly the resistant no-cost strain. Such results provide support for the hypothesis that enhanced alpha-amylase activity may be playing a major role in mitigating fitness costs associated with insecticide resistance.

  15. Efficacy of fipronil for protecting individual pines from mortality attributed to attack by western pine beetle and mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.J. Fettig; A.S. Munson; C.I. Jorgenson; D.M. and Grosman

    2010-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: C~rculionidae, Scolytinae) are commonly recognized as important tree mortality agents in coniferous forests of the western U.S. Most species feed on the phloem and cambium, or xylem tissue of woody plants; and a few are recognized as the most destructive of all forest insect pests. The last decade has seen elevated levels of bark beetle caused...

  16. Alfalfa Weevil in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Edward W.

    1989-01-01

    The alfalfa weevil is a major pest throughout Utah. It is a beetle with one generation per year. Eggs hatch in the spring, and the grub-like immature weevils (larvae) feed by chewing on the alfalfa foliage. In high numbers, alfalfa weevils can cause severe damage to Utah alfalfa. In any given year, however, the weevils are few enough in number in many fields to cause only minor damage.

  17. The infestation by an exotic ambrosia beetle, Euplatypus parallelus (F. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Platypodinae of Angsana trees (Pterocarpus indicus Willd. in southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bumrungsri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An exotic ambrosia beetle, Euplatypus parallelus (F. was collected from infested Pterocarpus indicus Willd. trees in Prince of Songkla University. Larvae and eggs were found in simple galleries with a single branch. Either a single male or a male and a female were found in each gallery. Half of these infested trees were previously attacked by long-horned beetles probably Aristobia horridula (Hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, while some of them appeared to be healthy. Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht.:Fr. was isolated from frass, sapwood samples and insect larvae, and might be a cause of death of P.indicus.

  18. effect of age, female mating status and density on the banana weevil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    journal

    morfologia externa de Cosmopolites sordidus. Germar. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Ciencias Biologia La. Habana 1:1-11. Mitchell, G. A. 1978. The estimation of banana borer population and resistance levels. WINBAN Research and development. Technical bulletin No. 2. pp. 34. Ndiege, I. O., Jayaraman, S., Oehlschlager, ...

  19. Insecticidal Properties of Peumus boldus Molina Powder Used Alone and Mixed with Lime Against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleopter: Curculionidae Propiedades Insecticidas del Polvo de Peumus boldus Molina Solo y en Mezcla con Cal contra Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Gabriel Bustos-Figueroa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal properties of boldus (Peumus boldus Molina powder used alone and mixed with lime against adults of maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky were evaluated under laboratory conditions. Additionally, aeration effects (presence or absence and temperature (room temperature vs. 3 ºC on insecticidal properties were studied over time. A mortality rate of 100% was observed at 20 g kg-1 (w/w of P. boldus powder when used alone and mixed with lime in proportions of 50:50, 60:40, and 80:20. The 50% lethal concentration (LC50 for all treatments was Se evaluaron las propiedades insecticidas del polvo de boldo (Peumus boldus Molina, solo y en mezcla con cal, bajo condiciones de laboratorio. Adicionalmente, se evaluó el efecto de la aeración (presencia vs. ausencia y de la temperatura (temperatura ambiente vs. 3 ºC sobre la mortalidad y emergencia de adultos de la F1. La concentración de 20 g kg-1 (p/p del polvo de boldo ya sea solo o en combinación con cal en las proporciones de 50:50, 60:40 y 80:20 mostraron 100% de mortalidad. La concentración letal 50% (CL50, en todos los tratamientos fue menor a 5 g kg-1 (p/p mientras que la CL90 no superó 11 g kg-1 (p/p. La mezcla del polvo con los granos de maíz tanto solo como en mezcla con cal no afectó la germinación. La temperatura y la aeración no afectaron la mortalidad de los adultos parentales ni la emergencia de adultos de la F1. Cuando se mezcló el maíz con el polvo de boldo molido 24 h antes de la infestación con adultos, la mortalidad de los adultos parentales y la emergencia de adultos de la F1 fue de 100 y de 0%, respectivamente. Los resultados no fueron satisfactorios cuando el polvo de boldo almacenado durante 30, 60 y 90 d fue mezclado con el maíz infestado. La toxicidad del follaje de boldo es alta 24 h después de pulverizarse; si el tiempo es mayor, la toxicidad declina significativamente.

  20. Control of Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... Control of Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) with local plant materials in the western highlands of Cameroon. AKOB C. A.1,2*, and EWETE, F. K. 1. 1. Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria: 2. Regional College of ...

  1. Evaluation of toxicity of biorational insecticides against larvae of the alfalfa weevil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadi V.P. Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, is a major pest of alfalfa Medicago sativa L. (Fabaceae. While H. postica usually causes the most damage before the first cutting, in summer of 2015 damaging levels of the pest persisted in Montana well after the first harvest of alfalfa. Although conventional insecticides can control H. postica, these chemicals have adverse effects on non-target organisms including pollinators and natural enemy insects. In this context, use of biorational insecticides would be the best alternative options, as they are known to pose less risk to non-target organisms. We therefore examined the six commercially available biorational insecticides against H. postica under laboratory condition: Mycotrol® ESO (Beauveria bassiana GHA, Aza-Direct® (Azadirachtin, Met52® EC (Metarhizium brunneum F52, Xpectro OD® (B. bassiana GHA + pyrethrins, Xpulse OD® (B. bassiana GHA + Azadirachtin and Entrust WP® (spinosad 80%. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 times the lowest labelled rates were tested for all products. However, in the case of Entrust WP, additional concentrations of 0.001 and 0.01 times the lowest label rate were also assessed. Mortality rates were determined at 1–9 days post treatment. Based on lethal concentrations and relative potencies, this study clearly showed that Entrust was the most effective, causing 100% mortality within 3 days after treatment among all the tested materials. With regard to other biorational, Xpectro was the second most effective insecticide followed by Xpulse, Aza-Direct, Met52, and Mycotrol. Our results strongly suggested that these biorational insecticides could potentially be applied for H. postica control.

  2. Inherited influence of low dose gamma radiation on the reproductive potential and spermiogenesis of the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem A. Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The southern cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F is a severe agriculture pest worldwide. In the current work, newly emerged adult males of C. maculatus have been irradiated with a low dose of 20Gy gamma radiation. The inherited deleterious effects on the fecundity, hatchability, adult emergence, and the sterility percent were recorded for the progenies F1 and F2 of the irradiated parental males. The fecundity, hatched larvae, the number of males and females were reduced in both F1 and F2. The sterility percent was high in F1 (70.8% and increased in the F2 (88.3% generation. Histopathological effects were also documented in the testes of F1 and F2 progenies. The spermatids and sperms have exhibited a variety of abnormalities. In the early spermatids, the nebenkern outer cell membrane was ruptured. The spermatid nucleus loses its homogeneous texture and has multiple foci of dense chromatin, as well as, profiles range has little dense material. In some groups, the nucleus had a peculiar ring of chromatin. The sperms had shown a variety of aberrations. The sperms irregularity distributed in lysed cysts by unusual manner. Also, some sperms had remarkably enlarged axoneme and small rounded nucleus. Many of the sperm cells were observed with two axonemes, abnormal mitochondria derivatives, and more than two accessory bodies. These results indicate that the low dose of 20 Gy induces semi-sterility in C. maculatus through generations. The same technique would help to improve using of sterile insect technique for other agriculture pests.

  3. Potential of an indigenous strain of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana as a biological control agent against the Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembilio, Oscar; Quesada-Moraga, Enrique; Santiago-Alvarez, Cándido; Jacas, Josep A

    2010-07-01

    The potential of a strain of Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Clavicipitaceae) obtained from a naturally infected Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pupa as a biological control agent against this weevil was evaluated both in the laboratory and in semi-field assays. Laboratory results indicate that this strain of B. bassiana can infect eggs, larvae and adults of R. ferrugineus (LC(50) from 6.3 x 10(7) to 3.0 x 10(9) conidia per ml). However, mortality was not the only indicator of treatment efficacy because adults of either sex inoculated with the fungus efficiently transmitted the disease to untreated adults of the opposite sex, with male-to-female and female-to-male rates of transmission of 55% and 60%, respectively. In addition, treatment with B. bassiana significantly reduced fecundity (up to 62.6%) and egg hatching (32.8%) in pairing combinations with fungus-challenged males, females or both sexes. Likewise, 30-35% increase in larval mortality was observed in larvae obtained from eggs from fungus-challenged females or from untreated females coupled with inoculated males, resulting in an overall 78% progeny reduction. Semi-field preventive assays on potted 5-year old Phoenix canariensis palms, with efficacies up to 85.7%, confirmed the potential of this strain as a biological control agent against R. ferrugineus. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Volatile and Within-Needle Terpene Changes to Douglas-fir Trees Associated With Douglas-fir Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, A D; Runyon, J B; Jenkins, M J; Teich, M

    2016-08-01

    Mass attack by tree-killing bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) brings about large chemical changes in host trees that can have important ecological consequences. For example, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) attack increases emission of terpenes by lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.), affecting foliage flammability with consequences for wildfires. In this study, we measured chemical changes to Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Mirb.) Franco) foliage in response to attack by Douglas-fir beetles (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins) as trees die and crowns transitioned from green/healthy, to green-infested (year of attack), to yellow (year after attack), and red (2 yr after attack). We found large differences in volatile and within-needle terpene concentrations among crown classes and variation across a growing season. In general, emissions and concentrations of total and individual terpenes were greater for yellow and red needles than green needles. Douglas-fir beetle attack increased emissions and concentrations of terpene compounds linked to increased tree flammability in other conifer species and compounds known to attract beetles (e.g., [Formula: see text]-pinene, camphene, and D-limonene). There was little relationship between air temperature or within-needle concentrations of terpenes and emission of terpenes, suggesting that passive emission of terpenes (e.g., from dead foliage) does not fully explain changes in volatile emissions. The potential physiological causes and ecological consequences of these bark beetle-associated chemical changes are discussed. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. On the identity of some weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius (1745-1808) in the Museum of Zoology of Copenhagen (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea, Curculionoidea, Tenebrionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The types of thirty-two nominal weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius are reviewed and lecto- and paralectotypes are designated for twenty-two of them. A neotype is designated for Curculiosticticus Fabricius, 1777. Protapionvaripes (Germar, 1817) is declared a nomen protectum over Curculioflavipes Fabricius, 1775. Based on a study of syntypes, Rhinomacercurculioides Fabricius, 1781 is confirmed as a member of Mycterus (Mycteridae), Bruchusundatus Fabricius, 1787 is tentatively transferred to Erotylidae, Curculiofulvirostris Fabricius, 1787 and Anthribusroboris Fabricius, 1798 are confirmed as members of Salpingus (Salpingidae), and Brachyceruscristatus Fabricius, 1798 is transferred to Tenebrionidae. Based on lectotype designation, Curculiocaninus Fabricius, 1792 is confirmed as a synonym of Sitonalineatus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Curculioinnocuus Fabricius, 1802 as a synonym of Cneorhinusbarcelonicus (Herbst, 1797). Bruchusrufipes Fabricius, 1792 is not considered an available species name, but a later use of Bruchusrufipes Olivier, 1790. Cossonusincisus Pascoe, 1885 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Cossonusilligeri Champion, 1909 and Cossonusvulneratus Illiger, 1805 from synonymy under Cossonuscanaliculatus (Fabricius, 1792) (a primary homonym of Curculiocanaliculatus Olivier, 1791). Cossonuscanaliculatus Fabricius, 1802 is a secondary homonym of the former and is replaced with Cossonusincisus. Salpingusfulvirostris (Fabricius, 1787) is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Salpingusplanirostris (Fabricius, 1787), a primary homonym of Curculioplanirostris Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783. The following new combinations are proposed: Brachysomuserinaceus (Fabricius, 1802) (from Curculio), Bronchusferus (Gyllenhal, 1840) (from Hipporhinus), Bronchusglandifer (Fabricius, 1792) (from Curculio), Bronchusnivosus (Sparrman, 1785) (from Curculio), Bronchussparrmani (Gyllenhal, 1833) (from Hipporhinus), Coelocephalapionatrirostre (Fabricius, 1802

  6. Flightless Catapionus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae) in Southwest China survive the Holocene trapped on mountaintops: new species, unknown phylogeny and clogging taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Vasily V

    2016-12-06

    This paper reports the first discovery of the weevil genus Catapionus in Southwest China. Eighteen specimens of C. mopsus sp.n. were collected in two high altitude localities some 360 km apart: Mt. Haba in Yunnan (the type locality) at 4,158-4,195 m and Mt. Gongga in Sichuan at 3,533-4,143 m. Habitus and genitalia of a male and a female from each locality are extensively illustrated. Six specimens from each locality were DNA barcoded (dx.doi.org/10.5883/DS-CATAPCH). Taxonomic validation of the new species name was made by referring to high quality illustrations of the holotype and to its DNA barcode, and without providing a customary verbal description. This novel approach was chosen partly due to the redundancy of description in the presence of high quality images, and partly due to the lack of adequate and unambiguously identified comparative material. Analysis of mtDNA sequences dated the separation of both geographical populations at about 3.65 Ma. The disjunct distribution of Catapionus in Asia is discussed and mapped for the first time. Monophyly and internal relationships of the genus are discussed and remain untested, together with the generic assignment to the phylogenetically vague Cneorhinini and/or Dermatodini. Discovery of the southernmost members of Catapionus high in the mountains of Southwest China evokes a hypothesis on interglacial refugia. A new term "clogging taxonomy" is introduced for situations as encountered in Catapionus when an abundance of obscure historical species-group names impedes further research.

  7. Mowing Height Influences Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Oviposition Behavior and Mechanical Removal From Golf Course Putting Greens, but Not Larval Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewski, Benjamin D; McGraw, Benjamin A

    2017-10-01

    The annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby), is a highly destructive pest of golf course turfgrass in eastern North America. Previous research has demonstrated that females prefer to oviposit within short-mown turfgrasses (<1.25 cm), and these offspring have improved fitness traits compared with larvae developing in higher-mowed turf. However, damage to putting green turf (<3.55 mm) is rarely reported. We investigated whether this phenomenon was due to adult removal through mowing or an inability of larvae to develop within a shortened plant. Greenhouse studies revealed that between 26% and 38% of adults were removed when turf was mowed at 2.54 mm (0.100 in), but the effect diminished with increasing mowing heights. The majority of adults survived mowing, indicating a potential for adults to reinvade turf stands adjacent to areas where grass clippings are discarded. Females oviposited in all mowing height treatments in laboratory and field experiments. However, behavior was influenced by plant height, as significantly fewer eggs were placed inside of the turfgrass stem at the lowest mowing height. Larval development was not affected by egg placement or turf height, and significant numbers of larvae were capable of developing to damaging stages (fourth- and fifth-instar larvae) in all treatments. Our findings suggest that L. maculicollis poses a threat to putting green-height turf, but the probability of damage occurring and need for insecticide applications may be lessened on low-mown surfaces. Future studies are needed to determine factors that influence L. maculicollis movement within the turfgrass canopy to optimize mechanical control. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Microwave radiation effects on the different stages of Sitophilus oryzae (Linne, 1763) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) evolutive cycle in rice, focusing its control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Jose G.; Franco, Suely S.H., E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H.; Arthur, Paula B.; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: caiohaddadfranco@lnbio.cnpem.com.br, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia e Ambiente

    2013-07-01

    As insects increase in radio tolerance as they develop and usually several developmental stages of pest may present in grain shipped commodity, it is important to know the microwave radiation susceptibility of stages of the target insect before the establishment of microwave radiation quarantine treatments. The current research had the aim to evaluate the microwave radiation effects on several phases of the rice weevil evolution cycle (S.oryzae), focusing its control. This specie is considered as on of the most serious worldwide pests for stored grains. The tests have been done in glass vials with 250 grams of whole grain (brown) rice and the irradiation was done in a 2,450 MHz commercial microwave oven, model Carousel II (potency of 800W). It was determined the exposure time needed to each phase control for the insect evolutive cycle, concluding that the immature phases (larvae and pupae), contained inside the rice, are more sensitive, requiring only 100 seconds to obtain 100% control while the egg phase requires a longer exposure (130 seconds). Referring to the grown phase, the time required to attain the lethal dose was 160 seconds. All the exposure time have been irradiated with a low potency (240 W). It also displayed that to greater quantities of rice (1.0 kg), with egg presence and forming a 2.0-centimeter layer on the microwave plate surface, it required an exposure time of 180 seconds. Therefore, in a more effective way, we can recommend these 180 seconds exposure time to the control of all phases concerning the insect evolutive cycle. (author)

  9. Sublethal Exposure to Clove and Cinnamon Essential Oils Induces Hormetic-Like Responses and Disturbs Behavioral and Respiratory Responses in Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddi, Khalid; Oliveira, Eugênio E; Faroni, Lêda R A; Guedes, Daniela C; Miranda, Natalie N S

    2015-12-01

    Essential oils have been suggested as suitable alternatives for controlling insect pests. However, the potential adaptive responses elicited in insects for mitigating the actions of these compounds have not received adequate attention. Furthermore, as is widely reported with traditional insecticides, sublethal exposure to essential oils might induce stimulatory responses or contribute to the development of resistance strategies that can compromise the management of insect pests. The current study evaluated the locomotory and respiratory responses as well as the number of larvae per grain produced by the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, after being sublethally exposed to the essential oils of clove, Syzygium aromaticum L., and cinnamon, Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. The essential oils showed similar insecticidal toxicity (exposure route: contact with dried residues; Clove LC95 = 3.96 [2.78-6.75] µl/cm(2); Cinnamon LC95 = 3.47 [2.75-4.73] µl/cm(2)). A stimulatory effect on the median survival time (TL50) was observed when insects were exposed to low concentrations of each oil. Moreover, a higher number of larvae per grain was produced under sublethal exposure to clove essential oil. S. zeamais avoided the treated areas (in free-choice experiments) and altered their mobility when sublethally exposed to both essential oils. The respiratory rates of S. zeamais (i.e., CO2 production) were significantly reduced under low concentrations of the essential oils. We recommend the consideration of the potential sublethal effects elicited by botanical pesticides during the development of integrated pest management programs aiming to control S. zeamais. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. On the identity of some weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius (1745–1808) in the Museum of Zoology of Copenhagen (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea, Curculionoidea, Tenebrionoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The types of thirty-two nominal weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius are reviewed and lecto- and paralectotypes are designated for twenty-two of them. A neotype is designated for Curculio sticticus Fabricius, 1777. Protapion varipes (Germar, 1817) is declared a nomen protectum over Curculio flavipes Fabricius, 1775. Based on a study of syntypes, Rhinomacer curculioides Fabricius, 1781 is confirmed as a member of Mycterus (Mycteridae), Bruchus undatus Fabricius, 1787 is tentatively transferred to Erotylidae, Curculio fulvirostris Fabricius, 1787 and Anthribus roboris Fabricius, 1798 are confirmed as members of Salpingus (Salpingidae), and Brachycerus cristatus Fabricius, 1798 is transferred to Tenebrionidae. Based on lectotype designation, Curculio caninus Fabricius, 1792 is confirmed as a synonym of Sitona lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Curculio innocuus Fabricius, 1802 as a synonym of Cneorhinus barcelonicus (Herbst, 1797). Bruchus rufipes Fabricius, 1792 is not considered an available species name, but a later use of Bruchus rufipes Olivier, 1790. Cossonus incisus Pascoe, 1885 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Cossonus illigeri Champion, 1909 and Cossonus vulneratus Illiger, 1805 from synonymy under Cossonus canaliculatus (Fabricius, 1792) (a primary homonym of Curculio canaliculatus Olivier, 1791). Cossonus canaliculatus Fabricius, 1802 is a secondary homonym of the former and is replaced with Cossonus incisus. Salpingus fulvirostris (Fabricius, 1787) is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Salpingus planirostris (Fabricius, 1787), a primary homonym of Curculio planirostris Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783. The following new combinations are proposed: Brachysomus erinaceus (Fabricius, 1802) (from Curculio), Bronchus ferus (Gyllenhal, 1840) (from Hipporhinus), Bronchus glandifer (Fabricius, 1792) (from Curculio), Bronchus nivosus (Sparrman, 1785) (from Curculio), Bronchus sparrmani (Gyllenhal, 1833) (from Hipporhinus

  11. On the identity of some weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius (1745–1808 in the Museum of Zoology of Copenhagen (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea, Curculionoidea, Tenebrionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Alonso-Zarazaga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The types of thirty-two nominal weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius are reviewed and lecto- and paralectotypes are designated for twenty-two of them. A neotype is designated for Curculio sticticus Fabricius, 1777. Protapion varipes (Germar, 1817 is declared a nomen protectum over Curculio flavipes Fabricius, 1775. Based on a study of syntypes, Rhinomacer curculioides Fabricius, 1781 is confirmed as a member of Mycterus (Mycteridae, Bruchus undatus Fabricius, 1787 is tentatively transferred to Erotylidae, Curculio fulvirostris Fabricius, 1787 and Anthribus roboris Fabricius, 1798 are confirmed as members of Salpingus (Salpingidae, and Brachycerus cristatus Fabricius, 1798 is transferred to Tenebrionidae. Based on lectotype designation, Curculio caninus Fabricius, 1792 is confirmed as a synonym of Sitona lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758 and Curculio innocuus Fabricius, 1802 as a synonym of Cneorhinus barcelonicus (Herbst, 1797. Bruchus rufipes Fabricius, 1792 is not considered an available species name, but a later use of Bruchus rufipes Olivier, 1790. Cossonus incisus Pascoe, 1885 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Cossonus illigeri Champion, 1909 and Cossonus vulneratus Illiger, 1805 from synonymy under Cossonus canaliculatus (Fabricius, 1792 (a primary homonym of Curculio canaliculatus Olivier, 1791. Cossonus canaliculatus Fabricius, 1802 is a secondary homonym of the former and is replaced with Cossonus incisus. Salpingus fulvirostris (Fabricius, 1787 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Salpingus planirostris (Fabricius, 1787, a primary homonym of Curculio planirostris Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783. The following new combinations are proposed: Brachysomus erinaceus (Fabricius, 1802 (from Curculio, Bronchus ferus (Gyllenhal, 1840 (from Hipporhinus, Bronchus glandifer (Fabricius, 1792 (from Curculio, Bronchus nivosus (Sparrman, 1785 (from Curculio, Bronchus sparrmani (Gyllenhal, 1833 (from Hipporhinus, Coelocephalapion

  12. Molecular systematics and morphological identification of the cryptic species of the genus Acalles Schoenherr, 1825, with descriptions of new species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, André; Stüben, Peter E

    2015-02-02

    Molecular systematics and morphological study of the monophyletic weevil genus Acalles Schoenherr, 1825 are presented. Based on the mitochondrial CO1 barcoding gene and 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we discuss three difficult species complexes in the framework of a molecular phylogenetic reconstruction of 37 of 47 Western Palaearctic Acalles species or subspecies: the A. echinatus, A. maraoensis and A. sierrae complexes. Two results are given: 1. An exclusive focus on morphological, exoskeletal methods reach their limits in the case of many cryptic Cryptorhynchinae. In these cases molecular analysis is indispensable to resolve species level questions. 2. By using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic characters it is not only possible to ascertain phylogenetic relationships, but also to uncover new morphological, non-intraspecifical characteristics. Digital photography with image stacking makes this possible: for the first time we present photo key for Acalles species, a reliable, less costly and quick method for identification alongside DNA barcoding. The following taxonomic changes are given: Coloracalles edoughensis Desbrochers, 1892 comb. nov. (formerly Acalles edoughensis) from North Africa and Spain change to Coloracalles Astrin & Stüben, 2008 and Pseudodichromacalles xerampelinus Wollaston, 1864 comb. nov. from the Canarian Island Tenerife, Acalles bazaensis Stüben, 2001 syn. nov. is a junior synonym of Acalles sierrae H. Brisout, 1865. Two new species of Acalles s. str. , A. iblanensis Stüben sp. nov. from Morocco and A. vorsti Stüben sp. nov. from Spain (Mallorca), and a new species of the subgenus Origoacalles Stüben & Astrin 2010, A. granulimaculosus Stüben sp. nov. from La Gomera, are described. Acalles temperei Péricart, 1987 stat. nov. is a subspecies of A. parvulus Boheman, 1837. A catalogue of all 43 (+4 incertae sedis) species of Acalles is presented. Finally and for the first time we compare 9 of 12 known North American so-called "Acalles

  13. Observations on the Cave-Associated Beetles (Coleoptera of Nova Scotia, Canada

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    Moseley M.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The cave-associated invertebrates of Nova Scotia constitute a fauna at a very early stage of post-glacial recolonization. TheColeoptera are characterized by low species diversity. A staphylinid Quedius spelaeus spelaeus, a predator, is the only regularlyencountered beetle. Ten other terrestrial species registered from cave environments in the province are collected infrequently. Theyinclude three other rove-beetles: Brathinus nitidus, Gennadota canadensis and Atheta annexa. The latter two together with Catopsgratiosus (Leiodidae constitute a small group of cave-associated beetles found in decompositional situations. Quedius s. spelaeusand a small suite of other guanophiles live in accumulations of porcupine dung: Agolinus leopardus (Scarabaeidae, Corticariaserrata (Latrididae, and Acrotrichis castanea (Ptilidae. Two adventive weevils Otiorhynchus ligneus and Barypeithes pellucidus(Curculionidae collected in shallow cave passages are seasonal transients; Dermestes lardarius (Dermestidae, recorded fromone cave, was probably an accidental (stray. Five of the terrestrial beetles are adventive Palaearctic species. Aquatic beetles arecollected infrequently. Four taxa have been recorded: Agabus larsoni (Dytiscidae may be habitual in regional caves; another Agabussp. (probably semivittatus, Dytiscus sp. (Dytiscidae, and Crenitis digesta (Hydrophilidae are accidentals. The distribution andecology of recorded species are discussed, and attention is drawn to the association of beetles found in a Nova Scotia “ice cave”.

