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Sample records for weekend physical activity

  1. Weekday and weekend sedentary time and physical activity in differentially active children.

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    Fairclough, Stuart J; Boddy, Lynne M; Mackintosh, Kelly A; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; Ramirez-Rico, Elena

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether weekday-weekend differences in sedentary time and specific intensities of physical activity exist among children categorised by physical activity levels. Cross-sectional observational study. Seven-day accelerometer data were obtained from 810 English children (n=420 girls) aged 10-11 years. Daily average minday(-1) spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity were calculated for each child. Sex-specific moderate to vigorous physical activity quartile cut-off values categorised boys and girls separately into four graded groups representing the least (Q1) through to the most active (Q4) children. Sex- and activity quartile-specific multilevel linear regression analyses analysed differences in sedentary time, light physical activity, moderate physical activity, vigorous physical activity, and moderate to vigorous physical activity between weekdays and weekends. On weekdays Q2 boys spent longer in light physical activity (pphysical activity, and Q1-Q3 boys accumulated significantly more vigorous physical activity and moderate to vigorous physical activity than at weekends. There were no significant differences in weekday and weekend sedentary time or physical activity for Q4 boys. On weekdays Q2 and Q3 girls accumulated more sedentary time (pphysical activity (pphysical activity (pphysical activity (pphysical activity varied little between weekdays and weekends. The most active children maintained their sedentary time and physical activity levels at weekends, while among less active peers weekend sedentary time and physical activity at all intensities was lower. Low active children may benefit most from weekend intervention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased participation in weekend physical activity reduces postprandial lipemia in postmenopausal women.

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    Miyashita, M; Takahashi, M; Burns, S

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the acute effect of increased participation in weekend physical activity on postprandial lipemia in postmenopausal women. Ten postmenopausal women, aged 63±4 years (mean±SD), completed 2 trials in a random order: 1) control trial and 2) active trial. In the control trial, participants maintained their usual weekend lifestyle. In the active trial, participants increased their weekend activities above their usual lifestyle levels, freely deciding the duration and intensity of their chosen activities. On Monday of each trial, participants rested and consumed a standardised breakfast and lunch. Capillary blood samples were collected in the fasted state (0 h) and at 2, 4 and 6 h after eating. In the active trial, participants increased their moderate to vigorous weekend physical activity by 16 min (mean±SD: 12.3±6.7 min vs. 27.9±11.9 min, P=0.009). Area under the capillary triacylglycerol concentration vs. time curve was 13% lower in the active trial than control trial (8.8±3.8 vs. 10.1±3.9 mmol/L∙6 h, P=0.024). These findings demonstrate that small increases in moderate to vigorous physical activity under a real-life setting lowers postprandial lipemia in postmenopausal women. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Patterns of weekday and weekend physical activity in youth in 2 Canadian provinces.

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    Comte, Melisa; Hobin, Erin; Majumdar, Sumit R; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Ball, Geoff D C; McGavock, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    Few Canadian children are meeting physical activity (PA) guidelines for optimal growth and health. There is little information describing the patterns of PA among Canadian youth, so it is difficult to determine where the deficits occur. The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of youth and windows of time characterized by low PA and high sedentary behaviour. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 626 youth (aged 10-15 years) in 2 Canadian provinces. The primary exposure variables included geographic setting (rural vs. urban), sex, and days of the week (weekend days vs. weekdays). The primary outcome measures were minutes of light PA, moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and sedentary behavior, assessed with accelerometry. Compared with weekdays, MVPA was ∼30% lower on weekend days (55.8 ± 23.0 min vs. 38.7 ± 26.7 min; p 60 min of MVPA on weekdays than on weekend days (46% vs. 22%; p < 0.001). Sex-specific differences in MVPA were more pronounced on weekdays than on weekend days (∼13 vs ∼8 min per day; p < 0.01). Youth in rural settings achieved ∼9 fewer minutes of MVPA daily than youth in urban settings (p < 0.001). In youth 10 to 15 years of age, daily MVPA is lower and light PA is higher on weekend days than on weekdays. Girls and students living in rural areas were particularly vulnerable to low levels of MVPA.

