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  1. Longitudinal Analysis of Leptin Variation during Weight Regain after Weight Loss in Obese Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jens-Christian, Holm; Michael, Gamborg; Leigh, Ward

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed if lower than predicted serum leptin concentrations seen during weight loss persisted during weight regain, with possible implications for weight control. Methods: 115 children were investigated during a 12-week weight loss program. 90 children completed the program....... Results: Children with the greatest increases in BMI standard deviation score (SDS) exhibited the largest leptin increments. The disproportionate reduction of leptin seen during weight loss recovered after weight loss. Leptin increases mirrored increases in BMI SDS during weight regain, and the leptin......-BMI SDS relationship seen during follow-up resembled the baseline leptin-BMI SDS relationship. Conclusion: Proportional increases of leptin and BMI SDS during weight regain suggests an intact leptin response during re-accumulation of fat. Following the pronounced reduction of leptin during weight loss...

  2. Longer weekly sleep duration predicts greater 3-month BMI reduction among obese adolescents attending a clinical multidisciplinary weight management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallinen, Bethany J; Hassan, Fauziya; Olszewski, Amy; Maupin, Angela; Hoban, Timothy F; Chervin, Ronald D; Woolford, Susan J

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether baseline levels of self-reported sleep and sleep problems among obese adolescents referred to an outpatient multidisciplinary family-based weight management program predict reduction in BMI 3 months later. A retrospective medical chart review was conducted for 83 obese adolescents. The following baseline variables were extracted: self-reported sleep duration (weekdays and weekends), and presence of snoring, daytime fatigue, suspected sleep apnea, and physician-diagnosed sleep apnea. Anthropometric data at baseline and 3 months were also collected. On average, adolescents reported significantly less sleeping on weeknights (7.7 ± 1.3 h) compared to weekend nights (10.0 ± 1.8 h), t(82) = 10.5, p = 0.0001. Reduction in BMI after 3 months of treatment was predicted by more weekly sleep at baseline (R² = 0.113, F(1, 80) = 10.2, p = 0.002). Adolescents who reduced their BMI by ≥1 kg/m² reported greater weekly sleep at baseline compared to adolescents who experienced <1 kg/m² reduction (60.7 ± 7.5 h vs. 56.4 ± 8.6 h; F(1, 80) = 5.7, p = 0.02). Findings from this study, though correlational, raise the possibility that increased duration of sleep may be associated with weight loss among obese adolescents enrolled in a weight management program. Evidence-based behavioral techniques to improve sleep hygiene and increase sleep duration should be explored in pediatric weight management settings. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  3. Longer Weekly Sleep Duration Predicts Greater 3-Month BMI Reduction among Obese Adolescents Attending a Clinical Multidisciplinary Weight Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany J. Sallinen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine whether baseline levels of self-reported sleep and sleep problems among obese adolescents referred to an outpatient multidisciplinary family-based weight management program predict reduction in BMI 3 months later. Methods: A retrospective medical chart review was conducted for 83 obese adolescents. The following baseline variables were extracted: self-reported sleep duration (weekdays and weekends, and presence of snoring, daytime fatigue, suspected sleep apnea, and physician-diagnosed sleep apnea. Anthropometric data at baseline and 3 months were also collected. Results: On average, adolescents reported significantly less sleeping on weeknights (7.7 ± 1.3 h compared to weekend nights (10.0 ± 1.8 h, t(82 = 10.5, p = 0.0001. Reduction in BMI after 3 months of treatment was predicted by more weekly sleep at baseline (R2 = 0.113, F(1, 80 = 10.2, p = 0.002. Adolescents who reduced their BMI by ≥1 kg/m2 reported greater weekly sleep at baseline compared to adolescents who experienced 2 reduction (60.7 ± 7.5 h vs. 56.4 ± 8.6 h; F(1, 80 = 5.7, p = 0.02. Conclusion: Findings from this study, though correlational, raise the possibility that increased duration of sleep may be associated with weight loss among obese adolescents enrolled in a weight management program. Evidence-based behavioral techniques to improve sleep hygiene and increase sleep duration should be explored in pediatric weight management settings.

  4. Longitudinal Analysis of Leptin Variation during Weight Regain after Weight Loss in Obese Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens-Christian; Gamborg, Michael; Ward, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed if lower than predicted serum leptin concentrations seen during weight loss persisted during weight regain, with possible implications for weight control. Methods: 115 children were investigated during a 12-week weight loss program. 90 children completed the program......, and 68 children entered a follow-up program spanning 28 months. Measurements were performed at baseline and day 82 as well as at months 10, 16, and 28. Height, weight, body composition, Tanner stages, testicular size, and serum concentrations of leptin, and insulin were measured at all time points....... Results: Children with the greatest increases in BMI standard deviation score (SDS) exhibited the largest leptin increments. The disproportionate reduction of leptin seen during weight loss recovered after weight loss. Leptin increases mirrored increases in BMI SDS during weight regain, and the leptin...

  5. Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement

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    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Spinal Cord Stimulation Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement Past Issues / Summer ... a lifelong sentence of permanent paralysis." Read More "Spinal Cord Stimulation" Articles Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement / Progress in ...

  6. Caloric restriction induces changes in insulin and body weight measurements that are inversely associated with subsequent weight regain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica H T Wong

    Full Text Available Successful weight maintenance following weight loss is challenging for many people. Identifying predictors of longer-term success will help target clinical resources more effectively. To date, focus has been predominantly on the identification of predictors of weight loss. The goal of the current study was to determine if changes in anthropometric and clinical parameters during acute weight loss are associated with subsequent weight regain.The study consisted of an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD followed by a 6-month weight maintenance phase. Anthropometric and clinical parameters were analyzed before and after the LCD in the 285 participants (112 men, 173 women who regained weight during the weight maintenance phase. Mixed model ANOVA, Spearman correlation, and linear regression were used to study the relationships between clinical measurements and weight regain.Gender differences were observed for body weight and several clinical parameters at both baseline and during the LCD-induced weight loss phase. LCD-induced changes in BMI (Spearman's ρ = 0.22, p = 0.0002 were inversely associated with weight regain in both men and women. LCD-induced changes in fasting insulin (ρ = 0.18, p = 0.0043 and HOMA-IR (ρ = 0.19, p = 0.0023 were also associated independently with weight regain in both genders. The aforementioned associations remained statistically significant in regression models taking account of variables known to independently influence body weight.LCD-induced changes in BMI, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR are inversely associated with weight regain in the 6-month period following weight loss.

  7. Is pedometer-determined day-of-the-week variability of step counts related to age and BMI in Czech men and women aged 50 to 70 years?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Pelclová

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Day-to-day walking variability appears not to be random and may fluctuate by day of week or type of day (workdays/non-workdays. The day-of-the-week variability is less clear in period of life transition between the ages of 50-70 years. Moreover, it is unclear whether the variability is related to age or BMI.Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the weekdays-weekends patterns and the day-to-day variability in step patterns in men and women of different age and BMI groups. Methods: During the years 2009-2012, 1,170 individuals (532 men and 638 women aged 50-70 years participated in a seven-day monitoring using a Yamax Digiwalker SW-700 pedometer. Results: Using ANOVA of repeated measures, it was found that steps/day varied across the day of the week in both men and women in younger age groups (≤ 64 years (p ≤ .04, whereas in older age group (65-70 years, no significant systematic variability by day of the week was found. Existence of variability by day of the week with significant drop in steps/day on weekend days, especially on Sunday, was confirmed in normal weight, overweight and obese Czech men and women. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study contributes to the evidence with the findings about the existing the day-of-the-week variability of step counts per day in the population aged 50 to 64 years and about the absence of significant variability in seniors (≥ 65 years. Sunday was the least active day in different age and BMI groups aged 50 to 70 years of Czech population. Researchers and practitioners should take the results of this study into consideration when preparing for data collection of habitual physical activity in senior population and in the development of walking interventions and weight reduction programmes designed for this age group.

  8. Regaining Weaver and Shannon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Genosko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available My claim is that communication considered from the standpoint of how it is modeled must not only reckon with Claude E. Shannon and Warren Weaver but regain their pioneering efforts in new ways. I want to regain two neglected features. I signal these ends by simply reversing the order in which their names commonly appear.First, the recontextualization of Shannon and Weaver requires an investigation of the technocultural scene of information ‘handling’ embedded in their groundbreaking postwar labours; not incidentally, it was Harold D. Lasswell, whose work in the 1940s is often linked with Shannon and Weaver’s, who made a point of distinguishing between those who affect the content of messages (controllers as opposed to those who handle without modifying (other than accidentally such messages. Although it will not be possible to maintain such a hard and fast distinction that ignores scenes of encoding and decoding, Lasswell’s (1964: 42-3 examples of handlers include key figures such as ‘dispatchers, linemen, and messengers connected with telegraphic communication’ whose activities will prove to be important for my reading of the Shannon and Weaver essays. Telegraphy and its occupational cultures are the technosocial scenes informing the Shannon and Weaver model.Second, I will pay special attention to Weaver’s contribution, despite a tendency to erase him altogether by means of a general scientific habit of listing the main author first and then attributing authorship only to the first name on the list (although this differs within scientific disciplines, particularly in the health field where the name of the last author is in the lead, so to speak. I begin with a displacement of hierarchy and authority. I am inclined to simply state for those who, in the manner of Sherlock Holmes, ‘know my method’, that I focus my attention on the less well-known half of thinking pairs – on Roger Caillois instead of Georges Bataille, on F

  9. Longitudinal changes in blood pressure during weight loss and regain of weight in obese boys and girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens-Christian; Gamborg, Michael; Neland, Mette

    2012-01-01

    To investigate blood pressure (BP) in relation to changes in body mass index (BMI) in obese children during weight loss and subsequent weight regain.......To investigate blood pressure (BP) in relation to changes in body mass index (BMI) in obese children during weight loss and subsequent weight regain....

  10. The effect of rate of weight loss on long-term weight regain in adults with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Roel G; Roumans, Nadia J T; Arkenbosch, Laura A J; Mariman, Edwin C M; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effect of rate of weight loss, with similar total weight loss, on weight regain in individuals with overweight and obesity. Fifty-seven participants (BMI: 28-35 kg/m(2) ) underwent a dietary intervention (DI). They were randomized to a low-calorie diet (LCD; 1250 kcal/day) for 12 weeks (slow weight loss) or a very-low-calorie diet (VLCD; 500 kcal/day) for 5 weeks (rapid weight loss) (weight loss (WL) period) followed by a 4-week weight-stable (WS) period and 9 months follow-up. Body weight and body composition (BodPod) were determined at study start and after each period. Weight change was similar in both groups after WL (LCD: -8.2 kg and VLCD: -9.0 kg, P = 0.24). Weight regain after follow-up was not significantly different between groups (LCD: 4.2 kg and VLCD: 4.5 kg, P = 0.73). Percentage fat-free mass loss (%FFML) was higher in the VLCD-group compared to the LCD-group after DI (8.8% and 1.3%, respectively, P = 0.034) and was associated with weight regain during follow-up in the whole group (r = 0.325, P = 0.018). The present study showed that, with similar total weight loss, rate of weight loss did not affect weight regain. However, %FFML after DI was associated with weight regain. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  11. Long-term weight regain after gastric bypass: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Daniéla Oliveira; Geloneze, Bruno; Delfini, Regis; Pareja, Bruna Contini; Callejas, Francisco; Pareja, José Carlos

    2008-06-01

    A certain weight gain occurs after obesity surgery compared to the lower weight usually observed between 18 and 24 months postsurgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate weight regain in patients submitted to gastric bypass over a 5-year follow-up period. A longitudinal prospective study was conducted on 782 obese patients of both genders. Only patients with at least 2 years of surgery were included. The percentage of excess body mass index (BMI) loss at 24, 36, 48, and 60 months postsurgery was compared to the measurements obtained at 18 months after surgery. Surgical therapeutic failure was also evaluated. Percent excess BMI loss was significant up to 18 months postsurgery (p < 0.001), with a mean difference in BMI of 1.06 kg/m2 compared to 12 months postsurgery. Percent BMI loss was no longer significant after 24 months, and weight regain became significant within 48 months after surgery (p < 0.01). Among the patients who presented weight regain, a mean 8% increase was observed within 60 months compared to the lowest weight obtained at 18 months after surgery. The percentage of surgical failure was higher in the superobese group at all times studied, reaching 18.8% at 48 months after surgery. Weight regain was observed within 24 months after surgery in approximately 50% of patients. Both weight regain and surgical failure were higher in the superobese group. Studies in regard to metabolic and hormonal mechanisms underlying weight regain might elucidate the causes of this finding.

  12. Longitudinal variation of circulating irisin after an energy restriction-induced weight loss and following weight regain in obese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crujeiras, Ana B; Pardo, María; Arturo, Roca-Rivada; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Zulet, M Angeles; Martínez, J Alfredo; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered peptide irisin has been hypothesized to be a regulator of body metabolism. The objective of this work was to evaluate whether circulating human irisin levels are modulated by body size and changes in adiposity during an energy restriction treatment and the subsequent weight regain. A group of 94 obese patients (50 men, 44 women; 49.4 ± 9.4 years; BMI 35.6 ± 4.5 kg/m(2) ) participated in a weight loss program following an 8-week hypocaloric diet (-30% energy expenditure) with a weight maintenance follow-up. The patients were evaluated at 0, 8, and 24 weeks after starting treatment. In addition, 48 normal-weight subjects (16 men, 32 women; 35.71 ± 8.8 years; BMI 22.9 ± 2.2 kg/m(2) ) participated as controls. Plasma irisin, body weight, body composition, and hormones controlling energy homeostasis were measured. Irisin levels were higher in obese subjects (353.1 ± 18.6 ng/mL) than in those of normal-weight (198.4 ± 7.8 ng/mL; P ≤ 0.001) and were also higher in men (340.9 ± 20 ng/mL) than in women (267.6 ± 12 ng/mL; P weight, BMI, waist circumference, and fat mass, as measured by bioimpedance, but not with height or leptin levels. Interestingly, irisin levels paralleled body weight reduction after the dietary treatment (week 8) and again returned to the baseline levels at 24 weeks in those patients regaining the lost weight. Irisin strongly reflects body fat mass, suggesting that the irisin circulating levels are conditioned by adiposity level. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Psychological predictors of weight regain in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Susan M; Cooper, Zafra; Fairburn, Christopher G

    2004-11-01

    It is a consistent finding that, among obese patients, the weight lost as a result of the most widely available treatments for obesity is almost always regained. This relapse appears to be attributable to the individual's inability to persist with the behavioural strategies needed to maintain the new lower weight. Little research has investigated the psychological mechanisms that might account for this phenomenon. This study aimed to identify psychological factors that predict weight regain. Fifty-four women with obesity who had lost weight by attending community slimming clubs were interviewed immediately after losing 10% of their initial body weight, and then followed-up every 2 months for a period of 1 year by means of telephone interviews. The results identified two prospective predictors of weight regain: one cognitive factor (dichotomous thinking) and one historical variable (maximum lifetime weight). The finding that a specific cognitive style is a significant predictor of relapse has implications for the treatment of obesity.

  14. Perception of exercise difficulty predicts weight regain in formerly overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, David W; Chandler-Laney, Paula C; Alvarez, Jessica A; Gower, Barbara A; Gaesser, Glenn A; Hunter, Gary R

    2010-05-01

    It has been previously reported that overweight and obese individuals perceive exercise as more difficult than their lean counterparts, and this difference may not be solely attributed to physiological differences. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that individual differences in the perception of exercise difficulty during exercise, independent of concurrently measured physiological markers of exertion, are predictive of weight regain, after completion of a weight loss program. A total of 113 formerly overweight women who had previously completed a weight-loss program to achieve a normal body weight (BMI perceived exertion (rating of perceived exertion (RPE)) were recorded. Weight gain was assessed following a subsequent 1-year free-living period. Average weight regain 1 year following the intervention was 5.46 +/- 3.95 kg. In regression modeling, RPE (beta = 0.21, P = 0.01), but not physiological exertion (beta = 0.02, P = 0.81), during the submaximal exercise task was positively associated with 1-year weight regain following weight loss in premenopausal women, independent of measured confounding variables. The association between RPE and weight regain suggests that perception of exercise difficulty is an important predictor of weight regain following a weight-loss intervention.

  15. Plasma Ghrelin Levels and Weight Regain After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Thompson, Christopher C

    2017-04-01

    Ghrelin is a gut hormone that induces hunger, gastric acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility. A number of studies have previously demonstrated a possible correlation between a decrease in ghrelin level and weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This study aimed to assess if there was a relationship between ghrelin level and weight regain after RYGB nadir weight had been achieved. Sixty-three consecutive RYGB patients who were referred for an upper endoscopy were enrolled. Weight and responses to the 21-item Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ-R21) were collected. Ghrelin levels were measured. Upper endoscopy was performed to evaluate pouch length and stoma diameter. Multivariate linear regression was performed to assess an association between ghrelin level, TFEQ-R21 score, pouch length, stoma diameter, and percentage of weight regained. Subjects were 47 ± 10 years old and had a BMI of 38 ± 7.7 kg/m 2 . Out of 63 patients, 76 % had weight regain (gaining of ≥20 % of maximal weight lost after the RYGB) and 24 % did not. Average pouch length was 44 ± 13 mm, stoma diameter 20 ± 6.6 mm, and ghrelin levels 125 ± 99 ng/ml. Ghrelin level was not associated with weight regain (β = 0.17, p = 0.2). GJ stoma diameter was associated with weight regain (β = 0.39, p Ghrelin levels do not appear to correlate with weight change after RYGB nadir weight has been achieved. A dilated GJ stoma diameter is a risk factor for weight regain and uncontrolled eating behavior after RYGB.

  16. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and weight regain after diet in type 2 diabetes: results from the randomised controlled POWER trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Kirsten A; Buijks, Hanneke I M; Verhoeven, Adrie J M; Mulder, Monique T; Özcan, Behiye; van 't Spijker, Adriaan; Timman, Reinier; Busschbach, Jan J; Sijbrands, Eric J

    2018-01-09

    Weight-loss programmes for adults with type 2 diabetes are less effective in the long term owing to regain of weight. Our aim was to determine the 2 year effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural group therapy (group-CBT) programme in weight maintenance after diet-induced weight loss in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, using a randomised, parallel, non-blinded, pragmatic study design. We included 158 obese adults (median BMI 36.3 [IQR 32.5-40.0] kg/m2) with type 2 diabetes from the outpatient diabetes clinic of Erasmus MC, the Netherlands, who achieved ≥5% weight loss on an 8 week very low calorie diet. Participants were randomised (stratified by weight loss) to usual care or usual care plus group-CBT (17 group sessions). The primary outcomes were the between-group differences after 2 years in: (1) body weight; and (2) weight regain. Secondary outcomes were HbA1c levels, insulin dose, plasma lipid levels, depression, anxiety, self-esteem, quality of life, fatigue, physical activity, eating disorders and related cognitions. Data were analysed using linear mixed modelling. During the initial 8 week dieting phase, the control group (n = 75) lost a mean of 10.0 (95% CI 9.1, 10.9) kg and the intervention group (n = 83) lost 9.2 (95% CI 8.4, 10.0) kg (p = 0.206 for the between-group difference). During 2 years of follow-up, mean weight regain was 4.7 (95% CI 3.0, 6.3) kg for the control group and 4.0 (95% CI 2.3, 5.6) kg for the intervention group, with a between-group difference of -0.7 (95% CI -3.1, 1.6) kg (p = 0.6). The mean difference in body weight at 2 years was -1.2 (95% CI -7.7, 5.3) kg (p = 0.7). None of the secondary outcomes differed between the two groups. Despite increased treatment contact, a group-CBT programme for long-term weight maintenance after an initial ≥5% weight loss from dieting in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes was not superior to usual care alone. Trialregister.nl NTR2264 FUNDING: The study

  17. Effect of weight loss and regain on adipose tissue distribution, composition of lean mass and resting energy expenditure in young overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosy-Westphal, A; Schautz, B; Lagerpusch, M; Pourhassan, M; Braun, W; Goele, K; Heller, M; Glüer, C-C; Müller, M J

    2013-10-01

    Although weight cycling is frequent in obese patients, the adverse consequences on body composition and an increased propensity to weight gain remain controversial. We investigated the effect of intentional weight loss and spontaneous regain on fat distribution, the composition of lean mass and resting energy expenditure (REE). Weight regainers (≥ 30% of loss, n=27) and weight-stable subjects (within weight change, n=20) were selected from 103 overweight and obese subjects (body mass index 28-43 kg m(-2), 24-45 years) who passed a 13-week low-calorie diet intervention. REE and body composition (by densitometry and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging) were examined at baseline, after weight loss and at 6 months of follow-up. Mean weight loss was -12.3 ± 3.3 kg in weight-stable subjects and -9.0 ± 4.3 kg in weight regainers (PWeight regain was incomplete, accounting for 83 and 42% of weight loss in women and men. Regain in total fat and different adipose tissue depots was in proportion to weight regain except for a higher regain in adipose tissue of the extremities in women and a lower regain in extremity and visceral adipose tissue in men. In both genders, regain in skeletal muscle of the trunk lagged behind skeletal muscle regain at the extremities. In contrast to weight-stable subjects, weight regainers showed a reduced REE adjusted for changes in organ and tissue masses after weight loss (PWeight regain did not adversely affect body fat distribution. Weight loss-associated adaptations in REE may impair weight loss and contribute to weight regain.

  18. Dietary Intake after Weight Loss and the Risk of Weight Regain: Macronutrient Composition and Inflammatory Properties of the Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Freitag Luglio Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Weight regain after successful weight loss is a big problem in obesity management. This study aimed to investigate whether weight regain after a weight loss period is correlated with the macronutrient composition and/or the inflammatory index of the diet during that period. Sixty one overweight and obese adults participated in this experimental study. Subjects lost approximately 10% of their initial weight by means of very low-calorie diet for five weeks, or a low calorie diet for 12 weeks. After that, subjects in both groups followed a strict weight maintenance diet based on individual needs for four weeks, which was followed by a nine-month weight maintenance period without dietary counseling. Anthropometrics and dietary intake data were recorded before weight loss (baseline and during the weight maintenance period. On average, participants regained approximately half of their lost weight. We found no evidence that macronutrient composition during the weight maintenance period was associated with weight regain. The dietary inflammatory index (r = 0.304, p = 0.032 was positively correlated with weight regain and remained significant after correction for physical activity (r = 0.287, p = 0.045. Our data suggest that the inflammatory properties of diet play a role in weight regain after weight loss in overweight and obese adults.

  19. Impact of carbohydrates on weight regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Müller, Manfred J

    2015-07-01

    Research on obesity treatment has shifted its focus from weight loss to weight-loss maintenance strategies. The conventional approach of a low-fat diet is challenged by insights from glycemic effects of carbohydrates on body weight regulation. Metabolic and endocrine adaptations to weight loss that contribute to weight regain involve reduced energy expenditure, increased insulin sensitivity, and enhanced orexigenic signals. This review summarizes the impact of carbohydrates on energetic efficiency, partitioning of weight regain as fat and lean mass, and appetite control. Both the amount and frequency of postprandial glycemia add to body weight regulation after weight loss and strengthen the concept of glycemic index and glycemic load. In addition, dietary fiber and slowly or poorly absorbable functional sugars modify gastrointestinal peptides involved in appetite and metabolic regulation and exert prebiotic effects. Current evidence suggests that a low-glycemic load diet with a preference for low-glycemic index foods and integration of slowly digestible, poorly absorbable carbohydrates may improve weight-loss maintenance. Future studies should investigate the health benefits of low glycemic functional sweeteners (e.g., isomaltulose and tagatose).

  20. Pregnancy week by week

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Map Premature Birth Report Cards Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Pregnancy week by week Pregnancy week by week Week by week Videos Infographics ...

  1. Nutrition Care for Patients with Weight Regain after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlene Johnson Stoklossa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20–25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews several factors that influence weight regain after bariatric surgery, including type of surgery, food tolerance, energy requirements, drivers to eat, errors in estimating intake, adherence, food and beverage choices, and patient knowledge. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach can provide the best care for patients with weight regain. Nutrition care by a registered dietitian is recommended for all bariatric surgery patients. Nutrition diagnoses and interventions are discussed. Regular monitoring of weight status and early intervention may help prevent significant weight regain.

  2. Metabolic syndrome, circulating RBP4, testosterone, and SHBG predict weight regain at 6 months after weight loss in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ping; Menheere, Paul P C A; Astrup, Arne

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Weight loss helps reduce the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the obese, but weight regain after active weight loss is common. We investigated the changes and predictive role of circulating adipokines and sex hormones for weight regain in men during dietary intervention......, adiponectin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), luteinizing hormone, prolactin, progesterone, total and free testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were measured at baseline, after 8-week low-calorie diet-induced active weight loss, and after a subsequent 26-week ad libitum weight maintenance...... diet, and analyzed together with anthropometrical and physiological parameters. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese men with MetS at baseline had higher risk to regain weight (odds ratio=2.8, P=0.015). High baseline RBP4, and low total testosterone and low SHBG are predictors of weight loss...

  3. The Mechanics of Regaining Balance in Pirouettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Melanie B.

    All forms of dance incorporate examples of the human body in motion or standing in an aesthetically appealing pose. While balancing in a static position, dancers make small adjustments to avoid toppling. Balancing when the body is rotating around a vertical axis with one supporting foot at the floor (a pirouette) is more complex. Dancers are often taught to perform pirouettes by beginning the movement as close to balanced as possible and holding the body rigid throughout the turn. Theoretically, if the body is initially perfectly balanced, the number of revolutions will be limited only by friction. However, the research reported here demonstrates that dancers who perform pirouettes without making adjustments to correct for loss of balance will likely be unable to complete more than a two- or three-turn pirouette. The topple angle (theta) as a function of time was predicted for a model of a rigid body dancer. When theta becomes large enough, dancers must compensate for loss of balance or end the turn. That limiting angle was determined experimentally and set as the upper limit to theta. It was found that performing more than a three-turn, rigid-body pirouette requires the dancer to begin unreasonably close to perfectly balanced (theta aesthetic of the movement; or (3) slide the SF under the CM, which moves the area of support and produces a horizontal force to move the CM to a revised location. An experimental analysis of dancers' pirouettes was performed in order to determine what adjustment mechanisms were successfully employed to regain balance. Sliding the SF was the most common and effective technique used by advanced dancers. The SF slides were accompanied by a decrease in normal force, so the instruction to "lift" when performing a pirouette may be useful.

  4. Regular exercise attenuates the metabolic drive to regain weight after long-term weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Paul S; Higgins, Janine A; Wyatt, Holly R; Melanson, Edward L; Johnson, Ginger C; Jackman, Matthew R; Giles, Erin D; Brown, Ian E; Hill, James O

    2009-09-01

    Weight loss is accompanied by several metabolic adaptations that work together to promote rapid, efficient regain. We employed a rodent model of regain to examine the effects of a regular bout of treadmill exercise on these adaptations. Obesity was induced in obesity-prone rats with 16 wk of high-fat feeding and limited physical activity. Obese rats were then weight reduced (approximately 14% of body wt) with a calorie-restricted, low-fat diet and maintained at that reduced weight for 8 wk by providing limited provisions of the diet with (EX) or without (SED) a daily bout of treadmill exercise (15 m/min, 30 min/day, 6 days/wk). Weight regain, energy balance, fuel utilization, adipocyte cellularity, and humoral signals of adiposity were monitored during eight subsequent weeks of ad libitum feeding while the rats maintained their respective regimens of physical activity. Regular exercise decreased the rate of regain early in relapse and lowered the defended body weight. During weight maintenance, regular exercise reduced the biological drive to eat so that it came closer to matching the suppressed level of energy expenditure. The diurnal extremes in fuel preference observed in weight-reduced rats were blunted, since exercise promoted the oxidation of fat during periods of feeding (dark cycle) and promoted the oxidation of carbohydrate (CHO) later in the day during periods of deprivation (light cycle) . At the end of relapse, exercise reestablished the homeostatic steady state between intake and expenditure to defend a lower body weight. Compared with SED rats, relapsed EX rats exhibited a reduced turnover of energy, a lower 24-h oxidation of CHO, fewer adipocytes in abdominal fat pads, and peripheral signals that overestimated their adiposity. These observations indicate that regimented exercise altered several metabolic adaptations to weight reduction in a manner that would coordinately attenuate the propensity to regain lost weight.

  5. Gastric Bypass Surgery: What Happens If I Regain the Weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... happens if you gain back weight after gastric bypass surgery? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L. ... If you begin to regain weight after gastric bypass surgery, talk to your doctor. You may have ...

  6. Asthma Drug May Help Kidney Patients Regain Sense of Smell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug May Help Kidney Patients Regain Sense of Smell Problem is common in chronic kidney disease and ... patients is a loss of the sense of smell, which could lead to an inadequate diet, researchers ...

  7. BMI and Lifetime Changes in BMI and Cancer Mortality Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taghizadeh, Niloofar; Boezen, H Marike; Schouten, Jan P; Schröder, Carolien P; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Vonk, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    Body Mass Index (BMI) is known to be associated with cancer mortality, but little is known about the link between lifetime changes in BMI and cancer mortality in both males and females. We studied the association of BMI measurements (at baseline, highest and lowest BMI during the study-period) and

  8. Bmi-1 absence causes premature brain degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangliang Cao

    Full Text Available Bmi-1, a polycomb transcriptional repressor, is implicated in cell cycle regulation and cell senescence. Its absence results in generalized astrogliosis and epilepsy during the postnatal development, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of four-week-old Bmi-1 null mice. The mice showed various hallmarks of neurodegeneration including synaptic loss, axonal demyelination, reactive gliosis and brain mitochondrial damage. Moreover, astroglial glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase decreased in the Bmi-1 null hippocampus, which might contribute to the sporadic epileptic-like seizures in these mice. These results indicate that Bmi-1 is required for maintaining endogenous antioxidant defenses in the brain, and its absence subsequently causes premature brain degeneration.

  9. Predictors of not regaining basic mobility after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulsbæk, Signe; Larsen, Rikke Faebo; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Regaining basic mobility after hip fracture surgery is a milestone in the in-hospital rehabilitation. The aims were to investigate predictors for not regaining basic mobility at the fifth post-operative day and at discharge after undergoing hip fracture surgery. METHOD: In a prospective...... cohort study 274 hip fracture patients were included. Patients with compromised ability to exercise were excluded leaving 167 patients for analysis. Patient demographics, functional level, method of operation, post-operative hemoglobin and the completion of physiotherapy was registered. Basic mobility...... on first post-operative day (OR = 3.3) (p values: 0.009-hip fracture surgery, who are not able to complete physiotherapy on first post-operative day, are at a greater risk of not regaining basic mobility during hospitalization...

  10. Biology's response to dieting: the impetus for weight regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Paul S; Bergouignan, Audrey; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Jackman, Matthew R

    2011-09-01

    Dieting is the most common approach to losing weight for the majority of obese and overweight individuals. Restricting intake leads to weight loss in the short term, but, by itself, dieting has a relatively poor success rate for long-term weight reduction. Most obese people eventually regain the weight they have worked so hard to lose. Weight regain has emerged as one of the most significant obstacles for obesity therapeutics, undoubtedly perpetuating the epidemic of excess weight that now affects more than 60% of U.S. adults. In this review, we summarize the evidence of biology's role in the problem of weight regain. Biology's impact is first placed in context with other pressures known to affect body weight. Then, the biological adaptations to an energy-restricted, low-fat diet that are known to occur in the overweight and obese are reviewed, and an integrative picture of energy homeostasis after long-term weight reduction and during weight regain is presented. Finally, a novel model is proposed to explain the persistence of the "energy depletion" signal during the dynamic metabolic state of weight regain, when traditional adiposity signals no longer reflect stored energy in the periphery. The preponderance of evidence would suggest that the biological response to weight loss involves comprehensive, persistent, and redundant adaptations in energy homeostasis and that these adaptations underlie the high recidivism rate in obesity therapeutics. To be successful in the long term, our strategies for preventing weight regain may need to be just as comprehensive, persistent, and redundant, as the biological adaptations they are attempting to counter.

  11. Biology's response to dieting: the impetus for weight regain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Jackman, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Dieting is the most common approach to losing weight for the majority of obese and overweight individuals. Restricting intake leads to weight loss in the short term, but, by itself, dieting has a relatively poor success rate for long-term weight reduction. Most obese people eventually regain the weight they have worked so hard to lose. Weight regain has emerged as one of the most significant obstacles for obesity therapeutics, undoubtedly perpetuating the epidemic of excess weight that now affects more than 60% of U.S. adults. In this review, we summarize the evidence of biology's role in the problem of weight regain. Biology's impact is first placed in context with other pressures known to affect body weight. Then, the biological adaptations to an energy-restricted, low-fat diet that are known to occur in the overweight and obese are reviewed, and an integrative picture of energy homeostasis after long-term weight reduction and during weight regain is presented. Finally, a novel model is proposed to explain the persistence of the “energy depletion” signal during the dynamic metabolic state of weight regain, when traditional adiposity signals no longer reflect stored energy in the periphery. The preponderance of evidence would suggest that the biological response to weight loss involves comprehensive, persistent, and redundant adaptations in energy homeostasis and that these adaptations underlie the high recidivism rate in obesity therapeutics. To be successful in the long term, our strategies for preventing weight regain may need to be just as comprehensive, persistent, and redundant, as the biological adaptations they are attempting to counter. PMID:21677272

  12. Weight regain after slimming induced by an energy-restricted diet depends on interleukin-6 and peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma2 gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyenechea, Estibaliz; Dolores Parra, M; Alfredo Martínez, J

    2006-11-01

    Weight-loss maintenance after following an energy-restricted diet is a major problem that a number of studies are trying to characterise. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of IL-6 -174G>C and PPAR-gamma2 Pro12Ala variants on weight regulation in obese subjects receiving a low-energy diet and at 1 year after the acute slimming period. Sixty-seven volunteers (age 34.7 (SD 7.0) years; BMI 35.8 (SD 4.8) kg/m(2)) were enrolled in a 10-week dietary intervention and were contacted again 1 year after the end of this period. Body composition was measured at three times during the study. Also, PPAR-gamma2 Pro12Ala and IL-6 -174G>C polymorphisms were analysed in the participants. No statistical differences were observed depending on the genetic variants at baseline for anthropometric variables, or after the intervention. However, the C allele of the -174G>C IL-6 gene polymorphism was more frequently observed (P=0.032) in subjects with successful weight maintenance (C polymorphism gives protection against regain of weight lost. Moreover, the presence of the Ala allele of the PPARgamma-2 together with the C allele strengthens this protection. These findings support a role for these polymorphisms on weight regulation and suggest a synergetic effect of both variants on weight maintenance after following a diet to lose weight.

  13. Biology of obesity and weight regain: Implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Mary Madeline; Gautam, Bibha

    2017-10-01

    Weight loss is recommended as first-line therapy for many chronic illnesses, including obesity. Most patients who do successfully lose weight are unable to maintain their reduced weight. Recent research findings are reviewed and synthesized to explain the biology of obesity, adaptation to weight loss, and weight regain. Weight regain is a common consequence of successful weight loss. Current obesity management strategies fail to take into consideration the underlying genetic and environmental causes of obesity. Available treatment modalities create a negative energy balance that stimulates integrated, persistent neurologic, endocrine, muscle, and adipose tissue adaptation to restore body weight and fat mass, independent of lifestyle changes. Understanding the pathophysiology of obesity and weight loss alters nurse practitioners' responsibilities in caring for patients with obesity. They are responsible for expanding assessment and intervention strategies and offering people with obesity realistic expectations for weight loss and regain. They are obligated to explain weight regain when it occurs to minimize patient frustration. Nurse practitioners have the opportunity to adopt new approaches to patient advocacy, especially in the areas of public policy to improve diagnostic tools and adjunctive therapy for people with obesity. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, F L

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an 'obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their efforts

  15. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, F L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an ‘obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their

  16. Long-Term Weight Maintenance after a 17-Week Weight Loss Intervention with or without a One-Year Maintenance Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuula Pekkarinen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Weight lost by obese patients is almost always regained over time. Extended treatment may improve maintenance, but solid evidence is lacking. Purpose. We determined effectiveness of maintenance therapy after a weight loss program. Methods. Together 201 patients (mean age 47 years and BMI 42 kg/m2, 71% women were randomly assigned to either a 17-week weight loss program followed by a one-year maintenance program or to a weight loss program without subsequent maintenance intervention. The weight loss program included behavior modification and a very-low-calorie diet, and maintenance program behavior modification. The primary outcome measure was percentage of patients with 5% or more weight loss at the end of maintenance (week 69 and one year later (week 121. Secondary outcomes were weight related changes in lifestyle and quality of life. Results. At week 69, 52% of the patients with and 44% of those without maintenance program had lost weight ≥5%, P=0.40, and, at week 121, 33% and 34%, P=0.77, respectively. At week 121 secondary outcomes did not differ between the groups among those successfully followed up. Conclusions. This one-year maintenance program was not effective in preventing weight regain in severely obese patients. Trial Registration. This trial is registered under clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00590655.

  17. Impulse control in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex counteracts post-diet weight regain in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weygandt, Martin; Mai, Knut; Dommes, Esther; Ritter, Kerstin; Leupelt, Verena; Spranger, Joachim; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2015-04-01

    A variety of studies suggest that efficient treatments to induce short-term dietary success in obesity exist. However, sustained maintenance of reduced weight is rare as a large proportion of patients start to regain weight when treatment is discontinued. Thus, from a clinical perspective, it would be desirable to identify factors that counteract post-diet weight regain across longer time-scales. To address this question, we extended our previous work on neural impulse control mechanisms of short-term dietary success in obesity and now investigated the mechanisms counteracting long-term weight regain after a diet. Specifically, we measured neural impulse control during a delay discounting task with fMRI at two time points, i.e. the beginning ('T0') and the end ('T12') of a one-year follow-up interval after a 12-week diet. Then, we tested whether activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) at T0 and whether activity changes across the follow-up period (T0-T12) are linked to success in weight maintenance. The analyses conducted show that control-related DLPFC activity at T0 was coupled to the degree of success in weight maintenance. Consistently, also behavioral measures of control were linked to the degree of success in maintenance. A direct comparison of neural and behavioral control parameters for prognostic weight change modeling revealed that neural signals were more informative. Taken together, neural impulse control in the DLPFC measured with fMRI directly after a diet predicts real-world diet success in obese patients across extended time periods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Resistant starch and exercise independently attenuate weight regain on a high fat diet in a rat model of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Ginger C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term weight reduction remains elusive for many obese individuals. Resistant starch (RS and exercise may be useful for weight maintenance. The effects of RS, with or without exercise, on weight regain was examined during relapse to obesity on a high carbohydrate, high fat (HC/HF diet. Methods Obesity-prone rats were fed ad libitum for 16 weeks then weight reduced on a low fat diet to induce a 17% body weight loss (weight reduced rats. Weight reduced rats were maintained on an energy-restricted low fat diet for 18 weeks, with or without a daily bout of treadmill exercise. Rats were then allowed free access to HC/HF diet containing low (0.3% or high (5.9% levels of RS. Weight regain, energy balance, body composition, adipocyte cellularity, and fuel utilization were monitored as rats relapsed to obesity and surpassed their original, obese weight. Results Both RS and exercise independently attenuated weight regain by reducing the energy gap between the drive to eat and suppressed energy requirements. Exercise attenuated the deposition of lean mass during relapse, whereas its combination with RS sustained lean mass accrual as body weight returned. Early in relapse, RS lowered insulin levels and reduced the deposition of fat in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Exercise cessation at five weeks of relapse led to increased weight gain, body fat, subcutaneous adipocytes, and decreased lean mass; all detrimental consequences to overall metabolic health. Conclusions These data are the first to show the complimentary effects of dietary RS and regular exercise in countering the metabolic drive to regain weight following weight loss and suggest that exercise cessation, in the context of relapse on a HC/HF diet, may have dire metabolic consequences.

  19. Regaining momentum for international climate policy beyond Copenhagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haug Constanze

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 'Copenhagen Accord' fails to deliver the political framework for a fair, ambitious and legally-binding international climate agreement beyond 2012. The current climate policy regime dynamics are insufficient to reflect the realities of topical complexity, actor coalitions, as well as financial, legal and institutional challenges in the light of extreme time constraints to avoid 'dangerous' climate change of more than 2°C. In this paper we analyze these stumbling blocks for international climate policy and discuss alternatives in order to regain momentum for future negotiations.

  20. Exercise training prevents regain of visceral fat for 1-year following weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary R.; Brock, David W.; Byrne, Nuala M; Chandler-Laney, Paula; Coral, Pedro Del; Gower, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what effect aerobic and resistance exercise training has on gain of visceral fat during the year following weight loss. After being randomly assigned to aerobic training, resistance training, or no exercise training, 45 European-American and 52 African-American women lost 12.3±2.5 kg on a 800 kcal/day diet. Computed tomography was used to measure abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue while total fat and regional fat (leg, arm, and trunk) were measured by Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry after weight loss and one year following the weight loss. Since not all the subjects adhered to the 2 time/week 40 minutes/day exercise training during the one year follow-up, subjects were divided into five groups for analysis; aerobic adherers, aerobic non-adherers, resistance adherers, resistance non-adherers and no exercise. No significant differences were observed between the aerobic training and resistance training adherers for any variable. However, the aerobic (3.1 kg) and resistance (3.9 kg) exercise adherers gained less weight than any of the other 3 groups (all more than 6.2 kg). In addition, the two exercise adherence groups did not significantly increase visceral fat (exercise groups and the 25% for the non-exercise group. In conclusion, as little as 80 minutes/week aerobic or resistance training had modest positive effects on preventing weight regain following a diet induced weight loss. More importantly, both aerobic and resistance training prevented regain of potentially harmful visceral fat. PMID:19816413

  1. Long-lasting improvements in liver fat and metabolism despite body weight regain after dietary weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufe, Sven; Haas, Verena; Utz, Wolfgang; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; Jeran, Stephanie; Böhnke, Jana; Mähler, Anja; Luft, Friedrich C; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Boschmann, Michael; Jordan, Jens; Engeli, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Weight loss reduces abdominal and intrahepatic fat, thereby improving metabolic and cardiovascular risk. Yet, many patients regain weight after successful diet-induced weight loss. Long-term changes in abdominal and liver fat, along with liver test results and insulin resistance, are not known. We analyzed 50 overweight to obese subjects (46 ± 9 years of age; BMI, 32.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2; women, 77%) who had participated in a 6-month hypocaloric diet and were randomized to either reduced carbohydrates or reduced fat content. Before, directly after diet, and at an average of 24 (range, 17-36) months follow-up, we assessed body fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging and markers of liver function and insulin resistance. Body weight decreased with diet but had increased again at follow-up. Subjects also partially regained abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. In contrast, intrahepatic fat decreased with diet and remained reduced at follow-up (7.8 ± 9.8% [baseline], 4.5 ± 5.9% [6 months], and 4.7 ± 5.9% [follow-up]). Similar patterns were observed for markers of liver function, whole-body insulin sensitivity, and hepatic insulin resistance. Changes in intrahepatic fat und intrahepatic function were independent of macronutrient composition during intervention and were most effective in subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease at baseline. A 6-month hypocaloric diet induced improvements in hepatic fat, liver test results, and insulin resistance despite regaining of weight up to 2 years after the active intervention. Body weight and adiposity measurements may underestimate beneficial long-term effects of dietary interventions.

  2. Effects of weight regain following intentional weight loss on glucoregulatory function in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kristen M; Case, L Douglas; Blackwell, Caroline S; Katula, Jeffery A; Goff, David C; Vitolins, Mara Z

    2015-01-01

    To assess the extent to which initial, intentional weight loss-associated improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin action are diminished with weight regain. 138 overweight and obese (BMI: 32.4±3.9kg/m(2)), adults (59.0±9.7 years), with pre-diabetes were followed through a 6-month weight loss intervention and subsequent 18-month weight maintenance period, or usual care control condition. Longitudinal change in weight (baseline, 6, 24 months) was used to classify individuals into weight pattern categories (Loser/Maintainer (LM), n= 50; Loser/Regainer (LR), n=51; and Weight Stable (WS), n=37). Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months and model adjusted changes, by weight pattern category, were assessed. LMs and LRs lost 8.3±4.7kg (8.7±4.5%) and 9.6±4.7kg (10.2±4.7%) during the first 6 months, respectively. LM continued to lose 1.1±3.4kg over the next 18 months (9.9±6.5% reduction from baseline; pWeight change was directly associated with change in all DM risk factors (all pweight (from baseline to 24 months) achieved in the LR group, 24-month changes in FPG, insulin, and HOMA-IR did not differ between WS and LR groups. Conversely, LM saw sustained improvements in all measured DM risk factors. Significant weight loss followed by weight loss maintenance is associated with sustained improvements in FPG, insulin, and HOMA-IR; conversely, even partial weight regain is associated with regression of initial improvements in these risk factors towards baseline values. Copyright © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. BMI and Lifetime Changes in BMI and Cancer Mortality Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Niloofar; Boezen, H. Marike; Schouten, Jan P.; Schröder, Carolien P.; de Vries, E. G. Elisabeth; Vonk, Judith M.

    2015-01-01

    Body Mass Index (BMI) is known to be associated with cancer mortality, but little is known about the link between lifetime changes in BMI and cancer mortality in both males and females. We studied the association of BMI measurements (at baseline, highest and lowest BMI during the study-period) and lifetime changes in BMI (calculated over different time periods (i.e. short time period: annual change in BMI between successive surveys, long time period: annual change in BMI over the entire study period) with mortality from any cancer, and lung, colorectal, prostate and breast cancer in a large cohort study (n=8,645. Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen, 1965-1990) with a follow-up on mortality status on December 31st 2008. We used multivariate Cox regression models with adjustments for age, smoking, sex, and place of residence. Being overweight at baseline was associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer mortality (hazard ratio (HR) =2.22; 95% CI 1.19-4.17). Obesity at baseline was associated with a higher risk of any cancer mortality [all subjects (1.23 (1.01-1.50)), and females (1.40 (1.07-1.84))]. Chronically obese females (females who were obese during the entire study-period) had a higher risk of mortality from any cancer (2.16 (1.47-3.18), lung (3.22 (1.06-9.76)), colorectal (4.32 (1.53-12.20)), and breast cancer (2.52 (1.15-5.54)). We found no significant association between long-term annual change in BMI and cancer mortality risk. Both short-term annual increase and decrease in BMI were associated with a lower mortality risk from any cancer [all subjects: (0.67 (0.47-0.94)) and (0.73 (0.55-0.97)), respectively]. In conclusion, a higher BMI is associated with a higher cancer mortality risk. This study is the first to show that short-term annual changes in BMI were associated with lower mortality from any type of cancer. PMID:25881129

  4. Resistant starch and exercise independently attenuate weight regain on a high fat diet in a rat model of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Ginger C; Brown Ian L; Jackman Matthew R; Higgins Janine A; Steig Amy; Wyatt Holly R; Hill James O; MacLean Paul S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Long-term weight reduction remains elusive for many obese individuals. Resistant starch (RS) and exercise may be useful for weight maintenance. The effects of RS, with or without exercise, on weight regain was examined during relapse to obesity on a high carbohydrate, high fat (HC/HF) diet. Methods Obesity-prone rats were fed ad libitum for 16 weeks then weight reduced on a low fat diet to induce a 17% body weight loss (weight reduced rats). Weight reduced rats were mainta...

  5. The Physics of Toppling and Regaining Balance during a Pirouette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Melanie B; Laws, Kenneth L

    2012-12-01

    One of the most common movements in dance is a turn around a vertical axis with one supporting foot on the floor--a pirouette. If the pirouette is not performed with the body on balance, it is not considered successful. Dancers are often taught to perform successful pirouettes by beginning the movement on balance and then keeping the body in that configuration, as opposed to correcting for an imbalance with small adjustments during the turn. Many, even advanced, dancers have significant difficulty performing more than two or three turns in a pirouette before losing balance, despite continued trial and error efforts to improve. To describe the mechanics of toppling and control of toppling during a pirouette, a theoretical model of a dancer in standard pirouette position was created, and an experimental study of real dancers performing pirouettes was conducted. Body segment parameters for the model (mass, length, etc.) were based on anatomical data and adjusted for sex, total body mass, and height. The principal moments of inertia were determined for several hypothetical dancers, and rigid body equations of motion numerically solved to express topple angle vs. time. When dancers reach too large a topple angle, they are forced to compensate by either hopping on the supporting foot in an attempt to regain balance or terminating the turn. The angle at which dancers lose stability and feel inclined to hop (θmax) was determined experimentally through a video analysis of nine intermediate to advanced ballet dancers' pirouettes (8 female, 1 male; 16 ± 2.3 years of age). The dancers hopped on the supporting foot after the body reached an average angle of 9.3 ± 1.9° from the vertical. With an average spin rate of 1.7 rev/s, it was found that a "rigid body" dancer (male or female) would need to begin the pirouette displaced less than one degree from the vertical in order to perform more than a double pirouette before reaching θmax. The results of this study demonstrate

  6. Weight loss and regain and effects on body composition: the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, J.S.; Visser, M.; Tylavsky, F.A.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Schwartz, A.; Sahyoun, N.; Harris, T.B.; Newman, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundOlder adults are less able to conserve lean mass relative to fat mass with weight change. A cycle of weight loss and regain in an older individual could accelerate sarcopenia. We examined whether older adults experiencing weight loss and regain would show a greater loss of lean mass during

  7. How does thinking in Black and White terms relate to eating behavior and weight regain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palascha, A.; Kleef, van E.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the role of dichotomous thinking on eating behavior and its association with restraint eating and weight regain in a wide range of people. In a web-based survey with 241 adults, dichotomous thinking and behavioral outcomes related to eating (restraint eating, weight regain, body

  8. [Public health policies in Chile: seeking to regain trust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Cristóbal

    2016-09-07

    Healthcare represents a key area in the public agenda. In the case of Chile, this central part of citizen demands has emerged with an increasing criticism of the health system, its actors and institutions, while a major democratic and legitimacy crisis in Chilean society unfolds. The starting point of this analysis is the link between the critical and widespread societal dissatisfaction with the legitimacy crisis in the health sector. There is an interdependence and parallelism between these two different aspects of the crisis. The analysis is built around the dimensions of trust and legitimacy as a potential driver of the conflict, taking as an analytical framework the socio-political matrix. Conceptual elements around the ideas of trust and legitimacy in public policies are reviewed. This article focuses on recent situations surrounding the dynamics of the Chilean health system such as the rise of the Instituciones de Salud Previsional (ISAPRE) and the market-driven health system, the failed health care reform of the last decade, conflicts of interest in the formulation of public policies, loss of legitimacy of healthcare authorities, and the role of the health professionals in this process. Finally, a discussion arises seeking to regain public trust as a central issue for the future development and sustainability of health policies.

  9. Comorbidities remission after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass for morbid obesity is sustained in a long-term follow-up and correlates with weight regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino Neto, Rafael M; Herbella, Fernando A M; Tauil, Renato M; Silva, Fabricio S; de Lima, Sizenando E

    2012-10-01

    Obesity-related comorbidities are treated by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) due to weight loss and intestinal hormone changes. Few studies report the evolution of these comorbidities in a long-term follow-up, especially if weight regain is present. This study aims to analyze: (1) the resolution of obesity-related comorbidities after RYGB in a long-term follow-up and (2) its relationship to weight regain. A retrospective study was conducted on 140 patients submitted to RYGB for morbid obesity for at least 5 years (mean follow-up 90 months). Mean body mass index (BMI) before operation was 52 kg/m(2), at nadir weight 29 kg/m(2), and at last follow-up 33 kg/m(2). The comorbidities diabetes, cardiovascular disease, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, sleep apnea, arthropathy, and infertility were classified as resolved, improved, unchanged, and worsened at nadir weight that happened between the first and second year and after five or more years of surgery. For each comorbidity, we compared the changes in the distribution of patients in the categories and the correlation of it with weight loss at the nadir and final weight. BMI was significantly different in the three periods. Comorbidities resolution was sustained in a long-term follow-up for diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and infertility. Comorbidities status was directly related to the weight loss for all comorbidities except infertility. Our results show that comorbidities remission after RYGB is sustained in a long-term follow-up. Weight regain is linked to worse results for all comorbidities except infertility.

  10. Regaining motor control in musician's dystonia by restoring sensorimotor organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Karin; Butler, Katherine; Williamon, Aaron; Rothwell, John C

    2009-11-18

    Professional musicians are an excellent model of long-term motor learning effects on structure and function of the sensorimotor system. However, intensive motor skill training has been associated with task-specific deficiency in hand motor control, which has a higher prevalence among musicians (musician's dystonia) than in the general population. Using a transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm, we previously found an expanded spatial integration of proprioceptive input into the hand motor cortex [sensorimotor organization (SMO)] in healthy musicians. In musician's dystonia, however, this expansion was even larger. Whereas motor skills of musicians are likely to be supported by a spatially expanded SMO, we hypothesized that in musician's dystonia this might have developed too far and now disrupts rather than assists task-specific motor control. If so, motor control should be regained by reversing the excessive reorganization in musician's dystonia. Here, we test this hypothesis and show that a 15 min intervention with proprioceptive input (proprioceptive training) restored SMO in pianists with musician's dystonia to the pattern seen in healthy pianists. Crucially, task-specific motor control improved significantly and objectively as measured with a MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) piano, and the amount of behavioral improvement was significantly correlated to the degree of sensorimotor reorganization. In healthy pianists and nonmusicians, the SMO and motor performance remained essentially unchanged. These findings suggest that the differentiation of SMO in the hand motor cortex and the degree of motor control of intensively practiced tasks are significantly linked and finely balanced. Proprioceptive training restored this balance in musician's dystonia to the behaviorally beneficial level of healthy musicians.

  11. Is lost lean mass from intentional weight loss recovered during weight regain in postmenopausal women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kristen M; Lyles, Mary F; Davis, Cralen C; Wang, Xuewen; Beavers, Daniel P; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2011-09-01

    Despite the well-known recidivism of obesity, surprisingly little is known about the composition of body weight during weight regain. The objective of this study was to determine whether the composition of body weight regained after intentional weight loss is similar to the composition of body weight lost. The design was a follow-up to a randomized controlled trial of weight loss in which body composition was analyzed and compared in 78 postmenopausal women before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and 6 and 12 mo after the intervention. All body mass and composition variables were lower immediately after weight loss than at baseline (all P lost with weight loss, which resulted in body-composition changes favoring a lower percentage of body fat and a higher lean-to-fat mass ratio (P weight regain was noted (CV = 1.07). In women who regained ≥2 kg body weight, a decreasing trend in the lean-to-fat mass ratio was observed, which indicated greater fat mass accretion than lean mass accretion (P lost during the weight-loss intervention, 0.26 kg lean tissue was lost; for every 1 kg fat regained over the following year, only 0.12 kg lean tissue was regained. Although not all postmenopausal women who intentionally lose weight will regain it within 1 y, the data suggest that fat mass is regained to a greater degree than is lean mass in those who do experience some weight regain. The health ramifications of our findings remain to be seen.

  12. Is lost lean mass from intentional weight loss recovered during weight regain in postmenopausal women?123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Mary F; Davis, Cralen C; Wang, Xuewen; Beavers, Daniel P; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the well-known recidivism of obesity, surprisingly little is known about the composition of body weight during weight regain. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether the composition of body weight regained after intentional weight loss is similar to the composition of body weight lost. Design: The design was a follow-up to a randomized controlled trial of weight loss in which body composition was analyzed and compared in 78 postmenopausal women before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and 6 and 12 mo after the intervention. Results: All body mass and composition variables were lower immediately after weight loss than at baseline (all P lost with weight loss, which resulted in body-composition changes favoring a lower percentage of body fat and a higher lean-to-fat mass ratio (P weight regain was noted (CV = 1.07). In women who regained ≥2 kg body weight, a decreasing trend in the lean-to-fat mass ratio was observed, which indicated greater fat mass accretion than lean mass accretion (P lost during the weight-loss intervention, 0.26 kg lean tissue was lost; for every 1 kg fat regained over the following year, only 0.12 kg lean tissue was regained. Conclusions: Although not all postmenopausal women who intentionally lose weight will regain it within 1 y, the data suggest that fat mass is regained to a greater degree than is lean mass in those who do experience some weight regain. The health ramifications of our findings remain to be seen. PMID:21795437

  13. Effect of jute fibre treatment on moisture regain and mechanical performance of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Baheti, V.; Jabbar, A.; Militky, J.; Palanisamy, S.; Siddique, H. F.; Karthik, D.

    2017-10-01

    This study was focussed to investigate the effect of fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and hybrid fluorocarbon on the mechanical properties and moisture regain of jute fiber reinforced composites. A significant difference in moisture regain values of treated and untreated reinforcement samples was observed at a concentration of 40 g/l. The composite made from treated reinforcement regained very low moisture content and exhibited improved mechanical properties (tensile and flexural strength). Being dual nature (hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups) of Hybrid fluorocarbon, the treated jute fibers and corresponding composites showed better properties as compared to other two chemicals due to better interface.

  14. Maternal BMI during Pregnancy: Effect on trace elements Status and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gestational age ≤25 weeks; mean = 21.77±3.14 wks; aged = 15-45 years, mean = 27.04±4.75 yr) ... Results: Four women (1.1%) were underweight, 40.7% had normal BMI, 35.5% were overweight, 17.2% were obese and 5.4% were morbidly obese.

  15. BMI and BMI SDS in childhood: annual increments and conditional change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannsether, Bente; Eide, Geir Egil; Roelants, Mathieu; Bjerknes, Robert; Júlíusson, Pétur Benedikt

    2017-02-01

    Background Early detection of abnormal weight gain in childhood may be important for preventive purposes. It is still debated which annual changes in BMI should warrant attention. Aim To analyse 1-year increments of Body Mass Index (BMI) and standardised BMI (BMI SDS) in childhood and explore conditional change in BMI SDS as an alternative method to evaluate 1-year changes in BMI. Subjects and methods The distributions of 1-year increments of BMI (kg/m 2 ) and BMI SDS are summarised by percentiles. Differences according to sex, age, height, weight, initial BMI and weight status on the BMI and BMI SDS increments were assessed with multiple linear regression. Conditional change in BMI SDS was based on the correlation between annual BMI measurements converted to SDS. Results BMI increments depended significantly on sex, height, weight and initial BMI. Changes in BMI SDS depended significantly only on the initial BMI SDS. The distribution of conditional change in BMI SDS using a two-correlation model was close to normal (mean = 0.11, SD = 1.02, n = 1167), with 3.2% (2.3-4.4%) of the observations below -2 SD and 2.8% (2.0-4.0%) above +2 SD. Conclusion Conditional change in BMI SDS can be used to detect unexpected large changes in BMI SDS. Although this method requires the use of a computer, it may be clinically useful to detect aberrant weight development.

  16. Delayed regaining of gait ability in a patient with brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Little is known about delay in regaining gait ability at a chronic stage after brain injury. In this study, we report on a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. Methods and results: A 40-year-old male patient diagnosed with viral encephalitis underwent comprehensive rehabilitation until 2 years after onset. However, he could not even sit independently and presented with severe physic...

  17. Predictors of Success in Bariatric Surgery: the Role of BMI and Pre-operative Comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Magda Rosa Ramos; Branco-Filho, Alcides José; Zaparolli, Marília Rizzon; Wagner, Nathalia Farinha; de Paula Pinto, José Simão; Campos, Antônio Carlos Ligocki; Taconeli, Cesar Augusto

    2017-11-10

    This is a retrospective review of 204 patients who underwent bariatric surgery. The impact of weight regain (WR), pre-operative comorbidities and BMI values on the recurrence of comorbidities was evaluated, and an equation was elaborated to estimate BMI at 5 years of bariatric surgery. Pre-operative data, after 1 year and after 5 years, was collected from the medical records. Descriptive analyses and bivariate hypothesis tests were performed first, and then, a generalised linear regression model with Tweedie distribution was adjusted. The hit rate and the Kendall coefficient of concordance (Kendall's W) of the equation were calculated. At the end, the Mann-Whitney test was performed between the BMI, WR and the presence of comorbidities, after a post-operative period of 5 years. The adjustment of the model resulted in an equation that estimates the mean value of BMI 5 years after surgery. The hit rate was 82.35% and the value of Kendall's W was 0.85 for the equation. It was found that patients with comorbidities presented a higher median WR (10.13%) and a higher mean BMI (30.09 kg/m(2)) 5 years after the surgery. It is concluded that the equation is useful for estimating the mean BMI at 5 years of surgery and that patients with low pre-operative HDL and folic acid levels, with depression and/or anxiety and a higher BMI, have a higher BMI at 5 years of surgery and higher incidence of comorbid return and dissatisfaction with post-operative results.

  18. Low BMI at age 20 years predicts gestational diabetes independent of BMI in early pregnancy in Japan: Tanaka Women's Clinic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachi, Y; Tanaka, Y; Nishibata, I; Sugawara, A; Kodama, S; Saito, K; Sone, H

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity and weight gain since early adulthood are known predictors of gestational diabetes in Western countries. However, their impact has not been evaluated well in Asia, where mean BMI levels are generally lower than in Western countries. We therefore examined the associations of BMI at age 20 years and BMI change since age 20 years with the risk of gestational diabetes in Japanese pregnant women. Six hundred and twenty-four consecutive pregnant women without recognized diabetes before pregnancy, whose initial obstetric clinic visit was before 13 weeks' gestation, were prospectively observed. Weight at age 20 years was self-reported. Baseline height and weight measurements were obtained at the initial obstetric visit. Multivariate logistic regression analysis estimated the risk of incident gestational diabetes for BMI change since 20 years and BMI at age 20 years. Twenty-eight women developed incident gestational diabetes. By multivariate logistic regression analysis that adjusted for maternal age, parity and baseline BMI, we observed a statistically significant inverse association between BMI at age 20 years and incidence of gestational diabetes (odds ratio 0.68, 95% CI 0.51-0.92). Similarly, when we assessed the association of BMI change since age 20 years, adjusted for maternal age and parity, BMI change was associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes (odds ratio 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.53). When we focused on the threshold of risk of gestational diabetes, women with BMI at 20 years of less than 18 kg/m(2) had a 6.30-fold (2.26-17.59) greater risk than women with both BMI at age 20 years of 18 kg/m(2) or more and BMI change since age 20 years of less than 1.85. Both low BMI at age 20 years and BMI change since age 20 years were significantly associated with increased risk of incident gestational diabetes. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  19. Post-bariatric surgery weight regain: evaluation of nutritional profile of candidate patients for endoscopic argon plasma coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambi, Maria Paula Carlini; Marchesini, Simone Dallegrave; Baretta, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is effective treatment for weight loss, but demand continuous nutritional care and physical activity. They regain weight happens with inadequate diets, physical inactivity and high alcohol consumption. To investigate in patients undergoing Roux-Y-of gastroplasty weight regain, nutritional deficiencies, candidates for the treatment with endoscopic argon plasma, the diameter of the gastrojejunostomy and the size of the gastric pouch at the time of treatment with plasma. A prospective 59 patients non-randomized study with no control group undergoing gastroplasty with recurrence of weight and candidates for the endoscopic procedure of argon plasma was realized. The surgical evaluation consisted of investigation of complications in the digestive system and verification of the increased diameter of the gastrojejunostomy. Nutritional evaluation was based on body mass index at the time of operation, in the minimum BMI achieved after and in which BMI was when making the procedure with plasma. The laboratory tests included hemoglobin, erythrocyte volume, ferritin, vitamin D, B12, iron, calcium, zinc and serum albumin. Clinical analysis was based on scheduled follow-up. Of the 59 selected, five were men and 51 women; were included 49 people (four men and 44 women) with all the complete data. The exclusion was due to the lack of some of the laboratory tests. Of this total 19 patients (38.7%) had a restrictive ring, while 30 (61.2%) did not. Iron deficiency anemia was common; 30 patients (61.2%) were below 30 with ferritin (unit); 35 (71.4%) with vitamin B12 were below 300 pg/ml; vitamin D3 deficiency occurred in more than 90%; there were no cases of deficiency of protein, calcium and zinc; glucose levels were above 99 mg/dl in three patients (6.12%). Clinically all had complaints of labile memory, irritability and poor concentration. All reported that they stopped treatment with the multidisciplinary team in the first year after the operation. The profile of

  20. Laparoscopic re-sleeve gastrectomy as a treatment of weight regain after sleeve gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Giovanni; Uccelli, Matteo; Ciccarese, Francesca; Carrieri, Domenico; Castello, Giorgio; Olmi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate laparoscopic re-sleeve gastrectomy as a treatment of weight regain after Sleeve. METHODS: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a common bariatric procedure. Weight regain after long-term follow-up is reported. Patients were considered for laparoscopic re-sleeve gastrectomy when we observed progressive weight regain and persistence of comorbidities associated with evidence of dilated gastric fundus and/or antrum on upper gastro-intestinal series. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 1, 3, 6 and 12 mo after surgery and every 6 mo thereafter. Measures of change from baseline at different times were analyzed with the paired samples t test. RESULTS: We observed progressive weight regain after sleeve in 11 of the 201 patients (5.4%) who had a mean follow-up of 21.1 ± 9.7 mo (range 6-57 mo). Three patients started to regain weight after 6 mo following Sleeve, 5 patients after 12 mo, 3 patients after 18 m. Re-sleeve gastrectomy was always performed by laparoscopy. The mean time of intervention was 55.8 ± 29.1 min. In all cases, neither intra-operative nor post-operative complications occurred. After 1 year follow-up we observed a significant (P sleeve in those patients affected by hypertension and diabetes. Joint problems and sleep apnea syndrome improved in all 11 patients. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic re-sleeve gastrectomy is a feasible and effective intervention to correct weight regain after sleeve. PMID:24976903

  1. Know Your Body Mass Index (BMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Special Section Know Your Body Mass Index (BMI) Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... it pays to understand your body mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height ...