  14. Captura de Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: curculionidae em armadilhas iscadas com o feromônio de agregação e compostos voláteis de frutos do abacaxi Trap catches of Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: curculionidae baited with its aggregation pheromone and volatile compounds from pineapple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Guimarães Duarte

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar os índices de captura de Rhynchophorus palmarum em armadilhas iscadas com o feromônio de agregação, 6-metil-2(E-hepten-4-ol (rincoforol, associado a toletes de cana-de-açúcar, a pedaços de frutos do abacaxi e a seis compostos voláteis isolados de frutos do abacaxi. Os compostos voláteis do abacaxi são caracterizados por uma mistura de ésteres metílicos e etílicos, sendo o octanoato de metila e o octanoato de etila os mais abundantes. As armadilhas iscadas com o rincoforol associado a toletes de cana-de-açúcar e as iscas com rincoforol associado a pedaços de abacaxi não apresentaram diferenças significativas no número de besouros capturados. No entanto, ambas apresentaram índices de captura superiores àquelas em que o rincoforol foi utilizado em associação com voláteis do abacaxi. Não se observaram efeitos significativos do local e época de captura, nem no número de machos e de fêmeas capturados.The aim of this work was to investigate the capture of Rhynchophorus palmarum in traps baited with its aggregation pheromone, 6-methyl-2(E-hepten-4-ol (rhynchophorol, in association with sugar cane, pieces of pineapple fruit, and six volatile compounds from pineapple. A mixture of methyl and ethyl esters, being methyl octanoate and ethyl octanoate the most abundant, characterizes the volatile compounds from pineapple fruits. Traps baited with rhynchophorol in association with sugar cane and those baited with rhynchophorol in association with pieces of pineapple, showed no significant differences in the number of trapped weevils. However, both traps caught significantly more weevils, than those baited with rhynchophorol in association with pineapple volatiles. There were no significant effects from place and time or in the number of male and female weevils trapped.

  15. Adult Diapause in Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Hodek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies dealing with adult (reproductive diapause in the Coleoptera are reviewed, as a kind of supplement to the classic compendia. In the first two sections, the general characteristics of adult diapause are described and principal terms explained. Original articles dealing with 19 species from nine coleopteran families (Coccinellidae, Chrysomelidae, Bruchidae, Curculionidae, Carabidae, Silphidae, Scolytidae, Scarabaeidae, and Endomychidae are reviewed. Finally attempts are made at generalisations from the papers reviewed, and hypotheses on diapause evolution are inferred. A polyphenic character of diapause is a prominent feature in C. septempunctata and L. decemlineata, but has been found also in other Coleoptera and in insects generally and often generates voltinism heterogeneity within populations.

  16. La morfología de Laparocerus undatus Wollaston, 1864 y consideraciones sobre la tribu Laparocerini Lacordaire, 1863 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae

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    Machado, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This morphological study of Laparocerus undatus Wollaston, 1864 covers the external and internal anatomy of the imago, including the alimentary canal, the central nervous system and the reproductive system. The anatomy of the larva and pupa, unknown in this genus, is also described. Laparocerus are Entimin weevils that bear some primitive characters, not frequent in the group. The justification of a tribe Laparocerini, not revised since it was established by Lacordaire in 1863, is considered. Similarities of adult and preimaginal characters with those of other genera and tribes are discussed, and genetic relationships are researched using partial sequences of the 16SrRNA gen obtained from GenBank for some twenty tribe representative species. Laparocerus has important singular characters or a combination of them and is clearly separate from the other Entiminae studied. It has possibly a basal phylogenetic position within the group. Some combined diagnostic characters for Laparocerini are proposed, in particular: presence of a dehiscent mandible process (or its scar, phanerognatus mouth parts, long scape, eyes and antennal scroba not dorsal, suture of ventrites 1-2 arcuate at middle, ventrite 2 as long as 3 and 4 together, femora unarmed, tibiae mucronate with open corbels, claws connate, and VIII sternite of male membranaceous bearing a short spiculum relictum; in the larvae, antennae are cushion shaped with an oval base and the mala has five ventral setae; the pupa lacks mandibular setae. These and other characters are used to evaluate the other genera traditionally assigned to Laparocerini. Recent exclusion of some of these genera by other authors is corroborated and the removal of Merimnetes, Neomerimnetes and Cyrtozemia is here proposed. Asmaratrox and Straticus from Africa remain as Laparocerini, pending confirmation. Finally, the convenience of splitting Laparocerus into several genera or keeping it as a single genus with many subgenera is

  17. The current status of the distribution range of the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis (Curculionidae: Solytinae) in northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    O. Valerio-Mendoza; F. Armendariz-Toledano; G. Cuellar-Rodriguez; Jose F. Negron; G. Zuniga

    2017-01-01

    The distribution range of the western pine beetle Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is supported only by scattered records in the northern parts of Mexico, suggesting that its populations may be marginal and rare in this region. In this study, we review the geographical distribution of D. brevicomis in northern Mexico and perform a geometric...

  18. Emergence of Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, and Scolytinae (Coleoptera) from mountain pine beetle-killed and fire-killed ponderosa pines in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheryl L. Costello; William R. Jacobi; Jose F. Negron

    2013-01-01

    Wood borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Buprestidae) and bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infest ponderosa pines, Pinus ponderosa P. Lawson and C. Lawson, killed by mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, and fire. No data is available comparing wood borer and bark beetle densities or species guilds associated with MPB-killed or fire-...

  19. Ecological aspects of a Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae population in São Miguel do Iguaçu, PR./ Aspectos ecológicos da população de Cosmopolites sordidus, (Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em São Miguel do Iguaçu, PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rohde

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The population dynamics of Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar was studied in banana crops (cultivar Nanicão at São Miguel do Iguaçu, PR, using roof-tile-like baits, between June/2003 and May/2004. Adults infected by entomopathogenic fungi were recorded, and predators were also found on the baits. A comparative bioassay was carried out between the Beauveria bassiana isolate obtained from the experiment area and from other regions in Brazil against C. sordidus adults. The population peaks of C. sordidus adults occurred in June and July, a period with mild temperatures and low precipitation. The population of C. sordidus larvae, however, was concentrated in December. The insect predators found in the area were insects of the following orders: Coleoptera (Carabidae, Dermaptera (Forficulidae, Hemiptera (Reduviidae, Hymenoptera (Formicidae, and spiders of the families Ctenidae, Clubionidae, and Lycosidae, with a population peak two months after the pest population peak. A low number of C. sordidus adults infected by B. bassiana was found, with an annual mean of 0.44%. In the laboratory, the B. bassiana isolates were pathogenic to the insects.Estudou-se a dinâmica populacional de Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar em cultivo de banana(cultivar Nanicão, em São Miguel do Iguaçu, PR, através de iscas do tipo telha, entre junho/2003 a maio/2004. Atribuiu-se conceito ao estado de conservação da isca, visando observar sua durabilidade e atratividade. Registraram-se adultos infectados por fungos entomopatogênicos, sendo também encontrados predadores nas iscas. Realizou-se um bioensaio com isolados de Beauveria bassiana da área experimental e de Centros de Pesquisa do Brasil, para avaliar a patogenicidade em C. sordidus. Verificou-se que os picos populacionais de adultos de C. sordidus ocorreram em junho e julho, período de temperaturas amenas e baixas precipitações, enquanto que as larvas foram mais abundantes em dezembro. Os insetos predadores

  20. A new subgenus of the weevil genus Otiorhynchus Germar, 1822 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae for a new species from Mediterranean Turkey associated with the carob tree, Ceratonia siliqua L. (Fabaceae

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    Genrik E. Davidian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species Otiorhynchus ceratoniae Davidian, Gültekin & Korotyaev sp. nov. is described from eastern Mediterranean Turkey. A new monotypic subgenus Arnoldinus Davidian, Gültekin & Korotyaev subgen. nov. is erected for this species. The new species was found only under Ceratonia siliqua L. trees with lower leaves damaged by adults.

  1. Bisexual populations of Otiorhynchus rugifrons (Coleoptera : Curculionidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, Th.; Hodge, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Vooral binnen het snuitkevergenus Otiorhynchus komen veel soorten voor die zich parthenogenetisch voortplanten. Sommige van deze soorten hebben in een beperkt deel van het areaal toch mannetjes. Voorbeelden hiervan zijn O, raucus, O. nodosus, O. rugosostriatus, O. scaber, O. veterator, O. sulcatus,

  2. TWO NEW ITALIAN CEUTORHYNCHUS (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Enzo Colonnelli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Are described and illustrated two new Italian species of Ceutorhynchus. The first of them, C. apenninus n. sp. from central Italy, collected on the montane crucifer Isatis allionii P. W. Ball., is close to C. peyerimhoffi Hustache from Spain, Italy and Algeria, also living on Isatis. The second, C. magnanoi n. sp. from southern Italy is very close to the French C. matthiolae Hoffmann, and was collected of Matthiola like the species from southern France.

  3. ON SOME JAPANESE CURCULIONINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Morimoto, Katsura

    1981-01-01

    This is the additions and corrections to my revision of the subfamily Curcu-lioninae from Japan (1960, ‘62). New taxa, recombinations and synonymies treated in this paper are as follows: Labminus gen. nov. (Type-species : Curponinus plicatulus Heller, 1925) Labaninus fukienensis (Voss, 1958), comb. nov. (Curculio) Labaninus kimotoi (Morimoto, 1960), comb. nov. (Curculio) Labaninus p2icatuZus (Heller, 1925), comb. nov. (Carponinus) Shigizo rhombiformis gen. et sp. nov. (monobasic) Curculio hir...

  4. Nematoides entomopatogênicos e sua interação com inseticida químico visando ao controle da broca-da-bananeira Cosmopolites sordidus Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    BORTOLUZZI, L.; L. F. A. ALVES; Alves,V.S.; Holz, N.

    2013-01-01

    The banana weevil borer (Cosmopolites sordidus) is the main pest of banana crops, causing significant losses in productivity, being recommended control by chemical insecticides which cause several environmental impacts. On the other hand, entomopathogenic nematodes can be an alternative to the pest control, mainly because of their habits. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating isolated entomopathogenic nematodes under laboratory conditions and also their interaction with a chemical insecticide ...

  5. Chemical Control of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic pest of U.S. trees in the family Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and redbay (P. borbonia). It threatens avocado production in Florida by transmitting Raffaelea lauricola, the fungal...

  6. Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Star Anise Illicium verum Extracts Against Maize Weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Linlin; Hua, Rimao; Li, Maoye; Huang, Yanzhang; Li, Shiguang; He, Yujie; Shen, Zonghai

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop eco-friendly botanical pesticides. Dried fruits of star anise (Illicium verum Hook.f. (Austrobaileyales: Schisandraceae)) were extracted with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) at 25°C. The constituents were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the repellency and contact toxicity of the extracts against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults were tested. Fortyfour compounds, whose concentra...

  7. The Current Status of the Distribution Range of the Western Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis (Curculionidae: Solytinae) in Northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Mendoza, O; Armendáriz-Toledano, F; Cuéllar-Rodríguez, G; Negrón, José F

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The distribution range of the western pine beetle Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is supported only by scattered records in the northern parts of Mexico, suggesting that its populations may be marginal and rare in this region. In this study, we review the geographical distribution of D. brevicomis in northern Mexico and perform a geometric morphometric analysis of seminal rod shape to evaluate its reliability for identifying this species with respect to other members of the Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) complex. Our results provide 30 new records, with 26 distributed in the Sierra Madre Occidental and 4 in the Sierra Madre Oriental. These records extend the known distribution range of D. brevicomis to Durango and Tamaulipas states in northern Mexico. Furthermore, we find high geographic variation in size and shape of the seminal rod, with conspicous differences among individuals from different geographical regions, namely west and east of the Great Basin and between mountain systems in Mexico. PMID:28922899

  8. Spatio-temporal analysis of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Circulionidae: Scolytinae) Invasion in Eastern U.S. Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.H. Koch; W.D. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The non-native redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has recently emerged as a signiÞcant pest of southeastern U.S. coastal forests. SpeciÞcally, a fungal symbiont (Raffaelea sp.) of X. glabratus has caused mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia...

  9. Posición taxonómica de Acrotomopus atropunctellus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae y descripción del daño producido en el cultivo de caña de azúcar en la Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Pilar PÉREZ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrotomopus atropunctellus (Boheman (Curculionidae: Molytinae: Cholini es una especie de picudo, endémica de la Argentina, que habita principalmente en la provincia biogeográfica de las Yungas; citada como perjudicial para la caña de azúcar en 1929. Hasta hace una década, no se habían producido nuevos reportes de daños, sin embargo, el aumento de la superficie cultivada con caña ha provocado el resurgimiento de la plaga. Morfológicamente, esta especie se asemeja a Acrotomopus wagneri Hustache, distribuida en la provincia biogeográfica del Chaco. Su biología es similar a la de otras especies de la tribu Cholini con larvas minadoras de cañas. Las hembras oviponen en las porciones basal y media de los plantines. Las larvas cavan galerías descendentes hasta alcanzar la cepa para pasar allí el invierno y reducen paulatinamente el rebrote de la caña en las siguientes temporadas. Los adultos producen perforaciones de pequeño diámetro y bordes ásperos en los brotes, macollos, tallos y nervadura central de las hojas. Se brinda una clave dicotómica para separar A. atropunctellus de las otras tres especies del género, todas presentes en la Argentina (A. wagneri, A. microspilotus (Pascoe y A. obtusus (Hustache y se describen los rasgos principales de su ciclo biológico y de los daños ocasionados en cultivos de caña de la provincia de Tucumán. El trabajo incluye fotografías de hábito de las cuatro especies de Acrotomopus, y de la larva y los daños ocasionados por A. atropunctellus.

  10. Effects of a non-native biocontrol weevil, Larinus planus, and other emerging threats on populations of the federally threatened Pitcher's thistle, Cirsium pitcheri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Kayri; Jolls, Claudia L.; Marik, Julie E.; Vitt, Pati; McEachern, A. Kathryn; Kind, Darcy

    2012-01-01

    Larinus planus Frabicius (Curculionidae), is a seed-eating weevil that was inadvertently introduced into the US and was subsequently distributed in the US and Canada for the control of noxious thistle species of rangelands. It has been detected recently in the federally threatened Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri). We assayed weevil damage in a natural population of Pitcher's thistle at Whitefish Dunes State Park, Door County, WI and quantified the impact on fecundity. We then estimated the impact of this introduced weevil and other emerging threats on two natural, uninvaded populations of Pitcher's thistle for which we have long-term demographic data for 16 yr (Wilderness State Park, Emmet County, MI) and 23 yr (Miller High Dunes, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Porter County, IN). We used transition matrices to determine growth rates and project the potential effects of weevil damage, inbreeding, goldfinch predation, and vegetative succession on Pitcher's thistle population viability. Based on our models, weevil seed predation reduced population growth rate by 10–12%, but this reduction was enough to reduce time to extinction from 24 yr to 13 yr and 8 yr to 5 yr in the MI and IN population, respectively. This impact is particularly severe, given most populations of Pitcher's thistle throughout its range hover near or below replacement. This is the first report of unanticipated ecological impacts from a biocontrol agent on natural populations of Cirsium pitcheri.

  11. Bioindication Potential of the Coleoptera

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    Belitskaya Mariya Nikolaevna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Different families of Coleoptera ambiguously respond to the pollution of SPZs with industrial emissions. For example, the SPZ of Volgograd aluminum plant has the changing biodiversity of insect communities at different distances from the pollution source. The increasing level of pollution is accompanied by the reduction in species abundance. At a distance of 200 m a special ecological zone with the specific composition of the entomofauna was formed. It is significantly different from other habitats. No Cerambycidae species may survive in the zone of maximum pollution, and the number of Curculionidae species is reduced significantly. The number of Cerambycidae decreases by more than 40 % in the presence of even minimal contamination. The most sensitive bioindicators are represented by such insects as Cerambycidae, Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Changes in the indices can be described by the function y = arctan (x, where x is the distance from the pollution source (in meters. The specificity of this function is to identify levels of possible changes of species richness and numerical abundance of communities. On the basis of trigonometric functions describing the changes in the species composition and abundance, the authors offered the method for assessing the quality of the environment in SPZs. The use of three families of insects opens up prospects of differentiation zones of technogenic pressure.

  12. Interception of weevils on cut flowers from South Africa by Korea plant quarantine

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    Wonhoon Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2015, a total of 31 samples belonging to superfamily Curculionoidea (Coleoptera were intercepted from the cut flowers imported from South Africa at the Korean quarantine border. These samples were identified based on the available literature, and they were confirmed as 11 species belonging to four families. However, only three species were identified at the species level. The others were only classified into seven genera and one tribe level. Until now, there have been very few studies about weevils distributed in Africa. Consequently, there is a lack of available information for species identification of intercepted weevils at the quarantine border. This study aims to raise public awareness regarding the introduction of unwanted insect pests from the international trade of plants and/or plant products. It also suggests the need for international cooperation and taxonomic networking for the identification of intercepted pests. Keywords: Curculionoidea, cut flower, interception, plant quarantine, taxonomic networking system

  13. NON PREFERENCE FOR OVIPOSITION AND FEEDING OF Weevil Zabrotes subfasciatus (BOHEMANN, 1833 (COLEOPTERA-BRUCHIDAE IN BEAN LINES (Phaseolus vulgaris L. BEARERS OF ARCELIN NÃO-PREFERÊNCIA PARA OVIPOSIÇÃO E ALIMENTAÇÃO DE Zabrotes subfasciatus (BOHEMANN, 1833 (COLEOPTERA: BRUCHIDAE EM CULTIVARES DE FEIJÃO (Phaseolus vulgaris L. PORTADORES DE ARCELINA

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    Eliane Divina de Tolêdo Souza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Arcelin is a seed protein only found in wild beans which gives resistance to bean weevil (Zabrotes subfasciatus Bohemann, 1833. In this study the non preference for oviposition and feeding of the bean weevil was evaluated on a series of near isogenic bean lines: Arc 1, Arc 2, Arc 3 and Arc 4. The bean cultivars Porrillo 70 and Goiano Precoce were utilized as susceptible checks. There wasn’t oviposition preference among the six genotypes studied. The near isogenic lines that contain Arcelin 1 and Arcelin 2 were the last in preference for feeding.

    KEY-WORDS: Resistance; non preference.

    A arcelina é uma proteína encontrada somente em feijões silvestres e é o fator que confere resistência ao caruncho Zabrotes subfasciatus (Bohemann, 1833. Procurou-se verificar a não-preferência para oviposição e alimentação de Z. subfasciatus em uma série de linhagens de feijão quase isogênicas contendo diferentes alelos de arcelina: Arc 1, Arc 2, Arc 3 e Arc 4. Os controles suscetíveis utilizados foram Porrillo 70 e Goiano Precoce. Não houve preferência para oviposição entre os seis genótipos estudados. As linhagens quase isogênicas contendo Arcelina 1 e Arcelina 2 foram as menos preferidas para alimentação.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Resistência; Phaseolus; Zabrotes; não-preferência.

  14. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by abscisic acid and sugar (Research article). 63 achiasmy. Male-biased recombination in odonates: insights from a linkage map of the damselfly Ischnura elegans (Research note). 115 acorn weevil. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for acorn weevil Curculio bimaculatus Faust (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

  15. Seed-feeding insects impacting globemallow seed production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Hammon; Melissa Franklin

    2012-01-01

    Weevils (Anthonomus sphaeralciae Fall [Coleoptera: Curculionidae]), which attack flowers and developing seeds, can significantly impact globemallow Sphaeralcea spp. A. St.-Hil. (Malvaceae) seed production without a grower even noticing there was insect damage. This weevil damaged almost one-quarter of the flowers in a seed production field in Delta County, Colorado,...

  16. THE ROLE OF HALTICA SP. (COLEOPTERA: HALTICIDAE AS BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENT OF POLYGONUM CHINENSE

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    SUN JAY A

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Haltica sp. (Coleoptera: Halticidae with emphasis on host specificity and damage potential in controlling Polygonum chinense was evaluated under laboratory condition. Starvation test of the weevil on 33 weeds and 14 crop plant species indicated that only 6 weed species were attacked: Polygonum chinense, P. nepalense, P. barbatum, P. longisetum, Ludwigia octovalvis and L. parennis with P. chinense as the most preferred host plant. Preliminary damage potential test indicated that a population of 0, 1,2 and 3 pairs of adult weevil reduced the percentage of fresh weight increment of P. chinense by 0; 46.2; 74.7 and 75.5% respectively. Field observations indicated that the larvae as well as adult weevils are potential biological control agents of P. chinense. Further studies are, however, on the host-range of this weevil.

  17. Additive photonic colors in the Brazilian diamond weevil: entimus imperialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, S.; Vigneron, J.-P.; Colomer, J.-F.; Vandenbem, C.; Deparis, O.

    2012-10-01

    Structurally colored nano-architectures found in living organisms are complex optical materials, giving rise to multiscale visual effects. In arthropods, these structures often consist of porous biopolymers and form natural photonic crystals. A signature of the structural origin of coloration in insects is iridescence, i.e., color changes with the viewing angle. In the scales located on the elytra of the Brazilian weevil Entimus imperialis (Curculionidae), three-dimensional photonic crystals are observed. On one hand, each of them interacts independently with light, producing a single color which is observed by optical microscopy and ranges from blue to orange. On the other hand, the color perceived by the naked eye is due to multi-length-scale light effects involving different orientations of a single photonic crystal. This disorder in crystal orientations alters the light propagation in such a way that the crystal iridescence is removed. Entimus imperialis is therefore a remarkable example of additive photonic colors produced by a complex multi-scale organic architecture. In order to study this specific natural photonic structure, electron microscopy is used. The structure turns out to be formed of a single type of photonic crystal with different orientations within each scale on the elytra. Our modeling approach takes into account the disorder in the photonic crystals and explains why the structure displays bright colors at the level of individual scales and a non-iridescent green color in the far-field.

  18. Persistência de óleos essenciais em milho armazenado, submetido à infestação de gorgulho do milho Persistence of essential oils in stored maize submitted to infestation of maize weevil

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    Rodrigo Leandro Braga de Castro Coitinho

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Os óleos essenciais e os compostos constituintes têm sido pesquisados quanto a sua atividade inseticida contra pragas de grãos armazenados. Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a persistência de óleos essenciais em milho armazenado, submetido à infestação do gorgulho do milho, Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. A persistência dos óleos e do eugenol foi avaliada no período inicial (logo após a impregnação e aos 30, 60, 90 e 120 dias de armazenamento. As mortalidades de S. zeamais, no período inicial, variaram entre 93,8 (Piper hispidinervum, Melaleuca leucadendron e eugenol e 100% (Eugenia uniflora, frutos verdes de Schinus terebinthifolius e Piper marginatum. A partir dos 30 dias, as mortalidades, de modo geral, decresceram, com exceção de P. marginatum (92,2%, que alcançou 53,1% de mortalidade aos 120 dias de armazenamento. De acordo com as equações de regressão ajustadas para o número de S. zeamais emergidos em todo o período de armazenamento, apenas não houve significância para os óleos de S. terebinthifolius, P. marginatum e testemunha. Em relação à média geral, o óleo de P. marginatum foi o mais persistente, proporcionando emergência de apenas 0,30 insetos, diferindo dos óleos restantes, do eugenol e da testemunha. Os demais tratamentos só diferiram em relação à testemunha.The essential oils and constituent compounds have been studied for their insecticidal activity against stored grain pests. In this research, persistence of the essential oils in stored maize subject to infestation by maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae were evaluated. Persistence of oils and eugenol were evaluated in the initial period (after impregnation and at 30, 60, 90 and 120 days of storage. Mortalities of S. zeamais in the initial period ranged between 93.8 (Piper hispidinervum, Melaleuca leucadendron and eugenol to 100% (Eugenia uniflora, green fruits of Schinus terebinthifolius and Piper

  19. Acoustic assessment of Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) effects on Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larval activity and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae), the red palm weevil, is an economically important palm tree pest in subtropical regions of the world. Previous studies have shown that R. ferrugineus can be infected and killed by the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana. Howev...