  4. The Association of Physical Activity during Weekdays and Weekend with Body Composition in Young Adults

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    Clemens Drenowatz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA is a key contributor in long-term weight management but there remains limited research on the association between weekly PA patterns and weight change. The purpose of the present study was to examine the prospective association between weekly PA patterns and weight change in generally healthy young adults. Anthropometric measurements, including dual X-ray absorptiometry, were obtained every 3 months over a period of one year in 338 adults (53% male. At each measurement time, participants wore a multisensor device for a minimum of 10 days to determine total daily energy expenditure and time spent sleeping, sedentary, in light PA (LPA, in moderate PA (MPA, and in vigorous PA (VPA. PA did not differ between weekdays and the weekend at baseline. Twenty-four-hour sleep time, however, was significantly longer during weekends compared to weekdays, which was associated with less time spent sedentary. Weight loss was associated with a significant increase in LPA at the expense of sedentary time during the weekend but not during weekdays. Regression analyses further revealed an inverse association between change in VPA during the weekend and body composition at 12-month follow-up. Taken together, these results suggest that weekend PA plays an important role in long-term weight management.

  5. Context matters! sources of variability in weekend physical activity among families: a repeated measures study

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    Robert J. Noonan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family involvement is an essential component of effective physical activity (PA interventions in children. However, little is known about the PA levels and characteristics of PA among families. This study used a repeated measures design and multiple data sources to explore the variability and characteristics of weekend PA among families. Methods Families (including a ‘target’ child aged 9–11 years, their primary caregiver(s and siblings aged 6–8 years were recruited through primary schools in Liverpool, UK. Participants completed a paper-based PA diary and wore an ActiGraph GT9X accelerometer on their left wrist for up to 16 weekend days. ActiGraph.csv files were analysed using the R-package GGIR version 1.1–4. Mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA for each weekend of measurement were calculated using linear mixed models, and variance components were estimated for participant (inter-individual, weekend of measurement, and residual error (intra-individual. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were calculated from the proportion of total variance accounted for by inter-individual sources, and used as a measure of reliability. Diary responses were summed to produce frequency counts. To offer contextual insight into weekend PA among family units, demographic, accelerometer, and diary data were combined to form two case studies representative of low and high active families. Results Twenty-five participants from 7 families participated, including 7 ‘target’ children (mean age 9.3 ± 1.1 years, 4 boys, 6 siblings (mean age 7.2 ± 0.7 years; 4 boys and 12 adults (7 mothers and 5 fathers. There was a high degree of variability in target children’s (ICC = 0.55, siblings (ICC = 0.38, and mothers’ MVPA (ICC = 0.58, but not in fathers’ MVPA (ICC = 0.83. Children’s weekend PA was mostly unstructured in nature and undertaken with friends, whereas a greater proportion of parents’ weekend

  6. Weekday and weekend patterns of physical activity and sedentary time among Liverpool and Madrid youth.

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    Ramirez-Rico, Elena; Hilland, Toni A; Foweather, Lawrence; Fernández-Garcia, Emilia; Fairclough, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    Levels of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour among English and Spanish youth are high and vary within different regions of each country. Little though is known about these during specific periods of the day. The purpose of this study was to describe physical activity (PA) and sedentary time during segments of the day and week, and compare these critical contexts between youth in the Liverpool and Madrid areas of England and Spain, respectively. PA was objectively assessed in 235 Liverpool- and 241 Madrid youth (aged 10-14 years) who wore accelerometers for seven consecutive days. Minutes of sedentary time, moderate PA, vigorous PA and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were calculated for weekdays, weekend days, school time, non-school time and after-school. Between-country differences were analysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Madrid youth spent significantly more time in sedentary activities than their Liverpool counterparts. Madrid youth engaged in more minutes of moderate intensity physical activity (MPA) than Liverpool youth during weekdays, school time and non-school time (Pphysical activity (VPA) than Madrid peers during week days and weekend days (Pyouth during non-school time (Pyouth achieved recommended levels of MVPA. Low levels of MVPA and systematic differences in sedentary time, MPA and VPA exist between Liverpool and Madrid youth. Interventions targeted at the least-active children during weekends, after-school and non-school periods within the cultural contexts common to each city are required.