  2. BMI and BMI SDS in childhood: annual increments and conditional change

    OpenAIRE

    Brannsether-Ellingsen, Bente; Eide, Geir Egil; Roelants, Mathieu; Bjerknes, Robert; Juliusson, Petur Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early detection of abnormal weight gain in childhood may be important for preventive purposes. It is still debated which annual changes in BMI should warrant attention. Aim: To analyse 1-year increments of Body Mass Index (BMI) and standardised BMI (BMI SDS) in childhood and explore conditional change in BMI SDS as an alternative method to evaluate 1-year changes in BMI. Subjects and methods: The distributions of 1-year increments of BMI (kg/m2) and BMI SDS are summarised by...

  3. Adiposity rebound is misclassified by BMI rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta-Danielzik, S; Bosy-Westphal, A; Kehden, B; Gehrke, M I; Kromeyer-Hauschild, K; Grillenberger, M; Willhöft, C; Heymsfield, S B; Müller, M J

    2013-09-01

    Adiposity rebound (AR) is defined as the nadir or the inflexion point of body mass index (BMI) percentiles between the age of 3 and 7 years. An early rebound is seen as a risk of obesity and, thus, AR is considered as a suitable time period for prevention. As BMI does not reflect body composition, we aimed to examine the rebounds of fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) together with BMI. Cross-sectional data of 19 264 children aged 3-11 years were pooled from three German studies (Kiel Obesity Prevention Study, the project 'Better diet. More exercise. KINDERLEICHT-REGIONS' and regular examinations of Jena children). Height and weight were measured. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were obtained from bioelectrical impedance analysis and analysed using a population-specific algorithm. Percentiles of BMI, FMI and FFMI were constructed by the LMS method. Both BMI and FMI percentiles showed a rebound, whereas FFMI percentiles steadily increased with age. On P90, FMI rebound was about 1.6-1.8 years later compared with that of BMI, that is, at ages 4.2 years (BMI) and 5.8 years (FMI) in boys and at 4.2 years (BMI) and 6.0 years (FMI) in girls. At AR, the slope of the BMI-P90 was explained by increases in FFMI rather than FMI. By contrast, at FMI rebound, the slope of BMI was strongly related to FMI. BMI rebound does not equal the rebound of FM. At AR, the slope in BMI is determined by the increase in FFMI. AR should be defined as FMI rebound rather than BMI rebound.

  4. Mini-trampoline exercise related to mechanisms of dynamic stability improves the ability to regain balance in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; Karamanidis, Kiros; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2011-06-01

    Falls have been described by several studies as the major cause of hip and femur fractures among the elderly. Therefore, interventions to reduce fall risks, improve dynamic stability and the falling recovery strategies in the elderly population are highly relevant. This study aimed at investigating the effects of a 14-week mini-trampoline exercise intervention regarding the mechanisms of dynamic stability on elderly balance ability during sudden forward falls. Twenty-two elderly subjects participated on mini-trampoline training and 12 subjects were taken as controls. The subjects of the experimental group were evaluated before and after the 14-week trampoline training (exercised group), whereas control subjects were evaluated twice in the forward fall task with a three-month interval. The applied exercise intervention increased the plantarflexors muscle strength (∼10%) as well as the ability to regain balance during the forward falls (∼35%). The 14-week mini-trampoline training intervention increased elderly abilities to recover balance during forward falls; the improvement was attributed to the higher rate of hip moment generation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regular exercise attenuates the metabolic drive to regain weight after long-term weight loss

    OpenAIRE

    MacLean, Paul S.; Higgins, Janine A.; Wyatt, Holly R.; Melanson, Edward L.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Giles, Erin D.; Brown, Ian E.; Hill, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Weight loss is accompanied by several metabolic adaptations that work together to promote rapid, efficient regain. We employed a rodent model of regain to examine the effects of a regular bout of treadmill exercise on these adaptations. Obesity was induced in obesity-prone rats with 16 wk of high-fat feeding and limited physical activity. Obese rats were then weight reduced (∼14% of body wt) with a calorie-restricted, low-fat diet and maintained at that reduced weight for 8 wk by providing li...

  6. Regaining my new life: Daily lives of suicide-bereaved individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara-Kiritani, Mami; Ikeda, Mari; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to develop a conceptual framework of the experience of persons who have lost a family member to suicide in Japan. The authors conducted in-depth interviews with 24 such family members. They conceptualized their experience as a process of regaining my new life. Initially, their lives were out of their hands, but gradually they learned striving skills and recuperative conditioning, and integrated the skills to regain their lives. Some participants eventually reached a state of living a redefined life. How individuals underwent this process varied. The authors identified two types of people dealing with this issue: dialoguers and mood changers.

  7. BMI1: A Biomarker of Hematologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagh A. Sahasrabuddhe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BMI1 oncogene is a catalytic member of epigenetic repressor polycomb group proteins. It plays a critical role in the regulation of gene expression pattern and consequently several cellular processes during development, including cell cycle progression, senescence, aging, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and importantly self-renewal of adult stem cells of several lineages. Preponderance of evidences indicates that deregulated expression of PcG protein BMI1 is associated with several human malignancies, cancer stem cell maintenance, and propagation. Importantly, overexpression of BMI1 correlates with therapy failure in cancer patients and tumor relapse. This review discusses the diverse mode of BMI1 regulation at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels as well as at various critical signaling pathways regulated by BMI1 activity. Furthermore, this review highlights the role of BMI1 as a biomarker and therapeutic target for several subtypes of hematologic malignancies and the importance to target this biomarker for therapeutic applications.

  8. The Report Card on BMI Report Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hannah R; Madsen, Kristine A

    2017-06-01

    Half of states in the USA have legislation requiring that schools conduct body mass index (BMI) screening among students; just under half of these states report results to parents. The effectiveness of school-based BMI screening and reporting in reducing childhood obesity is not established and the practice has raised concerns about the potential for increased weight-based stigmatization. Recent experimental studies of BMI screening and reporting have not demonstrated a positive impact on students' weight status. However, the language and formatting of BMI reports used in studies to date have been suboptimal and have likely limited the potential effectiveness of the practice. This article reviews the recent literature on school-based BMI screening and reporting and highlights important areas for future inquiry. The present review suggests that evidence to date is not sufficient to support definitive conclusions about the value of school-based BMI screening and reporting as a childhood obesity prevention tool.

  9. Brain-machine interface (BMI) in paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, U; Birbaumer, N; Curado, M R

    2015-02-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) use brain activity to control external devices, facilitating paralyzed patients to interact with the environment. In this review, we focus on the current advances of non-invasive BMIs for communication in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and for restoration of motor impairment after severe stroke. BMI represents a promising strategy to establish communication with paralyzed ALS patients as it does not need muscle engagement for its use. Distinct techniques have been explored to assess brain neurophysiology to control BMI for patients' communication, especially electroencephalography (EEG) and more recently near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Previous studies demonstrated successful communication with ALS patients using EEG-BMI when patients still showed residual eye control, but patients with complete paralysis were unable to communicate with this system. We recently introduced functional NIRS (fNIRS)-BMI for communication in ALS patients in the complete locked-in syndrome (i.e., when ALS patients are unable to engage any muscle), opening new doors for communication in ALS patients after complete paralysis. In addition to assisted communication, BMI is also being extensively studied for motor recovery after stroke. BMI for stroke motor recovery includes intensive BMI training linking brain activity related to patient's intention to move the paretic limb with the contingent sensory feedback of the paretic limb movement guided by assistive devices. BMI studies in this area are mainly focused on EEG- or magnetoencephalography (MEG)-BMI systems due to their high temporal resolution, which facilitates online contingency between intention to move and sensory feedback of the intended movement. EEG-BMI training was recently demonstrated in a controlled study to significantly improve motor performance in stroke patients with severe paresis. Neural basis for BMI-induced restoration of motor function and perspectives for future

  10. Changes in body composition and fat distribution in response to weight loss and weight regain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooy, van der K.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes the effects of weight loss and subsequent weight regain on body composition, fat distribution and resting energy expenditure in moderately obese men and moderately obese premenopausal women. Participants were subjected to a controlled 4.2 MJ/day energy deficit diet for

  11. Computer-generated versus nurse-determined strategy for incubator humidity and time to regain birthweight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, Onno K.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2008-01-01

    To compare effects on premature infants' weight gain of a computer-generated and a nurse-determined incubator humidity strategy. An optimal humidity protocol is thought to reduce time to regain birthweight. Prospective randomized controlled design. Level IIIC neonatal intensive care unit in the

  12. Effects of rapid weight loss and regain on body composition and energy expenditure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sagayama, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Eiichi; Yamada, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Mamiko; Ebine, Naoyuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    .... Ten weight-classified athletes were instructed to reduce their body weight by 5% in 7 days. Following the weight loss, they were asked to try to regain all of their lost weight with an ad libitum diet for 12 h...

  13. Body Mass Index (BMI) Charts (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... September 2015 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Overweight and Obesity Growth Charts What Is a Growth Disorder? Your Child's Weight What Is a BMI Report Card? Your Child's ... the Right Weight for Me? Be a Fit Kid Body Mass Index (BMI) I'm Not Fat. ...

  14. Enhanced metabolic efficiency contributes to weight regain after weight loss in obesity-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Paul S; Higgins, Janine A; Johnson, Ginger C; Fleming-Elder, Brooke K; Donahoo, William T; Melanson, Edward L; Hill, James O

    2004-12-01

    Metabolic adjustments occur with weight loss that may contribute to a high rate of weight regain. We have previously observed in obesity-prone, obese rats that weight reduction is accompanied by a suppression in resting metabolic rate beyond what would be predicted for the change in metabolic mass. In the present study, we examine if this adjustment in metabolic efficiency is affected by the length of time in weight maintenance and if it contributes to the propensity to regain after weight loss. Twenty-four-hour, nonresting, and resting energy expenditure (REE) were obtained by indirect calorimetry and normalized to metabolic mass estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A 10% loss in body weight in weight-reduced rats was accompanied by a 15% suppression in adjusted REE. This enhancement in metabolic efficiency was not altered with either 8 or 16 wk of weight maintenance, but it did resolve when the forced control of intake was removed and the weight was regained. The rate of weight regain increased with the time in weight maintenance and was exceptionally high early during the relapse period. During this high rate of weight gain, the suppression in REE persists while consumption increases to a level that is higher than when they were obese. In summary, an enhanced metabolic efficiency and an elevated appetite both contribute (60% and 40%, respectively) to a large potential energy imbalance that, when the forcible control of energy intake is relieved, becomes actualized and results in an exceptionally high rate of weight regain.

  15. BMI peak in infancy as a predictor for later BMI in the Uppsala Family Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Silverwood, RJ; de Stavola, BL; Cole, TJ; Leon, DA

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The development of obesity through childhood, often characterized by using body mass index (BMI), has received much recent interest because of the rapidly increasing levels of obesity worldwide. However, the extent to which the BMI trajectory in the first year of life (the BMI 'peak' in particular) is associated with BMI in later childhood has received little attention. SUBJECTS: The Uppsala Family Study includes 602 families, comprising mother, father and two consecutive singleto...

  16. Difficulty buying food, BMI, and eating habits in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Anne; Maguire, Jonathon L; Carsley, Sarah; Chen, Yang; Lebovic, Gerald; Omand, Jessica; Parkin, Patricia; Birken, Catherine S

    2018-01-22

    To determine whether parent report of difficulty buying food was associated with child body mass index (BMI) z-score or with eating habits in young children. This was a cross-sectional study in primary care offices in Toronto, Ontario. Subjects were children aged 1-5 years and their caregivers, recruited through the TARGet Kids! Research Network from July 2008 to August 2011. Regression models were developed to test the association between parent report of difficulty buying food because of cost and the following outcomes: child BMI z-score, parent's report of child's intake of fruit and vegetables, fruit juice and sweetened beverages, and fast food. Confounders included child's age, sex, birth weight, maternal BMI, education, ethnicity, immigration status, and neighbourhood income. The study sample consisted of 3333 children. Data on difficulty buying food were available for 3099 children, and 431 of these (13.9%) were from households reporting difficulty buying food. There was no association with child BMI z-score (p = 0.86). Children from households reporting difficulty buying food (compared with never having difficulty buying food) had increased odds of consuming three or fewer servings of fruits and vegetables per day (odds ratio [OR]: 1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.69), more than one serving of fruit juice/sweetened beverage per day (OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.28-2.00), and, among children 1-2 years old, one or more servings of fast food per week (OR: 2.91, 95% CI: 1.67-5.08). Parental report of difficulty buying food is associated with less optimal eating habits in children but not with BMI z-score.

  17. BMI, a performance parameter for speed improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Sedeaud

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between anthropometric characteristics and performance in all track and field running events and assess Body Mass Index (BMI as a relevant performance indicator. Data of mass, height, BMI and speed were collected for the top 100 international men athletes in track events from 100 m to marathon for the 1996-2011 seasons, and analyzed by decile of performance. Speed is significantly associated with mass (r = 0.71 and BMI (r = 0.71 in world-class runners and moderately with height (r = 0.39. Athletes, on average were continuously lighter and smaller with distance increments. In track and field, speed continuously increases with BMI. In each event, performances are organized through physique gradients. « Lighter and smaller is better » in endurance events but « heavier and taller is better » for sprints. When performance increases, BMI variability progressively tightens, but it is always centered around a distance-specific optimum. Running speed is organized through biometric gradients, which both drives and are driven by performance optimization. The highest performance level is associated with narrower biometric intervals. Through BMI indicators, diversity is possible for sprints whereas for long distance events, there is a more restrictive aspect in terms of physique. BMI is a relevant indicator, which allows for a clear differentiation of athletes' capacities between each discipline and level of performance in the fields of human possibilities.

  18. Exercise decreases lipogenic gene expression in adipose tissue and alters adipocyte cellularity during weight regain after weight loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Danielle Giles

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is a potent strategy to facilitate long-term weight maintenance. In addition to increasing energy expenditure and reducing appetite, exercise also favors the oxidation of dietary fat, which likely helps prevent weight re-gain. It is unclear whether this exercise-induced metabolic shift is due to changes in energy balance, or whether exercise imparts additional adaptations in the periphery that limit the storage and favor the oxidation of dietary fat. To answer this question, adipose tissue lipid metabolism and related gene expression were studied in obese rats following weight loss and during the first day of relapse to obesity. Mature, obese rats were weight-reduced for 2 weeks with or without daily treadmill exercise (EX. Rats were weight maintained for 6 weeks, followed by relapse on: a ad libitum low fat diet (LFD, b ad libitum LFD plus EX, or c a provision of LFD to match the positive energy imbalance of exercised, relapsing animals. 24h retention of dietary- and de novo-derived fat were assessed directly using 14C palmitate/oleate and 3H20, respectively. Exercise decreased the size, but increased the number of adipocytes in both retroperitoneal (RP and subcutaneous (SC adipose depots, and prevented the relapse-induced increase in adipocyte size. Further, exercise decreased the expression of genes involved in lipid uptake (CD36 & LPL, de novo lipogenesis (FAS, ACC1, and triacylglycerol synthesis (MGAT & DGAT in RP adipose during relapse following weight loss. This was consistent with the metabolic data, whereby exercise reduced retention of de novo-derived fat even when controlling for the positive energy imbalance. The decreased trafficking of dietary fat to adipose tissue with exercise was explained by reduced energy intake which attenuated energy imbalance during refeeding. Despite having decreased expression of lipogenic genes, the net retention of de novo-derived lipid was higher in both the RP and SC adipose of exercising

  19. Neurodevelopmental problems and extremes in BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóra Kerekes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over the last few decades, an increasing number of studies have suggested a connection between neurodevelopmental problems (NDPs and body mass index (BMI. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and autism spectrum disorders (ASD both seem to carry an increased risk for developing extreme BMI. However, the results are inconsistent, and there have been only a few studies of the general population of children.Aims. We had three aims with the present study: (1 to define the prevalence of extreme (low or high BMI in the group of children with ADHD and/or ASDs compared to the group of children without these NDPs; (2 to analyze whether extreme BMI is associated with the subdomains within the diagnostic categories of ADHD or ASD; and (3 to investigate the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to BMI in boys and girls at ages 9 and 12.Method. Parents of 9- or 12-year-old twins (n = 12,496 were interviewed using the Autism—Tics, ADHD and other Comorbidities (A-TAC inventory as part of the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS. Univariate and multivariate generalized estimated equation models were used to analyze associations between extremes in BMI and NDPs.Results. ADHD screen-positive cases followed BMI distributions similar to those of children without ADHD or ASD. Significant association was found between ADHD and BMI only among 12-year-old girls, where the inattention subdomain of ADHD was significantly associated with the high extreme BMI. ASD scores were associated with both the low and the high extremes of BMI. Compared to children without ADHD or ASD, the prevalence of ASD screen-positive cases was three times greater in the high extreme BMI group and double as much in the low extreme BMI group. Stereotyped and repetitive behaviors were significantly associated with high extreme BMIs.Conclusion. Children with ASD, with or without coexisting ADHD, are more prone to have low or high extreme BMIs than

  20. Cardiometabolic risk after weight loss and subsequent weight regain in overweight and obese postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Daniel P; Beavers, Kristen M; Lyles, Mary F; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the effect of intentional weight loss and subsequent weight regain on cardiometabolic risk factors in older adults. The objective of this study was to determine how cardiometabolic risk factors change in the year following significant intentional weight loss in postmenopausal women, and if observed changes were affected by weight and fat regain. Eighty, overweight and obese, older women (age = 58.8±5.1 years) were followed through a 5-month weight loss intervention and a subsequent 12-month nonintervention period. Body weight/composition and cardiometabolic risk factors (blood pressure; total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; triglycerides; fasting glucose and insulin; and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance) were analyzed at baseline, immediately postintervention, and 6- and 12-months postintervention. Average weight loss during the 5-month intervention was 11.4±4.1kg and 31.4% of lost weight was regained during the 12-month follow-up. On average, all risk factor variables were significantly improved with weight loss but regressed toward baseline values during the year subsequent to weight loss. Increases in total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance during the postintervention follow-up were significantly (p weight and fat mass regain. Among women who regained weight, model-adjusted total cholesterol (205.8±4.0 vs 199.7±2.9mg/dL), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (128.4±3.4 vs 122.7±2.4mg/dL), insulin (12.6±0.7 vs 11.4±0.7mg/dL), and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (55.8±3.5 vs 50.9±3.7mg/dL) were higher at follow-up compared with baseline. For postmenopausal women, even partial weight regain following intentional weight loss is associated with increased cardiometabolic risk. Conversely, maintenance of or continued weight loss is associated with sustained improvement in the cardiometabolic profile.

  1. Sex-differences in heritability of BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, K; Willemsen, G; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2003-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI), a simple anthropometric measure, is the most frequently used measure of adiposity and has been instrumental in documenting the worldwide increase in the prevalence of obesity witnessed during the last decades. Although this increase in overweight and obesity is thought...... to be mainly due to environmental changes, i.e., sedentary lifestyles and high caloric diets, consistent evidence from twin studies demonstrates high heritability and the importance of genetic differences for normal variation in BMI. We analysed self-reported data on BMI from approximately 37,000 complete twin...... factors that influence variation in BMI. These results encourage the continued search for genes of importance to the body composition and the development of obesity. Furthermore, they suggest that strategies to identify predisposing genes may benefit from taking into account potential sex specific effects....

  2. Bmi-1 plays a critical role in protection from renal tubulointerstitial injury by maintaining redox balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jianliang; Lv, Xianhui; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jinbo; Wang, Qian; Wang, Rong; Lu, Xiang; Miao, Dengshun

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether Bmi-1 deficiency could lead to renal tubulointerstitial injury by mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in the kidney, 3-week-old Bmi-1-/- mice were treated with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 1 mg mL−1) in their drinking water, or pyrro-quinoline quinone (PQQ, 4 mg kg−1 diet) in their diet for 2 weeks, and their renal phenotypes were compared with vehicle-treated Bmi1-/- and wild-type mice. Bmi-1 was knocked down in human renal proximal tubular epithelial (HK2) cells which were treated with 1 mm NAC for 72 or 96 h, and their phenotypes were compared with control cells. Five-week-old vehicle-treated Bmi-1-/- mice displayed renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy, and severe renal function impairment with decreased renal cell proliferation, increased renal cell apoptosis and senescence, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Impaired mitochondrial structure, decreased mitochondrial numbers, and increased oxidative stress occurred in Bmi-1-/- mice; subsequently, this caused DNA damage, the activation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling, and the imbalance between extracellular matrix synthesis and degradation. Oxidative stress-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of renal tubular epithelial cells was enhanced in Bmi-1 knocked down HK2 cells. All phenotypic alterations caused by Bmi-1 deficiency were ameliorated by antioxidant treatment. These findings indicate that Bmi-1 plays a critical role in protection from renal tubulointerstitial injury by maintaining redox balance and will be a novel therapeutic target for preventing renal tubulointerstitial injury. PMID:24915841

  3. The Role of BMI1 in CRPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    antagonist MDV3100 synergistically inhibited the growth of AR+ PCa. Cell proliferation assay (Fig. 5A, B, 72 hours drug treatment) showed that PTC209... inhibiting BMI1 decreased prostate cancer tumor growth in VCaP murine xenograft. 15. SUBJECT TERMS: Polycomb, BMI1, Androgen Receptor, ubiquitination...of binding affinity of AR and PRC1, and set-up of a high-throughput platform for small molecule inhibition screening 24 60% Milestone(s) Achieved

  4. Symmetrization in jellyfish: reorganization to regain function, and not lost parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Michael J; Goentoro, Lea

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair in the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Rather than regenerating lost parts, juvenile Aurelia reorganize remaining parts to regain essential body symmetry. This process that we called symmetrization is rapid and frequent, and is not driven by cell proliferation or cell death. Instead, the swimming machinery generates mechanical forces that drive symmetrization. We found evidence for symmetrization across three other species of jellyfish (Chrysaora pacifica, Mastigias sp., and Cotylorhiza tuberculata). We propose reorganization to regain function without recovery of initial morphology as a potentially broad class of self-repair strategy beyond radially symmetrical animals, and discuss the implications of this finding on the evolution of self-repair strategies in animals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  5. [Acupuncture therapy for regaining consciousness in terms of acupoint location, needle insertion and needle manipulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianggang; Gu, Wenlong; Ma, Fen; Du, Yuzheng; Zhao, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Acupuncture therapy for regaining consciousness activates soreness, numbness, distention, heaviness, radiating and moving, electric shock and ant climbing sensations at the specific acupoints in the stroke patients. Radiating and moving sensations are the summary of needling sensations such as soreness, numbness and twitching presenting during lifting and thrusting manipulation. These sensations are the essential factors of the therapeutic effect of regaining consciousness. Radiating sensation refers to the conduction along meridians and radiation of soreness and numbness. Moving sensation refers to the local muscular twitching at acupoints and the involuntary movement of limbs, joints and the distal. Acupuncture at the specific acupoints achieves radiating and moving sensations for promoting the circulation in meridians, regulating qi and mind and balancing yin and yang in stroke patients. This therapy was introduced in the paper in view of acupoint location, needle insertion and manipulation.

  6. ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF NUTMEG ON MEMORY BOOSTING AND REGAINING IN WISTAR ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Jissa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study provides further evidence for improvement of memory by oral consumption of nutmeg. The present study was undertaken with an objective to study the effects of oral administration of nutmeg on memory boosting and regaining. Methods: Here we investigate the influence of oral intake of nutmeg on behavioral task performance by using T-maze and radial arm maze and physiological measures relative to a milk control group. Results: We have observed significant memory boosting and memory regaining effects of nutmeg when administered orally. This effect may be due to facilitation of acetylcholine activity by decreasing acetylcholinesterase activity of nutmeg. Hence we recommend further research in this area by investigating compound metabolism to optimize quantification of memory performance following nutmeg consumption.

  7. Most patients regain prefracture basic mobility after hip fracture surgery in a fast-track programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with hip fracture has improved over the past decade. Still, some patients do not regain independent mobility within their primary hospital stay even if they follow a multimodal fast-track surgical programme. The aim of the present article was to examine the validity of the p...... of the preliminary prefracture New Mobility Score (NMS), age and fracture type as independent predictors of in-hospital outcome after hip fracture surgery.......Treatment of patients with hip fracture has improved over the past decade. Still, some patients do not regain independent mobility within their primary hospital stay even if they follow a multimodal fast-track surgical programme. The aim of the present article was to examine the validity...

  8. Ability to delay gratification and BMI in preadolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Amanda S; Black, William R; Bruce, Jared M; Daldalian, Marina; Martin, Laura E; Davis, Ann M

    2011-05-01

    Delay of gratification tasks require an individual to forgo an immediate reward and wait for a more desirable delayed reward. This study used an ecologically valid measure of delayed gratification to test the hypothesis that preadolescents with higher BMI would be less likely to delay gratification. Healthy Hawks is a 12-week educational/behavioral obesity intervention at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Each week, children earn a point if they complete their goals worksheet. They can spend that point immediately on a small toy prize or save points to use on a larger prize. We retrospectively calculated the percentage of points saved over the 12 weeks for 59 children (28 females) ages 8-12 years old (mean = 10.29 ± 1.39). Spearman correlation revealed that higher BMI percentile was associated with reduced point savings (r = 0.33, P = 0.01). Similarly, obese preadolescents saved significantly fewer points than healthy weight (HW) and overweight preadolescents (t (57) = 3.14, P delay gratification than overweight and HW children. Even for nonfood rewards, preadolescent children with higher BMIs prefer the immediate reward over a delayed, larger reward. This has implications for developing specific strategies within obesity treatments aimed at improving delayed gratification.

  9. Most patients regain prefracture basic mobility after hip fracture surgery in a fast-track programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with hip fracture has improved over the past decade. Still, some patients do not regain independent mobility within their primary hospital stay even if they follow a multimodal fast-track surgical programme. The aim of the present article was to examine the validity...... of the preliminary prefracture New Mobility Score (NMS), age and fracture type as independent predictors of in-hospital outcome after hip fracture surgery....

  10. Perception of exercise difficulty predicts weight regain in formerly overweight women

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, David W.; Chandler-Laney, Paula C.; Alvarez, Jessica A.; Gower, Barbara A.; Gaesser, Glenn A.; Hunter, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    It has been previously reported that overweight and obese individuals perceive exercise as more difficult than their lean counterparts, and this difference may not be solely attributed to physiological differences. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that individual differences in the perception of exercise difficulty during exercise, independent of concurrently measured physiological markers of exertion, are predictive of weight regain, after completion of a weight loss program. One-hundred ...

  11. Most patients regain prefracture basic mobility after hip fracture surgery in a fast-track programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with hip fracture has improved over the past decade. Still, some patients do not regain independent mobility within their primary hospital stay even if they follow a multimodal fast-track surgical programme. The aim of the present article was to examine the validity of the p...... of the preliminary prefracture New Mobility Score (NMS), age and fracture type as independent predictors of in-hospital outcome after hip fracture surgery....

  12. Delayed regaining of gait ability in a patient with brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Little is known about delay in regaining gait ability at a chronic stage after brain injury. In this study, we report on a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. Methods and results: A 40-year-old male patient diagnosed with viral encephalitis underwent comprehensive rehabilitation until 2 years after onset. However, he could not even sit independently and presented with severe physical deconditioning and severe ataxia. To understand his neurological state, 4 neural tracts related to gait function were reconstructed, and based on the state of these neural tracts, we decided that the patient had the neurological potential to walk independently. Therefore, we assumed that the main reasons for gait inability in this patient were severe physical deconditioning and truncal ataxia. Consequently, the patient underwent the following intensive rehabilitative therapy: administration of drugs for control of ataxia (topiramate, clonazepam, and propranolol) and movement therapy for physical conditioning and gait training. As a result, after 2 months of rehabilitation, he was able to walk independently on an even floor, with improvement of severe physical deconditioning and truncal ataxia. Conclusion: We described the rehabilitation program in a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. PMID:27661035

  13. Warm Parenting Associated with Decreasing or Stable Child BMI during Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Kyung E; Jelalian, Elissa; Boutelle, Kerri; Dickstein, Susan; Seifer, Ronald; Wing, Rena

    2016-04-01

    While authoritative parenting, which includes high levels of warmth and behavioral control, has been associated with lower risk of obesity, little is known about how general parenting impacts child weight loss during treatment. Our goal was to examine the relationship between several general parenting dimensions and 'decreasing /stable' child BMI during a 16-week family-based behavioral weight control program. Forty-four overweight parent-child dyads (child age 8 to 12 years) enrolled in the program. Families were videotaped at baseline eating dinner in their home. Using the General Parenting Observational Scale (GPOS), meals were coded for several general parenting dimensions. Primary outcome was percent of children whose BMI 'decreased or stayed the same.' Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between general parenting and decreasing/stable child BMI. Forty families (91%) completed the program. Children had a mean BMI change of -0.40 (SD 1.57), which corresponds to a -0.15 (SD 0.20) change in BMI z-score (BMI-Z); 75% of children had decreasing/stable BMI. In the unadjusted models, lower parent BMI, higher parent education, and higher levels of parental warmth were significantly associated with decreasing/stable child BMI. In the multivariable model, only higher level of warmth was associated with increased odds of decreasing/stable child BMI (OR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.62). Baseline parental warmth may influence a child's ability to lower/maintain BMI during a standard family-based behavioral weight control program. Efforts to increase parent displays of warmth and emotional support towards their overweight child may help to increase the likelihood of treatment success.

  14. Preoperative prediction for regaining ambulatory ability in paretic non-ambulatory patients with metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, M; Hirano, T; Watanabe, K; Katsumi, K; Shoji, H; Sano, A; Tashi, H; Takahashi, I; Wakasugi, M; Shibuya, Y; Endo, N

    2017-05-01

    Retrospective multicenter study. To analyze the predictive factors for postoperative ambulatory recovery in paretic non-ambulatory patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Japan. Eighty-two consecutive patients (74.4% men; mean age, 66.2 years) who could not walk before surgery due to cervical or thoracic MSCC and underwent posterior decompressive surgery between 2003 and 2014 were included. Patients were divided into two groups according to ambulatory status at 6 weeks after surgery: recovery (group R) and non-recovery (group NR). To evaluate the speed of progression of motor deficits, we assessed the period from onset of neurological symptoms to gait inability (T1). Fifty patients (61.0%) regained the ability to walk (group R). The period of T1 demonstrated a positive correlation with probability of ambulatory recovery (P=0.00; Kendall's tau-b=0.38), and a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the cutoff value of T1 was 5 days (area under the curve=0.72; P=0.001). In multivariate analysis, ambulatory ability (odds ratio, 8.74; P=0.00). The speed of progression of motor deficits can independently and powerfully predict the chance of postoperative ambulatory recovery as well as previously identified predictors. Since information about the speed of progression can be obtained easily by interviewing patients or family members, even if the patient is in an urgent state, our results will be helpful in clinical decision-making.

  15. Human milk insulin is related to maternal plasma insulin and BMI: but other components of human milk do not differ by BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, B E; Patinkin, Z; Palmer, C; de la Houssaye, B; Barbour, L A; Hernandez, T; Friedman, J E; Krebs, N F

    2017-09-01

    The impact of maternal BMI and insulin sensitivity on bioactive components of human milk (HM) is not well understood. As the prevalence of obesity and diabetes rises, it is increasingly critical that we understand how maternal BMI and hormones associated with metabolic disease relate to concentrations of bioactive components in HM. This longitudinal cohort design followed 48 breastfeeding mothers through the first four months of lactation, collecting fasting morning HM samples at 2-weeks and 1, 2, 3 and 4-months, and fasting maternal blood at 2-weeks and 4-months. Insulin, glucose, adipokines leptin and adiponectin, appetite regulating hormone ghrelin, marker of oxidative stress 8OHdG and inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a) were measured in HM and maternal plasma. A total of 26 normal weight (NW) (BMI=21.4±2.0 kg/m(2)) and 22 overweight/obese (OW/Ob) (BMI=30.4±4.2 kg/m(2)) were followed. Of all HM analytes measured, only insulin and leptin were different between groups - consistently higher in the OW/Ob group (leptin: P<0.001; insulin: P<0.03). HM insulin was 98% higher than maternal plasma insulin at 2-weeks and 32% higher at 4-months (P<0.001). Maternal fasting plasma insulin and HOMA-IR were positively related to HM insulin at 2-weeks (P<0.001, R(2)⩾0.38, n=31), and 4-months (P⩽0.005, R(2)⩾0.20, n=38). The concentrations of insulin in HM are higher than in maternal plasma and are related to maternal BMI and insulin sensitivity. With the exception of leptin, there were minimal other differences observed in HM composition across a wide range in maternal BMI.

  16. Optimal retraining time for regaining functional fitness using multicomponent training after long-term detraining in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minyoung; Lim, Taehyun; Lee, Jaehyuk; Kim, Kimyeong; Yoon, BumChul

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about the optimal retraining time for regaining functional fitness through multicomponent training following long-term detraining in older adults. This study first investigated the time course of functional fitness changes during 12-month multicomponent training, 12-month detraining, and 9-month retraining in 18 older adults (68.33±3.46) and then determined the optimal retraining time for regaining the post-training functional fitness level after a 12-month detraining period. Functional fitness, including lower and upper limb strength, lower and upper limb flexibility, aerobic endurance, and dynamic balance, was assessed at baseline, 12 months post-training, 12 months post-detraining, and 3, 6, and 9 months post-retraining. There were significant increases in all of the functional fitness components except upper limb flexibility at post-training and no significant decreases at post-detraining. For lower and upper limb strength and lower limb flexibility, a 3-month period was required to regain the post-training condition. For aerobic endurance and dynamic balance, a retraining period ≥9months was necessary to regain the post-training functional fitness condition. To regain the post-training condition of all functional fitness components, a retraining period ≥9months was required. This information might be useful for health professionals to encourage older adults not to interrupt retraining until they regain their post-training functional fitness condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Parental pre-pregnancy BMI influences on offspring BMI and waist circumference at 21 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalbahar, Nurzalinda; Najman, Jake; McIntrye, Harold D; Mamun, Abdullah

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the prospective association between parental pre-pregnancy BMI and adult male and female offspring BMI and waist circumference (WC). Sub-sample of 2,229 parent-offspring pairs with parental pre-pregnancy BMI and offspring BMI and WC at 21 years were used from the MUSP (Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy cohort). Multivariable results were adjusted for maternal factors around pregnancy (e.g. gestational weight and smoking during pregnancy) and offspring factors in early life (e.g. birth weight) and at 14 years (e.g. sports participation and mealtime with family). After adjustments for confounders, each unit increase in paternal and maternal BMI, the BMI of young adult offspring increased by 0.33kg/m(2) and 0.35kg/m(2) , and the WC increased by 0.76 cm and 0.62 cm, respectively. In the combination of parents' weight status, offspring at 21 years were six times the risk being overweight/obese (OW/OB) when both parents were OW/OB, compared to offspring of healthy weight parents. Prenatal parental BMI are independently related to adult offspring BMI and WC. Both prenatal paternal-maternal weight status are important determinants of offspring weight status in long-term. Further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanisms. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  18. Prenatal risk factors influencing childhood BMI and overweight independent of birth weight and infancy BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, C S; Ängquist, L; Baker, J L

    2017-01-01

    BMIz). For BMIz at age 11 with BMIz at age 7 included in the model, similar effects were found, but the direct effects of BMIz at age 5 and 12 months were mediated through BMI at age 7 (0.62 BMIz per BMIz). Same results were found for overweight. The sum of the direct effects can be translated...... to approximate absolute measures; 2.4 kg at 7 years, 5.7 kg at 11 years, in a child with average height and BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Parental BMI, low SEP and smoking during pregnancy have persisting, strong and direct effects on child BMI and overweight independent of birth weight and infancy BMI.International Journal...

  19. From regained function to daily use: experiences of surgical reconstruction of grip in people with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdell, Johanna; Carlsson, Gunnel; Friden, Jan

    2014-01-01

    To capture patients' relearning processes from regained function to improvements in daily life after grip reconstructive surgery in tetraplegia. Eleven people with tetraplegia who underwent grip reconstructive surgery during February 2009 to March 2011. Qualitative interviews were conducted 7 to 17 months after surgery and analysed using grounded theory. Determination to reach a higher level of independence was the core concept to integrate regained function into daily life. There were 3 phases identified; "Initiate activity training," "Establish hand control in daily activities," and "Challenge dependence." Between the phases psychological stages occurred, first; "a belief in improved ability", and later in the process; "confidence in ability". The process to fully integrate regain function in daily life was described as long and time-consuming. However, the participants claimed it useful to do the skills training in their home environment, without long-term in clinic rehabilitation. Relearning activities in daily life after a grip reconstruction is a time-consuming and demanding process. It includes skills training, mental strategies and psychological stages together with environmental and social factors. Accordingly, rehabilitation after grip reconstruction in tetraplegia should focus on both grip skills and psychological stages, to encourage that patient's keep their determination and achieve greater independence. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a stepwise process to transform improved function into daily use. The most important factor to transform improved function into daily use was motivation to reach a higher independence. Other important factors were; skills training, use of individual learning strategies, belief and confidence in personal ability, social and environmental factors. There was a long and demanding process to fully transform the improved function into daily use. The participants preferred to do activity training in the specific

  20. Genetic Influences on Growth Traits of BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob V B; Fagnani, Corrado; Silventoinen, Karri

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the interplay between genetic factors influencing baseline level and changes in BMI in adulthood.Methods and Procedures:A longitudinal twin study of the cohort of Finnish twins (N = 10,556 twin individuals) aged 20-46 years at baseline was conducted and followed up 15 years.......068) for males and 0.04 (0.00, 0.08) for females.Discussion:Our population-based results provide a basis for identifying genetic variants for change in BMI, in particular weight gain. Furthermore, they demonstrate for the first time that such genetic variants for change in BMI are likely to be different from....... Data on weight and height were obtained from mailed surveys in 1975, 1981, and 1990.Results:Latent growth models revealed a substantial genetic influence on BMI level at baseline in males and females (heritability (h(2)) 80% (95% confidence interval 0.79-0.80) for males and h(2) = 82% (0.81, 0...

  1. Adiposity rather than BMI determines metabolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Antonino; Bianchi, Alessia; Maroni, Pasquale; Iannarelli, Annarita; Di Daniele, Nicola; Iacopino, Leonardo; Di Renzo, Laura

    2013-06-05

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that WHO body mass index (BMI) cut-off values are outdated and should not be applied to different population. To overcome misclassifications, direct measurements of percentage body fat (PBF) would be a better tool for preobesity and obesity diagnosis. The aim of this study was to analyze the body composition in a adult population in Centre-South of Italy, by age and gender, and to verify the accordance between BMI and PBF cut-off points for health status classification. The total subject pool cover a total of 4408 participants adults. A completed screening of anthropometry and body composition by Dual X-ray Absorptiometry, (DXA) was assessed on 3.258 subjects. Distributions and quantitative reliable estimates of PBF, total body fat and lean, according to gender and age are provided. The prevalence of "at risk" subjects (preobese and obese) was 69% and 85%, for men and women respectively, according to PBF cut-off points. The agreement of BMI and PBF categories resulted low for the total and male population, even scarce for female population (all P ≤ 0.001). The false negative classification of BMI was stronger for women than men and for younger than older subjects. Screening for adiposity in subjects with a normal BMI could better identify those at higher risk for cardiometabolic disturbances and cardiovascular mortality. The herein used cut-offs points of PBF, by age and gender, may provide a useful reference in clinical settings and public health services, in particular for the Italian Caucasian population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Associations of maternal macronutrient intake during pregnancy with infant BMI peak characteristics and childhood BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Wei; Aris, Izzuddin M; Bernard, Jonathan Y; Tint, Mya-Thway; Colega, Marjorelee; Gluckman, Peter D; Tan, Kok Hian; Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi; Chong, Yap-Seng; Yap, Fabian; Godfrey, Keith M; van Dam, Rob M; Chong, Mary Foong-Fong; Lee, Yung Seng

    2017-03-01

    Background: Infant body mass index (BMI) peak characteristics and early childhood BMI are emerging markers of future obesity and cardiometabolic disease risk, but little is known about their maternal nutritional determinants.Objective: We investigated the associations of maternal macronutrient intake with infant BMI peak characteristics and childhood BMI in the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes study.Design: With the use of infant BMI data from birth to age 18 mo, infant BMI peak characteristics [age (in months) and magnitude (BMIpeak; in kg/m(2)) at peak and prepeak velocities] were derived from subject-specific BMI curves that were fitted with the use of mixed-effects model with a natural cubic spline function. Associations of maternal macronutrient intake (assessed by using a 24-h recall during late gestation) with infant BMI peak characteristics (n = 910) and BMI z scores at ages 2, 3, and 4 y were examined with the use of multivariable linear regression.Results: Mean absolute maternal macronutrient intakes (percentages of energy) were 72 g protein (15.6%), 69 g fat (32.6%), and 238 g carbohydrate (51.8%). A 25-g (∼100-kcal) increase in maternal carbohydrate intake was associated with a 0.01/mo (95% CI: 0.0003, 0.01/mo) higher prepeak velocity and a 0.04 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.08) higher BMIpeak These associations were mainly driven by sugar intake, whereby a 25-g increment of maternal sugar intake was associated with a 0.02/mo (95% CI: 0.01, 0.03/mo) higher infant prepeak velocity and a 0.07 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.13) higher BMIpeak Higher maternal carbohydrate and sugar intakes were associated with a higher offspring BMI z score at ages 2-4 y. Maternal protein and fat intakes were not consistently associated with the studied outcomes.Conclusion: Higher maternal carbohydrate and sugar intakes are associated with unfavorable infancy BMI peak characteristics and higher early childhood BMI. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01174875.

  3. Regaining lost youth: the controversial and colorful beginnings of hormone replacement therapy in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Arnold

    2005-02-01

    The quest for regaining lost youth seems to have existed since the beginning of recorded history and has taken many forms. One strategy that began in earnest in the latter part of the 19th century and continues to have enormous momentum today is based on the notion that by replacing internally secreted substances, that is, hormones, that decline with age, the vitality and physical attributes associated with youth can be regained. Although the approach remains highly controversial as, for example, in "anti-aging medicine," it is no more controversial than it was many years ago when the work of three high profile investigators, Charles Eduoard Brown-Séquard, Eugen Steinach, and Serge Voronoff set the basis for using this strategy. In the case of all three individuals, the therapies they developed received widespread attention (including ridicule) in the popular press, were spread rapidly by practitioners of questionable training and ethical motivation, and finally and relatively quickly disappeared from common use. However, and ultimately more importantly, in the process of developing and promoting their therapies, these individuals made important contributions to the origins of endocrinology, the biology of sex, and establishment of hormone replacement therapy. It remains to be seen whether contemporary efforts using hormone replacement therapy to blunt and reverse aging have the same fate as their predecessors and make comparable important contributions to biology and medicine.

  4. Changing BMI Categories and Healthcare Expenditures Among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Rust, George S.; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2011-01-01

    To examine the association between changes in BMI categories and health-care expenditures among elderly Medicare beneficiaries using longitudinal data of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) 2000–2005. Changes in BMI were (i) Stayed Normal: individuals with a normal BMI at baseline and follow-up; (ii) Stayed Overweight individuals with overweight BMI at baseline and follow-up; (iii) Stayed Obese individuals with obese BMI at baseline and follow-up; (iv) Normal-Overweight: individual...

  5. Food brand recognition and BMI in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kristen; Moorman, Jessica; Peralta, Mericarmen; Fayhee, Kally

    2017-07-01

    Children's food brand recognition predicts health-related outcomes such as preference for obesogenic foods and increased risk for overweight. However, it is uncertain to what degree food brand recognition acts as a proxy for other factors such as parental education and income, child vocabulary, child age, child race/ethnicity, parent healthy eating guidance, child commercial TV viewing, and child dietary intake, all of which may influence or be influenced by food brand recognition. U.S. preschoolers (N = 247, average age 56 months) were measured for BMI and completed the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test plus recognition and recall measures for a selection of U.S. food brands. Parents completed measures of healthy eating guidance, child dietary intake, child commercial TV viewing, parent education, household income, parent BMI, and child age and race/ethnicity. Controlling these variables, child food brand recognition predicted higher child BMI percentile. Further, qualitative examination of children's incorrect answers to recall items demonstrated perceptual confusion between brand mascots and other fantasy characters to which children are exposed during the preschool years, extending theory on child consumer development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Peripheral metabolic responses to prolonged weight reduction that promote rapid, efficient regain in obesity-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Paul S; Higgins, Janine A; Jackman, Matthew R; Johnson, Ginger C; Fleming-Elder, Brooke K; Wyatt, Holly R; Melanson, Edward L; Hill, James O

    2006-06-01

    Weight regain after weight loss is the most significant impediment to long-term weight reduction. We have developed a rodent paradigm that models the process of regain after weight loss, and we have employed both prospective and cross-sectional analyses to characterize the compensatory adaptations to weight reduction that may contribute to the propensity to regain lost weight. Obese rats were fed an energy-restricted (50-60% kcal) low-fat diet that reduced body weight by 14%. This reduced weight was maintained for up to 16 wk with limited provisions of the low-fat diet. Intake restriction was then removed, and the rats were followed for 56 days as they relapsed to the obese state. Prolonged weight reduction was accompanied by 1) a persistent energy gap resulting from an increased drive to eat and a reduced expenditure of energy, 2) a higher caloric efficiency of regain that may be linked with suppressed lipid utilization early in the relapse process, 3) preferential lipid accumulation in adipose tissue accompanied by adipocyte hyperplasia, and 4) humoral adiposity signals that underestimate the level of peripheral adiposity and likely influence the neural pathways controlling energy balance. Taken together, long-term weight reduction in this rodent paradigm is accompanied by a number of interrelated compensatory adjustments in the periphery that work together to promote rapid and efficient weight regain. These metabolic adjustments to weight reduction are discussed in the context of a homeostatic feedback system that controls body weight.

  7. Comparison between BMI and Inverted BMI in Evaluating Metabolic Risk and Body Composition in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Saki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare BMI and inverted BMI in evaluating body measurement, resting blood pressure, Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA parameters of fat mass and metabolic risk factors in Iranian children Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study on 477 children aged 9-18 yearsin the South of Iran. Weight, height, resting blood pressure, waist and hip circumference and pubertal stage of all participants was measured with standard methods. DEXA was used to determine body composition index. Blood samples were checked for serum lipid profiles and fasting blood sugar (FBS. Metabolic risk score (MRS was calculated by the summation of the Z-scores for TC, TG/HDL, LDL, systolic blood pressure, and waist circumference minus HDL Z-score. Results: BMI did not have a normal distribution in our participants but iBMI had a normal distribution. IBMI had more significant correlation with waist to hip ratio and systolic blood pressure (r2=0.053 and r2=0.182 than BMI (r2=0.041 and r2=0.101. MRS had a positive correlation with BMI (P

  8. Chef of the Week

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dee

    2012-01-01

    There is an overwhelming amount of research and data on childhood nutrition due to drastic increases in childhood obesity (classified as a BMI index greater than the 95th percentile for their height/weight). Obesity amounts have tripled in the last 30 years for children who fall in the age range of the author's students. The effects of childhood…

  9. Dietary Supplementation at Home Improves the Regain of Lean Body Mass After Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Bach; Hessov, Ib

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about nutritional intake after discharge though it takes months to regain preoperative weight after gastrointestinal surgery. We studied whether a 4-mo intervention with dietary advice and protein-rich supplements would increase nutritional intake and gain in lean body mass (LBM......) in patients who had undergone gastrointestinal surgery. Patients admitted for gastrointestinal surgery were randomized at discharge to serve as control patients (n = 47) or to receive intervention (n = 40). One month after discharge, the control patients had a nutritional intake (3-d diet record) comparable...... and fat were gained (control 1.7 kg LBM and 0.2 kg fat versus intervention 3.1 kg LBM and 1.5 kg fat; LBM: P = 0.029 and fat: P = 0.056). At discharge patients should increase protein intake to 1.5 g·kg−1·d−1 for 2 mo, e.g., by taking protein-rich liquid supplements....

  10. Enhanced independence: experiences after regaining grip function in people with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdell, Johanna; Carlsson, Gunnel; Fridén, Jan

    2013-01-01

    To explore how surgical reconstruction of grip affects everyday life for patients with tetraplegia, with special emphasis on patients perspective of their perceived changes. Qualitative method. Eleven people (aged 22-73) with tetraplegia who had undergone surgical reconstruction to restore grip function. Qualitative interviews were conducted 7-17 months after surgery and analysed using Grounded theory. The core concept describing the participants experienced gains after grip reconstructive surgery was "enhanced independence". It was associated with changes in both practical and psychological aspects of independence. Practical aspects identified were: "perform more activities", "smoother everyday life", "renewed ability to participate in social activities", "less dependence on assistance" and "less restricted by physical environment". Psychological aspects of independence included "regained privacy", "increased manageability", "regained identity", "recapture a part of the body" and "share positive experiences with relatives and friends". Encompassing all categories was the concept "self-efficacy in hand control". It was seen as a result included in the enhanced independency core but also as an important factor for the development of all the other categories. Participants in this study experienced enhanced independence after grip reconstructive surgery and rehabilitation. The enhanced independence included both practical and physical aspects and it influenced all domains using the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health model; body function and structure, activities, participation, personal factors and environmental factors. Implications for Rehabilitation Patients with tetraplegia experience grip reconstruction as a useful intervention, an enhanced independence, related to their improved hand control. The increased hand control impacted not only physical aspects but also practical and psychological aspects. It also influenced social and

  11. Pre-pregnancy BMI-specific optimal gestational weight gain for women in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Naho; Nagata, Chie; Jwa, Seung Chik; Sago, Haruhiko; Saito, Shigeru; Oken, Emily; Fujiwara, Takeo

    2017-10-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines are the most widely used guidelines on gestational weight gain; however, accumulation of evidence that body composition in Asians differs from other races has brought concern regarding whether their direct application is appropriate. We aimed to study to what extent optimal gestational weight gain among women in Japan differs by pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and to compare estimated optimal gestational weight gain to current Japanese and Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. We retrospectively studied 104,070 singleton pregnancies among nulliparous women in 2005-2011 using the Japanese national perinatal network database. In five pre-pregnancy BMI sub-groups (17.0-18.4, 18.5-19.9, 20-22.9, 23-24.9, and 25-27.4 kg/m 2 ), we estimated the association of the rate of gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcomes (fetal growth, preterm delivery, and delivery complications) using multivariate regression. Weight gain rate associated with the lowest risk of adverse outcomes decreased with increasing BMI (12.2 kg, 10.9 kg, 9.9 kg, 7.7 kg, and 4.3 kg/40 weeks) for the five BMI categories as described above, respectively. Current Japanese guidelines were lower than optimal gains, with the lowest risk of adverse outcomes for women with BMI below 18.5 kg/m 2 , and current IOM recommendations were higher than optimal gains for women with BMI over 23 kg/m 2 . Optimal weight gain during pregnancy varies largely by pre-pregnancy BMI, and defining those with BMI over 23 kg/m 2 as overweight, as proposed by the World Health Organization, may be useful when applying current IOM recommendations to Japanese guidelines. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Maternal Prepregnancy BMI and Risk of Cerebral Palsy in Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forthun, Ingeborg; Wilcox, Allen J; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in offspring. METHODS: The study population consisted of 188 788 children in the Mothers and Babies in Norway and Denmark CP study, using data from 2 population-based, prospective birth...... cohorts: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and the Danish National Birth Cohort. Prepregnancy BMI was classified as underweight (BMI BMI 18.5-22.9), upper normal weight (BMI 23.0-24.9), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9), and obese (BMI ≥30). CP diagnoses were obtained from...... the national CP registries. Associations between maternal prepregnancy BMI and CP in offspring were investigated by using log-binomial regression models. RESULTS: The 2 cohorts had 390 eligible cases of CP (2.1 per 1000 live-born children). Compared with mothers in the lower normal weight group, mothers...

  13. Prospective associations between sedentary lifestyle and BMI in midlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Siegler, Ilene C; Barefoot, John C

    2006-01-01

    A strong positive cross-sectional relationship between BMI and a sedentary lifestyle has been consistently observed in numerous studies. However, it has been questioned whether high BMI is a determinant or a consequence of a sedentary lifestyle.......A strong positive cross-sectional relationship between BMI and a sedentary lifestyle has been consistently observed in numerous studies. However, it has been questioned whether high BMI is a determinant or a consequence of a sedentary lifestyle....

  14. Tracking of leptin, soluble leptin receptor, and the free leptin index during weight loss and regain in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens-Christian; Gamborg, Michael; Ward, Leigh C

    2011-01-01

    To investigate changes in leptin and soluble leptin receptor (SLR) concentrations, and in the free leptin index (FLI) during weight loss and subsequent weight regain; and to ascertain whether these indices remain stable in the rank of the distribution in repeated measures (tracking) during pertur...... perturbations of weight in obese children....

  15. Variation in extracellular matrix genes is associated with weight regain after weight loss in a sex-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roumans, Nadia J T; Vink, Roel G; Gielen, Marij

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipocytes is important for body weight regulation. Here, we investigated whether genetic variation in ECM-related genes is associated with weight regain among participants of the European DiOGenes study. Overweight and obese subjects (n = 469, 310 females, 159 m...

  16. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and weight regain after diet in type 2 diabetes: results from the randomised controlled POWER trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A.C. Berk (Kirsten); H. Buijks (Hanneke); A.J.M. Verhoeven (Adrie); Mulder, M.T. (Monique T.); B. Özcan (Behiye); van ’T Spijker, A. (Adriaan); R. Timman (Reinier); J.J. van Busschbach (Jan); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAims/hypothesis: Weight-loss programmes for adults with type 2 diabetes are less effective in the long term owing to regain of weight. Our aim was to determine the 2 year effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural group therapy (group-CBT) programme in weight maintenance after diet-induced

  17. Regaining water swallowing function in the rehabilitation of critically ill patients with intensive-care-unit acquired muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Simone; Sauter, Wolfgang; Starrost, Ulrike; Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan

    2017-03-21

    Treatment in intensive care units (ICUs) often results in swallowing dysfunction. Recent longitudinal studies have described the recovery of critically ill people, but we are not aware of studies of the recovery of swallowing function in patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. This paper aims to describe the time course of regaining water swallowing function in patients with ICU-acquired weakness in the post-acute phase and to describe the risks of regaining water swallowing function and the risk factors involved. This cohort study included patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness in our post-acute department, who were unable to swallow. We monitored the process of regaining water swallowing function using the 3-ounce water swallowing test. We included 108 patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Water swallowing function was regained after a median of 12 days (interquartile range =17) from inclusion in the study and after a median of 59 days (interquartile range= 36) from the onset of the primary illness. Our multivariate Cox Proportional Hazard model yielded two main risk factors for regaining water swallowing function: the number of medical tubes such as catheters at admission to the post-acute department (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.282; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.099-1.495) and the time until weaning from the respirator in days (adjusted HR =1.02 per day; 95%CI: 0.998 to 1.008). We describe a time course for regaining water swallowing function based on daily tests in the post-acute phase of critically ill patients. Risk factors associated with regaining water swallowing function in rehabilitation are the number of medical tubes and the duration of weaning from the respirator. Implications for rehabilitation Little guidance is available for the management of swallowing dysfunction in the rehabilitation of critically ill patients with intensive-care-units acquired muscle weakness. There is a time dependent pattern of recovery from

  18. Does bone loss begin after weight loss ends? Results 2 years after weight loss or regain in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Thun, Nancy L; Sukumar, Deeptha; Heymsfield, Steven B; Shapses, Sue A

    2014-05-01

    Short-term weight loss is accompanied by bone loss in postmenopausal women. The longer-term impact of weight loss on bone in reduced overweight/obese women compared with women who regained their weight was examined in this study using a case-control design. Postmenopausal women (N = 42; mean [SD] body mass index, 28.3 [2.8] kg/m; mean [SD] age, 60.7 [5.5] y) were recruited 2 years after the start of a 6-month weight loss trial; those who maintained their weight (weight loss maintainer [WL-M] group) were matched to a cohort of women who regained their weight (weight loss regainer [WL-R] group). Serum hormones and bone markers were measured in a subset. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the femoral neck, trochanter, spine, radius, and total body, and soft-tissue composition were taken at baseline, 0.5 years, and 2 years. During weight loss, both groups lost 9.3% (3.4%) of body weight, with no significant difference between the groups. After weight loss, weight change was -0.1% (2.7%) and 6.0% (3.3%) in the WL-M (n = 22) and WL-R (n = 20) groups, respectively. After 2 years, both groups lost BMD at the femoral neck and trochanter (P ≤ 0.01), whereas only the WL-M group reduced BMD at the 1/3 radius (P weight reduction-induced bone loss, irrespective of weight regain. These data suggest that the period after weight loss may be an important point in time to prevent bone loss for those who maintain weight and those who regain weight.

  19. Vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease II: Regaining FMD-free status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, J A; Engel, B; Dekker, A; van Roermund, H J W

    2012-11-01

    An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) can have devastating effects on animal welfare, economic revenues, the export position and society as a whole. The preferred control strategy in the Netherlands has recently changed to vaccination-to-live, but - not have been applied before - this poses unprecedented challenges for effectively controlling an epidemic, regaining FMD-free status and minimizing economic losses. These three topics are addressed in an interdisciplinary model analysis. In this second part we evaluate whether vaccination-to-live poses a higher risk for regaining FMD-free status than non-vaccination strategies and whether the final screening can be improved to reduce this risk. The FMD transmission model that was developed in the first part, predicted the prevalence of infected animals in undetected herds for 1000 hypothetical epidemics per control strategy. These results serve as input for the final screening model that was developed in this part. It calculates the expected number of undetected infected herds and animals per epidemic after final screening, as well as the number of herds and animals to be tested. Our results show that vaccination strategies yield a larger number of undetected infected animals in the whole country per epidemic before final screening than preemptive culling (median values and 5-95% interval): 8 (0-42) animals for 1 km preemptive culling, 50 (7-148) for 2 km vaccination and 35 (6-99) for 5 km vaccination. But the final screening reduced these to comparably low numbers: 1.0 (0-9.1) for 1 km preemptive culling, 3.5 (0.3-15) for 2 km vaccination and 2.1 (0.3-9.4) for 5 km vaccination. Undetected infected animals were mainly found in non-vaccinated sheep herds and vaccinated cattle and sheep herds. As a consequence, testing more non-vaccinated cattle and pig herds will not reduce the expected number of undetected infected animals after the final screening by much, while the required testing resources drastically

  20. Associations of maternal BMI and insulin resistance with the maternal metabolome and newborn outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Victoria; Reisetter, Anna C; Bain, James R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Nodzenski, Michael; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga; Lowe, Lynn P; Metzger, Boyd E; Newgard, Christopher B; Scholtens, Denise M; Lowe, William L

    2017-03-01

    Maternal obesity increases the risk for large-for-gestational-age birth and excess newborn adiposity, which are associated with adverse long-term metabolic outcomes in offspring, probably due to effects mediated through the intrauterine environment. We aimed to characterise the maternal metabolic milieu associated with maternal BMI and its relationship to newborn birthweight and adiposity. Fasting and 1 h serum samples were collected from 400 European-ancestry mothers in the Hyperglycaemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Study who underwent an OGTT at ∼28 weeks gestation and whose offspring had anthropometric measurements at birth. Metabolomics assays were performed using biochemical analyses of conventional clinical metabolites, targeted MS-based measurement of amino acids and acylcarnitines and non-targeted GC/MS. Per-metabolite analyses demonstrated broad associations with maternal BMI at fasting and 1 h for lipids, amino acids and their metabolites together with carbohydrates and organic acids. Similar metabolite classes were associated with insulin resistance with unique associations including branched-chain amino acids. Pathway analyses indicated overlapping and unique associations with maternal BMI and insulin resistance. Network analyses demonstrated collective associations of maternal metabolite subnetworks with maternal BMI and newborn size and adiposity, including communities of acylcarnitines, lipids and related metabolites, and carbohydrates and organic acids. Random forest analyses demonstrated contribution of lipids and lipid-related metabolites to the association of maternal BMI with newborn outcomes. Higher maternal BMI and insulin resistance are associated with broad-based changes in maternal metabolites, with lipids and lipid-related metabolites accounting, in part, for the association of maternal BMI with newborn size at birth.

  1. Weight loss-induced cellular stress in subcutaneous adipose tissue and the risk for weight regain in overweight and obese adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roumans, N.J.T.; Vink, R.G.; Bouwman, F.G.; Fazelzadeh, P.; Baak, van M.A.; Mariman, E.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background/objective: Weight loss is often followed by weight regain after the dietary intervention (DI). Cellular stress is increased in adipose tissue of obese individuals. However, the relation between cellular stress and weight regain is unclear. Previously, we observed increased adipose

  2. BMI changes in adolescents treated with bupropion SR for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floden, Lysbeth; Taren, Douglas L; Muramoto, Myra L; Leischow, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent overweight and obesity and smoking continue to be very important health challenges because of their lasting effects on overall health. Weight gain after smoking cessation is a barrier to quitting as well as a negative consequence to health. This study reports changes in the body mass index (BMI) z-scores of adolescent smokers participating in a dose-ranging clinical trial of bupropion SR (150 mg/day and 300 mg/day) for smoking cessation. A total of N = 296 adolescent smokers (placebo n = 100, 150 mg/day n = 101, 300 mg/day n = 95) with a BMI z-score of 0.5 (sd: 1.4), 0.5 (sd: 1.3), and 0.5 (sd: 1.2) in the placebo, 150 mg/day, and 300 mg/day groups, respectively, were followed for 6 months. Adolescents in the 300 mg/day group had a significant reduction in BMI z-score 6 weeks after quitting (β = -0.16, CI = (-0.29, -0.04), P-value = 0.01). This result was not sustained at the 6-month follow-up. A reduction in BMI z-score during smoking cessation with bupropion has important implications for the future of adolescent smoking cessation. These results are particularly relevant for adolescents who have either overweight or obesity or who have reservations about quitting for fear of gaining weight or BMI. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  3. Eating behaviour patterns and BMI in Portuguese higher education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poínhos, Rui; Oliveira, Bruno M P M; Correia, Flora

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to determine prototypical patterns of eating behaviour among Portuguese higher education students, and to relate these patterns with BMI. Data from 280 higher education students (63.2% females) aged between 18 and 27 years were analysed. Several eating behaviour dimensions (emotional and external eating, flexible and rigid restraint, binge eating, and eating self-efficacy) were assessed, and eating styles were derived through cluster analysis. BMI for current, desired and maximum self-reported weights and the differences between desired and current BMI and between maximum and current BMI were calculated. Women scored higher in emotional eating and restraint, whereas men showed higher eating self-efficacy. Men had higher current, desired and maximum BMI. Cluster analysis showed three eating styles in both male and female subsamples: "Overeating", "High self-efficacy" and "High restraint". High self-efficacy women showed lower BMI values than the others, and restrictive women had higher lost BMI. High self-efficacy men showed lower desired BMI than overeaters, and lower maximum and lost BMI than highly restrictive ones. Restrictive women and men differ on important eating behaviour features, which may be the cause of differences in the associations with BMI. Eating self-efficacy seems to be a central variable influencing the relationships between other eating behaviour dimensions and BMI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of BMI on Bone Loading due to Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tina; Reeves, Sue; Halsey, Lewis; Huber, Jörg; Luo, Jin

    2017-08-03

    The aim of the current study was to compare bone loading due to physical activity between lean and, overweight and obese individuals. Fifteen participants (lower BMI group: BMIBMI group: 25 kg/m(2) BMI BMI participants at a frequency band of 0.1-2 Hz (P=.039, Cohen's d =1.27) and 2-4 Hz (P=.044, d =1.24). Lower BMI participants also had a significantly greater step count (P=.023, d =1.55). This corroborated with loading intensity (d ≥ 0.93) and questionnaire (d =0.79) effect sizes to indicate higher BMI participants tended to spend more time in very light, and less time in light and moderate activity. Overall participants with a lower BMI exhibited greater bone loading due to physical activity; participants with a higher BMI may benefit from more light and moderate level activity to maintain bone health.