  20. Response of banana cultivars to banana weevil attack

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to keep banana plantations free of destructive levels of banana weevil. Gold et al (1997) have reported that moderate and intensive sanitation significantly lowered both weevil population and damage due to banana weevil. New pheromone traps (Cosmo-lures) that can trap many times more weevils compared to traditional ...

  1. Integrated biological control of water hyacinths, Eichhornia crassipes by a novel combination of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella (Valenciennes, 1844), and the weevil, Neochetina spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ayyaru; Rajkumar, Mayalagu; Sun, Jun; Parida, Ajay; Venmathi Maran, Balu Alagar

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella (Cyprinidae) and weevils Neochetina spp. (Curculionidae) to control the aquatic weed, water hyacinth, is investigated in a square net cage (happas) setting at a farm in Cuddalore District, South India. This novel combination of insects and fish is found to be superior to individual treatments for controlling the weed growth within 110 d. The biomass of the weed, number of plants, percentage of flowered plants and chlorophyll contents were studied. The weed biomass is reduced from 5 kg (day 1) to 0.33 kg (day 110) when exposed to grass carp and weevils. The number of plants is reduced to 0.75 in grass carp and weevil exposed happas, while it is 741.5 in the control. The mean number of leaves per plant is also reduced. In addition, the chlorophyll a and b are significantly reduced in happas exposed to the combination of fish and insects when compared to the other treatments. Based on the results of this study, we consider the combined use of grass carp and weevils to be more efficient and sustainable for managing water hyacinths than the use of these organisms individually.

  2. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF BEAN WEEVIL (Acanthoscelides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    and 13.1mg of iron respectively; indication that insects are rich sources of Fe. Like other insects weevils are good sources of calcium, occasioned by their possession of exoskeleton which is composed of calcium (Ebong, 1993). (d). Table III reports the level of toxicants in bean weevil. The milligram per 100g dry matter of the.

  3. Enhancing banana weevil ( Cosmopolites sordidus ) resistance by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this review, the current status of banana weevil resistance, sources of resistance and resistance mechanisms is assessed. Further, current efforts and future prospects for identifying resistance genes outside the genus Musa with potential to control banana weevil in a transgenic approach are outlined and discussed.

  4. EFFECT OF MULCHING ON BANANA WEEVIL MOVEMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    pheromone-baited traps. Three treatments were used to create different mulching levels: banana without mulch. (control), banana with thin mulch (< 6 cm thick), and banana with thick mulch (15 cm thick). Pheromone traps were placed in the plots and weevil trap catches were monitored. Weevil catches in pheromone traps ...

  5. Deleterious effects of plant cystatins against the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiggundu, Andrew; Muchwezi, Josephine; Van der Vyver, Christell; Viljoen, Altus; Vorster, Juan; Schlüter, Urte; Kunert, Karl; Michaud, Dominique

    2010-02-01

    The general potential of plant cystatins for the development of insect-resistant transgenic plants still remains to be established given the natural ability of several insects to compensate for the loss of digestive cysteine protease activities. Here we assessed the potential of cystatins for the development of banana lines resistant to the banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus, a major pest of banana and plantain in Africa. Protease inhibitory assays were conducted with protein and methylcoumarin (MCA) peptide substrates to measure the inhibitory efficiency of different cystatins in vitro, followed by a diet assay with cystatin-infiltrated banana stem disks to monitor the impact of two plant cystatins, oryzacystatin I (OC-I, or OsCYS1) and papaya cystatin (CpCYS1), on the overall growth rate of weevil larvae. As observed earlier for other Coleoptera, banana weevils produce a variety of proteases for dietary protein digestion, including in particular Z-Phe-Arg-MCA-hydrolyzing (cathepsin L-like) and Z-Arg-Arg-MCA-hydrolyzing (cathepsin B-like) proteases active in mildly acidic conditions. Both enzyme populations were sensitive to the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 and to different plant cystatins including OsCYS1. In line with the broad inhibitory effects of cystatins, OsCYS1 and CpCYS1 caused an important growth delay in young larvae developing for 10 days in cystatin-infiltrated banana stem disks. These promising results, which illustrate the susceptibility of C. sordidus to plant cystatins, are discussed in the light of recent hypotheses suggesting a key role for cathepsin B-like enzymes as a determinant for resistance or susceptibility to plant cystatins in Coleoptera. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. (Curculionidae) et Oryctes rhinoceros (Scarabeidae), deux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conservation et étude de la valeur nutritive des larves de Rhynchophorus phoenicis (Curculionidae) et Oryctes rhinoceros (Scarabeidae), deux coléoptères d'intérêt alimentaire au Congo-Brazzaville.

  7. EFFECT OF MULCHING ON BANANA WEEVIL MOVEMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Hebblethwaite, 1989). Mulching influences weevil movements in banana plantations (Gold et al., 1999), but to what extent this would affect pheromone trap catches of C. sordidus is not known. Mulching may have several effects on efficacy of pheromone ...

  8. Phylogeographical patterns of a generalist acorn weevil: insight into the biogeographical history of broadleaved deciduous and evergreen forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kyoko; Kato, Makoto; Murakami, Noriaki

    2009-05-16

    Climatic changes during glacial periods have had a major influence on the recent evolutionary history of living organisms, even in temperate forests on islands, where the land was not covered with ice sheets. We investigated the phylogeographical patterns of the weevil Curculio sikkimensis (Curculionidae), a generalist seed predator of Fagaceae plants living in both deciduous oak and evergreen forests of Japan. Its genetic structure was compared to that of another host-specific seed predator, C. hilgendorfi, inhabiting only evergreen forests. We examined 921 bp of mitochondrial DNA for 115 individuals collected from 33 populations of C. sikkimensis from 11 plant species of three genera, Quercus, Lithocarpus, and Castanopsis. An analysis of molecular variance revealed that a large proportion (almost 50%, P ages, in the southwestern and northeastern parts of the main islands, although these two types of forests are presently distributed in cool and warm temperate zones of Japan, respectively.

  9. A repellent against the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer continues to pose a formidable challenge to coffee growers worldwide. Due to the cryptic life habit of the insect inside coffee berries, effective pest management strategies have been difficult to develop. A sesquiterpene, (E,E)-a-farnesene, produced by infested coffee berries...

  10. A taxonomic monograph of Nearctic Scolytus Geoffroy (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah M.; Cognato, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Nearctic bark beetle genus Scolytus Geoffroy was revised based in part on a molecular and morphological phylogeny. Monophyly of the native species was tested using mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (28S, CAD, ArgK) genes and 43 morphological characters in parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Parsimony analyses of molecular and combined datasets provided mixed results while Bayesian analysis recovered most nodes with posterior probabilities >90%. Native hardwood- and conifer-feeding Scolytus species were recovered as paraphyletic. Native Nearctic species were recovered as paraphyletic with hardwood-feeding species sister to Palearctic hardwood-feeding species rather than to native conifer-feeding species. The Nearctic conifer-feeding species were monophyletic. Twenty-five species were recognized. Four new synonyms were discovered: Scolytus praeceps LeConte, 1868 (= Scolytus abietis Blackman, 1934; = Scolytus opacus Blackman, 1934), Scolytus reflexus Blackman, 1934 (= Scolytus virgatus Bright, 1972; = Scolytus wickhami Blackman, 1934). Two species were reinstated: Scolytus fiskei Blackman, 1934 and Scolytus silvaticus Bright, 1972. A diagnosis, description, distribution, host records and images were provided for each species and a key is presented to all species. PMID:25408617

  11. A taxonomic monograph of Nearctic Scolytus Geoffroy (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae

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    Sarah Smith

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Nearctic bark beetle genus Scolytus Geoffroy was revised based in part on a molecular and morphological phylogeny. Monophyly of the native species was tested using mitochondrial (COI and nuclear (28S, CAD, ArgK genes and 43 morphological characters in parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Parsimony analyses of molecular and combined datasets provided mixed results while Bayesian analysis recovered most nodes with posterior probabilities >90%. Native hardwood- and conifer-feeding Scolytus species were recovered as paraphyletic. Native Nearctic species were recovered as paraphyletic with hardwood-feeding species sister to Palearctic hardwood-feeding species rather than to native conifer-feeding species. The Nearctic conifer-feeding species were monophyletic. Twenty-five species were recognized. Four new synonyms were discovered: S. praeceps LeConte, 1868 (= S. abietis Blackman, 1934; = S. opacus Blackman, 1934, S. reflexus Blackman, 1934 (= S. virgatus Bright, 1972; = S. wickhami Blackman, 1934. Two species were reinstated: S. fiskei Blackman, 1934 and S. silvaticus Bright, 1972. A diagnosis, description, distribution, host records and images were provided for each species and a key is presented to all species.

  12. Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara Bentz

    2008-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is considered one of the most economically important insect species in coniferous forests of western North America. Adult beetles are capable of successfully reproducing in at least 12 North American species of Pinus (Pineacea) from southern British Columbia to northern Baja Mexico. Mountain pine beetle adults...

  13. ON THE TAXONOMY AND NOMENCLATURE OF SOME MECININI (COLEOPTERA, CURCULIONIDAE

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    Roberto Caldara

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the Code, ten actions are taken to preserve nomenclatural stability of names of taxa currently belonging to Mecinini. Following the provisions of ICZN Article 23.9.1, Cleopomiarus graminis (Gyllenhal, 1813 (formerly Rhynchaenus is made a nomen protectum and Curculio ellipticus Herbst, 1795 is made a nomen oblitum; Rhinusa antirrhini (Paykull, 1800 (formerly Curculio is made a nomen protectum and Curculio noctis herbst, 1795 is made a nomen oblitum; having met the conditions of ICZN article 75.3 the neotypes of the following taxa are designated: Curculio antirrhini Paykull, 1800, Curculio cinctus Rossi, 1790, Curculio curvirostris Rossi, 1790, Curculio linariae Panzer, 1792, Cionus thapsicola Germar, 1821, Mecinus collaris Germar, 1821. Lectotypes of Curculio ellipticus Herbst, 1795, Gymnetron eversmanni Rosenschöld, 1838, Mecinus barbarus Gyllenhal, 1838, and Mecinus longiusculus Boheman, 1845 are also designated. Rhinusa linariae (Panzer, 1792 (formerly Curculio remains the valid name of the taxon since Curculio curvirostris Rossi, 1790 (non Fabricius, 1781 nec Herbst, 1784 is unavailable; Mecinus collaris Germar, 1821 remains the valid name of the taxon since Curculio cinctus Rossi, 1790 (non Drury, 1782 nec Geoffroy, 1785 is unavailable. The following new synonymies are proposed: Mecinus barbarus Gyllenhal, 1838 = Mecinus longiusculus Boheman, 1845 n. syn., = Mecinus teretiusculus Boheman, 1845 n. syn., = Mecinus filiformis Aubé, 1850 n. syn.; Rhinusa florum (Rübsaamen, 1895 = Gymnetron smreczynskii Fremuth, 1972 n. syn.; Rhinusa tetra (Fabricius, 1792 = Cionus thapsicola Germar, 1821 n. syn. Rhinusa eversmanni (Rosenschöld, 1838 is the name proposed for Rhinusa thapsicola sensu auctorum (non Germar, 1821.

  14. Walnut Twig Beetle (pityophthorus juglandis blackman) (coleoptera: curculionidae: scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert E. Mayfield; P.L. Lambdin

    2014-01-01

    The walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman (Scolytini: Pityophthorina), was initially described by Blackamn (1928) from specimens collected on black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) in Lone Mountain, New Mexico and Paradise, Arizona (Blackman, 1928; Cranshaw, 2011; LaBonte and rabaglia, 2012). There are no synonyms in the literature.

  15. Redbay Ambrosia Beetle (xyleborus glabratus eichoff) (coleoptera: curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Hanula; Albert E. Mayfield

    2014-01-01

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff, and its associated fungus Raffaelea lauricola T.C. Harrl, Fraedrich & Aghgayeva are exotic species, recently invasive to the United States. Together, they cause a vascular wilt disease that is highly destructive to some species in the Lauraceae (Fraedrich et al., 2008). Xyleborus glabratus is a member of the...

  16. ON THE TAXONOMY AND NOMENCLATURE OF SOME MECININI (COLEOPTERA, CURCULIONIDAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Caldara

    2008-01-01

    In accordance with the Code, ten actions are taken to preserve nomenclatural stability of names of taxa currently belonging to Mecinini. Following the provisions of ICZN Article 23.9.1, Cleopomiarus graminis (Gyllenhal, 1813) (formerly Rhynchaenus) is made a nomen protectum and Curculio ellipticus Herbst, 1795 is made a nomen oblitum; Rhinusa antirrhini (Paykull, 1800) (formerly Curculio) is made a nomen protectum and Curculio noctis herbst, 1795 is made a nomen oblitum; having met the condit...

  17. Rhabdorrhynchus echii (Brahm, 1790), a "forgotten" name (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Lixinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meregalli, Massimo; Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    The application of the name Curculio echii Brahm, 1790 is discussed. Based on the description it is evident that it should be applied to a German species of the genus Rhabdorrhynchus, and that it has priority over the name currently applied to the species, Rhabdorrhynchus seriegranosus Chevrolat, 1873. The new combination Rhab-dorrhynchus echii (Brahm, 1790) is proposed. As there is a lack of any type material of Curculio echii a neotype is designated. Based on the study of the type specimen, Rhabdorrhynchus seriegranosus is restored as a valid species.

  18. Ionizing irradiation quarantine treatment against plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Guy J

    2003-10-01

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), is a quarantine pest of many temperate fruits, such as pomes, Malus spp.; stone fruits, Prunus spp.; and blueberries, Vaccinium spp.; in North America east of the Rocky Mountains and a small area in Utah. There are two strains, a northern univoltine one that undergoes obligate diapause as an adult and a southern multivoltine strain that usually has facultative diapause. Current quarantine treatments for shipment to areas that do not have the pest include methyl bromide fumigation and cold storage for several weeks. The cold storage treatment may not be effective against northern strain adults in diapause. The objective of this research was to develop an irradiation quarantine treatment against plum curculio. The estimated dose to kill southern strain plum curculio adults in one day is approximately 4 kGy. Diapausing northern strain plum curculios were prevented from reproducing with 40 Gy. Reproduction of southern strain plum curculios was prevented with a target dose of 80 Gy, and the dose recommended as a quarantine treatment, that would prevent adults from reproducing, is 92 Gy, the maximum absorbed dose measured when a target dose of 80 Gy was sought. At that dose, oviposition may still occur for up to 1 wk and some of the eggs may hatch, but there is no development beyond the first instar. Hosts of the plum curculio would tolerate that dose well. Immature plum curculios were prevented from reproducing with lower doses.

  19. Response of banana cultivars to banana weevil attack

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pesticides can effectively control banana weevil but these are unaffordable by resource ... use of weevil resistant cultivars. Chemical control is effective but expensive to small holder farmers, contaminates the environment, and is poisonous to both humans and their ..... Banana Weevil and Nematode Damage Assessment in.

  20. Glacial bottleneck and postglacial recolonization of a seed parasitic weevil, Curculio hilgendorfi, inferred from mitochondrial DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, K; Kato, M; Murakami, N

    2008-07-01

    Climatic changes during glacial periods have had a major influence on the recent evolutionary history of living organisms, even in the warm temperate zone. We investigated phylogeographical patterns of a weevil Curculio hilgendorfi (Curculionidae), a host-specific seed predator of Castanopsis (Fagaceae) growing in the broadleaved evergreen forests in Japan. We examined 2709 bp of mitochondrial DNA for 204 individuals collected from 62 populations of the weevil. Four major haplogroups were detected, in southwestern and northeastern parts of the main islands and in central and southern parts of the Ryukyu Islands. The demographic population expansion was detected for the two groups in the main islands but not for the Ryukyu groups. The beginning time of the expansion was dated to 39,000-59,000 years ago, which is consistent with the end of the last glacial period. Our data also demonstrated that the southwestern population of the main islands has experienced a more severe bottleneck and more rapid population growth after glacial ages than the northeastern population. At least three refugial areas in the main islands were likely to have existed during the last glacial periods, one of which had not previously been recognized by analyses of intraspecific chloroplast DNA variation of several plant species growing in the broadleaved evergreen forests. Our results represent the first phylogeographical and population demographic analysis of an insect species associated with the broadleaved evergreen forests in Japan, and reveal more detailed postglacial history of the forests.

  1. Attraction of Coffee Bean Weevil, Araecerus fasciculatus, to Volatiles from the Industrial Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuai; Mei, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Li, Yao-Fa; She, Dongmei; Zhang, Tao; Ning, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The coffee bean weevil (CBW), Araecerus fasciculatus (De Geer, 1775) (Coleoptera: Anthribidae) is an important pest of stored products such as grains, coffee beans, cassava, and traditional Chinese medicine materials. In China, CBW causes large losses of Daqu, a traditional Chinese liquor fermentation starter, and, unfortunately, the use of conventional insecticides against CBW is not suitable in Daqu storage. We found CBW to be highly attracted to fermenting yeast cultures, such as Kluyveromyces lactis. Eight volatile compounds, produced by fermenting cultures and not by sterile samples, were identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Five of these substances elicited significant responses in Y-tube behavioral bioassays. Field trapping experiments revealed 2-phenylethanol and 2-phenylethyl acetate to be crucial for attraction of CBW. Results show that yeast volatiles play an important role in host location, and that 2-phenylethanol and 2-phenylethyl acetate could be utilized as potential attractants in monitoring and control systems against this important pest.

  2. Chitinolitic activity in proteic extracts of Bacillus thuringiensis toxic to boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, T.S; Rocha, T.L. [EMBRAPA Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, DF (Brazil); Vasconcelos, E.A.R [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil); Grossi-de-Sa, M.F. [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a spore forming bacteria, which produces Cry proteins toxic towards several insect orders. Bt S 811 strain produces at least three Cry toxins: Cry1Ab, Cry1Ia12, and Cry8, and shown toxicity to insects from Coleoptera order. In order to characterize the production of theses toxins, and check its activity against Boll weevil larvae, proteic extracts from Bt cells and supernatant proteins from the bacterial culture, were obtained at different stages of cell cycle; 8, 16, 24, and 32 hours after inoculation (HAI). Proteins from 32 HAI of the supernatant, and 8 HAI of the cellular fractions, shown highest activity towards the Boll weevil larvae. Western blotting assays using anti-Cry8 and anti-Cry1I were carried out to analyse these toxins in the Bt proteic extracts. The existence of a Cry8 was detected at 8 HAI in the cellular fraction, what allow associate this molecule with the toxicity of this fraction. However, toxicity observed at 32 HAI in the supernatant fraction, was not possible to be associated with Cry8 or Cry1Ia toxins, indicating that there are another protein(s) responsible for the toxicity. A protein homo log to Cry1Ab was identified by 'Peptide Mass Fingerprint' at 32 HAI of the supernatant fraction and a chitin binding protein was identified by 2DE/MS/MS in this same stage and chitinolitic activity was also observed by enzymatic assay. All our data suggest a possible synergism between Cry toxins and a chitinase in the activity of this strain towards Boll weevil.

  3. Chaves para a identificação dos principais Coleoptera (Insecta associados com produtos armazenados Keys for the identification of Coleoptera (Insecta associated with stored products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Valle da Silva Pereira

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available An illustrated key to identify nine families of Coleoptera commonly found in stored products is presented. Keys for the identification of Anobiidae [Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792, Stegobium paniceum (Linnaeus, 1761], Bruchidae [Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say, 1831, Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman, 1833], Curculionidae [Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus, 1763, S. zeamais Motschulsky, 1885], Silvanidae [Ahasverus advena (Waltl, 1832, Cathartus quadricollis (Guérin, 1892, Oryzaephilus mercator (Fauvel, 1889, O. surinamensis (Linnaeus, 1758] and Tenebrionidae [Gnathocerus cornutus (Fabricius, 1798, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797, T. confusum du Val, 1868] are also provided. These keys cover the most frequent Coleoptera found in stored products, specially grains, and are to the adult stage only. Illustrations of external morphology and general characteristics are provided for each species reported.

  4. Model selection in statistical historical biogeography of Neotropical insects-The Exophthalmus genus complex (Curculionidae: Entiminae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanyang; Basharat, Usmaan; Matzke, Nicholas; Franz, Nico M

    2017-04-01

    Statistical historical biogeographic methods rely on models that represent various biogeographic processes. Until recently model selection in this domain was not widely used, and the impact of differential model selection on inferring biogeographic scenarios was not well understood. Focusing on Neotropical weevils in the Exophthalmus genus complex (EGC) (Insecta: Curculionidae: Entiminae), we compare three commonly used biogeographic models - DIVA (Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis), DEC (Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis) and BayArea (Bayesian Analysis of Biogeography), and examine the impact of modeling founder-event jump dispersal on historical biogeographic reconstructions. We also investigate the biogeographic events that have shaped patterns of distribution, diversification, and endemism in this weevil lineage. We sample representatives of 65 species of the EGC and 26 outgroup terminals from the Neotropics, including Caribbean islands and the mainland. We reconstruct a molecular phylogeny based on six genes and apply molecular dating using a relaxed clock with three fossil calibration points. Historical biogeographic estimations and alternative biogeographic models are computed and compared with the R package BioGeoBEARS. Model selection strongly favors biogeographic models that include founder-event jump dispersal. Without modeling jump dispersal, estimations based on the three biogeographic models are dramatically different, especially for early-diverging nodes. When jump dispersal is included, the three biogeographic models perform similarly. Accordingly, we show that the Neotropical mainland was colonized by Caribbean species in the early Miocene, and that in situ diversification accounts for a majority (∼75%) of the biogeographic events in the EGC. Our study highlights the need to assess wide-ranging historical biogeographic processes - including founder-event jump dispersal - for best-fitting statistical Caribbean biogeographic reconstructions. Moreover

  5. Insects in IBL-4 pine weevil traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. Skrzecz

    2003-01-01

    Pipe traps (IBL-4) are used in Polish coniferous plantations to monitor and control the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.). This study was conducted in a one-year old pine plantation established on a reforested clear-cut area in order to evaluate the impact of these traps on non-target insects. Evaluation of the catches indicated that species of

  6. Rice weevil response to basil oil fumigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil oil, Ocimum basilicum L., is a volatile plant essential oil that is known to have insecticidal activity against stored product pests such as rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.). Basil oil was diluted in acetone and applied to a sponge held inside a tea strainer for fumigations in containers wi...

  7. Biology and host specificity of Rhinusa pilosa, a recommended biological control agent of Linaria vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre Gassmann; Rosemarie De Clerck-Floate; Sharlene Sing; Ivo Tosevski; Milana Mitrovic; Olivier Krstic

    2014-01-01

    Linaria vulgaris Mill. (Plantaginaceae), common or yellow toadflax, is a Eurasian short-lived perennial forb invasive throughout temperate North America. Rhinusa pilosa (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) is a univoltine shoot-galling weevil found exclusively on L. vulgaris in Europe. Under no-choice test conditions, 13 non-native Linaria species exposed toR....

  8. Effect of irradiation and insect pest control on rots and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The coffee bean weevil, Araecerus fasciculatus Degeer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is associated with rots in stored yam tubers. The current study was designed to assess the effect of irradiation and other insect pest control strategies on rots and sensory quality of stored yams. 450 tubers each of two varieties of white yam ...

  9. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the fruit tree weevil Naupactus xanthographus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): cross-amplification in related species of the Naupactus–Pantomorus complex · N. Guzmán H. Contreras-Díaz A. Lanteri C. Juan V. Confalonieri · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp e28-e32.

  10. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management - Vol 9 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enteric pathogen modification by anaecic earthworm, Lampito Mauritii ... Proximate composition and levels of some toxicants in four commonly consumed spices ... Evaluation of the potential of some local spices as stored grain protectants against the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Mots (Coleoptera: Curculionidae.

  11. Effects of Insect Predation on Hypocotyl Survival and Germination Success of Mature Quercus variabilis Acorns

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi, FUKUMOTO; Hisashi, KAJIMURA; Laboratory of Forest Protection, School of Agricultural Sciences, Nagoya University:Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

    2000-01-01

    The rates of hypocotyl and radicle survival and of germination success were investigated in mature acorns of Quercus variabilis Blume in relation to endosperm loss due to seed insects. The acorns were damaged by curculio weevils (Coleoptera : Curculionidae) and moths, including tortricid moths (Lepidoptera : Tortricidae); the former were more abundant than the latter. Acorns damaged by curculio weevils showed a significantly lower germination rate when there was a large endosperm loss than th...