  7. Compensation for Adolescents’ School Mental Load by Physical Activity on Weekend Days

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    Michal Kudláček

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Increasing mental load and inadequate stress management significantly affect the efficiency, success and safety of the educational/working process in adolescents. The objective of this study is to determine the extent that adolescents compensate for their school mental load by physical activity (PA on weekend days and, thus, to contribute to the objective measurement of mental load in natural working conditions. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2013 and April 2014. A set of different methods was employed—self-administered questionnaire (IPAQ-long questionnaire, objective measurements—pedometers, and accelerometers (ActiTrainers. They was distributed to 548 students from 17 high schools. Participants’ mental load was assessed based on the difference between PA intensity and/or physical inactivity and heart rate range. Results: The participants with the highest mental load during school lessons do not compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. Conclusions: Adolescents need to be encouraged to be aware of their subjective mental load and to intentionally compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. It is necessary to support the process of adopting habits by sufficient physical literacy of students, as well as teachers, and by changes in the school program.

  8. Compensation for Adolescents' School Mental Load by Physical Activity on Weekend Days.

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    Kudláček, Michal; Frömel, Karel; Jakubec, Lukáš; Groffik, Dorota

    2016-03-09

    Increasing mental load and inadequate stress management significantly affect the efficiency, success and safety of the educational/working process in adolescents. The objective of this study is to determine the extent that adolescents compensate for their school mental load by physical activity (PA) on weekend days and, thus, to contribute to the objective measurement of mental load in natural working conditions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2013 and April 2014. A set of different methods was employed-self-administered questionnaire (IPAQ-long questionnaire), objective measurements-pedometers, and accelerometers (ActiTrainers). They was distributed to 548 students from 17 high schools. Participants' mental load was assessed based on the difference between PA intensity and/or physical inactivity and heart rate range. The participants with the highest mental load during school lessons do not compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. Adolescents need to be encouraged to be aware of their subjective mental load and to intentionally compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. It is necessary to support the process of adopting habits by sufficient physical literacy of students, as well as teachers, and by changes in the school program.

  9. Weekday and weekend moderate to vigorous physical activity of young musicians in the context of public health recommendations.

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    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Mynarski, Władysław; Grabara, Małgorzata; Powerska-Didkowska, Aneta; Borek, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is very important for the proper mental and physical development of children and youths, especially for the development of the locomotor system. The students of music schools are a unique group of children and youths, because of specific loads on the organs of locomotion, associated with the playing of musical instruments. They can therefore be exposed to a variety of health problems, particularly in the case of insufficient physical activity. The aim of the presented study was to assess the level of physical activity of music schools' students on weekdays and weekends against the parameters of physical efforts beneficial to health. The study involved 225 musicians from the Katowice School of Music, Complex of I and II degrees, aged 10-18 years (138 girls and 87 boys). The level of physical activity was assessed on the basis of moderate to vigorous rates (MVPA). Both on weekdays as well as at the weekends, boys presented a higher level of physical activity of at least moderate intensity (MVPA), which also resulted in a greater total weekly pro-health physical activity. Both boys and girls dedicated significantly more time to beneficial pro-health efforts physical health at weekends (pphysical activity in both groups was dramatically low (3.6% of girls and 11.5% of boys). Both boys and girls from the music schools often undertake moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at the weekends. The boys more often than the girls made pro-health physical efforts of moderate and high intensity.