  5. Analysis list: BMI1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BMI1 Blood,Digestive tract,Neural,Prostate + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/BMI...1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/BMI1.5.tsv http://db...archive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/BMI1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/BMI...1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/BMI1.Diges...tive_tract.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/BMI1.Neural.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscie

  6. Regaining familiarity with own body after treatment for operable lung cancer - a qualitative longitudinal exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missel, M; Pedersen, J H; Hendriksen, C; Tewes, M; Adamsen, L

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about the experiences of operable lung cancer patients during treatment in a clinical setting based on fast-track surgery. The study aimed to explore (1) the embodied meaning of illness in patients with operable lung cancer during treatment to 4 months after surgery and (2) patterns of change over time that may affect the patients' daily lives. Twenty patients referred for lung cancer surgery were interviewed three times, corresponding to potential critical transition points following surgery: hospitalisation; hospital-to-home transition; and resumption of daily life activities. Data collection, analysis and interpretation followed a phenomenological hermeneutical approach inspired by Ricoeur and the theoretical framework was grounded in Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception. The findings reveal the process patients went through in regaining familiarity with their own body after lung cancer treatment. Through the post-operative trajectory the patients' resumption of daily activities involved adjusting to a new awareness of everyday life, physical restrictions and their perception of themselves. The findings are expressed in four sub-themes: (1) perceptions of embodied alterations; (2) transformation of embodied structures in the transition from hospital to home was unexpectedly challenging; (3) embodied perceptions of the intersubjective world; and (4) transforming embodied disruptions into bodily awareness. Patients experienced a smooth treatment trajectory regarding physical consequences of illness and treatment which might be due to the fast-track surgery. Clinicians should be aware of patients' experiences of illness to facilitate patient reconstitution of own identity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Emancipatory actions displayed by multi-ethnic women: "Regaining control of my health care".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ivy M

    2010-11-01

    Despite the recognized importance of patient involvement in primary care interactions, little information describing women's needs and expectations for these interactions is available. This participatory action study was based in Critical Action Theory and designed to describe any emancipatory interests that surfaced when eight ethnically diverse women examined their interactions with primary care nurse practitioners (PCNPs) over the course of five successive focus group meetings. Focus group meeting transcripts, field notes, interaction notations, seating maps, and first impression summaries. Participants wanted to learn how to "stand up" for themselves in primary care interactions. They believed this could be accomplished by developing a positive sense of self-esteem. Ultimately, they identified the right way to "talk back" to clinicians and created a method for regaining control of their own health care and maintaining equality in interactions with primary care clinicians. Nurse practitioners working in the primary setting are especially well situated to support self-management and foster patient participation by women as they live with chronic disease, engage in health promotion activities, and deal with common symptomatic problems for themselves and their families. ©2010 The Author Journal compilation ©2010 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. Life interrupted and life regained? Coping with stroke at a young age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuluski, Kerry; Dow, Clare; Locock, Louise; Lyons, Renee F; Lasserson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability across the developed world, affecting an increasing number of younger people. In this article, we seek to understand the experience of stroke as a disabling life situation among young people and the strategies that they use to recover and cope. Directed content analysis was conducted from interviews with 17 community-dwelling stroke survivors aged 55 years and younger across the United Kingdom. The sample was drawn from a larger maximum variation sample of stroke survivors. Using the sociological concepts of biographical disruption and biographical repair as a guide, excerpts from the interviews pertaining to aspects of the patients' life that were interrupted, in addition to how they coped with the changes, were selected and analysed. All individuals described an "altered sense of self," a theme that included loss of identity, family disruption, and/or loss of valued activities. Individuals sought to adapt their sense of self by seeking external support, by restoring normality, and/or through positive reflection. Despite the adapted self that emerged, most individuals continued to experience impairments. While young stroke survivors adapt to their illness over time, they continue to experience impairments and disruptions in their personal and work lives. A holistic model of rehabilitation that helps individuals regain the capacity for everyday activities related to work, family life, and leisure can begin to address the emotional ramifications of diseases such as stroke, restore wellness, and work towards minimizing the burden felt by family caregivers and children.

  9. Eye Inside Out: Endonasal Endoscopic Reposition of Eye from Nose with Complete Vision Regainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Girish S; Bhatt, Sushen Harish

    2017-03-01

    Faciomaxillary and ocular trauma is a common entity in most emergency and trauma units. We came across a 68-year-old female patient with a history of bull horn injury over the right eye. Examination revealed an empty orbital socket with unreliable perception of light present. Imaging showed that the eye had displaced posteroinferomedially to be lying in the ethmoid air cells in the nasal cavity. Under nasal endoscopic guidance, the eye was reposited back into the orbital socket and conjunctival sutures were taken to stabilize the position. The patient had vision of counting fingers at 1.5 m on the first postoperative day which improved to 6/24 on last follow-up. Such is the rarity that never before has such a case been described in literature where traumatic displacement of eyeball into the nose has been successfully repositioned by an endonasal endoscope with appreciable regaining of vision. It also further promotes endonasal endoscopic approach in the management of orbital blow out injuries.

  10. Life interrupted and life regained? Coping with stroke at a young age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Clare; Locock, Louise; Lyons, Renee F.; Lasserson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability across the developed world, affecting an increasing number of younger people. In this article, we seek to understand the experience of stroke as a disabling life situation among young people and the strategies that they use to recover and cope. Directed content analysis was conducted from interviews with 17 community-dwelling stroke survivors aged 55 years and younger across the United Kingdom. The sample was drawn from a larger maximum variation sample of stroke survivors. Using the sociological concepts of biographical disruption and biographical repair as a guide, excerpts from the interviews pertaining to aspects of the patients’ life that were interrupted, in addition to how they coped with the changes, were selected and analysed. All individuals described an “altered sense of self,” a theme that included loss of identity, family disruption, and/or loss of valued activities. Individuals sought to adapt their sense of self by seeking external support, by restoring normality, and/or through positive reflection. Despite the adapted self that emerged, most individuals continued to experience impairments. While young stroke survivors adapt to their illness over time, they continue to experience impairments and disruptions in their personal and work lives. A holistic model of rehabilitation that helps individuals regain the capacity for everyday activities related to work, family life, and leisure can begin to address the emotional ramifications of diseases such as stroke, restore wellness, and work towards minimizing the burden felt by family caregivers and children. PMID:24461569

  11. Regaining ownership and restoring belongingness: impact of family group conferences in coercive psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Ellen; Schout, Gert; de Jong, Gideon; Abma, Tineke

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the impact of family group conferences on coercive treatment in adult psychiatry. Coercive treatment in psychiatry infringes the fundamental rights of clients, including the right to control their lives. A promising intervention is the family group conferences, which has the potential to prevent crises through the integration of the expertise of informal and professional networks. A responsive evaluation, including qualitative and quantitative methods, was deployed to study the process leading up to the FGC, the proceedings and the impact of the conference. From 2013-2015, 41 family group conferences were studied in three regions in the Netherlands. The impact of every conference was examined with scales (ranging from 0-10) during interviews with attendees (clients, family members, friends, mental health professionals and family group conferences coordinators) who reflected on three outcome measures: belongingness, ownership and coercion. After the family group conferences, respondents indicated a slight reduction in their experience of coercive treatment. They also mentioned an increase in ownership and belongingness. Family group conferences seems a promising intervention to reduce coercion in psychiatry. It helps to regain ownership and restores belongingness. If mental health professionals take a more active role in the pursuit of a family group conferences and reinforce the plans with their expertise, they can strengthen the impact even further. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Time Course of Leptin in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa during Inpatient Treatment: Longitudinal Relationships to BMI and Psychological Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroe-Kunold, Esther; Buckert, Magdalena; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Wesche, Daniela; Kopf, Stefan; Herzog, Wolfgang; Wild, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, appears to play a major role in the homeostasis of body weight and psychobiological processes associated with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, there is scarce data on its exact influence on this disorder, in particular data over time. The present study addresses whether leptin changes during inpatient treatment play a role for treatment outcome and psychological factors in underweight AN patients. In order to understand whether leptin's role differs in relation to AN severity, data were assessed from 11 patients with a very low BMI and a higher chronicity (high severity group; HSS; mean BMI at the beginning of the study = 13.6; mean duration of illness = 5.1 years) vs. nine with less severe symptoms (LSS; mean BMI = 16.2; mean duration of illness = 3.7 years). During the course of treatment, serum leptin concentrations were assessed weekly while weight (BMI) was assessed twice per week. Concomitantly, psychological variables were obtained by means of electronic diaries. Unconditional linear growth models were calculated to evaluate the temporal course of leptin in relation to BMI. For HSS patients, two phases of treatment (BMI < 16 and BMI ≥ 16 kg/m2) were investigated. Leptin increased significantly with BMI in both groups of patients. For HSS patients, the increase of leptin in the first treatment phase did not predict later increases in BMI. Furthermore, the relationship of leptin and psychological factors was modulated by symptom severity. In HSS patients, higher leptin levels were associated with greater feelings of depression, anxiety, and stress whereas in LSS patients a higher leptin level showed the trend to be associated with lower psychological symptom burden. Our results suggest that leptin changes are differently associated with weight gain and psychological symptoms depending on the severity of starvation.

  13. Anti-aging Effect of Transplanted Amniotic Membrane Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Premature Aging Model of Bmi-1 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chunfeng; Jin, Jianliang; Lv, Xianhui; Tao, Jianguo; Wang, Rong; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether transplanted amniotic membrane mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) ameliorated the premature senescent phenotype of Bmi-1-deficient mice, postnatal 2-day-old Bmi-1−/− mice were injected intraperitoneally with the second-passage AMSCs from amniotic membranes of β-galactosidase (β-gal) transgenic mice or wild-type (WT) mice labeled with DiI. Three reinjections were given, once every seven days. Phenotypes of 5-week-old β-gal+ AMSC-transplanted or 6-week-old DiI+ AMSC-transplanted Bmi-1−/− mice were compared with vehicle-transplanted Bmi-1−/− and WT mice. Vehicle-transplanted Bmi-1−/− mice displayed growth retardation and premature aging with decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis; a decreased ratio and dysmaturity of lymphocytic series; premature osteoporosis with reduced osteogenesis and increased adipogenesis; redox imbalance and DNA damage in multiple organs. Transplanted AMSCs carried Bmi-1 migrated into multiple organs, proliferated and differentiated into multiple tissue cells, promoted growth and delayed senescence in Bmi-1−/− transplant recipients. The dysmaturity of lymphocytic series were ameliorated, premature osteoporosis were rescued by promoting osteogenesis and inhibiting adipogenesis, the oxidative stress and DNA damage in multiple organs were inhibited by the AMSC transplantation in Bmi-1−/− mice. These findings indicate that AMSC transplantation ameliorated the premature senescent phenotype of Bmi-1-deficient mice and could be a novel therapy to delay aging and prevent aging-associated degenerative diseases. PMID:26370922

  14. Examining the BMI-mortality relationship using fractional polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Edwin S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many previous studies estimating the relationship between body mass index (BMI and mortality impose assumptions regarding the functional form for BMI and result in conflicting findings. This study investigated a flexible data driven modelling approach to determine the nonlinear and asymmetric functional form for BMI used to examine the relationship between mortality and obesity. This approach was then compared against other commonly used regression models. Methods This study used data from the National Health Interview Survey, between 1997 and 2000. Respondents were linked to the National Death Index with mortality follow-up through 2005. We estimated 5-year all-cause mortality for adults over age 18 using the logistic regression model adjusting for BMI, age and smoking status. All analyses were stratified by sex. The multivariable fractional polynomials (MFP procedure was employed to determine the best fitting functional form for BMI and evaluated against the model that includes linear and quadratic terms for BMI and the model that groups BMI into standard weight status categories using a deviance difference test. Estimated BMI-mortality curves across models were then compared graphically. Results The best fitting adjustment model contained the powers -1 and -2 for BMI. The relationship between 5-year mortality and BMI when estimated using the MFP approach exhibited a J-shaped pattern for women and a U-shaped pattern for men. A deviance difference test showed a statistically significant improvement in model fit compared to other BMI functions. We found important differences between the MFP model and other commonly used models with regard to the shape and nadir of the BMI-mortality curve and mortality estimates. Conclusions The MFP approach provides a robust alternative to categorization or conventional linear-quadratic models for BMI, which limit the number of curve shapes. The approach is potentially useful in estimating

  15. Association between body mass index (BMI) and duration of pregnancy in women referred to Shariati Hospital in Bandar Abbas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Arefeh; Dabiri, Fatemeh; Kamjoo, Azita; Yabandeh, Asieh Pormehr; Khademi, Zahra; Davaridolatabadi, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    Prolonged pregnancy is associated with increased risk of pregnancy complications. The role of body mass index (BMI) is not completely identified in the risk of occurrence of prolonged pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine the association between BMI and duration of pregnancy in woman referred to the Shariati Maternity Hospital in Bandar Abbas (Hormozgan Province, Iran). This cross-sectional study was carried out on 1100 pregnant women referred to the Shariati Hospital in Bandar Abbas in 2015. Gestational age determined by last menstrual period (LMP) or first-trimester ultra-sonography. The women were divided into two groups of less than 40 weeks of gestation and more than 40 weeks of gestation. The women were divided based on their BMI at the first trimester of pregnancy into four groups, including less than normal, normal, overweight, and excess weight. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, Mann-Whitney test, and chi-square test by SPSS version 16.0. The average age of mothers studied was 23 ± 4.30 years. Average of gestational age was 39 ± 1.85 weeks. Among the study participants 1020 (92.7%) had term pregnancies, 53 (4.8%) had preterm pregnancies, and 27 (2.5%) had post-term pregnancies. Also among the study participants, 40% had a BMI less than 19.8 kg/m(2), 45.9% had BMI between 19.8 and 26 kg/m(2), and 9.8% had BMI between 26.1 and 29 kg/m(2), and 4.3% had BMI less than 29 kg/m(2). Mean BMI was 20.95 ± 4.02 for women with gestational age of equal to or less than 40 weeks and 23.34 ± 4.52 for women with gestational age of more than 40 weeks. Duration of pregnancy was significantly higher in women with higher BMI at the first trimester (pBMI of a mother in the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with prolonged pregnancy and may increase the risk of post-term pregnancy. Women are recommended to reach an ideal weight before pregnancy to decrease the risk of the pregnancy complications.

  16. Does CPAP lead to change in BMI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redenius, Rachel; Murphy, Carli; O'Neill, Erin; Al-Hamwi, Majed; Zallek, Sarah Nath

    2008-06-15

    Obesity is an important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and weight loss can reduce apnea severity or even lead to resolution in some patients. Effective CPAP therapy may lead to weight loss by any of several proposed mechanisms, including, but not limited to, increased physical activity and increased responsiveness to leptin. This retrospective study sought to determine whether subjects who adhered to prescribed CPAP treatment for OSAS would lose weight, or gain less weight than control subjects who were either untreated or did not adhere to prescribed CPAP treatment. BMI was determined at the time of diagnosis and at followup approximately 1 year (10-14 months) later. Subjects who used CPAP > or = 4 h per night and > or = 70% of nights were considered treatment subjects. Control subjects used no treatment for OSAS or used CPAP weight gain in some; none lost weight. CPAP may affect weight in ways not measured here. Physicians should stress an active weight loss plan and not assume CPAP alone will lead to weight loss. A larger, prospective study may help clarify these findings.

  17. Cortisol in human milk predicts child BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer; Le, Tran Bao; Chung, Anna; Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M

    2016-12-01

    Breastfeeding has been linked to lower rates of childhood obesity. Human milk contains cortisol, known to regulate glucose storage and metabolism. The aim of this study was to to test the hypothesis that early exposure to cortisol in human breast milk helps to modulate infant body mass index (BMI) trajectories over the first 2 years of life. Growth curve modeling was used to examine whether infant exposure to cortisol in human milk at 3 months predicted changes in child body mass index percentile (BMIP) at 6, 12, and 24 months of age in 51 breastfeeding mother-child pairs. Infants exposed to higher milk cortisol levels at 3 months were less likely to exhibit BMIP gains over the first 2 years of life, compared with infants exposed to lower milk cortisol. By age 2, infants exposed to higher milk cortisol levels had lower BMIPs than infants exposed to lower milk cortisol. Milk cortisol was a stronger predictor of BMIP change in girls than boys. Cortisol exposure through human milk may help to program metabolic functioning and childhood obesity risk. Further, because infant formula contains only trace amounts of glucocorticoids, these findings suggest that cortisol in milk is a novel biological pathway through which breastfeeding may protect against later obesity. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  18. A Novel Method to Describe Early Offspring Body Mass Index (BMI) Trajectories and to Study Its Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles, Sophie; Charles, Marie-Aline; Forhan, Anne; Slama, Rémy; Heude, Barbara; Botton, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Accurately characterizing children's body mass index (BMI) trajectories and studying their determinants is a statistical challenge. There is a need to identify early public health measures for obesity prevention. We describe a method that allows studies of the determinants of height, weight and BMI growth up to five years of age. We illustrated this method using maternal smoking during pregnancy as one of the early-life factors that is potentially involved in prenatal programming of obesity. Individual height and weight trajectories were fitted using the Jenss-Bayley model on 28,381 and 30,515 measurements, respectively, from 1,666 children to deduce BMI trajectories. We assessed global associations between smoking and growth trajectories and cross-sectional associations at specific ages. Children exposed in late pregnancy had a 0.24 kg/m2 (95% confidence interval: 0.07, 0.41) higher BMI at 5 years of age compared with non-exposed children. Although the BMIs of children exposed during late pregnancy became significantly higher compared with those of non-exposed children from 2 years onwards, the trajectories began to diverge during the first weeks of life. Our method is relevant for studies on the relationships between individual-level exposures and the dynamics and shapes of BMI growth during childhood, including key features such as instantaneous growth velocities and the age or BMI value at the BMI infancy peak that benefit from the monotonic pattern of height and weight growth.

  19. Life interrupted and life regained? Coping with stroke at a young age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Kuluski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability across the developed world, affecting an increasing number of younger people. In this article, we seek to understand the experience of stroke as a disabling life situation among young people and the strategies that they use to recover and cope. Directed content analysis was conducted from interviews with 17 community-dwelling stroke survivors aged 55 years and younger across the United Kingdom. The sample was drawn from a larger maximum variation sample of stroke survivors. Using the sociological concepts of biographical disruption and biographical repair as a guide, excerpts from the interviews pertaining to aspects of the patients’ life that were interrupted, in addition to how they coped with the changes, were selected and analysed. All individuals described an “altered sense of self,” a theme that included loss of identity, family disruption, and/or loss of valued activities. Individuals sought to adapt their sense of self by seeking external support, by restoring normality, and/or through positive reflection. Despite the adapted self that emerged, most individuals continued to experience impairments. While young stroke survivors adapt to their illness over time, they continue to experience impairments and disruptions in their personal and work lives. A holistic model of rehabilitation that helps individuals regain the capacity for everyday activities related to work, family life, and leisure can begin to address the emotional ramifications of diseases such as stroke, restore wellness, and work towards minimizing the burden felt by family caregivers and children.

  20. Neural stem cells differentiated from iPS cells spontaneously regain pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Sol; Hong, Yean Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2014-10-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells by transduction of exogenous reprogramming factors. After induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are established, exogenous genes are silenced. In the pluripotent state, retroviral genes integrated in the host genome are kept inactive through epigenetic transcriptional regulation. In this study, we tried to determine whether exogenous genes remain silenced or are reactivated upon loss of pluripotency or on differentiation using an in vitro system. We induced differentiation of iPS cells into neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro; the NSCs appeared morphologically indistinguishable from brain-derived NSCs and stained positive for the NSC markers Nestin and Sox2. These iPS cell-derived NSCs (iPS-NSCs) were also capable of differentiating into all three neural subtypes. Interestingly, iPS-NSCs spontaneously formed aggregates on long-term culture and showed reactivation of the Oct4-GFP marker, which was followed by the formation of embryonic stem cell-like colonies. The spontaneously reverted green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive (iPS-NSC-GFP(+) ) cells expressed high levels of pluripotency markers (Oct4 and Nanog) and formed germline chimeras, indicating that iPS-NSC-GFP(+) cells had the same pluripotency as the original iPS cells. The reactivation of silenced exogenous genes was tightly correlated with the downregulation of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) during differentiation of iPS cells. This phenomenon was not observed in doxycycline-inducible iPS cells, where the reactivation of exogenous genes could be induced only by doxycycline treatment. These results indicate that pluripotency can be regained through reactivation of exogenous genes, which is associated with dynamic change of Dnmt levels during differentiation of iPS cells. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  1. BMI-1, a promising therapeutic target for human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, MIN-CONG; LI, CHUN-LI; CUI, JIE; JIAO, MIN; WU, TAO; JING, LI; NAN, KE-JUN

    2015-01-01

    BMI-1 oncogene is a member of the polycomb-group gene family and a transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of BMI-1 has been identified in various human cancer tissues and is known to be involved in cancer cell proliferation, cell invasion, distant metastasis, chemosensitivity and patient survival. Accumulating evidence has revealed that BMI-1 is also involved in the regulation of self-renewal, differentiation and tumor initiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these biological processes remain unclear. The present review summarized the function of BMI-1 in different human cancer types and CSCs, and discussed the signaling pathways in which BMI-1 is potentially involved. In conclusion, BMI-1 may represent a promising target for the prevention and therapy of various cancer types. PMID:26622537

  2. Regaining a sense of agency and shared self-reliance: the experience of advanced disease cancer patients participating in a multidimensional exercise intervention while undergoing chemotherapy--analysis of patient diaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midtgaard, Julie; Stelter, Reinhard; Rørth, Mikael; Adamsen, Lis

    2007-04-01

    Evidence is emerging that exercise can reduce psychological distress in cancer patients undergoing treatment. The present study aimed to (qualitatively) explore the experiences of advanced disease cancer patients participating in a 6-week, 9-hours weekly, structured, group-based multidimensional exercise intervention while undergoing chemotherapy. Unstructured diaries from a purposive sample of three females and two males (28-52 years old) who participated in the program served as the database. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological, narrative method. The analysis yielded three themes: shifting position, self-surveillance, and negotiated strength. The intervention highlighted situations making it possible for the participants to negate psychological and physical constraints. The concept of structured exercise contains viable psychotherapeutic potentials by allowing the development of alternative bodily and mental realities complying with cancer patients' demands and abilities to regain autonomy and commitment to discover and adopt a sense of agency and shared self-reliance.

  3. Exercise Decreases Lipogenic Gene Expression in Adipose Tissue and Alters Adipocyte Cellularity during Weight Regain After Weight Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Erin Danielle Giles; Steig, Amy J.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Higgins, Janine A.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Lindstrom, Rachel C.; MacLean, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is a potent strategy to facilitate long-term weight maintenance. In addition to increasing energy expenditure and reducing appetite, exercise also favors the oxidation of dietary fat, which likely helps prevent weight re-gain. It is unclear whether this exercise-induced metabolic shift is due to changes in energy balance, or whether exercise imparts additional adaptations in the periphery that limit the storage and favor the oxidation of dietary fat. To answer this question, adipose ...

  4. Does waist circumference uncorrelated with BMI add valuable information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngueta, Gerard; Laouan-Sidi, Elhadji A; Lucas, Michel

    2014-09-01

    Estimation of relative contribution of Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) on health outcomes requires a regression model that includes both obesity metrics. But, multicollinearity could yield biased estimates. To address the multicollinearity issue between BMI and WC, we used the residual model approach. The standard WC (Y-axis) was regressed on the BMI (X-axis) to obtain residual WC. Data from two adult population surveys (Nunavik Inuit and James Bay Cree) were analysed to evaluate relative effect of BMI and WC on four cardiometabolic risk factors: insulin, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein levels. In multivariate models, standard WC and BMI were significantly associated with cardiometabolic outcomes. Residual WC was not linked with any outcomes. The BMI effect was weakened by including standard WC in the model, but its effect remained unchanged if residual WC was considered. The strong correlation between standard WC and BMI does not allow assessment of their relative contributions to health in the same model without a risk of making erroneous estimations. By contrast with BMI, fat distribution (residual WC) does not add valuable information to a model that already contains overall adiposity (BMI) in Inuit and Cree. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Implication of Human Hair in Regaining Spilled Oil Further Creating A Production Rise in Oyster Mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, A.; Srivastava, P.; Singh, U.

    2016-12-01

    It is estimated that 4.9 million liters of petroleum are spilled into U.S. waters from vessels and pipelines in a typical year. Oil spill may be as huge as of 8 million barrels (The Persian Gulf oil spill of 1991). Oil-water separation processes using polymeric or inorganic membranes have been proposed as effective and cost competitive technologies but in present the commercial use of membrane in treatment of spilled oil is currently limited by their low efficiency as well as high capital and operating cost. Indian hair-market is a billion-dollar industry yearly exporting thousands of tones of thick and dark hairs. Hairs contain keratin, a family of fibrous structural proteins been proved to adsorb oils. Laboratory results conclude that one gram of human hair can selectively adsorb about 15.5301 grams of crude oil over water, following Frendlich's isotherm. We seek hair mats made up of hairs of size ≤5 inches, costing 37/ton from selected parts of Indian hair market. With a known adsorbing efficiency of 95% towards crude oil, an estimated desorption efficiency of 70% oil worth 0.8M per year can be regained in crude form from U.S. waters only. To ensure solid waste management of hairs, hair mats left with 30% of adsorbed oil can be utilized in the cultivation of oyster mushrooms, a 20-34/kg crop that grows best in 20-25°C ,80-90% relative humidity and oily conditions. This will reduce the growing period of crop ensuring yearly profit of $6.06M in U.S. only engaging variety of stakeholders over borders. Results thus obtained in this study present an economic, safer and sustainable technique to minimize oil loss due to oil spill in waters further ensuring a low labor-low cost technique of waste management that enhances the growth of an in-demand crop. Keywords: Oil Spill, Human Hair Mats, Adsorb, Oyster Mushrooms

  6. BMI may underestimate the socioeconomic gradient in true obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, G.; van Eijsden, M.; Vrijkotte, T. G. M.; Gemke, R. J. B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) does not make a distinction between fat mass and lean mass. In children, high fat mass appears to be associated with low maternal education, as well as low lean mass because maternal education is associated with physical activity. Therefore, BMI might underestimate true obesity

  7. Trends in the evolution of BMI in Belgian army men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullie, Patrick; Vansant, Greet; Guelinckx, Isabelle; Hulens, Mieke; Clarys, Peter; Degrave, Etienne

    2009-07-01

    The first aim was to evaluate BMI cross-sectionally over a period of 14 years (1992 to 2005) in 43,343 army men and the second was to compare BMI using the paired data of 1497 army men. The data were analysed as a function of the military ranking system, used as an indicator for socio-economic position. Multiple cross-sectional and longitudinal design. A significant increase of BMI between age categories was detected over the 14-year period; BMI remained stable in each age category. In the paired cohort, median BMI increased during the same period from 23.9 (interquartile range 3.3) kg/m2 to 24.7 (interquartile range 3.5) kg/m2 (P < 0.0001). This age-dependent evolution was present in all military rankings. From age 40 years or more, BMI indicated a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. For the total cohort, BMI remained stable in each age category. For the paired cohort, BMI increased over time. The military leadership should emphasize prevention in order to reduce the health-care costs and disease burden in this cohort. This emphasis on prevention should target those aged less than 40 years.

  8. Childhood BMI Trajectories Predicting Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Brittany P.; Nelson, Jackie A.; Holub, Shayla C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study compared growth parameters of girls’ and boys’ BMI trajectories from infancy to middle childhood, and evaluated these parameters as predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adolescence. Methods Using 657 children from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD), quadratic growth curve analyses were conducted to establish growth parameters (intercept, slope, quadratic term) for girls and boys from 15 months to age 10 ½. Parameters were compared across gender and evaluated as predictors of a CVD risk index at age 15, controlling for characteristics of the adiposity rebound (AR) including age at which it occurred and children’s BMI at the rebound. Results Boys had more extreme trajectories of growth compared to girls with higher initial BMI at 15 months (intercept), more rapid declines in BMI before the AR (slope), and sharper rebound growth in BMI after the rebound (quadratic term). For boys and girls, higher intercept, slope, and quadratic term values predicted higher CVD risk at age 15, controlling for characteristics of the AR. Conclusions Findings suggest that individuals at risk for developing CVD later in life may be identified before the AR by elevated BMI at 15 months and slow BMI declines. Due to the importance of early intervention in altering lifelong health trajectories, consistent BMI monitoring is essential in identifying high-risk children. PMID:25746172

  9. Distress tolerance as a predictor of adherence to a yoga intervention: Moderating roles of BMI and body image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baird, S.O.; Hopkins, L.B.; Medina, J.L.; Rosenfield, D.; Powers, M.B.; Smits, J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether distress tolerance, body image, and body mass index (BMI) predicted adherence to a yoga intervention. Participants were 27 women who participated in a yoga intervention as part of a randomized controlled trial. Attendance and distress tolerance were assessed weekly, and

  10. Trends in BMI of urban Australian adults, 1980-2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Helen L; Wolfe, Rory; Haby, Michelle M

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse changes in the distribution of BMI in Australia between 1980 and 2000. DESIGN: Data were from the 1980, 1983 and 1989 National Heart Foundation Risk Factor Prevalence Study, the 1995 National Nutrition Survey and the 1999/2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study...... of 7.4 kg/m2 at the higher end for women aged 55-64 years. While the prevalence of obesity (BMI >or= 30 kg/m2) doubled, the prevalence of obesity class III (BMI >or= 40 kg/m2) increased fourfold. CONCLUSIONS: BMI in urban Australian adults has increased and its distribution has become increasingly...... right-skewed. This has resulted in a large increase in the prevalence of obesity, particularly the more severe levels of obesity. It will be important to monitor changes in the different classes of obesity and the extent to which obesity interventions both shift the BMI distribution leftwards...

  11. Childhood BMI growth trajectories and endometrial cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Julie; Gamborg, Michael; Tilling, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we found that excess weight already in childhood has positive associations with endometrial cancer, however, associations with changes in body mass index (BMI) during childhood are not well understood. Therefore, we examined whether growth in childhood BMI is associated with endometrial......, each girl's BMI growth trajectory was estimated as the deviance from the average trajectory for three different growth periods (6.25-7.99, 8.0-10.99, 11.0-14.0 years). Via a link to health registers, 1020 endometrial cancer cases were identified, and Cox regressions were performed. A greater gain...... in BMI during childhood was positively associated with endometrial cancer but no differences between the different growth periods were detected in models adjusted for baseline BMI. The hazard ratios for the associations with overall growth during childhood per 0.1 z-score increase were 1.15 (95...

  12. Education modifies genetic and environmental influences on BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Wendy; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Skytthe, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is more common among the less educated, suggesting education-related environmental triggers. Such triggers may act differently dependent on genetic and environmental predisposition to obesity. In a Danish Twin Registry survey, 21,522 twins of same-sex pairs provided zygosity, height, weight......, and education data. Body mass index (BMI = kg weight/ m height(2)) was used to measure degree of obesity. We used quantitative genetic modeling to examine how genetic and shared and nonshared environmental variance in BMI differed by level of education and to estimate how genetic and shared and nonshared...... environmental correlations between education and BMI differed by level of education, analyzing women and men separately. Correlations between education and BMI were -.13 in women, -.15 in men. High BMI's were less frequent among well-educated participants, generating less variance. In women, this was due...

  13. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  14. Genes implicated in serotonergic and dopaminergic functioning predict BMI categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuemmeler, Bernard F; Agurs-Collins, Tanya D; McClernon, F Joseph; Kollins, Scott H; Kail, Melanie E; Bergen, Andrew W; Ashley-Koch, Allison E

    2008-02-01

    This study addressed the hypothesis that variation in genes associated with dopamine function (SLC6A3, DRD2, DRD4), serotonin function (SLC6A4, and regulation of monoamine levels (MAOA) may be predictive of BMI categories (obese and overweight + obese) in young adulthood and of changes in BMI as adolescents transition into young adulthood. Interactions with gender and race/ethnicity were also examined. Participants were a subsample of individuals from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally representative sample of adolescents followed from 1995 to 2002. The sample analyzed included a subset of 1,584 unrelated individuals with genotype data. Multiple logistic regressions were conducted to evaluate the associations between genotypes and obesity (BMI > 29.9) or overweight + obese combined (BMI > or = 25) with normal weight (BMI = 18.5-24.9) as a referent. Linear regression models were used to examine change in BMI from adolescence to young adulthood. Significant associations were found between SLC6A4 5HTTLPR and categories of BMI, and between MAOA promoter variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) among men and categories of BMI. Stratified analyses revealed that the association between these two genes and excess BMI was significant for men overall and for white and Hispanic men specifically. Linear regression models indicated a significant effect of SLC6A4 5HTTLPR on change in BMI from adolescence to young adulthood. Our findings lend further support to the involvement of genes implicated in dopamine and serotonin regulation on energy balance.

  15. Are BMI and Sedentariness Correlated? A Multilevel Study in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayse Natacha Gomes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI and sedentariness (Sed in children and to examine the influence of child and school correlates on their variation. The sample comprises 580 children (337 girls, 9–11 years. Sedentariness was assessed with an accelerometer, and BMI was computed. Child- and school-level covariates were analyzed using multilevel models. No significant correlation between Sed and BMI was found. School context explains 5% and 1.5% of the total variance in Sed and BMI, respectively. At the child level, only moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was associated with both Sed (β = −0.02 ± 0.002 and BMI (β = −0.005 ± 0.002. Sleep time is related to Sed (β = −0.42 ± 0.04, while sex (β = 1.97 ± 0.13, biological maturity (β = 1.25 ± 0.07, media in the bedroom (β = 0.26 ± 0.08 and healthy (β = −0.09 ± 0.03 and unhealthy (β = −0.07 ± 0.04 diet scores were associated with BMI. None of the school-level covariates were related to BMI, but access to cafeteria (β = −0.97 ± 0.25, playground equipment (β = −0.67 ± 0.20 and restaurants (β = 0.16 ± 0.08 were related to Sed. In conclusion, Sed and BMI were not correlated. Further, they have different correlates, while children’s traits seem to play more relevant roles in their differences in Sed and BMI than the school milieu. This information should be taken into account when strategies to reduce Sed and BMI are implemented.

  16. P16 (INK4a) Deletion Ameliorated Renal Tubulointerstitial Injury in a Stress-induced Premature Senescence Model of Bmi-1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jianliang; Tao, Jianguo; Gu, Xin; Yu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Rong; Zuo, Guoping; Li, Qing; Lv, Xianhui; Miao, Dengshun

    2017-08-08

    To determine whether p16 (INK4a) deletion ameliorated renal tubulointerstitial injury by inhibiting a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in Bmi-1-deficient (Bmi-1 (-/-)) mice, renal phenotypes were compared among 5-week-old Bmi-1 and p16 (INK4a) double-knockout, and Bmi-1 (-/-) and wild-type mice. Fifth-passage renal interstitial fibroblasts (RIFs) from the three groups were analyzed for senescence and proliferation. The effect of Bmi-1 deficiency on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was examined in Bmi-1-knockdown human renal proximal tubular epithelial (HK2) cells, which were treated with concentrated conditioned medium (CM) from the fifth-passage renal interstitial fibroblasts (RIFs) of above three group mice or with exogenous TGF-β1. Our results demonstrated that p16 (INK4a) deletion largely rescued renal aging phenotypes caused by Bmi-1 deficiency, including impaired renal structure and function, decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, senescence and SASP, DNA damage, NF-κB and TGF-β1/Smad signal activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. P16 (INK4a) deletion also promoted proliferation, reduced senescence and SASP of RIFs and subsequently inhibited EMT of Bmi-1-knockdown HK2 cells. TGF-β1 further induced the EMT of Bmi-1-knockdown HK2 cells. Thus, p16 (INK4a) positive senescent cells would be a therapeutic target for preventing renal tubulointerstitial injury.

  17. Is BMI a valid measure of obesity in postmenopausal women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banack, Hailey R; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Hovey, Kathleen M; Stokes, Andrew

    2017-11-13

    Body mass index (BMI) is a widely used indicator of obesity status in clinical settings and population health research. However, there are concerns about the validity of BMI as a measure of obesity in postmenopausal women. Unlike BMI, which is an indirect measure of obesity and does not distinguish lean from fat mass, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) provides a direct measure of body fat and is considered a gold standard of adiposity measurement. The goal of this study is to examine the validity of using BMI to identify obesity in postmenopausal women relative to total body fat percent measured by DXA scan. Data from 1,329 postmenopausal women participating in the Buffalo OsteoPerio Study were used in this analysis. At baseline, women ranged in age from 53 to 85 years. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m and body fat percent (BF%) greater than 35%, 38%, or 40%. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value to evaluate the validity of BMI-defined obesity relative BF%. We further explored the validity of BMI relative to BF% using graphical tools, such as scatterplots and receiver-operating characteristic curves. Youden's J index was used to determine the empirical optimal BMI cut-point for each level of BF% defined obesity. The sensitivity of BMI-defined obesity was 32.4% for 35% body fat, 44.6% for 38% body fat, and 55.2% for 40% body fat. Corresponding specificity values were 99.3%, 97.1%, and 94.6%, respectively. The empirical optimal BMI cut-point to define obesity is 24.9 kg/m for 35% BF, 26.49 kg/m for 38% BF, and 27.05 kg/m for 40% BF according to the Youden's index. Results demonstrate that a BMI cut-point of 30 kg/m does not appear to be an appropriate indicator of true obesity status in postmenopausal women. Empirical estimates of the validity of BMI from this study may be used by other investigators to account for BMI-related misclassification in older women.

  18. Earlier BMI rebound and lower pre-rebound BMI as risk of obesity among Japanese preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, N; Isojima, T; Yokoya, S; Tanaka, T; Ono, A; Yokomichi, H; Yamagata, Z; Tanaka, S; Matsubara, H; Ishikuro, M; Kikuya, M; Chida, S; Hosoya, M; Kuriyama, S; Kure, S

    2017-10-03

    Longitudinal growth data of children were analyzed to clarify the relationship between the timing of body mass index (BMI) rebound and obesity risk in later ages. Of 54 558 children born between April 2004 and March 2005 and longitudinally measured in April and October every year in the preschool period, 15 255 children were analyzed wherein no longitudinal measurement is missing after 1 year of age. BMI rebound age was determined as the age with smallest BMI value across longitudinal individual data after 1 year of age. Rebound age was compared between overweight and non-overweight groups. The subjects were divided into groups based on the timing of rebound. The sex- and age-adjusted mean of the BMI, height and weight s.d. scores for age group, along with 6 months weight and height gain, were compared among groups using analysis of covariance. Among those who were overweight at 66-71 months of age, BMI rebound age obtained at approximately 3 years of age was compared with the non-overweight group, whose BMI rebound age was utmost 66 months or later (PBMI age group showed that earlier BMI rebound results in larger BMI (PBMI rebound earlier than 30 months of age, low BMI was observed (PBMI rebound among groups with rebound age earlier than 60 months of age (PBMI rebound timing with pre-rebound low BMI leads to greater childhood obesity risk; hence, early detection and prevention is necessary for such cases.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 24 October 2017; doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.242.

  19. The effects of stress on body weight: biological and psychological predictors of change in BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Cliff; Troop, Nicholas; Connan, Frances; Treasure, Janet; Campbell, Iain C

    2007-12-01

    To investigate individual differences in the effects of stress on BMI. Participants were 71 healthy women volunteers enrolled in a university-based nurse practitioner program. Predictors of change in BMI were hypothesized to be cortisol secretion, dietary restraint, binging, mastery, mood, and eating attitudes. Measures were made at the beginning of the academic semester and 12 weeks later during the participants' examination period. The women were of normal weight (BMI 25.2 +/- 4.3) for their age [43; standard deviation (SD), 7]. By the examination period, 40 had gained weight (mean, 5.5 pounds; SD, 2.2), 19 lost weight (mean, 2.5 pounds; SD, 1.5), and 12 had stable weight. BMI, salivary cortisol secretion, binging behavior, depression, and anxiety increased significantly, whereas scores on dietary restraint, weight, shape, and eating concerns, and mastery decreased significantly. Regression analysis showed that change in daily cortisol secretion significantly predicted change in BMI and that mastery significantly moderated this relationship. However, a reduction in dietary restraint was a perfect mediator of this relationship. Change in cortisol secretion also significantly predicted change in dietary restraint, and this was moderated by dietary restraint at the beginning of the academic semester. Reduction in dietary restraint was also predicted by a reduction in mastery and weight concern. We identified individual differences that confer vulnerability to weight gain during stressful life events (dietary restraint and mastery). Given that women are exposed to daily stressors and use cognitive strategies to restrain their dietary intake, increasing awareness of the role of stress on eating behavior and weight is an important goal.

  20. Dietary patterns as predictors of body fat and BMI in women: a factor analytic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Larry A; Tucker, Jared M; Bailey, Bruce W; LeCheminant, James D

    2015-01-01

    To identify independent patterns of diet using factor analysis to determine the extent to which dietary patterns account for differences in body fat percentage (BF%) and body mass index (BMI). Also, to ascertain the extent to which the associations are influenced by age, education, menopause, energy intake, and physical activity. Study design was cross-sectional. Study setting was approximately 20 cities in the Mountain West. The study included 281 apparently healthy female nonsmokers. Diet was assessed using 7-day weighed food records, and foods were categorized using the American Diabetes and American Dietetic Associations Exchange Lists and expressed as servings per 1000 kcal. BF% was measured using the Bod Pod, and physical activity was estimated using accelerometers worn for 1 week. We used factor analysis, general linear models, and partial correlations. Three dietary patterns were identified: (1) Prudent Pattern, (2) Low-fat Milk, and (3) Meat. Higher consumption of the Prudent Pattern corresponded with significantly lower BF% (F = 8.5, p = .0038) and BMI (F = 4.4, p = .0363). The Low-fat Milk pattern was inversely related to BF% (F = 5.4, p = .0207) and BMI (F = 9.5, p = .0023). Higher intake of the Meat pattern was related to higher levels of BF% (F = 4.5, p = .0346) and BMI (F = 4.2, p = .0418). These findings support an association between dietary patterns and body composition. Dietary patterns reflect the complex interrelationships inherent in day-to-day eating and are strongly related to differences in BF% and BMI in women.

  1. A requiem for BMI in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Maria Cristina; Correia, Maria Isabel T D; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2017-09-01

    Quetelet reported in the nineteenth century that body weight varies across adults with the square of height. Quetelet's index, now known as BMI, is accepted by most health organizations as a first-level measure of body fat and as a screening tool for diagnosing excess adiposity. Modern imaging methods now, however, indicate that BMI has limited predictive value for estimating body fat and lean mass at the individual level. The use of BMI as a measure of body composition in the clinical setting should therefore be challenged. Recent studies enrolling cancer and surgical patients reported discrepant outcomes when BMI was used as a body composition surrogate. Sarcopenia, loss of muscle mass and function, which affects the elderly and those with chronic and acute diseases, is not accurately diagnosed with BMI. The distribution of adipose tissue is not characterized by BMI, specific measures of which have greater predictive value for metabolic impairments and clinical outcomes. BMI, as the traditional tool for assessing malnutrition and obesity, is not appropriate to accurately differentiate between important body weight components and therefore should not be used for making clinically important decisions at the individual patient level.

  2. Bmi-1: At the crossroads of physiological and pathological biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Resham; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Street, Mark; Dey, Anindya; Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar

    2015-01-01

    Bmi-1 is a member of the Polycomb Repressor Complex1 that mediates gene silencing by regulating chromatin structure and is indispensable for self-renewal of both normal and cancer stem cells. Despite three decades of research that have elucidated the transcriptional regulation, post-translational modifications and functions of Bmi-1 in regulating the DNA damage response, cellular bioenergetics, and pathologies, the entire potential of a protein with such varied function remains to be realized. This review attempts to synthesize the current knowledge on Bmi-1 with an emphasis on its role in both normal physiology and cancer. Additionally, since cancer stem cells are emerging as a new paradigm for therapy resistance, the role of Bmi-1 in this perspective is also highlighted. The wide spectrum of malignancies that implicate Bmi-1 as a signature for stemness and oncogenesis also make it a suitable candidate for therapy. Nonetheless new approaches are vitally needed to further characterize physiological roles of Bmi-1 with the long-term goal of using Bmi-1 as a prognostic marker and a therapeutic target. PMID:26448339

  3. Education modifies genetic and environmental influences on BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendy; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Skytthe, Axel; Deary, Ian J; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2011-01-19

    Obesity is more common among the less educated, suggesting education-related environmental triggers. Such triggers may act differently dependent on genetic and environmental predisposition to obesity. In a Danish Twin Registry survey, 21,522 twins of same-sex pairs provided zygosity, height, weight, and education data. Body mass index (BMI = kg weight/ m height(2)) was used to measure degree of obesity. We used quantitative genetic modeling to examine how genetic and shared and nonshared environmental variance in BMI differed by level of education and to estimate how genetic and shared and nonshared environmental correlations between education and BMI differed by level of education, analyzing women and men separately. Correlations between education and BMI were -.13 in women, -.15 in men. High BMI's were less frequent among well-educated participants, generating less variance. In women, this was due to restriction of all forms of variance, overall by a factor of about 2. In men, genetic variance did not vary with education, but results for shared and nonshared environmental variance were similar to those for women. The contributions of the shared environment to the correlations between education and BMI were substantial among the well-educated, suggesting importance of familial environmental influences common to high education and lower BMI. Family influence was particularly important in linking high education and lower levels of obesity.

  4. Sleep duration and BMI in a sample of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katie A; Wall, Melanie M; Larson, Nicole I; Laska, Melissa N; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-06-01

    We examined the association between sleep duration and BMI in young adults, and, specifically, in possible gender differences. The population-based sample included 955 young men and 1051 young women (mean age = 25.3 years, s.d. = 1.7) who participated in Project EAT-III (Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults)-III. In 2008-2009, study participants completed a survey, on which they reported their weight, height, and typical bed and awakening times. Gender-specific regression models estimated cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and weight status, adjusting for age, race, SES, family structure, depressive symptoms, physical activity, and sedentary and dietary behaviors. In multivariable-adjusted linear regression models, an hour increase in sleep was associated with a -0.38 (-0.70, -0.048) BMI in men. Men who slept BMI (27.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 26.9, 28.9) than men who slept 7-9 h/day (26.5; 95% CI: 26.1, 27.0). Prevalence estimates of overweight (BMI ≥ 25) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30) were also inversely associated with sleep duration among men. Sleep duration was not associated with BMI, overweight, or obesity in women. Among women, but not men, there was a statistically significant positive association between trouble falling or staying asleep and mean BMI. Sleep may be an important modifiable risk factor for obesity, particularly in young adult men.

  5. Prospective associations between sedentary lifestyle and BMI in midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Laust H; Siegler, Ilene C; Barefoot, John C; Grønbaek, Morten; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2006-08-01

    A strong positive cross-sectional relationship between BMI and a sedentary lifestyle has been consistently observed in numerous studies. However, it has been questioned whether high BMI is a determinant or a consequence of a sedentary lifestyle. Using data from four follow-ups of the University of North Carolina Alumni Heart Study, we examined the prospective associations between BMI and sedentary lifestyle in a cohort of 4595 middle-aged men and women who had responded to questionnaires at the ages of 41 (standard deviation 2.3), 44 (2.3), 46 (2.0), and 54 (2.0). BMI was consistently related to increased risk of becoming sedentary in both men and women. The odds ratios of becoming sedentary as predicted by BMI were 1.04 (95% confidence limits, 1.00, 1.07) per 1 kg/m(2) from ages 41 to 44, 1.10 (1.07, 1.14) from ages 44 to 46, and 1.12 (1.08, 1.17) from ages 46 to 54. Controlling for concurrent changes in BMI marginally attenuated the effects. Sedentary lifestyle did not predict changes in BMI, except when concurrent changes in physical activity were taken into account (p sedentary lifestyle but did not provide unambiguous evidence for an effect of sedentary lifestyle on weight gain.

  6. Endoscopic Treatment of Weight Regain Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunaldi, Vitor Ottoboni; Jirapinyo, Pichamol; de Moura, Diogo Turiani H; Okazaki, Ossamu; Bernardo, Wanderley M; Galvão Neto, Manoel; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Santo, Marco Aurélio; de Moura, Eduardo G H

    2018-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure. Despite its high efficacy, some patients regain part of their lost weight. Several endoscopic therapies have been introduced as alternatives to treat weight regain, but most of the articles are relatively small with unclear long-term data. To systematically assess the efficacy of endoscopic therapies for weight regain after RYGB. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane, OVID, CINAHL/EBSCo, LILACS/Bireme, and gray literature. Primary outcomes were absolute weight loss (AWL), excess weight loss (EWL), and total body weight loss (TBWL). Thirty-two studies were included in qualitative analysis. Twenty-six described full-thickness (FT) endoscopic suturing and pooled AWL, EWL, and TBWL at 3 months were 8.5 ± 2.9 kg, 21.6 ± 9.3%, and 7.3 ± 2.6%, respectively. At 6 months, they were 8.6 ± 3.5 kg, 23.7 ± 12.3%, and 8.0 ± 3.9%, respectively. At 12 months, they were 7.63 ± 4.3 kg, 16.9 ± 11.1%, and 6.6 ± 5.0%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that all outcomes were significantly higher in the group with FT suturing combined with argon plasma coagulation (APC) (p < 0.0001). Meta-analysis included 15 FT studies and showed greater results. Three studies described superficial-thickness suturing with pooled AWL of 3.0 ± 3.8, 4.4 ± 0.07, and 3.7 ± 7.4 kg at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Two articles described APC alone with mean AWL of 15.4 ± 2.0 and 15.4 ± 9.1 kg at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Full-thickness suturing is effective at treating weight regain after RYGB. Performing APC prior to suturing seems to result in greater weight loss. Head-to-head studies are needed to confirm our results. Few studies adequately assess effectiveness of other endoscopic techniques.

  7. Selective regain of egfr gene copies in CD44+/CD24-/low breast cancer cellular model MDA-MB-468

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Antje

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased transcription of oncogenes like the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is frequently caused by amplification of the whole gene or at least of regulatory sequences. Aim of this study was to pinpoint mechanistic parameters occurring during egfr copy number gains leading to a stable EGFR overexpression and high sensitivity to extracellular signalling. A deeper understanding of those marker events might improve early diagnosis of cancer in suspect lesions, early detection of cancer progression and the prediction of egfr targeted therapies. Methods The basal-like/stemness type breast cancer cell line subpopulation MDA-MB-468 CD44high/CD24-/low, carrying high egfr amplifications, was chosen as a model system in this study. Subclones of the heterogeneous cell line expressing low and high EGF receptor densities were isolated by cell sorting. Genomic profiling was carried out for these by means of SNP array profiling, qPCR and FISH. Cell cycle analysis was performed using the BrdU quenching technique. Results Low and high EGFR expressing MDA-MB-468 CD44+/CD24-/low subpopulations separated by cell sorting showed intermediate and high copy numbers of egfr, respectively. However, during cell culture an increase solely for egfr gene copy numbers in the intermediate subpopulation occurred. This shift was based on the formation of new cells which regained egfr gene copies. By two parametric cell cycle analysis clonal effects mediated through growth advantage of cells bearing higher egfr gene copy numbers could most likely be excluded for being the driving force. Subsequently, the detection of a fragile site distal to the egfr gene, sustaining uncapped telomere-less chromosomal ends, the ladder-like structure of the intrachromosomal egfr amplification and a broader range of egfr copy numbers support the assumption that dynamic chromosomal rearrangements, like breakage-fusion-bridge-cycles other than proliferation drive the gain

  8. Carbohydrate quality and quantity affect glucose and lipid metabolism during weight regain in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerpusch, Merit; Enderle, Janna; Eggeling, Ben; Braun, Wiebke; Johannsen, Maike; Pape, Detlef; Müller, Manfred J; Bosy-Westphal, Anja

    2013-10-01

    In this controlled, parallel-group feeding trial, we examined the impact of carbohydrate (CHO) intake and glycemic index (GI) on glucose and lipid metabolism during refeeding after weight loss. Healthy men (n = 32 total, age: 25.5 ± 3.9 y, BMI: 23.5 ± 2.0 kg/m2) overconsumed diets containing either 50% or 65% CHO for 1 wk (+50% of energy requirements) and then underwent 3 wk of calorie restriction (CR; -50%) followed by 2 wk of overconsuming (refeeding, +50%) the same diet but with either a low or high GI (40 vs.70 during CR, 41 vs.74 during refeeding) so that glycemic load (GL; dietary CHO content x GI) differed between groups during all phases. Glucose profiles were assessed by continuous interstitial glucose monitoring, insulin sensitivity (IS) by fasting blood sampling, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and liver fat by MRI. Daytime area under the curve-glucose during refeeding was higher with high compared with low GI (P = 0.01) and 65% compared with 50% CHO intake (P = 0.05) and correlated with dietary GL (r = 0.71; P fat also improved with CR (-17 ± 38 mg/dL and -1.1 ± 1.3%; P fat were elevated above baseline values with 65% CHO intake only (+59.9 ± 37.5 mg/dL and +1.1 ± 1.7%, P-interaction fat.

  9. CERN safety week

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    Following an increase in the number of accidents in 2008, the Safety Commission is organising a CERN safety week from 8 to 12 June for riders of bicycles, scooters and motorbikes. We invite you to take part in the programme, which will be held in the Main Building (Bldg. 500) and will consist of an exhibition, organised events and hands-on activities, including demonstrations of emergency braking, a driving simulator, simulation of what it feels like to drive under the influence of alcohol, demonstrations by the Fire Brigade, video projections, etc. There will also be a number of prizes to be won. Please sign up via your DSO.

  10. Soft Robotics Week

    CERN Document Server

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Iida, Fumiya; Cianchetti, Matteo; Margheri, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive, timely snapshot of current research, technologies and applications of soft robotics. The different chapters, written by international experts across multiple fields of soft robotics, cover innovative systems and technologies for soft robot legged locomotion, soft robot manipulation, underwater soft robotics, biomimetic soft robotic platforms, plant-inspired soft robots, flying soft robots, soft robotics in surgery, as well as methods for their modeling and control. Based on the results of the second edition of the Soft Robotics Week, held on April 25 – 30, 2016, in Livorno, Italy, the book reports on the major research lines and novel technologies presented and discussed during the event.

  11. Low birth weight, adult BMI and inflammation in middle age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jolene Lee Masters; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Avlund, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the association between birthweight and adult BMI with inflammation in middle age measured by interleukin 6 (IL- 6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), interleukin 18 (IL-18), high sensitivity Creactive protein (hsCRP) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (tnf-α). The study is based...... on participants with continued participation in the Copenhagen Perinatal cohort and Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank clinical examination (n=1,719). Birthweight was negatively associated with hsCRP and IL-18.No association was identified with tnf-α, IL-6 and IL-10. Adult BMI was positively and significantly...... associated with all measures of inflammation besides IL-10. Finally, participants in both the lowest tertile of birthweight and highest tertile of adult BMI had the highest levels of all inflammatory markers. Low birthweight and high adult BMI are risk factors for inflammation in middle age. While...

  12. Orthorexia nervosa: Assessment and correlates with gender, BMI, and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Crystal D; Samaghabadi, Razieh O; Hughes, Elizabeth M

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether orthorexia nervosa (ON; characterized by an obsessive fixation on eating healthy) may be predicted from the demographics variables of gender and BMI, and from the personality variables of self-esteem, narcissism, and perfectionism. Participants were 459 college students, who completed several online questionnaires that assessed these variables. A principal components analysis confirmed that the Eating Habits Questionnaire (Gleaves, Graham, & Ambwani, 2013) assesses three internally-consistent ON components: healthy eating behaviors, problems resulting from those behaviors, and positive feelings associated with those behaviors. A MANOVA and its tests of between subjects effects then revealed significant interactions between gender and BMI, such that for men but not women, a higher BMI was associated with greater symptomatology for all ON components. Partial correlation analyses, after controlling for gender and BMI, revealed that both narcissism and perfectionism were positively correlated with all aspects of ON symptomatology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ATLAS overview week highlights

    CERN Document Server

    D. Froidevaux

    2005-01-01

    A warm and early October afternoon saw the beginning of the 2005 ATLAS overview week, which took place Rue de La Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the heart of the Quartier Latin in Paris. All visitors had been warned many times by the ATLAS management and the organisers that the premises would be the subject of strict security clearance because of the "plan Vigipirate", which remains at some level of alert in all public buildings across France. The public building in question is now part of the Ministère de La Recherche, but used to host one of the so-called French "Grandes Ecoles", called l'Ecole Polytechnique (in France there is only one Ecole Polytechnique, whereas there are two in Switzerland) until the end of the seventies, a little while after it opened its doors also to women. In fact, the setting chosen for this ATLAS overview week by our hosts from LPNHE Paris has turned out to be ideal and the security was never an ordeal. For those seeing Paris for the first time, there we...

  14. Weight-loss-associated changes in bone mineral density and bone turnover after partial weight regain with or without aerobic exercise in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, P S; Rector, R S; Linden, M A; Warner, S O; Dellsperger, K C; Chockalingam, A; Whaley-Connell, A T; Liu, Y; Thomas, T R

    2012-05-01

    Moderate, long-term weight loss results in the loss of bone mass in overweight or obese premenopausal women. However, whether these changes persist during weight maintenance or regain remains to be determined. Overweight or obese (body mass index: 25.8-42.5 kg/m(2)) women (n=40) with at least two risk factors for the metabolic syndrome participated in this 12-month study that examined the effects of prescribed weight loss and regain, with or without exercise, on bone turnover and on bone mineral density (BMD) in a subset of participants (n=24). During the first 6 month, participants lost ≈ 10% of their initial body weight via energy restriction and supervised aerobic exercise. Following weight loss, participants were randomly assigned to either an exercise or a no exercise treatment for the regain (+50% of weight lost) phase. A one-way (time) repeated measures one-factor analysis of variance (RMANOVA) tested the effects of weight loss on BMD and bone turnover, and a two-way RMANOVA (time, exercise) was used to examine the effects of exercise during weight regain. Hip (P=0.007) and lumbar spine (P=0.05) BMD decreased with weight loss, and remained reduced after weight regain with or without exercise. Likewise, the weight-loss-associated increases in osteocalcin (Pexercise. The results of the present study, which is the first to examine changes in bone mass and turnover during carefully controlled weight regain, suggest that weight-loss-induced perturbations in bone mass and turnover persist after partial weight regain, regardless of whether regular weight-bearing aerobic exercise was continued.

  15. Reduced cortical thickness associated with visceral fat and BMI

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, Ralf; Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Machann, Jürgen; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Structural brain imaging studies have shown that obesity is associated with widespread reductions in gray matter (GM) volume. Although the body mass index (BMI) is an easily accessible anthropometric measure, substantial health problems are more related to specific body fat compartments, like visceral adipose tissue (VAT). We investigated cortical thickness measures in a group of 72 healthy subjects (BMI range 20–35 kg/m2, age range 19–50 years). Multiple regression analyses were performed us...

  16. Secular changes in BMI and the associations between risk factors and BMI in children born 29 years apart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S M; Taylor, R W; Taylor, B J

    2013-02-01

    What is already known about this subject Factors associated with children's body mass index (BMI) include parents' BMIs, birth weight, maternal smoking, sleep duration and television watching. Few studies have attempted to quantify either changes in the association between risk factors and BMI or the contribution of changes in the risk factors to increases in BMI over a generation. What this study adds The magnitude of the association between most risk factors and children's BMIs has not changed over a 29-year period. Increases in the population level of mothers' body mass index (BMI) explains ~20% of the increase in children's BMI whereas the smaller increase in fathers' BMI contributes only 6%. Maternal smoking, despite the decrease in prevalence, contributes ~17%. Using two cohorts born 29 years apart in Dunedin, New Zealand we aim to examine changes in risk factors and their associations with body mass index (BMI) at ages 3 and 7 years, and estimate their contribution to the secular changes in BMI at age 7 years. Birth weight and anthropometric measures at ages 3, 5 and 7 years were obtained for 974 participants in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (DMHDS), born in 1972-1973, and 241 in the Family Lifestyle, Activity, Movement and Eating Study (FLAME), born in 2001-2002. Information about maternal age, education and smoking in pregnancy, as well as breastfeeding, children's television time and time in bed, was obtained by questionnaire. The increase in BMI over the 29-year period was 0.84 (95% CI 0.61, 1.06) kg m(-2) at age 7. A 1-unit difference in the mother's BMI was associated with a 0.06 (0.03, 0.08) kg m(-2) difference in offspring in both studies; the 3.4 (2.8, 4.0) kg m(-2) increase in the mothers' BMIs accounts for a change of 0.19 kg m(-2) in the children's BMI. The much smaller generational increase in fathers' BMI (0.7 kg m(-2) ) correspondingly had a more limited effect on change in child BMI over time (0.06 kg m(-2

  17. Comparison of orlistat and sibutramine in an obesity management program: efficacy, compliance, and weight regain after noncompliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, A; Erdogan, M F; Cin, M O; Cesur, M; Baskal, N

    2006-12-01

    To describe the comparative efficacy of orlistat and sibutramine in an obesity management program, with specific attention to compliance and weight regains after noncompliance. We prospectively evaluated 182 obese patients who were randomized to treatment with orlistat (n=98) or sibutramine (n=84) along with the diet and exercise prescriptions. Compliance (or compliant patient) was defined as adherence to scheduled visit times (at 3- month intervals) and following the prescribed drug regimen. A telephone survey was conducted in case of noncompliance. Significant body weights improvements were seen in both treatment groups. Patients lost a mean of 7.6+/-2.8% and 10.5+/-2.9% of initial body weights after a mean drug use of 8.8+/-5.7 and 8.3+/-3.7 months in the orlistat and sibutramine groups, respectively (p0.05 between groups). Both drugs in an obesity management program can achieve substantial weight loss. However, noncompliance and rebound weight regain after noncompliance are considerable problems.

  18. Self-monitoring of spontaneous physical activity and sedentary behavior to prevent weight regain in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklas, Barbara J; Gaukstern, Jill E; Beavers, Kristen M; Newman, Jill C; Leng, Xiaoyan; Rejeski, W Jack

    2014-06-01

    The objective was to determine whether adding a self-regulatory intervention (SRI) focused on self-monitoring of spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and sedentary behavior to a standard weight loss intervention improved maintenance of lost weight. Older (65-79 years), obese (BMI = 30-40 kg/m(2) ) adults (n = 48) were randomized to a 5-month weight loss intervention involving a hypocaloric diet (DIET) and aerobic exercise (EX) with or without the SRI to promote SPA and decrease sedentary behavior (SRI + DIET + EX compared with DIET + EX). Following the weight loss phase, both groups transitioned to self-selected diet and exercise behavior during a 5-month follow-up. Throughout the 10-months, the SRI + DIET + EX group utilized real-time accelerometer feedback for self-monitoring. There was an overall group by time effect of the SRI (P weight and regained more weight than SRI + DIET + EX. The average weight regain during follow-up was 1.3 kg less in the SRI + DIET + EX group. Individuals in this group maintained approximately 10% lower weight than baseline compared with those in the DIET + EX group whom maintained approximately 5% lower weight than baseline. Addition of a SRI, designed to increase SPA and decrease sedentary behavior, to a standard weight loss intervention enhanced successful maintenance of lost weight. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  19. Reduced cortical thickness associated with visceral fat and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Ralf; Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Machann, Jürgen; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Structural brain imaging studies have shown that obesity is associated with widespread reductions in gray matter (GM) volume. Although the body mass index (BMI) is an easily accessible anthropometric measure, substantial health problems are more related to specific body fat compartments, like visceral adipose tissue (VAT). We investigated cortical thickness measures in a group of 72 healthy subjects (BMI range 20-35 kg/m(2), age range 19-50 years). Multiple regression analyses were performed using VAT and BMI as predictors and age, gender, total surface area and education as confounds. BMI and VAT were independently associated with reductions in cortical thickness in clusters comprising the left lateral occipital area, the left inferior temporal cortex, and the left precentral and inferior parietal area, while the right insula, the left fusiform gyrus and the right inferior temporal area showed a negative correlation with VAT only. In addition, we could show significant reductions in cortical thickness with increasing VAT adjusted for BMI in the left temporal cortex. We were able to detect widespread cortical thinning in a young to middle-aged population related to BMI and VAT; these findings show close resemblance to studies focusing on GM volume differences in diabetic patients. This may point to the influence of VAT related adverse effects, like low-grade inflammation, as a potentially harmful factor on brain integrity already in individuals at risk of developing diabetes, metabolic syndromes and arteriosclerosis.

  20. Reduced cortical thickness associated with visceral fat and BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Veit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural brain imaging studies have shown that obesity is associated with widespread reductions in gray matter (GM volume. Although the body mass index (BMI is an easily accessible anthropometric measure, substantial health problems are more related to specific body fat compartments, like visceral adipose tissue (VAT. We investigated cortical thickness measures in a group of 72 healthy subjects (BMI range 20–35 kg/m2, age range 19–50 years. Multiple regression analyses were performed using VAT and BMI as predictors and age, gender, total surface area and education as confounds. BMI and VAT were independently associated with reductions in cortical thickness in clusters comprising the left lateral occipital area, the left inferior temporal cortex, and the left precentral and inferior parietal area, while the right insula, the left fusiform gyrus and the right inferior temporal area showed a negative correlation with VAT only. In addition, we could show significant reductions in cortical thickness with increasing VAT adjusted for BMI in the left temporal cortex. We were able to detect widespread cortical thinning in a young to middle-aged population related to BMI and VAT; these findings show close resemblance to studies focusing on GM volume differences in diabetic patients. This may point to the influence of VAT related adverse effects, like low-grade inflammation, as a potentially harmful factor on brain integrity already in individuals at risk of developing diabetes, metabolic syndromes and arteriosclerosis.

  1. Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Liraglutide 3.0 mg in Individuals with BMI above and below 35 kg/m²: A Post-hoc Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Carel; Aroda, Vanita; Hemmingsson, Joanna; Cancino, Ana Paula; Christensen, Rune; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier

    2017-11-17

    To investigate whether the efficacy and safety of liraglutide 3.0 mg differed between two subgroups, BMI 27 to post-hoc analysis of two 56-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (SCALE Obesity and Prediabetes; SCALE Diabetes). Subgroup differences in treatment effects of liraglutide 3.0 mg were evaluated by testing the interaction between treatment group and baseline BMI subgroup. Significantly greater weight loss (0-56 weeks) was observed with liraglutide 3.0 mg versus placebo in all patient groups while on treatment. There was no evidence that the weight-lowering effect of liraglutide 3.0 mg differed between BMI subgroups (interaction p > 0.05). Similarly, for most secondary endpoints significantly greater improvements were observed with liraglutide 3.0 mg versus placebo, with no indication treatment effects differing between subgroups. The safety profile of liraglutide 3.0 mg was broadly similar across BMI subgroups. This post-hoc analysis did not indicate any differences in the treatment effects, or safety profile, of liraglutide 3.0 mg for individuals with BMI 27 to <35 or ≥35 kg/m². Liraglutide 3.0 mg can therefore be considered for individuals with a BMI of ≥35 as well as for those with a BMI of 27 to <35 kg/m². © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  2. Maternal Pre-pregnancy BMI and Reproductive Health of Daughters in Young Adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariansdatter, Saga Elise; Ernst, Andreas; Toft, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the possible associations between maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and daughters' age of menarche and subsequent markers of reproductive health. Methods Nine hundred eighty-five pregnant women (80 %) were enrolled at their routine 30th week examinations in 1988......-1989. In 2008, a follow-up questionnaire was completed for 365 daughters (83 %), while 267 daughters (61 %) participated in a subsequent clinical examination. Main outcome measures were age of menarche, reproductive hormone profile, and ovarian follicle count in daughters. Results Daughters of mothers...