  12. Iridovirus in the root weevil Diaprepes abbreviatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Hunter

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Invertebrate iridescent virus 6 (IIV6 was evaluated for mode of transmission and ability to cause infection in the root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.. This is the first evidence of IIV6 infection in D. abbreviatus, which caused both patent and sub-lethal covert infections in both larvae and adults. Adults and larvae were successfully infected with IIV6 by puncture, injection and per os. Transmission of IIV6 was demonstrated between infected and healthy individuals regardless of gender. Virus was detected in egg masses produced by virus-infected females suggesting IIV6 is transmitted transovarially. Virus particles were observed in the cytoplasm of weevil cells, and were shown to infect fat bodies, muscle, and nerve tissues, as visualized using transmission electron microscopy. Patent infections resulted in death of individuals within 3 to 4 days post infection. Individuals with covert infections tested positive for virus infection on day 7 by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Sequencing of PCR amplicons confirmed virus infection. Discovery of new pathogens against root weevils may provide new management tools for development of control strategies based on induced epizootics. This is the first report of a virus infecting D. abbreviatus.

  13. Genotypic variation for maize weevil resistance in eastern and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    The maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky) is the most destructive storage insect pest of maize (Zea mays L.) worldwide, ... heritability (89 – 96%) for weevil resistance that suggested high potential for germplasm improvement through ... emphasizing other traits, including grain yield enhancement (Tollenaar and ...

  14. Response of banana cultivars to banana weevil attack | Kiggundu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Highland Bananas (EAHB) (Musa AAA, 'Matooke' group) are a major staple food in the East African region. However, banana weevil (Cosmopolites sorllidus) is a major production constraint to bananas and may cause damage levels of up to 100%. Pesticides can effectively control banana weevil but these are ...

  15. Contact toxicity of 38 insecticides to pales weevil adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqueline L. Robertson; Robert L. Lyon; Nancy L. Gillette

    1975-01-01

    The pales weevil, Hylobius pales (Herbst), attacks all pine species in Eastern North America and is considered the most destructive pest of pine reproduction in the Eastern United States (Speers and Rauchenberger 1971). Large numbers of seedlings are damaged or killed by the adult weevils, which feed on the inner bark.

  16. Selection of assessment methods for evaluating banana weevil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Oviposition is in the base of the banana mat. The larvae tunnel in the corm and lower pseudostem. Most attack occurs below the soil surface. Pupation is within the plant. Population build-up is slow and weevil problems become increasingly important in ratoon crops. Damage is caused entirely by larval feeding. Weevil ...

  17. Field attraction of the vine weevil Otiorhynchus sulcatus to Kairomones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van R.W.H.M.; Bruck, D.J.; Griepink, F.C.; Kogel, de W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Root weevils in the genus Otiorhynchus are cited as one of the most important pests in the major nursery and small fruit production areas throughout the United States, western Canada, and northern Europe. A major problem in combating weevil attack is monitoring and timing of control measures.

  18. Family-Group Names In Coleoptera (Insecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Bouchard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names: Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. n. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae, Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae, Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae, Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae; Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein syn. n. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy syn. n. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae, Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein syn. n. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae, Sclerastes Gistel, 1856 (type species

  19. Family-group names in Coleoptera (Insecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Patrice; Bousquet, Yves; Davies, Anthony E.; Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.; Lawrence, John F.; Lyal, Chris H. C.; Newton, Alfred F.; Reid, Chris A. M.; Schmitt, Michael; Ślipiński, S. Adam; Smith, Andrew B. T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant) based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names): Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. nov. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae), Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae), Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae), Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae); Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein) syn. nov. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy) syn. nov. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae), Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein) syn. nov. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae), Sclerastes

  20. Velcro-Like System Used to Fix a Protective Faecal Shield on Weevil Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuhrovec, Jiří; Stejskal, Robert; Trnka, Filip; di Giulio, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The last instar larva and pupa of Eucoeliodes mirabilis (A. Villa & G. B. Villa, 1835) (Curculionidae: Ceutorhynchini) are described using drawings and SEM images and are compared and keyed with already described larvae of 58 other ceutorhynchinae taxa. The larval body has an effective combination of morphological adaptations that assist a unique biological defensive strategy. All larval stages of E. mirabilis feed ectophytically on leaves of Euonymus europaeus L. (Celastraceae), and the larval body is covered with a thick faecal shield. The fixation of this protective shield on the larval back is performed by a peculiar dorsal microsculpture composed of a dense carpet of microtrichia on the thorax and abdomen, which serves effectively as a velcro system. Because of this strategy, macrosetae on the larval and pupal body of E. mirabilis are completely reduced. Larvae of E. mirabilis also have distinct morphological adaptations for protecting the spiracles against intrusion of faeces and avoiding occlusion of the tracheal system: a) microtrichia around spiracles are slightly shorter, distinctly stronger and are arranged with high-density and in clusters and b) spiracles are protected by an external safety valve. This strategy of E. mirabilis larvae is unique, although somewhat similar to that of Criocerinae and Blepharida-group leave beetles (Galerucinae) (both Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), but with distinctly different morphological adaptations.

  1. Identification of relevant non-target organisms exposed to weevil-resistant Bt sweetpotato in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukarwa, R J; Mukasa, S B; Odongo, B; Ssemakula, G; Ghislain, M

    2014-06-01

    Assessment of the impact of transgenic crops on non-target organisms (NTO) is a prerequisite to their release into the target environment for commercial use. Transgenic sweetpotato varieties expressing Cry proteins (Bt sweetpotato) are under development to provide effective protection against sweetpotato weevils (Coleoptera) which cause severe economic losses in sub-Saharan Africa. Like any other pest control technologies, genetically engineered crops expressing insecticidal proteins need to be evaluated to assess potential negative effects on non-target organisms that provide important services to the ecosystem. Beneficial arthropods in sweetpotato production systems can include pollinators, decomposers, and predators and parasitoids of the target insect pest(s). Non-target arthropod species commonly found in sweetpotato fields that are related taxonomically to the target pests were identified through expert consultation and literature review in Uganda where Bt sweetpotato is expected to be initially evaluated. Results indicate the presence of few relevant non-target Coleopterans that could be affected by Coleopteran Bt sweetpotato varieties: ground, rove and ladybird beetles. These insects are important predators in sweetpotato fields. Additionally, honeybee (hymenoptera) is the main pollinator of sweetpotato and used for honey production. Numerous studies have shown that honeybees are unaffected by the Cry proteins currently deployed which are homologous to those of the weevil-resistant Bt sweetpotato. However, because of their feeding behaviour, Bt sweetpotato represents an extremely low hazard due to negligible exposure. Hence, we conclude that there is good evidence from literature and expert opinion that relevant NTOs in sweetpotato fields are unlikely to be affected by the introduction of Bt sweetpotato in Uganda.

  2. First record of the genus Pseudopilolabus Legalov, 2003 (Coleoptera: Attelabidae) in Dominican amber

    OpenAIRE

    Poinar Jr., G.; Brown, A. E.; A. A. Legalov

    2015-01-01

    A new weevil species (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:2D5E9E4A-A250-4D0A-AF69-CF4753436686), Pseudopilolabus othnius Poinar, Brown and Legalov, sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Attelabidae), is described from Dominican amber. The new species is close to the extant P. viridanus (Gyllenhal, 1839) and P. splendens (Gyllenhal, 1839) but differs by having a bronzed body, narrower and more convex elytral intervals, long antennae reaching the middle of the pronotum, and weakly convex eyes; from P. rugi...

  3. Contact Toxicity of Deltamethrin Against Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudyal, S; Opit, G P; Arthur, F H; Bingham, G V; Gautam, S G

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, to evaluate the response to deltamethrin concentrations for adults of three stored-product insects, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), Sitophilus oryzae (L.), and Rhyzopertha dominica (F.). In insect toxicological studies, knockdown is the state of intoxication and partial paralysis as a result of exposure to an insecticide. Deltamethrin concentrations ranging from 0.48 to 140 mg/m(2) (1 to 3,000 ppm) were sprayed on glass Petri dishes. After the dishes dried, 20 adult insects of each species were placed on the treated dishes to determine the contact toxicity of deltamethrin. Assessments for knockdown were made at 15-min intervals for up to 8 h after initial exposure and then again after 24 or 48 h. Insects were then transferred to clean untreated Petri dishes with diet and observed from 0.5 to 72 h. Mortality was assessed 72 h after transfer to untreated dishes with food material. Deltamethrin was highly effective against all three species tested and achieved 99% knockdown of insects of all species within 4 h after exposure at concentrations ≥1.2 mg/m(2) Although some insects recovered from initial knockdown at concentrations ≤48 mg/m(2), nearly all the insects were killed at 140 mg/m(2) when exposed for 48 h. LC95 values for all species tested, for the 48-h exposure period, were insect pest control. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Phylogeographical patterns of a generalist acorn weevil: insight into the biogeographical history of broadleaved deciduous and evergreen forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Makoto

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climatic changes during glacial periods have had a major influence on the recent evolutionary history of living organisms, even in temperate forests on islands, where the land was not covered with ice sheets. We investigated the phylogeographical patterns of the weevil Curculio sikkimensis (Curculionidae, a generalist seed predator of Fagaceae plants living in both deciduous oak and evergreen forests of Japan. Its genetic structure was compared to that of another host-specific seed predator, C. hilgendorfi, inhabiting only evergreen forests. Results We examined 921 bp of mitochondrial DNA for 115 individuals collected from 33 populations of C. sikkimensis from 11 plant species of three genera, Quercus, Lithocarpus, and Castanopsis. An analysis of molecular variance revealed that a large proportion (almost 50%, P Conclusion Our results suggest that geology and historical environment have contributed to shaping the present genetic structure of C. sikkimensis. The geographical patterns of genetic differentiation in the Chugoku-Shikoku region observed in the two types of Fagaceae-associated Curculio in this study have also been observed in several plant species growing in warm and cool temperate zones of Japan. The occurrence of this common pattern suggests that deciduous oak and evergreen forests of Japan survived together, or adjacent to each other, in small refugia during glacial ages, in the southwestern and northeastern parts of the main islands, although these two types of forests are presently distributed in cool and warm temperate zones of Japan, respectively.

  5. Uji Aktivitas Ekstrak Daun Seledri ( Apium graveolens L. terhadap Kumbang Kacang Callosobruchus chinensis L. (Coleoptera:Bruchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NI NENGAH DARMIATI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Activity Test of Celery Leaf Extract (Apium graveolens L. Against Bean Weevil, Callosobruchus cinensis L. (Coleoptera:Bruchidae The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of Plant Pest and Disease Management,Department of Agroecotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, Udayana University. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the activity of celery leaf extract against bean weevil, Callosobruchus chinensis L. The experiment was Randomized Complete Design, with five treatments of formulation concentration. The activities of celery leaf extract was indicated through i.e. contact poison test, repellent test, and the placement of eggs (oviposition test. The results showed that the celery leaf extract has activity as a contact poison with concentration 75% formulations caused over 50% death of the total insect. The extract with 100% concentration acted as a repellent and anti oviposition as well.

  6. Sampling plantations to determine white-pine weevil injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Talerico; Robert W., Jr. Wilson

    1973-01-01

    Use of 1/10-acre square plots to obtain estimates of the proportion of never-weeviled trees necessary for evaluating and scheduling white-pine weevil control is described. The optimum number of trees to observe per plot is estimated from data obtained from sample plantations in the Northeast and a table is given. Of sample size required to achieve a standard error of...

  7. Ophiostoma species (Ascomycetes: Ophiostomatales) associated with bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) colonizing Pinus radiata in northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romón, Pedro; Zhou, XuDong; Iturrondobeitia, Juan Carlos; Wingfield, Michael J; Goldarazena, Arturo

    2007-06-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) are known to be associated with fungi, especially species of Ophiostoma sensu lato and Ceratocystis. However, very little is known about these fungi in Spain. In this study, we examined the fungi associated with 13 bark beetle species and one weevil (Coleoptera: Entiminae) infesting Pinus radiata in the Basque Country of northern Spain. This study included an examination of 1323 bark beetles or their galleries in P. radiata. Isolations yielded a total of 920 cultures, which included 16 species of Ophiostoma sensu lato or their asexual states. These 16 species included 69 associations between fungi and bark beetles and weevils that have not previously been recorded. The most commonly encountered fungal associates of the bark beetles were Ophiostoma ips, Leptographium guttulatum, Ophiostoma stenoceras, and Ophiostoma piceae. In most cases, the niche of colonization had a significant effect on the abundance and composition of colonizing fungi. This confirms that resource overlap between species is reduced by partial spatial segregation. Interaction between niche and time seldom had a significant effect, which suggests that spatial colonization patterns are rarely flexible throughout timber degradation. The differences in common associates among the bark beetle species could be linked to the different niches that these beetles occupy.

  8. The attractiveness of manuka oil and ethanol, alone and in combination, to xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and other curculionidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.W. Johnson; R.S. Cameron; J.L. Hanula; C. Bates

    2014-01-01

    The increasing volume of international commerce in the last century has resulted in an exchange of organisms at an alarming rate. Among those exhibiting a significant threat to forests are the bark and ambrosia beetles and their associated fungi. Between 1985 and 2005, 18 scolytinae species introductions to the U.S. were recorded, and others have been documented since...

  9. Estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis efetivas contra insetos das ordens Lepidoptera, Coleoptera e Diptera Bacillus thuringiensis strains effective against insects of Lepidoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian Botelho Praça

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar entre 300 estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis as efetivas simultaneamente contra larvas de Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith e Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus e Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Foram selecionadas duas estirpes de B. thuringiensis, denominadas S234 e S997, que apresentaram atividade contra as três ordens de insetos. As estirpes foram caracterizadas por métodos morfológicos, bioquímicos e moleculares. As mesmas apresentaram duas proteínas principais de 130 e 65 kDa, produtos de reação em cadeia da polimerase de tamanho esperado para a detecção dos genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B e cry2 e cristais bipiramidais, cubóides e esféricos.The aim of this work was to select among 300 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis those which are simultaneously effective against larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith and Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Two strains of B. thuringiensis were selected, S234 and S997, which presented activity against those three insect orders. Both strains were characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular methods. They have presented two main proteins with 130 and 65 kDa, polimerase chain reaction products with expected sizes for detection of the genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B and cry2 and bipiramidal, cubical and spherical crystals.

  10. Biological role of Nardonella endosymbiont in its weevil host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kuriwada

    Full Text Available Weevils constitute the most species-rich animal group with over 60,000 described species, many of which possess specialized symbiotic organs and harbor bacterial endosymbionts. Among the diverse microbial associates of weevils, Nardonella spp. represent the most ancient and widespread endosymbiont lineage, having co-speciated with the host weevils for over 125 million years. Thus far, however, no empirical work on the role of Nardonella for weevil biology has been reported. Here we investigated the biological role of the Nardonella endosymbiont for the West Indian sweet potato weevil, Euscepes postfasciatus. This insect is an experimentally tractable pest insect that can easily be reared on a natural diet of sweet potato root as well as on an agar-based artificial diet. By larval feeding on an antibiotic-containing artificial diet, Nardonella infection was effectively eliminated from the treated insects. The antibiotic-treated insects exhibited significantly lighter body weight and lower growth rate than the control insects. Then, the antibiotic-treated insects and the control insects were respectively allowed to mate and oviposit on fresh sweet potatoes without the antibiotic. The offspring of the antibiotic-treated insects, which were all Nardonella-negative, exhibited significantly lighter body weight, smaller body size, lower growth rate and paler body color in comparison with the offspring of the control insects, which were all Nardonella-positive. In conclusion, the Nardonella endosymbiont is involved in normal growth and development of the host weevil. The biological role of the endosymbiont probably underlies the long-lasting host-symbiont co-speciation in the evolutionary course of weevils.

  11. Plant extracts on Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Beauveria bassianaExtratos vegetais sobre Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae e Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Zorzetti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Looking for alternatives to pesticides for Hypothenemus hampei control, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts of Moringa oleifera (Moringa and Tephrosia purpurea (tephrosia (seeds, leaves and roots and Melia azedarach (cinnamon, Nerium oleander (oleander and Azadirachta indica (neem (leaves only, on mortality and repellency of H. hampei and its compatibility with Beauveria bassiana, an important natural enemy of this pest. To assess the mortality, coffee leaves (Coffea arabica L were treated by immersion in a solution of endosulfan and plant extracts at a concentration of 10% and then offered to adults of H. hampei. The repellency was evaluated in multiple-choice tests and in no-choice tests among coffee fruit treated and untreated The compatibility between extracts and Beauveria bassiana (CG 452 was analyzed by quantifying germination, colony forming units, growth and yield / productivity of conidia. The highest mortalities were observed when leaves were treated with ethanolic extract of T. purpurea (leaves which did not differ from endosulfan, and aqueous and ethanolic extracts from M. oleifera seeds . In free-choice tests, all the ethanolic extracts showed repellent action, being higher for M. oleifera (root and T. purpurea (seed. The aqueous extracts of M. oleifera (leaves and seeds and N. oleander (leaves showed the highest repellency. In no-choice tests the highest repellency level was for coffee fruits treated with A. indica (leaves. The ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves negatively affected B. bassiana germination. These studies showed the potential of these plant extracts for use in the field as an alternative to chemical control, once they are also selective for B. bassiana. Visando alternativas ao uso de agrotóxicos no controle de Hypothenemus hampei, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial de extratos vegetais aquosos e etanólicos de Moringa oleifera (moringa e Tephrosia purpurea (tephrosia (sementes, folhas e raízes e Melia azedarach,(cinamomo Nerium oleander, (espirradeira Azadirachta indica (nim (apenas folhas, na mortalidade e repelência de H. hampei, e sua compatibilidade com Beauveria bassiana, importante inimigo natural desta praga. Para avaliar a mortalidade, ofereceram-se aos adultos, folhas de cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L tratadas por imersão em solução de endosulfan e em extratos vegetais na concentração de 10%. A repelência foi avaliada em testes com e sem chance de escolha, entre frutos de cafeeiro tratados e não tratados. A compatibilidade entre os extratos e Beauveria bassiana (CG 452 foi analisada quantificando a germinação, unidades formadoras de colônias, crescimento vegetativo e produção/produtividade de conídios. As maiores mortalidades foram observadas quando folhas foram tratadas com o extrato etanólico das de T. purpurea (folhas que não diferiu do endosulfan, e de extrato aquoso e etanólico da semente de M. oleifera. Em testes com chance de escolha, todos os extratos etanólicos possuíram ação repelente, sendo que a maior repelência foi causada por M. oleifera (raiz e T. purpurea (semente. Os extratos aquosos de folhas e semente de M. oleifera e de folhas de N. oleander apresentaram a maior repelência. Nos ensaios sem chance de escolha o maior nível de repelência foi para frutos de cafeeiro tratados com A. indica (folhas. O extrato etanólico de folhas de M. oleifera afetou negativamente a germinação. Estes estudos mostraram o potencial desses extratos para uso a campo como uma alternativa ao controle químico, sendo também seletivos para B. bassiana.

  12. Parisoschoenus obesulus Casey (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is not a pest of young coconut tree fruits; Parisoschoenus obesulus Casey (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) nao e praga de frutos novos do coqueiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Jose I.L.; Sgrillo, Ricardo B.; Valle, Raul R.; Delabie, Jacques H.C. [Comissao Executiva da Lavoura Cacaueira, Itabuna, BA (Brazil)], e-mail: jinaciolacerda@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: sgrillo@cepec.gov.br, e-mail: raul@cepec.gov.br, e-mail: jacques.delabie@gmail.com; Ferreira, Joana M.S. [EMBRAPA Tabuleiros Costeiros, Aracaju, SE (Brazil)], e-mail: joana@cpatc.embrapa.br; Almeida, Alex-Alan F. de [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas], e-mail: alex@uesc.br; Cividanes, Francisco J. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade], e-mail: fjcivida@fcav.unesp.br

    2009-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate if Parisoschoenus obesulus Casey only attacks naturally aborting coconuts and, consequently, is not a pest of young fruits of coconut tree. Aiming to test this hypothesis, inflorescences at diverse stages of physiological development were offered to individuals of P. obesulus. The Results showed that only aborting fruits were colonized by P. obesulus corroborating the established hypothesis. (author)

  13. Repeated cycles of chilling and warming effectively terminate prolonged larval diapause in the chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Morio

    2006-05-01

    Curculio sikkimensis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) requires one or more years to complete its life cycle, owing to prolonged larval diapause. To compare the effects of temperature cycles and total periods of chilling on the termination of prolonged diapause, larvae were subjected to different chilling (5 degrees C) and warming (20 degrees C) cycles ranging from 30 to 720 days, and all cycles were repeated until the sum of chilling and warming periods reached 720 days. The prolonged diapause of C. sikkimensis was more effectively terminated by repeated cycles of chilling and warming than by prolonging the continuous chilling period. However, extremely short temperature cycles were not highly effective in enhancing diapause termination, even when such cycles were repeated many times. To examine the role of warming periods on diapause termination, diapause larvae were subjected to a sequence of chilling (120 days at 5 degrees C) and warming (240 days at 20 degrees C) with a warming period (0-120 days at 20 degrees C) inserted in the chilling period. Diapause larvae that were not reactivated in the first chilling period required exposure to a certain period of warming before they were able to complete diapause development in the subsequent chilling. Thus, C. sikkimensis appears to spread its reactivation times over several years in response to seasonal temperature cycles.

  14. Insecticide activity of clove essential oil on bean weevil and maize weevil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Jairoce

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bean weevil and maize weevil can cause considerable damage to stored grains. These insects are mainly controlled with synthetic chemical insecticides, which may bring serious problems to human and environmental health. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of the essential oil of clove [Syzygium aromaticum (L. Merrill & Perry (Myrtaceae (origin: Bahia, season Sep.2014-Feb.2015] in the control of S. zeamais and A. obtectus under laboratory conditions. The essential oil was extracted through the classic hydrodistillation process and its chemical components were identified via gas chromatography. Oil efficiency was tested at the doses of 35, 17.9, 8.9, 3.6, 1.8, 0.4 and 0.2 μL g-1 (derived from a pilot study for insect control and the LC50 was determined. The results showed that eugenol was the major compound. The essential oil caused mortality of 100% for both species 48 h after treatment with the concentrations of 17.9 and 35 μL g-1. The LC50 for A. obtectus was 9.45 μL g-1, against 10.15 μL g-1 for S. zeamais. The use of clove essential oil represents a promising alternative to be used under storage conditions for the integrated management of stored grains pests.

  15. Impact of seed predators on the herb Baptista lanceolata (Fabales: Fabacae).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Horn; James L. Hanula.

    2004-09-01

    Leguminous seeds are a concentrated source of nutrition (Brashier 2000). In a nutrient-poor habitat, these seeds are important resources for many of the animal species residing there. Several insect predators are known to feed on Baptisia seeds. One such insect is Apion rostrum Say (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a weevil that feeds on seeds of several wild indigo species. Females lay eggs in developing seed pods where the larvae eat the seeds.

  16. White-pine weevil control with knapsack mistblower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur R. Hastings; John H. Risley

    1962-01-01

    Tests made in New York State in 1956-60 indicate that the portable knapsack mistblower has considerable promise for practical control of the white-pine weevil, now the major insect enemy of white pine in the Northeast. Lindane and malathion, alone and with Aroclor 5460, were the toxicants used in the tests.

  17. Effects of potassium deficiency, drought and weevils on banana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Gold (1996) concluded from a literature review that phytophagous insects are sensitive to nutritional changes .... Corm damage due to weevils was assessed using the method described by Gold et al. ..... high K fertilizer recovery efficiency of 75% that have been found in some other banana fertilizer studies (Lopez and.

  18. Effect of radio frequency treatments on cowpea weevil adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dried pulses (chickpeas, lentils and dried peas) are valuable export commodities in the US Pacific Northwest. Postharvest infestation by stored product insect pests such as the cowpea weevil may cause importing countries to require phytosanitary treatments before shipment. Typically, chemical fumiga...

  19. Control damage by seedling debarking weevil. Technical note No. 271

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidt, D.C.; Weaver, C.A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Technical note describing a method of controlling the damage to seedlings by the seedling debarking weevil by using nematodes. Information is given on the damage involved, the nematodes to be used, treatment methods, planting procedures, benefits and costs, and results of earlier trials.

  20. Biological effects of plant extracts against the rice weevil Sitophilus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extract of C. odorata was moderately toxic to S. oryzae but that of K. senegalensis was highly toxic to the weevils, evoking 100% mortality in maize treated with the highest dosage after 72 h of exposure. Grains treated with extract of the two plant materials caused a highly significant reduction in the number of progeny ...

  1. Cultural control of banana weevils in Ntungamo, southwestern Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okech, S.H.; Gold, C.S.; Bagamba, F.; Masanza, M.; Tushemereirwe, W.; Ssennyonga, J.

    2005-01-01

    The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture and the Uganda National Banana Research Programme tested and evaluated selected cultural management options for the banana weevil through on-farm farmer participatory research in Ntungamo district, Uganda between 1996 and 003. A farmer adoption

  2. A screening method for banana weevil (Cosmopolites sordidus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... The banana weevil (Cosmopolites sordidus Germar) is a serious pest in most banana-growing areas of the world. Host-plant resistance is considered to be the most feasible and sustainable method for its control. However, a quick and effective method for screening banana genotypes for resistance against.