  10. Weekday-weekend patterns of physical activity and screen time in parents and their pre-schoolers

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    Dagmar Sigmundová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study focuses on the comparison of weekday/weekend parent-child behavioural patterns (step count (SC and screen time (ST and answers the question of whether achieving the recommendations for daily SC (10,000 in parents also helps their preschool children achieve the recommended daily SC (11,500. Methods The participants (278 parents aged 30–45 and their 194 children aged 4–7 were randomly recruited from 10 Czech public kindergartens. The participants recorded SC (pedometer Yamax Digiwalker SW-200 and ST duration (proxy-report for seven consecutive days (≥8 h/day during September–October 2014 and April–May 2015. Differences between weekdays/weekends SC or ST were tested using a paired t-test. The odds of achieving the recommended daily SC for children were estimated using general logistic regression separately for weekdays and weekends. Results Only the mothers were found to have a significantly lower SC at weekends than on weekdays. All of the participants showed significantly more ST at weekends than on weekdays (daughters: 78.6 vs. 45.7 min/day, p < 0.001; sons: 78.8 vs. 55.8 min/day; mothers: 93.0 vs. 68.3 min/day; and fathers: 116.6 vs. 87.5 min/day. Daughters and sons were significantly more likely to achieve daily SC recommendation if a the SC on weekdays during the daily routine in kindergarten exceeded the median of kindergarten SC or b at weekends if their mother (OR: 9.67, 95 % CI: 3.57–26.23 exceeded 10,000 steps a day. Conclusions Especially at weekends, preschoolers have higher odds of meeting the recommended 11,500 steps per day when their mother reaches 10,000 steps per day and this is independent of the amount of parents’ ST. Moreover, physical activity in kindergarten helps preschool children meet the 11,500 recommended steps per day on weekdays. Therefore, interventions to promote physical activity in preschoolers should focus on kindergartens and encourage involvement of their

  11. Relationship of "weekend warrior" and regular physical activity patterns with metabolic syndrome and its associated diseases among Chinese rural adults.

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    Xiao, Jing; Chu, Minjie; Shen, Huan; Ren, Wenlong; Li, Zhou; Hua, Tianqi; Xu, Hong; Liang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Yuexia; Zhuang, Xun

    2018-01-18

    Little is known about the "weekend warrior" pattern of physical activity (PA) where people perform all their PA in 1 or 2 sessions per week. We investigated the relationship of weekend warrior and other PA patterns with metabolic syndrome (MS) and its associated diseases. Data on sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics were collected from the Nantong Metabolic Syndrome Study that included 13,505 women and 6,997 men between 2007 and 2008. Compared with inactive participants, weekend warriors were at lower risk of MS, diabetes, and hypertension; respective odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for men and women were 0.58 (0.43-0.79) and 0.67 (0.52-0.86), 0.52 (0.34-0.79) and 0.52 (0.33-0.83), and 0.79 (0.63-0.99) and 0.71 (0.57-0.89). Similar results were observed with regular activity, at a frequency of >3 sessions per week. Both weekend warrior and regular PA patterns showed a 10-60% decrease in abnormal triglycerides, glucose, and blood pressure in both sexes; abnormal waist circumference in men only; and abnormal high-density lipoprotein in women only. Our observed cross-sectional relationships reflect that >150 min/week of moderate PA or 75 min/week vigorous-intensity PA is needed to prevent MS and its component diseases, even if in a short-bout, intermittent PA pattern. MS: Metabolic syndrome; WC: Waist circumference; TG: Triglycerides; HDL-c: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol; BP: Blood pressure; SBP: Systolic blood pressure, DBP: Diastolic blood pressure; PA: Physical activity; JIS: Joint Interim Statement; CVD: Cardiovascular disease; ATP III: US Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program, the Adult Treatment Panel; IDF: International Diabetes Federation; IPAQ: International Physical Activity Questionnaire; BMI: Body mass index; CDC: the Nantong Centers for Disease Control; OR: Odds ratio; CI: Confidence interval; SD: Standard deviation; IQR: Interquartile range.

  12. Differences in Spatial Physical Activity Patterns between Weekdays and Weekends in Primary School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Accelerometry and Global Positioning System

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    Rahel Bürgi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeting the weekend to promote physical activity (PA in children seems to be promising given that they tend to be less physically active and, particularly, as the age-related decline in PA is more marked during weekends. Considering the ambiguity of why children are not able to maintain their PA level on weekends, the aim of the present study was to objectively investigate differences in children’s spatial PA patterns between week and weekend days using the combination of Global Positioning System (GPS and accelerometry. Seventy-four second graders (aged 7–9 years and 98 sixth graders (aged 11–14 years wore an accelerometer and GPS sensor for seven consecutive days to determine where children spend time and engage in PA. Time-matched accelerometer and GPS data was mapped with a geographic information system and multilevel analyses accounting for the hierarchical structure of the data were conducted. Differences between weekdays and weekends regarding the total time spent and the absolute and relative level of PA in various settings were found in both age groups. The findings support previous research pointing to the importance of targeting weekend PA, especially when children grow older. Future interventions should encourage children to use outdoor spaces more frequently on weekends, rather than stay at home, and to commute actively to destinations other than school.