  3. Programs of Active Aging – A Relation between BMI and Triglycerides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Honório

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To enhance the importance of physical activity programs for elderly and their influence on BMI and triglycerides. Methods: The sample consisted of 91 elderly individuals, 63 females and 28 males aged between 65 and 78 years of age. All seniors practice water activities, including swimming and gymnastics. Were analyzed with respect to two aspects: BMI, Triglycerides and practice time, seniors who were physically active at least 2 months, and seniors who maintained habits of physical activity between 2 and 6 months and still accumulated 30 or more minutes of other activities. We have established contingency tables were confronted where the variables described in the analysis. Results: It was found that elderly who maintained physical activity programs were broader outnumbered those who were overweight and obesity rates in Table I of BMI, and lower triglycerides values. Conclusions: We concluded therefore that physical activity programs that contemplate 2 or more hours per week, duly organized and systematized constitute a positive factor in combating inactivity and turn into a more active and cheerful elderly.

  4. Maternal BMI, IGF-I Levels, and Birth Weight in African American and White Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana C. Vidal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At birth, elevated IGF-I levels have been linked to birth weight extremes; high birth weight and low birth weight are risk factors for adult-onset chronic diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. We examined associations between plasma IGF-I levels and birth weight among infants born to African American and White obese and nonobese women. Prepregnancy weight and height were assessed among 251 pregnant women and anthropometric measurements of full term infants (≥37 weeks of gestation were taken at birth. Circulating IGF-I was measured by ELISA in umbilical cord blood plasma. Linear regression models were utilized to examine associations between birth weight and high IGF-I, using the bottom two tertiles as referents. Compared with infants with lower IGF-I levels (≤3rd tertile, those with higher IGF-I levels (>3rd tertile were 130 g heavier at birth, (β-coefficient=230, se=58.0, P=0.0001, after adjusting for gender, race/ethnicity, gestational age, delivery route, maternal BMI and smoking. Stratified analyses suggested that these associations are more pronounced in infants born to African American women and women with BMI ≥30 kg/m2; the cross product term for IGF-I and maternal BMI was statistically significant (P≤0.0004. Our findings suggest that the association between IGF-I levels and birth weight depends more on maternal obesity than African American race/ethnicity.

  5. Change in BMI accurately predicted by social exposure to acquaintances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloritun, Rahman O; Ouarda, Taha B M J; Moturu, Sai; Madan, Anmol; Pentland, Alex Sandy; Khayal, Inas

    2013-01-01

    Research has mostly focused on obesity and not on processes of BMI change more generally, although these may be key factors that lead to obesity. Studies have suggested that obesity is affected by social ties. However these studies used survey based data collection techniques that may be biased toward select only close friends and relatives. In this study, mobile phone sensing techniques were used to routinely capture social interaction data in an undergraduate dorm. By automating the capture of social interaction data, the limitations of self-reported social exposure data are avoided. This study attempts to understand and develop a model that best describes the change in BMI using social interaction data. We evaluated a cohort of 42 college students in a co-located university dorm, automatically captured via mobile phones and survey based health-related information. We determined the most predictive variables for change in BMI using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method. The selected variables, with gender, healthy diet category, and ability to manage stress, were used to build multiple linear regression models that estimate the effect of exposure and individual factors on change in BMI. We identified the best model using Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and R(2). This study found a model that explains 68% (pchange in BMI. The model combined social interaction data, especially from acquaintances, and personal health-related information to explain change in BMI. This is the first study taking into account both interactions with different levels of social interaction and personal health-related information. Social interactions with acquaintances accounted for more than half the variation in change in BMI. This suggests the importance of not only individual health information but also the significance of social interactions with people we are exposed to, even people we may not consider as close friends.

  6. BMI at birth and overweight at age four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Jonathan D; Taylor, Yhenneko; Mowrer, Lauren; Winter, Katherine M; Dulin, Michael F

    Extensive investigation has established that an elevated weight at birth is associated with subsequent obesity and obesity related negative health outcomes. The significance of overweight at birth, however, remains ill-defined. Historically, it has been difficult to approximate adiposity in infancy in a way that is both simple and meaningful. Body-mass-index (BMI) growth charts for children younger than two years of age only became available in 2006 when published by the WHO. This retrospective cohort analysis utilised anthropometric data extracted from the electronic medical record of a large integrated healthcare system in North Carolina. BMI and weight-for-age (WFA) >85% of WHO growth charts measured newborn overweight and macrosomia respectively. Logistic regression models assessed the associations between newborn macrosomia and overweight and overweight at 4 years of age, as well as associations with maternal BMI. Models included demographic data, gestational age, and maternal diabetes status as covariates. Both BMI and WFA >85% at birth were significantly associated with overweight at age 4 years. However, the greater odds of overweight was associated with newborn BMI >85%, with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 2.08 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-3.08) versus 1.57 (95% CI: 1.08-2.27). Maternal obesity was also more robustly correlated with newborn BMI >85%, AOR of 4.14 (95% CI: 1.6-10.7), than with newborn WFA >85%, AOR of 3.09 (95% CI: 1.41-6.77). BMI >85% at birth is independently associated with overweight at 4 years. Newborn overweight is perhaps superior to newborn macrosomia in predicting overweight at age 4. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Change in BMI accurately predicted by social exposure to acquaintances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman O Oloritun

    Full Text Available Research has mostly focused on obesity and not on processes of BMI change more generally, although these may be key factors that lead to obesity. Studies have suggested that obesity is affected by social ties. However these studies used survey based data collection techniques that may be biased toward select only close friends and relatives. In this study, mobile phone sensing techniques were used to routinely capture social interaction data in an undergraduate dorm. By automating the capture of social interaction data, the limitations of self-reported social exposure data are avoided. This study attempts to understand and develop a model that best describes the change in BMI using social interaction data. We evaluated a cohort of 42 college students in a co-located university dorm, automatically captured via mobile phones and survey based health-related information. We determined the most predictive variables for change in BMI using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO method. The selected variables, with gender, healthy diet category, and ability to manage stress, were used to build multiple linear regression models that estimate the effect of exposure and individual factors on change in BMI. We identified the best model using Akaike Information Criterion (AIC and R(2. This study found a model that explains 68% (p<0.0001 of the variation in change in BMI. The model combined social interaction data, especially from acquaintances, and personal health-related information to explain change in BMI. This is the first study taking into account both interactions with different levels of social interaction and personal health-related information. Social interactions with acquaintances accounted for more than half the variation in change in BMI. This suggests the importance of not only individual health information but also the significance of social interactions with people we are exposed to, even people we may not consider as

  8. Eating tasty food to cope. Longitudinal association with BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggiano, M M; Wenger, L E; Turan, B; Tatum, M M; Morgan, P R; Sylvester, M D

    2015-04-01

    The goals of this study were to determine if a change in certain motives to eat highly palatable food, as measured by the Palatable Eating Motives Scale (PEMS), could predict a change in body mass index (BMI) over time, to assess the temporal stability of these motive scores, and to test the reliability of previously reported associations between eating tasty foods to cope and BMI. BMI, demographics, and scores on the PEMS and the Binge Eating Scale were obtained from 192 college students. Test-retest analysis was performed on the PEMS motives in groups varying in three gap times between tests. Regression analyses determined what PEMS motives predicted a change in BMI over two years. The results replicated previous findings that eating palatable food for Coping motives (e.g., to forget about problems, reduce negative feelings) is associated with BMI. Test-retest correlations revealed that motive scores, while somewhat stable, can change over time. Importantly, among overweight participants, a change in Coping scores predicted a change in BMI over 2 years, such that a 1-point change in Coping predicted a 1.76 change in BMI (equivalent to a 10.5 lb. change in body weight) independent of age, sex, ethnicity, and initial binge-eating status (Cohen's f(2) effect size = 1.44). The large range in change of Coping scores suggests it is possible to decrease frequency of eating to cope by more than 1 scale point to achieve weight losses greater than 10 lbs. in young overweight adults, a group already at risk for rapid weight gain. Hence, treatments aimed specifically at reducing palatable food intake for coping reasons vs. for social, reward, or conformity reasons, should help achieve a healthier body weight and prevent obesity if this motive-type is identified prior to significant weight gain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Two-Year BMI Outcomes From a School-Based Intervention for Nutrition and Exercise: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Laura M; Elliott, Marc N; Cowgill, Burton O; Klein, David J; Hawes-Dawson, Jennifer; Uyeda, Kimberly; Schuster, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the long-term effects on BMI of a randomized controlled trial of Students for Nutrition and Exercise, a 5-week, middle school-based obesity prevention intervention combining school-wide environmental changes, encouragement to eat healthy school cafeteria foods, and peer-led education and marketing. We randomly selected schools from the Los Angeles Unified School District and assigned 5 to the intervention group and 5 to a wait-list control group. Of the 4022 seventh-graders across schools, a total of 1368 students had their height and weight assessed at baseline and 2 years' postintervention. A multivariable linear regression was used to predict BMI percentile at ninth grade by using BMI percentile at seventh grade, school indicators, and sociodemographic characteristics (child gender, age, Latino race/ethnicity, US-born status, and National School Lunch Program eligibility [as a proxy for low-income status]). Although the Students for Nutrition and Exercise intervention did not exhibit significant effects on BMI percentile overall, intervention students who were classified as obese at baseline (in seventh grade) showed significant reductions in BMI percentile in ninth grade (b = -2.33 percentiles; SE, 0.83; P = .005) compared with control students. This outcome translated into ∼9 pounds (∼4.1 kg) lower expected body weight after 2 years for an obese student in the intervention school at the mean height and age of the sample at baseline. Multilevel school-based interventions can have long-term effects on BMI among students who are obese. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which school-based obesity interventions can affect BMI over time. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. A Novel Method to Describe Early Offspring Body Mass Index (BMI Trajectories and to Study Its Determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Carles

    Full Text Available Accurately characterizing children's body mass index (BMI trajectories and studying their determinants is a statistical challenge. There is a need to identify early public health measures for obesity prevention. We describe a method that allows studies of the determinants of height, weight and BMI growth up to five years of age. We illustrated this method using maternal smoking during pregnancy as one of the early-life factors that is potentially involved in prenatal programming of obesity.Individual height and weight trajectories were fitted using the Jenss-Bayley model on 28,381 and 30,515 measurements, respectively, from 1,666 children to deduce BMI trajectories. We assessed global associations between smoking and growth trajectories and cross-sectional associations at specific ages.Children exposed in late pregnancy had a 0.24 kg/m2 (95% confidence interval: 0.07, 0.41 higher BMI at 5 years of age compared with non-exposed children. Although the BMIs of children exposed during late pregnancy became significantly higher compared with those of non-exposed children from 2 years onwards, the trajectories began to diverge during the first weeks of life.Our method is relevant for studies on the relationships between individual-level exposures and the dynamics and shapes of BMI growth during childhood, including key features such as instantaneous growth velocities and the age or BMI value at the BMI infancy peak that benefit from the monotonic pattern of height and weight growth.

  11. A memorable week

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    This has been a memorable week for CERN, starting with the award of a Special Fundamental Physics Prize and ending with the handover of the CERN Council Presidency from Michel Spiro to Agnieszka Zalewska. In between, the LHC team demonstrated its expertise with a successful pilot run with 25 nanosecond bunch spacing, a new application for Associate Membership was received, and we had good news on the budget.   The award of the Fundamental Physics Prize, and the manner in which it was divided between ATLAS, CMS and the LHC, is fitting recognition of the efforts of the thousands of people who have contributed over many years to the success of our flagship scientific endeavour. In making the award, the Milner Foundation aims to raise the profile of fundamental physics and its value to society. The Fundamental Physics Prize comes hot on the heels of the European Physical Society’s first Edison Volta Prize, which Sergio Bertolucci, Steve Myers and I were honoured to accept on behalf of t...

  12. Maternal Recreational Exercise during Pregnancy in relation to Children’s BMI at 7 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Schou Andersen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposures during fetal life may have long-term health consequences including risk of childhood overweight. We investigated the associations between maternal recreational exercise during early and late pregnancy and the children’s body mass index (BMI and risk of overweight at 7 years. Data on 40,280 mother-child pairs from the Danish National Birth Cohort was used. Self-reported information about exercise was obtained from telephone interviews around gestational weeks 16 and 30. Children’s weight and height were reported in a 7-year follow-up and used to calculate BMI and overweight status. Data was analyzed using multiple linear and logistic regression models. Recreational exercise across pregnancy was inversely related to children’s BMI and risk of overweight, but all associations were mainly explained by smoking habits, socioeconomic status, and maternal pre-pregnancy BMI. Additionally, we did not find exercise intensity or changes in exercise habits in pregnancy related to the children’s BMI or risk of overweight.

  13. Impact of Pre-Pregnancy BMI on B Vitamin and Inflammatory Status in Early Pregnancy: An Observational Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lise Bjørke-Monsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Maternal nutrition and inflammation have been suggested as mediators in the development of various adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with maternal obesity. We have investigated the relation between pre-pregnancy BMI, B vitamin status, and inflammatory markers in a group of healthy pregnant women. Cobalamin, folate, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, and riboflavin; and the metabolic markers homocysteine, methylmalonic acid, and 3-hydroxykynurenine/xanthurenic acid ratio (HK/XA; and markers of cellular inflammation, neopterin and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio (KTR were determined in pregnancy week 18 and related to pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI, in 2797 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa. Pre-pregnancy BMI was inversely related to folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP, and riboflavin (p < 0.001, and associated with increased neopterin and KTR levels (p < 0.001. Inflammation seemed to be an independent predictor of low vitamin B6 status, as verified by low PLP and high HK/XA ratio. A high pre-pregnancy BMI is a risk factor for low B vitamin status and increased cellular inflammation. As an optimal micronutrient status is vital for normal fetal development, the observed lower B vitamin levels may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with maternal obesity and B vitamin status should be assessed in women with high BMI before they get pregnant.

  14. Genes and the intergenerational transmission of BMI and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Timothy J; Thompson, Owen

    2016-12-01

    This paper compares the strength of intergenerational transmission of body mass index (BMI) and obesity in a sample of adoptees relative to a matched sample of biological children with similar observable characteristics. We find that BMI and obesity are strongly correlated among biological parent-child pairs, but there are no significant intergenerational associations in these health traits among adoptive parent-child pairs. The intergenerational elasticity of BMI for children to their parents is 0.2 in the matched biological sample, but indistinguishable from zero for adopted children with a standard error more than three times as large as the coefficient. Under reasonable assumptions, these findings indicate that the intergenerational transmission of BMI and obesity occurs primarily through genetic mechanisms. Additional analyses of transmission rates by parental gender and among step-parents and step-children support this conclusion. The role of determinants of BMI and obesity in the household environment in relation to our findings is discussed. Given the negative consequences of obesity on earnings and other economic measures, our results suggest that the genetic transmission of weight problems contributes substantially to intergenerational persistence in economic outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Appetitive traits and relationships with BMI in adults: Development of the Adult Eating Behaviour Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunot, Claudia; Fildes, Alison; Croker, Helen; Llewellyn, Clare H; Wardle, Jane; Beeken, Rebecca J

    2016-10-01

    The Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) is a validated parent-report measure of appetitive traits associated with weight in childhood. There is currently no matched measure for use in adults. The aim of this study was to adapt the CEBQ into a self-report Adult Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (AEBQ) to explore whether the associations between appetitive traits and BMI observed in children are present in adults. Two adult samples were recruited one year apart from an online survey panel in 2013 (n = 708) and 2014 (n = 954). Both samples completed the AEBQ and self-reported their weight and height. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to derive 35 items for the AEBQ in Sample 1 and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to replicate the factor structure in Sample 2. Reliability of the AEBQ was assessed using Cronbach's α and a two week test-retest in a sub-sample of 93 participants. Correlations between appetitive traits measured by the AEBQ and BMI were calculated. PCA and CFA results showed the AEBQ to be a reliable questionnaire (Cronbach's α > 0.70) measuring 8 appetitive traits similar to the CEBQ [Hunger (H), Food Responsiveness (FR), Emotional Over-Eating (EOE), Enjoyment of Food (EF), Satiety Responsiveness (SR), Emotional Under-eating (EUE), Food Fussiness (FF) and Slowness in Eating (SE)]. Associations with BMI showed FR, EF (p < 0.05) and EOE (p < 0.01) were positively associated and SR, EUE and SE (p < 0.01) were negatively associated. Overall, the AEBQ appears to be a reliable measure of appetitive traits in adults which translates well from the validated child measure. Adults with a higher BMI had higher scores for 'food approach' traits (FR, EOE and EF) and lower scores for 'food avoidance' traits (SR, EUE and SE). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Blood Pressure Variation Throughout Pregnancy According to Early Gestational BMI: A Brazilian Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Rebelo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The maternal cardiovascular system undergoes progressive adaptations throughout pregnancy, causing blood pressure fluctuations. However, no consensus has been established on its normal variation in uncomplicated pregnancies. Objective: To describe the variation in systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP levels during pregnancy according to early pregnancy body mass index (BMI. Methods: SBP and DBP were measured during the first, second and third trimesters and at 30-45 days postpartum in a prospective cohort of 189 women aged 20-40 years. BMI (kg/m2 was measured up to the 13th gestational week and classified as normal-weight (<25.0 or excessive weight (≥25.0. Longitudinal linear mixed-effects models were used for statistical analysis. Results: A decrease in SBP and DBP was observed from the first to the second trimester (βSBP=-0.394; 95%CI: -0.600- -0.188 and βDBP=-0.617; 95%CI: -0.780- -0.454, as was an increase in SBP and DBP up to 30-45 postpartum days (βSBP=0.010; 95%CI: 0.006-0.014 and βDBP=0.015; 95%CI: 0.012-0.018. Women with excessive weight at early pregnancy showed higher mean SBP in all gestational trimesters, and higher mean DBP in the first and third trimesters. Excessive early pregnancy BMI was positively associated with prospective changes in SBP (βSBP=7.055; 95%CI: 4.499-9.610 and in DBP (βDBP=3.201; 95%CI: 1.136-5.266. Conclusion: SBP and DBP decreased from the first to the second trimester and then increased up to the postpartum period. Women with excessive early pregnancy BMI had higher SBP and DBP than their normal-weight counterparts throughout pregnancy, but not in the postpartum period.

  17. BMI is not a good indicator for metabolic risk in adolescent girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMI (kg/m2) does not provide information about body fat percentile.Adolescents with BMI girls with low BMI can have high body fat percentile. We hypothesized that these girls are already insulin resi...

  18. Maintain and Regain Well Clear: Maneuver Guidance Designs for Pilots Performing the Detect-and-Avoid Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Kevin J.; Roberts, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    In order to support the future expansion and integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), ongoing research efforts have sought to produce findings that inform the minimum display information elements required for acceptable UAS pilot response times and traffic avoidance. Previous simulations have revealed performance benefits associated with DAA displays containing predictive information and suggestive maneuver guidance tools in the form of banding. The present study investigated the impact of various maneuver guidance display configurations on detect-and-avoid (DAA) task performance in a simulated airspace environment. UAS pilots ability to maintain DAA well clear was compared between displays with either the presence or absence of green DAA bands, which indicated conflict-free flight regions. Additional display comparisons assessed pilots ability to regain DAA well clear with two different guidance presentations designed to aid in DAA well clear recovery during critical encounters. Performance implications and display considerations for future UAS DAA systems are discussed.

  19. Tracking of BMI z Scores for Severe Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, David S; Berenson, Gerald S

    2017-09-01

    Although the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) growth charts are widely used in studies of childhood obesity, BMI z scores are known to be inaccurate at values greater than the 97th percentile. We used longitudinal data from 6994 children in the Bogalusa Heart Study who were examined multiple times to compare tracking of 3 BMI metrics: BMI-for-sex/age z score (BMIz), BMI expressed as a percentage of the 95th percentile (%BMIp95), and levels of BMI z score that adjust for the compression of very high z scores (adjusted z score [BMIaz]). The later 2 metrics, unlike BMIz, do not have an upper limit. The mean interval between examinations was 2.8 years. We were particularly interested in these metrics among children with obesity or severe obesity (%BMIp95 ≥120%). Although there was little difference in the tracking of the 3 metrics in the overall sample, among 247 children with severe obesity, the correlation of BMIz levels between examinations (r = 0.46) was substantially weaker than those for BMIaz and %BMIp95 (r = 0.65 and 0.61). Age-stratified analyses indicated that the weak tracking of BMIz was particularly evident before the age of 10 years (r = 0.36 vs 0.57 and 0.60). Several children with severe obesity showed BMIz decreases between examinations despite having BMI increases of over 5. Among children with severe obesity, the tracking of BMIz is weak. This is because of the constraints in converting very high BMIs into z scores based on the CDC growth charts. Rather than using BMIz, it would be preferable to express very high BMIs relative to the CDC 95th percentile or to use BMIaz. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Alternative regression models to assess increase in childhood BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansmann Ulrich

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body mass index (BMI data usually have skewed distributions, for which common statistical modeling approaches such as simple linear or logistic regression have limitations. Methods Different regression approaches to predict childhood BMI by goodness-of-fit measures and means of interpretation were compared including generalized linear models (GLMs, quantile regression and Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS. We analyzed data of 4967 children participating in the school entry health examination in Bavaria, Germany, from 2001 to 2002. TV watching, meal frequency, breastfeeding, smoking in pregnancy, maternal obesity, parental social class and weight gain in the first 2 years of life were considered as risk factors for obesity. Results GAMLSS showed a much better fit regarding the estimation of risk factors effects on transformed and untransformed BMI data than common GLMs with respect to the generalized Akaike information criterion. In comparison with GAMLSS, quantile regression allowed for additional interpretation of prespecified distribution quantiles, such as quantiles referring to overweight or obesity. The variables TV watching, maternal BMI and weight gain in the first 2 years were directly, and meal frequency was inversely significantly associated with body composition in any model type examined. In contrast, smoking in pregnancy was not directly, and breastfeeding and parental social class were not inversely significantly associated with body composition in GLM models, but in GAMLSS and partly in quantile regression models. Risk factor specific BMI percentile curves could be estimated from GAMLSS and quantile regression models. Conclusion GAMLSS and quantile regression seem to be more appropriate than common GLMs for risk factor modeling of BMI data.

  1. Impact of baseline BMI on glycemic control and weight change with metformin monotherapy in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients: phase IV open-label trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linong Ji

    Full Text Available Differences exist between treatment recommendations regarding the choice of metformin as first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes patients according to body mass index (BMI. This study compared the efficacy of metformin monotherapy among normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.In this prospective, multicenter, open-label study in China, patients aged 23-77 years were enrolled 1∶1:1 according to baseline BMI: normal-weight (BMI 18.5-23.9 kg/m(2; n = 125; overweight (BMI 24.0-27.9 kg/m(2; n = 122 or obese (BMI ≥28 kg/m(2; n = 124. Extended-release metformin was administered for 16 weeks (500 mg/day, up-titrated weekly to a maximum 2,000 mg/day. The primary efficacy endpoint was the effect of baseline BMI on glycemic control with metformin monotherapy, measured as the change from baseline in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c at week 16 compared among BMI groups using ANCOVA. Other endpoints included comparisons of metformin's effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG, lipid levels and body weight.Mean HbA1c decreases at week 16, adjusted for baseline values, were -1.84%, -1.78% and -1.78% in normal-weight, overweight and obese patients, (P = 0.664; body weight decreased by 2.4%, 3.9% and 3.5%, respectively. FPG levels decreased similarly over time in all BMI groups (P = 0.461 and changes from baseline in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C did not differ significantly among BMI groups at week 16 (P = 0.143 and 0.451, respectively.Baseline BMI had no impact on glycemic control, weight change or other efficacy measures with metformin monotherapy. These data suggest that normal-weight type 2 diabetes patients would derive the same benefits from first-line treatment with metformin as overweight and obese patients, and are not at increased risk of excess weight loss.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00778622.

  2. Food neophobia associates with lower dietary quality and higher BMI in Finnish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaapila, Antti J; Sandell, Mari A; Vaarno, Jenni; Hoppu, Ulla; Puolimatka, Tuuli; Kaljonen, Anne; Lagström, Hanna

    2015-08-01

    Food neophobia has been associated with decreased consumption of vegetables mainly among children. We hypothesized that food neophobia in adults is also associated with lower overall dietary quality and higher BMI. Data for the present cross-sectional analyses were derived from parents in a follow-up family study. The STEPS study, a longitudinal study of health and development of a cohort of children born in south-west Finland. The parents, 1178 women (age 19-45 years, mean 32·2 years) and 1013 men (age 18-57 years, mean 34·1 years), completed a questionnaire at home when their child was 13 months old. The questionnaire included the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS; range 10-70), the Index of Diet Quality (IDQ; range 0-16) and a measure of fruit and vegetable consumption. At that time the participants' height and weight were also measured by a research nurse to calculate BMI. Compared with the food neophilics (FNS score 10-24), the food neophobics (FNS score 40-70) consumed fewer vegetables (women: 15 v. 10 portions/week; men: 13 v. 7 portions/week), scored lower on the IDQ (women: 9·7 v. 8·5; men: 8·8 v. 7·8) and had higher BMI (women: 24·2 v. 26·0 kg/m²; men: 26·5 v. 27·5 kg/m²) as tested by one-way ANOVA, with all P values food neophobics followed a diet lower in nutritional quality than did the food neophilics, especially regarding vegetables. Food neophobia may complicate adaptation to dietary recommendations and predispose to overweight.

  3. Maternal Prepregnancy BMI and Risk of Cerebral Palsy in Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forthun, Ingeborg; Wilcox, Allen J.; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in offspring. METHODS: The study population consisted of 188 788 children in the Mothers and Babies in Norway and Denmark CP study, using data from 2 population-based, prospective birth...... the national CP registries. Associations between maternal prepregnancy BMI and CP in offspring were investigated by using log-binomial regression models. RESULTS: The 2 cohorts had 390 eligible cases of CP (2.1 per 1000 live-born children). Compared with mothers in the lower normal weight group, mothers...

  4. Sleep, but not other daily routines, mediates the association between maternal employment and BMI for preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, Katherine E; Liechty, Janet M; Wu, Chi-Fang

    2014-12-01

    It has been established that the more time mothers spend working outside of the home, the more likely their preschool-aged children are to be overweight. However, the mechanisms explaining this relationship are not well understood. Our objective was to explore child sleep, dietary habits, TV time, and family mealtime routines as mediators of the relationship between maternal employment status (full-time, part-time, and no or minimal employment) and child body mass index (BMI) percentile. Data were drawn from waves 1 and 2 of STRONG Kids, a prospective panel study examining childhood obesity among parent-preschooler dyads (n = 247). Mothers reported their own work hours, their child's hours of nighttime sleep, dietary habits, TV time, and mealtime routines. Trained staff measured child height and weight. Compared to working 0-19 h/week, both full-time (>35 h/week) and part-time (20-34 h/week) employment predicted higher child BMI percentile 1 year later. Hours of child nighttime sleep partially mediated the association between maternal full-time employment and child BMI percentile. Adjusting for individual and family characteristics, children whose mothers were employed full time were less likely to sleep longer hours than children whose mothers were employed 0-19 h/week (b = -0.49, p sleep was associated with higher BMI percentile (b = -7.31, p sleep for young children's health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Maternal Recreational Exercise during Pregnancy in relation to Children’s BMI at 7 Years of Age

    OpenAIRE

    Camilla Schou Andersen; Mette Juhl; Michael Gamborg; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Ellen Aagaard Nohr

    2012-01-01

    Exposures during fetal life may have long-term health consequences including risk of childhood overweight. We investigated the associations between maternal recreational exercise during early and late pregnancy and the children’s body mass index (BMI) and risk of overweight at 7 years. Data on 40,280 mother-child pairs from the Danish National Birth Cohort was used. Self-reported information about exercise was obtained from telephone interviews around gestational weeks 16 and 30. Children’s w...

  6. Clipboard: Brain–muscle interface: The next-generation BMI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-05-16

    muscle interface: The next-generation BMI. Radhika Rajan Neeraj Jain. Volume 36 Issue 2 June 2011 pp 201-203. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/036/02/0201- ...

  7. ADRB3 Polymorphism Associated with BMI Gain in Japanese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouhei Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the Trp64Arg polymorphism in the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB3: rs4994 and BMI and serological and anthropometric data in healthy Japanese. Methods. Healthy Japanese recruited in a large-scale integrated manufacturing facility in Japan (=1355; age: 37.25 ± 9.43; BMI: 22.86 ± 3.46 were eligible for analysis. The anthropometric data and serological data were measured during a comprehensive health check, and a self-reporting questionnaire was used to assess lifestyle habits (current exercise, smoking status, alcohol intake, and working style and weight at age 20. Genotyping for the ADRB3 polymorphism was performed by PCR-RFLP method. Results. Among 1355 participants, the genotype frequencies of the Trp/Trp, Trp/Arg, and Arg/Arg variants were 920 (67.9%, 394 (29.1%, and 41 (3.05%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, a multiple linear regression model in men for the adjustment of age, drinking habits, smoking habits, exercise habits, working status and serological measurements statistically showed an overall weak significance between annual BMI gain from age 20 and age, LDL or ADRB3 polymorphism. Conclusions. The level of LDL, age, and ADRB3 polymorphism (Arg/Arg genotype were statistically associated with annual BMI gain in Japanese men.

  8. Seasonal BMI differences between restrictive and purging anorexia nervosa subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Angela; Caggianesse, Veronica; Carrera, Olaia; Graell, Montserrat; Morandé, Gonzalo; Gutiérrez, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal differences in anorexia nervosa is an area of research which has received scarce attention in the literature. The aim of this study was to explore patterns of seasonal variation in body weight in anorexia nervosa patients admitted to an eating disorders unit from January 2007 to December 2011. Anorexia nervosa restrictive (ANR) and binge eating/purging (ANBP) subtypes were compared with respect to BMI on admission during the Warm and Cold Semester, and in terms of lenght of hospital stay. The main result was that BMI differences between ANBP and ANR patients were due to bodyweight differences during the colder months of the year (p < 0.01) whereas no difference in bodyweight on admission was observed between both subtypes during the Warm Semester months. Furthermore, ANR patients' bodyweight was lower when admitted during the Cold compared to the Warm Semester (p < 0.05). Length of stay was significantly associated with reduced BMI in ANR patients (p < 0.01), but not so for ANBP patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the literature providing data on seasonal variations in the BMI on admission of anorexia nervosa patients, and in the length of hospitalization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Prevalence of Obesity as Indicated by BMI and Waist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in most developed countries and in urban areas of many less developed countries has been increasing markedly over the past twenty years. This study\\'s aims were to determine the prevalence of obesity using BMI and waist circumference among Nigerian adults ...

  10. Differences in the association between childhood trauma and BMI in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Forty-four normalweight (BMI30kg/m2), black and white premenopausal women completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), which retrospectively assessed emotional and physical neglect, and emotional, physical and sexual abuse in childhood. Results: Body composition ...

  11. Community-Specific BMI Cutoff Points for South Indian Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Kishore Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze multiparameters related to total body composition, with specific emphasis on obesity in South Indian females, in order to derive community-specific BMI cutoff points. Patients and Methods. A total number of 87 females (of age 37.33±13.12 years from South Indian Chennai urban population participated in this clinical study. Body composition analysis and anthropometric measurements were acquired after conducting careful clinical examination. Results. BMI demonstrated high significance when normal group (21.02±1.47 kg/m2 was compared with obese group (29.31±3.95 kg/m2, <0.0001. BFM displayed high significance when normal group (14.92±4.28 kg was compared with obese group (29.94 ± 8.1 kg, <0.0001. Conclusion. Community-specific BMI cutoffs are necessary to assess obesity in different ethnic groups, and relying on WHO-based universal BMI cutoff points would be a wrong strategy.

  12. Social ideological influences on reported food consumption and BMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei C; Worsley, Anthony; Cunningham, Everarda G

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between ideological beliefs, perceptions of the importance of health behaviours, health attitudes, food consumption, and Body Mass Index (BMI). A behavioural model was hypothesized based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975). Methods A survey was conducted among shoppers aged between 40 and 70 years at Eastland Shopping Centre, Melbourne, Australia. The hypothesized model was tested with this empirical data (n = 410) for younger (n = 151) and older (n = 259) age groups using structural equation modelling. Results The findings generally support the study hypotheses. For both groups, egalitarianism had a direct and positive influence on perceptions of the importance of health behaviours. Materialism and masculinity impacted negatively on health attitudes, which positively influenced importance of health behaviours. Perceptions of importance of health behaviours impacted positively on the consumption of healthy foods such as vegetables and fruits, but negatively on consumption of unhealthy foods including sweets and fats. However, BMI was significantly influenced by the consumption of unhealthy foods (e.g., sugar and fats) only for the younger age group. Hence, the associations between beliefs, attitudes, consumption behaviours, and BMI outcomes differed between younger and older age populations. Conclusion Social ideological beliefs appear to influence health attitudes and thereafter, the consumption of healthy and unhealthy foods and BMI via different pathways. PMID:18412977

  13. Social ideological influences on reported food consumption and BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worsley Anthony

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between ideological beliefs, perceptions of the importance of health behaviours, health attitudes, food consumption, and Body Mass Index (BMI. A behavioural model was hypothesized based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975. Methods A survey was conducted among shoppers aged between 40 and 70 years at Eastland Shopping Centre, Melbourne, Australia. The hypothesized model was tested with this empirical data (n = 410 for younger (n = 151 and older (n = 259 age groups using structural equation modelling. Results The findings generally support the study hypotheses. For both groups, egalitarianism had a direct and positive influence on perceptions of the importance of health behaviours. Materialism and masculinity impacted negatively on health attitudes, which positively influenced importance of health behaviours. Perceptions of importance of health behaviours impacted positively on the consumption of healthy foods such as vegetables and fruits, but negatively on consumption of unhealthy foods including sweets and fats. However, BMI was significantly influenced by the consumption of unhealthy foods (e.g., sugar and fats only for the younger age group. Hence, the associations between beliefs, attitudes, consumption behaviours, and BMI outcomes differed between younger and older age populations. Conclusion Social ideological beliefs appear to influence health attitudes and thereafter, the consumption of healthy and unhealthy foods and BMI via different pathways.

  14. Pattern of body mass index (BMI) among adult hypertensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent times Asaba – the capital of Delta State, Nigeria – is witnessing a rapid growth in urbanization and fast food eateries. Several studies have shown that Blood Pressure (BP) is directly associated with Body Mass Index (BMI) in populations worldwide. However, some variations exist in the pattern of the association ...

  15. Role of sleep timing in caloric intake and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Kelly G; Reid, Kathryn J; Kern, Andrew S; Zee, Phyllis C

    2011-07-01

    Sleep duration has been linked to obesity and there is also an emerging literature in animals demonstrating a relationship between the timing of feeding and weight regulation. However, there is a paucity of research evaluating timing of sleep and feeding on weight regulation in humans. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of sleep timing in dietary patterns and BMI. Participants included 52 (25 females) volunteers who completed 7 days of wrist actigraphy and food logs. Fifty-six percent were "normal sleepers" (midpoint of sleep ≥5:30 AM). Late sleepers had shorter sleep duration, later sleep onset and sleep offset and meal times. Late sleepers consumed more calories at dinner and after 8:00 PM, had higher fast food, full-calorie soda and lower fruit and vegetable consumption. Higher BMI was associated with shorter sleep duration, later sleep timing, caloric consumption after 8:00 PM, and fast food meals. In multivariate models, sleep timing was independently associated with calories consumed after 8:00 PM and fruit and vegetable consumption but did not predict BMI after controlling for sleep duration. Calories consumed after 8:00 PM predicted BMI after controlling for sleep timing and duration. These findings indicate that caloric intake after 8:00 PM may increase the risk of obesity, independent of sleep timing and duration. Future studies should investigate the biological and social mechanisms linking timing of sleep and feeding in order to develop novel time-based interventions for weight management.

  16. Longitudinal association between marital disruption and child BMI and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkes, Jeremy

    2012-08-01

    This research examines whether family disruptions (i.e., divorces and separation) contribute to children's weight problems. The sample consists of 7,299 observations for 2,333 children, aged 5-14, over the 1986-2006 period, from a US representative sample from the Child and Young Adult Survey accompanying the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The study uses individual-fixed-effects models in a longitudinal framework to compare children's BMI and weight problems before and after a disruption. Furthermore, besides doing a before-after comparison for children, the study also estimates the effects at various periods relative to the disruption in order to examine whether children are affected before the disruption and whether any effects change as time passes from the disruption, as some effects may be temporary or slow to develop. Despite having a larger sample than the previous studies, the results provide no evidence that, on average, children's BMI and BMI percentile scores (measured with continuous outcomes) are affected before the disruption, after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption, relative to a baseline period a few years before the disruption. However, children experiencing a family disruption do have an increased risk of obesity (having a BMI percentile score of 95 or higher) in the two years leading up to the disruption as well as after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption.

  17. Effect of BMI on Knee Joint Torques in Ergometer Rowing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemer, Karen; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Richter, Chris; Munoz-Maldonado, Yolanda; Hamilton, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Although an authoritative panel recommended the use of ergometer rowing as a non-weight-bearing form of exercise for obese adults, the biomechanical characterization of ergometer rowing is strikingly absent. We examined the interaction between body mass index (BMI) relative to the lower extremity

  18. BMI z-score is the optimal measure of annual adiposity change in elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Mikako; Matsuo, Nobutake; Takayama, John I; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2011-11-01

    BMI or BMI% adjusted for age has been identified as the optimal measure of short-term adiposity change in kindergarten children aged 29-68 months. The optimal measure of annual adiposity change in older age children, however, has not been determined. To identify the optimal measure of annual adiposity change for Japanese children aged 6-12 years. A cohort of 669 Japanese children in one private school in Tokyo in whom height and weight were measured annually between 6 and 12 years. Each child's annual variability in adiposity was summarized by the standard deviation (SD) of BMI and BMI% adjusted for age, BMI z-score and BMI centile. The SDs were compared in overweight and non-overweight children and correlated with each child's baseline BMI z-score. The within-child BMI, BMI% and BMI centile SDs were significantly different in overweight and non-overweight children, while the BMI z-score SDs were similar in the two groups. Furthermore, the within-child BMI, BMI% and BMI centile SDs were inversely correlated with baseline BMI z-score, whereas BMI z-score SDs were not, with the exception of measurements for grade 1-2 children. The BMI z-score is the optimal measure of annual adiposity change for elementary school children.

  19. Marathon performance but not BMI affects post-marathon pro-inflammatory and cartilage biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mündermann, Annegret; Geurts, Jeroen; Hügle, Thomas; Nickel, Thomas; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Halle, Martin; Hanssen, Henner

    2017-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that changes in serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration after regular endurance training and running a marathon race depend on body mass index (BMI) and/or on marathon performance. Blood samples were collected from 45 runners of varying BMI and running experience before and after a 10-week marathon training programme and before, immediately and 24 h after a marathon race. Serum biomarker concentrations, BMI and marathon finishing time were measured. The mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) changes from before to immediately after the marathon were COMP: 4.09 U/L (3.39-4.79 U/L); TNF-α: -1.17 mg/L (-2.58 to 0.25 mg/L); IL-6: 12.0 pg/mL (11.4-12.5 pg/mL); and hsCRP: -0.08 pg/mL (-0.14 to -0.3 pg/mL). The mean (95% CI) changes from immediately after to 24 h after the marathon were COMP: 0.35 U/L (-0.88 to 1.57 U/L); TNF-α: -0.43 mg/L (-0.99 to 0.13 mg/L); IL-6: -9.9 pg/mL (-10.5 to -9.4 pg/mL); and hsCRP: 1.52 pg/mL (1.25-1.79 pg/mL). BMI did not affect changes in biomarker concentrations. Differences in marathon finishing time explained 32% of variability in changes in serum hsCRP and 28% of variability in changes in serum COMP during the 24 h recovery after the marathon race (P < 0.001). Slower marathon finishing time but not a higher BMI modulates increases in pro-inflammatory markers or cartilage markers following a marathon race.

  20. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resins are an attractive new addition to world-wide composite applications. This type of thermosetting polyimide provides several unique characteristics such as excellent physical property retention at elevated temperatures and in wet environments, constant electrical properties over a vast array of temperature settings, and nonflammability properties as well. This makes BMI a popular choice in advance composites and electronics applications [I]. Bismaleimide-2 (BMI-2) resin was used to infuse intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) based carbon fiber. Two panel configurations consisting of 4 plies with [+45deg, 90deg]2 and [0deg]4 orientations were fabricated. For tensile testing, a [90deg]4 configuration was tested by rotating the [0deg]4 configirration to lie orthogonal with the load direction of the test fixture. Curing of the BMI-2/IM7 system utilized an optimal infusion process which focused on the integration of the manufacturer-recommended ramp rates,. hold times, and cure temperatures. Completion of the cure cycle for the BMI-2/IM7 composite yielded a product with multiple surface voids determined through visual and metallographic observation. Although the curing cycle was the same for the three panellayups, the surface voids that remained within the material post-cure were different in abundance, shape, and size. For tensile testing, the [0deg]4 layup had a 19.9% and 21.7% greater average tensile strain performance compared to the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45degg] layups, respectively, at failure. For tensile stress performance, the [0deg]4 layup had a 5.8% and 34.0% greater average performance% than the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45deg] layups.

  1. Effects of social mobility from childhood to adolescence on BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Ana Paula; Gonçalves-Silva, Regina Maria Veras; Ferreira, Márcia Gonçalves; Sichieri, Rosely

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the contribution of childhood socio-economic position (SEP) and social mobility to weight change. The present study evaluated the effect of family SEP during the pre-school years and social mobility on BMI between birth and adolescence. Longitudinal. The SEP of each child's family was classified according to an asset-based wealth index as low, medium or high. Four different categories of childhood-adolescence SEP groups were created in order to examine social mobility: low-medium/high, medium-medium, medium-high and high-high/medium. For each of these categories, BMI was tracked from birth to adolescence. Linear mixed-effects models were used to analyse the data. Cuiabá-MT, Brazil. A population-based cohort of children born between 1994 and 1999 was assessed between 1999 and 2000, and again between 2009 and 2011. A total of 1716 adolescents were followed from childhood to adolescence (71·4 % of baseline). The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 20·4 % in childhood and 27·7 % in adolescence. A higher SEP in childhood was associated with a greater prevalence of overweight in adolescence. Expressive upward social mobility occurred, mainly in the lowest SEP group. There was a greater rate of change in BMI between birth and adolescence among children with a higher SEP in childhood and children who remained in the higher SEP from childhood to adolescence. Individuals from a higher SEP in childhood and those who remained in the higher social classes showed greater rate of change in BMI. Thus, initial SEP was the major determinant of changes in BMI.

  2. Gene-environment interaction study for BMI reveals interactions between genetic factors and physical activity, alcohol consumption and socioeconomic status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Torgny; Ek, Weronica E.

    2017-01-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of genetic loci to be associated with body mass index (BMI) and risk of obesity. Genetic effects can differ between individuals depending on lifestyle or environmental factors due to gene-environment interactions. In this study, we examine gene-environment interactions in 362,496 unrelated participants with Caucasian ancestry from the UK Biobank resource. A total of 94 BMI-associated SNPs, selected from a previous GWAS on BMI, were used to construct weighted genetic scores for BMI (GSBMI). Linear regression modeling was used to estimate the effect of gene-environment interactions on BMI for 131 lifestyle factors related to: dietary habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, physical activity, socioeconomic status, mental health, sleeping patterns, as well as female-specific factors such as menopause and childbirth. In total, 15 lifestyle factors were observed to interact with GSBMI, of which alcohol intake frequency, usual walking pace, and Townsend deprivation index, a measure of socioeconomic status, were all highly significant (p = 1.45*10−29, p = 3.83*10−26, p = 4.66*10−11, respectively). Interestingly, the frequency of alcohol consumption, rather than the total weekly amount resulted in a significant interaction. The FTO locus was the strongest single locus interacting with any of the lifestyle factors. However, 13 significant interactions were also observed after omitting the FTO locus from the genetic score. Our analyses indicate that many lifestyle factors modify the genetic effects on BMI with some groups of individuals having more than double the effect of the genetic score. However, the underlying causal mechanisms of gene-environmental interactions are difficult to deduce from cross-sectional data alone and controlled experiments are required to fully characterise the causal factors. PMID:28873402

  3. Creating a Global Consciousness by Embracing a World of Women: A Pedagogical Strategy Dedicated to Regaining the Momentum for Women's Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Regina M.

    2007-01-01

    If we are to regain some of the energy which characterized the Women's Movement during its earliest years and again during the 1960's and 1970's, we must endeavor to raise awareness among young people about the work for social justice that remains undone and we must find ways to inspire them to re-embrace activism and to develop, what Smyser…

  4. HOMA, BMI, and Serum Leptin Levels Variations during Antiviral Treatment Suggest Virus-Related Insulin Resistance in Noncirrhotic, Nonobese, and Nondiabetic Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 1 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Grasso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship between insulin resistance and viral load decay in nondiabetic and noncirrhotic genotype 1 chronic HCV patients during peginterferon and ribavirin treatment and the possible influence of BMI and leptin as metabolic confounders. Methods. 75 consecutive noncirrhotic, nonobese, and nondiabetic patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C treated with peginterferon alpha 2a plus ribavirin were evaluated. HOMA-IR, serum leptin, and BMI were measured in all patients at baseline and at weeks 12 and 48, whereas viral load was measured at the same time points and then 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Results. HOMA-IR was significantly associated with both BMI and leptin at baseline. During peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment, there was a significant reduction of HOMA-IR at weeks 12 and 48 from baseline (P=0.033 and 0.048, resp. in patients who achieved an early viral load decay (EVR, a trend not observed in patients who not achieved EVR. No variations during treatment were observed regarding BMI and leptin irrespective of EVR. Conclusion. The early reduction of HOMA-IR but not of BMI and leptin during antiviral treatment in noncirrhotic, chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 patients who achieved EVR suggests a viral genesis of insulin resistance in patients with nonmetabolic phenotype.

  5. Comparison among criteria to define successful weight-loss maintainers and regainers in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) and Diabetes Prevention Program trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Samantha E; Huggins, Gordon S; McCaffery, Jeanne M; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2017-12-01

    Background: Given the low rates of successful weight maintenance after lifestyle-induced weight loss, it is critical to develop approaches that distinguish successful weight-loss maintainers from regainers.Objective: The aim of this study was to compare published categorization criteria that differentiate maintainers and regainers via quantitative agreement.Design: The study used publicly available data from Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes; n = 1791) and Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP; n = 613) participants with ≥3% initial weight loss after lifestyle interventions and 4-y follow-up data. Eight previously published criteria defining maintainers and regainers were compared with respect to number of participants and concordance via agreement statistics. Criteria were assessed separately among those with 3-9% and ≥10% initial weight loss.Results: Regainers had higher body weight at year 4 than did maintainers (mean difference range: 6.6-11.9 kg in Look AHEAD; 11.5-14.6 kg in DPP; P loss. Among those with 3-9% initial weight loss in both cohorts, 9 of 28 comparisons were concordant (agreement ≥80%). Among those with ≥10% initial weight loss, 7 of 28 comparisons in Look AHEAD and 13 of 28 in the DPP were in high agreement. The definition of successful weight-loss maintenance "regaining ≤25% of initial weight loss during maintenance" showed high agreement with the most commonly used definition of "staying ≥10% below initial weight" among those with ≥10% initial weight loss (agreement: 85.0% in Look AHEAD; 87.4% in DPP). The same definition of ≤25% regain showed high agreement with the definition of staying ≥5% below initial weight among those with 3-9% initial weight loss (agreement: 91.6% in Look AHEAD; 90.5% in DPP).Conclusions: Although all of the criteria discriminated on the basis of weight loss, many showed low agreement, which limited cross-study comparisons. Among criteria with high agreement, the definition of successful weight

  6. A Comparison of Perceived and Measured Paternal Weight and BMI, and Relationship to Weight and BMI of his Children

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, RF

    2018-02-01

    Nineteen percent of 9 years old Irish children are overweight; seven percent are obese. Our aims were: to examine whether differences exist between paternal self-reported and measured height, weight and BMI in a population representative sample; and to explore paternal perceptions of their own weight status.\\r\

  7. BMI-associated alleles do not constitute risk alleles for polycystic ovary syndrome independently of BMI: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.V. Louwers (Yvonne); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); B.M. Herrera (Blanca); L. Stolk (Lisette); C.J. Groves (Christopher); T.M. Barber (Thomas); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S. Franks (Stephen); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); M.I. McCarthy (Mark)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has a strong genetic background and the majority of patients with PCOS have elevated BMI levels. The aim of this study was to determine to which extent BMI-increasing alleles contribute to risk of PCOS when contemporaneous BMI is taken into

  8. Correlation between body mass index (BMI) and the Gleason score of prostate biopsies in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Xi; Pu, Jinxian; Ouyang, Jun; Li, Gang; Ping, Jigen; Lu, Yong; Hou, Jianquan; Han, Yong

    2016-09-27

    We assessed the correlation between BMI and Gleason score in prostate biopsies in Chinese Population. In this retrospective study, we collected the Gleason score, PSA, BMI, age, race, and other related clinical data on 290 patients who had undergone prostatic biopsy. We then compared the prostate cancer detection rates and Gleason scores between the high BMI group (BMI ≥ 25; 143 cases) and low BMI group (Gleason scores (Gleason score Gleason scores (≥ 7). Within the high BMI group, 44.76% had high Gleason scores, which was significantly greater than the 38.10% in the low BMI group (P = 0.027). These results indicate that while there was no effect of BMI on the rate of positive prostate cancer biopsies, the rate of high Gleason scores was greater in the high BMI group than the normal BMI group.

  9. Peer effects in adolescent BMI: evidence from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Toni; Gil, Joan

    2013-05-01

    This paper extends the recent literature on the influence of peers on adolescent weight on three new fronts. First, based on a survey of secondary school students in Spain in which peers are formed by nominated classmate friends, we find a more powerful positive and significant causal effect of friends' mean BMI on adolescent BMI than previous US-based research. These results are in line with international data, which show that peer group contact tends to vary across countries. Our findings cover a large set of controls, fixed effects, the testing of correlated unobservables, contextual influences and instrumental variables. Second, social interactions are identified through the property of intransitivity in network relationships. Finally, we report evidence of a strong, positive effect of peer pressure on several subgroups of adolescents in an attempt to study their vulnerability to social influences. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Applying best practices from digital control systems to BMI implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlack, Charlie; Moritz, Chet; Chizeck, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Many brain-machine interface (BMI) algorithms, such as the population vector decoder, must estimate neural spike rates before transforming this information into an external output signal. Often, rate estimation is performed via the selection of a bin width corresponding to the effective sampling rate of the decoding algorithm. Here, we implement real-time rate estimation by extending prior work on the optimization of Gaussian filters for offline rate estimation. We show that higher sampling rates result in improved spike rate estimation. We further show that the choice of sampling rate need not dictate the number of parameters which must be used in an autoregressive decoding algorithm. Multiple studies in other neural signal processing contexts suggest that BMI performance could be improved substantially via careful choice of smoothing filter, discrete-time decoder representation, and sampling rate. Together, these ensure minimal deviation from the behavior of the modeled continuous-time systems.

  11. Obesity-risk behaviors and their associations with body mass index (BMI) in Korean American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myoungock; Grey, Margaret; Sadler, Lois; Jeon, Sangchoon; Nam, Soohyun; Song, Hee-Jung; Whittemore, Robin

    2017-08-03

    The purpose of the paper was to describe obesity-risk behaviors (diet, physical activity, and sedentary behavior) and examine the relationships of the obesity-risk behaviors with body mass index (BMI) in school-aged Korean American children. Korean American children have a risk of becoming overweight or obese and developing obesity-related complications; however, there is limited research about obesity-risk behaviors in Korean American children. A cross-sectional study. Obesity-risk behaviors of children were assessed with well-validated self-report questionnaires (i.e., Elementary-level School-based Nutrition Monitoring Questionnaire) from children and their mothers. Height and weight of children were measured. Data were analyzed with bivariate and multivariate analyses using mixed effects models to incorporate the correlation within siblings. A total of 170 Korean American children [mean age 10.9 (2.0) years; 52.4% girls; mean BMI 19.3(3.2); 28.7% ≥85 percentiles] participated in the study. Only 38.3% of Korean American children met established recommendations of 5 fruits/vegetables per day; 56.5% met recommendations for more than 3 days per week of vigorous physical activity, and 40.8% met recommendations for less than 2 hours of recreational screen time per day. Sixty percent and 88.8% of children met the recommendation of sleep on a weekday and weekend, respectively. Only screen time was positively associated with child BMI Z-score (β=0.08; pobesity in Korean American children and initiate clinical interventions to improve obesity-risk behaviors, especially sedentary behavior, in Korean American children. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. One-shot genitalia are not an evolutionary dead end - Regained male polygamy in a sperm limited spider species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalik Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monogynous mating systems with extremely low male mating rates have several independent evolutionary origins and are associated with drastic adaptations involving self-sacrifice, one-shot genitalia, genital damage, and termination of spermatogenesis immediately after maturation. The combination of such extreme traits likely restricts evolutionary potential perhaps up to the point of making low male mating rates irreversible and hence may constitute an evolutionary dead end. Here, we explore the case of a reversion to multiple mating from monogynous ancestry in golden orb-web spiders, Nephila senegalensis. Results Male multiple mating is regained by the loss of genital damage and sexual cannibalism but spermatogenesis is terminated with maturation, restricting males to a single loading of their secondary mating organs and a fixed supply of sperm. However, males re-use their mating organs and by experimentally mating males to many females, we show that the sperm supply is divided between copulations without reloading the pedipalps. Conclusion By portioning their precious sperm supply, males achieve an average mating rate of four females which effectively doubles the maximal mating rate of their ancestors. A heritage of one-shot genitalia does not completely restrict the potential to increase mating rates in Nephila although an upper limit is defined by the available sperm load. Future studies should now investigate how males use this potential in the field and identify selection pressures responsible for a reversal from monogynous to polygynous mating strategies.

  13. One-shot genitalia are not an evolutionary dead end - Regained male polygamy in a sperm limited spider species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Monogynous mating systems with extremely low male mating rates have several independent evolutionary origins and are associated with drastic adaptations involving self-sacrifice, one-shot genitalia, genital damage, and termination of spermatogenesis immediately after maturation. The combination of such extreme traits likely restricts evolutionary potential perhaps up to the point of making low male mating rates irreversible and hence may constitute an evolutionary dead end. Here, we explore the case of a reversion to multiple mating from monogynous ancestry in golden orb-web spiders, Nephila senegalensis. Results Male multiple mating is regained by the loss of genital damage and sexual cannibalism but spermatogenesis is terminated with maturation, restricting males to a single loading of their secondary mating organs and a fixed supply of sperm. However, males re-use their mating organs and by experimentally mating males to many females, we show that the sperm supply is divided between copulations without reloading the pedipalps. Conclusion By portioning their precious sperm supply, males achieve an average mating rate of four females which effectively doubles the maximal mating rate of their ancestors. A heritage of one-shot genitalia does not completely restrict the potential to increase mating rates in Nephila although an upper limit is defined by the available sperm load. Future studies should now investigate how males use this potential in the field and identify selection pressures responsible for a reversal from monogynous to polygynous mating strategies. PMID:21740561

  14. Regaining Candidacy for Heart Transplantation after Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy in Left Ventricular Assist Device Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq A. Khemees

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several factors may highlight the relevance of prostate cancer to the pre-heart-transplant population. First, the expansion in candidate selection criteria led to increased number of men over the age of fifty to be considered for heart transplantation. With the introduction of left ventricular assist device (LVAD therapy, waiting-list mortality has dramatically declined over the past decade. Additionally, transplant candidates are diligently screened for preexisting neoplasm while on the waiting list. Taken together, screening-detected prostate cancer may increasingly be diagnosed in patients on the waiting list. If discovered, it will pose unique challenge to clinicians as to date there has been no universally accepted management guideline. We report a case of LVAD-treated heart transplant candidate diagnosed with prostate cancer while on the waiting list. Patient screening demonstrated PSA elevation which prompted prostate biopsy. Low-risk clinically localized prostate cancer was confirmed and led to removal of patient from transplant list. When counseled regarding management of his cancer, the patient elected to undergo radical prostatectomy in a hope to regain candidacy for heart transplantation. Despite being of high surgical risk, multidisciplinary team approach led to successful management of prostate cancer and the patient eventually received heart transplant one year following prostatectomy.

  15. Older adults prioritize postural stability in the anterior-posterior direction to regain balance following volitional lateral step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Shaun; Nantel, Julie

    2015-02-01

    Postural control in the medial-lateral (ML) direction is of particular interest regarding the assessment of changes in postural control, as it is highly related to the risk of falling. To determine the postural strategies used to regain balance following a voluntary lateral step and compare these strategies between young and older adults. Sixteen older adults (60-90 years) and 14 young adults (20-40 years) were asked to stand quietly for 30s, walk in place and then take a lateral step and stand quietly (30s). Balance Post was divided into 10s intervals. Center of pressure displacement (CoP) and velocity (VCoP) in the anterio-posterior (AP) and ML directions were analyzed. In both groups, CoP and VCoP in AP and ML increased in Post1 compared to Pre (Pdisplacement and velocity, the AP strategy to recover postural balance following a lateral step could become less efficient as older adults age and therefore increasing the risk of falls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Regaining legitimacy in the context of global governance? UNESCO, Education for All coordination and the Global Monitoring Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. Brent; Okitsu, Taeko; da Costa, Romina; Kitamura, Yuto

    2017-06-01

    This research note shares insights which resulted from a larger study into the ways in which the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) - during 2010-2014 - used its position as coordinator of the post-Dakar Framework for Action (initiated at the World Education Forum held in 2000 and designed to reinvigorate the Education for All initiative) to help it regain some of the legitimacy it had lost in the preceding decades. The research study focused on the role of both the UNESCO Education for All Follow-up Unit and the production of the Global Monitoring Report (GMR) during the 2000s because they were at the heart of UNESCO's efforts to repair its image and renew its impact in one area of global governance, specifically in the global education policy field. The study's findings were based on an analysis of documents, archives and interviews ( n = 17) with key actors inside and outside UNESCO, including representatives of UNESCO's peer institutions.

  17. BMI Is a Risk Factor for Colorectal Cancer Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Aasma; Dostal, Allison; Menk, Jeremiah; Church, Timothy R

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between dietary and lifestyle risk factors and long-term mortality from colorectal cancer is poorly understood. Several factors, such as obesity, intakes of red meat, and use of aspirin, have been reported to be associated with risk of colorectal cancer mortality, though these findings have not been replicated in all studies to date. In the Minnesota Colon Cancer Control Study, 46,551 participants 50-80 years old were randomly assigned to usual care (control) or annual or biennial screening by fecal occult blood testing. Colon cancer mortality was assessed after 30 years of follow-up. Dietary intake and lifestyle risk factors were assessed by questionnaire at baseline. Age [hazard ratio (HR) 1.09; 95% CI 1.07, -1.11], male sex (HR 1.25; 95% CI 1.01, 1.57), and higher body mass index (BMI) (HR 1.03; 95% CI 1.00-1.05) increased the risk of CRC mortality, while undergoing screening for CRC was associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer mortality (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.61-0.94 and 0.67; 95% CI 0.53-0.83 for biennial and annual screening, respectively). Intakes of grains, meats, proteins, coffee, alcohol, aspirin, fiber, fruits, and vegetables were not associated with colorectal cancer mortality. Our study confirms the relationship between BMI and long-term colorectal cancer mortality. Modulation of BMI may reduce risk of CRC mortality.

  18. WBDOC Weekly Workload Status Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Weekly reports of workloads processed in the Wilkes Barre Data Operation Center. Reports on quantities of work received, processed, pending and average processing...

  19. A new therapeutic application of brain-machine interface (BMI) training followed by hybrid assistive neuromuscular dynamic stimulation (HANDS) therapy for patients with severe hemiparetic stroke: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Michiyuki; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Ushiba, Junichi; Nishimoto, Atsuko; Abe, Kaoru; Honaga, Kaoru; Nishimura, Atsuko; Mizuno, Katsuhiro; Kodama, Mitsuhiko; Masakado, Yoshihisa; Liu, Meigen

    2016-09-21

    Hybrid assistive neuromuscular dynamic stimulation (HANDS) therapy improved paretic upper extremity motor function in patients with severe to moderate hemiparesis. We hypothesized that brain machine interface (BMI) training would be able to increase paretic finger muscle activity enough to apply HANDS therapy in patients with severe hemiparesis, whose finger extensor was absent. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of BMI training followed by HANDS therapy in patients with severe hemiparesis. Twenty-nine patients with chronic stroke who could not extend their paretic fingers were participated this study. We applied BMI training for 10 days at 40 min per day. The BMI detected the patients' motor imagery of paretic finger extension with event-related desynchronization (ERD) over the affected primary sensorimotor cortex, recorded with electroencephalography. Patients wore a motor-driven orthosis, which extended their paretic fingers and was triggered with ERD. When muscle activity in their paretic fingers was detected with surface electrodes after 10 days of BMI training, we applied HANDS therapy for the following 3 weeks. In HANDS therapy, participants received closed-loop, electromyogram-controlled, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) combined with a wrist-hand splint for 3 weeks at 8 hours a day. Before BMI training, after BMI training, after HANDS therapy and 3month after HANDS therapy, we assessed Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper extremity motor score (FMA) and the Motor Activity Log14-Amount of Use (MAL-AOU) score. After 10 days of BMI training, finger extensor activity had appeared in 21 patients. Eighteen of 21 patients then participated in 3 weeks of HANDS therapy. We found a statistically significant improvement in the FMA and the MAL-AOU scores after the BMI training, and further improvement was seen after the HANDS therapy. Combining BMI training with HANDS therapy could be an effective therapeutic strategy for severe UE paralysis after

  20. Blood Pressure Variation Throughout Pregnancy According to Early Gestational BMI: A Brazilian Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Fernanda; Farias, Dayana Rodrigues; Mendes, Roberta Hack; Schlüssel, Michael Maia; Kac, Gilberto

    2015-02-13

    Background: The maternal cardiovascular system undergoes progressive adaptations throughout pregnancy, causing blood pressure fluctuations. However, no consensus has been established on its normal variation in uncomplicated pregnancies. Objective: To describe the variation in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels during pregnancy according to early pregnancy body mass index (BMI). Methods: SBP and DBP were measured during the first, second and third trimesters and at 30-45 days postpartum in a prospective cohort of 189 women aged 20-40 years. BMI (kg/m2) was measured up to the 13th gestational week and classified as normal-weight (gravidez saudável. Objetivo: Descrever a variação da pressão arterial sistólica (PAS) e diastólica (PAD) durante a gravidez e no pós-parto imediato segundo o índice de massa corporal (IMC) no início da gravidez. Métodos: A PAS e a PAD foram medidas no 1º, 2º e 3º trimestres gestacionais e aos 30-45 dias pós-parto em uma coorte prospectiva de 189 mulheres com idade entre 20 e 40 anos. O IMC (kg/m2) foi aferido até a 13a semana e classificado como normal (gravidez, mas não no pós-parto, quando comparadas às de IMC normal.

  1. BMI, physical inactivity, cigarette and alcohol consumption in female nursing students: a 5-year comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Franziska; von Lindeman, Katharina; Klewer, Jörg; Kugler, Joachim

    2014-04-17

    Nursing staff are often involved in counseling patients with regard to health behavior. Although care promoting healthy lifestyle choices is included in the curriculum of nursing students in Germany, several studies of nursing students have reported a high prevalence of unhealthy behavior. This paper focuses on the behavior of female nursing students with regard to body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and cigarette and alcohol consumption. It describes trends through the comparison of results from 2008 and 2013. Data was collected in two waves at a regional medical training college. First, 301 nursing students were asked to fill out a 12 page questionnaire on health behavior in 2008. The questioning was repeated in 2013 with 316 participating nursing students using the previous questionnaire. 259 female nursing students completed the questionnaire in 2013. 31.6% of them were either overweight or obese, 28.5% exercised less than once a week, 42.9% smoked between 10 and 20 cigarettes a day and 72.6% drank alcohol, wherefrom 19.7% consumed alcohol in risky quantities. In comparison to the data of 266 female nursing students from 2008, there were significant differences in the BMI and alcohol consumption: The percentage of overweight and obese students and the percentage of alcohol consumers at risk increased significantly. Health behavior of female nursing students is often inadequate especially in regard to weight and cigarette and alcohol consumption. Strategies are required to promote healthy lifestyle choices.

  2. Somatic Changes of University Students in BMI and WHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cepková Alena

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article dealt with the assessment of somatic changes of the students at the Slovak University of Technology (STU, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (FME, specifically expressed by Body Mass Index (BMI and Waist Hip Ratio (WHR during the years 2007 and 2013. In total 2228 men were involved in the study and measured upon their entry at the university. It was found out that the values of BMI belonged to the category of average range measured for adults (from 22.96 kg.m-2 to 24.60 kg.m-2 and indicates standard values. Statistically significant differences (p<0.01 were discovered between the years 2011 (23.70 kg.m-2 and 2012 (24.60 kg.m-2, 2012 (24.60 kg.m-2 and 2013 (22.96 kg.m-2. In 2012 participants achieved in average the highest values (BMI = 24.60 kg.m-2, which borders with a moderate overweight. In the contrary, in 2013 the students achieved the lowest values of BMI (22.96 kg.m-2. A slight increase of average BMI values may be observed from the first test in 2007 until 2012. The predominance of standard weight was measured at 71% of the total number of monitored students and the predominance of overweight was measured at 22% of students from the total number of university students. The observation of WHR numbers makes us conclude that during our seven year study no significant differences were discovered in the first five years. The values were stable and from the mean point of view, they do not indicate the risk of development of diseases relating to overweight and obesity. In 2012 and 2013 a slight decrease of WHR values was detected < 0.85. Statistically significant differences (p<0.05 were discovered between the years 2010 (0.854 and 2011 (0.864, and also between 2011 (0.864 and 2012 (0.843. The lowest mean value of WHR was measured when performing the last test in the year 2013 (0.823. There was a statistically significant difference at p<0.05 within the years 2012 and 2013. The highest mean value was discovered in 2011 (0

  3. ERD-based online brain-machine interfaces (BMI) in the context of neurorehabilitation: optimizing BMI learning and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Witkowski, Matthias; Mellinger, Jürgen; Ramos, Ander; Birbaumer, Niels; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2011-10-01

    Event-related desynchronization (ERD) of sensori-motor rhythms (SMR) can be used for online brain-machine interface (BMI) control, but yields challenges related to the stability of ERD and feedback strategy to optimize BMI learning.Here, we compared two approaches to this challenge in 20 right-handed healthy subjects (HS, five sessions each, S1-S5) and four stroke patients (SP, 15 sessions each, S1-S15). ERD was recorded from a 275-sensor MEG system. During daily training,motor imagery-induced ERD led to visual and proprioceptive feedback delivered through an orthotic device attached to the subjects' hand and fingers. Group A trained with a heterogeneous reference value (RV) for ERD detection with binary feedback and Group B with a homogenous RV and graded feedback (10 HS and 2 SP in each group). HS in Group B showed better BMI performance than Group A (p learning was significantly better (p learning relative to use of a heterogeneous RV and binary feedback.