  3. The palm weevil Rhynchophorus vulneratus is eradicated from Laguna Beach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Hoddle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In October 2010, Rhynchophorus vulneratus, originally identified as the red palm weevil, R. ferrugineus, was discovered infesting Canary Island date palms in Laguna Beach, California. The red palm weevil has caused extensive mortality of palms in the Mediterranean, the Middle East and North Africa, and its discovery in California caused concern for the state's ornamental palm and date industries and the many palms in Southern California landscapes. A rapid, coordinated effort led to the deployment of traps baited with the weevil's aggregation pheromone, coordinated pesticide applications to privately owned palms and destruction of palms at advanced stages of infestation. Research confirmed the chemical components of the aggregation pheromone, assessed the efficacy of trapping strategies and resolved the taxonomic identity, native range and putative region of origin for the population detected in Laguna Beach. The last confirmed detection of a live R. vulneratus was Jan. 20, 2012. USDA-APHIS declared this weevil eradicated from California on Jan. 20, 2015. The estimated cost of the eradication was $1,003,646.

  4. Plant compounds insecticide activity against Coleoptera pests of stored products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Marcio Dionizio; Picanco, Marcelo Coutinho; Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho; Campos, Mateus Ribeiro de; Silva, Gerson Adriano; Martins, Julio Claudio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal]. E-mail: marcio.dionizio@gmail.com; picanco@ufv.br; guedes@ufv.br; mateusc3@yahoo.com.br; agronomiasilva@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-15

    The objective of this work was to screen plants with insecticide activity, in order to isolate, identify and assess the bioactivity of insecticide compounds present in these plants, against Coleoptera pests of stored products: Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae), Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae). The plant species used were: basil (Ocimum selloi Benth.), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), lion's ear (Leonotis nepetifolia (L.) R.Br.), jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.), baleeira herb (Cordia verbenacea L.), mint (Mentha piperita L.), wild balsam apple (Mormodica charantia L.), and billy goat weed or mentrasto (Ageratum conyzoides L.). The insecticide activity of hexane and ethanol extracts from those plants on R. dominica was evaluated. Among them, only hexane extract of A. conyzoides showed insecticide activity; the hexane extract of this species was successively fractionated by silica gel column chromatography, for isolation and purification of the active compounds. Compounds 5,6,7,8,3',4',5'-heptamethoxyflavone; 5,6,7,8,3'-pentamethoxy-4',5'-methilenedioxyflavone and coumarin were identified. However, only coumarin showed insecticide activity against three insect pests (LD{sub 50} from 2.72 to 39.71 mg g{sup -1} a.i.). The increasing order of insects susceptibility to coumarin was R. dominica, S. zeamais and O. surinamensis. (author)

  5. First Report of the Occurrence of Weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) in Plantations of Green Tea in Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eduardo Suguino; Terezinha Monteiro Dos Santos-Cividanes; Francisco Jorge Cividanes; Ana Maria De Faria; Adriana Novais Martins

    2013-01-01

    ...) in tea plantations in the municipality of São Miguel Arcanjo, SP, Brazil. The damage caused by these insects is related mainly to the presence of insect fragments in dried tea leaves, hindering the marketing of the product...

  6. Fumigation Toxicity of Essential Oil Monoterpenes to Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Olufunmilayo E. Ajayi; Arthur G. Appel; Henry Y. Fadamiro

    2014-01-01

    The fumigant toxicity of eight essential oil components, 1-8-cineole, carvacrol, eugenol, (−)-menthone, (−)-linalool, S-(−)-limonene, (−)-β-pinene, and (+)-α-pinene, was tested against the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), at 0.25–60 µL/L air doses. 1-8-Cineole, carvacrol, and eugenol caused complete adult mortality at 10 µL/L air 24 h after treatment. 1-8-Cineole and carvacrol were the most toxic with LD50 values of 0.24 and 0.6 µL/L air at 24 h...

  7. The influence of silvicultural practices on genetic improvement: height growth and weevil resistance in eastern white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Thomas Ledig; D.M. Smith

    1981-01-01

    When grown in a common environment, the progeny of white pine (Pinus strobus L.) from weeviled stands improved by selection thinning outperformed the progeny of wolfy dominants from untreated stands in both height and weevil resistance. Within families, weevils tended to attack the tallest trees. Among families the relationship was not as strong and...

  8. Scolytinae in hazelnut orchards of Turkey: clarification of species and identification key (Coleoptera, Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Celal; Knizek, Milos; Hulcr, Juri

    2017-01-01

    Hazelnut, a very important cash crop in Turkey, is frequently colonized by bark and ambrosia beetle species (Scolytinae). Some scolytine species may cause economic damage while other species do not; therefore, proper identification is important in orchard management. Extensive sampling demonstrated that the most common pest species in Turkey's hazelnut orchards are Anisandrus dispar, Xylosandrus germanus, and Xyleborinus saxesenii. Hypothenemus eruditus can also be common, but only colonizes branches that are already dead. Lymantor coryli, Hypoborus ficus, Taphrorychus ramicola, and Taphrorychus hirtellus are rare and do not causes damage to live plants. Xyleborinus saxesenii appears to have been frequently misidentified and misreported as either L. coryli or Xyleborus xylographus. The former is rare, and the latter probably does not occur in Turkey. To avoid future misidentifications, a dichotomous identification key is provided for bark and ambrosia beetles of hazelnut orchards in Turkey.

  9. Scolytinae in hazelnut orchards of Turkey: clarification of species and identification key (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal Tuncer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hazelnut, a very important cash crop in Turkey, is frequently colonized by bark and ambrosia beetle species (Scolytinae. Some scolytine species may cause economic damage while other species do not; therefore, proper identification is important in orchard management. Extensive sampling demonstrated that the most common pest species in Turkey’s hazelnut orchards are Anisandrus dispar, Xylosandrus germanus, and Xyleborinus saxesenii. Hypothenemus eruditus can also be common, but only colonizes branches that are already dead. Lymantor coryli, Hypoborus ficus, Taphrorychus ramicola, and Taphrorychus hirtellus are rare and do not causes damage to live plants. Xyleborinus saxesenii appears to have been frequently misidentified and misreported as either L. coryli or Xyleborus xylographus. The former is rare, and the latter probably does not occur in Turkey. To avoid future misidentifications, a dichotomous identification key is provided for bark and ambrosia beetles of hazelnut orchards in Turkey.

  10. Resposta de Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky 1885 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae frente ao extrato de Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ferreira da Silva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available O uso desenfreado de agrotóxicos vem a ser um caso de saúde pública, pois prejudica a saúde do trabalhador do campo assim como do consumidor final desses produtos. O Sitophilus zeamais é uma praga de armazenamento que ataca o milho, e no combate a essa praga comumente é utilizado produtos tóxicos. Visando essa problemática, a busca por produtos alternativos vem a ser um campo de investigação promissor, pois esse método de controle não gera resíduos para o homem tão pouco ao meio ambiente. O extrato utilizado para avaliar o potencial de repelência foi o de Capsicum annuum L. popularmente conhecido como pimentão. Os testes foram realizados com a utilização de arenas, onde em cada arena foram liberados 30 adultos de S. zeamais, não sexados e após 24 horas, foram registrados o número de insetos em cada recipiente. Os grãos de milho foram tratados com volume de extrato correspondente a 1,0% da massa de grãos, nas concentrações 0,0 (álcool 70%; 25,0; 50,0; 75,0 e 100,0% (volume de extrato/volume álcool. O experimento foi organizado segundo o delineamento inteiramente casualizado e constou de cinco tratamentos e quatro repetições. As maiores repelências foram observadas nas concentrações de 25% e 100%, repelindo 72 e 70% dos insetos respectivamente. Sendo assim a utilização desse extrato pode ser empregado no tratamento de sementes armazenadas, evitando assim uma maior infestação desses insetos, preservando assim a integridade física e fisiológica das sementes.

  11. High individual variation in pheromone production by tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Brian T. Sullivan; Matthew P. Ayres

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation via pheromone signaling is essential for tree-killing bark beetles to overcome tree defenses and reproduce within hosts. Pheromone production is a trait that is linked to fitness, so high individual variation is paradoxica1. One explanation is that the technique of measuring static pheromone pools overestimates true variation among individuals. An...

  12. The Role of the Beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Mango Wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Tarcísio Visintin da Silva; Ferreira, Dalton de Oliveira; Santana Júnior, Paulo Antônio; Arcanjo, Lucas de Paulo; Queiroz, Elenir Aparecida; Sarmento, Renato Almeida; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2017-06-01

    The knowledge of the spatiotemporal dynamics of pathogens and their vectors is an important step in determining the pathogen dispersion pattern and the role of vectors in disease dynamics. However, in the case of mango wilt little is known about its spatiotemporal dynamics and the relationship of its vector [the beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Stebbing 1914)] to these dynamics. The aim of this work was to determine the spatial-seasonal dynamic of H. mangiferae attacks and mango wilt in mango orchards and to verify the importance of H. mangiferae in the spatiotemporal dynamics of the disease. Two mango orchards were monitored during a period of 3 yr. The plants in these orchards were georeferenced and inspected monthly to quantify the number of plants attacked by beetles and the fungus. In these orchards, the percentage of mango trees attacked by beetles was always higher than the percentage infected by the fungus. The colonization of mango trees by beetles and the fungus occurred by colonization of trees both distant and proximal to previously attacked trees. The new plants attacked by the fungus emerged in places where the beetles had previously begun their attack. This phenomenon led to a large overlap in sites of beetle and fungal occurrence, indicating that establishment by the beetle was followed by establishment by the fungus. This information can be used by farmers to predict disease infection, and to control bark beetle infestation in mango orchards. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Dispersal and overwintering behavior of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in southern Quebec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, G.

    1988-01-01

    Two techniques for applying the isotope {sup 65}Zn to the body surface of plum curculio (PC), Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), are described. Mortality increased with both increase in radioactivity and duration of exposure. A mixture of radioisotope and paint was applied to the elytra of >5000 beetles to study their dispersal and overwintering behavior in the field. In fall, labeled PC were released in orchards, woodlots, and field microplots. From orchards, PC migrated massively towards high tree silhouettes and hibernated in woodlots. The following spring, they reinfested the orchards. In a field choice experiment, comprising four microhabitats, 86% of labeled beetles hibernated in those with a thick litter layer. Few PC (<1%) hibernated within the soil in field conditions. Survival was clearly related to the preferred microhabitat type. Females dispersed further than males. Within woodlots PC migrated south, which confirmed the southern migratory tendency observed in all of the other field experiments. Adults were most active between sunset and sunrise. In spring, following their migration to the orchard, PC were found on the ground under the apple trees. Highest mean PC activity was recorded at fruit set.

  14. Prepupal diapause and instar IV developmental rates of the spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Matthew Hansen; Barbara J. Bentz; James A. Powell; David R. Gray; James C. Vandygriff

    2011-01-01

    The spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby), is an important mortality agent of native spruces throughout North America. The life-cycle duration of this species varies from 1 to 3 years depending temperature. The univoltine cycle (one generation per year) is thought to maximize outbreak risk and accelerate host mortality in established outbreaks. Prepupal...

  15. Effects of hermetic storage on adult Sitophilus oryzae L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) acoustic activity patterns and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermetic storage is of interest to farmers and warehouse managers as a method to control insect pests in small storage facilities. To develop improved understanding of effects of hermetic storage on insect pest activity and mortality over time, oxygen levels, acoustic signals, and observations of vi...

  16. Quarantine treatment for Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) through gamma radiation from Cobalt-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Amanda Cristina Oliveira, E-mail: amandaramos@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Potenza, Marcos Roberto, E-mail: potenza@biologico.sp.gov.b [Instituto Biologico de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento de Sanidade Vegetal; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: varthur@cena.usp.b [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Pests like beetles, moths, fungus and mites normally attack stored products such as grains, spices, flours, brans and tobacco in bale. Among these pests the Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most important pests due its elevated potential of reproduction, infesting a great number of products, inducing great damages. This work had as objective to determine the efficacy of gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 as quarantine treatment for S. zeamais. The insects used in this experiment were reared in maize grains, at the Laboratorio de Artropodes of the Instituto Biologico/SP, on climatic room with 27 +- 2 deg C of temperature and relative humidity of 70 +- 5%. Samples containing 25 adult insects were put in acrylic recipients measuring 2.8cm x 2.8cm. Each treatment had four repetitions, in a total of 100 insects for treatment. They were irradiated with growing doses of gamma radiation: 0 (control); 0,25; 0,5; 0,75; 1,0; 1,25; 1,5; 1,75; 2,0; 2,25 2,5; 2,75; 3,0; 3,5 e 4,0 kGy, in a experimental irradiator of Cobalt-60, model Gammacell-220, located at the Centro de Tecnologia da Radiacoes - CTR of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN/SP. After irradiation, the samples were transferred to plastic recipients measuring 3,5cm x 10cm, with perforated lids (to allow gaseous exchanges). After the irradiation the samples were kept in climatic room (27 +- 2 deg C and 70 +- 5%). The mortality of insects was evaluated 1 hour after the irradiation and also on the next 7 days. By the results obtained we can conclude that was the dose of 2.75 kGy that induced the immediate mortality for adult insects of the specie S. zeamais. (author)

  17. The genus Apodrosus Marshall, 1922 in Cuba (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae, Polydrusini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Anderson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Apodrosus Marshall is newly recorded for, and revised for Cuba. Nine new species are recognized as follows: Apodrosus alberti (type locality, Granma, Parque Nacional Pico Turquino, A. alternatus (type locality, Guantánamo, El Yunque, A. franklyni (type locality, Cienfuegos, Parque Nacional Pico San Juan, A. griseus (type locality, Santiago de Cuba, Siboney-Jutici Ecological Reserve, A. mensurensis (type locality, Holguin, Parque Nacional La Mensura-Piloto, A. pseudoalternatus (type locality, Matanzas, Varahicacos, A. beckeli (type locality, Guantánamo, 8 km W. Imias, A. sandersoni (type locality, Guantánamo, Loma Lafarola, and A. zayasi (type locality, Cienfuegos, Parque Nacional Pico San Juan. A key for their identification, descriptions, summaries of natural history information and data on distributions are presented. A molecular phylogeny based on 11 species of Apodrosus from Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico is reconstructed. A sister group relationship between Polydrusus and Apodrosus is recovered with a limited sampling of the former genus. The monophyly of Apodrosus is recovered with strong support. Cuban Apodrosus are not monophyletic. Five of the six sampled Cuban species form a clade, sister to an undescribed Apodrosus species from the Dominican Republic; and, Apodrosus alternatus is sister to A. quisqueyanus Girón & Franz, 2010, a species from the Dominican Republic. Biogeographic implications for Cuban species are discussed in light of the phylogeny.

  18. Molecular phylogeny and taxonomic review of Premnobiini Browne 1962 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony I Cognato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomy of Premnobiini is reviewed in the context a molecular phylogeny including species of Ipini, Dryocoeotini, and Xyleborini. DNA data from COI, 16S, 28S, and CAD (~ 2640 characters were generated for 79 species and phylogenies were reconstructed using parsimony and Bayesian methods under different nucleotide sequence alignment parameters. The topologies of these phylogenies were in general agreement. Ipini was monophyletic along with all genera except Acathotomicus. Premnobiini was nested within Ipini and consisted of two clades, which associated with Premnobius and Premnophilus. These results justified taxonomic changes. Premnophilus was resurrected as a valid genus and Premnobiini was considered a sub-tribe of Ipini.

  19. The gut microbiota of larvae of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Oliver (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tagliavia, Marcello; Messina, Enzo; Manachini, Barbara; Cappello, Simone; Quatrini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    .... The gut microbiota of insects plays a remarkable role in the host life and understanding the relationship dynamics between insects and their microbiota may improve the biological control of insect pests...

  20. Natural occurrence of Beauveira bassiana (Balsamo Vuill. in Aracanthus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Ursi Ventura

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the natural occurrence of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana in a population of Aracanthus sp. in common a bean field in Londrina, PR. Four samples were taken with six repetitions each. The dead insects were monitored for infection of fungi (every 3 days for a period of 15 days. Among the dead insects it was shown that 72, 63, 84 and 79% respectively in each sample were infected by the fungus, indicating that this is a potential agent for the control of Aracanthus sp.

  1. Effects of neem seed derivatives on behavioral and physiological responses of the Cosmopolites sordidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musabyimana, T; Saxena, R C; Kairu, E W; Ogol, C P; Khan, Z R

    2001-04-01

    Both in a choice and multi-choice laboratory tests, fewer adults of the banana root borer, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar), settled under the corms of the susceptible banana "Nakyetengu" treated with 5% aqueous extract of neem seed powder or cake or 2.5 and 5% emulsified neem oil than on water-treated corms. Feeding damage by larvae on banana pseudostem discs treated with 5% extract of powdered neem seed, kernel, or cake, or 5% emulsified neem oil was significantly less than on untreated discs. The larvae took much longer to locate feeding sites, initiate feeding and bore into pseudostem discs treated with extract of powdered neem seed or kernel. Few larvae survived when confined for 14 d on neem-treated banana pseudostems; the survivors weighed two to four times less than the larvae developing on untreated pseudostems. Females deposited up to 75% fewer eggs on neem-treated corms. In addition, egg hatching was reduced on neem-treated corms. The higher the concentration of neem materials the more severe the effect.

  2. Odontopus brevirostris (Hustache, 1936 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae associated with new host plants belonging to Annona (Annonaceae

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    Germano H. Rosado-Neto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontopus brevirostris (Hustache, 1936 feeding on Annona squamosa L., A. cherimola Mill., A. glabra L., and A. muricata L. was observed. The last three host plants are recorded for the first time. The endophitic oviposition occurs in the veins of the ventral surface of the young leaves. The larvae, leaf miners, eat the parenchyma and the adults make small holes in the leaves. The pupation occurs in spherical cocoons protected by a sort of nest (pupation chamber between the two epidermal layers.

  3. The genus Apodrosus Marshall, 1922 in Cuba (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae, Polydrusini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert S; Zhang, Guanyang

    2017-01-01

    The genus Apodrosus Marshall is newly recorded for, and revised for Cuba. Nine new species are recognized as follows: Apodrosus alberti (type locality, Granma, Parque Nacional Pico Turquino), A. alternatus (type locality, Guantánamo, El Yunque), A. franklyni (type locality, Cienfuegos, Parque Nacional Pico San Juan), A. griseus (type locality, Santiago de Cuba, Siboney-Jutici Ecological Reserve), A. mensurensis (type locality, Holguin, Parque Nacional La Mensura-Piloto), A. pseudoalternatus (type locality, Matanzas, Varahicacos), A. beckeli (type locality, Guantánamo, 8 km W. Imias), A. sandersoni (type locality, Guantánamo, Loma Lafarola), and A. zayasi (type locality, Cienfuegos, Parque Nacional Pico San Juan). A key for their identification, descriptions, summaries of natural history information and data on distributions are presented. A molecular phylogeny based on 11 species of Apodrosus from Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico is reconstructed. A sister group relationship between Polydrusus and Apodrosus is recovered with a limited sampling of the former genus. The monophyly of Apodrosus is recovered with strong support. Cuban Apodrosus are not monophyletic. Five of the six sampled Cuban species form a clade, sister to an undescribed Apodrosus species from the Dominican Republic; and, Apodrosus alternatus is sister to A. quisqueyanus Girón & Franz, 2010, a species from the Dominican Republic. Biogeographic implications for Cuban species are discussed in light of the phylogeny.

  4. Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Asociados a Dos Maderas en un Bosque muy Húmedo Premontano (Antioquia, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Pulgarín Díaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. Cedrela odorata y Jacaranda copaia son especies importantes en el neotrópico para protección y producción. Los insectos xilófagos que las atacan se han estudiado poco. Se caracterizó la diversidad de Scolytinae que perforan tales maderas y se comparó por especie forestal, época y ecosistema; se estudió su similitud por especie forestal; se probó su asociación con las maderas; y se midió su daño y el de otros insectos. Se expusieron trozas de las maderas en bosque, pastizal y su ecotono, por un mes, en época lluviosa y seca; luego se extrajeron los insectos de su interior. Las especies capturadas fueron Xyleborus ferrugineus, X. affinis y Platypodini. La diversidad de los Scolytinae fue baja, menor en J. copaia, la época seca y el potrero. Esta fauna fue similar entre las dos maderas. No se evidenció asociación entre las especies de escolitinos y las maderas. Los ataques fueron leves y no deterioraron gravemente los leños, siendo los Scolytinae los que más daños causan. Las diferencias encontradas radican principalmente en que los escolitinos capturados son generalistas y en las diferencias ambientales probadas. Se recomienda apear la madera en época seca y trasladarla a potreros para evitar ataques de organismos xilófagos.Abstract. Cedrela odorata and Jacaranda copaia are important species in the neotropics for protection and production. Xylophagous insects that attack the mentioned woods, have been little studied. Scolytinae that bore the mentioned woods diversity's was characterized and compared among species, season and ecosystem; similarity between forest species was studied; its association and woods was tested; and the damage produced by this and other insects was measured. Wood logs were exposed in a forest, grassland and its ecotono, for a month, in a rainy and dry season, then the insects from its interior were extracted. The captured species were Xyleborus ferrugineus, X. affinis and Platypodini. Scolytinae that attack the studied woods' diversity was low, lowest in J. copaia, the dry season and in the grassland. The fauna was similar between the two woods. Association between scolitins and wood species was not proved. The attacks were low and do not damage the logs seriously, been scolitins the most damaging insects. Differences found are due because captured scolitins are generalist and the environmental differences, mainly. It is recommended to harvest the wood in dry season and take it to grasslands to avoid xylophagous insects attack.

  5. Bioactivity of diatomaceous earth to Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in different application conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto H. Sousa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the insecticidal activity of diatomaceous earth (DE at different ambient temperatures on adult Sitophilus zeamais and progeny, using different doses and exposure periods. The experiments were performed in Petri dishes containing 40 g of the whole corn kernel, treated with DE at doses of 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 kg Mg-1. Each dish was infested with 25 S. zeamais adults and kept at climatic chambers under temperatures of 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 ºC. The insect mortality was recorded after six and 15 days from the beginning of the bioassays. The grains evaluated at 15 days were separated from insects and kept in the dishes for another 75 days under the same temperature conditions. After this period the effect of ambient temperature and of diatomaceous earth doses on the emergence of S. zeamais in the F1 generation was evaluated. It was found that the mortality of S. zeamais increased with the higher dose and temperature during the exposure period of six and 15 days. The number of insects emerged reduced with increasing temperature in these two exposure periods. The increase of temperature and exposure period favored the efficacy of DE in lower doses for control of S. zeamais.

  6. Chemical control of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infesting avocado (Persea americana) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three trials were undertaken to determine the effectiveness of insecticides against Scolytinae infesting avocado between 2010 and 2011. These included contact and systemic insecticides applied either to trees or to avocado logs. Efficacy of the insecticides was determined either by the number of ent...

  7. New associations of phoretic mites on Pityokteines curvidens (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan Pernek; Stefan Wirth; Stacy R. Blomquist; Dimitrios N. Avtzis; John C. Moser

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The species composition and abundance of phoretic mites of the bark beetle Pityokteines curvidens caught in pheromone traps were investigated in Croatia. The P. curvidens trapping programs have been in an experimental phase in Croatia since 2004 as a possible monitoring and control system. The trapping program also permits the opportunity to sample phoretic...

  8. Phylogeography of the bark beetle Dendroctonus mexicanus Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel A. Anducho-Reyes; Anthony I. Cognato; Jane L. Hayes; Gerardo. Zuniga

    2008-01-01

    Dendroctonus mexicanus is polyphagous within the Pinus genus and has a wide geographical distribution in Mexico and Guatemala. We examined the pattern of genetic variation across the range of this species to explore its demographic history and its phylogeographic pattern. Analysis of the mtDNA sequences of 173 individuals from...

  9. Taxonomic notes on the afrotropical genera Hapalogenius Hagedorn, Hylesinopsis Eggers, and Rhopalopselion Hagedorn (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Beaver

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic confusion among the afrotropical scolytine genera Hapalogenius Hagedorn, Hylesinopsis Eggers and Rhopalopselion Hagedorn, and their synonyms is discussed with especial reference to the catalogues of Wood and Bright (1992, and Alonso-Zarazaga and Lyal (2009. A key is given to separate the three genera recognised, and the species considered to be included in each genus are listed. Hylesinopsis is resurrected from synonymy with Hapalogenius, and shown not to be closely related to it. Chilodendron Schedl is considered to be a synonym of Hylesinopsis and not of Xylechinus Chapuis. The following new synonymy is proposed at specific level: Hapalogenius africanus (Eggers (= Hapalogenius lesnei Eggers, = Metahylesinus brincki Schedl; Hapalogenius fuscipennis (Chapuis (= Hapalogenius bimaculatus Eggers; Hapalogenius oblongus (Eggers (= Metahylesinus striatus Schedl; Hylesinopsis fasciata (Hagedorn (= Kissophagus punctatus Eggers; Phrixosoma niger Eggers (= Hapalogenius niger Schedl. The following species are returned to Hylesinopsis from Hapalogenius to which they were transferred by Alonso-Zarazaga and Lyal (2009: Hylesinopsis alluaudi (Lepesme, H. angolensis (Schedl, H. arabiae (Schedl, H. atra (Nunberg, H. confusa (Eggers, H. decellei (Nunberg, H. dubia Eggers, H. emarginata (Nunberg, H. fasciata (Hagedorn, H. ficus (Schedl, H. granulata (Lepesme, H. hirsuta (Schedl, H. joveri (Schedl, H. pauliani (Lepesme, H. punctata (Eggers, H. saudiarabiae (Schedl. The following new combination is given: Hylesinopsis leprosula (Browne from Cryphalus Erichson. New distributional records are given for some species.