  13. Weekend warrior physical activity pattern and common mental disorder: a population wide study of 108,011 British adults.

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    Hamer, Mark; Biddle, Stuart J H; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2017-07-14

    The dose-response association between physical activity (PA) and mental health is poorly described. We explored cross-sectional associations between physical activity and common mental disorder (psychological distress) in 'weekend warriors' who do all their exercise in one or two sessions per week. Adult participants (n = 108,011, age = 47 ± 17 yrs., 46.5% men) were recruited from general population household-based surveys (Health Survey for England and Scottish Health Survey) from 1994 to 2004. Data were pooled and analyzed using logistic regression models. Moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was self-reported and psychological distress was measured using the 12 item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Psychological distress (GHQ-12 > 3) was prevalent in 14.5% of the sample. In healthy participants an inverse association between PA and psychological distress was optimal at the PA guideline (150 mins/wk. MVPA or 75 min/wk. Vigorous PA) regardless of whether it was accumulated in one or two bouts per week "Weekend warrior" (odd ratio = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.63, 0.73) or as more frequent daily bouts (odd ratio = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.64, 0.72) in comparison to the inactive reference group. In participants with chronic health conditions an inverse association between PA and psychological distress was also evident at lower doses (one or two sessions of PA a week below PA guideline) (OR = 0.72, 95% CI, 0.68, 0.77). Undertaking vigorous intensity PA as part of the PA guideline conferred additional benefit in women (odds ratio = 0.87, 95% CI, 0.75, 1.00), but not men. Mental health benefits may be accrued through different PA patterns, thus individual approaches to prescribing exercise should be promoted.

  14. Parent-Child Associations in Pedometer-Determined Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour on Weekdays and Weekends in Random Samples of Families in the Czech Republic

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    Dagmar Sigmundová

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether more physically active parents bring up more physically active children and whether parents’ level of physical activity helps children achieve step count recommendations on weekdays and weekends. The participants (388 parents aged 35–45 and their 485 children aged 9–12 were randomly recruited from 21 Czech government-funded primary schools. The participants recorded pedometer step counts for seven days (≥10 h a day during April–May and September–October of 2013. Logistic regression (Enter method was used to examine the achievement of the international recommendations of 11,000 steps/day for girls and 13,000 steps/day for boys. The children of fathers and mothers who met the weekend recommendation of 10,000 steps were 5.48 (95% confidence interval: 1.65; 18.19; p < 0.01 and 3.60 times, respectively (95% confidence interval: 1.21; 10.74; p < 0.05 more likely to achieve the international weekend recommendation than the children of less active parents. The children of mothers who reached the weekday pedometer-based step count recommendation were 4.94 times (95% confidence interval: 1.45; 16.82; p < 0.05 more likely to fulfil the step count recommendation on weekdays than the children of less active mothers.

  15. Does School-Based Health Promotion Affect Physical Activity on Weekends? And, Does It Reach Those Students Most in Need of Health Promotion?