  4. Dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16Ink4a pathway provokes an aging-associated decline of submandibular gland function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Kimi; Katano, Satoshi; Iida, Mayu; Kimura, Hiromi; Okuma, Atsushi; Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Ohtani, Naoko; Hara, Eiji; Maruyama, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Bmi-1 prevents stem cell aging, at least partly, by blocking expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16Ink4a. Therefore, dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16Ink4a pathway is considered key to the loss of tissue homeostasis and development of associated degenerative diseases during aging. However, because Bmi-1 knockout (KO) mice die within 20 weeks after birth, it is difficult to determine exactly where and when dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16Ink4a pathway occurs during aging in vivo. Using real-time in vivo imaging of p16Ink4a expression in Bmi-1-KO mice, we uncovered a novel function of the Bmi-1/p16Ink4a pathway in controlling homeostasis of the submandibular glands (SMGs), which secrete saliva into the oral cavity. This pathway is dysregulated during aging in vivo, leading to induction of p16Ink4a expression and subsequent declined SMG function. These findings will advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the aging-related decline of SMG function and associated salivary gland hypofunction, which is particularly problematic among the elderly. PMID:25832744

  5. Associations between night work and BMI, alcohol, smoking, caffeine and exercise--a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchvold, Hogne Vikanes; Pallesen, Ståle; Øyane, Nicolas M F; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2015-11-12

    Shift work is associated with negative health effects. Increased prevalence of several cardiovascular risk factors among shift workers/night workers compared with day workers have been shown resulting in increased risk of cardiovascular events among shift workers and night workers. Previous studies have taken a dichotomous approach to the comparison between day and night workers. The present study uses a continuous approach and provides such a new perspective to the negative effects of night work load as a possible risk factor for undesirable health effects. This cross sectional study (The SUrvey of Shift work, Sleep and Health (SUSSH)) uses data collected from December 2008 to March 2009. The study population consists of Norwegian nurses. The study collected information about demographic and lifestyle factors: Body Mass Index (BMI), smoking habits, alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption and exercise habits. The lifestyle parameters were evaluated using multiple hierarchical regression and binary logistic regression. Number of night shifts worked last year (NNL) was used as operationalization of night work load. Adjustment for possible confounders were made. Obesity was defined as BMI > 30. Alcohol Consumption was evaluated using the short form of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption (AUDIT-C). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 22. We had data from 2059 nurses. NNL was significantly and positively associated with BMI, both when evaluated against BMI as a continuous parameter (Beta = .055, p worked per week (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI = 1.01-1.05). We found a positive significant association between night work load and BMI. This suggests that workers with a heavy night work load might need special attention and frequent health checks due to higher risk of undesirable health effects.

  6. Proportionality lost - proportionality regained?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the European Court of Justice (the ECJ) seems to have accepted restrictions on the freedom of establishment and other basic freedoms, despite the fact that a more thorough proportionality test would have revealed that the restriction in question did not pass the 'rule of reason....... This often cannot be done without thorough knowledge of the particular legal field in which the case is anchored, and the ECJ is often left to flounder somewhat on this, with the result that we are suddenly faced with the Court’s acceptance of a restriction. The difficulty often lies - not in recognising...... the restriction, but in testing its proportionality. The article illustrates its point by referring to two categories of decision: (A) proportionality-strong decisions, which illustrate a thorough and firm proportionality assessment, and (B) proportionality-weak decisions, which could have led to a different...

  7. Regaining Strategic Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    battle experience and had also tied down substantial German forces in Italy. In addition, the Combined Bomber Offensive had placed increasing stress...on Germany’s war economy; the Allies had achieved air supe- riority over Western Europe; and the German disasters at Stalingrad and Kursk had kept...Allies in fighting power and how narrow the margin of Allied victory was in many of the key battles from 1943 to 1945. The best indication of

  8. Time and Motion Regained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Paul S.

    1993-01-01

    A General Motors-Toyota auto assembly plant demonstrates how hierarchy and standardization can improve productivity and motivate workers. The production system is strongly committed to the social context of work and focused on standards designed by workers themselves, giving continuous improvement a specific foundation. (SK)

  9. The impact of a 10-week physical activity intervention programme on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Body mass index (BMI), fasting insulin, fasting glucose, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), Windkessel arterial compliance (Cw), total peripheral resistance (TPR) and waist circumference were measured. After the 10-week PA ...

  10. Clinical correlates of weight loss and attrition during a 10-week dietary intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Holst, Claus; Grau, Katrine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the pre-treatment subject characteristics and weight loss changes as determinants of weight loss and attrition during a 10-week dietary intervention study. Methods: A total of 771 obese subjects (BMI 35.6 kg/m(2)) of both genders were included from 8...

  11. Endoscopic plasma argon coagulation in treatment of weight regain after bariatric surgery: what does the patient think about this?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Simone Dallegrave; Baretta, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; Cambi, Maria Paula Carlini; Marchesini, João Batista

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is an effective treatment for refractory morbid obesity, causing the loss of 75% of initial excess weight. After the surgery, however, weight regain can occur in 10-20% of cases. To help, endoscopic argon plasma coagulation (APC) is used to reduce the anastomotic diameter. Many patients who undergo this treatment, are not always familiar with this procedure and its respective precautions. The aim of this study was to determine how well the candidate for APC understands the procedure and absorbs the information provided by the multidisciplinary team. We prepared a questionnaire with 12 true/false questions to evaluate the knowledge of the patients about the procedure they were to undergo. The questionnaire was administered by the surgeon during consultation in the preoperative period. The patients were invited to fill out the questionnaire. We found out that the majority learned about the procedure through the internet. They knew it was an outpatient treatment, where the anesthesia was similar to that for endoscopy, and that they would have to follow a liquid diet. But none of them knew that the purpose of this diet was to improve local wound healing. Bariatric patients who have a second chance to resume weight loss, need continuous guidance. The internet should be used by the multidisciplinary team to promote awareness that APC will not be sufficient for weight loss and weight-loss maintenance in the long term. Furthermore, there is a need to clarify again the harm of drinking alcohol in the process of weight loss, making its curse widely known.

  12. Barriers to regaining control within a constructivist grounded theory of family resilience in ICU: Living with uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pauline; Liamputtong, Pranee; Koch, Susan; Rawson, Helen

    2017-12-01

    To discuss families' experiences of their interactions when a relative is admitted unexpectedly to an Australian intensive care unit. The overwhelming emotions associated with the unexpected admission of a relative to an intensive care unit are often due to the uncertainty surrounding the condition of their critically ill relative. There is limited in-depth understanding of the nature of uncertainty experienced by families in intensive care, and interventions perceived by families to minimise their uncertainty are not well documented. Furthermore, the interrelationships between factors, such as staff-family interactions and the intensive care unit environment, and its influence on families' uncertainty particularly in the context of the Australian healthcare system, are not well delineated. A grounded theory methodology was adopted for the study. Data were collected between 2009-2013, using in-depth interviews with 25 family members of 21 critically ill patients admitted to a metropolitan, tertiary-level intensive care unit in Australia. This paper describes the families experiences of heightened emotional vulnerability and uncertainty when a relative is admitted unexpectedly to the intensive care unit. Families uncertainty is directly influenced by their emotional state, the foreign environment and perceptions of being 'kept in the dark', as well as the interrelationships between these factors. Staff are offered an improved understanding of the barriers to families' ability to regain control, guided by a grounded theory of family resilience in the intensive care unit. The findings reveal in-depth understanding of families' uncertainty in intensive care. It suggests that intensive care unit staff need to focus clinical interventions on reducing factors that heighten their uncertainty, while optimising strategies that help alleviate it. Families are facilitated to move beyond feelings of helplessness and loss of control, and cope better with their situation.

  13. Intuitive eating: associations with physical activity motivation and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Julie; Campbell Nielson, Amy; Hunt, Anne; Leiker, Jason J

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether university women who demonstrated internal motivation related to eating behavior may also be internally motivated to participate in regular physical activity (PA) and have a lower body mass index (BMI) when controlling for age. Traditional approaches for health promotion related to healthy weight include restrictive eating and exercise prescription. Examining motivation for eating and PA may prove an effective alternative for achieving or maintaining healthy weight for university women. Design was a cross-sectional study. Study setting was a large, public university in the western United States. Subjects . Study subjects were 200 undergraduate women with a mean age of 19 years, mostly white (90%) and of healthy weight (69%, with a BMI range of 18.5-24.9). Study measures were the Intuitive Eating Scale and the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire. Correlations and regression models were used. Intuitive eating was examined in the sample as a whole and among subgroups of respondents grouped based on tertile rankings of intuitive eating scores. There was evidence that women who demonstrated internal motivation related to eating were also internally motivated to participate in regular PA. Women who reported being internally motivated to eat were significantly more likely to engage in PA for pleasure and to view PA as part of their self-concept. Women who reported high levels of intuitive eating had significantly lower BMI scores than those reporting medium or low levels when controlling for age. For women to achieve or maintain a healthy weight, it may be best for health professionals to examine motivation for eating and PA rather than the encouragement of restrictive eating and exercise prescriptions.

  14. The utility of weight loss medications after bariatric surgery for weight regain or inadequate weight loss: A multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Alfaris, Nasreen; Gomez, Gricelda; Ricks, Elizabeth T; Shukla, Alpana P; Corey, Kathleen E; Pratt, Janey S; Pomp, Alfons; Rubino, Francesco; Aronne, Louis J

    2017-03-01

    Patients who undergo bariatric surgery often have inadequate weight loss or weight regain. We sought to discern the utility of weight loss pharmacotherapy as an adjunct to bariatric surgery in patients with inadequate weight loss or weight regain. Two academic medical centers. We completed a retrospective study to identify patients who had undergone bariatric surgery in the form of a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or a sleeve gastrectomy from 2000-2014. From this cohort, we identified patients who were placed on weight loss pharmacotherapy postoperatively for inadequate weight loss or weight regain. We extracted key demographic data, medical history, and examined weight loss in response to surgery and after the initiation of weight loss pharmacotherapy. A total of 319 patients (RYGB = 258; sleeve gastrectomy = 61) met inclusion criteria for analysis. More than half (54%; n = 172) of all study patients lost≥5% (7.2 to 195.2 lbs) of their total weight with medications after surgery. There were several high responders with 30.3% of patients (n = 96) and 15% (n = 49) losing≥10% (16.7 to 195.2 lbs) and≥15% (25 to 195.2 lbs) of their total weight, respectively, Topiramate was the only medication that demonstrated a statistically significant response for weight loss with patients being twice as likely to lose at least 10% of their weight when placed on this medication (odds ratio = 1.9; P = .018). Regardless of the postoperative body mass index, patients who underwent RYGB were significantly more likely to lose≥5% of their total weight with the aid of weight loss medications. Weight loss pharmacotherapy serves as a useful adjunct to bariatric surgery in patients with inadequate weight loss or weight regain. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Design and Development of BMI Calc Android Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Ali, Iliana; Samsudin, Nooraida

    2016-11-01

    Body mass index is a familiar term for those who are weight conscious. It is the term that let user know about the overall body composition in terms of fat.The available body mass index calculators whether online or on Play Store do not provide Malaysian meal suggestions. Hence, this paper proposes an application for body mass index calculator together with Malaysian meal suggestion. The objectives of the study are to design and develop BMI Calc android application for the purpose of calculating body mass index while embedding meal suggestion module. The design and methodology involve in the process are also presented.

  16. [Brain-machine interface (BMI) - application to neurological disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Hirata, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) is a new technology to receive input from the brain which is translated to operate a computer or other external device in real time. After significant progress during the recent 10 years, this technology is now very close to the clinical use to restore neural functions of patients with severe neurologic impairment. This technology is also a strong tool to investigate the mode of neuro-signal processing in the brain and to understand the mechanism of neural dysfunction which leads to the development of novel neurotechnology for the treatment of various sorts of neurological disorders.

  17. Influence of aramid fiber moisture regain during atmospheric plasma treatment on aging of treatment effects on surface wettability and bonding strength to epoxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Yu [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Ministry of Education (China); College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Nantong 226007 (China); Wang Chunxia [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Ministry of Education (China); College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224003 (China); Qiu Yiping [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Ministry of Education (China); College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)], E-mail: ypqiu@dhu.edu.cn

    2007-09-30

    One of the main differences between a low-pressure plasma treatment and an atmospheric pressure plasma treatment is that in atmosphere, the substrate material may absorb significant amount of water which may potentially influence the plasma treatment effects. This paper investigates how the moisture absorbed by aramid fibers during the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment influences the aging behavior of the modified surfaces. Kevlar 49 fibers with different moisture regains (MR) (0.5, 3.5 and 5.5%, respectively) are treated with atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) with helium as the carrier gas and oxygen as the treatment gas. Surface wettability and chemical compositions, and interfacial shear strengths (IFSS) to epoxy for the aramid fibers in all groups are determined using water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and micro-bond pull out tests, respectively. Immediately after the plasma treatment, the treated fibers have substantially lower water contact angles, higher surface oxygen and nitrogen contents, and larger IFSS to epoxy than those of the control group. At the end of 30 day aging period, the fibers treated with 5.5% moisture regain had a lower water contact angle and more polar groups on the fiber surface, leading to 75% improvement of IFSS over the control fibers, while those for the 0.5 and 3.5% moisture regain groups were only 30%.

  18. Time for critically ill patients to regain mobility after early mobilization in the intensive care unit and transition to a general inpatient floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandullo, Sarah M; Spilman, Sarah K; Smith, Janell A; Kingery, Lisa K; Pille, Sara M; Rondinelli, Robert D; Sahr, Sheryl M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if patient mobility achievements in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting are sustained during subsequent phases of hospitalization, specifically after transferring to inpatient floors and on the day of hospital discharge. The study is an analysis of adult patients who stayed in the ICU for 48 hours or more during the second quarter of 2013. The study sample included 182 patients who transferred to a general inpatient floor after the ICU stay. Patients experienced an average delay of 16 hours to regain or exceed chair level of mobility and 7 hours to regain ambulation level after transferring to an inpatient floor. One third of patients ambulated in the ICU, and those patients had significantly shorter post-ICU and hospital stays compared with patients who did not ambulate in the ICU. Delays in regaining mobility on the floor were modestly associated with initial Morse Fall Score and being male. Mobility progression through the hospital course is imperative to improving patient outcomes. Study findings show the need for improvement in maintaining early ICU mobilization achievement during the crucial phase between ICU stay and hospital discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Bmi-1-responding Element within the Human p16 Promoter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Sha; Luo, Min; Sun, He; Yu, Xin; Shen, Meili; Zhang, Quancang; Zhou, Rudan; Ju, Xiaofang; Tao, Wei; Liu, Di; Deng, Hongkui; Lu, Zhigang

    2010-01-01

    Bmi-1, the first functionally identified polycomb gene family member, plays critical roles in cell cycle regulation, cell immortalization, and cell senescence. Bmi-1 is involved in the development and progression of carcinomas and is a potent target for cancer therapy. One important pathway regulated by Bmi-1 is that involving two cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p16Ink4a and p19Arf, as Bmi-1 represses the INK4a locus on which they are encoded. A close correlation between the up-regulation of Bmi-1 and down-regulation of p16 has been demonstrated in various tumors; however, how Bmi-1 regulates p16 expression is not clear. In this study, we revealed that Bmi-1 regulates the expression of p16 by binding directly to the Bmi-1-responding element (BRE) within the p16 promoter. The BRE resided at bp −821 to −732 upstream of the p16 ATG codon. BRE alone was sufficient to allow Bmi-1-mediated regulation of the CMV promoter. Bmi-1 typically functions by forming a complex with Ring2; however, regulation of p16 was independent of Ring2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing of Bmi-1-precipitated chromatin DNA revealed that 1536 genes were targeted by Bmi-1, including genes involved in tissue-specific differentiation, cell cycle, and apoptosis. By analyzing the binding sequences of these genes, we found two highly conserved Bmi-1-binding motifs, which were required for Bmi-1-mediated p16 promoter regulation. Taken together, our results revealed the molecular mechanism of Bmi-1-mediated regulation of the p16 gene, thus providing further insights into the functions of Bmi-1 as well as a sensitive high-throughput platform with which to screen Bmi-1-targeted small molecules for cancer therapy. PMID:20551323

  20. Nutrimetry: BMI assessment as a function of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selem-Solís, Jorge Enrique; Alcocer-Gamboa, Alberto; Hattori-Hara, Mónica; Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko

    2018-02-01

    Adequate nutritional assessment is required to fight malnutrition (undernutrition and overfeeding) in children and adolescents. For this, joint interpretation of certain indicators (body mass index [BMI], height, weight, etc.) is recommended. This is done clinically, but not epidemiologically. The aim of this paper is to present "nutrimetry", a simple method that crosses anthropometric information allowing for bivariate interpretation at both levels (clinical and epidemiological). Data from 41,001 children and adolescents aged 0-19 years, taken from Mexico's National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012, were analyzed. Data crossed were BMI-for-age z-scores (BAZ) with height-for-age z-scores (HAZ) according to the World Health Organization (WHO) standards. Conditional prevalences were calculated in a 3×3 grid and were compared with expected values. This method identified subgroups in each BAZ category showing heterogeneity of the sample with regard to WHO standards for HAZ and nutritional status. According to the method, nutritional status patterns differed among Mexican states and age and sex groups. Nutrimetry is a helpful and accessible tool to be used in epidemiology. It allows for detecting unexpected distributions of conditional prevalences, its graphical representation facilitates communication of results by geographic areas, and enriched interpretation of BAZ helps guide intervention actions according to their codes. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The Bmi-1 helix–turn and ring finger domains are required for Bmi-1 antagonism of (–) epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppression of skin cancer cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Scharadin, Tiffany M.; Han, Bingshe; Xu, Wen; Eckert, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The Bmi-1 Polycomb group (PcG) protein is an important epigenetic regulator of chromatin status. Elevated Bmi-1 expression is observed in skin cancer and contributes to cancer cell survival. (–) Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), an important green tea-derived cancer prevention agent, reduces Bmi-1 level resulting in reduced skin cancer cell survival. This is associated with increased p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 expression, reduced cyclin, and cyclin dependent kinase expression, and increased cleavage of apoptotic markers. These EGCG-dependent changes are attenuated by vector-mediated maintenance of Bmi-1 expression. In the present study, we identify Bmi-1 functional domains that are required for this response. Bmi-1 expression reverses the EGCG-dependent reduction in SCC-13 cell survival, but Bmi-1 mutants lacking the helix–turn–helix–turn–helix–turn (Bmi-1ΔHT) or ring finger (Bmi-1ΔRF) domains do not reverse the EGCG impact. The reduction in Ring1B ubiquitin ligase activity, observed in the presence of mutant Bmi-1, is associated with reduced ability of these mutants to interact with and activate Ring1B ubiquitin ligase, the major ligase responsible for the ubiquitination of histone H2A during chromatin condensation. This results in less chromatin condensation leading to increased tumor suppressor gene expression and reduced cell survival; thereby making the cells more susceptible to the anti-survival action of EGCG. We further show that these mutants act in a dominant-negative manner to inhibit the action of endogenous Bmi-1. Our results suggest that the HT and RF domains are required for Bmi-1 ability to maintain skin cancer cell survival in response to cancer preventive agents. PMID:25843776

  2. Risk of a venous thromboembolic episode due to caesarean section and BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmorn, Lotte Berdiin; Ladelund, S; Rasmussen, S

    2014-01-01

    BMI significantly influences the risk of venous thromboembolism after emergency caesarean delivery compared with vaginal delivery.......BMI significantly influences the risk of venous thromboembolism after emergency caesarean delivery compared with vaginal delivery....

  3. Body Mass Index (BMI) and All-Cause Mortality Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BMI and All-Cause Mortality Pooling Project quantified the risk associated with being overweight and the extent to which the relationship between BMI and all-cause mortality varies by certain factors.

  4. Measuring adiposity in patients: the utility of body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, and leptin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shah, Nirav R; Braverman, Eric R

    2012-01-01

    ...%. Currently, the body mass index (BMI) is most commonly used to determine adiposity. However, BMI presents as an inaccurate obesity classification method that underestimates the epidemic and contributes to failed treatment...

  5. A role for leukocyte integrins and extracellular matrix remodeling of adipose tissue in the risk of weight regain after weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumans, Nadia Jt; Vink, Roel G; Fazelzadeh, Parastoo; van Baak, Marleen A; Mariman, Edwin Cm

    2017-05-01

    Background: Weight loss (WL) is often followed by weight regain after an energy-restricted dietary intervention (DI). When people are following a diet, the volume of an adipocyte decreases by loss of triglycerides, which creates stress between the cell contents and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). Previously, we observed that genetic variations in ECM genes are associated with an increased risk of weight regain.Objective: We investigated the relation between the expression of ECM genes during WL and a period of weight stabilization (WS) and the risk of weight regain.Design: In this randomized controlled trial, 61 healthy overweight or obese participants followed either a 5-wk very-low-calorie diet (VLCD; 500 kcal/d) or a 12-wk low-calorie diet (1250 kcal/d) (WL period) with a subsequent 4-wk WS period and a 9-mo follow-up. The WL and WS periods combined were considered the DI. Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsy samples were collected for microarray analysis. Gene expression changes for a broad set of ECM-related genes were correlated with the weight-regain percentage (WR%).Results: A total of 26 of the 277 genes were significantly correlated with WR% during WL, WS, or the DI periods. Most correlations were observed in the VLCD group during the WS period. Four genes code for leukocyte-specific receptors. These and other genes belong to a group of 26 genes, among which the expression changes were highly correlated (r ≥ 0.7, P ≤ 0.001). This group could be divided into 3 subclusters linking to 2 biological processes-leukocyte integrin gene activity and ECM remodeling-and a link to insulin sensitivity was also apparent.Conclusions: Our present findings indicate the importance of adipose tissue leukocytes for the risk of weight regain. ECM modification also seems to be involved, and we observed a link to insulin sensitivity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01559415. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. The risk of perinatal mortality with each week of expectant management in obese pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ruofan; Schuh, Brittany L; Caughey, Aaron B

    2017-09-27

    The risk of stillbirth associated with maternal obesity increases with gestational age; however, it is unclear if earlier delivery reduces the overall perinatal mortality rate. Our objective was to compare the risk of perinatal mortality associated with each additional week of expectant management to that of immediate delivery. This was a retrospective cohort study of singleton non-anomalous births in Texas between 2006 and 2011. Analyses were stratified based on maternal pre-pregnancy BMI class. For each BMI class, we calculated the rate of neonatal death and stillbirth at each week of gestation from 34 to 41 weeks. A composite risk of perinatal mortality associated with 1 week of expectant management was estimated combining the stillbirth rate of the current week and the neonatal death rate of the following week. This was compared with the rate of neonatal death of the current week. After all exclusions, 2,149,771 births remained for analysis. In the normal weight group, stillbirth risk increased from 0.8 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 5.7 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, whereas the neonatal death risk decreased from 76.5 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 30.4 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, there were no differences between expectant management and delivery for any gestational week. In the obese group, stillbirth risk increased from 1.8 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 10.5 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, whereas the neonatal death risk decreased from 67.7 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 26.2 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, the perinatal mortality risk favored delivery at 39 weeks (RR: 1.17; 99% CI: 1.01-1.36) and not thereafter. In contrast, in the morbidly obese group, stillbirth risk increased from 8.8 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 83.7 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, whereas the neonatal death risk decreased from 63.6 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 15.5 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, the perinatal mortality risk favored delivery from 38 weeks (RR: 1.53; 99

  7. Associations between Three School-Based Measures of Health: Is BMI Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Emily H.; Houser, Robert F.; Au, Lauren E.; Sacheck, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    School-based body mass index (BMI) notification programs are often used to raise parental awareness of childhood overweight and obesity, but how BMI results are associated with physical fitness and diet is less clear. This study examined the relationship between BMI, fitness, and diet quality in a diverse sample of urban schoolchildren…

  8. File list: Oth.Kid.50.BMI1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Relationship between 8/9-yr-old school children BMI, parents' BMI and educational level: a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilato Valentina

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents are responsible not only for the genetic structure of their children, but also for passing onto them their behaviours and attitudes toward life. The aim of this study was to analyse the connection between school-age children's obesity and that of their parents as well as between child obesity and parents' educational level, as a proxy indicator of the socio-economic status (SES of families in Tuscany. Methods The children sample was selected from "OKkio alla Salute 2010" (a cross sectional survey carried out by the Italian Institute of Health and consisted of 1,751 (922 males and 855 females 8-9 year-old school children. Weight and height were measured by ad hoc trained personnel, and Body Mass Index (BMI categories were calculated using Cole et al.'s cut-off. Parents' weight, height and educational level were collected by a self-administered questionnaire. The educational levels were classified as high, medium and low. Results The prevalence of obese children increased along the parents' BMI category: from 1.4% for underweight mothers to 30.3% for obese mothers and from 4% for under-normal-weight fathers to 23.9% for obese fathers (p Conclusion Parents' obesity and the cultural resources of the family, particularly the father's, seem to influence the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Tuscan children.

  20. The ATLAS Glasgow Overview Week

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Hawkings

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Overview Weeks always provide a good opportunity to see the status and progress throughout the experiment, and the July week at Glasgow University was no exception. The setting, amidst the traditional buildings of one of the UK's oldest universities, provided a nice counterpoint to all the cutting-edge research and technology being discussed. And despite predictions to the contrary, the weather at these northern latitudes was actually a great improvement on the previous few weeks in Geneva. The meeting sessions comprehensively covered the whole ATLAS project, from the subdetector and TDAQ systems and their commissioning, through to offline computing, analysis and physics. As a long-time ATLAS member who remembers plenary meetings in 1991 with 30 people drawing detector layouts on a whiteboard, the hardware and installation sessions were particularly impressive - to see how these dreams have been translated into 7000 tons of reality (and with attendant cabling, supports and services, which certainly...

  1. Association between physical activity and body fat percentage, with adjustment for BMI: a large cross-sectional analysis of UK Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Kathryn E; Guo, Wenji; Cairns, Benjamin J; Armstrong, Miranda E G; Key, Timothy J

    2017-03-24

    The objective of this study was to examine if, in the general population, physically active adults have less body fat after taking body mass index (BMI) into account. A cross-sectional analysis of participants recruited into UK Biobank in 2006-2010. UK Biobank assessment centres throughout the UK. 119 230 men and 140 578 women aged 40-69 years, with complete physical activity information, and without a self-reported long-term illness, disability or infirmity. Physical activity measured as excess metabolic equivalent (MET)-hours per week, estimated from a combination of walking, and moderate and vigorous physical activity. BMI from measured height and weight. Body fat percentage estimated from bioimpedance. BMI and body fat percentage were highly correlated (r=0.85 in women; r=0.79 in men), and both were inversely associated with physical activity. Compared with BMI (27.1 vs 28.2 kg/m(2)) and 2.8 percentage points lower body fat (23.4% vs 26.3%) in men, and 2.2 kg/m(2) lower BMI (25.6 vs 27.7 kg/m(2)) and 4.0 percentage points lower body fat (33.9% vs 37.9%) in women. For a given BMI, greater physical activity was associated with lower average body fat percentage (for a BMI of 22.5-24.99 kg/m(2): 2.0 (95% CI 1.8 to 2.2), percentage points lower body fat in men and 1.8 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.0) percentage points lower body fat in women, comparing ≥100 excess MET-hours per week with BMI and body fat percentage. For people with the same BMI, those who were more active had a lower body fat percentage. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Protocol Standardization Reveals MV Correlation to Healthy Donor BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Hexley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles (MVs are cell-derived vesicles which are of interest in a clinical setting, as they may be predictive of early signs of disease and/or of treatment progression. However, there are growing concerns about using conventional flow cytometry (cFMC for the detection and quantification of microvesicles. These concerns range from error-sources in collection through to the physical limitations of detection. Here we present a standardized method for collection and analysis which shows that the MV numbers detected by cFCM correlate to donor Body Mass Index (BMI. Although unlikely to be comprehensive, we also demonstrate how cFCM is a useful and valid tool in the analysis of MVs.

  3. Westernization, intuitive eating, and BMI: an exploration of Jordanian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Amanda L; Madanat, Hala N

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Arabic-version of the adapted Marin Bidimensional Acculturation Scale and investigate the relationship between Westernization, intuitive eating, and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of Jordanian female adolescents. A total of 199 subjects between the ages of 11-18 were surveyed. Participants who scored higher on the Arabic domain exhibited higher Intuitive Eating Scale (IES) intrinsic subscale scores (r = 0.147, P = 0.048) suggesting that those who are more orientated toward Arabic culture may respond more naturally to physical hunger cues than their more Westernized counterparts. Reinforcing intuitive eating attitudes and behaviors and emphasizing body ideals resonant with the Arabic culture may propagate the continuation of intuitive eating in this population, potentially reducing the risk of obesity and other nutrition-related non-communicable diseases.

  4. DOES PRESENTING PATIENT'S BMI INCREASE DOCUMENTATION OF OBESITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norm Clothier, MD, M. Kim Marvel, PhD, Courtney S. Cruickshank, MS

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Despite the associated health consequences, obesity is infrequently documented as a problem in medical charts. The purpose of this study is to determine whether a simple intervention (routine listing of the BMI on the medical chart will increase physician documentation of obesity in the medical record. Methods: Participants were resident physicians in a family medicine residency program. Participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a control group. For experimental group physicians, the Body Mass Index was listed alongside other vital signs of patients seen in an ambulatory setting. Physician documentation of patient obesity was assessed by chart review after patient visits. Documentation was defined as inclusion of obesity on the problem list or in the progress note. Results: The intervention did not significantly increase the rate of documentation of obesity in the medical chart. Several reasons for the lack of change are explored, including the difficulty of treating obesity successfully.

  5. Perceptions of body mass index (BMI) in pediatric cancer survivors and their providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchuri, Swati V; Patterson, Briana C; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Mertens, Ann C; Record, Elizabeth; Meacham, Lillian R

    2014-08-01

    Abnormalities in BMI are well documented in childhood cancer survivors. Perceptions of BMI status in cancer survivors have been understudied. This study determines the accuracy of parent/survivor and provider reporting of BMI status in a cancer survivor program. This is a retrospective study. Parent/survivor assessment of BMI status was obtained from a baseline questionnaire of subjects enrolled in Children's Healthcare of Atlanta-Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer Survivor Study (CHOA-CAYACSS). Provider reporting of BMI was obtained from a clinic visit close in date to completion of the survey. Perceptions of BMI were compared to actual BMI status calculated from clinic visits and categorized based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) BMI guidelines. Perceptions of BMI were collected from 290 survivors of pediatric cancer or their parents (range, 4.3-22.9 years). Nearly 5% of survivors were underweight, 19.7% overweight and 16.2% obese. High BMI was the BMI state least likely to be correctly identified by parents, survivors, and providers. Among survivors with high BMI, parents, survivors, and providers failed to identify the problem 49.4%, 66.7%, and 26.9% of the time, respectively. Providers were less likely to correctly identify overweight compared to obese status (P survivor, ethnicity, or primary cancer diagnosis. Abnormal BMI states, especially overweight, are frequently not correctly perceived by parents/survivors or providers. Assessment of BMI status and discussion about steps to normalize BMI is needed to prevent weight related morbidities in this population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A week of Israeli restraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhart, T.

    2006-01-01

    In Israeli discourse, Israel is always the side exercising restraint in its conflict with the Palestinians. This was true again for the events of the past week: As the Qassam rockets were falling on the Southern Israeli town of Sderot, it was “leaked” that the Israeli Minister of Defense had

  7. [PREDICTORS OF WEIGHT LOSS AND FAT IN THE DIETARY MANAGEMENT: SEX, AGE, BMI AND CONSULTING ASSISTANCE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig García-Galbis, Manuel; Rizo Baeza, Mercedes; Cortés Castell, Ernesto

    2015-09-01

    WL%: percentage of weight loss; % FL: percentage fat loss; PNLWF: patients who lose weight or fat; PLWF: patients who lose weight and fat. assess whether the% WL and FL% in the dietary treatment was affected by gender, age, BMI and assistance to the query. 4,700 consultations, 670 patients (BMI ≥25), in the south-east of Spain (2006-12). Balanced and hypo-caloric diet was used. Two types of patients: PNLWF and PLWF (91.9%). in PLWF, men and those attending a greater number of occasions to the consultation have shown a greater loss against women (%FL: 23.0 vs 14.3%, p = 0.000; %WL: 7.7 vs 6.6%, p = 0.020), and those who attend less frequently (%FL: 19.1 vs 7.3%, p = 0.000; %WL: 7.8 vs 2.9%, p = 0.000). Multinomial regression analysis (PNLWF / PLWF) indicates that only attend more than one and a half to the consultation is a factor in the loss, OR 8.3 (IC 95% 4.5-15.1; p = 0.000). the body fat measurement provides additional information lost weight; Most patients attend more than six weeks, obtained a high %FL; attendance is a predictor of loss; the %FL indicates that the dietary management plays a major role in the resolution of this pathology; It is recommended to design practical schemes of action process nutritionists according to the IMCI and variable. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. The influence of exercise and BMI on injuries and illnesses in overweight and obese individuals: a randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janney Carol A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medically treated injuries have been shown to increase with increasing body mass index (BMI. Information is lacking on the frequency and type of injuries and illnesses among overweight and obese adults who engage in regular physical activities as part of weight loss or weight gain prevention programs. Methods Sedentary adults with BMIs between 25 and 40 kg/m2 (n = 397 enrolled in one of two randomized clinical trials that emphasized exercise as part of a weight loss or weight gain prevention program. Interventions differed by duration of the exercise goal (150, 200, or 300 minutes/week or control group. Walking was prescribed as the primary mode of exercise. At six month intervals, participants were asked, "During the past six months, did you have any injury or illness that affected your ability to exercise?" Longitudinal models were used to assess the effects of exercise and BMI on the pattern of injuries/illnesses attributed to exercise over time; censored linear regression was used to identify predictors of time to first injury/illness attributed to exercise. Results During the 18-month study, 46% reported at least one injury/illness, and 32% reported at least one injury that was attributed to exercise. Lower-body musculoskeletal injuries (21% were the most commonly reported injury followed by cold/flu/respiratory infections (18% and back pain/injury (10%. Knee injuries comprised one-third of the lower-body musculoskeletal injuries. Only 7% of the injuries were attributed to exercise alone, and 59% of the injuries did not involve exercise. BMI (p ≤ 0.01 but not exercise (p ≥ 0.41 was significantly associated with time to first injury and injuries over time. Participants with higher BMIs were injured earlier or had increased odds of injury over time than participants with lower BMIs. Due to the linear dose-response relationship between BMI and injury/illness, any weight loss and reduction in BMI was associated with a

  9. Body mass index (BMI) in Turner Syndrome before and during growth hormone (GH) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackett, P R; Rundle, A C; Frane, J; Blethen, S L

    2000-02-01

    To study whether body mass index (BMI) is different in girls with Turner syndrome (TS) compared to normal girls, and whether BMI in TS is affected by growth hormone (GH) treatment. A retrospective cross-sectional study. 2468 girls with TS enrolled in the National Cooperative Group Study (NCGS), a collaborative surveillance study for assessing GH-treated children. BMI and BMI standard deviation score (BMI SDS) at baseline and during GH treatment were computed from height and weight data. BMI in TS patients increases with age as expected. However, BMI SDS increased starting at about age 9 y. A similar pattern of increase in BMI SDS was observed after each year of GH treatment for up to 4 y, but GH treatment did not change the magnitude of increase. BMI and BMI SDS curves before and during GH treatment were essentially superimposable. These findings suggest that mechanisms specific for TS are responsible for the age-related increase in BMI SDS. This increase was unaffected by GH treatment.

  10. Expression of Bmi-1 is a prognostic marker in bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li-Hua

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms of the development and progression of bladder cancer are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the expression of Bmi-1 protein and its clinical significance in human bladder cancer. Methods We examined the expression of Bmi-1 mRNA and Bmi-1 protein by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively in 14 paired bladder cancers and the adjacent normal tissues. The expression of Bmi-1 protein in 137 specimens of bladder cancer and 30 specimens of adjacent normal bladder tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. Statistical analyses were applied to test the relationship between expression of Bmi-1, and clinicopathologic features and prognosis. Results Expression of Bmi-1 mRNA and protein was higher in bladder cancers than in the adjacent normal tissues in 14 paired samples (P P P P P > 0.5. In superficial bladder cancers, the expression of Bmi-1 protein in recurrent cases was higher than in recurrence-free cases (62.5% versus 13.7%, P P P > 0.05. Five-year survival in the group with higher Bmi-1 expression was 50.8%, while it was 78.5% in the group with lower Bmi-1 expression (P P Conclusion Expression of Bmi-1 was greater in bladder cancers than in the adjacent normal tissues. The examination of Bmi-1 protein expression is potentially valuable in prognostic evaluation of bladder cancer.

  11. Nuclear BMI-1 expression in laryngeal carcinoma correlates with lymph node pathological status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allegra Eugenia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main cause of treatment failure and death in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. The current clinical staging criteria fail to differentiate patients with occult metastasis from patients without metastasis. Identifying molecular markers of the disease might improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis and development of laryngeal carcinoma and may help improve clinical staging and treatment. Methods Sixty-four previously untreated patients who underwent surgical excision of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma with neck dissection were included in this study. The expression of B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1 was examined immunohistochemically on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary tissue specimens. Results Nuclear expression of BMI-1 (nBMI-1 was detected in 32 of the 64 tumors (50%, cytoplasmic expression of BMI-1 (cBMI-1 was detected in 22 (34.4%, and 10 tumors (15.6% showed no BMI-1 immunoreactivity. High nBMI-1 expression levels (≥10 were detected in 28 of the 32 (87.5% nBMI-1-positive patients. Multivariate analysis including age at diagnosis, grade, tumor location, TNM status, and nBMI-1 expression showed that a high nBMI-1 expression level was an independent prognostic factor for lymph node metastasis. Conclusion The expression of BMI-1 in patients with laryngeal carcinoma seems to correlate with lymph node metastasis.

  12. Job strain and binge eating among Brazilian workers participating in the ELSA-Brasil study: does BMI matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena Gralle, Ana Paula Bruno; Barbosa Moreno, Arlinda; Lopes Juvanhol, Leidjaira; Mendes da Fonseca, Maria de Jesus; Prates Melo, Enirtes Caetano; Antunes Nunes, Maria Angélica; Toivanen, Susanna; Griep, Rosane Härter

    2017-05-25

    To assess the association between job strain and binge eating as well as the effect-modifying influence of body mass index (BMI) on this association. A total of 11,951 active civil servants from the multicenter Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) was included in this cross-sectional analysis. Job strain was assessed using the Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire. Binge eating was defined as eating a large amount of food with a sense of lack of control over what and how much is eaten in less than 2 hours at least twice a week. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between binge eating and job strain as well as its interaction with BMI. After adjustment, and using low-strain job as the reference category, binge eating was associated with high-strain job (high demand/low control: odds ratio [OR]=1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26-1.98), active job (high demand/high control: OR=1.35, 95% CI 1.07-1.70), and passive job (low demand/low control: OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.01-1.53). Psychological job demands were positively associated with binge eating (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07), while greater job control and social support at work were each inversely associated with binge eating (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.97 and OR=0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98, respectively). BMI modified the association between job strain and binge eating: Heavier psychological job demands were associated with higher odds of binge eating among obese participants, while a stronger inverse association between job control and binge eating was seen among slimmer participants. Job strain increases the odds of binge eating and this association is modified by BMI.

  13. Differences in genetic and environmental variation in adult BMI by sex, age, time period, and region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Jelenkovic, Aline; Sund, Reijo

    2017-01-01

    and women increased from young adulthood to old age. The heritability of BMI was largely similar between cultural-geographic regions and measurement years, despite large differences in mean BMI and variances in BMI. Our results show a strong influence of genetic factors on BMI, especially in early adulthood......Background: Genes and the environment contribute to variation in adult body mass index [BMI (in kg/m(2))], but factors modifying these variance components are poorly understood.Objective: We analyzed genetic and environmental variation in BMI between men and women from young adulthood to old age...... from the 1940s to the 2000s and between cultural-geographic regions representing high (North America and Australia), moderate (Europe), and low (East Asia) prevalence of obesity.Design: We used genetic structural equation modeling to analyze BMI in twins ≥20 y of age from 40 cohorts representing 20...

  14. Postoperative Complications of Total Joint Arthroplasty in Obese Patients Stratified by BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusmanovich, Mikhail; Kester, Benjamin S; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2017-10-10

    High body mass index (BMI) is associated with significant complications in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. Many studies have evaluated this trend, but few have looked at the rates of complications based on BMI as a continuous variable. The purpose of this study was to stratify obese patients into 3 BMI categories and evaluate their rates of complications and gauge whether transitioning from higher to lower BMI category lowers complication. Patients undergoing primary total joint arthroplasty were selected from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2008-2015 and arranged into 3 groups based on BMI: O1 (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m(2)), O2 (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m(2)), and O3 (BMI >40 kg/m(2)). Thirty-day complications were recorded and evaluated utilizing univariate and multivariate analyses stratified by BMI. A total of 268,663 patients were identified. Patients with a BMI >30 kg/m(2) had more infectious and medical complications compared with nonobese patients. Furthermore, there were increased complications as the BMI categories increased. Patients with a BMI >40 kg/m(2) (O3) had longer operating times, length of stay, higher rates of readmissions, reoperations, deep venous thrombosis, renal insufficiency, superficial infections, deep infections, and wound dehiscence. These trends were present when comparing the O2 with O1 category as well. We have demonstrated increased rates of medical and surgical complications in obese patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated a stepwise increase in complication rates when transitioning to higher BMI groups. Based on our data, we believe that preoperative counseling and interventions to decrease BMI should be explored before offering elective surgery to obese patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prognostic relevance of Bmi-1 expression and autoantibodies in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Bmi-1 has been observed in a variety of cancers, and it has been suggested to be an independent prognostic marker for the patients. The objective of this study was to determine the level of Bmi-1 expression or its autoantibodies in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to correlate it with clinicopathologic data. Methods We first examined Bmi-1 expression in ESCC cell lines and tumor samples by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. We then analyzed Bmi-1 protein expression in 171 clinicopathologically characterized ESCC cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we detected its autoantibodies in sera of patients with ESCC by ELISA. Results We found that Bmi-1 expression was higher in the immortalized cells, cancer cell lines and most cancer tissue than in non-tumorous control tissue at both mRNA and protein level. In addition, Bmi-1 expression was observed in 64.3% (110 of 171) archive ESCC specimen by immunohistochemistry analysis, and the location of Bmi-1 in ESCC was in the nuclei instead of cytoplasm of tumor cells. There was a significant difference of Bmi-1 expression in patients categorized according to stage (P = 0.003) and pN classification (P = 0.047). Multivariate analysis suggested that Bmi-1 expression was an independent prognostic marker for ESCC patients. A prognostic significance of Bmi-1 was also found in the subgroup of T3~T4 and N1 tumor classification. Bmi-1 autoantibodies were detected in sera of 39.0% (62 of 159) ESCC patients. The correlations between anti-Bmi-1 antibodies and tumor stage (P = 0.040), or lymph node status (P Bmi-1 protein is a valuable marker of ESCC progression. The presence of Bmi-1 autoantibodies in sera from patients with ESCC may have clinical utility in esophageal cancer diagnosis. PMID:20809956

  16. Bmi1 Is Required for Hedgehog Pathway-Driven Medulloblastoma Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowell Evan Michael

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate Hedgehog (Hh signaling underlies development of a subset of medulloblastomas, and tumors with elevated HH signaling activity express the stem cell self-renewal gene BMI1. To test whether Bmi1 is required for Hh-driven medulloblastoma development, we varied Bmi1 gene dosage in transgenic mice expressing an oncogenic Hh effector, SmoA1, driven by a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP promoter. Whereas 100% of SmoA1; Bmi1+/+ or SmoA1;Bmi1+/- mice examined between postnatal (P days 14 and 26 had typical medulloblastomas (N = 29, tumors were not detected in any of the SmoA1;Bmi1-/- animals examined (N = 6. Instead, small ectopic collections of cells were present in the region of greatest tumor load in SmoA1 animals, suggesting that medulloblastomas were initiated but failed to undergo expansion into frank tumors. Cells within these Bmi1-/- lesions expressed SmoA1 but were largely nonproliferative, in contrast to cells in Bmi1+/+ tumors (6.2% vs 81.9% PCNA-positive, respectively. Ectopic cells were negative for the progenitor marker nestin, strongly GFAP-positive, and highly apoptotic, relative to Bmi1+/+ tumor cells (29.6% vs 6.3% TUNEL-positive. The alterations in proliferation and apoptosis in SmoA1;Bmi1-/- ectopic cells are associated with reduced levels of Cyclin D1 and elevated expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p19Arf, two inversely regulated downstream targets of Bmi1. These data provide the first demonstration that Bmi1 is required for spontaneous de novo development of a solid tumor arising in the brain, suggest a crucial role for Bmi1-dependent, nestin-expressing progenitor cells in medulloblastoma expansion, and implicate Bmi1 as a key factor required for Hh pathway-driven tumorigenesis.

  17. Impact of baseline BMI and weight change in CCTG adjuvant breast cancer trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerushalmi, R; Dong, B; Chapman, J W; Goss, P E; Pollak, M N; Burnell, M J; Levine, M N; Bramwell, V H C; Pritchard, K I; Whelan, T J; Ingle, J N; Shepherd, L E; Parulekar, W R; Han, L; Ding, K; Gelmon, K A

    2017-07-01

    We hypothesized that increased baseline BMI and BMI change would negatively impact clinical outcomes with adjuvant breast cancer systemic therapy. Data from chemotherapy trials MA.5 and MA.21; endocrine therapy MA.12, MA.14 and MA.27; and trastuzumab HERA/MA.24 were analyzed. The primary objective was to examine the effect of BMI change on breast cancer-free interval (BCFI) landmarked at 5 years; secondary objectives included BMI changes at 1 and 3 years; BMI changes on disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS); and effects of baseline BMI. Stratified analyses included trial therapy and composite trial stratification factors. In pre-/peri-/early post-menopausal chemotherapy trials (N = 2793), baseline BMI did not impact any endpoint and increased BMI from baseline did not significantly affect BCFI (P = 0.85) after 5 years although it was associated with worse BCFI (P = 0.03) and DSS (P = 0.07) after 1 year. BMI increase by 3 and 5 years was associated with better DSS (P = 0.01; 0.01) and OS (P = 0.003; 0.05). In pre-menopausal endocrine therapy trial MA.12 (N = 672), patients with higher baseline BMI had worse BCFI (P = 0.02) after 1 year, worse DSS (P = 0.05; 0.004) after 1 and 5 years and worse OS (P = 0.01) after 5 years. Increased BMI did not impact BCFI (P = 0.90) after 5 years, although it was associated with worse BCFI (P = 0.01) after 1 year. In post-menopausal endocrine therapy trials MA.14 and MA.27 (N = 8236), baseline BMI did not significantly impact outcome for any endpoint. BMI change did not impact BCFI or DSS after 1 or 3 years, although a mean increased BMI of 0.3 was associated with better OS (P = 0.02) after 1 year. With the administration of trastuzumab (N = 1395) baseline BMI and BMI change did not significantly impact outcomes. Higher baseline BMI and BMI increases negatively affected outcomes only in pre-/peri-/early post-menopausal trial patients. Otherwise, BMI

  18. Exercise reduces appetite and traffics excess nutrients away from energetically efficient pathways of lipid deposition during the early stages of weight regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steig, Amy J; Jackman, Matthew R; Giles, Erin D; Higgins, Janine A; Johnson, Ginger C; Mahan, Chad; Melanson, Edward L; Wyatt, Holly R; Eckel, Robert H; Hill, James O; MacLean, Paul S

    2011-09-01

    The impact of regular exercise on energy balance, fuel utilization, and nutrient availability, during weight regain was studied in obese rats, which had lost 17% of their weight by a calorie-restricted, low-fat diet. Weight reduced rats were maintained for 6 wk with and without regular treadmill exercise (1 h/day, 6 days/wk, 15 m/min). In vivo tracers and indirect calorimetry were then used in combination to examine nutrient metabolism during weight maintenance (in energy balance) and during the first day of relapse when allowed to eat ad libitum (relapse). An additional group of relapsing, sedentary rats were provided just enough calories to create the same positive energy imbalance as the relapsing, exercised rats. Exercise attenuated the energy imbalance by 50%, reducing appetite and increasing energy requirements. Expenditure increased beyond the energetic cost of the exercise bout, as exercised rats expended more energy to store the same nutrient excess in sedentary rats with the matched energy imbalance. Compared with sedentary rats with the same energy imbalance, exercised rats exhibited the trafficking of dietary fat toward oxidation and away from storage in adipose tissue, as well as a higher net retention of fuel via de novo lipogenesis in adipose tissue. These metabolic changes in relapse were preceded by an increase in the skeletal muscle expression of genes involved in lipid uptake, mobilization, and oxidation. Our observations reveal a favorable shift in fuel utilization with regular exercise that increases the energetic cost of storing excess nutrients during relapse and alterations in circulating nutrients that may affect appetite. The attenuation of the biological drive to regain weight, involving both central and peripheral aspects of energy homeostasis, may explain, in part, the utility of regular exercise in preventing weight regain after weight loss.

  19. ATLAS Overview Week at Brookhaven

    CERN Multimedia

    Pilcher, J

    Over 200 ATLAS participants gathered at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the first week of June for our annual overview week. Some system communities arrived early and held meetings on Saturday and Sunday, and the detector interface group (DIG) and Technical Coordination also took advantage of the time to discuss issues of interest for all detector systems. Sunday was also marked by a workshop on the possibilities for heavy ion physics with ATLAS. Beginning on Monday, and for the rest of the week, sessions were held in common in the well equipped Berkner Hall auditorium complex. Laptop computers became the norm for presentations and a wireless network kept laptop owners well connected. Most lunches and dinners were held on the lawn outside Berkner Hall. The weather was very cooperative and it was an extremely pleasant setting. This picture shows most of the participants from a view on the roof of Berkner Hall. Technical Coordination and Integration issues started the reports on Monday and became a...

  20. Percutaneous Retrograde Transhepatic Arterial Puncture to Regain Access in the True Lumen of the Dissected and Acutely Occluded Transplant Hepatic Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Fumagalli, R; Jia, Z; Sella, D M; McKinney, J M; Frey, G T; Wang, W

    2017-03-01

    Iatrogenic hepatic artery dissection is a serious complication that can progress to complete hepatic artery occlusion and graft loss. Restoration of arterial flow to the graft is urgent, but the severity and extent of the dissection may interfere with endovascular techniques. The authors describe a technique of percutaneous retrograde transhepatic arterial puncture to regain access into the true lumen of the dissected hepatic artery to restore in-line flow to the liver graft. © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. The new Epinal image: the regained confidence and quality; La nouvelle image d'Epinal: la confiance et la qualite retrouvees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renoult, F.; Levitchi, M.; Hajj, L.E.; Marchesi, V.; Buchheit, I.; Noel, A.; Simon, J.M.; Peiffert, D.; Marchal, C. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France); Perrin, E. [Centre hospitalier Jean-Monnet, 88 - Epinal, (France)

    2010-10-15

    After the closing down of the Epinal radiotherapy department, the Nancy Alexis-Vautrin was entrusted to take up its activity again. It implemented a quality approach for equipment, organization and practices, in order to regain the confidence of patients in radiotherapy. This comprises a homogenisation of practices, a document management for technical protocols and procedures between both centres. A return-on-experience committee and an analysis of failure modes and of their effects and criticality have been implemented to reduce the error risk. Patient confidence has been assessed by the department psychologist and questionnaire results are assessed every three months. Short communication

  2. Relationships between weekly walking distance and adiposity in27,596 women are nonlinear with respect to both distance andadiposity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2004-12-01

    The cross-sectional relationships of weekly walking distance to BMI, body circumferences, and bra cup sizes are reported for 27,596 women. The percent reductions between walking 40-50 km/wk and < 10km/wk were greatest for BMI, substantial for waist circumference and cupsize, and least for hip and chest circumferences. The relationships between distance and adiposity were nonlinear with respect to both the independent (quadratic function of distance) and dependent variables(slope and curvilinearity depending upon the percentile of BMI, circumference, or cup size). The slope relating adiposity to km/wk were greatest (most negative) in overweight sedentary women and least in lean active women. For example, compared to women averaging 10 km/wk, the slope of BMI versus km/wk was 43 percent less at 25 km/wk and 87 percent less at 40 km/wk in overweight women (95th BMI percentile), but negligible at all distances in lean women (5th BMI percentile). The greater estimated decrease in BMI per km/wk in walkers than runners was largely accounted for (over 75 percent) by the walkers greater adiposity. Thus classical representations of the relationship between adiposity and moderate physical activity are inadequate for either statistical analyses or descriptive purposes. The clinical implications of these results and their statistical ramifications are discussed.

  3. BMI and WHR Are Reflected in Female Facial Shape and Texture: A Geometric Morphometric Image Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Mayer

    Full Text Available Facial markers of body composition are frequently studied in evolutionary psychology and are important in computational and forensic face recognition. We assessed the association of body mass index (BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR with facial shape and texture (color pattern in a sample of young Middle European women by a combination of geometric morphometrics and image analysis. Faces of women with high BMI had a wider and rounder facial outline relative to the size of the eyes and lips, and relatively lower eyebrows. Furthermore, women with high BMI had a brighter and more reddish skin color than women with lower BMI. The same facial features were associated with WHR, even though BMI and WHR were only moderately correlated. Yet BMI was better predictable than WHR from facial attributes. After leave-one-out cross-validation, we were able to predict 25% of variation in BMI and 10% of variation in WHR by facial shape. Facial texture predicted only about 3-10% of variation in BMI and WHR. This indicates that facial shape primarily reflects total fat proportion, rather than the distribution of fat within the body. The association of reddish facial texture in high-BMI women may be mediated by increased blood pressure and superficial blood flow as well as diet. Our study elucidates how geometric morphometric image analysis serves to quantify the effect of biological factors such as BMI and WHR to facial shape and color, which in turn contributes to social perception.

  4. Social disparities in body mass index (BMI) trajectories among Chinese adults in 1991-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Changchun; Liang, Ying

    2017-08-16

    Obesity is a serious public health problem in China. The relationship between obesity and socio-economic status (SES) is changing and affected by uncertainty, particularly, in developing countries. The sex-related differences in body mass index (BMI) trajectories are controversial and require substantial empirical data for updating and enriching. This study examined the relationship between SES and BMI in Chinese adults from a dynamic perspective using longitudinal data (1991-2011) from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). Then, sex-related differences were determined. A hierarchical linear model was used. SES positively affected the male BMI changes, with faster BMI growth rates in the high-SES males over the past 20 years. By contrast, female BMI was only affected by BMI baseline and residential area. Specifically, greater BMI baseline led to greater BMI growth rate and earlier BMI decline. In the past 20 years, the BMI growth rate has been greater in the urban females than in the rural females. The relationship between SES and obesity is complex in China, and a substantial sex-related difference exists. We argue that this large sex-related difference is due to the rapid economic and social changes that have affected national health and increased the gender inequality and social role restrictions in females. We provide insights for further research and policy recommendations.

  5. BMI increase through puberty and adolescence is associated with risk of adult stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Claes; Bygdell, Maria; Sondén, Arvid; Jern, Christina; Rosengren, Annika; Kindblom, Jenny M

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate the contribution of prepubertal childhood body mass index (BMI) and BMI change through puberty and adolescence, 2 distinct developmental BMI parameters, for risk of adult stroke in men. In this population-based study in Gothenburg, Sweden, men born in 1945-1961 with information on both childhood BMI at age 8 and BMI change through puberty and adolescence (BMI at age 20-BMI at age 8) were followed until December 2013 (n = 37,669). Information on stroke events was retrieved from high-quality national registers (918 first stroke events, 672 ischemic stroke events [IS], 207 intracerebral hemorrhage events [ICH]). BMI increase through puberty and adolescence (hazard ratio [HR] 1.21 per SD increase; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-1.28), but not childhood BMI, was independently associated with risk of adult stroke. Subanalyses revealed that BMI increase through puberty and adolescence was associated with both IS (HR per SD increase 1.19; 95% CI 1.11-1.28) and ICH (HR per SD increase 1.29; 95% CI 1.15-1.46). High BMI increase during puberty was strongly associated with increased risk of adult hypertension (odds ratio per SD increase 1.35; 95% CI 1.32-1.39). BMI increase through puberty and adolescence is associated with risk of adult IS and ICH in men. We propose that greater BMI increases during puberty contribute to increased risk of adult stroke at least partly via increased blood pressure. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Nutritional status (BMI in children suffering from asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šćepanović Anđelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The research encompassed 708 children of both genders, aged 6 to 15. Three hundred and fifty four of the total number had been diagnosed with Asthma bronchiale, whereas the other half of the children were healthy and served as a control group. Their nutritional condition was determined on the basis of the percentile value of their BMI. Recent studies on the level of nutrition and its connection to asthma have shown contradictory results. This paper was aimed at estimating the nutritional level of sick children in relation to healthy ones. The data were analyzed in relation to group, gender and age by means of descriptive methods, univariate (analysis of variance - ANOVA and multivariate (multivariate analysis of variance - MANOVA, whereas the results were tested by Roy’s test (Pearson contingency coefficient χ, coefficient of multiple correlation R. It was determined that male children more frequently suffer from this disease than female children do. Both healthy and sick children were normally nourished. However, as regards the sick, the number of normally nourished was considerably lower, whereas the number of underweight was considerably higher, as well as those that were overweight. Intergroup differences in the distribution of certain levels of nutrition of male and female children occurred in only two non-sequential age groups, being later in boys than in girls. This uneven distribution is probably a consequence of the joint effects of environment factors, sickness and therapy.

  7. Psychosocial predictors of decay in healthy eating and physical activity improvements in obese women regaining lost weight: translation of behavioral theory into treatment suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J

    2016-06-01

    Regain of lost weight is a universal problem for behavioral treatments. An increased understanding of theory-based psychosocial predictors of decay in behavioral correlates of weight loss might improve treatments. Data were derived from a previous weight loss investigation of 110 women with obesity. A subsample from the experimental treatment who lost ≥3 % body weight and regained at least one third of that over 24 months (N = 36) was assessed. During months 6 through 24, there were unfavorable changes in behavioral (fruit/vegetable and sweet intake; physical activity) and psychosocial variables. Mood change predicted change in fruit/vegetable and sweet intake, with emotional eating change mediating the latter relationship. Change in self-regulation predicted changes in sweet and fruit/vegetable intake and physical activity, with self-efficacy mediating the self-regulation-fruit/vegetable intake and self-regulation-physical activity relationships. Findings suggest that after treatment-induced weight loss, addressing indicated theory-based psychosocial variables might mitigate decay in behavioral predictors of healthier weight.

  8. Maternal hyperglycemia in singleton pregnancies conceived by IVF may be modified by first-trimester BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, S; Natarajan, P; Chan, J K Y; Wong, P C; Tan, K H; Godfrey, K M; Gluckman, P D; Shek, L P C; Yap, F; Kramer, M S; Chan, S Y; Chong, Y S

    2017-09-01

    Does IVF independently increase the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and is this increase in risk modified by maternal body mass index? IVF appears to be an independent risk factor for GDM and elevated blood glucose levels in overweight women (BMI > 25 kg/m2). IVF has been associated with increased risk of GDM, but most previous studies did not adequately assess confounding or effect modification by other risk factors. Cross-sectional study using data from 1089 women with singleton pregnancies who participated in a Singaporean birth cohort study (GUSTO) and received a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 26-28 weeks gestation. A total of 1089 women (n = 1013 conceived spontaneously, n = 76 conceived through IVF) with singleton pregnancies received a 75 g OGTT at 26-28 weeks gestation. Fasting and 2 h postprandial blood glucose levels were assayed. World Health Organization criteria (1999) standard criteria were used to classify GDM: ≥7.0 mmol/L for fasting and/or ≥7.8 mmol/L for 2-h postprandial plasma glucose levels, which was the clinical guideline in use during the study. IVF pregnancies had nearly double the odds of GDM (OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.03-3.26) and elevated fasting (mean difference = 0.12 mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.00-0.24) and OGTT 2-h blood glucose levels (mean difference = 0.64 mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.27-1.01), after adjusting for commonly recognized risk factors for GDM. After stratification by first-trimester BMI, these increased risks of GDM (OR = 3.54, 95% CI: 1.44-8.72) and elevated fasting (mean difference = 0.39 mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.13-0.65) and 2-h blood (mean difference = 1.24 mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.56-1.91) glucose levels were significant only in the IVF group who is also overweight or obese (BMI > 25 kg/m2). One limitation of our study is the absence of a 1 h post-OGTT plasma glucose sample, as we were using the 1999 WHO diagnostic criteria (the clinical guideline in Singapore) at the time of our study, instead of the revised 2013 WHO

  9. School Programs and Characteristics and Their Influence on Student BMI: Findings from Healthy Passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Tracy K.; Elliott, Marc N.; Franzini, Luisa; Kawachi, Ichiro; Caughy, Margaret O.; Gilliland, M. Janice; Walls, Courtney E.; Franklin, Frank A.; Lowry, Richard; Banspach, Stephen W.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the contribution of school contextual factors to individual student body mass index (BMI). We set out to determine if school characteristics/resources: (1) are associated with student BMI; (2) explain racial/ethnic disparities in student BMI; and (3) explain school-level differences in student BMI. Methods Using gender-stratified multi-level modeling strategies we examined the association of school characteristics/resources and individual BMI in 4,387 5th graders in the Healthy Passages Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Additionally, we examined the association of race/ethnicity and individual BMI as well as the between-school variance in BMI before and after adding individual and school characteristics to test for attenuation. Results The school-level median household income, but not physical activity or nutrition resources, was inversely associated with female BMI (β = −0.12, CI: −0.21,−0.02). Neither school demographics nor physical activity/nutrition resources were predictive of individual BMI in males. In Black females, school characteristics attenuated the association of race/ethnicity and BMI. Individual student characteristics—not school characteristics/resources-reduced the between-school variation in BMI in males by nearly one-third and eliminated it in females. Conclusions In this cohort of 5th graders, school SES was inversely associated with female BMI while school characteristics and resources largely explained Black/White disparities in female weight status. Between-school differences in average student weight status were largely explained by the composition of the student body not by school characteristics or programming. PMID:24454697

  10. Changes in Adult BMI and Waist Circumference Are Associated with Increased Risk of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G; Monahan, Patrick; Song, Yiqing; Zollinger, Terrell W; Champion, Victoria L; Stump, Timothy E; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2017-11-01

    Waist circumference (WC) is a stronger predictor of colon cancer (CRC) risk than body mass index (BMI). However, how well change in either WC or BMI predicts risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia (AN) is unclear. To determine the relationship between change in BMI and WC from early adulthood to later age and the risk of AN and which change measure is a stronger predictor. In 4500 adults, ages 50-80, with no previous neoplasia and undergoing screening colonoscopy, BMI and WC at age 21 and at time of screening were reported. Changes in BMI and WC were defined using universal risk cutoffs. Known CRC risk factors were controlled in the logistic models. Overall, model statistics showed WC change (omnibus test χ (2) = 10.15, 2 DF, p value = 0.006) was a statistically stronger predictor of AN than BMI change (omnibus test χ (2) = 5.66, 5 DF, p value = 0.34). Independent of BMI change, participants who increased WC (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.05-1.96) or maintained a high-risk WC (OR 2.50; 95% CI 1.38-4.53) at age 21 and at screening had an increased risk of AN compared to those with a low-risk WC. Study participants who were obese at age 21 and at screening had an increased risk of AN (OR 1.87; 95% CI 1.08-3.23) compared to those who maintained a healthy BMI. Maintaining an overweight BMI or increasing BMI was not associated with AN. Maintaining an unhealthy BMI and WC throughout adult life may increase risk of AN. WC change may be a better predictor of AN than BMI change.