  10. Trap-lure combinations for redbay ambrosia beetle detection (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous reports showed that manuka and phoebe oils were attractive baits for monitoring the redbay ambrosia beetle. We report here a combination of field trapping studies and chemical analysis evaluating attraction of X. glabratus to commercial phoebe and manuka lures in relation to the release ra...

  11. Phytosanitation Methods Influence Posttreatment Colonization of Juglans nigra Logs by Pityophthorus juglandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Audley; A. E. Mayfield; S. W. Myers; A. Taylor; W. E. Klingeman

    2015-01-01

    Several North American walnut species (Juglans spp.) are threatened by thousand cankers disease which is caused by the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman) and its associated fungal plant pathogen, Geosmithia morbida M. Kolarý´k, E. Freeland, C. Utley and N. Tisserat sp. nov. Spread of this...

  12. Cellulolytic Bacteria Associated with the Gut of Dendroctonus armandi Larvae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to investigate the cellulolytic bacterial community in the intestine of the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi larvae. A total of 91 cellulolytic bacteria were isolated and assigned to 11 genotypes using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA. Partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis and morphological tests were used to assign the 11 representative isolates. The results showed that the isolates belonged to α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Members of γ-Proteobacteria were the most frequently represented species and accounted for 73.6% of all the cellulolytic bacteria. The majority of cellulolytic bacteria in D. armandi larva gut were identified as Serratia and accounted for 49.5%, followed by Pseudomonas, which accounted for 22%. In addition, members of Bacillus, Brevundimonas, Paenibacillus, Pseudoxanthomonas, Methylobacterium and Sphingomonas were found in the D. armandi larva gut. Brevundimonas kwangchunensis, Brevundimonas vesicularis, Methylobacterium populi and Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana were reported to be cellulolytic for the first time in this study. Information generated from the present study might contribute towards understanding the relationship between bark beetle and its gut flora.

  13. Extremely low infection levels of pathogens and nematodes in Trypodendron spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegensteiner Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The striped ambrosia beetles Trypodendron lineatum and T. domesticum are timber forest pests in the Palearctic region and North America. Because only a few pathogens are known for Trypodendron species, the aim of this work was to determine the spectrum of pathogen species of T. lineatum, T. laeve, and T. domesticum. Trypodendron species were collected in pheromone traps at nine localities in the Czech Republic, five localities in Poland, and one locality in Austria. In total, 2,439 T. lineatum, 171 T. domesticum, and 17 T. laeve beetles were dissected and examined. Infection was found in only two of the 17 specimens of T. laeve and in only two of the 171 specimens of T. domesticum; in all four cases, the parasites were nematodes. Parasitisation of T. lineatum by nematodes was found in T. lineatum at eight localities with a mean (± SE parasitisation level of 8.1 ± 4.7%. A Chytridiopsis sp. was detected in cells of the midgut epithelium of one T. lineatum specimen, and Gregarina sp. was detected in the midgut lumen of two T. lineatum specimens; no other pathogens were found in T. lineatum. The low infection rates and the tendency for infection by nematodes can be explained by the monogamy of Trypodendron spp. and their feeding on fungi in short galleries that are not connected to the galleries of conspecifics.

  14. Semiochemicals provide a deterrent to the black twig borer, Xylosandrus compactus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick Dudley; John D. Stein; Taylor Jones; Nancy Gillette

    2007-01-01

    The black twig borer (Xylosandrus compactus) (BTB) is a serious pest of agriculture, forestry, and native Hawaiian plants. The BTB is a typical ambrosia beetle that bores into the host and inoculates the galleries with an ambrosia fungus (Fusarium solani) known to cause cankers, root rot, and wilt. The host list for this beetle is...

  15. Walnut Twig Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) Colonization of Eastern Black Walnut Nursery Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audley, Jackson; Klingeman, William E; Mayfield, Albert; Myers, Scott; Taylor, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Thousand cankers disease, caused by the invasive bark beetle Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman and an associated fungal pathogen Geosmithia morbida M.Kolařík, E. Freeland, C. Utley, N. Tisserat, currently threatens the health of eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) in North America. Both the beetle and pathogen have expanded beyond their native range via transport of infested walnut wood. Geosmithia morbida can develop in seedlings following inoculation, but the ability of P. juglandis to colonize young, small diameter trees has not been investigated. This study assessed the beetle's colonization behavior on J. nigra nursery trees. Beetles were caged directly onto the stems of walnut seedlings from five nursery sources representing a range of basal stem diameter classes. Seedlings were also exposed to P. juglandis in a limited choice, field-based experiment comparing pheromone-baited and unbaited stems. When beetles were caged directly onto stems, they probed and attempted to colonize seedlings across the range of diameters and across sources tested, including stems as small as 0.5 cm in diameter. In the field experiment, beetles only attempted to colonize seedlings that were baited with a pheromone lure and appeared to prefer (though not statistically significant) the larger diameter trees. Despite several successful penetrations into the phloem, there was no evidence of successful progeny development within the young trees in either experiment. Further investigation is recommended to better elucidate the risk nursery stock poses as a pathway for thousand cankers disease causal organisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  16. Attraction of the Euwallacea sp. near fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Quercivorol and to Infestations in Avocado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, John A; Maoz, Yonatan; Levi-Zada, Anat

    2017-08-01

    The Euwallacea sp. near fornicatus (Euwallacea sp. 1 hereafter) feeds on many woody shrubs and trees and is a pest of avocado, Persea americana Mill., in several countries including Israel and the United States. Quercivorol baits are commercially available for Euwallacea sp. 1 females (males do not fly), but their attractive strength compared to other pheromones and potential for mass trapping are unknown. We used sticky traps baited with quercivorol released at 0.126 mg/d (1×) and at 0.01×, 0.1×, and 10× relative rates to obtain a dose-response curve of Euwallacea sp. 1 attraction. The curve fitted well a kinetic formation function of first order. Naturally infested limbs of living avocado trees had attraction rates equivalent to 1× quercivorol. An effective attraction radius (EAR) was calculated according to previous equations for each of the various baits (1× EAR = 1.18 m; 10× EAR = 2.00 m). A pole with six sticky traps spaced from 0.25-5.75 m in height had captures of Euwallacea sp. 1 yielding a mean flight height of 1.24 m with vertical flight distribution SD of 0.88 m (0.82-0.96 m, 95% CI). The SD with specific EAR was used to calculate EARc, two-dimensional EAR (1× EARc = 0.99 m; 10× EARc = 2.86 m), for comparison with other insect pheromone traps and for use in simulations. The simulation methods described previously were performed with combinations of 1-16 traps with 1-50 aggregations per 9-ha plot. The simulations indicate mass trapping with quercivorol could be effective if begun in spring before Euwallacea sp. 1 establishes competing sources of attraction. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [Population fluctuation of Xyleborus ferrugineus and X. affinis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in ecosystems of Tabasco, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Ricardo; Pérez, Manuel; Sánchez, Saúl; Capello, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    The Scolytinae insects are commonly known as bark or ambrosial beetles because of their feeding habits. Among them, some species restrict their reproductive activity to a host plant or a small number of them, whereas others are highly polyphagous. In order to evaluate the population dynamics of Scolytinae species, populations of Xyleborusferrugineus and X. affinis in ecosystems from Tabasco, Mexico were studied. The study was carried out from November 2010-July 2011, February 2010-January 2011 and 2007. The trapping methods used were alcohol traps, light traps and direct capture on their host plants. A total of 688 specimens ofX ferrugineus and 3 911 specimens of X. affinis were collected. The population dynamics of X. ferrugineus showed low size population in the studied ecosystems, without any marked seasonality. The highest population sizes were recorded both in dry season (March-May) and rainy season (September-December). Unlike the populations of X. ferrugineus, those of X. affinis were more abundant and showed the highest peaks during the rainy seasons (except in May at the Botanical Garden "José Narciso Rovisora"). Alcohol and light traps can be complementary methods for monitoring the populations of these types of insects. They occur most of the year and theirs population dynamics depends on food resources availability as well as environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. Judging by the observed abundance it is suggested that X. affinis has been adapted and exploited resources in a better way than X. ferrugineus in those ecosystems. Correlations between abundance and climatic factors had both positive and negative values. The results reflect the behavior of populations. However, a detail assessment of the biological and abiotic factors that influence the fluctuations of these insects is required.

  18. A taxonomic monograph of the genus Tylodinus Champion (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae: Tylodina) of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Cozar, Jesús; Anderson, Robert S; Jones, Robert W; León-Corté, Jorge L

    2014-04-15

    The species of the genus Tylodinus from the Mexican state of Chiapas are revised. We examined 989 specimens representing 36 species; 23 species are grouped into eight species groups with 13 species considered as Incertae sedis. A total of 32 species are described as new and one species is a new record for México. Species groups  (numbers of species in parentheses) and species are: Tylodinus buchanani species group (6) T. buchanani new species (type locality: Chiapas, Unión Juárez, Volcán Tacan), T. exiguus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Motozintla, 7 km SSW Motozintla de Mendoza), T. ixchel new species (type locality: Chiapas, Unión Juarez, Volcán Tacan), T. jonesi new species (type locality: Chiapas, Angel Albino Corzo, Reserva de la Biosfera el Triunfo, Campamento el Quetzal), T. variabilis new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec), T. wibmeri new species (type locality: Chiapas, Motozintla, 7 km SSW Motozintla de Mendoza); Tylodinus canaliculatus species group (3) T. canaliculatus Champion (Chiapas, Unión Juárez, Volcán Tacan, new record for  México), T. sepulturaensis new species (Type locality: Chiapas, Villa Corzo, Ejido Sierra Morena), T. triumforium new species (Type locality: Chiapas, La Concordia, 4 km SE Custepec); Tylodinus cavicrus species group (3) T. cavicrus Champion, T. pseudocavicrus new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec), T. rugosus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Flores, Sierra Morena); Tylodinus coapillensis species group (2) T. coapillensis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Coapilla, ca. 10.5 km NE Coapilla), T. leoncortesi new species (type locality: Chiapas, Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán, La Yerbabuena); Tylodinus mutabilis species group (2) Tylodinus mutabilis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Corzo, Ejido Sierra Morena), T. parvus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Trinitaria, Lagunas de Montebello); Tylodinus nodulosus species group (3) T. andersoni new species (Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1), T. nodulosus (Boheman), T. zilchi Kuschel; Tylodinus pusillus species group (2) T. porvenirensis new species (type locality: Chiapas, El Porvenir, El Porvenir (2 km NE)), T. pusillus new species (type locality: Chiapas, 4 km SE Custepec); Tylodinus spiniventris species group (2) T. lum new species (Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec), and T. spiniventris new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Reserva Huitepec); Incertae sedis (13) T. pinguis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1) , T. kissingeri new species (type locality: Chiapas, Tapalapa, ca. 14 km NE Coapilla), T. complicatus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán, La Yerbabuena), T. dominicus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Corzo, Reserva de la Biósfera La Sepultura), T. noctis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Coapilla, ca. 10.5 km NE Coapilla), T. rufus new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec); T. branstetteri new species (type locality: Chiapas, La Concordia, 4 km SE Custepec), T. kuscheli new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Flores, Ejido Sierra Morena), T. pappi new species (type locality: Chiapas, Unión Juárez, Volcán Tacan), T. gibbosus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán, Yerbabuena Reserve), T. immundus new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas Cerro Huitepec), T. intzin new species (type locality: Chiapas, Tenejapa, Yashanal), T. elongatus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1). Three species (T. nodulosus (Boheman), T. zilchi Kuschel and T. cavicrus Champion) are not known to occur in Chiapas but were included in this study to be more representative of inter- and intraspecific variation and to provide a better definition of the taxonomic limits of species and species groups.        Species groups are characterized and taxonomic composition and general distribution and ecological correlates summarized. Diagnoses and distributions are given for all species and ecological information is presented where available. Immature stages, life history and food habits are not known for any of the species. 

  19. Xylosandrus germanus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) Occurrence, Fungal Associations, and Management Trials in New York Apple Orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Arthur M; Breth, Deborah I; Tee, Elizabeth M; Cox, Kerik D; Villani, Sara M; Ayer, Katrin M; Wallis, Anna E; Donahue, Daniel J; Combs, David B; Davis, Abagail E; Neal, Joshua A; English-Loeb, Forrest M

    2017-10-01

    Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) has caused increasing damage in high-density New York apple orchards since 2013, resulting in tree decline and death. We documented their occurrence and timing in > 50 orchards using ethanol-baited traps from 2014 to 2016. First captures ranged from 48 to 83 degree days (base 10 °C) from 1 January. Captures were numerically higher at the orchard-woods interface than within the orchard interior, but differences were not significant in locations with lower populations. Control using insecticide trunk sprays was tested in potted, waterlogged apple trees placed in orchards and nurseries, and inside wooded areas adjacent to orchards. A verbenone repellent was used in combination with trunk sprays to improve control. Overall, insecticide sprays were inconsistent and marginal in preventing new infestations. Chlorpyrifos significantly reduced infestations versus lambda-cyhalothrin and untreated trees at one location in the 2015 orchard trials, and versus untreated trees at one location in the 2016 nursery trials, but otherwise performed no better than other treatments. The addition of verbenone to either the check or permethrin treatments resulted in significantly fewer attack sites containing brood at one orchard site in 2016. Chlorpyrifos, lambda-cyhalothrin, and permethrin significantly reduced the number of attack sites containing adults compared with untreated trees at one nursery trial location in 2016, but were otherwise ineffective in reducing numbers of trees in other locations and infestation categories. We found several fungal and bacterial species associated with X. germanus and its infestation of apples. These microbes likely play a minimal role in apple decline. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  20. High individual variation in pheromone production by tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pureswaran, Deepa S; Sullivan, Brian T; Ayres, Matthew P

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation via pheromone signalling is essential for tree-killing bark beetles to overcome tree defenses and reproduce within hosts. Pheromone production is a trait that is linked to fitness, so high individual variation is paradoxical. One explanation is that the technique of measuring static pheromone pools overestimates true variation among individuals. An alternative hypothesis is that aggregation behaviour dilutes the contribution of individuals to the trait under selection and reduces the efficacy of natural selection on pheromone production by individuals. We compared pheromone measurements from traditional hindgut extractions of female southern pine beetles with those obtained by aerating individuals till they died. Aerations showed greater total pheromone production than hindgut extractions, but coefficients of variation (CV) remained high (60-182%) regardless of collection technique. This leaves the puzzle of high variation unresolved. A novel but simple explanation emerges from considering bark beetle aggregation behaviour. The phenotype visible to natural selection is the collective pheromone plume from hundreds of colonisers. The influence of a single beetle on this plume is enhanced by high variation among individuals but constrained by large group sizes. We estimated the average contribution of an individual to the pheromone plume across a range of aggregation sizes and showed that large aggregation sizes typical in mass attacks limit the potential of natural selection because each individual has so little effect on the overall plume. Genetic variation in pheromone production could accumulate via mutation and recombination, despite strong effects of the pheromone plume on the fitness of individuals within the aggregation. Thus, aggregation behaviour, by limiting the efficacy of natural selection, can allow the persistence of extreme phenotypes in nature.

  1. High individual variation in pheromone production by tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pureswaran, Deepa S.; Sullivan, Brian T.; Ayres, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation via pheromone signalling is essential for tree-killing bark beetles to overcome tree defenses and reproduce within hosts. Pheromone production is a trait that is linked to fitness, so high individual variation is paradoxical. One explanation is that the technique of measuring static pheromone pools overestimates true variation among individuals. An alternative hypothesis is that aggregation behaviour dilutes the contribution of individuals to the trait under selection and reduces the efficacy of natural selection on pheromone production by individuals. We compared pheromone measurements from traditional hindgut extractions of female southern pine beetles with those obtained by aerating individuals till they died. Aerations showed greater total pheromone production than hindgut extractions, but coefficients of variation (CV) remained high (60-182%) regardless of collection technique. This leaves the puzzle of high variation unresolved. A novel but simple explanation emerges from considering bark beetle aggregation behaviour. The phenotype visible to natural selection is the collective pheromone plume from hundreds of colonisers. The influence of a single beetle on this plume is enhanced by high variation among individuals but constrained by large group sizes. We estimated the average contribution of an individual to the pheromone plume across a range of aggregation sizes and showed that large aggregation sizes typical in mass attacks limit the potential of natural selection because each individual has so little effect on the overall plume. Genetic variation in pheromone production could accumulate via mutation and recombination, despite strong effects of the pheromone plume on the fitness of individuals within the aggregation. Thus, aggregation behaviour, by limiting the efficacy of natural selection, can allow the persistence of extreme phenotypes in nature.

  2. Host suitability analysis of the bark beetle Scolytus amygdali (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiri, A; Ahmed, M Z; Braham, M; Qiu, B-L

    2015-08-01

    Scolytus amygdali is a polyphagous insect pest that feeds on fruit trees and forest trees. Our study assessed the host preference and reproductive potential of S. amygdali on four tree species: almond (Prunus dulcis), apricot (Prunus armeniaca), peach (Prunus persica), and plum (Prunus domestica). Females of S. amygdali produced maternal galleries that were longer on peach than the other three trees, and female fecundity was highest on peach. Females with longer maternal galleries produced more eggs, indicating a positive correlation between maternal gallery length and female fertility. The under-bark development time of S. amygdali is significantly shorter on plum (45 days) and almond (56 days) than on apricot (65 days) and peach (64 days). Despite this longer development time on peach, our results still suggest that, of the four types of tree tested, peach is the most preferred host for S. amygdali.

  3. Effects of soil moisture and temperature on overwintering survival of Curculio larvae (Coleoptera : Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricca, M.A.; Weckerly, F.W.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Few studies to date have investigated factors, other than mast crop size, that influence the dynamics of Curculio populations.W e examined the effects of varying levels of soil moisture (0.35, 0.4 and 0.5 g water/g soil) and temperature (8, 14 and 20 C) on over wintering survival of Curculio larvae collected from Quercus michauxii acorns. Survival of larvae, analyzed using log-linear analysis, was adversely affected by soil moisture but not by soil temperature. Larvae that overwinter in drier soil may have higher probabilities of successfully metamorphosing.

  4. Ergosterol content of fungi associated with Dendroctonus ponderosae and Dendroctonus rufipennis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara J. Bentz; Diana L. Six

    2006-01-01

    Insects require sterols for normal growth, metamorphosis, and reproduction, yet they are unable to synthesize these organic compounds and are therefore dependent upon a dietary source. For phloephagous species, such as Dendroctonus bark beetles, whose food does not necessarily contain appropriate types or adequate quantities of sterols, fungal...

  5. Effects of a Commercial Chitosan Formulation on Bark Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Resistance Parameters in Loblolly Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. D. Klepzig; B. L. Strom

    2011-01-01

    A commercially available chitosan product, Beyond™, was evaluated for its effects on loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., responses believed related to bark beetle resistance. Treatments were applied 4 times at approx. 6-wk intervals between May and November 2008. Five treatments were evaluated: ground application (soil drench), foliar application, ground...

  6. Freezing as a treatment to prevent the spread of Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Robert C; Jang, Eric B; Follett, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) is the most serious insect pest of coffee around the world. Although it is already present in most of the world's major coffee growing regions, it is important to delay further spread and to prevent reintroductions that might include hyperparasites or improve the genetic base of existing populations. Green coffee is shipped around the world for custom blending and roasting and such shipments carry the risk of spreading H. hampei. We used heavily infested coffee berries as a surrogate for green coffee to test the freezing tolerance of H. hampei. After freezing, all life stages of H. hampei were dissected from coffee berries and mortality was assessed. Counting all life stages, > 15,000 insects were measured in this study. A temperature of approximately -15 degrees C (range, -13.9 to -15.5) for 48 h provided 100% control of all life stages. A logit regression model predicted < or = 1 survivor in a million for treatments of -20 degrees C for 5 d or -15 degrees C for 6 d. A freezing treatment for green coffee might be more economical and acceptable compared with fumigation with methyl bromide, especially for small-scale and organic growers and millers in Hawaii who ship green coffee beans to other islands for custom roasting. Freezing treatments could also be used to kill H. hampei in coffee seeds before export with minimal effects on seed germination if coffee seeds are first dried to critical water content levels in accordance with published methods.

  7. Review of American Xyleborina (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) Occurring North of Mexico, with an Illustrated Key

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert J. Rabaglia; Stephanie A. Dole; Anthony I. Cognato

    2006-01-01

    .... The need for a worldwide revision of this tribe hampers the ability to identify species. To remedy this situation, an illustrated key is constructed and Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, Xyleborus similis Ferrari, and Euwallacea fornicatus (Eichhoff...

  8. Two new species of Otiorhynchus GERMAR, 1822 subgenus Lixorrhynchus REITTER, 1914 from Morocco (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Otiorhynchini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Białooki Piotr Z.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Otiorhynchus (Lixorrhynchus deceptorius sp. n. and O. (L. incisus sp. n. from northern Morocco are described and illustrated. Both new species are superficially similar to Mirorhynchus bellus MAGNANO, 2003 based on the conspicuously laterally incised rostrum. The erroneous indication of M. bellus from Cyprus is corrected here to Crete

  9. Insecticidal potency of RNAi-based catalase knockdown in Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Oliver) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ayedh, Hassan; Rizwan-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Hussain, Abid; Aljabr, Ahmed M

    2016-11-01

    Palm trees around the world are prone to notorious Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, which causes heavy losses of palm plantations. In Middle Eastern countries, this pest is a major threat to date palm orchards. Conventional pest control measures with the major share of synthetic insecticides have resulted in insect resistance and environmental issues. Therefore, in order to explore better alternatives, the RNAi approach was employed to knock down the catalase gene in fifth and tenth larval instars with different dsRNA application methods, and their insecticidal potency was studied. dsRNA of 444 bp was prepared to knock down catalase in R. ferrugineus. Out of the three dsRNA application methods, dsRNA injection into larvae was the most effective, followed by dsRNA application by artificial feeding. Both methods resulted in significant catalase knockdown in various tissues, especially the midgut. As a result, the highest growth inhibition of 123.49 and 103.47% and larval mortality of 80 and 40% were observed in fifth-instar larvae, whereas larval growth inhibition remained at 86.83 and 69.08% with larval mortality at 30 and 10% in tenth-instar larvae after dsRNA injection and artificial diet treatment. The topical application method was the least efficient, with the lowest larval growth inhibition of 57.23 and 45.61% and 0% mortality in fifth- and tenth-instar larvae. Generally, better results were noted at the high dsRNA dose of 5 µL. Catalase enzyme is found in most insect body tissues, and thus its dsRNA can cause broad-scale gene knockdown within the insect body, depending upon the application method. Significant larval mortality and growth inhibition after catalase knockdown in R. ferrugineus confirms its insecticidal potency and suggests a bright future for RNAi-based bioinsecticides in pest control. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Migration and dispersal of Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro STADLER

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio sobre la dispersión de Anthonomus grandis Boheman, el picudo del algodonero, en Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay y Bolivia, explora las características ecológicas y fisiológicas que han permitido a este insecto dispersarse y establecerse exitosamente en América del Sur. La plasticidad fenotípica de A. grandis se caracteriza por un tiempo de desarrollo flexible, ciclo de vida multivoltino con generaciones superpuestas, la capacidad de alimentarse con polen de diversas familias botánicas así como de otras fuentes de alimento y por su habilidad para migrar y dispersarse con la ayuda del viento. Todo esto hace de esta especie una plaga clave para el cultivo del algodón. Los cultivos de cítricos en Misiones, Argentina, son posibles sitios para la hibernación de esta especie. En esta región fueron capturadas grandes cantidades de individuos prediapausantes, provenientes de algodonales en post-cosecha en Paraguay, atraídos probablemente por compuestos volátiles de cítricos cultivados en la zona. La quiescencia facultativa que atraviesan los adultos ante condiciones adversas, conlleva a un retraso en el desarrollo que se relaciona con las condiciones desfavorables. Esto sugiere que la hibernación en A. grandis puede ser definida como «oligopausa», una forma intermedia de diapausa. Desde su introducción en Brasil en 1983 y hasta el 2006, el picudo se ha dispersado en dirección sudoeste hacia Argentina, a una velocidad promedio de 61 km año-1. Sin embargo, le ha insumido aproximadamente diez años cruzar 250 km, desde Paraguay hacia el centro de la zona algodonera de Argentina. Este progreso más lento se debe probablemente a las acciones llevadas a cabo en el marco del programa de erradicación del picudo del algodonero, por parte del gobierno de Argentina. La llegada del picudo al área central de cultivo de algodón en la Argentina, así como a otras áreas de cultivo en Paraguay y Argentina, confirma el hecho de que el picudo debería finalmente incluirse en un programa único de manejo integrado de plagas del algodón.