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    Bastian, Kerry A; Maximova, Katerina; McGavock, Jonathan; Veugelers, Paul

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether a school-based health promotion program affects children's weekend physical activity and whether this effect varies according to socioeconomic-status. This was a quasi-experimental trial of school-based programs on physical activity levels implemented in disadvantaged neighborhoods in Alberta, Canada. In 2009 and 2011, 7 full days of pedometer data were collected from cross-sectional samples of grade 5 students (age 10-11 years) from 10 intervention schools in low-socioeconomic neighbourhoods and 20 comparison schools in middle-socioeconomic neighbourhoods. Multilevel models assessed differences in step-counts between intervention and comparison groups over-time by weight (objectively measured) and socioeconomic status subgroups. In 2009, children from intervention schools were less active on weekends relative to comparison schools (9212 vs. 11186 steps/day pschools increased such that they approximated those of children from middle socioeconomic comparison schools (12148 vs. 12121 steps/day p = 0.96). The relative difference in steps between intervention and comparison schools on weekends reduced from -21.4% to 0.2% following the intervention. The normalization of weekend step counts was similar for normal weight (-21.4% to +2.0%) and overweight (-19.1 to +3.9%) children, and was balanced across socioeconomic subgroups. These data suggest that school-based health promotion is effective for reducing inequities in physical activity levels outside school hours. Investments in school-based health promotion lead to behavior modification beyond the school environment. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01914185.

  16. [Prefrontal activity and weekend alcoholism in the young].

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    García-Moreno, Luis Miguel; Expósito, Javier; Sanhueza, Claudia; Angulo, Ma Teresa

    2008-01-01

    High alcohol consumption by young people at weekends is a public health problem of considerable social and family importance. Chronic alcohol intake causes structural changes in the central nervous system, though the effects are not uniform throughout the brain. The prefrontal cortex (PC) has been reported to be one of the regions most sensitive to prolonged alcohol ingestion. The effects of chronic ethanol exposure have been extensively studied. Our aim is to identify the neuropsychological deficits in PC function induced by intermittent heavy alcohol drinking in young adults. Neuropsychological assessment was carried out on participants to examine their performance in PC-dependent tasks. 62 subjects (mean age 18.82+/-1.099) were assigned to one of three categories: 1) Those reporting heavy binge drinking of alcohol at weekends (ALE); 2) Those reporting moderate binge drinking of alcohol at weekends (ALM); and 3) Those reporting no alcohol intake (CTR). The findings indicate that intermittent alcohol binge drinking, either heavy or moderate, in young people results in poorer performance in neuropsychological tasks such as Digits, Corsi or Stroop, which depend on correct PC functioning. Our results support the claim that the binge pattern of exposure to ethanol leads to neurocognitive and neurobehavioural impairment equivalent, in many respects, to that found in chronic drinkers. Moreover, intermittent heavy alcohol drinking in adolescence and early adulthood increases the risks of lifetime alcohol dependence and other psychopathologies.

  17. Detecting short-term responses to weekend recreation activity: desert bighorn sheep avoidance of hiking trails

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    Longshore, Kathleen M.; Lowrey, Chris; Thompson, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    To study potential effects of recreation activity on habitat use of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni), we placed Global Positioning System collars on 10 female bighorn sheep within the Wonderland of Rocks–Queen Mountain region of Joshua Tree National Park (JOTR), California, USA, from 2002 to 2004. Recreation use was highest from March to April and during weekends throughout the year. Daily use of recreation trails was highest during midday. By comparing habitat use (slope, ruggedness, distance to water, and distance to recreation trails) of female bighorn sheep on weekdays versus weekends, we were able to detect short-term shifts in behavior in response to recreation. In a logistic regression of bighorn sheep locations versus random locations for March and April, female locations at midday (1200 hours) were significantly more distant from recreation trails on weekends compared with weekdays. Our results indicate that within this region of JOTR, moderate to high levels of human recreation activity may temporarily exclude bighorn females from their preferred habitat. However, the relative proximity of females to recreation trails during the weekdays before and after such habitat shifts indicates that these anthropogenic impacts were short-lived. Our results have implications for management of wildlife on public lands where the co-existence of wildlife and recreational use is a major goal.

  18. Chronotype influences activity circadian rhythm and sleep: differences in sleep quality between weekdays and weekend.