  11. Infant BMI or Weight-for-Length and Obesity Risk in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sani M.; Spivack, Jordan G.; Faith, Myles S.; Chesi, Alessandra; Mitchell, Jonathan A.; Kelly, Andrea; Grant, Struan F. A.; McCormack, Shana E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Weight-for-length (WFL) is currently used to assess adiposity under 2 years. We assessed WFL- versus BMI-based estimates of adiposity in healthy infants in determining risk for early obesity. METHODS: Anthropometrics were extracted from electronic medical records for well-child visits for 73 949 full-term infants from a large pediatric network. World Health Organization WFL and BMI z scores (WFL-z and BMI-z, respectively) were calculated up to age 24 months. Correlation analyses assessed the agreement between WFL-z and BMI-z and within-subject tracking over time. Logistic regression determined odds of obesity at 2 years on the basis of adiposity classification at 2 months. RESULTS: Agreement between WFL-z and BMI-z increased from birth to 6 months and remained high thereafter. BMI-z at 2 months was more consistent with measurements at older ages than WFL-z at 2 months. Infants with high BMI (≥85th percentile) and reference WFL (5th–85th percentiles) at 2 months had greater odds of obesity at 2 years than those with high WFL (≥85th percentile) and reference BMI (5th–85th percentiles; odds ratio, 5.49 vs 1.40; P BMI had a higher positive predictive value than WFL for obesity at 2 years using cut-points of either the 85th percentile (31% vs 23%) or 97.7th percentile (47% vs 29%). CONCLUSIONS: High BMI in early infancy is more strongly associated with early childhood obesity than high WFL. Forty-seven percent of infants with BMI ≥97.7th percentile at 2 months (versus 29% of infants with WFL ≥97.7th percentile at 2 months) were obese at 2 years. Epidemiologic studies focused on assessing childhood obesity risk should consider using BMI in early infancy. PMID:27244803

  12. Maintaining a Healthy BMI: Data From a 16-Year Study of Young Australian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wendy J; Kabir, Enamul; Clark, Bronwyn K; Gomersall, Sjaan R

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this prospective cohort study were to examine 16-year trajectories of weight and BMI in young adult women who had a healthy BMI in 1996 and determinants of remaining in the healthy BMI category. A total of 4,881 women with healthy BMI at baseline and either healthy, overweight, or obese BMI at 16-year follow-up reported their weight, height, health, and health behaviors in six surveys of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health between 1996 (aged 18-23 years) and 2012 (aged 34-39 years). Determinants of BMI maintenance were estimated using binary logistic regression and generalized estimating equations in 2015. Almost 60% remained in the healthy BMI category from 1996 to 2012, (mean weight gain, 0.19 kg/year), 29% transitioned to overweight BMI (0.83 kg/year), and 11.6% transitioned to obese (1.73 kg/year). The mean rates of annual weight gain in each group were consistent over time. Only three factors (low alcohol, moderate/high physical activity, having a university degree) were positively associated with maintaining a healthy BMI. Additional behavioral factors (smoking, high sitting time, energy intake, dieting, takeaway food, and use of oral contraceptives), as well as blue collar occupation, separation/divorce/widowhood, and major illness were negatively associated with BMI maintenance. To prevent the transition from healthy to overweight/obese BMI, weight gain must be limited to healthy BMI, but with higher rates of weight gain in their early 20s, could be identified by health professionals for assistance with prevention of becoming overweight/obese. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern and BMI change among U.S. adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Calvo, Nerea; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Falbe, Jennifer; Hu, Frank B.; Field, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among adults, the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MDP) is inversely related to body mass index (BMI). Data are lacking on adherence to the MDP among youth in the United States and whether the MDP is related to weight change in that group. Objective: To assess whether adherence to the MDP was associated with BMI change among adolescents. To examine temporality we studied the association between baseline and 2–3 year changes in adherence to the MDP with concurrent changes in BMI, as ...

  14. School programs and characteristics and their influence on student BMI: findings from healthy passages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K Richmond

    Full Text Available Little is known about the contribution of school contextual factors to individual student body mass index (BMI. We set out to determine if school characteristics/resources: (1 are associated with student BMI; (2 explain racial/ethnic disparities in student BMI; and (3 explain school-level differences in student BMI.Using gender-stratified multi-level modeling strategies we examined the association of school characteristics/resources and individual BMI in 4,387 5(th graders in the Healthy Passages Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Additionally, we examined the association of race/ethnicity and individual BMI as well as the between-school variance in BMI before and after adding individual and school characteristics to test for attenuation.The school-level median household income, but not physical activity or nutrition resources, was inversely associated with female BMI (β = -0.12, CI: -0.21,-0.02. Neither school demographics nor physical activity/nutrition resources were predictive of individual BMI in males. In Black females, school characteristics attenuated the association of race/ethnicity and BMI. Individual student characteristics-not school characteristics/resources-reduced the between-school variation in BMI in males by nearly one-third and eliminated it in females.In this cohort of 5(th graders, school SES was inversely associated with female BMI while school characteristics and resources largely explained Black/White disparities in female weight status. Between-school differences in average student weight status were largely explained by the composition of the student body not by school characteristics or programming.

  15. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  16. Prenatal risk factors influencing childhood BMI and overweight independent of birth weight and infancy BMI: a path analysis within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, C S; Ängquist, L; Baker, J L; Andersen, A M N; Michaelsen, K F; Sørensen, T I A

    2017-09-08

    Prenatal risk factors for childhood overweight may operate indirectly through development in body size in early life and/or directly independent hereof. We quantified the effects of maternal and paternal body mass index (BMI), maternal age, socioeconomic position (SEP), parity, gestational weight gain, maternal smoking during pregnancy, caesarean section, birth weight, and BMI at 5 and 12 months on BMI and overweight at 7 and 11 years. Family triads with information on maternal, paternal and child BMI at ages 7 (n=29 374) and 11 years (n=18 044) were selected from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Information originated from maternal interviews and medical health examinations. Path analysis was used to estimate the direct and indirect effects of prenatal risk factors on childhood BMI z-scores (BMIz per unit score of the risk factor). Logistic regression was used to examine associations with overweight. The strongest direct effects on BMIz at age 7 were found for maternal and paternal BMI (0.19 BMIz and 0.14 BMIz per parental BMIz), low SEP (0.08 BMIz), maternal smoking (0.12 BMIz) and higher BMIz at 5 and 12 months (up to 0.19 BMIz per infant BMIz). For BMIz at age 11 with BMIz at age 7 included in the model, similar effects were found, but the direct effects of BMIz at age 5 and 12 months were mediated through BMI at age 7 (0.62 BMIz per BMIz). Same results were found for overweight. The sum of the direct effects can be translated to approximate absolute measures: 2.4 kg at 7 years, 5.7 kg at 11 years, in a child with average height and BMI. Parental BMI, low SEP and smoking during pregnancy have persisting, strong and direct effects on child BMI and overweight independent of birth weight and infancy BMI.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 31 October 2017; doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.217.

  17. Effect of activity and television viewing on BMI z-score in early adolescents in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmert, Elif N; Ozdemir, Ramazan; Pektaş, Ayhan; Uçkardeş, Yasemin; Yurdakök, Kadriye

    2011-02-01

    television, computer and other causes of increased inactivity are reported to be among the major causes of obesity. This cross-sectional study was aimed to evaluate the effect of television viewing and other daily activities on body mass index (BMI) z-score of early adolescents. a total of 860 students and their parents (581) from different socioeconomic level schools were included. They were instructed to fill in a self-designed questionnaire. Weight and height were measured, and BMI z-scores were calculated. BMI z-score was higher in boys and in those attending high socioeconomic level schools. Children with a BMI z-score >2SD watched television (2.5 ± 0.9 h/day) longer than those with 2SD) differed significantly according to maternal (P<0.05) and paternal (P<0.005) BMI. Linear logistic regression analysis revealed that socioeconomic level, maternal BMI and paternal BMI are factors affecting BMI z-score significantly. genetic and/or family environment which may affect the nutrition and activity of adolescents seems to be the most important factor affecting their BMI z-score.

  18. Prediction of BMI at age 11 in a longitudinal sample of the Ulm Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Viola; Wabitsch, Martin; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Brenner, Hermann; Schimmelmann, Benno G.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges in the world with childhood prevalence rates between 20–26% and numerous associated health risks. The aim of the current study was to analyze the 11-year follow-up data of the Ulm Birth Cohort Study (UBCS), to identify whether abnormal eating behavior patterns, especially restrained eating, predict body mass index (BMI) at 11 years of age and to explore other factors known to be longitudinally associated with it. Of the original UBCS, n = 422 children (~ 40% of the original sample) and their parents participated in the 11-year follow-up. BMI at age 8 and 11 as well as information on restrained eating, psychological problems, depressive symptoms, lifestyle, and IQ at age 8 were assessed. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to predict children’s BMI scores at age 11. PLS-SEM explained 68% of the variance of BMI at age 11, with BMI at age 8 being the most important predictor. Restrained eating, via BMI at age 8 as well as parental BMI, had further weak associations with BMI at age 11; no other predictor was statistically significant. Since established overweight at age 8 already predicts BMI scores at age 11 longitudinally, obesity interventions should be implemented in early childhood. PMID:28832593

  19. BMI-1 Promotes Self-Renewal of Radio- and Temozolomide (TMZ)-Resistant Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yanfang; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Pengxin; Ma, Weiyuan; Hu, Zhigang; Zhang, Kaili

    2017-12-01

    Breast cancer is a hormone-dependent malignancy and is the most prevalent cause of cancer-related mortality among females. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are common treatments of breast cancer. However, tumor relapse and metastasis following therapy are major clinical challenges. The importance of B-lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region-1 (BMI-1) was implicated in cell proliferation, stem cell maintenance, and tumor initiation. We established radio- and temozolomide (TMZ)-resistant (IRC-R) MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines to investigate the mechanism involved in therapeutic resistance. Cell proliferation and sphere number were dramatically elevated, and BMI-1 was remarkably upregulated, in IRC-R cells compared to parental cells. Silencing BMI-1 by RNA interference only affected the cell proliferation of IRC-R but not parental cells, suggesting the critical role of BMI-1 in radio- and TMZ resistance. We used a xenograft mice model to elucidate that BMI-1 was necessary in tumor development by assessing tumor volume and Ki67 expression. We found that Hedgehog (Hhg) signaling exerted synergized functions together with BMI-1, implicating the importance of BMI-1 in Hhg signaling. Downregulation of BMI-1 could be an effective strategy to suppress tumor growth, which supports the potential clinical use of targeting BMI-1 in breast cancer treatment.

  20. O-GlcNAcylation modulates Bmi-1 protein stability and potential oncogenic function in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Wang, L; Liu, J; Zhang, P; An, M; Han, C; Li, Y; Guan, X; Zhang, K

    2017-11-09

    The Polycomb group transcriptional repressor Bmi-1 often overexpressed and participated in stem cells self-renewal and tumorigenesis initiating of prostate cancer. In this progression, Bmi-1 protein was regulated by transcription and post-translational modifications (PTMs). Nobly, the underlying PTMs regulation of Bmi-1 is poorly known. Here we use co-immunoprecipitation show that in C4-2 cell line, Bmi-1 directly interacted with OGT which is the only known enzyme catalyzed the O-GlcNAcylation in human. Furthermore, we identified that Ser255 is the site for Bmi-1 O-GlcNAcylation, and O-GlcNAcylation promoted Bmi-1 protein stability and its oncogenic activity. Finally, microarray analysis has characterized potential oncogenes associated pathway subject to repression via the OGT-Bmi-1 axis. Taken together, these results indicate that OGT-mediated O-GlcNAcylation at Ser255 stabilizes Bmi-1 and hence inhibits the TP53, PTEN and CDKN1A/CDKN2A pathway. The study not only uncovers a novel functional PTMs of Bmi-1 but also reveals a unique oncogenic role of O-GlcNAcylation in prostate cancer.

  1. Prediction of BMI at age 11 in a longitudinal sample of the Ulm Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Hanna; Brandt, Stephanie; Walter, Viola; Wabitsch, Martin; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Brenner, Hermann; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Hirsch, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges in the world with childhood prevalence rates between 20-26% and numerous associated health risks. The aim of the current study was to analyze the 11-year follow-up data of the Ulm Birth Cohort Study (UBCS), to identify whether abnormal eating behavior patterns, especially restrained eating, predict body mass index (BMI) at 11 years of age and to explore other factors known to be longitudinally associated with it. Of the original UBCS, n = 422 children (~ 40% of the original sample) and their parents participated in the 11-year follow-up. BMI at age 8 and 11 as well as information on restrained eating, psychological problems, depressive symptoms, lifestyle, and IQ at age 8 were assessed. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to predict children's BMI scores at age 11. PLS-SEM explained 68% of the variance of BMI at age 11, with BMI at age 8 being the most important predictor. Restrained eating, via BMI at age 8 as well as parental BMI, had further weak associations with BMI at age 11; no other predictor was statistically significant. Since established overweight at age 8 already predicts BMI scores at age 11 longitudinally, obesity interventions should be implemented in early childhood.

  2. Infant BMI peak, breastfeeding, and body composition at age 3 y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Marie; Ritz, Christian; Ejlerskov, Katrine Tschentscher

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the increasing focus on obesity, growth patterns in infancy and early childhood have gained much attention. Although the adiposity rebound has been in focus because of a shown association with adult obesity, not much has been published about the infant peak in body mass index (BMI......) cohort were used to estimate BMI growth curves for the age span from 14 d to 19 mo by using a nonlinear mixed-effects model. BMI growth velocity before peak and age and BMI at peak were derived from the subject-specific models. Information about pregnancy and breastfeeding was assessed from background...

  3. Immunohistochemical expression and prognostic relevance of Bmi-1, a stem cell factor, in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El hafez, Amal; El-Hadaad, Hend Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in women. Bmi-1 is a stem cell factor implicated in many human malignancies with poor outcome. Few published reports on the expression of Bmi-1 in epithelial ovarian cancer were either experimental or performed on cell lines. This study evaluates the immunohistochemical expression of Bmi-1 protein in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue specimens and its relevance to the clinicopathologic prognostic variables and patient survival. Forty cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were selected according to the availability of paraffin-embedded tissue and the clinicopathologic and survival data. Immunohistochemistry was performed for anti-Bmi-1 antibody. Low and high Bmi-1 expression groups were compared with age, tumor stage, laterality, grade, histology, and patient survival. Bmi-1 expression was detected in 72.5% of cases, of which 42.5% had high expression. High Bmi-1 expression strongly associated with advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages (P = .007), bilaterality (P = .01), and higher Gynecologic Oncology Group grades (P = .031) and carcinomas of serous histology (P = .027). It had no association with patient age. Bmi-1 expression displayed a significant inverse association with patient overall and mean survival (P = .006, P < .001). These observations suggested correlation between increased Bmi-1 expression and clinical progression in ovarian epithelial cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Corelations between the ENT modifications and BMI in patients with sleep breathing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagoş, Adriana; Muhlfay, Gh; Zetu, Irina

    2010-01-01

    To show if between the BMI index of weight and the oro and hypopharingeal modifications we can establish a link for the same value of the index of AHI hypoapnea. At the patients with sleep breathing pathology of an obstructive type we conducted nasal, oro- and hypopharingeal endoscopic examinations, measurements and calculation of the weight index, followed by the polygraphic evaluation of the sleep, the establishment of the degree of sleep obstructive apnea; we used a form of ENT examination. The classification of patients according to the value of the apnea index of AHI hypoapnea in 3 groups: AHI 50. According to the value of the BMI weight index we analyze 3 groups of patients: BMI BMI BMI > 40. For AHI BMI BMI > 40 and AHI BMI 50 the occurring oropharingeal modifications are: normal amygdales, long and broad uvula and webbing spanning between 5-10 mm. Oropharingeal modifications and the index of BMI weight are essential elements, taken individually in the preoperatory evaluation of patients with syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea.

  5. Maternal Recreational Exercise during Pregnancy in relation to Children's BMI at 7 Years of Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou Andersen, Camilla; Juhl, Mette; Gamborg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Exposures during fetal life may have long-term health consequences including risk of childhood overweight. We investigated the associations between maternal recreational exercise during early and late pregnancy and the children's body mass index (BMI) and risk of overweight at 7 years. Data on 40...... was analyzed using multiple linear and logistic regression models. Recreational exercise across pregnancy was inversely related to children's BMI and risk of overweight, but all associations were mainly explained by smoking habits, socioeconomic status, and maternal pre-pregnancy BMI. Additionally, we did...... not find exercise intensity or changes in exercise habits in pregnancy related to the children's BMI or risk of overweight....

  6. GFAP-Cre-mediated transgenic activation of Bmi1 results in pituitary tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart A Westerman

    Full Text Available Bmi1 is a member of the polycomb repressive complex 1 and plays different roles during embryonic development, depending on the developmental context. Bmi1 over expression is observed in many types of cancer, including tumors of astroglial and neural origin. Although genetic depletion of Bmi1 has been described to result in tumor inhibitory effects partly through INK4A/Arf mediated senescence and apoptosis and also through INK4A/Arf independent effects, it has not been proven that Bmi1 can be causally involved in the formation of these tumors. To see whether this is the case, we developed two conditional Bmi1 transgenic models that were crossed with GFAP-Cre mice to activate transgenic expression in neural and glial lineages. We show here that these mice generate intermediate and anterior lobe pituitary tumors that are positive for ACTH and beta-endorphin. Combined transgenic expression of Bmi1 together with conditional loss of Rb resulted in pituitary tumors but was insufficient to induce medulloblastoma therefore indicating that the oncogenic function of Bmi1 depends on regulation of p16(INK4A/Rb rather than on regulation of p19(ARF/p53. Human pituitary adenomas show Bmi1 overexpression in over 50% of the cases, which indicates that Bmi1 could be causally involved in formation of these tumors similarly as in our mouse model.

  7. BMI and obesity incidence in relation to food patterns of Polish older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadolowska, L.; Danowska-Oziewicz, M.; Niedzwiedzka, E.

    2006-01-01

    BMI differentiation and obesity incidence in relation to food patterns of Polish older people were analysed. The research included 422 people aged 65+ years. 21 food patterns were separated by the factor analysis. On the basis of the self-reported body mass and height, the BMI and percentages...... of overweight or obese people were calculated. The increase of the BMI and overweight and obesity incidence for both sexes was unequivocally connected with eating rye. The increase of the BMI and overweight and obesity incidence depended among women on consuming pork meat and alcoholic beverages. For men...

  8. Medical image of the week: central pontine myelinolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqi TA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old woman with history of alcohol abuse was admitted with generalized weakness, dehydration, alcoholic hepatitis, hyponatremia (serum sodium 116 mM/L, and cachexia (BMI 19 kg/m2. She developed hypoxemic respiratory failure after intravenous fluid resuscitation and required intubation and mechanical ventilation. Neurological exam revealed motor weakness, hyporeflexia, ataxia, and unsustained clonus. Neurology consultation was obtained and MRI revealed hyperintensity in the pons consistent with osmotic demyelination syndrome (1. Review of her records revealed her sodium level increased by 8 mM/L in first 6 hours of presentation, and then a slow increase of 4-6 mM/L daily to the normal range. She received nutritional support and aggressive physical therapy, and was discharged to skilled nursing facility after six weeks of hospitalization.

  9. BMI-for-age graphs with severe obesity percentile curves: tools for plotting cross-sectional and longitudinal youth BMI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Susan B; Yu, Liyang; DuPont, Nicholas C; Clark, B Ruth

    2017-05-24

    Severe obesity is an important and distinct weight status classification that is associated with disease risk and is increasing in prevalence among youth. The ability to graphically present population weight status data, ranging from underweight through severe obesity class 3, is novel and applicable to epidemiologic research, intervention studies, case reports, and clinical care. The aim was to create body mass index (BMI) graphing tools to generate sex-specific BMI-for-age graphs that include severe obesity percentile curves. We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention youth reference data sets and weight status criteria to generate the percentile curves. The statistical software environments SAS and R were used to create two different graphing options. This article provides graphing tools for creating sex-specific BMI-for-age graphs for males and females ages 2 to graphing tools are an expanded BMI range to accommodate BMI values ˃35 kg/m2, inclusion of percentile curves for severe obesity classes 2 and 3, the ability to plot individual data for thousands of children and adolescents on a single graph, and the ability to generate cross-sectional and longitudinal graphs. These new BMI graphing tools will enable investigators, public health professionals, and clinicians to view and present youth weight status data in novel and meaningful ways.

  10. Does more education cause lower BMI, or do lower-BMI individuals become more educated? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Rebecca; von Hippel, Paul T; Lynch, Jamie L

    2017-03-21

    More educated adults have lower average body mass index (BMI). This may be due to selection, if adolescents with lower BMI attain higher levels of education, or it may be due to causation, if higher educational attainment reduces BMI gain in adulthood. We test for selection and causation in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, which has followed a representative US cohort from age 14-22 in 1979 through age 47-55 in 2012. Using ordinal logistic regression, we test the selection hypothesis that overweight and obese adolescents were less likely to earn high school diplomas and bachelor's degrees. Then, controlling for selection with individual fixed effects, we estimate the causal effect of degree completion on BMI and obesity status. Among 18-year-old women, but not among men, being overweight or obese predicts lower odds of attaining higher levels of education. At age 47-48, higher education is associated with lower BMI, but 70-90% of the association is due to selection. Net of selection, a bachelor's degree predicts less than a 1 kg reduction in body weight, and a high school credential does not reduce BMI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kamp K'aana, a 2-Week Residential Weight Management Summer Camp, Shows Long-Term Improvement in Body Mass Index z Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Alicia Elena; Sharma, Shreela; Abrams, Stephanie H; Wong, William W; Barlow, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Long-term effects of Kamp K'aana, a 2-week residential weight management camp, on body mass index (BMI) measures were evaluated on 71 of 108 (66%) obese youth 10 to 14 years of age. Measures were obtained at 11-month study follow-up (n = 38) or extracted from medical record (n = 33). Compared with baseline, BMI increased (P < 0.001), but both BMI percentile and BMI z score decreased (98.7 ± 1.0 to 97.3 ± 6.7 and 2.34 ± 0.30 to 2.23 ± 0.34, P < 0.001). A decrease in BMI z score of ≥0.2 units was seen in 27% of the participants (P < 0.001). The short program has sustained effect.

  12. Time regained: when people stop a physical activity program, how does their time use change? A randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjaan Gomersall

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate how previously inactive adults who had participated in a structured, partly supervised 6-week exercise program restructured their time budgets when the program ended. Using a randomised controlled trial design, 129 previously inactive adults were recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups: a Moderate or Extensive six-week physical activity intervention (150 and 300 additional minutes of exercise per week, respectively or a Control group. Additional physical activity was accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions with a wide range of activities. Use of time and time spent in energy expenditure zones was measured using a computerised 24-h self-report recall instrument, the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults, and accelerometry at baseline, mid- and end-program and at 3- and 6-months follow up. At final follow up, all significant changes in time use domains had returned to within 20 minutes of baseline levels (Physical Activity 1-2 min/d, Active Transport 3-9 min/d, Self-Care 0-2 min/d, Television/Videogames 13-18 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive group, relative to Controls, respectively, p > 0.05. Similarly, all significant changes in time spent in the moderate energy expenditure zone had returned to within 1-3 min/d baseline levels (p > 0.05, however time spent in vigorous physical activity according to accelerometry estimates remained elevated, although the changes were small in magnitude (1 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive groups, relative to Controls, p = 0.01. The results of this study demonstrate strong recidivist patterns in physical activity, but also in other aspects of time use. In designing and determining the effectiveness of exercise interventions, future studies would benefit from considering the whole profile of time use, rather than focusing on individual activities,Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000248066.

  13. Time Regained: When People Stop a Physical Activity Program, How Does Their Time Use Change? A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomersall, Sjaan; Maher, Carol; English, Coralie; Rowlands, Alex; Olds, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how previously inactive adults who had participated in a structured, partly supervised 6-week exercise program restructured their time budgets when the program ended. Using a randomised controlled trial design, 129 previously inactive adults were recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups: a Moderate or Extensive six-week physical activity intervention (150 and 300 additional minutes of exercise per week, respectively) or a Control group. Additional physical activity was accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions with a wide range of activities. Use of time and time spent in energy expenditure zones was measured using a computerised 24-h self-report recall instrument, the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults, and accelerometry at baseline, mid- and end-program and at 3- and 6-months follow up. At final follow up, all significant changes in time use domains had returned to within 20 minutes of baseline levels (Physical Activity 1-2 min/d, Active Transport 3-9 min/d, Self-Care 0-2 min/d, Television/Videogames 13-18 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive group, relative to Controls, respectively, p>0.05). Similarly, all significant changes in time spent in the moderate energy expenditure zone had returned to within 1-3 min/d baseline levels (p>0.05), however time spent in vigorous physical activity according to accelerometry estimates remained elevated, although the changes were small in magnitude (1 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive groups, relative to Controls, p=0.01). The results of this study demonstrate strong recidivist patterns in physical activity, but also in other aspects of time use. In designing and determining the effectiveness of exercise interventions, future studies would benefit from considering the whole profile of time use, rather than focusing on individual activities. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000248066 PMID

  14. Service evaluation of weight outcomes as a function of initial BMI in 34,271 adults referred to a primary care/commercial weight management partnership scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background It is not clear if behaviour change programmes are more or less effective for weight management in people with high BMIs than for those who are moderately overweight. An earlier service evaluation reported on the rate and extent of weight loss in a primary care/commercial weight management organisation partnership scheme, in 34,271 patients were referred by their health care professionals to a UK commercial weight management organisation, Slimming World for 12 weekly sessions. This project updated that service evaluation by examining weight loss outcomes as a function of initial BMI in the same 34,271 patients. Findings Patients referred to the scheme (n = 34,271) were categorised by BMI groups <30 kg/m2, 30-34.9 kg/m2, 35-39.9 kg/m2 and to ≥ 40 kg/m2. Mean weight losses after 12 weekly sessions were 2.9, 3.6, 4.1, and 4.8 kg for each BMI category respectively. Regression analysis showed that after adjusting for age and gender, relative to the <30 kg/m2 group, absolute weight losses were 0.8, 1.4 and 2.4 kg more for the 30-34.9 kg/m2, 35-39.9 kg/m2 and to ≥ 40 kg/m2 groups, respectively (all p<0.001). Percent weight loss was similar in each BMI category: 3.7%, 4.0%, 4.0% and 3.9%, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions This service evaluation demonstrates that 12 week referral to a commercial organisation is as effective for people with high BMIs as for those who are moderately overweight. PMID:23618381

  15. Web Lectures - ATLAS Overview Week

    CERN Multimedia

    Tushar Bhatnagar; Jeremy Herr; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS Web Archives Web Archives of the ATLAS Overview Week in Glasgow are now available from the University of Michigan portal here. Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials recorded over the past two years are available via the University of Michigan Lecture Portal. Other recent additions include the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27, the Physics Analysis Tools Workshop held in Bergen, Norway on April 23-27, and the CTEQ Workshop: "Physics at the LHC: Early Challenges" held at Michigan State University on May 14-15. Viewing requires a standard Web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the Web or downloaded locally. In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Feedback & Suggestions Welcome Suggestions for events or tutorials to record in 2007, as well as feedback on existing archives, is always welcome...

  16. A busy week for Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    This has been a busy week for the CERN Council, and there is much to report. Firstly, I’m pleased to say that Council approved the Organization’s Medium Term Plan, and with it the budget for financial year 2010. In a time of global recession, this is a strong vote of confidence from the Member States. This meeting of Council provided an opportunity for the working group on the scientific and geographical enlargement of CERN to set out a roadmap towards its final report, which is to be made at Council’s December session this year. One part of the process over the coming months is to bring the major players in particle physics from beyond the European region into the discussion, ensuring that the working group’s recommendations lead to an optimum position for CERN and European particle physics in the global context. An indicator of the continuing attractiveness of CERN is the fact that Council has received four new applications...

  17. Healthy food access for urban food desert residents: examination of the food environment, food purchasing practices, diet and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowitz, Tamara; Zenk, Shannon N; Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie; Cohen, Deborah A; Beckman, Robin; Hunter, Gerald; Steiner, Elizabeth D; Collins, Rebecca L

    2015-08-01

    To provide a richer understanding of food access and purchasing practices among US urban food desert residents and their association with diet and BMI. Data on food purchasing practices, dietary intake, height and weight from the primary food shopper in randomly selected households (n 1372) were collected. Audits of all neighbourhood food stores (n 24) and the most-frequented stores outside the neighbourhood (n 16) were conducted. Aspects of food access and purchasing practices and relationships among them were examined and tests of their associations with dietary quality and BMI were conducted. Two low-income, predominantly African-American neighbourhoods with limited access to healthy food in Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Household food shoppers. Only one neighbourhood outlet sold fresh produce; nearly all respondents did major food shopping outside the neighbourhood. Although the nearest full-service supermarket was an average of 2·6 km from their home, respondents shopped an average of 6·0 km from home. The average trip was by car, took approximately 2 h for the round trip, and occurred two to four times per month. Respondents spent approximately $US 37 per person per week on food. Those who made longer trips had access to cars, shopped less often and spent less money per person. Those who travelled further when they shopped had higher BMI, but most residents already shopped where healthy foods were available, and physical distance from full-service supermarkets was unrelated to weight or dietary quality. Improved access to healthy foods is the target of current policies meant to improve health. However, distance to the closest supermarket might not be as important as previously thought, and thus policy and interventions that focus merely on improving access may not be effective.

  18. The effect of skipping meals and daily activities of university students regarding the body mass index (BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Ozakar Akca

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: If we assume that the group of 18-24 years old young people are university students, their proper eating habits present social importance for their own health. With this present study it was aimed to determine the effect of eating habits and daily activity situations of university students regarding obesity. Methods: This descriptive and cross-sectional type study has been carried out in the Health College of the Hitit University. No sample selection was performed, the sample consisted of students visiting the school during the study dates (10- 21.03.2014 and participated voluntarily (n=197 in the study. Questionnaires were used as data collection tool. The data was evaluated with appropriate statistical methods. P < 0.05 has been accepted as statistically significant. Results: 73.1% of the students, participating in the study were female and 26,9% male. The overweight and obesity frequency rate of female students (16% was lower in comparison to male students (17%, whereas the students' BMI average was 22.595+/-3.57. 13.7% of participating students were thin and 8.5% obese. It was seen that 68% of participants in the study skip meals and 28.9% eat 1-2 meals per day. Additionally it was determined that students' skipping meal status is according to the BMI classification statistically significant (p<0.05 Apart from this it was stated that 90.7% of students are doing and #8804;2 hours/week sports. Conclusions: If we assume that one out of every three student is overweight/obese and that the majority do not have a proper nutrition and sport habit, it reveals the importance of BMI screenings and trainings regarding eating habits in school [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(5.000: 394-400

  19. Correlation of Bmi-1 expression and telomerase activity in human ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, F. B.; Sui, L. H.; Xin, T.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the oncoprotein Bmi-1 and telomerase activity in ovarian cancer. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method is used to detect the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Bmi-1 protein in 47 ovarian epithelial cancer cases, and immunohistochemistry

  20. Bmi1 confers resistance to oxidative stress on hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Nakamura

    Full Text Available The polycomb-group (PcG proteins function as general regulators of stem cells. We previously reported that retrovirus-mediated overexpression of Bmi1, a gene encoding a core component of polycomb repressive complex (PRC 1, maintained self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during long-term culture. However, the effects of overexpression of Bmi1 on HSCs in vivo remained to be precisely addressed.In this study, we generated a mouse line where Bmi1 can be conditionally overexpressed under the control of the endogenous Rosa26 promoter in a hematopoietic cell-specific fashion (Tie2-Cre;R26Stop(FLBmi1. Although overexpression of Bmi1 did not significantly affect steady state hematopoiesis, it promoted expansion of functional HSCs during ex vivo culture and efficiently protected HSCs against loss of self-renewal capacity during serial transplantation. Overexpression of Bmi1 had no effect on DNA damage response triggered by ionizing radiation. In contrast, Tie2-Cre;R26Stop(FLBmi1 HSCs under oxidative stress maintained a multipotent state and generally tolerated oxidative stress better than the control. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Bmi1 had no impact on the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS.Our findings demonstrate that overexpression of Bmi1 confers resistance to stresses, particularly oxidative stress, onto HSCs. This thereby enhances their regenerative capacity and suggests that Bmi1 is located downstream of ROS signaling and negatively regulated by it.

  1. Increased genetic variance of BMI with a higher prevalence of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokholm, Benjamin; Silventoinen, Karri; Ängquist, Lars

    2011-01-01

    populations. Several recent studies suggest that the genetic effects on adiposity may be stronger when combined with presumed risk factors for obesity. We tested the hypothesis that a higher prevalence of obesity and overweight and a higher BMI mean is associated with a larger genetic variation in BMI....

  2. Convergence of BMI1 and CHD7 on ERK Signaling in Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Badodi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We describe molecular convergence between BMI1 and CHD7 in the initiation of medulloblastoma. Identified in a functional genomic screen in mouse models, a BMI1High;CHD7Low expression signature within medulloblastoma characterizes patients with poor overall survival. We show that BMI1-mediated repression of the ERK1/2 pathway leads to increased proliferation and tumor burden in primary human MB cells and in a xenograft model, respectively. We provide evidence that repression of the ERK inhibitor DUSP4 by BMI1 is dependent on a more accessible chromatin configuration in G4 MB cells with low CHD7 expression. These findings extend current knowledge of the role of BMI1 and CHD7 in medulloblastoma pathogenesis, and they raise the possibility that pharmacological targeting of BMI1 or ERK may be particularly indicated in a subgroup of MB with low expression levels of CHD7. : Badodi et al. find convergence of the chromatin modifiers BMI1 and CHD7 in medulloblastoma pathogenesis, and they show that this pathway regulates tumor proliferation and growth via ERK signaling. Keywords: BMI1, CHD7, DUSP4, ERK, medulloblastoma, PcG genes, mouse models, epigenetics, chromatin

  3. Bmi-1 is a Crucial Regulator of Prostate Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Malignant Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Rita U.; Memarzadeh, Sanaz; Wu, Hong; Witte, Owen N.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The Polycomb group transcriptional repressor Bmi-1 is often up-regulated in prostate cancer, but its functional roles in prostate stem cell maintenance and prostate cancer are unclear. Loss- and gain-of-function analysis in a prostate sphere assay indicates that Bmi-1 expression is required for self-renewal activity and maintenance of p63+ stem cells. Loss of Bmi-1 blocks the self-renewal activity induced by heightened beta-catenin signaling, suggesting that Bmi-1 is required for full activity of another self-renewal pathway. In vivo, Bmi-1 expression is necessary for normal prostate tubule regeneration. Altered self-renewal and proliferation through Bmi-1 modulation diminishes the susceptibility of prostate cells to transformation. In an in vivo prostate regeneration system, Bmi-1 inhibition protects prostate cells from FGF10 driven hyperplasia and slows the growth of aggressive Pten-deletion induced prostate cancer. We conclude that Bmi-1 is a crucial regulator of self-renewal in adult prostate cells, and plays important roles in prostate cancer initiation and progression. PMID:21112563

  4. No seasonality of birth in BMI at 7 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla B; I. A. Sørensen, Thorkild; Heitmann, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal variation in birth weight was found in a previous Danish study. In the present study we investigated if the seasonality in birth weight tracked into BMI at 7 years of age, but found no seasonality of birth in either BMI, overweight, or obesity. © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd...

  5. Bmi-1 expression modulates non-small cell lung cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dan; Ye, Yunlin; Fu, Yujie; Wang, Jinglong; Kuang, Bohua; Wang, Hongbo; Wang, Xiumin; Zu, Lidong; Xiao, Gang; Hao, Mingang; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the role of B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi-1) is responsible for multiple cancer progression. However, Bmi-1 in controlling gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) development is not well explored. Here we report that the Bmi-1 level is highly increased in primary NSCLC tissues compared to matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues and required for lung tumor growth in xenograft model. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that Bmi-1 level is lower in matched involved lymph node cancerous tissues than the respective primary NSCLC tissues. We find that Bmi-1 does not affect cell cycle and apoptosis in lung cancer cell lines as it does not affect the expression of p16/p19, Pten, AKT and P-AKT. Mechanistic analyses note that reduction of Bmi-1 expression inversely regulates invasion and metastasis of NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo, followed by induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using genome microarray assays, we find that RNAi-mediated silence of Bmi-1 modulates some important molecular genetics or signaling pathways, potentially associated with NSCLC development. Taken together, our findings disclose for the first time that Bmi-1 level accumulates strongly in early stage and then declines in late stage, which is potentially important for NSCLC cell invasion and metastasis during progression. PMID:25880371

  6. Mother's pre-pregnancy BMI is an important determinant of adverse cardiometabolic risk in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal adiposity is associated with poor offspring cardiometabolic health. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) on the BMI, body composition and cardiometabolic characteristics of the offspring. Forty offspring of overweight/obese mothers (O-OW) and...

  7. Validity of newly-developed BMI and waist cut-off values for Sri Lankan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, V P; Arambepola, C; Bandara, D M P S; Abeysekera, M; Kuruppu, S; Dilshan, P; Dissanayake, B S

    2013-05-01

    Excess body fat leads to obesity-related morbidity and population/ethnicity-specific cut-off values of anthropometric measures are useful for better diagnosis. This study assesses the suitability of newly-developed Sri Lankan anthropometric cut-off values in the diagnosis of obesity in Sri Lankan children. A cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Colombo, Sri Lanka involving 5-15 year old children. Height, weight, waist (WC), and hip (HC) circumferences were measured. Total body fat (FM) was measured using whole body BIA. WHR and WHtR were calculated. Validity of anthropometric measures in detecting childhood obesity (Sri Lankan BMI/WC; IOTF, WHO, British and CDC BMI and British WC cut-off values) were evaluated. Nine hundred and twenty children were assessed. FM showed significant associations with BMI (r = 0.92, p cut-off values under-estimated obesity. Sri Lankan WC and BMI cut-off values over-estimated obesity. International BMI based cut-off values had high specificity (>99%) but a low sensitivity (∼12-33%), while Sri Lankan BMI cut-off values had high sensitivity (>93.1) but low specificity (>79.7). Internationally available BMI cut-off values are poor in diagnosing obesity in Sri Lankan children. Newly developed Sri Lankan BMI cut-off values for children improved the diagnosis. WC can be used successfully as an alternative diagnostic tool of obesity.

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage studies in BMI and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, Catherine L.; Chiodini, Benedetta D.; Sham, Pak; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Abkevich, Victor; Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Arya, Rector; Berenson, Gerald S.; Blangero, John; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Chagnon, Yvon C.; Chen, Wei; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Deng, Hong-Wen; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Feitosa, Mary F.; Froguel, Philippe; Hanson, Robert L.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huezo-Dias, Patricia; Kissebah, Ahmed H.; Li, Weidong; Luke, Amy; Martin, Lisa J.; Nash, Matthew; Ohman, Muena; Palmer, Lyle J.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Price, R. Arlen; Redline, Susan; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stern, Michael P.; Stone, Steven; Stringham, Heather; Turner, Stephen; Wijmenga, Cisca; Collier, David A.

    Objective: The objective was to provide an overall assessment of genetic linkage data of BMI and BMI-defined obesity using a nonparametric genome scan meta-analysis. Research Methods and Procedures: We identified 37 published studies containing data on over 31,000 individuals from more than >10,000

  9. Food and drinking patterns as predictors of 6-year BMI-adjusted changes in waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Jytte; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Tjønneland, Anne

    2004-01-01

    of concurrent changes in BMI as a measure of general obesity. The subjects were 2300 middle-aged men and women with repeated measurements of dietary intake, BMI and WC from 1982 to 1993. Intakes from ten food groups and from coffee, tea, wine, beer and spirits were assessed; gender-specific food factors were...

  10. Long-term maintenance of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells by expression of BMI1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizo, Aleksandra; Dontje, Bert; Vellenga, Edo; de Haan, Gerald; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) gene BMI1 has been identified as one of the key epigenetic regulators of cell fates during different stages of development in multiple murine tissues. In a clinically relevant model, we demonstrate that enforced expression of BMI1 in cord blood CD34(+) cells results in

  11. Predicting BMI in young adults from childhood data using two approaches to modelling adiposity rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S; Davie, G; Lam, F

    1999-04-01

    To identify the age of adiposity rebound and the value of its associated BMI and examine their association with BMI at ages 18 and 21 y for males and females. A longitudinal study of a large cohort of people born in Dunedin, New Zealand between 1972-1973. Four hundred and seventy-four males and 448 females aged between birth and 21 y. BMI was derived from measurements of weight and height made when the participants were born and at intervals from age 3-21 y. When a random coefficients model was fitted to the data for those who had five or more measures of BMI between age 3 and age 18y, adiposity rebound occurred at 6.0 y of age for boys and 5.6y for girls. The values of BMI associated with these were 15.7 kg/m2 for boys and 15.5 kg/m2 for girls. The correlations between age at adiposity rebound and BMI at ages 18 and 21 y were between -0.72 and -0.65 for boys and -0.59 and -0.47 for girls. These were higher than those derived from fitting individual curves or from deriving the adiposity rebound from data collected up to age 11 y. The correlation between BMI at age 7y and BMI at ages 18 and 21 y were 0.70 and 0.61 for boys and 0.56 and 0.52 for girls. The correlations between measures of skeletal maturity at age 7y and adiposity rebound were statistically significant for boys but not for girls. BMI in early adulthood was associated with both age of adiposity rebound and BMI at that age. As the correlations between BMI at age 7 y and BMI at ages 18 and 21 y were similar in magnitude, BMI at age 7 y may be a more practical way of predicting BMI in early adulthood.

  12. Safety and efficacy of eculizumab in anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive refractory generalised myasthenia gravis (REGAIN): a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, James F; Utsugisawa, Kimiaki; Benatar, Michael; Murai, Hiroyuki; Barohn, Richard J; Illa, Isabel; Jacob, Saiju; Vissing, John; Burns, Ted M; Kissel, John T; Muppidi, Srikanth; Nowak, Richard J; O'Brien, Fanny; Wang, Jing-Jing; Mantegazza, Renato

    2017-12-01

    Complement is likely to have a role in refractory generalised myasthenia gravis, but no approved therapies specifically target this system. Results from a phase 2 study suggested that eculizumab, a terminal complement inhibitor, produced clinically meaningful improvements in patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive refractory generalised myasthenia gravis. We further assessed the efficacy and safety of eculizumab in this patient population in a phase 3 trial. We did a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study (REGAIN) in 76 hospitals and specialised clinics in 17 countries across North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Eligible patients were aged at least 18 years, with a Myasthenia Gravis-Activities of Daily Living (MG-ADL) score of 6 or more, Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America (MGFA) class II-IV disease, vaccination against Neisseria meningitides, and previous treatment with at least two immunosuppressive therapies or one immunosuppressive therapy and chronic intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange for 12 months without symptom control. Patients with a history of thymoma or thymic neoplasms, thymectomy within 12 months before screening, or use of intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange within 4 weeks before randomisation, or rituximab within 6 months before screening, were excluded. We randomly assigned participants (1:1) to either intravenous eculizumab or intravenous matched placebo for 26 weeks. Dosing for eculizumab was 900 mg on day 1 and at weeks 1, 2, and 3; 1200 mg at week 4; and 1200 mg given every second week thereafter as maintenance dosing. Randomisation was done centrally with an interactive voice or web-response system with patients stratified to one of four groups based on MGFA disease classification. Where possible, patients were maintained on existing myasthenia gravis therapies and rescue medication was allowed at the study physician's discretion. Patients, investigators

  13. Can self-reported BMI be used as a valid measure among novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Martin Serup; Nielsen, R.O.; Rasmussen, Sten

    -reported BMI be used as a valid measure compared to BMI measured with a calibrated weight. PURPOSE : To determine the validity of self-reported BMI among novice runners. METHODS: Data on BMI was obtained from a prospective follow-up study investigating the link between training exposure and the development...... of RRI. Healthy novice runners between the age of 18 to 65 and without lower extremity injuries were able to participate in the study. During July and August 2011 the participants were included in the study based on an online questionnaire. 1532 persons completed the questionnaire, of these, 970 were...... invited to a test at baseline after meeting the requirements for participation. Information about BMI was obtained in two ways; firstly, from the online based questionnaire where the participants had to report height and weight themselves. Secondly, the weight was measured with calibrated weight (Tanita...

  14. Sickness Presenteeism Among Health Care Workers and the Effect of BMI, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup; Kongstad, Malte Bue; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Søgaard, Karen

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between sickness presenteeism and body mass index (BMI), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Female health care workers (n = 139) were analyzed cross-sectional as well as longitudinal after 3 and 12-month follow-up. Sickness presenteeism was assessed as a summed score using validated questions from three questionnaires: Health and Work Performance Questionnaire, Work Ability Index, and Quantity and Quality Method. CRF was assessed by a maximal cycling test and MVC from four muscle groups. Significant relationships were found between sickness presenteeism and BMI as well as MVC both cross-sectional and as changes over 3 months. Participants with BMI more than 30  kg/m had significantly higher sickness presenteeism than those with BMI less than 25  kg/m. This study suggests that actions that decrease BMI and increase MVC decrease the amount of sickness presenteeism.

  15. Are associations between electronic media use and BMI different across levels of physical activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melkevik, Ole; Haug, Ellen; Rasmussen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    and girls who did not comply with physical activity guidelines. Among physically active adolescents, EM was found to be significantly associated with BMI or odds for overweight among girls, but not among boys. CONCLUSION: While the usage of EM appear to be inconsequential for BMI and the risk of overweight......BACKGROUND: The use of electronic media has been found to be a risk factor for higher BMI and for being overweight. Physical activity has been found to be associated with lower BMI and lower risk for being overweight. Little is known about whether the associations between physical activity...... among physically active boys, we find evidence indicating that EM use is associated with BMI and risk for overweight among girls, including those who report complying with MVPA guidelines....

  16. Maternal Pre-Pregnancy BMI and Intelligence Quotient (IQ) in 5-Year-Old Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Mette; Olsen, Jørn; Støvring, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An association between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and childhood intelligence quotient (IQ) has repeatedly been found but it is unknown if this association is causal or due to confounding caused by genetic or social factors. METHODS: We used a cohort of 1,783 mothers and their 5-year...... and child IQ adjusted for a comprehensive set of potential confounders. Child IQ was assessed with the Wechsler Primary and Preschool Scales of Intelligence--Revised (WPPSI-R). RESULTS: The crude association between maternal BMI and child IQ showed that BMI was adversely associated with child IQ...... with a reduction in IQ of -0.40 point for each one unit increase in BMI. This association was attenuated after adjustment for social factors and maternal IQ to a value of -0.27 (-0.50 to -0.03). After mutual adjustment for the father's BMI and all other factors except maternal IQ, the association between paternal...

  17. Body Mass Index (BMI) in women booking for antenatal care: comparison between selfreported and digital measurements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fattah, Chro

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: We set out to compare measurement of Body Mass Index (BMI) with selfreporting in women early in pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: We studied 100 women booking for antenatal care in the first trimester with a normal ongoing pregnancy. Selfreported maternal weight and height were recorded and the Body Mass Index was calculated. Afterwards maternal weight and height were digitally measured and actual BMI was calculated. RESULTS: If selfreporting is used for BMI classification, we found that 22% of women were classified incorrectly when BMI was measured. 12% of the women who were classified as having a normal selfreported BMI were overweight and 5% classified as overweight were obese. Similar findings have been reported outside pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings have implications for clinical practice, and for research studies exploring the relationship between maternal adiposity and pregnancy complications.

  18. [Can 'the unlike' and 'the rejected' become 'the regained'? From persecution to tolerance and perhaps acceptance--a discourse devoted to homosexual men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritt, Remigiusz Jarosław

    2011-01-01

    The author, a sexologist engaged since many years in research on various aspects of homosexuality, presents a discourse on the fate of homosexually-oriented men throughout the centuries from antiquity till modern times. The presentation of various social approaches to homosexual men reveals a wide spectrum of attitudes, from persecution and execution on one side to growing tolerance and perhaps acceptance on the other. This article also includes an analysis of the definition of homosexuality taking into account positive and pejorative connotations which reflect changing social attitudes. The question in the title addresses various models of 'The Unlike' and 'The Rejected', often 'The Alien', who may perhaps become 'The Regained' in the 21st century.

  19. Overexpression of AtBMI1C, a polycomb group protein gene, accelerates flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Polycomb group protein (PcG-mediated gene silencing is emerging as an essential developmental regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic organisms. PcGs inactivate or maintain the silenced state of their target chromatin by forming complexes, including Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1 and 2 (PRC2. Three PRC2 complexes have been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis; of these, the EMF and VRN complexes suppress flowering by catalyzing the trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 of FLOWER LOCUS T (FT and FLOWER LOCUS C (FLC. However, little is known about the role of PRC1 in regulating the floral transition, although AtRING1A, AtRING1B, AtBMI1A, and AtBMI1B are believed to regulate shoot apical meristem and embryonic development as components of PRC1. Moreover, among the five RING finger PcGs in the Arabidopsis genome, four have been characterized. Here, we report that the fifth, AtBMI1C, is a novel, ubiquitously expressed nuclear PcG protein and part of PRC1, which is evolutionarily conserved with Psc and BMI1. Overexpression of AtBMI1C caused increased H2A monoubiquitination and flowering defects in Arabidopsis. Both the suppression of FLC and activation of FT were observed in AtBMI1C-overexpressing lines, resulting in early flowering. No change in the H3K27me3 level in FLC chromatin was detected in an AtBMI1C-overexpressing line. Our results suggest that AtBMI1C participates in flowering time control by regulating the expression of FLC; moreover, the repression of FLC by AtBMI1C is not due to the activity of PRC2. Instead, it is likely the result of PRC1 activity, into which AtBMI1C is integrated.

  20. BMI Development and Early Adolescent Psychosocial Well-Being: UK Millennium Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Yvonne; Patalay, Praveetha; Montgomery, Scott; Sacker, Amanda

    2016-12-01

    The underlying influences on different patterns of BMI development are not well understood, and psychosocial outcomes linked to BMI development have been little investigated. Objectives were to identify BMI developmental trajectories across the first decade of life, examine early life predictors of trajectory membership, and investigate whether being on a particular BMI trajectory is associated with markers of psychosocial well-being. We used latent class analysis to derive BMI trajectories by using data collected at ages 3, 5, 7, and 11 years on 16 936 participants from the Millennium Cohort Study. Regression models were used to estimate predictors of BMI trajectory membership and their psychosocial correlates. Four trajectories were identified: 83.8% had an average "stable" nonoverweight BMI, 0.6% were in a "decreasing" group, 13.1% had "moderate increasing" BMIs, and 2.5% had "high increasing" BMIs. Predictors of "moderate" and "high" increasing group membership were smoking in pregnancy (odds ratios [ORs] = 1.17 and 1.97, respectively), maternal BMI (ORs = 1.10 and 1.14), skipping breakfast (ORs = 1.66 and 1.76), nonregular bedtimes (ORs = 1.22 and 1.55). Children in the "moderate" and "high" increasing groups had worse scores for emotional symptoms, peer problems, happiness, body satisfaction, and self-esteem, and those in the "high increasing" group were more likely to have tried alcohol and cigarettes. Several potentially modifiable early life factors including smoking in pregnancy, skipping breakfast, and bedtime routines were important predictors of BMI development in the overweight and obese range, and high BMI growth was linked to worse psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. The Impact of Waiting List Bmi Changes on the Short-Term Outcomes of Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomphe, Valérie; Mailhot, Geneviève; Damphousse, Véronic; Tahir, Muhammad-Ramzan; Receveur, Olivier; Poirier, Charles; Ferraro, Pasquale

    2017-08-18

    Obesity and underweight are associated with a higher postlung transplantation (LTx) mortality. This study aims to assess the impact of the changes in BMI during the waiting period for LTx on early postoperative outcomes. Medical records of 502 consecutive cases of LTx performed at our institution between 1999 and 2015 were reviewed. Patients were stratified per change in BMI category between pre-LTx assessment (candidate BMI) and transplant BMI as follows: A-Candidate BMIBMIBMIBMI18.5-29.9, C-Candidate BMI18.5-29.9 and Transplant BMI18.5-29.9, D-Candidate BMI≥30 and Transplant BMI18.5-29.9 and E-Candidate BMI≥30 or 18.5-29.9 and Transplant BMI≥30. Our primary outcome was in-hospital (H) mortality and secondary outcomes were length of mechanical ventilation (MV), intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), H LOS and postoperative complications. BMI variation during the waiting time was common, as 1/3 of patients experienced a change in BMI category. Length of MV (21 vs. 9 d; p=0.018), ICU LOS (26 vs. 15 d; p=0.035) and rates of surgical complications (76 vs. 44%; p=0.018) were significantly worse in patients of group E vs. D. Obese candidates who failed to decrease BMIBMI evolution had no impact on postoperative morbidity and mortality in underweight patients. Our results suggest that obese candidates with an unfavorable pretransplant BMI evolution are at greater risk of worse post-LTx outcomes.

  2. The associations of Bmi-1 with progression of glomerular chronic kidney disease
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Bai, Ming; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Ma, Feng; Liu, Limin; Liu, Ting; Liu, Minna; Wang, Hanmin; Sun, Shiren

    2017-10-26

    Our previous studies indicated that Bmi-1 plays an important role in hypoxia-induced tubular epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the development of kidney fibrosis in cellular and animal models. However, circulating Bmi-1 levels in human chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their relation to progression remains unknown. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of a prospective cohort study. The blood samples and clinical data of 230 patients with glomerular CKD and 67 healthy adults were prospectively collected between January 2010 and June 2012. Serum Bmi-1 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CKD patients had significantly higher serum Bmi-1 concentrations than the healthy controls (496.4 (363.1 - 675.4) pg/mL compared with 257.3 (235.4 - 303.8) pg/mL, p Bmi-1 level inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (r = -0.346, p Bmi-1 levels and serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, cystatin C concentration, and the severity of tubulointerstitial fibrosis (r = 0.248, p Bmi-1 level was associated with a shorter duration of renal survival. Cox multivariate analyses further demonstrated that serum Bmi-1 concentration was an independent prognostic factor for CKD patients (HR = 6.48, p Bmi-1 levels were associated with adverse kidney disease outcome, suggesting that Bmi-1 is a novel biomarker for glomerular CKD progression. More data from larger longitudinal studies are required to validate our findings.

  3. Obesity prevalence and accuracy of BMI-defined obesity in Russian firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, K G; Poston, W S C; Anders, B; Ivkina, M A; Archangelskaya, A; Jitnarin, N; Starodubov, V I

    2017-01-01

    No data exist on obesity or the accuracy of body mass index (BMI) in Russian Federation firefighters. To determine the prevalence of obesity and rates of misclassification of BMI-based obesity status. Career firefighters in the Moscow region completed anthropometric assessments including height, weight, BMI, body fat per cent (BF%) and waist circumference (WC). Using these three methods, we defined obesity as BMI ≥30, BF% >25 and WC >102, respectively. The study group consisted of 167 male firefighters. Obesity prevalence was 22% for BMI [95% confidence interval (CI) 16.9-28.5], 60% for BF% (95% CI 52.5-67.3) and 28% for WC (95% CI 21.3-34.9). False positive rates for BMI-based obesity status were low, with 3% (95% CI -1.1 to 7.1) and 6% (95% CI 1.6-9.9) of non-obese participants defined by BF% and WC standards misidentified as obese using BMI. However, 65% (95% CI 55.7-77.4) of BF%-defined obese participants and 36% (95% CI 22.5-49.9) of WC-defined obese participants were misclassified as non-obese using BMI (i.e. false negatives). Rates of BMI-based obesity in Russian male firefighters were similar to that of males in the general Russian adult male population. Compared with BF% or WC standards, BMI-based obesity classi- fication produced low rates of false positives but demonstrated high rates of false negatives. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Measuring adiposity in patients: the utility of body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, and leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirav R; Braverman, Eric R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a serious disease that is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, stroke, and cancer, among other diseases. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates a 20% obesity rate in the 50 states, with 12 states having rates of over 30%. Currently, the body mass index (BMI) is most commonly used to determine adiposity. However, BMI presents as an inaccurate obesity classification method that underestimates the epidemic and contributes to failed treatment. In this study, we examine the effectiveness of precise biomarkers and duel-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to help diagnose and treat obesity. A cross-sectional study of adults with BMI, DXA, fasting leptin and insulin results were measured from 1998-2009. Of the participants, 63% were females, 37% were males, 75% white, with a mean age = 51.4 (SD = 14.2). Mean BMI was 27.3 (SD = 5.9) and mean percent body fat was 31.3% (SD = 9.3). BMI characterized 26% of the subjects as obese, while DXA indicated that 64% of them were obese. 39% of the subjects were classified as non-obese by BMI, but were found to be obese by DXA. BMI misclassified 25% men and 48% women. Meanwhile, a strong relationship was demonstrated between increased leptin and increased body fat. Our results demonstrate the prevalence of false-negative BMIs, increased misclassifications in women of advancing age, and the reliability of gender-specific revised BMI cutoffs. BMI underestimates obesity prevalence, especially in women with high leptin levels (>30 ng/mL). Clinicians can use leptin-revised levels to enhance the accuracy of BMI estimates of percentage body fat when DXA is unavailable.

  5. Accuracy of self-reported weight, height and BMI in US firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, W S C; Jitnarin, N; Haddock, C K; Jahnke, S A; Day, R S

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is of increasing concern especially among firefighters. Bias in self-reported body weight, height and body mass index (BMI) has received a great deal of attention given its importance in epidemiological field research on obesity. To determine the validity of self-reported weight, height and BMI and identify potential sources of bias in a national sample of US firefighters. Self-reported and measured weight and height (and BMI derived from them) were assessed in a national sample of 1001 career male firefighters in the USA and errors in self-reported data were determined. There were 1001 participants. Self-reported weight, height and BMI were significantly correlated with their respective measured counterparts, i.e. measured weight (r = 0.990; P firefighters. BMI-based weight status (P firefighters more likely to underestimate their weight and overestimate their height, resulting in underestimated BMIs. Therefore, using self-reported BMI would have resulted in overestimating the prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥ 30.0) by 1.8%, but underestimating the prevalence of more serious levels of obesity (Class II and III) by 1.2%. Self-reported weight and height (and the resulting BMI) were highly correlated with measured values. A primary and consistent source of error in self-reported weight, height and BMI based on those indices was BMI-based weight status. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Suboptimal Weight Loss and Weight Regain after Gastric Bypass Surgery-Postoperative Status of Energy Intake, Eating Behavior, Physical Activity, and Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Tina; Strømmen, Magnus; Martins, Catia

    2017-05-01

    Suboptimal weight loss (SWL) and weight regain (WR) after gastric bypass surgery (GB) remains poorly understood. This study aims to compare GB patients experiencing SWL or significant WR (SigWR) with successful controls, regarding postoperative food intake, eating behavior, physical activity (PA), and psychometrics. Forty-nine patients with >1 year post-surgery were classified as either experiencing SWL (excess body weight loss, EWL, weight regain ≥15%, n = 38), with respective control groups. Energy intake (EI) was measured with a Food Frequency Questionnaire, eating behavior using the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, and PA using both SenseWear Armbands and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Eating disorders, depression, and quality of life (QoL) were measured using the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory II, and Impact of Weight on Quality of Life, respectively. EI, macronutrient distribution, and meal frequency were similar among groups. However, disinhibited eating behavior score was higher, while most subcategories from IWQOL were significantly lower in both SWL and SigWR groups compared with their respective controls. PA was significantly lower in the SWL and SigWR groups compared with the respective controls. There were no differences between groups regarding depression. Lower PA levels, disordered eating behavior and lower QoL are associated with unsuccessful weigh loss outcome after GB surgery. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the potential causal relationship between the previously described variables and SWL/SigWR after GB.

  7. Effect of weight, height and BMI on injury outcome in side impact crashes without airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Chinmoy; Tomosaburo, Okabe; Vimalathithan, K; Jeyabharath, M; Muthukumar, M; Satheesh, N; Narahari, S

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive analysis is performed to evaluate the effect of weight, height and body mass index (BMI) of occupants on side impact injuries at different body regions. The accident dataset for this study is based on the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for accident year 2000-08. The mean BMI values for driver and front passenger are estimated from all types of crashes using NASS database, which clearly indicates that mean BMI has been increasing over the years in the USA. To study the effect of BMI in side impact injuries, BMI was split into three groups namely (1) thin (BMI30). For more clear identification of the effect of BMI in side impact injuries, a minimum gap of three BMI is set in between each adjacent BMI groups. Car model years from MY1995-1999 to MY2000-2008 are chosen in order to identify the degree of influence of older and newer generation of cars in side impact injuries. Impact locations particularly side-front (F), side-center (P) and side-distributed (Y) are chosen for this analysis. Direction of force (DOF) considered for both near side and far side occupants are 8 o'clock, 9 o'clock, 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock, 3 o'clock and 4 o'clock respectively. Age <60 years is also one of the constraints imposed on data selection to minimize the effect of bone strength on the occurrence of occupant injuries. AIS2+ and AIS3+ injury risk in all body regions have been plotted for the selected three BMI groups of occupant, delta-V 0-60kmph, two sets (old and new) of car model years. The analysis is carried with three approaches: (a) injury risk percentage based on simple graphical method with respect to a single variable, (b) injury distribution method where the injuries are marked on the respective anatomical locations and (c) logistic regression, a statistical method, considers all the related variables together. Lower extremity injury risk appears to be high for thin BMI group. It is found that BMI does not have much

  8. Fat and lean BMI reference curves in children and adolescents and their utility in identifying excess adiposity compared with BMI and percentage body fat1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David R; Moore, Reneé H; Leonard, Mary B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Body mass index (BMI) and percentage body fat (%BF) are widely used to assess adiposity. These indexes fail to account for independent contributions of fat mass (FM) and lean body mass (LBM) to body weight, which vary according to age, sex, pubertal status, and population ancestry in the pediatric population. Objective: The objective was to develop pediatric reference curves for fat mass index (FMI) and lean body mass index (LBMI) and evaluate the effects of population ancestry and LBM on measures of excess adiposity (BMI, %BF, and FMI). Design: Sex-specific FMI and LBMI reference curves relative to age for children and adolescents aged 8–20 y were generated from cross-sectional body-composition data measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry from NHANES. Results: The mean LBMI z score was higher in blacks (males: 0.26; females: 0.45) than in whites (males: −0.07; females: −0.09) and Mexican Americans (males: 0.05; females: −0.09). The positive predictive value of overweight by BMI to identify excess adiposity defined by FMI was lower in blacks (males: 35.9%; females: 30.3%) than in whites (males: 65.4%; females: 52.2%) and Mexican Americans (males: 73.3%; females: 68.3%). Participants classified as having excess adiposity by FMI but normal adiposity by %BF had significantly higher BMI, LBMI, and height z scores than did those classified as having excess adiposity by %BF but normal adiposity by FMI. Conclusions: Relative to FMI, the prevalence of excess adiposity is overestimated by BMI in blacks and underestimated by %BF in individuals with high LBM. The use of FMI and LBMI improves on the use of %BF and BMI by allowing for the independent assessment of FM and LBM. PMID:23697708

  9. Fat and lean BMI reference curves in children and adolescents and their utility in identifying excess adiposity compared with BMI and percentage body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David R; Moore, Reneé H; Leonard, Mary B; Zemel, Babette S

    2013-07-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and percentage body fat (%BF) are widely used to assess adiposity. These indexes fail to account for independent contributions of fat mass (FM) and lean body mass (LBM) to body weight, which vary according to age, sex, pubertal status, and population ancestry in the pediatric population. The objective was to develop pediatric reference curves for fat mass index (FMI) and lean body mass index (LBMI) and evaluate the effects of population ancestry and LBM on measures of excess adiposity (BMI, %BF, and FMI). Sex-specific FMI and LBMI reference curves relative to age for children and adolescents aged 8-20 y were generated from cross-sectional body-composition data measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry from NHANES. The mean LBMI z score was higher in blacks (males: 0.26; females: 0.45) than in whites (males: -0.07; females: -0.09) and Mexican Americans (males: 0.05; females: -0.09). The positive predictive value of overweight by BMI to identify excess adiposity defined by FMI was lower in blacks (males: 35.9%; females: 30.3%) than in whites (males: 65.4%; females: 52.2%) and Mexican Americans (males: 73.3%; females: 68.3%). Participants classified as having excess adiposity by FMI but normal adiposity by %BF had significantly higher BMI, LBMI, and height z scores than did those classified as having excess adiposity by %BF but normal adiposity by FMI. Relative to FMI, the prevalence of excess adiposity is overestimated by BMI in blacks and underestimated by %BF in individuals with high LBM. The use of FMI and LBMI improves on the use of %BF and BMI by allowing for the independent assessment of FM and LBM.