  11. First report of three scolytid species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Olenici

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Scolytids constitute an insect group of forest ecosystems that is very important both ecologically and economically, and which has been well studied in most European countries. However, new species are found quite often, especially in regions searched less intensively to date. In this paper three species of scolytid fauna not previously known in Romania are reported for the first time: Trypodendron laeve, Xylosandrus germanus and Hylastes linearis. Individuals of all three species were collected in the north-eastern part of Romania. T. laeve was found only in natural coniferous forests, at altitudes above 1230 m and in association with T. lineatum, but in much lower abundance. The Asian species X. germanus was found in an old beech forest situated at a much higher altitude (760-900 m than observed in western and central Europe. The third species, H. linearis, was captured as a single specimen in a plateau region (375 m.

  12. A new species Larinodontes freidbergi sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Lixinae from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Gültekin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new species in the genus Larinodontes Faust, 1898 is described from India, in addition to two previously known species. Diagnostic features of this species are: femoral tooth small, ventral tibial tooth undeveloped, protibial pre-mucro reduced, penis in dorsal view parallel sided at apical 2/3 and subapically with wide V-form angularly upwards. Description, diagnosis and illustrations of new species are presented.

  13. A contribution to the study of biology of Curculio elephas Gyll. (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drekić Milan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the insects that feeds on pedunculate oak acorns and reduces its seed yield is Curculio elephas Gyll. The study of Curculio elephas Gyll is necessary because of the severe damages caused by this insect and also owing to its insufficiently investigated biology. The research was conducted in the common oak seed orchard at Banov Brod, forest estate „Sremska Mitrovica“, and in the entomological laboratory. The adults emerge from the soil chambers from mid July till the beginning of September. The presence of adults, as determined by crown fogging, ranged from the end of July till the beginning of September with the highest number in mid August. After emerging from the soil, females are already fertile with the developed eggs in the ovaries. They start egg laying after 1 to 8 days and they lay from one to seven eggs per day. Egg laying period lasts from 7 to 20 days. Fertility of C. elephas females ranges from 5 to 40 eggs, while their fecundity ranges from 19 to 45 eggs. At the end of the larval stage, larvae bore into the soil and stay there from one to three years. The species hibernates only in the larval stage. C. elephas has a one-year life cycle, while a minor part of the population has a two or three-year life cycle.

  14. Gallery productivity, emergence, and flight activity of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Lake Maner; James Hanula; S. Kristine Braman

    2013-01-01

    Flight and emergence of the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, were monitored from March 2011 through August 2012 using Lindgren funnel traps baited with manuka oil and emergence traps attached over individual beetle galleries on infested redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Sprengel) trees. Of the 432 gallery entrances...

  15. Ethanol injection of ornamental trees facilitates testing insecticide efficacy against ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Michael E; Oliver, Jason B; Schultz, Peter B; Ranger, Christopher M; Youssef, Nadeer N

    2013-02-01

    Exotic ambrosia beetles are damaging pests in ornamental tree nurseries in North America. The species Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motshulsky) and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) are especially problematic. Management of these pests relies on preventive treatments of insecticides. However, field tests of recommended materials on nursery trees have been limited because of unreliable attacks by ambrosia beetles on experimental trees. Ethanol-injection of trees was used to induce colonization by ambrosia beetles to evaluate insecticides and botanical formulations for preventing attacks by ambrosia beetles. Experiments were conducted in Ohio, Tennessee, and Virginia. Experimental trees injected with ethanol had more attacks by ambrosia beetles than uninjected control trees in all but one experiment. Xylosandrus crassiusculus and X. germanus colonized trees injected with ethanol. In most experiments, attack rates declined 8 d after ethanol-injection. Ethanol-injection induced sufficient pressure from ambrosia beetles to evaluate the efficacy of insecticides for preventing attacks. Trunk sprays of permethrin suppressed cumulative total attacks by ambrosia beetles in most tests. Trunk sprays of the botanical formulations Armorex and Veggie Pharm suppressed cumulative total attacks in Ohio. Armorex, Armorex + Permethrin, and Veggie Pharm + Permethrin suppressed attacks in Tennessee. The bifenthrin product Onyx suppressed establishment of X. germanus in one Ohio experiment, and cumulative total ambrosia beetle attacks in Virginia. Substrate drenches and trunk sprays of neonicotinoids, or trunk sprays of anthranilic diamides or tolfenpyrad were not effective. Ethanol-injection is effective for inducing attacks and ensuring pressure by ambrosia beetles for testing insecticide efficacy on ornamental trees.

  16. Interaction of insecticide and media moisture on ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attacks on ornamental trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exotic ambrosia beetles, particularly Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford), are among the most economically damaging pests of ornamental trees in nurseries. Growers have had few tactics besides insecticide applications to reduce ambrosia beetle attacks but rec...

  17. Efficacy of current lures for detection of redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since its introduction into the USA in 2002, the exotic redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, has become a serious invasive pest, currently established in eight southeastern states. Females are the primary vectors of a pathogenic fungus, Raffaelea lauricola, that causes laurel wilt....

  18. Genetic structure of Dendroctonus mexicanus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the trans-Mexican volcanic belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardo Zúniga; Ramón Cisneros; Yolanda Salinas-Moreno; Jane L. Hayes; John E. Rinehart

    2006-01-01

    It is assumed that geographic isolation of Dendroctonus Erichson species populations or their plant hosts determines genetic structure. This structure can be analyzed with respect to the biogeographic pattern that describes the species in a region. The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is located between the Neartic and Neotropical regions and is...

  19. Response of Adult Plum Curculios (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Contrasting Shades in Field and Laboratory Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, R D; Whalon, M E; Iamurri, J L

    2015-04-01

    The responses of adult plum curculios, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), to visual stimuli were assessed in field and laboratory conditions to evaluate the hypothesis that adult captures should increase when traps visually contrast with a lighter horizon, such as the sky. Release-recapture field studies tested whether adult responses to traps were influenced by the trap's visual contrast with background on the horizon. Results at four sites showed that significantly more adults were captured in traps with woodlots behind them, refuting the hypothesis. Laboratory tests in environmental conditions of 315 lux or less observed the movement of adults between intervals. These showed that significantly more females and males relocated in areas marked with black. This effect occurred when adults were presented with black surfaces, stripes, or lines. The black shade used correlated with lower reflected lux (curculio movement. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. On the true identity of Curculio pericarpius Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhao Huang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the study of the type specimen of Curculio pericarpius Linnaeus, 1758 preserved in the Linnean Collection in London, and here designated as the lectotype, it was found that this name was misapplied to another close species of the genus Rhinoncus Schoenherr, 1825 starting from the Paykull 1792 misidentification. As a consequence, the following new synonymies are established: Rhinoncus pericarpius (Linnaeus, 1758 [= Curculio castor Fabricius, 1792, syn. n.; = Curculio interstitialis Reich, 1787, syn. n.; = Curculio scabratus Fabricius, 1792, syn. n.; = Curculio fruticulosus Herbst, 1795, syn. n.; = Curculio interstitialis Reich, 1797, syn. n.; = Rhynchaenus seniculus Gravenhorst, 1807, syn. n.; = Campylirhynchus quadricornis (Gyllenhal, 1813 sensu Dejean, 1821: 85 [misidentification] not Rhynchaenus quadricornis Gyllenhal, 1813, syn. n.; = Rhinoncus flavipes Stephens, 1831, syn. n.; = Rhinoncus rufipes Stephens, 1831, syn. n.; = Rhinoncus granulipennis Gyllenhal, 1837, syn. n.; = Rhinoncus pyrrhopus Boheman, 1845 sensu Hatch & Kincaid,1958: 20 [misidentification] not Rhinoncus pyrrhopus Boheman, 1845, syn. n.]; and Rhinoncus leucostigma (Marsham, 1802 [ = Curculio pericarpius Linnaeus, 1758 sensu Paykull, 1792 [misidentification] not Curculio pericarpius Linnaeus, 1758, syn. n.; = Cryptorhis herbstii Billberg, 1820: 43 [replacement name for Curculio pericarpius Linnaeus sensu Paykull, 1792], syn. n.; = Rhinoncus spartii Stephens, 1831, syn. n.; = Rhinoncus sanguinipes Reitter, 1916, syn. n.; = Rhinoncus pericarpius ssp. montanus Hoffmann, 1960, syn. n.]. Lectotypes are designated for Curculio pericarpius Linnaeus, 1758 and Curculio leucostigma Marsham, 1802. A neotype is selected for Curculio interstitialis Reich, 1797.

  1. Reproductive development of northern and southern strains of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Eric J; Coombs, Andrea B; Whalon, Mark E

    2004-02-01

    Laboratory-reared southern and field-collected northern strains of plum curculio, Conotrachelles nenuphar (Herbst), were sampled to examine the relationship between degree-day (DD) accumulation and female reproductive development, as measured by mating status, oocyte size, and number of oocytes. The overall goal was to generate an objective degree-day model for predicting damage potential that could be applied to various host commodities rather than relying on separate biofix models for each crop. Adult beetles were dissected to measure mating status, maximum oocyte size, and number of oocytes. Southern strain beetles reared at 25 degrees C initiated mating 9 d after eclosion and did not require mating to induce oocyte development. By 20 d posteclosion, unmated females had significantly higher egg loads compared with mated females of the same age. Logistic regression analysis suggests that southern and northern strain beetles had a stable maximum oocyte length of 62 and 72 microm, respectively. Northern strain females mated after overwintering; with approximately 95% of the female population mated after 134 DD (base 10 degrees C), which is before fruit set in many host crops. Oocyte size was the only measured parameter of field reproductive progress that could be linked with confidence to degree-day accumulation. The other two parameters do not share an exclusive relationship with degree-days. Rapid assessment of field-caught female reproductive status could assist in determining the potential for plum curculio damage in high-value commodities and allow for more informed control decisions.

  2. Phenology and infestation patterns of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on four highbush blueberry cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Sridhar; Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera; Barry, James D

    2004-12-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), is a well known pest in apple and peach orchards, but it also is capable of having an economic impact in highbush blueberries. Host phenology and plum curculio oviposition patterns were determined on four highbush blueberry cultivars differing in fruit maturation period. Numbers of oviposition scars were higher on early- ('Weymouth') and mid-season ('Duke' and 'Bluecrop') blueberries than on late-season 'Elliott' in 2001, 2002, and 2003. In 2002, eggs were first present on the three earliest cultivars 21 d before those on 'Elliott', whereas eggs were found on 'Elliott' >40 d after the last sample with eggs for the other three cultivars. The pattern of host phenology and infestation levels suggested that plum curculio oviposition synchronizes well with the availability of suitable fruit for oviposition on early and mid-season cultivars compared with a late-season cultivar of highbush blueberries. The implications of a transition to use of reduced-risk insecticides are discussed in relation to plum curculio management.

  3. Bioassay approaches to assessing behavioral responses of plum curculio adults (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to host fruit odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopy, R J; Cooley, S S; Phelan, P L

    1995-08-01

    We evaluated several approaches to developing a simple, sensitive, and reliable laboratory bioassay of responses of overwintered adult plum curculios (PCs),Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), to host fruit odor or its attractive components. A high proportion of assayed PCs responded positively to odor of wild plums under no-choice, moving-air conditions in a wind tunnel and under dual-choice, still-air conditions in enclosed Petri dishes. Positive response to controls lacking host odor, however, was much greater in the wind tunnel, arguing in favor of bioassays under dual-choice conditions in still air to provide greater PC discrimination. Response to host odor (from wild plums or hexane extract of wild plums or Liberty apples) in Petri dish bioassay chambers proved greatest: (1) during the scotophase of PCs under total dark or dim red light conditions, (2) when Petri dishes were completely enclosed, (3) when PCs were starved for 24 or 48 hr, and (4) when PCs were tested within seven weeks after apple tree petal fall. Neither the sex of a PC nor the direction in which a PC was obliged to move to find the source of host odor (upward through a port in the Petri dish lid or downward through a port in the base) had a substantial effect on level of response to host odor or discrimination of host odor from a nonodorous control. We conclude that an enclosed Petri dish bioassay chamber of the type described here should be a valuable asset in the process of chemically identifying components of host fruit odor attractive to PCs.

  4. Morphology of the larvae of three Central European Strophosoma Billberg, 1820 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Gosik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The larvae of Strophosoma (Strophosoma capitatum (DeGeer, 1775, S. (Strophosoma melanogrammum (Forster, 1771 and S. (Neliocarus sus Stephens, 1831, are illustrated and re-described or described for the first time. The first larval instar, and the mature or an older larval instar, are illustrated, and a general description of the Strophosoma larva is given. The biological data obtained from breeding and field-collecting are compared and discussed in relation to the known life-cycle data.

  5. Analysis of Wolbachia strains associated with Conotrachelus nenuphar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Luckhart, Shirley; Tu, Zhijian; Pfeiffer, Douglas G

    2010-04-01

    We studied the distribution patterns of Wolbachia infection associated with plum curculio strains in eight states of the eastern United States. The presence of the Wolbachia-specific gene wsp identified infections of this endosymbiont in 97.8% of the 93 samples tested. Three distinct Wolbachia strains were identified. The strains wCne1 (593 bp) and wCne2 (593 bp) were 97% identical, and their sequences were both 84% identical with wCne3 (590 bp). BLASTN searches through GenBank showed strong similarities between the wsp sequences of the three strains compared with Wolbachia sequenced from other hosts. Degree of similarity with sequences in other Wolbachia strains is discussed. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used for superinfection detection. Of 93 samples, 15 (16.1%), 21 (22.6%), 19 (20.4%), and 36 (38.7%) samples were infected by wCne1, wCne2, wCne1 + 2, and wCne3, respectively. Only two (2.2%) samples had no infection. The wCne3 strain was always present as a single infection. Wolbachia strains approximate the distribution of plum curculio strains: northern strain infected with wCne1 and wCne2 strains in supergroup B, and southern strain infected with wCne3 strain in supergroup A, with the mid-Atlantic region as the convergence area. Based on haplotype distribution of plum curculio mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I, there was a closer relation of the mid-southern plum curculio clade to the far-southern clade than to the northern clade. However, Wolbachia symbionts in mid-southern plum curculio are more closely related to those in northern plum curculio than to those in far-southern plum curculio. The relationship of Wolbachia infection with reproductive incompatibility between plum curculio populations was also discussed.

  6. Discrimination of occupied host fruit by plum curculio females (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkewich, S L; Prokopy, R J; Green, T A

    1987-08-01

    Larval survival of plum curculios (PCs),Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), was found to decrease with increasing egg density per fruit. Subsequently, we assayed PCs for propensity to avoid egg-laying at sites (immature plums) already occupied by conspecific eggs. Laboratory choice tests showed PCs made an equal number of visits to and ovipositions in fruit with a single oviposition as in clean fruit. Although there was a trend toward more visits to fruit which contained four or eight oviposition wounds and eggs or eight artificial punctures than to clean fruit, PCs oviposited less frequently into these than clean fruit. Results suggest that wounding of fruit may enhance the ability of ovipositing PCs to locate fruit, but at the same time may furnish cues allowing some degree of discrimination against heavily infested fruit for oviposition.

  7. Odor-baited trap trees: a new approach to monitoring plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopy, Ronald J; Chandler, Bradley W; Dynok, Sara A; Piñero, Jaime C

    2003-06-01

    We compared a trap approach with a trap-tree approach to determine the need and timing of insecticide applications against overwintered adult plum curculios, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst.), in commercial apple orchards in Massachusetts in 2002. All traps and trap trees were baited with benzaldehyde (attractive fruit odor) plus grandisoic acid (attractive pheromone). Sticky clear Plexiglas panel traps placed at orchard borders, designed to intercept adults immigrating from border areas by flight, captured significantly more adults than similarly placed black pyramid traps, which are designed to capture adults immigrating primarily by crawling, or Circle traps wrapped around trunks of perimeter-row trees, which are designed to intercept adults crawling up tree trunks. None of these trap types, however, exhibited amounts of captures that correlated significantly with either weekly or season-long amounts of fresh ovipositional injury to fruit by adults. Hence, none appears to offer high promise as a tool for effectively monitoring the seasonal course of plum curculio injury to apples in commercial orchards in Massachusetts. In contrast, baiting branches of selected perimeter-row trees with benzaldehyde plus grandisoic acid led to significant aggregation (14-15-fold) of ovipositional injury, markedly facilitating monitoring of the seasonal course of injury to apples. A concurrent experiment revealed that addition of other synthetic fruit odor attractants to apple trees baited with benzaldehyde plus grandisoic acid did not enhance aggregation of ovipositional injury above that of this dual combination. We conclude that monitoring apples on odor-baited trap trees for fresh ovipositional injury could be a useful new approach for determining need and timing of insecticide application against plum curculio in commercial orchards.

  8. Description and key to larvae of Curculio spp. of eastern United States and Canada (coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester P. Gibson

    1985-01-01

    A general description of Curculio larvae is given. Ke y characters are presented to separate 15 of the 16 described species of eastern North America. A brief key for separating Curculio larvae from Conotrachelus and lepidopterous larvae is presented.

  9. Rhabdorrhynchus echii (Brahm, 1790, a “forgotten” name (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Lixinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Meregalli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of the name Curculio echii Brahm, 1790 is discussed. Based on the description it is evident that it should be applied to a German species of the genus Rhabdorrhynchus, and that it has priority over the name currently applied to the species, R. seriegranosus Chevrolat, 1873. The new combination Rhab-dorrhynchus echii (Brahm, 1790 is proposed. As there is a lack of any type material of C. echii a neotype is designated. Based on the study of the type specimen, R. seriegranosus is restored as a valid species.

  10. Response of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to odor-baited traps near woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, J C; Wright, S E; Prokopy, R J

    2001-12-01

    Response of overwintered plum curculios, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), to odor-baited traps was evaluated from the beginning until nearly the end of emigration from overwintering sites in woods. We evaluated clear sticky Plexiglas panels and black pyramid traps placed close to woods adjacent to apple trees in an unsprayed section of an orchard. Traps were baited with aggregation pheromone (grandisoic acid) alone or in combination with one of six synthetic fruit volatiles (benzaldehvde, decyl aldehyde, E-2-hexenal, ethyl isovalerate, hexyl acetate, or limonene). Unbaited traps served as a control treatment. Plum curculio emigration from woods was divided into early-, mid-, and late-season periods based primarily on phenological stage of apple bud and fruit development (tight cluster to bloom, petal fall, and fruit set, respectively). During both early- and late season, panel and pyramid traps baited with benzaldehyde plus pheromone were significantly more attractive than any other traps (baited or unbaited), except panel traps baited with ethyl isovalerate plus pheromone in early season, which likewise captured significantly more adults than unbaited panel traps. During midseason, no lures were significantly attractive, possibly due to prevailing cool weather, unfavorable for adult activity. Over the entire season, panel or pyramid traps baited with benzaldehyde plus pheromone captured nearly six times as many plum curculios as unbaited traps of each type, whereas traps baited with pheromone alone captured about twice as many as unbaited traps of each type. We provide information on sex ratio, female maturity stage, and mating status, and several weather parameters associated with trap captures. We conclude that panel or pyramid traps, or a combination, baited with benzaldehyde plus pheromone placed at borders of plum curculio overwintering sites can be a valuable tool for monitoring the beginning, peak, and end of adult immigration into apple orchards.

  11. On the true identity of Curculio pericarpius Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Junhao Huang; Enzo Colonnelli

    2014-01-01

    Basing on the study of the type specimen of Curculio pericarpius Linnaeus, 1758 preserved in the Linnean Collection in London, and here designated as the lectotype, it was found that this name was misapplied to another close species of the genus Rhinoncus Schoenherr, 1825 starting from the Paykull 1792 misidentification. As a consequence, the following new synonymies are established: Rhinoncus pericarpius (Linnaeus, 1758) [= Curculio castor Fabricius, 1792, syn. n.; = Curculio interstitialis ...

  12. Rhabdorrhynchus echii (Brahm, 1790), a “forgotten” name (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Lixinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meregalli, Massimo; Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The application of the name Curculio echii Brahm, 1790 is discussed. Based on the description it is evident that it should be applied to a German species of the genus Rhabdorrhynchus, and that it has priority over the name currently applied to the species, Rhabdorrhynchus seriegranosus Chevrolat, 1873. The new combination Rhab-dorrhynchus echii (Brahm, 1790) is proposed. As there is a lack of any type material of Curculio echii a neotype is designated. Based on the study of the type specimen, Rhabdorrhynchus seriegranosus is restored as a valid species. PMID:23372419

  13. Flight Period of Mountain Pine Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in its Recently Expanded Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiker, K P; Van Hezewijk, B H

    2016-12-01

    The ability to predict key phenological events, such as the timing of flight periods, is useful for the monitoring and management of insect pests. We used empirical data to describe the flight period of mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, in its recently expanded range east of the Rocky Mountains in Canada and developed a degree-day model based on the number of trapped beetles. Data were collected over four degrees of latitude and six years. The main flight period, when the middle 70% of the total number of beetles were caught, started during the second or third week of July, lasted 26 d, and peaked within 2 wk of starting. The best model accounted for 89% of the variation in the data. Mountain pine beetle's flight tended to start later and be more contracted at higher latitudes. The synchrony of mountain pine beetle's flight period in the expanded range appears to be comparable to the limited reports from the historic range, although it may start earlier. This suggests that conditions in the new range are suitable for a coordinated dispersal flight, which is critical for the beetle's strategy of overwhelming tree defenses by attacking en masse. Forest managers can use the model to support operational decisions, e.g., when to impose hauling restrictions to reduce the risk of spread through the transport of infested material, or the time frame for control programs. Understanding the flight period may also improve our ability to assess the response of mountain pine beetle to novel and changing climates in the future. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Chemical composition and biological activity of star anise Illicium verum extracts against maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Linlin; Hua, Rimao; Li, Maoye; Huang, Yanzhang; Li, Shiguang; He, Yujie; Shen, Zonghai

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop eco-friendly botanical pesticides. Dried fruits of star anise (Illicium verum Hook.f. (Austrobaileyales: Schisandraceae)) were extracted with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) at 25°C. The constituents were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the repellency and contact toxicity of the extracts against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults were tested. Forty-four compounds, whose concentrations were more than 0.2%, were separated and identified from the MA, EA, and PE extracts. The extraction yields of trans-anethole, the most abundant biologically active compound in I. verum, were 9.7%, 7.5%, and 10.1% in the MA, EA, and PE extracts, respectively. Repellency increased with increasing extract dose. The average repellency rate of the extracts against S. zeamais adults peaked at 125.79 µg/cm(2) 72 hr after treatment. The percentage repellency of the EA extract reached 76.9%, making it a class IV repellent. Contact toxicity assays showed average mortalities of 85.4% (MA), 94.5% (EA), and 91.1% (PE). The EA extract had the lowest median lethal dose, at 21.2 µg/cm(2) 72 hr after treatment. The results suggest that I. verum fruit extracts and trans-anethole can potentially be developed as a grain protectant to control stored-product insect pests. Other active constituents in the EA extract merit further research. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  15. Bio-ecological studies of the mango stone weevil in southern Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to suggest that flowers may provide food and breeding sites. Infestation by the weevil did not affect fruit quality despite the high potential to disrupt the export trade in mangoes. The low quarantine rejection threshold of one fruit in 40 set in the export market suggests that solution to the problem posed by the weevil requires ...

  16. Polygalacturonase from Sitophilus oryzae: Possible horizontal transfer of a pectinase gene from fungi to weevils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicheng Shen

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Endo-polygalacturonase, one of the group of enzymes known collectively as pectinases, is widely distributed in bacteria, plants and fungi. The enzyme has also been found in several weevil species and a few other insects, such as aphids, but not in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, or Caenorhabditis elegans or, as far as is known, in any more primitive animal species. What, then, is the genetic origin of the polygalacturonases in weevils? Since some weevil species harbor symbiotic microorganisms, it has been suggested, reasonably, that the symbionts' genomes of both aphids and weevils, rather than the insects' genomes, could encode polygalacturonase. We report here the cloning of a cDNA that encodes endo-polygalacturonase in the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L., and investigations based on the cloned cDNA. Our results, which include analysis of genes in antibiotic-treated rice weevils, indicate that the enzyme is, in fact, encoded by the insect genome. Given the apparent absence of the gene in much of the rest of the animal kingdom, it is therefore likely that the rice weevil polygalacturonase gene was incorporated into the weevil's genome by horizontal transfer, possibly from a fungus.