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    Vitale, Jacopo A; Roveda, Eliana; Montaruli, Angela; Galasso, Letizia; Weydahl, Andi; Caumo, Andrea; Carandente, Franca

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have shown the differences among chronotypes in the circadian rhythm of different physiological variables. Individuals show variation in their preference for the daily timing of activity; additionally, there is an association between chronotype and sleep duration/sleep complaints. Few studies have investigated sleep quality during the week days and weekends in relation to the circadian typology using self-assessment questionnaires or actigraphy. The purpose of this study was to use actigraphy to assess the relationship between the three chronotypes and the circadian rhythm of activity levels and to determine whether sleep parameters respond differently with respect to time (weekdays versus the weekend) in Morning-types (M-types), Neither-types (N-types) and Evening-types (E-types). The morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQ) was administered to 502 college students to determine their chronotypes. Fifty subjects (16 M-types, 15 N-types and 19 E-types) were recruited to undergo a 7-days monitoring period with an actigraph (Actiwacth® actometers, CNT, Cambridge, UK) to evaluate their sleep parameters and the circadian rhythm of their activity levels. To compare the amplitude and the acrophase among the three chronotypes, we used a one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer post-hoc test. To compare the Midline Estimating Statistic of Rhythm (MESOR) among the three chronotypes, we used a Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test followed by pairwise comparisons that were performed using Dunn's procedure with a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The analysis of each sleep parameter was conducted using the mixed ANOVA procedure. The results showed that the chronotype was influenced by sex (χ(2) with p = 0.011) and the photoperiod at birth (χ(2) with p sleep parameters: Sleep end, Assumed Sleep, Immobility Time and Sleep Efficiency. Sleep Efficiency showed the same patterns as did Assumed Sleep and Immobility Time: the Sleep

  19. School and weekend physical activity of 15-16 year-old Czech, Slovak and Polish adolescents [Školní a víkendová pohybová aktivita 15-16letých českých, polských a slovenských adolescentů

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    Viera Bebčáková

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When it comes to physical activity, adolescents are the group at the highest risk. When monitoring physical activity in adolescents, it is necessary to differentiate school and weekend days. School days are crucial in adolescents’ weekly physical activity. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study is to identify to what extent the school day and weekend physical activity levels differ in Czech, Polish and Slovakian boys and girls with different cultural and education backgrounds in Central Europe. METHODS: The research was carried out in the Czech Republic in Moravia (11 schools, 383 participants, in Poland in the Katowice region (11 schools, 327 participants and in Slovakia in the Prešov region (8 schools, 252 participants. In total, 421 boys and 541 girls participated in the study. Participants wore YAMAX pedometers for seven days and recorded measured values onto a record sheet and into the internet Indares system. The results were processed using repeated ANOVA analyses and contingent charts. RESULTS: Czech, Polish, and Slovak boys and girls showed a significantly higher number of steps on school days than on weekend days. No difference between boys and girls was found on any day of the week in any of the states. The lowest number of steps was found, both in girls and boys, on Sundays. The highest number of daily steps was measured in Czech boys (n = 14015 steps • day-1, Polish girls (n = 12074 steps • day-1 and Slovakian girls (n = 12040 steps • day-1 on Fridays. CONCLUSIONS: Boys and girls in all three states were more physically active on school days than on weekend days. Wearing pedometers eliminated the differences between weekly physical activity in boys and girls in the Czech Republic, Poland and in Slovakia. Under Central European conditions, it was proven that wearing pedometers positively influences physical activity in girls.[VÝCHODISKA: Z hlediska poklesu pohybové aktivity jsou za nejvíce rizikovou skupinu ozna

  20. Decrease in weekend number of steps in adolescents

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    Jana Vašíčková

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The activities with which young people spend the weekends do not support the prevalence of an active and healthy lifestyle enough. There are research evidence-based results that physical activity performed during weekend days is lower than physical activity in weekdays. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to find out to what extent young people achieve recommended levels of physical activity on weekends and to identify possible differences with regard to nationality or gender. METHODS: Research was realised between 2008 and 2011 at randomly selected schools in the Czech Republic and in Poland. The week long step count monitoring had 786 participants in the Czech Republic and 673 participants in Poland aged 15–16 years. The online system INDARES was used to answer questionnaires and gather data from pedometers. RESULTS: Results showed that young people on average record lower numbers of steps on weekends compared to schooldays (difference is 1356 step/day; F(1, 1458 = 147.61; p ≈ .000; ω2 = .232***. The most critical day of the week is Sunday. The simplified recommended amount of 11,000 steps/day is achieved by 65.93% of Czech boys and 64.73% of Czech girls (49.28% of Polish boys and 42.92% of Polish girls on schooldays, whereas only by 42.59% of Czech boys and 43.8% of Czech girls (40.1% of Polish boys and 39.27% of Polish girls on weekends. There were no significant differences between boys and girls in terms of average number of steps per day. CONCLUSION: Reducing the weekend would certainly not secure effective advancement of physical activity and healthy lifestyle among young people, yet a change of their values and creating a habit of spending weekends actively is imperative. Use of the internet mainly in boys and use of pedometers mainly in girls are some of the tools to stimulate physical activity and healthy lifestyle in youth.