  10. Efficacy and Safety of the SGLT2 Inhibitor Luseogliflozin in Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Stratified According to Baseline Body Mass Index: Pooled Analysis of Data From 52-Week Phase III Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Soichi; Kaku, Kohei; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya; Haneda, Masakazu; Sasaki, Takashi; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kakiuchi, Haruka; Samukawa, Yoshishige

    2016-04-01

    Luseogliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, may be beneficial in obese diabetic patients based on its potential to decrease blood glucose and body weight, but there is limited proof. This analysis aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of luseogliflozin in patients with varying levels of obesity. A pooled analysis of four 52-week Phase III trials of luseogliflozin 2.5 mg daily (or up to 5 mg daily) in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus stratified according to baseline body mass index (BMI) was conducted. Efficacy end points included changes in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and body weight. In total, 1031 patients were included and stratified into 5 BMI (kg/m(2)) groups: low-to-medium (body weight. The reduction in glycemic parameters tended to be slightly smaller in patients with BMI body weight tended to be greater in patients with higher BMI, especially those with BMI ≥30 kg/m(2). Levels of fasting insulin, C-peptide immunoreactivity, triglyceride, blood pressure, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and uric acid decreased significantly at week 52 in all groups (except for aspartate aminotransferase in patients with BMI body weight decreased significantly in all groups. Decrease in glycemic parameters tended to be smaller in patients with BMI body weight was larger in patients with higher BMI. Furthermore, luseogliflozin was especially beneficial in patients with higher BMI in terms of metabolic abnormalities, including insulin secretion and hypertension. Luseogliflozin exhibited a favorable and similar safety profile over 52 weeks in all groups. This agent can be an effective and well-tolerated therapeutic option in patients with a wide range of BMI levels, and it may be more beneficial in patients with higher BMI. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Food reinforcement and delay discounting in zBMI-discordant siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feda, Denise M; Roemmich, James N; Roberts, April; Epstein, Leonard H

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of food reinforcement and the inability to delay gratification are related to adult energy intake and obesity. This study was designed to test the association of sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food and delay discounting on sibling pair differences in zBMI scores of same-gender zBMI-discordant siblings. We tested main and interactive relationships between delay discounting and relative reinforcing efficacy of food on zBMI discordance in 14 zBMI-discordant biological sibling pairs (6 female pairs) using a discordant sibling study design. Sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food were associated with sibling pair differences in zBMI (p= 0.046); this effect was moderated by delay discounting (p delay discounting had greater differences in zBMI. The combination of greater sibling pair differences in delay discounting and relative reinforcing efficacy is associated with greater discordance in zBMI in adolescent sibling pairs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Food reinforcement and delay discounting in zBMI-discordant siblings ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feda, Denise M.; Roemmich, James N.; Roberts, April; Epstein, Leonard H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The interaction of food reinforcement and the inability to delay gratification are related to adult energy intake and obesity. This study was designed to test the association of sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food and delay discounting on sibling pair differences in zBMI scores of same-gender zBMI-discordant siblings. Design and methods We tested main and interactive relationships between delay discounting and relative reinforcing efficacy of food on zBMI discordance in 14 zBMI-discordant biological sibling pairs (6 female pairs) using a discordant sibling study design. Results Sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food were associated with sibling pair differences in zBMI (p = 0.046); this effect was moderated by delay discounting (p delay discounting had greater differences in zBMI. Conclusions The combination of greater sibling pair differences in delay discounting and relative reinforcing efficacy is associated with greater discordance in zBMI in adolescent sibling pairs. PMID:25464024

  13. Family dinner frequency interacts with dinnertime context in associations with child and parent BMI outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, Melissa L; Schow, Robin; Friend, Sarah E; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2017-10-01

    For youth and parents, frequent family meals have been consistently associated with positive dietary outcomes but less consistently associated with lower body mass index (BMI). Researchers have speculated dinnertime context (dinnertime routines, parent dinnertime media use) may interact with family meal frequency to impact associations with BMI. The present study evaluates the associations and interactions between dinnertime context measures and family dinner frequency with parent and child BMI. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from the Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus randomized control trial that aimed to prevent childhood obesity. Participants (160 parent-child dyads) completed psychosocial surveys and were measured for height and weight. General linear models tested associations and interactions between dinnertime context measures and family dinner frequency with parent and child BMI, adjusted for race and economic assistance. Lower parent dinnertime media use and higher dinnertime routines were significantly associated with lower child BMI z scores but not parent BMI scores. Interaction-moderation findings suggest higher family dinner frequency amplifies the healthful impact of the dinnertime context on child BMI z scores. Additionally, findings emphasize that promoting frequent family meals along with consistent routines and reduction in parent dinnertime media use may be important for the prevention of childhood obesity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Obesity and attenuated adiposity rebound in children with congenital hypothyroidism. Normalization of BMI values in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadas, S; Magiakou, M-A; Mengreli, C; Girginoudis, P; Galani, C; Smyrnaki, P; Kanaka-Gantenbein, C; Xekouki, P; Chrousos, G P; Dacou-Voutetakis, C

    2007-07-01

    An earlier adiposity rebound, suggestive of adult obesity, has been reported in children with congenital hypothyroidism. We undertook this study to evaluate the effect of congenital hypothyroidism on: 1) the timing of adiposity rebound, 2) the long-term prognosis of BMI status, and 3) the factors potentially affecting adiposity in subjects with congenital hypothyroidism. We found that in children with congenital hypothyroidism the BMI values were higher during the first years of life compared to normal population, but subsequently normalized. After the initial rise of BMI, the decline (nadir) and subsequent rise (adiposity rebound), usually occurring in normal children at an age greater than 30 months, was less evident in our group of children with congenital hypothyroidism. The severity of hypothyroidism affected BMI values at 6 and 12, but not at 36 months of age. In conclusion, in children with congenital hypothyroidism, 1) the high BMI values in early childhood normalize in adolescence, and 2) the normally expected BMI fluctuations during the first years of life are attenuated. These findings constitute indirect evidence that thyroid function during fetal and neonatal life affects BMI status during the first years of life.

  15. Prognostic Significance of BMI-1 But Not MEL-18 Expression in Pulmonary Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Sosei; Yamashita, Shin-Ichi; Miyahara, S O; Wakahara, Junichi; Yamamoto, Leona; Mori, Ryo; Imamura, Naoko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Waseda, Ryuichi; Hiratsuka, Masafumi; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the possibility of BMI-1 and MEL-18 to predict survival in patients with pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma. One hundred and ninety-nine patients underwent surgery in our Institute between 1995 and 2005. We used immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis to determine the expressions of BMI-1 and MEL-18 and compared them with clinicopathological factors and survival. Forty-one of 199 cases (21%) were BMI-1-positive. No correlation was found between BMI-1 and MEL-18 expression by IHC and clinicopathological factors. Five-year overall survival in the BMI-1-positive group (66.8%), but not MEL-18, was significantly better than that in the negative group (45.5%, p=0.04). In multivariate analysis, positive BMI-1 was a better prognostic factor of overall survival (hazard ratio (HR)=0.561, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.271-1.16, p=0.12). BMI-1 expression, but not MEL-18, is associated with a favorable prognosis and is a possible prognostic factor of pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. p21/Cyclin E pathway modulates anticlastogenic function of Bmi-1 in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wen; Zhou, Yuan; Tiwari, Agnes FY; Su, Hang; Yang, Jie; Zhu, Dandan; Lau, Victoria Ming Yi; Hau, Pok Man; Yip, Yim Ling; Cheung, Annie LM; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Tsao, Sai Wah

    2015-01-01

    Apart from regulating stem cell self-renewal, embryonic development and proliferation, Bmi-1 has been recently reported to be critical in the maintenance of genome integrity. In searching for novel mechanisms underlying the anticlastogenic function of Bmi-1, we observed, for the first time, that Bmi-1 positively regulates p21 expression. We extended the finding that Bmi-1 deficiency induced chromosome breaks in multiple cancer cell models. Interestingly, we further demonstrated that knockdown of cyclin E or ectopic overexpression of p21 rescued Bmi-1 deficiency-induced chromosome breaks. We therefore conclude that p21/cyclin E pathway is crucial in modulating the anticlastogenic function of Bmi-1. As it is well established that the overexpression of cyclin E potently induces genome instability and p21 suppresses the function of cyclin E, the novel and important implication from our findings is that Bmi-1 plays an important role in limiting genomic instability in cylin E-overexpressing cancer cells by positive regulation of p21. PMID:25131797

  17. Cardiometabolic Profile Related to Body Adiposity Identifies Patients Eligible for Bariatric Surgery More Accurately than BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Moncada, Rafael; Valentí, Víctor; Silva, Camilo; Ramírez, Beatriz; Catalán, Victoria; Rodríguez, Amaia; Andrada, Patricia; Escalada, Javier; Pastor, Carlos; Cienfuegos, Javier A; Gil, María J; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2015-09-01

    Eligibility criteria for bariatric surgery (BS) are based on BMI and the presence of major comorbidities. Our aim was to analyze the usefulness of body adiposity determination in establishing the indication for BS. In order to analyze the cardiometabolic risk according to eligibility criteria for BS, four groups were studied. Morbidly obese patients with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) (n = 360), and obese subjects with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) and at least one comorbidity (n = 431), represented two groups of patients meeting original NIH criteria for BS. A third group included two cohorts of patients with a high body fat (BF)% that do not meet the original NIH eligibility criteria for BS: patients with either a BMI BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) without comorbidities (n = 266, NEHF). Lean subjects by BMI were the reference group (n = 140). BMI, BF% and markers of insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and cardiovascular risk were measured. Individuals from the NEHF group exhibited increased HbA1c (P adiposity. It is concluded that body composition analysis yields valuable information to be incorporated into indication criteria for BS and that adiposity may be an independent indicator for BS.

  18. Longitudinal BMI trajectories in multiple sclerosis: Sex differences in association with disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, R; Musallam, A; Xia, Z; Baruch, N; Messina, S; Healy, B C; Chitnis, T

    2016-07-01

    Adolescent obesity is a risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), but little is known about changes in body mass index (BMI) after MS onset. To assess the relationship between MS and longitudinal changes in BMI. We analyzed prospectively collected BMIs in a cohort of patients with adult-onset MS and matched adult healthy controls (HC) gathered from the same hospital network central clinical data registry. We made three main observations. First, at baseline MS patients had a significantly higher BMI than HC (age- and sex- adjusted mean difference=0.57; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.99; p=0.008). Second, a significant age by MS status interaction was observed (polder individuals, whereas BMIs in HCs were higher with increasing age. Third, we observed sex-specific associations with disease severity: higher BMI was associated with higher cross-sectional EDSS in women, but with lower EDSS in men (p=0.003, N=758). There were no longitudinal associations between BMI and EDSS in either sex or in the entire cohort (p=0.65, N=772). After MS onset, patients may not experience age-expected increases in BMI. BMI may have sex-specific associations with MS disability scores. More refined measures of body composition are warranted in future studies to distinguish adiposity from muscle mass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Attenuated associations between increasing BMI and unfavorable lipid profiles in Chinese Buddhist vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-Jie; Han, Peng; Sun, Su-Yun; Wang, Li-Ying; Yan, Bing; Zhang, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Shu-Yu; Li, Xue-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is related to hyperlipidemia and risk of cardiovascular disease. Health benefits of vegetarian diets have well-documented in the Western countries where both obesity and hyperlipidemia were prevalent. We studied the association between BMI and various lipid/lipoprotein measures, as well as between BMI and predicted coronary heart disease probability in lean, low risk populations in Southern China. The study included 170 Buddhist monks (vegetarians) and 126 omnivore men. Interaction between BMI and vegetarian status was tested in the multivariable regression analysis adjusting for age, education, smoking, alcohol drinking, and physical activity. Compared with omnivores, vegetarians had significantly lower mean BMI, blood pressures, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein ratio, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B and A-I, as well as lower predicted probability of coronary heart disease. Higher BMI was associated with unfavorable lipid/lipoprotein profile and predicted probability of coronary heart disease in both vegetarians and omnivores. However, the associations were significantly diminished in Buddhist vegetarians. Vegetarian diets not only lower BMI, but also attenuate the BMI-related increases of atherogenic lipid/ lipoprotein and the probability of coronary heart disease.

  20. Association between infancy BMI peak and body composition and blood pressure at age 5-6 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel H P Hof

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The development of overweight is often measured with the body mass index (BMI. During childhood the BMI curve has two characteristic points: the adiposity rebound at 6 years and the BMI peak at 9 months of age. In this study, the associations between the BMI peak and body composition measures and blood pressure at age 5-6 years were investigated. METHODS: Measurements from the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD study were available for this study. Blood pressure (systolic and diastolic and body composition measures (BMI, waist-to-height ratio, fat percentage were gathered during a health check at about 6 years of age (n = 2822. All children had multiple BMI measurements between the 0-4 years of age. For boys and girls separately, child-specific BMI peaks were extracted from mixed effect models. Associations between the estimated BMI peak and the health check measurements were analysed with linear models. In addition, we investigated the potential use of the BMI at 9 months as a surrogate measure for the magnitude of the BMI peak. RESULTS: After correction for the confounding effect of fetal growth, both timing and magnitude of the BMI peak were significantly and positively associated (p<0.001 with all body composition measures at the age of 5-6 years. The BMI peak showed no direct association with blood pressure at the age 5-6 year, but was mediated by the current BMI. The correlation between the magnitude of the BMI peak and BMI at 9 months was approximately 0.93 and similar associations with the measures at 5-6 years were found. CONCLUSION: The magnitude of the BMI peak was associated with body composition measures at 5-6 years of age. Moreover, the BMI at 9 months could be used as surrogate measure for the magnitude of the BMI peak.

  1. Association between Infancy BMI Peak and Body Composition and Blood Pressure at Age 5–6 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Michel H. P.; Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.; de Hoog, Marieke L. A.; van Eijsden, Manon; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The development of overweight is often measured with the body mass index (BMI). During childhood the BMI curve has two characteristic points: the adiposity rebound at 6 years and the BMI peak at 9 months of age. In this study, the associations between the BMI peak and body composition measures and blood pressure at age 5–6 years were investigated. Methods Measurements from the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD) study were available for this study. Blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) and body composition measures (BMI, waist-to-height ratio, fat percentage) were gathered during a health check at about 6 years of age (n = 2822). All children had multiple BMI measurements between the 0–4 years of age. For boys and girls separately, child-specific BMI peaks were extracted from mixed effect models. Associations between the estimated BMI peak and the health check measurements were analysed with linear models. In addition, we investigated the potential use of the BMI at 9 months as a surrogate measure for the magnitude of the BMI peak. Results After correction for the confounding effect of fetal growth, both timing and magnitude of the BMI peak were significantly and positively associated (pBMI peak showed no direct association with blood pressure at the age 5–6 year, but was mediated by the current BMI. The correlation between the magnitude of the BMI peak and BMI at 9 months was approximately 0.93 and similar associations with the measures at 5–6 years were found. Conclusion The magnitude of the BMI peak was associated with body composition measures at 5–6 years of age. Moreover, the BMI at 9 months could be used as surrogate measure for the magnitude of the BMI peak. PMID:24324605

  2. Nutritional status in sick children and adolescents is not accurately reflected by BMI-SDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusch, Gerhard; Raja, Preeya; Dung, Nguyen Quang; Karaolis-Danckert, Nadina; Barr, Ronald; Fusch, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional status provides helpful information of disease severity and treatment effectiveness. Body mass index standard deviation scores (BMI-SDS) provide an approximation of body composition and thus are frequently used to classify nutritional status of sick children and adolescents. However, the accuracy of estimating body composition in this population using BMI-SDS has not been assessed. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the accuracy of nutritional status classification in sick infants and adolescents using BMI-SDS, upon comparison to classification using percentage body fat (%BF) reference charts. BMI-SDS was calculated from anthropometric measurements and %BF was measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for 393 sick children and adolescents (5 months-18 years). Subjects were classified by nutritional status (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese), using 2 methods: (1) BMI-SDS, based on age- and gender-specific percentiles, and (2) %BF reference charts (standard). Linear regression and a correlation analysis were conducted to compare agreement between both methods of nutritional status classification. %BF reference value comparisons were also made between 3 independent sources based on German, Canadian, and American study populations. Correlation between nutritional status classification by BMI-SDS and %BF agreed moderately (r (2) = 0.75, 0.76 in boys and girls, respectively). The misclassification of nutritional status in sick children and adolescents using BMI-SDS was 27% when using German %BF references. Similar rates observed when using Canadian and American %BF references (24% and 23%, respectively). Using BMI-SDS to determine nutritional status in a sick population is not considered an appropriate clinical tool for identifying individual underweight or overweight children or adolescents. However, BMI-SDS may be appropriate for longitudinal measurements or for screening purposes in large field studies. When accurate nutritional

  3. Infant BMI peak, breastfeeding, and body composition at age 3 y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Signe M; Ritz, Christian; Ejlerskov, Katrine T; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2015-02-01

    With the increasing focus on obesity, growth patterns in infancy and early childhood have gained much attention. Although the adiposity rebound has been in focus because of a shown association with adult obesity, not much has been published about the infant peak in body mass index (BMI). This study links age and BMI at infant peak to duration of breastfeeding and body composition at 3 y of age. Frequent weight and height measurements for 311 Danish children in the SKOT (Complementary and Young Child Feeding - Impact on Short and Long Term Development and Health; in Danish) cohort were used to estimate BMI growth curves for the age span from 14 d to 19 mo by using a nonlinear mixed-effects model. BMI growth velocity before peak and age and BMI at peak were derived from the subject-specific models. Information about pregnancy and breastfeeding was assessed from background questionnaires. Assessment of body composition at age 3 y was made based on bioelectrical impedance, weight, and height. A longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding was associated with an earlier peak in infant BMI (P = 0.0003) and a lower prepeak velocity (P < 0.0001). BMI level at peak and prepeak velocity was positively associated with fat and fat-free mass at age 3 y (all P < 0.0001), whereas a later age at peak was associated with a lower fat mass, fat mass index, and fat-free mass index at age 3 y (all P < 0.001). BMI peak characteristics are strongly associated with both duration of exclusive breastfeeding and body composition at 3 y of age. Thus, a better knowledge of characteristics and determinants of the early BMI peak is likely to improve our understanding of early development of obesity. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Raised BMI cut-off for overweight in Greenland Inuit – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig Andersen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity is associated with increased morbidity and premature death. Obesity rates have increased worldwide and the WHO recommends monitoring. A steep rise in body mass index (BMI, a measure of adiposity, was detected in Greenland from 1963 to 1998. Interestingly, the BMI starting point was in the overweight range. This is not conceivable in a disease-free, physically active, pre-western hunter population. Objective. This led us to reconsider the cut-off point for overweight among Inuit in Greenland. Design and findings. We found 3 different approaches to defining the cut-off point of high BMI in Inuit. First, the contribution to the height by the torso compared to the legs is relatively high. This causes relatively more kilograms per centimetre of height that increases the BMI by approximately 10% compared to Caucasian whites. Second, defining the cut-off by the upper 90-percentile of BMI from height and weight in healthy young Inuit surveyed in 1963 estimated the cut-off point to be around 10% higher compared to Caucasians. Third, if similar LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides are assumed for a certain BMI in Caucasians, the corresponding BMI in Inuit in both Greenland and Canada is around 10% higher. However, genetic admixture of Greenland Inuit and Caucasian Danes will influence this difference and hamper a clear distinction with time. Conclusion. Defining overweight according to the WHO cut-off of a BMI above 25 kg/m2 in Greenland Inuit may overestimate the number of individuals with elevated BMI.

  5. Bidirectional associations between mothers' and fathers' parenting consistency and child BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Pauline W; Giallo, Rebecca; Westrupp, Elizabeth M; Wake, Melissa; Nicholson, Jan M

    2013-12-01

    Research suggests that general parenting dimensions and styles are associated with children's BMI, but directionality in this relationship remains unknown. Moreover, there has been little attention to the influences of both mothers' and fathers' parenting. We aimed to examine reciprocal relationships between maternal and paternal parenting consistency and child BMI. Participants were 4002 children and their parents in the population-based Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Mothers and fathers self-reported parenting consistency, and children's BMI was measured at 4 biennial waves starting at age 4 to 5 years in 2004. Bidirectionality between parenting and child BMI was examined by using regression analyses in cross-lagged models. The best-fitting models indicated a modest influence from parenting to child BMI, whereas no support was found for bidirectional influences. For mothers, higher levels of parenting consistency predicted lower BMI in children from Waves 1 to 2 and 3 to 4; for example, for every SD increase in mothers' parenting consistency at Wave 1, child BMIz fell by 0.025 in Wave 2 (95% confidence interval: -0.05 to -0.003). For fathers, higher levels of parenting consistency were associated with lower child BMI from Waves 1 to 2 and 2 to 3. Parenting inconsistency of mothers and fathers prospectively predicted small increases in offspring BMI over 2-year periods across middle childhood. However, child BMI did not appear to influence parenting behavior. These findings support recent calls for expanding childhood overweight interventions to address the broad parenting context while involving both mothers and fathers.

  6. Effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on asthma in childhood: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Granell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach.We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC. A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs. 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-values<0.001 and with childhood asthma (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.38-4.76 per unit score, p = 0.003. The estimated causal RR for the effect of BMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16-2.07 per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19-3.03 than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89-2.11 though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31. The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11-1.79 per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23-4.11 per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects.Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  7. Effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on asthma in childhood: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A John; Evans, David M; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2014-07-01

    Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-values<0.001) and with childhood asthma (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.38-4.76 per unit score, p = 0.003). The estimated causal RR for the effect of BMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16-2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19-3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89-2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11-1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23-4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  8. Effects of BMI, Fat Mass, and Lean Mass on Asthma in Childhood: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A. John; Evans, David M.; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R.; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. Methods and Findings We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-valuesBMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16–2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19–3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89–2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11–1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23–4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Conclusions Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24983943

  9. Cross-sectional analysis of BMI and some lifestyle variables in Flemish vegetarians compared with non-vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewaeters, K; Clarys, P; Hebbelinck, M; Deriemaeker, P; Clarys, J P

    Epidemiological studies on vegetarians indicate that appropriately planned vegetarian diets are associated with certain health benefits, which may lower mortality and morbidity. A healthy lifestyle, such as regular physical activity and avoidance of harmful practices, such as smoking and heavy drinking, could also influence these positive health-related outcomes in vegetarians. This study reports BMI, smoking and drinking habits, engagement in physical activity, medication use and subjective health perception in a vegetarian population (women: n = 206, mean age 37.0 +/- 12.3 years; men: n = 120, mean age 42.3 +/- 15.9 years) as compared with a reference Belgian population (women: n = 4993, mean age 49.8 +/- 18.0 years; men: n = 4666, mean age 48.0 +/- 17.1 years). When considering the vegetarian group as a whole, the vegetarians had a lower mean BMI compared with the reference population (respectively 22.1 +/- 3.1 kg/m2 compared with 24.6 +/- 4.8 kg/m2 for women (p Vegetarians smoked less than subjects of the reference group (13.5% compared with 28.5% respectively; p vegetarian and 35.8 in the reference population; p = 0.159). During the weekend, more subjects of the reference population drank alcohol compared with the vegetarian subjects (70.2% vs. 58.6% respectively; p = 0.026). More vegetarians were involved in intensive physical activity (over 4 h per week) compared with the reference population (36.8% vs. 17.3% respectively; p vegetarians were involved in moderate physical activity (up to 4 h per week) compared with subjects of the reference group (28.2% and 51.0% respectively; p vegetarians 34.9 vs. reference subjects 31.8; p = 0.625). Use of prescribed medication was lower among the vegetarians (25.5% compared with 47.3% in the reference population; p vegetarian group and 28.2% in the reference group; p = 0.580). More vegetarian subjects perceived their health to be good to very good compared with the subjects of the reference population (90.4% vs. 77

  10. Associations between Family-Related Factors, Breakfast Consumption and BMI among 10- to 12-Year-Old European Children: The Cross-Sectional ENERGY-Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lippevelde, Wendy; Te Velde, Saskia J.; Verloigne, Maïté; Van Stralen, Maartje M.; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Manios, Yannis; Bere, Elling; Vik, Froydis N.; Jan, Nataša; Fernández Alvira, Juan M.; Chinapaw, Mai J. M.; Bringolf-Isler, Bettina; Kovacs, Eva; Brug, Johannes; Maes, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations of family-related factors with children’s breakfast consumption and BMI-z-score and to examine whether children’s breakfast consumption mediates associations between family-related factors and children’s BMI-z-score. Subjects Ten- to twelve-year-old children (n = 6374; mean age = 11.6±0.7 years, 53.2% girls, mean BMI-z-score = 0.4±1.2) and one of their parents (n = 6374; mean age = 41.4±5.3 years, 82.7% female, mean BMI = 24.5±4.2 kg/m2) were recruited from schools in eight European countries (Belgium, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, Spain, and Switzerland). The children self-reported their breakfast frequency per week. The body weight and height of the children were objectively measured. The parents responded to items on family factors related to breakfast (automaticity, availability, encouragement, paying attention, permissiveness, negotiating, communicating health beliefs, parental self-efficacy to address children’s nagging, praising, and family breakfast frequency). Mediation analyses were performed using multi-level regression analyses (child-school-country). Results Three of the eleven family-related variables were significantly associated with children’s BMI-z-score. The family breakfast frequency was negatively associated with the BMI-z-score; permissiveness concerning skipping breakfast and negotiating about breakfast were positively associated with the BMI-z-score. Children’s breakfast consumption was found to be a mediator of the two associations. All family-related variables except for negotiating, praising and communicating health beliefs, were significantly associated with children’s breakfast consumption. Conclusions Future breakfast promotion and obesity prevention interventions should focus on family-related factors including the physical home environment and parenting practices. Nevertheless, more longitudinal research and intervention studies to

  11. 75 FR 70999 - National Entrepreneurship Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... Proclamation 8600--National Entrepreneurship Week, 2010 Proclamation 8601--America Recycles Day, 2010 #0; #0... 15, 2010 National Entrepreneurship Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A... and work hard enough, the American dream is within your reach. During National Entrepreneurship Week...

  12. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made…

  13. Are we operating too late? Mortality Analysis and Stochastic Simulation of Costs Associated with Bariatric Surgery: Reconsidering the BMI Threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ashish C; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Bhat, Suneel

    2016-01-01

    Present guidelines recommend bariatric surgery at BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 or BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related morbidity. Evidence for cost and mortality/morbidity risk of bariatric surgery and obesity-related diseases was evaluated determining equivalency point of absolute incremental mortality risk by BMI and risks associated with bariatric surgery. A stochastic model was developed evaluating costs related to surgical procedure at a given BMI. Bariatric surgery produces significant lifetime cost savings associated with diabetes, gallstones, hypertension, high cholesterol, colon cancer, heart disease, and stroke in men at BMI 30 kg/m2 for laparoscopic gastric bypass. For women, laparoscopic gastric bypass saves cost at BMI 32 kg/m2 and laparoscopic gastric banding at BMI 37 kg/m2. In white men, relative to single-year mortality risks by BMI, surgical intervention becomes risk-beneficial at BMI 25 kg/m2 for laparoscopic gastric banding, BMI 27 kg/m2 for laparoscopic gastric bypass procedure and open gastric banding, and BMI 37 kg/m2 for open gastric bypass. Risk benefit for African-American men by procedure occurs at BMI Risk benefit for black women by procedure occurs at BMI 27.5 kg/m2, BMI 33.5 kg/m2, and BMI 50+ kg/m2, respectively. Risk and cost benefit suggest surgical guidelines should be reconsidered. Threshold for bariatric surgery should be redefined to BMI 35 kg/m2 or BMI 30 kg/m2 with comorbidities.

  14. Epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) of BMI, BMI change and waist circumference in African American adults identifies multiple replicated loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerath, Ellen W; Guan, Weihua; Grove, Megan L; Aslibekyan, Stella; Mendelson, Michael; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Hedman, Åsa K; Sandling, Johanna K; Li, Li-An; Irvin, Marguerite R; Zhi, Degui; Deloukas, Panos; Liang, Liming; Liu, Chunyu; Bressler, Jan; Spector, Tim D; North, Kari; Li, Yun; Absher, Devin M; Levy, Daniel; Arnett, Donna K; Fornage, Myriam; Pankow, James S; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is an important component of the pathophysiology of chronic diseases. Identifying epigenetic modifications associated with elevated adiposity, including DNA methylation variation, may point to genomic pathways that are dysregulated in numerous conditions. The Illumina 450K Bead Chip array was used to assay DNA methylation in leukocyte DNA obtained from 2097 African American adults in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Mixed-effects regression models were used to test the association of methylation beta value with concurrent body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and BMI change, adjusting for batch effects and potential confounders. Replication using whole-blood DNA from 2377 White adults in the Framingham Heart Study and CD4+ T cell DNA from 991 Whites in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network Study was followed by testing using adipose tissue DNA from 648 women in the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource cohort. Seventy-six BMI-related probes, 164 WC-related probes and 8 BMI change-related probes passed the threshold for significance in ARIC (P metabolism, immune response/cytokine signaling and other diverse pathways, including LGALS3BP, KDM2B, PBX1 and BBS2, among others. Adiposity traits are associated with DNA methylation at numerous CpG sites that replicate across studies despite variation in tissue type, ethnicity and analytic approaches. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. EFFECT OF 8 WEEKS OF AEROBIC ON BODY COMPOSITION AND BLOOD PRESSURE IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamrezai Shahram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Nowadays increasing blood pressure is the most important risk factor of coronary, cerebral and renal vessel diseases. Epidemiological studies indicate that Physical inactivity adversely affects the blood pressure in postmenopausal women. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of aerobic on body composition and blood pressure in postmenopausal women. Methods: 20 healthy postmenopausal women with similar age and weight were randomly devided in intervention and control groups. Subjects completed an informed consent form and health history questionnaire. The intervention group was trained in an aerobic exercise program for 8 weeks (3 sessions weekly. Weight, body fat percentage (BF%, body mass index (BMI, waist to hip ratio (WHR, Lean body mass and blood pressure (BP were measured in the beginning and the end of the study for all of the subjects. Data were analyzed by the Paired t-test and independent t- test. Results: The results showed that BF% , WHR, BMI decreased and Lean body mass increased significantly in training group after 8 weeks training (P0.05. Conclusions: It seems that a period of aerobic training for 8 weeks can be effective as a non-pharmacological treatment strategy for improvement some physical fitness and body composition indexes, blood pressure in postmenopausal women.

  16. Maternal BMI at the start of pregnancy and offspring epigenome-wide DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Gemma C; Salas, Lucas A; Monnereau, Claire

    2017-01-01

    ,817 mother-child pairs), we meta-analysed the association between maternal BMI at the start of pregnancy and blood methylation in adolescents. In newborns, maternal BMI was associated with small (...Pre-pregnancy maternal obesity is associated with adverse offspring outcomes at birth and later in life. Individual studies have shown that epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation could contribute. Within the Pregnancy and Childhood Epigenetics (PACE) Consortium, we meta......-analysed the association between pre-pregnancy maternal BMI and methylation at over 450,000 sites in newborn blood DNA, across 19 cohorts (9,340 mother-newborn pairs). We attempted to infer causality by comparing the effects of maternal versus paternal BMI and incorporating genetic variation. In four additional cohorts (1...

  17. Sickness Presenteeism Among Health Care Workers and the Effect of BMI, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Muscle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup; Kongstad, Malte Bue; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between sickness presenteeism and body mass index (BMI), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). METHODS: Female health care workers (n = 139) were analyzed cross-sectional as well...... as longitudinal after 3 and 12-month follow-up. Sickness presenteeism was assessed as a summed score using validated questions from three questionnaires: Health and Work Performance Questionnaire, Work Ability Index, and Quantity and Quality Method. CRF was assessed by a maximal cycling test and MVC from four...... muscle groups. RESULTS: Significant relationships were found between sickness presenteeism and BMI as well as MVC both cross-sectional and as changes over 3 months. Participants with BMI more than 30 kg/m had significantly higher sickness presenteeism than those with BMI less than 25 kg/m. CONCLUSIONS...

  18. BMI percentile-for-age overestimates adiposity in early compared with late maturing pubertal children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kaspar; Juul, Anders

    2015-01-01

    and bioelectric impedance analyses (BIA) were used to estimate adiposity. Clinical pubertal markers (Tanner stages and testicular volume) were evaluated. LH, FSH, estradiol, testosterone, SHBG and IGF1 levels were determined by immunoassays. RESULTS: In all age groups, higher BMI (all 1 year age-groups, P ≤ 0.......041) was found with early compared with late maturation, despite similar BIA-estimated body fat percentage (BIA-BF%). Neither BMI nor BIA-BF% differed for a given stage of maturation. BMI percentile-for-age and prevalence of overweight/obesity were higher in the early compared with late matured pubertal children...... (all P ≤ 0.038), despite similar BIA-BF%. Pubertal girls with BIA-BF >29% had significantly lower LH and FSH levels compared with normal-weight girls (P ≤ 0.041). CONCLUSIONS: Early maturational timing was not associated with higher adiposity for a given stage of puberty. Using BMI percentile...

  19. Associations between sleep quality with cardiorespiratory fitness and BMI among adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Jorge; Vale, Susana

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to examine the association between sleeping quality with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and obesity status (BMI) This was a cross-sectional study of 1,726 adolescent girls, aged 10 to 18 years. CRF was predicted by maximal multistage 20 m shuttle-run test according to procedures described from FITNESSGRAM. Children's BMI was classified according to International Obesity Task Force and sleeping quality was assessed by questionnaire. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 21.2% and 5.7%, respectively. Sleeping quality was significantly associated with CRF (Rho = 0.17; P BMI. Girls who were classified as fit were more likely (OR: 2.25; P sleep quality compared to their unfit peers. Poor sleep quality was associated with lower CRF although no associations have been shown with BMI.

  20. Childhood obesity treatment; Effects on BMI SDS, body composition, and fasting plasma lipid concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann; Dahl, Maria

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS) may not adequately reflect changes in fat mass during childhood obesity treatment. This study aimed to investigate associations between BMI SDS, body composition, and fasting plasma lipid concentrations at baseline and during...... childhood obesity treatment. METHODS: 876 children and adolescents (498 girls) with overweight/obesity, median age 11.2 years (range 1.6-21.7), and median BMI SDS 2.8 (range 1.3-5.7) were enrolled in a multidisciplinary outpatient treatment program and followed for a median of 1.8 years (range 0......, and 80% improved their lipid concentrations. CONCLUSION: Reductions in the degree of obesity during multidisciplinary childhood obesity treatment are accompanied by improvements in body composition and fasting plasma lipid concentrations. Even in individuals increasing their BMI SDS, body composition...

  1. Body image, BMI, and physical activity in girls and boys aged 14-16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantanista, Adam; Osiński, Wiesław; Borowiec, Joanna; Tomczak, Maciej; Król-Zielińska, Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between body image, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity in adolescents. The study included 1702 girls and 1547 boys aged 14-16 years. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was evaluated by the Physical Activity Screening Measure. Body image was assessed using the Feelings and Attitudes Towards the Body Scale, and participants' BMI was determined based on measured height and weight. Compared to boys, girls reported more negative body image (pbody image was a statistically significant positive predictor of MVPA for adolescents, regardless of BMI. Additionally, body image was a stronger predictor of MVPA in boys than in girls. These findings suggest that body image, rather than BMI, is important in undertaking physical activity in adolescents and should be considered when preparing programs aimed at improving physical activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative Analysis and Comparison of BMI among Han, Tibetan, and Uygur University Students in Northwest China

    OpenAIRE

    Jingya, Bai; Ye, He; Jing, Wang; Xi, Huanjiu; Tao, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To fully analyze and compare BMI among Han, Tibetan, and Uygur university students, to discuss the differences in their physical properties and physical health, and thus to provide some theoretical suggestions for the improvement of students’ physical health. Methods. The cross-sectional random cluster sampling was used to investigate 10103 Han, Tibetan, and Uygur university students, aged 20–24 in Northwest China, and their height and weight were measured to calculate BMI. The BM...

  3. BMI-1 extends proliferative potential of human bronchial epithelial cells while retaining their mucociliary differentiation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munye, Mustafa M; Shoemark, Amelia; Hirst, Robert A; Delhove, Juliette M; Sharp, Tyson V; McKay, Tristan R; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Baines, Deborah L; Howe, Steven J; Hart, Stephen L

    2017-02-01

    Air-liquid interface (ALI) culture of primary airway epithelial cells enables mucociliary differentiation providing an in vitro model of the human airway, but their proliferative potential is limited. To extend proliferation, these cells were previously transduced with viral oncogenes or mouse Bmi-1 + hTERT, but the resultant cell lines did not undergo mucociliary differentiation. We hypothesized that use of human BMI-1 alone would increase the proliferative potential of bronchial epithelial cells while retaining their mucociliary differentiation potential. Cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchial epithelial cells were transduced by lentivirus with BMI-1 and then their morphology, replication kinetics, and karyotype were assessed. When differentiated at ALI, mucin production, ciliary function, and transepithelial electrophysiology were measured. Finally, shRNA knockdown of DNAH5 in BMI-1 cells was used to model primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). BMI-1-transduced basal cells showed normal cell morphology, karyotype, and doubling times despite extensive passaging. The cell lines underwent mucociliary differentiation when cultured at ALI with abundant ciliation and production of the gel-forming mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B evident. Cilia displayed a normal beat frequency and 9+2 ultrastructure. Electrophysiological characteristics of BMI-1-transduced cells were similar to those of untransduced cells. shRNA knockdown of DNAH5 in BMI-1 cells produced immotile cilia and absence of DNAH5 in the ciliary axoneme as seen in cells from patients with PCD. BMI-1 delayed senescence in bronchial epithelial cells, increasing their proliferative potential but maintaining mucociliary differentiation at ALI. We have shown these cells are amenable to genetic manipulation and can be used to produce novel disease models for research and dissemination. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Paternal body mass index (BMI is associated with offspring intrauterine growth in a gender dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Peng Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental alternations leading to fetal programming of cardiovascular diseases in later life have been attributed to maternal factors. However, animal studies showed that paternal obesity may program cardio-metabolic diseases in the offspring. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that paternal BMI may be associated with fetal growth. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the relationship between paternal body mass index (BMI and birth weight, ultrasound parameters describing the newborn's body shape as well as parameters describing the newborns endocrine system such as cortisol, aldosterone, renin activity and fetal glycated serum protein in a birth cohort of 899 father/mother/child triplets. Since fetal programming is an offspring sex specific process, male and female offspring were analyzed separately. Multivariable regression analyses considering maternal BMI, paternal and maternal age, hypertension during pregnancy, maternal total glycated serum protein, parity and either gestational age (for birth weight or time of ultrasound investigation (for ultrasound parameters as confounding showed that paternal BMI is associated with growth of the male but not female offspring. Paternal BMI correlated with birth parameters of male offspring only: birth weight; biparietal diameter, head circumference; abdominal diameter, abdominal circumference; and pectoral diameter. Cortisol was likewise significantly correlated with paternal BMI in male newborns only. CONCLUSIONS: Paternal BMI affects growth of the male but not female offspring. Paternal BMI may thus represent a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases of male offspring in later life. It remains to be demonstrated whether this is linked to an offspring sex specific paternal programming of cortisol secretion.

  5. Self-control mediates the relationship between time perspective and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Menna; Higgs, Suzanne; Lee, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Trait future time perspective measures the extent to which behaviour is dominated by a striving for future goals and rewards. Trait present time perspective measures orientation towards immediate pleasure. Previous research has explored the relationship between future and present time perspective and BMI with mixed findings. In addition, the psychological mechanism underlying this relationship is unclear. Self-control is a likely candidate, as it has been related to both BMI and time perspective, but the relationship between all of these concepts has not been examined in a single study. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine if trait self-control mediates the relationship between time perspective (future and present) and BMI. Self-report time perspective (ZTPI), self-control (SCS) and height/weight data were collected using an online survey from a mixed student and community sample (N = 218) with wide ranging age (mean 29, SD 11, range 18-73 years) and BMI (mean 24, SD 4, range 15-43). The results of a structural equation model including both facets of time perspective suggested that the traits are related yet distinct measures that independently predict BMI through changes in self-control. Bootstrap mediation analysis showed that self-control mediated the relationship between both future time perspective (95% CI, -0.10 to -0.02) and present time perspective (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.17), and BMI in opposite directions. Participants with higher future time perspective scores (higher present time perspective scores) had higher (lower) self-control, which predicted lower (higher) BMI. These results are consistent with previous research suggesting an important role for time perspective in health outcomes. Self-control likely mediates the relationship between temporal perspectives and BMI, suggesting that time perspective may be a target for individualised interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbohydrate intake and cardiometabolic risk factors in high BMI African American children

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts Lindsay S; Sharma Sushma; Lustig Robert H; Fleming Sharon E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between intakes of subgroups of energy-providing carbohydrate, and markers of cardiometabolic risk factors in high BMI African American (AA) children. A cross sectional analysis was performed on data from a sample of 9-11 year old children (n = 95) with BMI greater than the 85th percentile. Fasting hematological and biochemical values for selected markers of cardiometabolic risk factors were related to intakes of carbohydrates an...

  7. Modeling the dynamics of BMI changes during adolescence. The Oporto Growth, Health and Performance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M C; Eisenmann, J C; e Santos, D V; de Chaves, R N; de Moraes Forjaz, C L; Maia, J A R

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: (i) to model changes in body mass index (BMI) of 10-18-year-old adolescents, and (ii) to investigate the effects of total physical activity (TPA), physical fitness (PF), sleep duration and fruit/vegetable consumption in BMI trajectories across time. Data were obtained from the Oporto Growth, Health and Performance Study and comprised 6894 adolescents (3418 girls) divided into four age cohorts (10, 12, 14 and 16 years) measured annually for 3 years. BMI was computed using the standard formula (kg m(-2)); TPA was estimated with the Baecke questionnaire; PF measures included 1-mile run/walk, 50 yard dash (50YD), standing long jump (SLJ), handgrip strength (HGr) and agility shuttle run. Longitudinal changes in BMI were analyzed using the multilevel modeling approach. The average BMI at age of peak of height velocity was 20.7±0.07 kg m(-2) for girls (PBMI was 1.36±0.04 kg m(-2), PBMI trajectories in both sexes (Girls: β1mile=0.12±0.02, PBMI trajectories (β=0.10±0.03, P=0.001). After adjusting for the covariates, sleep duration and fruit/vegetable intake did not show any significant association with BMI trajectories either sex. BMI increased linearly with age in both gender. PF levels are negatively associated with BMI across time in both boys and girls. Therefore, promotion of PF in the adolescent years seems to be effective in the early prevention of obesity.

  8. BMI distribution/social stratification in Swiss conscripts from 1875 to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, K; Rühli, F J; Woitek, U; Pfister, C

    2010-04-01

    We aimed to extend the actual overweight discussion with new unbiased Swiss conscript data from 2005 to 2006, and to present for the first time Swiss data on body mass index (BMI) before 1950 and for the late-nineteenth century. For this study, 19-year-old Swiss male conscripts (draft army; Cantons Bern, Zurich, Basel-Stadt and Basel-Land) from the census of 1875-1879, 1933-1939 and 2005-2006 (N=28 033; 2005-2006 census) were included. BMI distribution (World Health Organization (WHO) classification) and social stratification (International Labour Organization classification) were main outcome measures. Mean BMI of 19-year-old men in Switzerland increased in the 50 years between the 1870s and the 1930s by 0.80 kg/m(2) and between the 1930s and 2005 by 1.45 kg/m(2). The modern BMI sample is much more right skewed and s.d. is higher. Obesity prevalence (according to modern WHO classification) has increased by a factor of 105 from 1870s until present. Over 23% of our representative sample of Swiss men in 2005-2006 had a BMI of over 25 kg/m(2). In 2005-2006, contrary to the nineteenth century, unskilled workers had articulately higher BMI values at the 75th, 90th and 95th percentile than students; 12% of unskilled workers were obese against 2% of students. It thus seems that BMI relations between the upper and the lower end of the socio-economic strata changed inversely from the late-nineteenth century to 2005-2006. We further propose that the phenomenon of massive right-skewing BMI distribution between the 1930s and 2005-2006 affected the lower socio-economic strata to a far greater extent than the higher socio-economic group.

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SERUM CHOLESTEROL AND VERBAL MEMORY MAY BE INFLUENCED BY BODY MASS INDEX (BMI) IN YOUNG HEALTHY WOMEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnai, Gergely; Plózer, Enikő; Altbácker, Anna; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Kőszegi, Tamás; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Lucza, Tivadar; Kovács, Norbert; Janszky, József; Zsófia, Clemens

    2016-03-30

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between verbal memory and total cholesterol (TC) levels related to body mass index (BMI) in healthy young women. Verbal memory was assessed using the Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) while total serum cholesterol was measured by enzymatic colorimetric test. In order to analyze the potential significance of BMI subjects were divided into three groups according to their calculated BMI percentile values. No significant correlation was found when assessing the group as a whole. However a remarkable pattern of correlation emerged when assessing the BMI groups separately: a close-to-significant positive correlation was found for total learning score and TC in the low BMI group, no correlation emerged in the medium BMI group while a strong inverse correlation was found in the high BMI group. These findings indicate that the relationship between verbal memory and serum TC level is also influenced by BMI.

  10. Effects of a 12-week, school-based obesity management program on obese primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyu Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:This study was designed to determine the effects of a school-based obesity-management program on obese primary school children. Methods:A total of 995 children (6&#8211;12 years old in a primary school were screened in March 2008, and of those, 101 obese students (44 boys and 57 girls, body mass index (BMI ?#249;5 percentile were enrolled for a study group. The school- based, obesity management program, which includes physical exercise and nutritional education, was conducted as part of an extracurricular program for 12 weeks. The measurement of height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure (BP, and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA was performed before and after the program. Results:Height and weight increased significantly (P&lt;0.05. The BMI and obesity index decreased significantly (P&lt;0.01. Systolic and diastolic BP decreased significantly (P&lt;0.01. BMI decreased in 61.4% of boys and 66.7% of girls. Protein and basal metabolic rate (BMR increased significantly on the BIA (P&lt;0.01. Fat decreased significantly (P&lt;0.05. The total body water (TBW and percent body fat (PBF decreased significantly (P&lt;0.01. The changes in protein, fat, TBW, PBF, and BMR significantly correlated to the change in BMI (P&lt;0.05. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, BMI change was significantly correlated to the changes in protein and fat content (P&lt;0.01. Conclusion:The school-based obesity management program is a very effective way to manage obesity for obese primary school children.

  11. Running more than three kilometers during the first week of a running regimen may be associated with increased risk of injury in obese novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R.O.; Bertelsen, Michael Lejbach; Parner, Erik Thorlund

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training guidelines for novice runners are needed to reduce the risk of injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the risk of injury varied in obese and non-obese individuals initiating a running program at different weekly distances. METHODS: A volunteer sample...... of 749 of 1532 eligible healthy novice runners was included in a 3-week observational explorative prospective cohort study. Runners were categorized into one of six strata based on their body mass index (BMI) (≤30=low; >30=high) and running distance after 1 week (6 km...... = high). Data was collected for three weeks for the six strata. The main outcome measure was running-related injury. RESULTS: Fifty-six runners sustained a running-related injury during the 3-week data collection. A significantly greater number of individuals with BMI>30 sustained injuries if they ran...

  12. BMI and breast cancer prognosis benefit: mammography screening reveals differences between normal weight and overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Amore, Alfonso; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; Giudice, Aldo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Montella, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    Few studies are available on the potential impact of body weight on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected patients. Moreover, it is not known whether body mass index (BMI) could have a different prognostic impact in screen-detected versus symptomatic breast cancer patients. To investigate these unsolved issues, we carried out a retrospective study evaluating the effect of BMI on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected vs symptomatic breast cancer patients. We conducted a follow-up study on 448 women diagnosed with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer. Patients were categorized according to their BMI as normal weight, overweight and obese. Disease free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and BMI curves were compared according to mode of cancer detection. Among screen-detected patients, higher BMI was associated with a significant lower DFS, whereas no significant difference was observed among symptomatic patients. OS showed similar results. In the multivariate analysis adjusting for age, education, tumor size, nodal status, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and menopausal status, the risk for high level of BMI among screen-detected patients did not reach the statistical significance for either recurrence or survival. Our study highlights the potential impact of high bodyweight in breast cancer prognosis, the findings confirm that obesity plays a role in women breast cancer prognosis independently from diagnosis mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effect of Incarceration on Adult Male BMI Trajectories, United States, 1981-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Brian

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity and overweight is socially patterned, with higher prevalence among women, racial/ethnic minorities, and those with lower socio-economic status. Contextual factors also affect obesity risk. However, an omitted factor has been incarceration, particularly since it disproportionately affects minorities. This study examines the effects of incarceration on adult male body mass index (BMI) in the United States over the life course, and whether effects vary by race/ethnicity and education. BMI trajectories were analyzed over age using growth curve models of men ages 18-49 from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth panel study. BMI was based on self-reported height/weight (kg/m2). Being currently incarcerated increased BMI, but the effect varied by race/ethnicity and education: blacks experienced the largest increases, while effects were lowered for men with more education than a high school diploma. Cumulative exposure to prison increased BMI for all groups. These results suggest a differential effect of incarceration on adult male BMI among some racial/ethnic-education minority groups. Particularly given that these groups are most commonly imprisoned, incarceration may help structure obesity disparities and disadvantage across the life course.

  14. Higher BMI Is Associated with Reduced Cognitive Performance in Division I Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fedor

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Poor cardiovascular fitness has been implicated as a possible mechanism for obesity-related cognitive decline, though no study has examined whether BMI is associated with poorer cognitive function in persons with excellent fitness levels. The current study examined the relationship between BMI and cognitive function by the Immediate Post Concussion and Cognitive Test (ImPACT in Division I collegiate athletes. Methods: Participants had an average age of 20.14 ± 1.78 years, were 31.3% female, and 53.9% football players. BMI ranged from 19.04 to 41.14 and averaged 26.72 ± 4.62. Results: Regression analyses revealed that BMI incrementally predicted performance on visual memory (R2 change = 0.015, p = 0.026 beyond control variables. Follow-up partial correlation analyses revealed small but significant negative correlations between BMI and verbal memory (r = -0.17, visual memory (r = -0.16, and visual motor speed (r = -0.12. Conclusions: These results suggest that higher BMI is associated with reduced cognitive function, even in a sample expected to have excellent levels of cardiovascular fitness. Further work is needed to better understand mechanisms for these associations.

  15. Is there a link between availability of food and beverage establishments and BMI in Mexican adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Mariana; Serván-Mori, Edson; Quezada, Amado D; Colchero, M Arantxa

    2017-10-03

    To study the association between density of stores (food and beverage stores, stores selling only fruits and vegetables, and supermarkets) and the BMI of adults aged ≥20 years in Mexico. A cross-sectional study was performed. Individual data came from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey, while information on stores was taken from the National Institute of Geography and Statistics' National Statistics Directory of Economic Units. A weighted least-squares model was estimated to test the association between density of stores and BMI of adults adjusting for sex, age, education, presence of hypertension, diabetes or both, household assets index and marginality index at the municipality level. Mexico. An additional 1 sd in the density of fruit and vegetable stores was associated with a reduction of 0·24 (95 % CI -0·37, -0·12) kg/m2 in BMI when the densities of the other stores were at their mean values. For food and beverage store density, a difference of 1 sd was associated with an increase of 0·50 (95 % CI 0·33, 0·67) kg/m2 in BMI, while for supermarkets the corresponding association was a reduction of 0·48 (95 % CI -1·52, 0·56) kg/m2 in BMI. In places with a higher density of stores that offer unhealthy foods, the BMI of adults tends to be higher.

  16. Obesogenic eating behaviors mediate the relationships between psychological problems and BMI in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallan, Kimberley M; Daniels, Lynne A; Nicholson, Jan M

    2017-05-01

    To examine the association between psychological problems and weight status in children aged 3.5 to 4 years and test whether obesogenic eating behaviors mediate this relationship. This study is a cross-sectional secondary analysis of data from first-time mothers (N = 194) in the control arm of the NOURISH randomized controlled trial. At child age 3.5 to 4 years, maternal-reported child eating behaviors and psychological problems were collected via valid tools, and child weight and height data were collected by trained study staff. Pearson's correlations and linear regressions examined associations between eating behaviors, psychological problems, and BMI z score. Multiple mediation models were tested by assessing indirect effects of psychological problems on BMI z score via obesogenic eating behaviors. Peer problems were associated with both higher food responsiveness and emotional overeating and directly with higher BMI z score. This relationship was partially mediated by emotional overeating. Both emotional overeating and food responsiveness fully mediated the association between emotional problems and BMI z score, and food responsiveness fully mediated the association between conduct problems and BMI z score. The findings suggest that children with psychological problems may also display obesogenic eating behaviors, which may result in higher BMI. This needs to be considered in the clinical management of both pediatric overweight/obesity and psychological problems. © 2017 The Authors. Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  17. Big drinkers: how BMI, gender and rules of thumb influence the free pouring of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandescu, Laura; Walker, Doug; Wansink, Brian

    2014-11-01

    This research examines free pouring behavior and provides an account of how Body Mass Index (BMI) and gender might lead to the overpouring, and consequently the overconsumption of wine. An observational study with young adults investigated how BMI and gender affect free-pouring of wine over a variety of pouring scenarios, and how rules-of-thumb in pouring affect the quantities of alcohol poured by men and women across BMI categories. For men, the amount poured was positively related to BMI. However, BMI did not affect pours by women. The use of the "half glass" rule-of-thumb in pouring reduced the volume of wine poured by over 20% for both men and women. Importantly, this rule-of-thumb substantially attenuated the pours by men at high BMI levels. Increasing awareness of pouring biases represents an early and effective step toward curbing alcohol consumption among men, and especially those who are overweight. Additionally, using a simple "half glass" rule-of-thumb may be an effective way to curb overpouring, despite non-standard glass sizes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Body Mass Index (BMI) Trajectories in Infancy Differ by Population Ancestry and May Presage Disparities in Early Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sani M.; Chesi, Alessandra; Mentch, Frank; Xiao, Rui; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Mitchell, Jonathan A.; Kelly, Andrea; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.; Zemel, Babette S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: No consensus definition exists for excess adiposity during infancy. After age 2 years, high body mass index (BMI) is related to adverse cardiometabolic outcomes. Before age 2 years, the utility of BMI as a metric of excess adiposity is unknown. Objectives: The objective of the study was to characterize infant BMI trajectories in a diverse, longitudinal cohort and investigate the relationship between the infancy BMI trajectory and childhood obesity. Subjects: Healthy, nonpreterm infants (n = 2114) in the Genetic Causes for Complex Pediatric Disorders study (The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) with six or more BMI measurements in the first 13.5 months participated in the study. Design: For each infant, the BMI trajectory was modeled using polynomial regression. Independent effects of clinical factors on magnitude and timing of peak BMI were assessed. The relationship between infancy BMI and early childhood BMI (age 4 y) was examined (n = 1075). Results: The cohort was 53% male and 61% African-American. Peak BMI was 18.6 ± 1.7 kg/m2 and occurred at 8.6 ± 1.4 months. In multivariate analysis, boys had a higher (0.50 kg/m2, P BMI than girls. The peak was higher (0.53 kg/m2, P ≤ .001) and occurred earlier (by 12 d, P BMI. Conclusions: We demonstrate sex- and ancestry-specific differences in infancy BMI and an association of infancy peak BMI with childhood BMI. These findings support the potential utility of infancy BMI to identify children younger than age 2 years with increased risk for later obesity. PMID:25636051

  19. Effects of a 6-week circuit training intervention on body esteem and body mass index in British primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Al-Nakeeb, Yahya; Nevill, Alan M

    2009-06-01

    Research examining the impact of physical activity on children's body image has been limited and equivocal. The current researchers examined the effect of 6-week circuit-based training on body esteem and body mass index (BMI) in 68 British children (34 boys and 34 girls, aged 10-11 years, 16% overweight, 7% obese). The Body Esteem Scale for Children (BES-C) was administered to both the intervention group and control group, pre, post and 6 weeks post the intervention. BMI was directly assessed from height and body mass pre- and post-intervention. The results of this study revealed that, as compared to the control group, participation in 6-week circuit training significantly improved body esteem scores post-intervention. However, these scores were not sustained 6 weeks post-intervention. The improvement in body esteem scores from pre- to post-intervention was greater for girls as compared to boys. Additionally, BMI decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group.

  20. Association of BMI and pediatric urologic postoperative events: Results from pediatric NSQIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Michael P; McNamara, Erin R; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Logvinenko, Tanya; Nelson, Caleb P

    2015-08-01

    Elevated body mass index (BMI) is a well-known risk factor for perioperative complications in adults, but has not been investigated in children undergoing urologic procedures. Given the low rate of complications associated with urologic surgery, a large sample is required for their characterization, but BMI is frequently not available in administrative databases. Here we report results from the first nationally based, prospectively assembled cohort analyzed with respect to the association of BMI with 30-day postoperative events for pediatric urologic procedures. To determine the association of elevated BMI with overall 30-day postoperative events and wound complications in a large national sample of children undergoing urologic procedures. We queried the 2012 Pediatric National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (NSQIP), defining obesity as a BMI above the 95th percentile and overweight above the 85th percentile, per CDC definitions. We used BMI percentile as a referent group. Complications were collected within 30 days of the procedure. Comorbidity was classified on a linear scale using a validated pediatric-specific comorbidity score, and procedures were classified as genital, abdominal without bowel involvement, or abdominal with bowel involvement. Univariate and multivariate logistic models were used to test significance of associations. 2871 patients aged 2-18 years were analyzed. Of these, 420 (14.6%) were overweight and 440 (15.3%) were obese. A summary of 30-day events and complications is shown in the structured abstract table. On multivariate analysis adjusting for age, gender, class of procedure, and comorbidity, BMI remained a significant risk factor for 30-day events when comparing BMI ≥85th percentile to BMI percentile (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03-1.8, p = 0.035). An exploratory subgroup analysis examining the rate of wound complications demonstrated an odds ratio of 2.36 (95% CI 1.28-4.35, p = 0.006) for BMI >85th percentile on multivariate

  1. The association of plasma cysteine and gamma-glutamyltransferase with BMI and obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elshorbagy, Amany K

    2009-07-01

    We recently reported a strong positive association of plasma total cysteine (tCys) with fat mass in over 5,000 subjects. As gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) enzyme increases cysteine availability by catalyzing glutathione breakdown and is positively associated with BMI and adiposity, we hypothesized that GGT might explain the association of tCys with adiposity. To study whether the associations of tCys and serum GGT with BMI and obesity were interrelated we conducted a cross-sectional study using data from 1,550 subjects recruited from nine European countries in the COMAC project. Multiple linear and logistic regression models and concentration-response curves were used. In age and sex-adjusted analyses, tCys showed strong positive associations with BMI (partial r = 0.19, P < 0.001), and obesity (odds ratio (OR) for 4th vs. 1st tCys quartile: 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.6-5.0, P < 0.001), both of which remained robust after adjustment for GGT and other metabolic and lifestyle confounders. Serum GGT was also a positive predictor of BMI (partial r = 0.17, P < 0.001) and obesity (OR for 4th vs. 1st GGT quartile: 4.8; 95% confidence interval: 2.5-9.2, P < 0.001), independent of tCys. However, the associations of GGT with BMI and obesity were weakened by adjustment for obesity-related factors such as serum lipids and blood pressure. These results indicate that tCys is a strong positive predictor of BMI and obesity, independent of GGT and other obesity-related factors. We also suggest that the association of serum GGT with BMI and obesity is unrelated to the role of GGT in cysteine turnover. The potential link between cysteine and fat metabolism should be further evaluated.

  2. Childhood obesity treatment; Effects on BMI SDS, body composition, and fasting plasma lipid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Fonvig, Cilius Esmann; Dahl, Maria; Mollerup, Pernille Maria; Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2018-01-01

    The body mass index (BMI) standard deviation score (SDS) may not adequately reflect changes in fat mass during childhood obesity treatment. This study aimed to investigate associations between BMI SDS, body composition, and fasting plasma lipid concentrations at baseline and during childhood obesity treatment. 876 children and adolescents (498 girls) with overweight/obesity, median age 11.2 years (range 1.6-21.7), and median BMI SDS 2.8 (range 1.3-5.7) were enrolled in a multidisciplinary outpatient treatment program and followed for a median of 1.8 years (range 0.4-7.4). Height and weight, body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and fasting plasma lipid concentrations were assessed at baseline and at follow-up. Lipid concentrations (total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), non-HDL, and triglycerides (TG)) were available in 469 individuals (264 girls). Linear regressions were performed to investigate the associations between BMI SDS, body composition indices, and lipid concentrations. At baseline, BMI SDS was negatively associated with concentrations of HDL (p = 6.7*10-4) and positively with TG (p = 9.7*10-6). Reductions in BMI SDS were associated with reductions in total body fat percentage (pSDS were associated with improvements in concentrations of TC, LDL, HDL, non-HDL, LDL/HDL-ratio, and TG (all p SDS, 61% improved their body composition, and 80% improved their lipid concentrations. Reductions in the degree of obesity during multidisciplinary childhood obesity treatment are accompanied by improvements in body composition and fasting plasma lipid concentrations. Even in individuals increasing their BMI SDS, body composition and lipid concentrations may improve.

  3. Body composition in 13-year-old adolescents with abdominal obesity, depending on the BMI value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goluch-Koniuszy, Zuzanna S; Kuchlewska, Magdalena

    2017-09-01

    Excessive adipocyte growth during the pubertal transition predisposes to the development and persistence of obesity in adulthood. Visceral accumulation of body fat is particularly disadvantageous when it is correlated with insulin resistance, secondary hyperinsulinaemia, dysglicaemia, and atherogenic dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to conduct a nutritional status assessment and body composition analysis in 13-year-old adolescents of both genders with visceral fat accumulation (WC ≥ 90th percentile) and different BMI values. The evaluation of state of nutrition of 1,738 Polish boys (n = 882) and girls (n = 856) aged 13 was done based on anthropometric measurements and calculated BMI (body mass index), WC (waist circumference) and WHtR indices (waist-to-height ratio). Taking into consideration the value of WC ≥ 90 pc, 353 people were designated (20.3 % of the total) with visceral obesity (but with various BMI), whose body composition was examined by the method of bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA). A total of 249 adolescents of both sexes (70.5% of the selected, 102 boys and 147 girls) and their parents agreed to the study. In adolescents with visceral obesity a significant change of body content was ascertained depending on the value of the BMI. Even in the people with a proper value of the BMI, a significantly higher than standard increase of the percentage of total body fat (TBF) and decrease of both the percentage of body lean (BL) and the content of total body water (TBW) in the body was observed. The values of the BMI, WC and WHtR in adolescents were significantly correlated with each other as well as with TBF, BL and TBW, and the strength of correlation was dependent on sex. The state of nutrition in adolescents with visceral obesity, even with a proper BMI, might contribute to the development of a metabolic syndrome.

  4. Association of BMI with risk of CVD mortality and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Chee Cheong; Sumarni, Mohd Ghazali; Lim, Kuang Hock; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Haniff, Jamaiyah; Tee, Guat Hiong Helen; Gurpreet, Kaur; Faudzi, Yusoff Ahmad; Amal, Nasir Mustafa

    2017-05-01

    To determine the relationship between BMI and risk of CVD mortality and all-cause mortality among Malaysian adults. Population-based, retrospective cohort study. Participants were followed up for 5 years from 2006 to 2010. Mortality data were obtained via record linkages with the Malaysian National Registration Department. Multiple Cox regression was applied to compare risk of CVD and all-cause mortality between BMI categories adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity. Models were generated for all participants, all participants the first 2 years of follow-up, healthy participants, healthy never smokers, never smokers, current smokers and former smokers. All fourteen states in Malaysia. Malaysian adults (n 32 839) aged 18 years or above from the third National Health and Morbidity Survey. Total follow-up time was 153 814 person-years with 1035 deaths from all causes and 225 deaths from CVD. Underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality, while obesity (BMI ≥30·0 kg/m2) was associated with a heightened risk of CVD mortality. Overweight (BMI=25·0-29·9 kg/m2) was inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality. Underweight was significantly associated with all-cause mortality in all models except for current smokers. Overweight was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in all participants. Although a positive trend was observed between BMI and CVD mortality in all participants, a significant association was observed only for severe obesity (BMI≥35·0 kg/m2). Underweight was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and obesity with increased risk of CVD mortality. Therefore, maintaining a normal BMI through leading an active lifestyle and healthy dietary habits should continue to be promoted.

  5. Longitudinal weight differences, gene expression, and blood biomarkers in BMI discordant identical twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jenny; Willemsen, Gonneke; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Neuteboom, Jacoline; Kluft, Cornelis; Jansen, Rick; Penninx, Brenda W.J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Background BMI discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins allows an examination of the causes and consequences of adiposity in a genetically controlled design. Few studies have examined longitudinal BMI discordance in MZ pairs. Objectives To study the development over time of BMI discordance in adolescent and adult MZ twin pairs, and to examine lifestyle, metabolic, inflammatory, and gene expression differences associated with concurrent and long-term BMI discordance in MZ pairs. Subjects/Methods BMI data from 2775 MZ twin pairs, collected in eight longitudinal surveys and a biobank project between 1991 and 2011, were analyzed to characterize longitudinal discordance. Lifestyle characteristics were compared within discordant pairs (ΔBMI ≥ 3 kg/m2) and biomarkers (lipids, glucose, insulin, CRP, fibrinogen, IL-6, TNF-α and sIL-6R and liver enzymes AST, ALT and GGT) and gene expression were compared in peripheral blood from discordant pairs who participated in the NTR biobank project. Results The prevalence of discordance ranged from 3.2% in 1991 (mean age=17, SD=2.4) to 17.4% (N=202 pairs) in 2009 (mean age=35, SD=15), and was 16.5% (N=174) among pairs participating in the biobank project (mean age=35, SD=12). Of 699 MZ with BMI data from 3-5 time points, 17 pairs (2.4%) were long-term discordant (at all available time points; mean follow-up range=6.4 years). Concurrently discordant pairs showed significant differences in self-ratings of which twin eats most (p=2.3×10−13), but not in leisure time exercise activity (p=0.28) and smoking (p>0.05). Ten out of 14 biomarkers showed significantly more unfavorable levels in the heavier of twin of the discordant pairs (p-values twin had a more unfavorable blood biomarker profile than the genetically matched leaner twin, in support of causal effects of obesity. PMID:25765203

  6. Attenuation of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by esculetin through modulation of Bmi-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Li, Xiao; Liu, Lanfang; Xiao, Xu; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shenglin; Lin, Pingping; Wang, Xiaojie; Wang, Yongwei; Li, Qingshan

    2017-09-01

    The protective effects and mechanisms of esculetin on doxorubicin (DOX)-induced injury of H9c2 cells were investigated. H9c2 cells were cultured and the logarithmic growth phase of the cells was divided into a control group, a DOX group and an esculetin + DOX group. Cell viability was detected by MTT assay. Annexin V-PI (AV-PI) double staining flow cytometry was carried out to detect cell apoptosis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to evaluate cell ultrastructure. Cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bcl-2, Bid and Bmi-1 proteins levels were investigated by western blot analysis. Bmi-1 siRNA was used to detect the role of Bmi-1 in the protective effects of esculetin against DOX-induced toxicity in H9c2 cells. The MTT and AV-PI double staining results showed that esculetin significantly increased H9c2 cell viability. Compared with the control group, the levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, Bid and ROS levels were significantly decreased, but the expression of Bcl-2 and Bmi-1 were significantly increased in the esculetin + DOX group. TEM showed that the cell structure of the mitochondria was protected by esculetin. The results of Bmi-1 siRNA showed that esculetin could protect DOX-induced cardiotoxicity by modulating Bmi-1 expression. Esculetin can protect DOX-induced cardiotoxicity and the effects may be attributable to modulation of Bmi-1 expression, provoking intracellular ROS accumulation, protecting the structure of mitochondria and reducing cell apoptosis.