  17. Forensic pollen geolocation techniques used to identify the origin of boll weevil reinfestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis, entered the United States of America in the early 20th century and became a major pest in cotton, Gossypium spp. Shortly after the passage of Tropical Storm Erin on 16 August 2007 through the South Texas/Winter Garden boll weevil eradication zone, over 150 boll ...

  18. Controlling pecan weevil with beneficial fungi: the impact of fungal species and fertilizer regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecan. Prior research indicated the potential for using entomopathogenic fungi to suppress pecan weevil in the soil. We compared the efficacy of two fungal species, Beauveria bassiana (GHA strain) and Metarhizium brunneum (F52), in their a...

  19. Value loss from weevil-caused defects in eastern white pine lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myron D. Ostrander; Carl H. Stoltenberg

    1957-01-01

    Owners of eastern white pine stands suffer financially in several ways from attacks by the white-pine weevil (Pissodes strobi). Crooks, forks, and other weevil-caused tree-bole deformities increase bucking, logging, and sawing costs, and they reduce recoverable volumes. The injuries also reduce the average value of the lumber recovered. It is only with this reduction...

  20. Identification and electrophysiological studies of (4 S,5 S)-5-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-heptanone and 4-methyl-3,5-heptanedione in male lucerne weevils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unelius, C. R.; Park, K.-C.; McNeill, M.; Wee, S. L.; Bohman, B.; Suckling, D. M.

    2013-02-01

    An investigation to identify a sex or aggregation pheromone of Sitona discoideus Gyllenhål (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is presented. Antenna flicking and attraction behaviors evoked by conspecifics of both sexes were recorded in arena bioassays, where attraction of females to males was observed. Air entrainment of both males and females was conducted in separate chambers. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of headspace volatiles revealed that two male-specific compounds, 4-methyl-3,5-heptanedione (major) and (4 S,5 S)-5-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-heptanone (minor), were emitted during the autumnal post-aestivatory flight period. The stereoisomers of the minor component were separated by enantioselective gas chromatography and their absolute configurations assigned by NMR (diastereomers) and the known preference of enantioselective transesterification reactions catalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B. Electroantennogram and single sensillum recording studies indicate that 4-methyl-3,5-heptanedione as well as all individual stereoisomers of 5-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-heptanone are detected by the antennae of male and female S. discoideus. Further, single sensillum recordings suggest that both sexes of S. discoideus have specialized olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) for detecting 4-methyl-3,5-heptanedione and different populations of stereoselective ORNs for detecting the stereoisomers of 5-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-heptanone. Some of these stereoselective ORNs appear to be sex-specific in S. discoideus.

  1. Penghambatan aktivitas peneluran kumbang kacang hijau Callosobruchus Chinensis L. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae oleh extrak sepuluh spesies tumbuhan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang Dadang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Oviposition Deterrence of Bean Weevil, Callosobruchus chinensis L.(Coleoptera: Bruchidae Treated with Ten Plant Extracts. Pest and Diseases attack agricultural products not only in the field but also in storehouse. Their attack causes decreasing both quantity and quality of stored materials. One of important stored product insect pests is Callosobruchus chinensis L. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae. Till now the effective strategy to control this insect pest is chemical control by using synthetic insecticides. The improper use synthetic insecticides causes some undesirable effects, so alternative strategist should be searched to controls insect pests in storehouse. One of the alternatives is by using plant materials as insect pests control agent. The aim of this study was to find out the oviposition deterrence of C. chinensis treated with ten plant which were extracted with methanol, hexane and ether. Oviposition deterrence was evaluated by choice and no-choice methods at 1,3 and 5% of extract concentration. Extract of Acorus calamus (methanol, A.calamus (hexane, A. calamus (ether, Illicium verum (ether, Pogostemon calbin (hexane, P. cablin (ether, Vetiveria zizanioides (hexane, and V. zizanioides (ether were able to deter ovipostion activity of C. chinensis by more than 90% of deterrence. Further study should be conducted to isolate and identify the active compound and to make botanical insecticide formulation for practical use as a commercial product.

  2. "Candidatus Curculioniphilus buchneri," a novel clade of bacterial endocellular symbionts from weevils of the genus Curculio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Koga, Ryuichi; Nikoh, Naruo; Meng, Xian Ying; Kimura, Nobutada; Fukatsu, Takema

    2010-01-01

    Here we investigated the bacterial endosymbionts of weevils of the genus Curculio. From all four species of Curculio weevils examined, a novel group of bacterial gene sequences were consistently identified. Molecular phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the sequences formed a distinct clade in the Gammaproteobacteria, which was not related to previously known groups of weevil endosymbionts such as Nardonella spp. and Sodalis-allied symbionts. In situ hybridization revealed that the bacterium was intracellularly harbored in a bacteriome associated with larval midgut. In adult females, the bacterium was localized in the germalia at the tip of each overiole, suggesting vertical transmission via ovarial passage. Diagnostic PCR surveys detected high prevalence of the bacterial infection in natural host populations. Electron microscopy identified the reduced cell wall of the bacterial cells, and the bacterial genes exhibited AT-biased nucleotide composition and accelerated molecular evolution, which are suggestive of a long-lasting endosymbiotic association. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the novel endocellular bacteria represent the primary symbiont of Curculio weevils and proposed the designation "Candidatus Curculioniphilus buchneri." In addition to "Ca. Curculioniphilus," we identified Sodalis-allied gammaproteobacterial endosymbionts from the chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis, which exhibited partial infection frequencies in host insect populations and neither AT-biased nucleotide composition nor accelerated molecular evolution. We suggest that such Sodalis-allied secondary symbionts in weevils might provide a potential source for symbiont replacements, as has occurred in an ancestor of Sitophilus grain weevils.

  3. Lipid composition of the pecan weevil,Curculio caryae (Horn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, R D; Thompson, A C; Gueldner, R C; Mody, N V; Neel, W W

    1973-11-01

    The lipids of larvae, male adults, and female adults of the pecan weevil,Curculio caryae (Horn), were studied, and special attention was given the fatty acid composition. The larvae contained an unusually high amount of lipid material (40.6%), most of it concentrated in the neutral lipid fraction. Male and famale adults contained more conventional quantities, 5.8 and 8.2%, respectively. Oleic acid was the major fatty acid in the total and neutral lipids of all stages; linoleic acid was the most abundant in the phospholipid fractions.

  4. Iridovirus infection of cell cultures from the Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Hunter

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We here report the development and viral infection of a Diaprepes root weevil cell culture. Embryonic tissues of the root weevil were used to establish cell cultures for use in screening viral pathogens as potential biological control agents. Tissues were seeded into a prepared solution of insect medium and kept at a temperature of 24°C. The cell culture had primarily fibroblast-like morphology with some epithelial monolayers. Root weevil cells were successfully infected in vitro with a known insect virus, Invertebrate Iridescent Virus 6. Potential uses of insect cell cultures and insect viruses are discussed.

  5. Pre-dispersal strategies by Quercus schottkyana to mitigate the effects of weevil infestation of acorns

    OpenAIRE

    Ke Xia; William L. Harrower; Roy Turkington; Hong-Yu Tan; Zhe-Kun Zhou

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how pre-dispersal strategies may mitigate the effects of weevil infestation of acorns in a population of Quercus schottkyana, a dominant oak in Asian evergreen broad-leaved forests, and assess if weevil infestation contributes to low seedling recruitment. We counted the number of acorns produced, daily from the end of August to mid-late November for 9 years from 2006?2014. We also recorded the rate of acorn infestation by weevils and acorn germination rates of weekly collectio...

  6. [Biological characteristics of the egg phase of citrus root weevils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Jerson V C; Parra, José R P

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study some characteristics of the egg phase of three species of citrus root weevils. The insects were collected from citrus plants in Itapetininga, SP, and brought to the Laboratório de Biologia de Insetos of ESALQ/USP, in Piracicaba, SP, where the species Naupactus cervinus (Boheman), Naupactus versatilis (Hustache) and Parapantomorus fluctuosus (Boheman) were kept. Duration and viability of the egg phase were evaluated, and the lower temperature threshold and thermal constant (K) were calculated for these species. The species of citrus root weevils showed different duration of egg phases. The egg phase ranged from 40.4 to 13.8 N. cervinus, from 38.7 to 20.0 days for N. versatilis, and from 35.0 to 13.8 days for P. fluctuosus, depending upon temperature. The temperature thresholds of this stage were 8.1, 8.3, and 9.9 masculineC at thermal constant was 385.7, 397.7 and 294.1 degree-days, for N. cervinus, N. versatilis and P. fluctuosus respectively. The duration of the egg phases of N. cervinus and N. versatilis were similar at the same temperatures and P. fluctuosus had a faster development than Naupactus spp. in all temperatures tested.

  7. Host-plant preference and performance of the vine weevil Otiorhynchus sulcatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, R.W.H.M.; van Dijk, N.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between reproductive performance and preference for potential host plants of the vine weevil is investigated, as shown in tests on contact (or feeding) preference, presented herein, and tests on olfactory preference, published elsewhere. Assessment of reproductive performance shows

  8. Community structure of acorn weevils (Curculio): inferences from multispecies occupancy models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Govindan, Byju N; Swihart, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    .... Specifically, mast production and acorn weevil (Curculio L., 1758) occupancy were estimated annually from 2006 to 2008 for individual host trees in a sample of 74 northern red oaks (Quercus rubra L.), 100 white oaks (Quercus alba L...

  9. Behavioral and Reproductive Response of White Pine Weevil (Pissodes strobi to Resistant and Susceptible Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne A. Robert

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available White pine weevil (Pissodes strobi, Peck. is a native forest insect pest in the Pacific Northwest of North America that attacks species of spruce (Picea spp. and pine (Pinus spp.. Young Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong. Carr.] trees are particularly susceptible to weevil attack. Pockets of naturally occurring Sitka spruce resistance have been identified in high weevil hazard areas in coastal British Columbia. In this study, we characterize behavioral, physiological and reproductive responses of weevils to an extremely resistant Sitka spruce genotype (H898 in comparison to a highly susceptible genotype (Q903. The experiments relied on a large number of three-year-old clonally propagated trees and were therefore restricted to two contrasting Sitka spruce genotypes. When exposed to resistant trees, both male and female weevils were deterred during host selection and mating, females showed delayed or reduced ovary development, and successful reproduction of weevils was prevented on resistant trees.

  10. Diversification of endosymbiosis: replacements, co-speciation and promiscuity of bacteriocyte symbionts in weevils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Notsu, Yutaka; Sota, Teiji; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-07-01

    The processes and mechanisms underlying the diversification of host-microbe endosymbiotic associations are of evolutionary interest. Here we investigated the bacteriocyte-associated primary symbionts of weevils wherein the ancient symbiont Nardonella has experienced two independent replacement events: once by Curculioniphilus symbiont in the lineage of Curculio and allied weevils of the tribe Curculionini, and once by Sodalis-allied symbiont in the lineage of grain weevils of the genus Sitophilus. The Curculioniphilus symbiont was detected from 27 of 36 Curculionini species examined, the symbiont phylogeny was congruent with the host weevil phylogeny, and the symbiont gene sequences exhibited AT-biased nucleotide compositions and accelerated molecular evolution. These results suggest that the Curculioniphilus symbiont was acquired by an ancestor of the tribe Curculionini, replaced the original symbiont Nardonella, and has co-speciated with the host weevils over evolutionary time, but has been occasionally lost in several host lineages. By contrast, the Sodalis-allied symbiont of Sitophilus weevils exhibited no host-symbiont co-speciation, no AT-biased nucleotide compositions and only moderately accelerated molecular evolution. These results suggest that the Sodalis-allied symbiont was certainly acquired by an ancestor of the Sitophilus weevils and replaced the original Nardonella symbiont, but the symbiotic association must have experienced occasional re-associations such as new acquisitions, horizontal transfers, replacements and/or losses. We detected Sodalis-allied facultative symbionts in populations of the Curculionini weevils, which might represent potential evolutionary sources of the Sodalis-allied primary symbionts. Comparison of these newcomer bacteriocyte-associated symbiont lineages highlights potential evolutionary trajectories and consequences of novel symbionts after independent replacements of the same ancient symbiont.

  11. Diversification of endosymbiosis: replacements, co-speciation and promiscuity of bacteriocyte symbionts in weevils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Tanabe, Akifumi S; Notsu, Yutaka; Sota, Teiji; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms underlying the diversification of host–microbe endosymbiotic associations are of evolutionary interest. Here we investigated the bacteriocyte-associated primary symbionts of weevils wherein the ancient symbiont Nardonella has experienced two independent replacement events: once by Curculioniphilus symbiont in the lineage of Curculio and allied weevils of the tribe Curculionini, and once by Sodalis-allied symbiont in the lineage of grain weevils of the genus Sitophilus. The Curculioniphilus symbiont was detected from 27 of 36 Curculionini species examined, the symbiont phylogeny was congruent with the host weevil phylogeny, and the symbiont gene sequences exhibited AT-biased nucleotide compositions and accelerated molecular evolution. These results suggest that the Curculioniphilus symbiont was acquired by an ancestor of the tribe Curculionini, replaced the original symbiont Nardonella, and has co-speciated with the host weevils over evolutionary time, but has been occasionally lost in several host lineages. By contrast, the Sodalis-allied symbiont of Sitophilus weevils exhibited no host–symbiont co-speciation, no AT-biased nucleotide compositions and only moderately accelerated molecular evolution. These results suggest that the Sodalis-allied symbiont was certainly acquired by an ancestor of the Sitophilus weevils and replaced the original Nardonella symbiont, but the symbiotic association must have experienced occasional re-associations such as new acquisitions, horizontal transfers, replacements and/or losses. We detected Sodalis-allied facultative symbionts in populations of the Curculionini weevils, which might represent potential evolutionary sources of the Sodalis-allied primary symbionts. Comparison of these newcomer bacteriocyte-associated symbiont lineages highlights potential evolutionary trajectories and consequences of novel symbionts after independent replacements of the same ancient symbiont. PMID:23446834

  12. Adaptive Potential for the Invasion of Novel Host Plants in the Bean Weevil: Patterns of the Reproductive Behavior in Populations That Used Different Host Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Milanović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to examine interpopulation patterns in the reproductive behavior of populations of bean weevil (Acanthoscelides obtectus Say; Coleoptera: Bruchidae that had different levels of specialization on their native host plant – the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., as well as on a novel host plant – the chickpea (Cicer arietinum Thorn. The obtained pattern of interpopulation mating behavior seemed exactly as if the males on chickpea had evolved a specific odor and/or a courtship ritual that females of populationson bean found repulsive. Unlike females, the males of bean populations seemed to be willing to mate with females from the population on chickpea equally as with their own females. Such an asymmetric pattern of reproductive isolation between populations ofa species has been often considered an initial phase of a process of speciation. Thus, our results could be a good starting point for further, thorough examination of both the role of the level of host specialization in females and the role of biochemical characteristics of male pheromone (and/or their cuticular hydrocarbones in the evolution of pre-reproductive isolation between insect populations.As the results of this study, together those of previous studies on A. obtectus, suggest great evolutionary potential for invasions of and fast specialization on novel host plants, they could provide valuable information for the development of long-term strategiesunder the programmes of Integrated Pest Management.

  13. Survival and preference of cotton boll weevil adults for alternative food sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pimenta

    Full Text Available Abstract Plants that have potential as alternative food source (floral nectar, pollen and plant tissues to the boll weevil during the intercropping season were evaluated considering the prevalent conditions of Cerrado in the Central Brazil. Initially, we tested the nutritional adequacy for the survival of the insect of flower resource (pollen and nectar provided by eight plant species (fennel, mexican sunflower, castor bean, okra, hibiscus, sorghum, pigeonpea and sunn hemp. Subsequently, we tested if the resources provided by the selected plants continued to be exploited by the boll weevil in the presence of cotton plant, its main food source average longevity of boll weevil adults was significantly longer when they were fed on hibiscus’ flowers (166.6 ± 74.4 and okra flowers (34.7 ± 28.9 than when they fed on flowers of other six species. Subsequently, the preference of the boll weevil in the use of resources was compared between okra or hibiscus and cotton plants, in dual choice experiments. Boll weevils preferred plants of the three species in the reproductive stages than those in vegetative stages. Although the cotton plant in the reproductive stage was the most preferred plant of all, boll weevils preferred flowering okra and hibiscus than cotton at the vegetative stage.

  14. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera) records for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Hume; Bouchard, Patrice; Anderson, Robert S; de Tonnancour, Pierre; Vigneault, Robert; Webster, Reginald P

    2013-01-01

    The following species of Curculionoidea are recorded from Canada for the first time, in ten cases also representing new records at the generic level: Ischnopterapion (Ischnopterapion) loti (Kirby, 1808); Stenopterapion meliloti (Kirby, 1808) (both Brentidae); Atrichonotus taeniatulus (Berg, 1881); Barinus cribricollis (LeConte, 1876); Caulophilus dubius (Horn, 1873); Cionus scrophulariae (Linnaeus, 1758); Cryptorhynchus tristis LeConte, 1876; Cylindrocopturus furnissi Buchanan, 1940; Cylindrocopturus quercus (Say, 1832); Desmoglyptus crenatus (LeConte, 1876); Pnigodes setosus LeConte, 1876; Pseudopentarthrum parvicollis (Casey, 1892); Sibariops confinis (LeConte, 1876); Sibariops confusus (Boheman, 1836); Smicronyx griseus LeConte, 1876; Smicronyx lineolatus Casey, 1892; Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff, 1875); Hylocurus rudis (LeConte, 1876); Lymantor alaskanus Wood, 1978; Phloeotribus scabricollis (Hopkins, 1916); Scolytus oregoni Blackman, 1934; Xyleborus celsus Eichhoff, 1868; Xyleborus ferrugineus (Fabricius, 1801); Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky, 1866) (all Curculionidae). In addition the following species were recorded for the first time from these provinces and territories: Yukon - Dendroctonus simplex LeConte, 1868; Phloetribus piceae Swaine, 1911 (both Curculionidae); Northwest Territories - Loborhynchapion cyanitinctum (Fall, 1927) (Brentidae); Nunavut - Dendroctonus simplex LeConte, 1868 (Curculionidae); Alberta - Anthonomus tectus LeConte, 1876; Promecotarsus densus Casey, 1892; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, 1902; Hylastes macer LeConte, 1868; Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher, 1940); Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902 (all Curculionidae); Saskatchewan - Phloeotribus liminaris (Harris, 1852); Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher, 1940); Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902 (all Curculionidae); Manitoba - Cosmobaris scolopacea Germar, 1819; Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby, 1837); Listronotus punctiger LeConte, 1876; Scolytus schevyrewi

  15. Resource limitation in natural populations of phytophagous insects. A long-term study case with the chestnut weevil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debouzie, Domitien; Desouhant, Emmanuel; Oberli, Frantz; Menu, Frédéric

    2002-03-01

    The chestnut weevil, Curculio elephas (Gyll.), is a non-outbreaking species whose populations and food resources, the European chestnut, Castanea sativa, can be precisely defined. Thirteen and 17 generations of this insect were studied in two isolated sites. Field observations and experiments allowed us to estimate the absolute abundance, availability and use of chestnuts for weevil oviposition, and the number of weevil females emerging per site. Unavailable chestnuts were defined as the fruits either infested first by the chestnut moth ( Cydia splendana) larvae (because of competition between the two species) or those avoided by chestnut weevil females when selecting their egg-laying sites, independently of chestnut moth presence. From a third to a half of the chestnuts were not available on the average for weevil infestation. Only one-fourth, on the average, of those available for oviposition were actually used by chestnut weevil females. Regardless of year and site, the number of available chestnuts per weevil female was higher than that of weevil-infested fruits per female, considering global food resources independently of their temporal variation in quality. However, realized fecundity of weevil females was positively correlated with the mean number of available chestnuts per female. We concluded that food resources can be limiting without being fully exploited by females because of temporal variation in chestnut quality.

  16. Cowpea Vicilins: Fractionation of Urea Denatured Sub-Units and Effects on Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Chagas Mota

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Vicilins (7S storage globulins isolated from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. seeds which were susceptible (S and resistant (R to the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus F., Coleoptera: Bruchidae were denatured by urea and fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. Isolated fractions were incorporated in artificial seeds for assessment of their toxicity to C. maculatus. The most acidic fractions of both susceptible (CE-31 cultivar and resistant (IT81D-1045 line seeds were shown to affect development and survival of the bruchid. Results indicated that vicilin polypeptides of toxic nature were expressed in both types of storage globulins although at different levels.Vicilinas (globulinas de reserva 7S isoladas de sementes de feijão-de-corda (Vigna unguiculata L., susceptíveis (S e resistentes (R ao caruncho/gorgulho (Callosobruchus maculatus F., Coleoptera: Bruchidae foram desnaturadas por uréia e fracionadas por cromatografia de troca iônica. As frações isoladas foram incorporadas em sementes artificiais para avaliação de sua toxicidade a C. maculatus. As fracões mais ácidas de ambas vicilinas afetaram o desenvolvimento e a sobrevivência do bruquídeo. Sugerimos que polipeptídeos de vicilinas de natureza tóxica são expressos em ambos tipos de globulinas de reserva, embora em níveis diferentes.

  17. A comparison of trapping techniques (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, and Curculionoidea excluding Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvarla, Michael J.; Dowling, Ashley P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Beetles (Coleoptera) are a charismatic group of insects targeted by collectors and often used in biodiversity surveys. As part of a larger project, we surveyed a small (4 hectare) plot in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas using 70 traps of 12 trap types and Berlese–Tullgren extraction of leaf litter and identified all Buprestidae, Carabidae, Cerambycidae, and Curculionoidea (Anthribidae, Attelabidae, Brachyceridae, Brentidae, and Curculionidae excluding Scolytinae) to species. This resulted in the collection of 7,973 specimens representing 242 species arranged in 8 families. In a previous publication, we reported new state records and the number of specimens collected per species. In this publication, we used these data to determine the most effective collection method for four beetle groups: Carabidae, Cerambycidae, Curculionoidea (excluding Scolytinae), and Buprestidae. We found that the combination of pitfall and Malaise traps was most effective for Carabidae, Cerambycidae, and Curculionoidea, but that the combination of Malaise and green Lindgren funnel traps was most effective at collecting Buprestidae. Species accumulation curves did not become asymptotic and extrapolated rarefaction curves did not become asymptotic until 350–1,000 samples, suggesting that much more effort is required to completely inventory even a small site. Additionally, seasonal activity is presented for each species and the similarity and overlap between collecting dates and seasons is discussed for each family. PMID:28042105

  18. Coleoptera in the Altai Mountains (Mongolia: species richness and community patterns along an ecological gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyundelger Khurelpurev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Altai Mountains located in western Mongolia comprise diverse habitats including forest, mountain steppe, dry steppe, semidesert, and desert. This study used advanced statistics to examine how diversity and species composition of beetle communities depend on vegetation pattern and environmental factors along an ecological gradient from steppe to desert. Our study included the beetle families Tenebrionidae, Carabidae, Curculionidae, and Coccinellidae, which account for the majority of the known beetle fauna in the area. The most abundant Coleoptera in all plots were Harpalus limbaris, Corsyra fusula, and Anatolica cellicola; otherwise, we caught a large number of rare species. The beta diversity of communities was correlated with distance between plots. Species richness of beetles was positively impacted by plant cover and correlated negatively with rising temperatures, whereas Shannon diversity of beetle communities was significantly higher in areas with higher precipitation. Distribution and community composition of Coleopterans were governed by environmental factors, especially plant diversity, mean annual temperature, and summer precipitation, as revealed by redundancy analysis.

  19. FAUNÍSTIC STUDY OF BEETLES (COLEOPTERA IN A SILVICULTURAL-PASTORAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Machado Auad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of beetles (Coleoptera in a silvicultural-pastoral system, estimating constancy, abundance, richness, diversity of families and seasonality, from July 2006 to June 2008. The study was carried out at the Embrapa Dairy Cattle station, in Coronel Pacheco, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The beetles were collected in Malaise traps, every two weeks, and taken to the laboratory for analysis. A total of 26 families, 294 morphospecies and 1,606 specimens were found. The Elateridae, Mordelidae, Chrysomelidae, Coccinellidae and Curculionidae families were the most abundant, rich and diverse. The Scarabaeidae and Scolytidae families were also among the most abundant, and the Cerambycidae family was among the richest, while the Bruchidae and Carabidae families presented high diversity.  The largest number of individuals and morphospecies sampled occurred during the period of rain. November 2007 presented the most (n = 535 specimens captures of any month, followed by October 2006, September 2007, March and April of 2008.

  20. Use of indigenous knowledge in the management of field and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Curculionidae), Prostephanus truncates (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), Tribolium spp (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), Bruchus rufimanus (Coleoptera; Bruchidae), Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and rodents on storage. IK based control methods used by farmers ranged from animal by-products (cow's urine and ...