  7. Eating frequency in relation to BMI in very young children: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachael W; Iosua, Ella; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Gray, Andrew R; Taylor, Barry J; Lawrence, Julie A; Hanna, Maha; Cameron, Sonya L; Sayers, Rachel; Galland, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    Eating less frequently is associated with increased obesity risk in older children but data are potentially confounded by reverse causation, where bigger children eat less often in an effort to control their weight. Longitudinal data, particularly in younger children, are scarce. We aimed to determine whether eating frequency (meals and snacks) at 2 years of age is associated with past, current or subsequent BMI. Cohort analysis of a randomised controlled trial. Eating frequency at 2 years of age was estimated using 48 h diaries that recorded when each child ate meals and snacks (parent-defined) in five-minute blocks. Body length/height and weight were measured at 1, 2 and 3·5 years of age. Linear regression assessed associations between the number of eating occasions and BMI Z-score, before and after adjustment for potential confounding variables. Prevention of Overweight in Infancy (POI) study, Dunedin, New Zealand. Children (n 371) aged 1-3·5 years. On average, children ate 5·5 (sd 1·2) times/d at 2 years of age, with most children (88-89 %) eating 4-7 times/d. Eating frequency at 2 years was not associated with current (difference in BMI Z-score per additional eating occasion; 95 % CI: -0·02; -0·10, 0·05) or subsequent change (0·02; -0·03, 0·06) in BMI. Similarly, BMI at age 1 year did not predict eating frequency at 2 years of age (difference in eating frequency per additional BMI Z-score unit; 95 % CI: -0·03; -0·19, 0·13). Number of eating occasions per day was not associated with BMI in young children in the present study.

  8. BMI percentile-for-age overestimates adiposity in early compared with late maturing pubertal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Kaspar; Juul, Anders

    2015-08-01

    Early pubertal timing is consistently associated with increased BMI percentile-for-age in pubertal girls, while data in boys are more ambiguous. However, higher BMI percentile-for-age may be a result of the earlier puberty per se rather than vice versa. The aim was to evaluate markers of adiposity in relation to pubertal timing and reproductive hormone levels in healthy pubertal boys and girls. Population-based cross-sectional study (The Copenhagen Puberty Study). Eight-hundred and two healthy Caucasian children and adolescents (486 girls) aged 8.5-16.5 years participated. BMI and bioelectric impedance analyses (BIA) were used to estimate adiposity. Clinical pubertal markers (Tanner stages and testicular volume) were evaluated. LH, FSH, estradiol, testosterone, SHBG and IGF1 levels were determined by immunoassays. In all age groups, higher BMI (all 1 year age-groups, P ≤ 0.041) was found with early compared with late maturation, despite similar BIA-estimated body fat percentage (BIA-BF%). Neither BMI nor BIA-BF% differed for a given stage of maturation. BMI percentile-for-age and prevalence of overweight/obesity were higher in the early compared with late matured pubertal children (all P ≤ 0.038), despite similar BIA-BF%. Pubertal girls with BIA-BF >29% had significantly lower LH and FSH levels compared with normal-weight girls (P ≤ 0.041). Early maturational timing was not associated with higher adiposity for a given stage of puberty. Using BMI percentile-for-age overestimated the degree of adiposity in early pubertal compared with late pubertal children. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  9. Dating violence, childhood maltreatment, and BMI from adolescence to young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cari Jo; Spencer, Rachael A; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Brady, Sonya S; Mason, Susan M; Connett, John E; Henderson, Kimberly M; To, Michelle; Suglia, Shakira F

    2014-10-01

    This study tested whether dating violence (DV) victimization is associated with increases in BMI across the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and whether gender and previous exposure to child maltreatment modify such increases. Data were from participants (N = 9295; 49.9% female) in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. BMI was calculated from measured height and weight at waves 2, 3, and 4 of the study. DV victimization was measured at waves 2, 3, and 4 by using items from the revised Conflict Tactics Scales. Linear regression by using generalized estimating equations with robust SEs was used to test the association. Models were stratified according to gender and history of child maltreatment. From baseline to wave 4, BMI increased on average 6.5 units (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.2-6.7) and 6.8 units (95% CI: 6.5-7.1) among men and women, respectively, and nearly one-half (45.5% of men; 43.9% of women) reported DV at some point. In stratified models, DV victimization (β: 0.3 [95% CI: 0.0-0.6]) independently predicted BMI increase over time in women. Exposure to childhood sexual abuse magnified the increase in BMI associated with DV victimization (β: 1.3 [95% CI: 0.3-2.3]). No other types of childhood maltreatment were significant modifiers of the DV-BMI association. Violence victimization was not associated with BMI among men. Screening and support for DV victims, especially women who have also experienced childhood maltreatment, may be warranted to reduce the likelihood of health consequences associated with victimization. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Representativeness and optimal use of body mass index (BMI) in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Forbes, Harriet J; Douglas, Ian; Leon, David A; Smeeth, Liam

    2013-09-13

    To assess the completeness and representativeness of body mass index (BMI) data in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), and determine an optimal strategy for their use. Descriptive study. Electronic healthcare records from primary care. A million patient random sample from the UK CPRD primary care database, aged ≥16 years. BMI completeness in CPRD was evaluated by age, sex and calendar period. CPRD-based summary BMI statistics for each calendar year (2003-2010) were age-standardised and sex-standardised and compared with equivalent statistics from the Health Survey for England (HSE). BMI completeness increased over calendar time from 37% in 1990-1994 to 77% in 2005-2011, was higher among females and increased with age. When BMI at specific time points was assigned based on the most recent record, calendar-year-specific mean BMI statistics underestimated equivalent HSE statistics by 0.75-1.1 kg/m(2). Restriction to those with a recent (≤3 years) BMI resulted in mean BMI estimates closer to HSE (≤0.28 kg/m(2) underestimation), but excluded up to 47% of patients. An alternative strategy of imputing up-to-date BMI based on modelled changes in BMI over time since the last available record also led to mean BMI estimates that were close to HSE (≤0.37 kg/m(2) underestimation). Completeness of BMI in CPRD increased over time and varied by age and sex. At a given point in time, a large proportion of the most recent BMIs are unlikely to reflect current BMI; consequent BMI misclassification might be reduced by employing model-based imputation of current BMI.

  11. Representativeness and optimal use of body mass index (BMI) in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Forbes, Harriet J; Douglas, Ian; Leon, David A; Smeeth, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the completeness and representativeness of body mass index (BMI) data in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), and determine an optimal strategy for their use. Design Descriptive study. Setting Electronic healthcare records from primary care. Participants A million patient random sample from the UK CPRD primary care database, aged ≥16 years. Primary and secondary outcome measures BMI completeness in CPRD was evaluated by age, sex and calendar period. CPRD-based summary BMI statistics for each calendar year (2003–2010) were age-standardised and sex-standardised and compared with equivalent statistics from the Health Survey for England (HSE). Results BMI completeness increased over calendar time from 37% in 1990–1994 to 77% in 2005–2011, was higher among females and increased with age. When BMI at specific time points was assigned based on the most recent record, calendar–year-specific mean BMI statistics underestimated equivalent HSE statistics by 0.75–1.1 kg/m2. Restriction to those with a recent (≤3 years) BMI resulted in mean BMI estimates closer to HSE (≤0.28 kg/m2 underestimation), but excluded up to 47% of patients. An alternative strategy of imputing up-to-date BMI based on modelled changes in BMI over time since the last available record also led to mean BMI estimates that were close to HSE (≤0.37 kg/m2 underestimation). Conclusions Completeness of BMI in CPRD increased over time and varied by age and sex. At a given point in time, a large proportion of the most recent BMIs are unlikely to reflect current BMI; consequent BMI misclassification might be reduced by employing model-based imputation of current BMI. PMID:24038008

  12. A Preliminary Exploration of the Effects of a 6-week Interactive Video Dance Exercise Program in an Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Downs, Anne; Fruth, Stacie J; Clifford, Anne; Hine, Stephanie; Huckstep, Jeremy; Merkel, Heidi; Wilkinson, Hilary; Yoder, Jason

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 6-week interactive video dance game (IVDG) program on adult participants' cardiorespiratory status and body mass index (BMI). Twenty-seven healthy adult participants attended IVDG sessions over a 6-week period. Participants completed pre- and post-testing consisting of a submaximal VO(2) treadmill test, assessment of resting heart rate (RHR) and blood pressure (BP), BMI, and general health questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptives, paired t-tests to assess pre-to post-testing differences, and one-way ANOVAs to analyze variables among select groups of participants. Questionnaire data was manually coded and assessed. Twenty participants attended at least 75% of available sessions and were used in data analysis. Mean BMI decreased significantly (from 26.96 kg/m(2) to 26.21 kg/m(2); 2.87%) and cardiorespiratory fitness measured by peak VO(2) increased significantly (from 20.63 ml/kg/min to 21.69 ml/kg/min; 5.14%). Most participants reported that the IVDG program was a good workout, and that they were encouraged to continue or start an exercise routine. Forty percent reported improvements in sleep, and nearly half stated they had or were considering purchasing a home version of a video dance game. Interactive video dance game is an effective and enjoyable exercise program for adults who wish to decrease their BMI and improve components of cardiorespiratory fitness.

  13. Increase of body mass index (BMI) from 1.5 to 3 years of age augments the degree of insulin resistance corresponding to BMI at 12 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisaka, Osamu; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Ichikawa, Go; Koyama, Satomi

    2017-04-01

    To elucidate the effect of early growth patterns on the metabolic sensitivity to adiposity, we examined the relationship between the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and body mass index (BMI) levels at 12 years of age in 101 boys and 91 girls in a birth cohort. Children with an increase in BMI from the ages of 1.5 to 3 years exhibited a greater increase of HOMA-IR per BMI increase at 12 years of age compared to those with a decrease in BMI or stable BMI from 1.5 to 3 years. This suggests that children who show an increase in BMI from 1.5 to 3 years, a period normally characterized by a decreased or stable BMI, are more prone to developing insulin resistance at 12 years of age.

  14. OEO SRB Weekly Workload Status Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Weekly reports of workloads processed in the Security Records Branch in Boyers, PA. Reports on quantities of work received, processed, pending and average processing...

  15. A Smart Modeling Framework for Integrating BMI-enabled Models as Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P.; Elag, M.; Kumar, P.; Peckham, S. D.; Liu, R.; Marini, L.; Hsu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Serviced-oriented computing provides an opportunity to couple web service models using semantic web technology. Through this approach, models that are exposed as web services can be conserved in their own local environment, thus making it easy for modelers to maintain and update the models. In integrated modeling, the serviced-oriented loose-coupling approach requires (1) a set of models as web services, (2) the model metadata describing the external features of a model (e.g., variable name, unit, computational grid, etc.) and (3) a model integration framework. We present the architecture of coupling web service models that are self-describing by utilizing a smart modeling framework. We expose models that are encapsulated with CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System) Basic Model Interfaces (BMI) as web services. The BMI-enabled models are self-describing by uncovering models' metadata through BMI functions. After a BMI-enabled model is serviced, a client can initialize, execute and retrieve the meta-information of the model by calling its BMI functions over the web. Furthermore, a revised version of EMELI (Peckham, 2015), an Experimental Modeling Environment for Linking and Interoperability, is chosen as the framework for coupling BMI-enabled web service models. EMELI allows users to combine a set of component models into a complex model by standardizing model interface using BMI as well as providing a set of utilities smoothing the integration process (e.g., temporal interpolation). We modify the original EMELI so that the revised modeling framework is able to initialize, execute and find the dependencies of the BMI-enabled web service models. By using the revised EMELI, an example will be presented on integrating a set of topoflow model components that are BMI-enabled and exposed as web services. Reference: Peckham, S.D. (2014) EMELI 1.0: An experimental smart modeling framework for automatic coupling of self-describing models, Proceedings of HIC 2014

  16. The association of BMI and knee pain among persons with radiographic knee osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilder Frances V

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA do not present with pain. It is suspected that such persons tend toward lower body mass index (BMI. The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between BMI and knee pain among persons with RKOA. Methods Subjects in the Clearwater Osteoarthritis Study with RKOA (N = 576 were classified as reporting knee pain (Pain or no knee pain (No Pain. WHO-classified BMI categories were compared by pain status. Odds ratios were calculated for the four elevated BMI groups, with the normal BMI group as the reference group. Elevated BMI was the risk factor, and knee pain status was the outcome factor. Results Pain subjects presented with a higher mean BMI (30.4 kg/m2 compared with No Pain subjects (27.5 kg/m2 (p Conclusion Among subjects with RKOA, those presenting with an elevated BMI had a greater likelihood of knee pain compared to subjects with a normal BMI, and this chance rose with each successive elevated BMI category. As BMI is a modifiable risk factor, longitudinal research is needed to confirm these findings and elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship.

  17. A Comparative Study of the Taste Choice of Adolescents in Terms of Gender and BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saime Kucukkmurler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the attitudes and choices of taste of adolescents, the conditions that affect these choices, and its variations with respect to BMI and gender. METHODS: 385 adolescents between the ages of 11 and 14, in Ankara, Turkey, participated in the research. In order to determine taste choices and attitudes towards taste, a Likert-type questionnaire was applied. Independent Samples t-test and correlational analysis were conducted. RESULTS: Boys preferred sweet and bitter tastes more than girls, but girls preferred salty tastes more than boys (p<0.05. It was found that when the BMI of adolescents increases, their taste scores decrease significantly (p<0.05. As the BMI increases, the sum preferences of sweet, sour, umami and salty taste scores decrease. There is a positive relation between sour and bitter and umami and bitter with umami (p< 0.01 CONCLUSION: . It is fair to argue that as BMI increases tendencies towards tastes decrease and that boys preferred sweet and bitter tastes more than girls did whereas girls preferred salty tastes more than boys.The fact that the tendencies towards tastes decrease with increasing BMI, and that taste preferences vary with respect to gender may imply that physiological requirements drive taste preferences. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(6.000: 451-458

  18. Adrenocortical regulation, eating in the absence of hunger and BMI in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, L A; Granger, D A; Susman, E J

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relations among adrenocortical regulation, eating in the absence of hunger, and body mass index (BMI) in children ages 5-9years (N=43). Saliva was collected before and after the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C), and was later assayed for cortisol. Area under the curve with respect to increase (AUCi) was used as a measure of changes in cortisol release from baseline to 60min post-TSST-C. Age- and sex-specific BMI scores were calculated from measured height and weight, and eating in the absence of hunger was assessed using weighed food intake during a behavioral procedure. We also included a measure of parents' report of child impulsivity, as well as family demographic information. Participants were stratified by age into younger (5-7years) and older (8-9years) groups. In younger children, parents' reports of child impulsivity were significantly and positively associated with BMI; cortisol AUCi was not associated with BMI or eating in the absence of hunger. In older children, however, greater stress-related cortisol AUCi was related to higher BMI scores and greater energy intake in the absence of hunger. The results suggest that cortisol AUCi in response to psychosocial stress may be linked to problems with energy balance in children, with some variation by age. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Trends in BMI among Belgian children, adolescents and adults from 1969 to 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulens, M; Beunen, G; Claessens, A L; Lefevre, J; Thomis, M; Philippaerts, R; Borms, J; Vrijens, J; Lysens, R; Vansant, G

    2001-03-01

    To document secular data on changes in the distribution of body mass index (BMI), to determine the probability of overweight at 40 y of age in Belgian males in relation to the presence or absence of overweight at different ages in adolescence, and to estimate tracking of BMI in Belgian males in Belgium aged 12-40 y. Cross-sectional and mixed longitudinal surveys in nationally representative samples of Belgian males and females. Cross-sectional-more than 21 000 boys and 9698 girls; to examine secular trends-3164 boys and 5140 girls; to examine tracking-161 males. Body mass and height to determine BMI. In Belgian children the degree of overweight has increased between 1969 and 1993. Tracking of BMI is high in adolescence (r=0.77) and adulthood (r=0.69-0.91) and moderate from adolescence to adulthood (r=0.49). In Belgian males, the probability of overweight at 40 y of age in the presence of overweight at different ages in adolescence is important (odds ratios 5.0-6.9). Cross-sectional and longitudinal data, trends and tracking of BMI from 1969 until 1996 in Belgium indicate an increase in the degree of childhood overweight and obesity. Moreover, the risk of an overweight male adolescent becoming an overweight adult is substantial. Measures to restrict the Belgian overweight and obesity epidemic should be taken.

  20. Effects of psychological eating behaviour domains on the association between socio-economic status and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Antje; Luck, Tobias; Then, Francisca S; Luck-Sikorski, Claudia; Pabst, Alexander; Kovacs, Peter; Böttcher, Yvonne; Breitfeld, Jana; Tönjes, Anke; Horstmann, Annette; Löffler, Markus; Engel, Christoph; Thiery, Joachim; Villringer, Arno; Stumvoll, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2017-10-01

    The current study investigates potential pathways from socio-economic status (SES) to BMI in the adult population, considering psychological domains of eating behaviour (restrained eating, uncontrolled eating, emotional eating) as potential mediators stratified for sex. Data were derived from the population-based cross-sectional LIFE-Adult-Study. Parallel-mediation models were conducted to obtain the total, direct and indirect effects of psychological eating behaviour domains on the association between SES and BMI for men and for women. Leipzig, Germany. We studied 5935 participants aged 18 to 79 years. Uncontrolled eating mediated the association between SES and BMI in men only and restrained eating in both men and women. Emotional eating did not act as mediator in this relationship. The total effect of eating behaviour domains on the association between SES and BMI was estimated as β=-0·03 (se 0·02; 95 % CI -0·062, -0·003) in men and β=-0·18 (se 0·02; 95 % CI -0·217, -0·138) in women. Our findings do not indicate a strong overall mediation effect of the eating behaviour domains restrained eating, uncontrolled eating and emotional eating on the association between SES and BMI. Further research on other pathways of this association is strongly recommended. Importantly, our findings indicate that, independent from one's social position, focusing on psychological aspects in weight reduction might be a promising approach.

  1. Does BMI influence hospital stay and morbidity after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Jørgensen, Christoffer C.; Gromov, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Body mass index (BMI) outside the normal range possibly affects the perioperative morbidity and mortality following total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in traditional care programs. We determined perioperative morbidity and mortality in such pat......Background and purpose - Body mass index (BMI) outside the normal range possibly affects the perioperative morbidity and mortality following total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in traditional care programs. We determined perioperative morbidity and mortality...... in such patients who were operated with the fast-track methodology and compared the levels with those in patients with normal BMI. Patients and methods - This was a prospective observational study involving 13,730 procedures (7,194 THA and 6,536 TKA operations) performed in a standardized fast-track setting....... Complete 90-day follow-up was achieved using national registries and review of medical records. Patients were grouped according to BMI as being underweight, of normal weight, overweight, obese, very obese, and morbidly obese. Results - Median length of stay (LOS) was 2 (IQR: 2-3) days in all BMI groups. 30...

  2. Candidate gene association study of BMI-related loci, weight, and adiposity in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Rachel A; Nalls, Michael A; Keller, Margaux; Garcia, Melissa; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Tylavsky, Frances A; Newman, Anne B; Tranah, Gregory J; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B

    2013-06-01

    Most genome-wide association studies are confined to middle-aged populations. It is unclear whether associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and obesity persist in old age. We aimed to relate 10 body mass index (BMI)-associated SNPs to weight, BMI, % fat, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in Health ABC and AGES-Reykjavik comprising 4,846 individuals of European Ancestry, and 1,139 African Americans over age 65. SNPs were scaled using effect estimates from candidate SNPs. In Health ABC, a SNP near GNPDA2 was modestly associated with weight and SAT area (p = .008, p = .001). Risk score (sum of scaled SNPs) was associated with weight, BMI, and SAT area (p BMI, visceral adippose tissue, subcutaneous adipose tissue, or % fat in AGES-Reykjavik. In African Americans, a SNP near SEC16B was weakly associated with weight (p = .04). In this sample of older adults, no BMI-associated SNPs were associated with weight or adiposity.

  3. Television, sleep, outdoor play and BMI in young children: the GECKO Drenthe cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijtsma, Anna; Koller, Marjory; Sauer, Pieter J J; Corpeleijn, Eva

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the interplay between screen time, sleep duration, outdoor play, having a television in the bedroom and the number of televisions at home and their association with body mass index (BMI) in preschool children. All participants, 3-4 years of age (n = 759), were part of the Groningen expert center for kids with obesity (GECKO) Drenthe birth cohort. Weight and height were measured. Total screen time, number of televisions at home, a television in the bedroom, sleep duration and time of outdoor play were self-reported by parents in a questionnaire. Ordinary least square (OLS) regression-based path analysis was used to estimate direct and indirect effects on BMI in mediation models. A television in the bedroom or more televisions at home gave a higher screen time, which were associated with decreased sleep duration and resulted in higher BMI (indirect effect = 0.0115, 95% bootstrap interval = 0.0016; 0.0368 and indirect effect = 0.0026, 95% bootstrap interval = 0.0004; 0.0078, respectively). In contrast to the direct effect of screen time, sleep duration and a television in the bedroom on BMI, no direct effect was found for outdoor play and number or televisions at home on BMI. Short sleep duration, long screen time and a television in the bedroom were associated with the presence of overweight in preschool children.

  4. BMI modulates calorie-dependent dopamine changes in accumbens from glucose intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene-Jack Wang

    Full Text Available Dopamine mediates the rewarding effects of food that can lead to overeating and obesity, which then trigger metabolic neuroadaptations that further perpetuate excessive food consumption. We tested the hypothesis that the dopamine response to calorie intake (independent of palatability in striatal brain regions is attenuated with increases in weight.We used positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine changes triggered by calorie intake by contrasting the effects of an artificial sweetener (sucralose devoid of calories to that of glucose to assess their association with body mass index (BMI in nineteen healthy participants (BMI range 21-35.Neither the measured blood glucose concentrations prior to the sucralose and the glucose challenge days, nor the glucose concentrations following the glucose challenge vary as a function of BMI. In contrast the dopamine changes in ventral striatum (assessed as changes in non-displaceable binding potential of [11C]raclopride triggered by calorie intake (contrast glucose - sucralose were significantly correlated with BMI (r = 0.68 indicating opposite responses in lean than in obese individuals. Specifically whereas in normal weight individuals (BMI <25 consumption of calories was associated with increases in dopamine in the ventral striatum in obese individuals it was associated with decreases in dopamine.These findings show reduced dopamine release in ventral striatum with calorie consumption in obese subjects, which might contribute to their excessive food intake to compensate for the deficit between the expected and the actual response to food consumption.

  5. Risk factors for incident type 2 diabetes in individuals with a BMI of Resistance Syndrome (DESIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, A; Balkau, B; Lange, C; Tichet, J; Bonnet, F

    2010-02-01

    Risk factors for incident type 2 diabetes, in particular, hepatic markers, have rarely been studied in leaner individuals. We aimed to identify the metabolic and hepatic markers associated with incident diabetes in men and women with a BMI of or=27 kg/m(2). Risk factors for 9 year incident diabetes were compared in the French Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR) cohort. Comparisons were made between the 2,947 participants with a BMI of or=27 kg/m(2). There were 92 incident cases of diabetes in individuals with a BMI of or=27 kg/m(2). Among those who were not markedly overweight, classical biological markers were associated with 9 year incident diabetes, glycaemia being the strongest predictor. gamma-Glutamyltransferase (GGT), either considered as a continuous variable or at levels >or=20 U/l, was associated with incident diabetes, with a stronger effect in the BMI or=27 kg/m(2) (results after adjustment for alcohol intake, alanine aminotransferase, waist circumference and the HOMA insulin resistance index). In individuals with a BMI of resistance, suggesting potential interactions between GGT, enhanced hepatic neoglucogenesis and/or early alterations of insulin secretion.

  6. Assessing the effects of 35 European-derived BMI-associated SNPs in Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Arkan; Peralta-Romero, Jesus; Suarez, Fernando; Gomez-Zamudio, Jaime; Burguete-Garcia, Ana I; Cruz, Miguel; Meyre, David

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity in Mexico has increased at an alarming rate in both adults and children. This study was undertaken to test in Mexican children the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that have been associated with body mass index (BMI) and obesity in Europeans. School-age children (N = 1,559, 5-17 years) were recruited in Mexico City. Thirty-five SNPs with established effects on BMI and obesity were genotyped and analyzed individually and as a combined gene score (GS). SNPs in FAIM2 (rs7138803), GPRC5BB (rs12444979), MTIF3 (rs4771122), TFAP2B (rs987237), TMEM18 (rs7561317), and the GS were significantly associated with BMI. The GS explained 0.9% of the variance of BMI. Also, SNPs in LRRN6C (rs10968576) and MC4R (rs17782313) were significantly associated with overweight and obesity categories, respectively. Importantly, the effect allele frequency of 26/35 SNPs (74.3%) differed significantly between Mexican children and European adults. No significant gene × environment or gene × gene interactions were detected after Bonferroni adjustment. Several SNPs first associated with BMI/obesity in European adults replicated well in Mexican children, and investigating differences in the distribution of effect alleles across ethnic populations may shed light on genetic susceptibilities of different populations to obesity. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  7. Assessing the Influence of Sleep-Wake Variables on Body Mass Index (BMI in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Randler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has established an association between overweight/obesity and sleep duration, suggesting that short sleep duration and timing of sleeping may lead to overweight. Most of these studies considered sleep-length rather than any other aspects associated with the sleep and wake rhythm, e.g. chronotype, which is a measure of timing of sleeping (‘when to sleep’; based on the midpoint of sleep. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of different factors of the sleep-wake cycle and of co-variates on the Body Mass Index in a cross-sectional questionnaire study. Nine hundred and thirteen pupils (406 boys, 507 girls from Southwestern Germany participated in this study. Mean age was 13.7 ± 1.5 (SD years and range was between 11 – 16 years. We found that chronotype (β = .079 and social jetlag (β = .063 showed a significant influence on Body Mass Index (BMI, while sleep duration did not. Social jetlag is the absolute difference between mid-sleep time on workdays and free days. Further, screen time (in front of TV, computer, β = .13 was positively related with BMI. Self-efficacy on nutrition (β = -.11, a psychological variable important in health-behaviour models, showed an influence with high scores on self-efficacy related to lower BMI. A high BMI was correlated with low fast-food consumption (β = -.12 suggesting that adolescents with high BMI may exert some control over their eating.

  8. 77 FR 22177 - National Volunteer Week, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... April 12, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8797--National Volunteer Week, 2012 Proclamation 8798--Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2012 Proclamation 8799--National Former Prisoner of War... achieving our highest ambitions--from a world-class education for every child to an economy built to last...

  9. IRVINGIA GABONENSIS FOR TWENTY-FOUR WEEKS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bark Extracts oflrvingia Gubonensis For Twenty-four eeIWeek 2 recorded an increase while week 12 neutrophil count significantly decreased. (Figure 9). The other values ...

  10. 78 FR 71431 - National Family Week, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... sharing a family meal, reading a bedtime story, or creating a holiday tradition, let us carve out a place... November 27, 2013 Part V The President Proclamation 9061--National Family Week, 2013 #0; #0; #0... National Family Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Whether united...

  11. Student Time Usage during Fall Reading Week

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ken; Pschibul, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the time usage and levels of perceived stress, academic workload, and recreation time for 177 students at the University of Windsor before, during, and after Fall Reading Week (FRW). Over a three-week span (at various times of the day), students received a message to their smartphone to complete a 20-second survey…

  12. The Fit Study: Design and rationale for a cluster randomized trial of school-based BMI screening and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristine A; Linchey, Jennifer; Ritchie, Lorrene; Thompson, Hannah R

    2017-07-01

    In the U.S., 25 states conduct body mass index (BMI) screening in schools, just under half of which report results to parents. While some experts recommend the practice, evidence demonstrating its efficacy to reduce obesity is lacking, and concerns about weight-related stigma have been raised. The Fit Study is a 3-arm cluster-randomized trial assessing the effectiveness of school-based BMI screening and reporting in reducing pediatric obesity and identifying unintended consequences. Seventy-nine elementary and middle schools across California were randomized to 1 of 3 Arms: 1) BMI screening and reporting; 2) BMI screening only; or 3) no BMI screening or reporting. In Arm 1 schools, students were further randomized to receive reports with BMI results alone or both BMI and fitness test results. Over 3 consecutive years, staff in schools in Arms 1 and 2 will measure students' BMI (grades 3-8) and additional aspects of fitness (grades 5-8), and students in grades 4-8 in all Arms will complete surveys to assess weight-based stigmatization. Change in BMI z-score will be compared between Arm 1 and Arm 2 to determine the impact of BMI reporting on weight status, with sub-analyses stratified by report type (BMI results alone versus BMI plus fitness results) and by race/ethnicity. The potential for BMI reports to lead to weight-based stigma will be assessed by comparing student survey results among the 3 study Arms. This study will provide evidence on both the benefit and potential unintended harms of school-based BMI screening and reporting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Bmi-1 regulates stem cell-like properties of gastric cancer cells via modulating miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Chang; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hua, Ruixi; Gan, Lu; Huang, Mingzhu; Zhao, Liqin; Ni, Sujie; Guo, Weijian

    2016-09-20

    B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1) plays an important role in regulating stemness in some kinds of cancer. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. This study was to investigate whether and how Bmi-1 regulates stemness of gastric cancer. We firstly explored the role of Bmi-1 in regulating stem cell-like features in gastric cancer. Secondly, we screened out its downstream miRNAs and clarified whether these miRNAs are involved in the regulation of stemness. Finally, we investigated the mechanisms how Bmi-1 regulates miRNAs. Bmi-1 positively regulates stem cell-like properties of gastric cancer and upregulates miR-21 and miR-34a. There was a positive correlation between Bmi-1 and miR-21 expression in gastric cancer tissues. MiR-21 mediated the function of Bmi-1 in regulating stem cell-like properties, while miR-34a negatively regulates stem cell-like characteristics via downregulating Bmi-1. Bmi-1 binds to PTEN promoter and directly inhibits PTEN and thereafter activates AKT. Bmi-1 also regulates p53 and PTEN via miR-21. Bmi-1 activated NF-kB via AKT and enhanced the binding of NF-kB to the promoter of miR-21 and miR-34a and increased their expression. Bmi-1 positively regulates stem cell-like properties via upregulating miR-21, and miR-34a negatively regulates stem cell-like characteristics by negative feedback regulation of Bmi-1 in gastric cancer. Bmi-1 upregulates miR-21 and miR-34a by activating AKT-NF-kB pathway.

  14. Low fitness is associated with abdominal adiposity and low-grade inflammation independent of BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedell-Neergaard, Anne-Sophie; Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Up to 30% of obese individuals are metabolically healthy. Metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals are characterized by having low abdominal adiposity, low inflammation level and low risk of developing metabolic comorbidity. In this study, we hypothesize that cardiorespiratory...... to be inversely associated with both abdominal adiposity and low-grade inflammation independent of BMI. These data suggest that, in spite of BMI, high fitness levels lead to a reduction in abdominal fat mass and low-grade inflammation....... fitness (fitness) is a determinant factor for the MHO individuals and aim to investigate the associations between fitness, abdominal adiposity and low-grade inflammation within different BMI categories. METHOD: Data from 10,976 individuals from the general population, DANHES 2007-2008, on waist...

  15. The impact of serum adropin and ischemia modified albumin levels based on BMI in PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inal, Zeynep Ozturk; Erdem, Sami; Gederet, Yavuz; Duran, Cevdet; Kucukaydin, Zehra; Kurku, Huseyin; Sakarya, Derya Kilic

    2018-02-21

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and body mass index (BMI) on serum adropin and ischemia modified albumin (IMA) levels. This prospective cross-sectional study was performed with a total of 120 women [group1; non-PCOS = 60 (BMI PCOS = 60 (BMI PCOS and non-PCOS patients in the lean and overweight groups (pPCOS group were lower than in the lean non-PCOS group (pPCOS group than in the overweight non-PCOS group (pPCOS group than in the non-PCOS group in both the lean and overweight groups (pPCOS group, IMA levels increased. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of adropin and IMA in women with PCOS and to use a new marker to monitorize treatment outcomes.

  16. Eating behaviour in treatment-seeking obese subjects - Influence of sex and BMI classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Barbara; Wilms, Britta; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    Obese subjects frequently show an adversely altered eating behaviour. However, little is known on differences in eating behaviour across different degree of obesity. We analysed data on the three factor eating questionnaire assessing cognitive restraint, disinhibition, and hunger that were filled in by 664 obese patients (469 women) who seeked treatment in our Interdisciplinary Obesity Center. Patients were divided in five BMI classes (30 - 50 kg/m(2)). Multivariate regression analyses revealed that sex was significantly related to all three eating behaviour traits (all P eating behaviour variables between the remaining BMI classes. Data indicate profound differences in eating behaviour between women and men that persist across a wide range of obesity. Furthermore, data suggest that while grade I obese patients show higher cognitive restraint and less disinhibition and hunger scores than more severe obese patients these dimensions of eating behaviour do not systematically vary across higher BMI classes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic upper airway collapse observed from sleep MRI: BMI-matched severe and mild OSA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huon, Leh-Kiong; Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Chen, Yunn-Jy; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows real-time characterization of upper airway collapse in sleeping subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of our study was to use sleep MRI to compare differences in upper airway collapse sites between BMI-matched subjects with mild OSA and severe OSA. This is a prospective, nested case-control study using dynamic sleep MRI to compare 15 severe OSA subjects (AHI >40) and 15 mild OSA (AHI BMI. Upper airway imaging was performed on sleeping subjects in a 3.0 T MRI scanner. Sleep MRI movies were used by blinded reviewers to identify retropalatal (RP), retroglossal (RG), and lateral pharyngeal wall (LPW) airway collapse. Mean AHI in the severe OSA group was 70.3 ± 23 events/h, and in the mild group was 7.8 ± 1 events/h (p BMI-matched mild OSA patients.

  18. Association between BMI and Dental Caries among School Children and Adolescents in Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Hussein Musa, Taha; Gao, Rong; Li, Xiao Shan; Wang, Wei Xiang; Hong, Lei; Wei, Ping Min

    2017-10-01

    Obesity and dental caries are increasing epidemics, especially among children and adolescents. This epidemiological observational cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the possible association between body mass index (BMI) and dental caries among 111,792 school children and adolescents in Jiangsu Province. We found that 13.14% participants of the study sample were overweight, and 7.37% were obese. The prevalence of dental caries was 12.95% in overweight and 7.89% in obese students. There were significant differences in caries prevalence by sex, region, age group, and BMI. Overweight and obesity statuses were associated with dental caries among the study population. BMI and dental caries present a continuous health problem. Thus, we recommend that oral health promotion be used for caries prevention and control. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  19. Antitumor activity and inhibitory effects on cancer stem cell-like properties of Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -mediated Bmi-1 interference driven by Bmi-1 promoter for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Guo, Weijian; Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xinyang; Huang, Mingzhu; Gan, Lu; Cheng, Yufan; Li, Jin

    2016-04-19

    Bmi-1 is aberrantly activated in various cancers and plays a vital role in maintaining the self-renewal of stem cells. Our previous research revealed that Bmi-1 was overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC) and it's overexpression was an independent negative prognostic factor, suggesting it can be a therapeutic target. The main purpose of this investigation was to explore the antitumor activity of Bmi-1 interference driven by its own promoter (Ad-Bmi-1i) for GC. In this study, we used adenoviral vector to deliver Bmi-1 shRNA driven by its own promoter to treat GC. Our results revealed that Ad-Bmi-1i could selectively silence Bmi-1 in GC cells which overexpress Bmi-1 and suppress the malignant phenotypes and stem-like properties of GC cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, direct injection of Ad-Bmi-1i into xenografts suppressed tumor growth and destroyed cancer cells in vivo. Ad-Bmi-1i inhibited the proliferation of GC cells mainly via inducing senescence in vitro, but it suppressed tumor through inducing senescence and apoptosis, and inhibiting angiogenesis in vivo. Bmi-1 knockdown by Ad-Bmi-1i downregulated VEGF via inhibiting AKT activity. These results suggest that Ad-Bmi-1i not only inhibits tumor growth and stem cell-like phenotype by inducing cellular senescence directly, but also has an indirect anti-tumor activity by anti-angiogenesis effects via regulating PTEN/AKT/VEGF pathway. Transfer of gene interference guided by its own promoter by an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector might be a potent antitumor approach for cancer therapy.

  20. BMI, waist circumference, and selected cardiovascular disease risk factors among preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiah, Sarah E; Arheart, Kristopher L; Natale, Ruby A; Hlaing, WayWay M; Lipshultz, Steven E; Miller, Tracie L

    2012-09-01

    In adults, overweight is often associated with other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. We determined whether these associations were also present in young children. This study examined the relationships between elevated BMI (≥85th and ≥95th percentiles for age and sex) and the highest quintile of waist circumference (WC) with CVD risk factors, including fasting triglyceride (TGL), high- and low-density lipoprotein (HDL and LDL), total cholesterol (TC), non-HDL cholesterol, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in 3,644 3- to 6-year-old children included in the 1999-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). Results showed that 20% (highest quintile) of the sample had a TC >170 mg/dl, LDL >109 mg/dl, TGL >103 mg/dl, non-HDL >128 mg/dl, CRP >0.13 mg/dl, WC >57.2 cm, and HDL <42 mg/dl. Increased BMI and WC were associated with increased CRP levels in non-Hispanic black boys and girls, Hispanic boys, and non-Hispanic white girls, whereas elevated TGL and non-HDL cholesterol and low HDL cholesterol were generally associated with elevated BMI and WC in Hispanic children. TC and LDL cholesterol were not significantly associated with elevated weight in 3- to 6-year-olds. BMI and WC were similar in predicting the same risk factors. In summary, this analysis shows that in preschool-age children, greater BMI and WC are associated with biomarkers that are related to CVD risk, but these associations vary by ethnicity. Child health providers should consider using both BMI and WC to identify young children who may be at risk for elevated CVD biomarkers.

  1. Association between Dental Caries and BMI in Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongru; Zhi, Qinghui; Zhou, Yan; Tao, Ye; Wu, Liping; Lin, Huancai

    2018-01-20

    Research on the association between dental caries and body mass index (BMI) in children has shown contradictory results; thus we aimed to examine the association between dental caries and the full range of BMI classes among children. We comprehensively searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library for studies published prior to March 2017. Articles comparing dental caries among the full range of BMI classes for children below 18 years of both genders were included. Fourteen studies were eligible for this study. Basic information - i.e., first author, published year, study design, country, sample size, age, type of dental caries index and BMI, main results and conclusions, and means and standard deviations of the dental caries indexes used - was pooled. The weighted mean differences and corresponding 95% confidence intervals for dental caries between children with abnormal weight and those with normal weight were analyzed. Generally, no significant differences in caries were found between any abnormal-weight group and the normal-weight group for both primary and permanent teeth. Sensitivity analyses showed that the obese group had more caries than the normal-weight group in their primary teeth. Significantly more caries was found among the overweight and obese children in both primary and permanent teeth in high-income countries, but not in low- and middle-income countries. We recommend that further studies use suitable sample sizes, unify the criteria for BMI categorization and the dental caries index, and investigate the confounding factors that might influence dental caries and BMI. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Snacking Behaviors, Diet Quality, and BMI in a Community Sample of Working Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Timothy L.; French, Simone A.; Harnack, Lisa J.; Mitchell, Nathan R.; Wolfson, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Background Snacking behaviors have been linked with higher energy intake and excess weight. However results have been inconsistent. Moreover, few data are available on the extent to which snacking affects diet quality. Objective This study describes snacking behaviors, including total snacking energy, frequency, time of day, and percentage of snacking energy intake by food groups, and their associations with diet quality and BMI. Design Snacking behaviors and dietary intake were examined cross-sectionally among 233 adults participating in a community-based worksite nutrition intervention from September 2010–February 2013. Three telephone-administered 24-hour dietary recalls were collected (two weekday; one weekend day). Diet quality was characterized by the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 and BMI was computed using measured height and weight. Setting The setting was a large metropolitan medical complex in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Main outcome measures Outcome measures included diet quality and BMI. Statistical analyses General linear regression models were used to examine associations between each of the snacking behaviors as independent variables, and diet quality and BMI as dependent variables. Results Percent of snacking energy from fruit & juice (β=0.13, P=0.001) and nuts (β=0.16, P=0.008) were significantly positively associated with diet quality. Percent of snacking energy from desserts and sweets (β=−0.16, Pdesserts and sweets was significantly associated with a higher BMI (β=0.04, P=0.017). Conclusions Snack food choices, but not total energy from snacks, frequency or time of day, were significantly associated with diet quality and BMI. PMID:25769747

  3. Postural sway, working years and BMI in healthy truck drivers: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlendorf, Daniela; Troebs, Paul; Lenk, Andreas; Wanke, Eileen; Natrup, Jörg; Groneberg, David

    2017-07-12

    The following study analyses the influence of risk factors among the occupational group of truck drivers on postural control and body mass index (BMI). Observational study. One motorway station close to several highways in Germany. 180 truck drivers (177 male/3 female), aged 21-65 years old, took part in this study. Postural control was examined using a pressure plate. In order to examine the influence of body weight (BMI) and working years on postural control, subjects were divided into samples of five and three groups, respectively. Furthermore, it was evaluated whether the subjects suffered from back pain. For data analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used as the data were not normally distributed. Once the p value of the Kruskal-Wallis test was p≤0.05, the Conover-Iman comparison and afterwards the Bonferroni-Holm correction were used. The significance level was set at α ≤0.05. Regarding the number of working years, a significant increase of frontal (p≤0.04) and sagittal (p≤0.001) sway were observed. The correlation of the five BMI groups with the number of working years demonstrates that an increase of the working years leads to an increase of BMI (p≤0.03). Furthermore, the majority of truck drivers participating in this study suffered from back pain (61.7%). BMI and musculoskeletal impairment are indicators of health risk factors. In this study, it is shown that an increasing number of working years and an increasing BMI lead to a decrease in frontal and sagittal postural sway. In addition, the number of working years correlates with body weight and back pain. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Breastfeeding duration, age of starting solids and high BMI risk and adiposity in Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleyachetty, Amrit; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Veena, Sargoor R; Hill, Jacqui; Karat, Samuel C; Fall, Caroline H D; Wills, Andrew K

    2013-04-01

    This study utilized data from a prospective birth cohort study on 568 Indian children, to determine whether a longer duration of breastfeeding and later introduction of solid feeding were associated with a reduced higher body mass index (BMI) and less adiposity. Main outcomes were high BMI (>90th within-cohort sex-specific BMI percentile) and sum of skinfold thickness (triceps and subscapular) at age 5. Main exposures were breastfeeding (six categories from 1-4 to ≥21 months) and age of starting regular solid feeding (four categories from ≤3 to ≥6 months). Data on infant-feeding practices, socio-economic and maternal factors were collected by questionnaire. Birthweight, maternal and child anthropometry were measured. Multiple regression analysis that accounted for potential confounders demonstrated a small magnitude of effect for breastfeeding duration or introduction of solid feeds on the risk of high BMI but not for lower skinfold thickness. Breastfeeding duration was strongly negatively associated with weight gain (0-2 years) [adjusted β = -0.12 standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.19 to -0.05 per category change in breastfeeding duration, P = 0.001], and weight gain (0-2 years) was strongly associated with high BMI at 5 years (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.53-5.56, P BMI risk and a negligible effect on skinfold thickness. However, accounting for sampling variability, these findings cannot exclude the possibility of no effect at the population level. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Change with age in regression construction of fat percentage for BMI in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Katsunori; Mishima, Takaaki; Watanabe, Eiji; Seki, Kazuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, curvilinear regression was applied to the relationship between BMI and body fat percentage, and an analysis was done to see whether there are characteristic changes in that curvilinear regression from elementary to middle school. Then, by simultaneously investigating the changes with age in BMI and body fat percentage, the essential differences in BMI and body fat percentage were demonstrated. The subjects were 789 boys and girls (469 boys, 320 girls) aged 7.5 to 14.5 years from all parts of Japan who participated in regular sports activities. Body weight, total body water (TBW), soft lean mass (SLM), body fat percentage, and fat mass were measured with a body composition analyzer (Tanita BC-521 Inner Scan), using segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis & multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Height was measured with a digital height measurer. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as body weight (km) divided by the square of height (m). The results for the validity of regression polynomials of body fat percentage against BMI showed that, for both boys and girls, first-order polynomials were valid in all school years. With regard to changes with age in BMI and body fat percentage, the results showed a temporary drop at 9 years in the aging distance curve in boys, followed by an increasing trend. Peaks were seen in the velocity curve at 9.7 and 11.9 years, but the MPV was presumed to be at 11.9 years. Among girls, a decreasing trend was seen in the aging distance curve, which was opposite to the changes in the aging distance curve for body fat percentage.

  6. Postural sway, working years and BMI in healthy truck drivers: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlendorf, Daniela; Troebs, Paul; Lenk, Andreas; Wanke, Eileen; Natrup, Jörg; Groneberg, David

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The following study analyses the influence of risk factors among the occupational group of truck drivers on postural control and body mass index (BMI). Design Observational study. Setting One motorway station close to several highways in Germany. Participants 180 truck drivers (177 male/3 female), aged 21–65 years old, took part in this study. Outcome measures Postural control was examined using a pressure plate. In order to examine the influence of body weight (BMI) and working years on postural control, subjects were divided into samples of five and three groups, respectively. Furthermore, it was evaluated whether the subjects suffered from back pain. For data analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used as the data were not normally distributed. Once the p value of the Kruskal-Wallis test was p≤0.05, the Conover-Iman comparison and afterwards the Bonferroni-Holm correction were used. The significance level was set at α ≤0.05. Results Regarding the number of working years, a significant increase of frontal (p≤0.04) and sagittal (p≤0.001) sway were observed. The correlation of the five BMI groups with the number of working years demonstrates that an increase of the working years leads to an increase of BMI (p≤0.03). Furthermore, the majority of truck drivers participating in this study suffered from back pain (61.7%). Conclusions BMI and musculoskeletal impairment are indicators of health risk factors. In this study, it is shown that an increasing number of working years and an increasing BMI lead to a decrease in frontal and sagittal postural sway. In addition, the number of working years correlates with body weight and back pain. PMID:28706082

  7. Longitudinal analysis of sleep in relation to BMI and body fat in children: the FLAME study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Philippa J; Taylor, Barry J; Williams, Sheila M; Taylor, Rachael W

    2011-05-26

    To determine whether reduced sleep is associated with differences in body composition and the risk of becoming overweight in young children. Longitudinal study with repeated annual measurements. Dunedin, New Zealand. 244 children recruited from a birth cohort and followed from age 3 to 7. Body mass index (BMI), fat mass (kg), and fat free mass (kg) measured with bioelectrical impedance; dual energy x ray absorptiometry; physical activity and sleep duration measured with accelerometry; dietary intake (fruit and vegetables, non-core foods), television viewing, and family factors (maternal BMI and education, birth weight, smoking during pregnancy) measured with questionnaire. After adjustment for multiple confounders, each additional hour of sleep at ages 3-5 was associated with a reduction in BMI of 0.48 (95% confidence interval 0.01 to 0.96) and a reduced risk of being overweight (BMI ≥ 85th centile) of 0.39 (0.24 to 0.63) at age 7. Further adjustment for BMI at age 3 strengthened these relations. These differences in BMI were explained by differences in fat mass index (-0.43, -0.82 to -0.03) more than by differences in fat free mass index (-0.21, -0.41 to -0.00). Young children who do not get enough sleep are at increased risk of becoming overweight, even after adjustment for initial weight status and multiple confounding factors. This weight gain is a result of increased fat deposition in both sexes rather than additional accumulation of fat free mass.

  8. 'You don't show everyone your weakness': Older adults' views on using Family Group Conferencing to regain control and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metze, Rosalie N; Kwekkeboom, Rick H; Abma, Tineke A

    2015-08-01

    Family Group Conferencing (FGC), a model in which a person and his or her social network make their own 'care' plan, is used in youth care and might also be useful in elderly care to support older persons living at home. In Amsterdam, the Netherlands, FGC was implemented for older adults but they showed resistance. Reasons for this resistance have been researched and are described in this article. We examine existing views and attitudes of older adults concerning the use of FGC, and report on how older adults see the possibility to regain control over their lives using FGC. To do this, focus group sessions, duo interviews and individual interviews were held with older adults with varying characteristics: living at home, in sheltered housing, or in a home for the elderly; and living in urban, suburban or rural areas. Themes were: views on and contentment with the control and autonomy that they experience in their lives, and the willingness to use FGC to improve this. The main reasons for our respondents to resist FGC were: expecting people to be there for them without a FGC, not feeling ready yet for a FGC, feeling embarrassed when asking for help, being reluctant to open up about their problems, and having the fear of losing control when organizing a FGC. We conclude that, for this generation of older adults, FGC means losing control and autonomy rather than gaining it. To be appealing to older adults, a relational empowerment strengthening model should most likely be focused on reciprocity, peer-to-peer support, and solutions instead of problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Fact of the Week 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Stacy C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Diegel, Susan W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, Sheila A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boundy, Robert G. [Roltek, Inc., Clinton, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Each week the U.S. Department of Energy s Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) posts a Fact of the Week on their website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/ . These Facts provide statistical information, usually in the form of charts and tables, on vehicle sales, fuel economy, gasoline prices, and other transportation-related trends. Each Fact is a stand-alone page that includes a graph, text explaining the significance of the data, the supporting information on which the graph was based, and the source of the data. A link to the current week s Fact is available on the VTO homepage, but older Facts (back to 2009) are archived and still available at: http://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/current-and-past-years-facts-week. Each Fact of the Week website page includes a link to an Excel file. That file contains the data from the Supporting Information section of the page so that researchers can easily use data from the Fact of the Week in their work. Beginning in August of 2015, a subscription list is available on the DOE website so that those interested can sign up for an email to be sent each Monday which includes the text and graphic from the current week s Fact. This report is a compilation of the Facts that were posted during calendar year 2015. The Facts were created, written and prepared by staff in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis.

  10. Adrenocortical Regulation, Eating in the Absence of Hunger and BMI in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, L. A.; Granger, D.A.; Susman, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relations among adrenocortical regulation, eating in the absence of hunger, and body mass index (BMI) in children ages 5 to 9 years (N = 43). Saliva was collected before and after the Trier Social Stress Test for children (TSST-C), and was later assayed for cortisol. Area under the curve with respect to increase (AUCi) was used as a measure of changes in cortisol release from baseline to 60 minutes post-TSST-C. Age- and sex-specific BMI scores were cal...

  11. Trajectories of BMI from early childhood through early adolescence: SES and psychosocial predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Sean P; Bluestone, Cheryl; Burke, Christopher T

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the ways in which body mass index (BMI) percentile - an identified risk factor for overweight and cardiovascular disease in adulthood - develops from birth through early adolescence. In addition, we examined whether psychosocial factors, such as parenting style and maternal depression, mediated the link between socio-economic status (SES) and BMI growth. Design. Data were obtained from phases 1-3 of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD) - a longitudinal study that followed children from 10 communities in the United States from birth to age 11. We applied growth mixture models to identify distinct subtypes of BMI development. Within these models, we performed between- and within-class mediation analyses to examine whether SES predicted class membership or differences in development within each class via maternal depression and parenting styles. Results identified three prototypic trajectories of BMI percentile growth, elevated, steady increase, and stable. We found evidence for both between- and within-class mediation, suggesting multiple pathways by which SES can affect BMI development. These findings add to the research that suggests that being in a family with a low SES is associated with falling into patterns of development characterized by early and lasting increases in BMI relative to one's peers, and that this association is partly accounted for by maternal depression and parenting styles. What is already known? Past research has found evidence that patterns of childhood overweight are impacted by socioeconomic status through psychosocial factors like parenting and depression. This evidence is often limited to individual points in time where neglectful, permissive, and authoritarian parenting and higher levels of maternal depression are associated with higher levels of overweight status among children from infancy to adolescence. However, little

  12. Open versus laparoscopic unilateral inguinal hernia repairs: defining the ideal BMI to reduce complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Ashley D; Lim, Robert B; Lustik, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    Open inguinal hernia repair is felt to be a less expensive operation than a laparoscopic one. Performing open repair on patients with an obese body mass index (BMI) results in longer operative times, longer hospital stay, and complications that will potentially impose higher cost to the facility and patient. This study aims to define the ideal BMI at which a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be advantageous over open inguinal hernia repair. The NSQIP database was analyzed for (n = 64,501) complications, mortality, and operating time for open and laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs during the time period from 2005 to 2012. Bilateral and recurrent hernias were excluded. Chi-square tests and Fisher's exact tests were used to assess associations between type of surgery and categorical variables including demographics, risk factors, and 30-day outcomes. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine whether odds ratios differed by level of BMI. The HCUP database was used for determining difference in cost and length of stay between open and laparoscopic procedures. There were 17,919 laparoscopic repairs and 46,582 open repairs in the study period. The overall morbidity (across all BMI categories) is statistically greater in the open repair group when compared to the laparoscopic group (p = 0.03). Postoperative complications (including wound disruption, failure to wean from the ventilator, and UTI) were greater in the open repair group across all BMI categories. Deep incisional surgical site infections (SSI) were more common in the overweight open repair group (p = 0.026). The return to the operating room across all BMI categories was statistically significant for the open repair group (n = 269) compared to the laparoscopic repair group (n = 70) with p = 0.003. There was no difference in the return to operating room between the BMI categories. The odds ratio (OR) was found to be statistically significant when comparing the obese

  13. Interaction between acyl-ghrelin and BMI predicts clinical outcomes in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beberashvili, Ilia; Sinuani, Inna; Azar, Ada; Shapiro, Gregory; Feldman, Leonid; Doenyas-Barak, Keren; Stav, Kobi; Efrati, Shai

    2017-01-18

    Ghrelin, a gastric orexigenic peptide, and body mass index (BMI) are known as inversely associated to each other and are both linked to cardiovascular (CV) risk and mortality in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. However, it is unclear whether the interaction between ghrelin and BMI is associated with a risk of all-cause and CV death in this population. A prospective observational study was performed on 261 MHD outpatients (39% women, mean age 68.6 ± 13.6 years) recruited from October 2010 through April 2012, and were followed until November 2014 (median follow-up-28 months, interquartile range-19-34 months). We measured acyl-ghrelin (AG) levels, appetite, nutritional and inflammatory markers, prospective all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. During follow-up, 109 patients died, 51 due to CV causes. A significant interaction effect of high BMI and high AG (defined as levels higher than median) on all-cause mortality was found. Crude Cox HR for the product termed BMI x AG was 0.52, with a 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.29 to 0.95 (P = 0.03). Evaluating the interaction on an additive scale revealed that the combined predictive value of BMI and AG is larger than the sum of their individual predictive values (synergy index was 1.1). Across the four BMI-AG categories, the group with high BMI and high AG exhibited better all-cause and cardiovascular mortality irrespective of appetite and nutritional status (multivariable adjusted hazard ratios were 0.31, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.62, P = 0.001, and 0.35, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.91, P = 0.03, respectively). Data analyses made by dividing patients according to fat mass-AG, but not to lean body mass-AG categories, provided similar results. Higher AG levels enhance the favourable association between high BMI and survival in MHD patients irrespective of appetite, nutritional status and inflammation.

  14. Testing the Utility of a Data-Driven Approach for Assessing BMI from Face Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolffhechel, Karin Marie Brandt; Hahn, Amanda C.; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    predictive power. Here we employed a data-driven approach in which statistical models were built using principal components (PCs) derived from objectively defined shape and color characteristics in face images. The predictive power of these models was then compared with models based on previously studied...... proportions. A non-linear PC model considering both 2D shape and color PCs was the best predictor of BMI. These results highlight the utility of a "bottom-up", data-driven approach for assessing BMI from face images....

  15. Kamp K’aana, a 2-week residential weight management summer camp, shows long-term improvement in body mass index z scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term effects of Kamp K'aana, a 2-week residential weight management camp, on body mass index (BMI) measures were evaluated on 71 of 108 (66%) obese youth 10 to 14 years of age. Measures were obtained at 11-month study follow-up (n=38) or extracted from medical record (n=33). Compared with basel...

  16. Safety and efficacy of canagliflozin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: post hoc subgroup analyses according to body mass index in a 52-week open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Nobuya; Goda, Maki; Yokota, Shoko; Maruyama, Nobuko; Iijima, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors in non-obese compared with obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is unknown. We conducted post hoc analyses of the results of a 52-week open-label study of Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients treated with 100 or 200 mg canagliflozin. Patients were divided into four subgroups according to their baseline body mass index (BMI): group I, BMI body levels exceeding 1000 μmol/l at any time for both canagliflozin doses. Hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose and body weight decreased significantly from baseline to week 52 at both canagliflozin doses. The changes in hemoglobin A1c, and fasting plasma glucose were not significantly different among the four BMI subgroups for either dose. Canagliflozin was tolerated in patients irrespective of their BMI at the start of treatment, although some caution may be needed.

  17. Accelerometer-based physical activity levels among Mexican adults and their relation with sociodemographic characteristics and BMI: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Deborah; Torres, Catalina; Villa, Umberto; Rivera, Juan A; Sarmiento, Olga L; Reis, Rodrigo S; Pratt, Michael

    2015-06-20

    The objectives of this study were to describe the accelerometer based total and bout-specific PA levels for a representative sample of adults from Cuernavaca, Mexico, and to examine the relationships with sociodemographic characteristics and BMI status. Cross sectional study of adults from Cuernavaca, Mexico (2011, n = 677). Participants wore Actigraph GT3X accelerometers for seven days and sociodemographic data was collected through a survey. Weight and height were objectively measured. Total minutes/week of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and of MVPA occurring within bouts of at least ten minutes were obtained. Intensity-specific (moderate and vigorous) total PA and bouted-PA was also obtained. The relation of each PA variable with sex, age, socioeconomic status, education, marital status and BMI status was assessed using unadjusted and adjusted linear models. The mean total MVPA among adults from Cuernavaca was 221.3 ± 10.0 (median = 178.3 min/week). Average MVPA within bouts was 65.8 ± 4.7 min/week (median = 30.0 min/week). 9.7 % of total MVPA occurred within bouts. Significant associations were found for total and bout-specific MVPA with being male (positive) and owning a motor vehicle (negative). Additional associations were found for intensity-specific PA outcomes. Mexican adults were more active during weekdays than weekends, suggesting that PA may be more strongly driven by necessity (transport) than by choice (leisure). This is the first study to objectively measure PA for a representative sample of Mexican adults in an urban setting. The sociodemographic correlates vary from those known from high income countries, stressing the need for more correlate studies from lower-to-middle income countries.

  18. Investigation of the effect of body mass index (BMI on semen parameters and male reproductive system hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Zeynel Keskin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI ratio on semen parameters and serum reproductive hormones. Materials and methods: The data of 454 patients who prsented to male infertility clinics in our hospital between 2014 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Weight, height, serum hormone levels and semen analysis results of the patients were obtained. BMI values were calculated by using the weight and height values of the patients and they were classified as group 1 for BMI values ≤ 25 kg/m2, as group 2 for BMI values 25-30 kg/m2 and as group 3 for BMI values ≥ 30 kg/m2. Results: The mean values of BMI, semen volume, concentration, total motility, progressive motility, total progressive motile sperm count (TPMSC, normal morphology according to Kruger, head abnormality, neck abnormality, tail abnormality, FSH, LH, prolactin, T/E2, total testosterone and estradiol parameters of the patients were considered. Patients were divided according to BMI values in Group 1 (n = 165, Group 2 (n = 222 and Group 3 (n = 56. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of all variables between the groups. Conclusions: We analyzed the relationship between BMI level and semen parameters and reproductive hormones, demonstrating no relationship between BMI and semen parameters. In our study, BMI does not affect semen parameters although it shows negative correlation with prolactin and testosterone levels.

  19. The Non-Linear Relationship between BMI and Health Care Costs and the Resulting Cost Fraction Attributable to Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxy, Michael; Stark, Renée; Peters, Annette; Hauner, Hans; Holle, Rolf; Teuner, Christina M

    2017-08-30

    This study aims to analyse the non-linear relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and direct health care costs, and to quantify the resulting cost fraction attributable to obesity in Germany. Five cross-sectional surveys of cohort studies in southern Germany were pooled, resulting in data of 6757 individuals (31-96 years old). Self-reported information on health care utilisation was used to estimate direct health care costs for the year 2011. The relationship between measured BMI and annual costs was analysed using generalised additive models, and the cost fraction attributable to obesity was calculated. We found a non-linear association of BMI and health care costs with a continuously increasing slope for increasing BMI without any clear threshold. Under the consideration of the non-linear BMI-cost relationship, a shift in the BMI distribution so that the BMI of each individual is lowered by one point is associated with a 2.1% reduction of mean direct costs in the population. If obesity was eliminated, and the BMI of all obese individuals were lowered to 29.9 kg/m², this would reduce the mean direct costs by 4.0% in the population. Results show a non-linear relationship between BMI and health care costs, with very high costs for a few individuals with high BMI. This indicates that population-based interventions in combination with selective measures for very obese individuals might be the preferred strategy.

  20. Role of BMI and age in predicting pathologic vertebral fractures in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lun; Liu, Yao-Chung; Wu, Chia-Hung; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chiu, Hsun-I; Lee, Gin-Yi; Lee, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Pei; Lin, Ting-Wei; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2017-11-06

    Vertebral fractures affect approximately 30% of myeloma patients and lead to a poor impact on survival and life quality. In general, age and body mass index (BMI) are reported to have an important role in vertebral fractures. However, the triangle relationship among age, BMI, and vertebral fractures is still unclear in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) patients. This study recruited consecutive 394 patients with NDMM at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2015. Risk factors for vertebral fractures in NDMM patients were collected and analyzed. The survival curves were demonstrated using Kaplan-Meier estimate. In total, 301 (76.4%) NDMM patients were enrolled in the cohort. In the median follow-up period of 18.0 months, the median survival duration in those with vertebral fractures ≥ 2 was shorter than those with vertebral fracture BMI BMI ≥ 24.0 kg/m(2) (adjusted RR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.44-5.43). In multivariable logistic regression, BMI BMI ≥ 24.0 kg/m(2) (adjusted OR, 6.05; 95% CI, 2.43-15.08). Among age stratifications, patients with both old age and low BMI were at a greater risk suffering from increased vertebral fractures, especially in patients > 75 years and BMI BMI. Elder patients with low BMI should consider to routinely receive spinal radiographic examinations and regular follow-up. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Investigation of the effect of body mass index (BMI) on semen parameters and male reproductive system hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mehmet Zeynel; Budak, Salih; Aksoy, Evrim Emre; Yücel, Cem; Karamazak, Serkan; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem; Kozacıoğlu, Zafer

    2017-10-03

    To evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI) ratio on semen parameters and serum reproductive hormones. The data of 454 patients who prsented to male infertility clinics in our hospital between 2014 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Weight, height, serum hormone levels and semen analysis results of the patients were obtained. BMI values were calculated by using the weight and height values of the patients and they were classified as group 1 for BMI values ≤ 25 kg/m2, as group 2 for BMI values 25-30 kg/m2 and as group 3 for BMI values ≥ 30 kg/m2. The mean values of BMI, semen volume, concentration, total motility, progressive motility, total progressive motile sperm count (TPMSC), normal morphology according to Kruger, head abnormality, neck abnormality, tail abnormality, FSH, LH, prolactin, T/E2, total testosterone and estradiol parameters of the patients were considered. Patients were divided according to BMI values in Group 1 (n = 165), Group 2 (n = 222) and Group 3 (n = 56). There was no statistically significant difference in terms of all variables between the groups. We analyzed the relationship between BMI level and semen parameters and reproductive hormones, demonstrating no relationship between BMI and semen parameters. In our study, BMI does not affect semen parameters although it shows negative correlation with prolactin and testosterone levels.

  2. The Non-Linear Relationship between BMI and Health Care Costs and the Resulting Cost Fraction Attributable to Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Laxy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyse the non-linear relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI and direct health care costs, and to quantify the resulting cost fraction attributable to obesity in Germany. Five cross-sectional surveys of cohort studies in southern Germany were pooled, resulting in data of 6757 individuals (31–96 years old. Self-reported information on health care utilisation was used to estimate direct health care costs for the year 2011. The relationship between measured BMI and annual costs was analysed using generalised additive models, and the cost fraction attributable to obesity was calculated. We found a non-linear association of BMI and health care costs with a continuously increasing slope for increasing BMI without any clear threshold. Under the consideration of the non-linear BMI-cost relationship, a shift in the BMI distribution so that the BMI of each individual is lowered by one point is associated with a 2.1% reduction of mean direct costs in the population. If obesity was eliminated, and the BMI of all obese individuals were lowered to 29.9 kg/m2, this would reduce the mean direct costs by 4.0% in the population. Results show a non-linear relationship between BMI and health care costs, with very high costs for a few individuals with high BMI. This indicates that population-based interventions in combination with selective measures for very obese individuals might be the preferred strategy.

  3. The impact of pre-treatment weight-loss expectations on weight loss, weight regain, and attrition in people who are overweight and obese: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Rochelle; Glover, Lesley

    2012-09-01

     Research exploring the relationships between initial weight-loss expectations with actual outcome in terms of weight loss, weight regain, and attrition/attendance suggests contradictory findings. The purpose of this review was to collate research exploring the impact of weight-loss expectations on weight loss, weight regain, and attendance/attrition. It was hoped this would further the current understanding of the relationship between expectations and outcome.  PsychInfo, Medline, and Web of Science were systematically searched and 13 relevant papers were identified. To be included for review, studies had to assess and analyse weight-related expectations; distinguish between higher and lower expectations; include participants who were aged over 18 and attempting to lose weight; be published within a peer-reviewed journal between 1990 and 2010. Findings were analysed qualitatively.  Findings were largely unclear. The relationship between expectations and weight loss appears to change with time, whilst the findings from studies looking at weight regain suggest that there is no association. The relationship between expectations with attendance/a