  1. Changes in behaviour and faecal glucocorticoid levels in response to increased human activities during weekends in the pin-tailed sandgrouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Fabián; Benítez-López, Ana; Tarjuelo, Rocío; Barja, Isabel; Viñuela, Javier; García, Jesús T; Morales, Manuel B; Mougeot, Francois

    2016-12-01

    Human recreational activities are becoming increasingly widespread and frequent, a fact that may potentially exacerbate their effects on wildlife. These human-related disturbances on animals may induce behavioural and physiological changes that can ultimately affect their fitness, showing a similar anti-predator response that against natural predator or other threats. Here, we combine the use of behavioural and physiological approaches to assess the potential effect of winter human activities on a threatened farmland bird in Europe, the pin-tailed sandgrouse (Pterocles alchata). We compared before, during and after weekend variations in human activity rates, pin-tailed sandgrouse behaviour (flocking and flying behaviour, interspecific association in mixed flocks and habitat use) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations. Human disturbances, in particular those associated with hunting activities, peaked during weekends. Sandgrouse showed significant behavioural changes (increased sandgrouse-only flock sizes, increased proportion of birds flying and changes in habitat use) during weekends and higher faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations after the weekends compared with during or before weekends. Therefore, physiological stress levels could be modulated by behavioural adjustments such as increased flock sizes and changes in habitat use that may allow sandgrouse to cope with increased human disturbance rates during weekends. Nevertheless, temporal and spatial organization of hunting days among groups of estates might be good strategies to buffer these potential adverse effects on wintering pin-tailed sandgrouse and other steppe species of conservation concern, while preserving a socio-economically important activity such as hunting.

  2. Changes in behaviour and faecal glucocorticoid levels in response to increased human activities during weekends in the pin-tailed sandgrouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Fabián; Benítez-López, Ana; Tarjuelo, Rocío; Barja, Isabel; Viñuela, Javier; García, Jesús T.; Morales, Manuel B.; Mougeot, Francois

    2016-12-01

    Human recreational activities are becoming increasingly widespread and frequent, a fact that may potentially exacerbate their effects on wildlife. These human-related disturbances on animals may induce behavioural and physiological changes that can ultimately affect their fitness, showing a similar anti-predator response that against natural predator or other threats. Here, we combine the use of behavioural and physiological approaches to assess the potential effect of winter human activities on a threatened farmland bird in Europe, the pin-tailed sandgrouse ( Pterocles alchata). We compared before, during and after weekend variations in human activity rates, pin-tailed sandgrouse behaviour (flocking and flying behaviour, interspecific association in mixed flocks and habitat use) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations. Human disturbances, in particular those associated with hunting activities, peaked during weekends. Sandgrouse showed significant behavioural changes (increased sandgrouse-only flock sizes, increased proportion of birds flying and changes in habitat use) during weekends and higher faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations after the weekends compared with during or before weekends. Therefore, physiological stress levels could be modulated by behavioural adjustments such as increased flock sizes and changes in habitat use that may allow sandgrouse to cope with increased human disturbance rates during weekends. Nevertheless, temporal and spatial organization of hunting days among groups of estates might be good strategies to buffer these potential adverse effects on wintering pin-tailed sandgrouse and other steppe species of conservation concern, while preserving a socio-economically important activity such as hunting.

  3. Weekend Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Karey

    2012-01-01

    Weekend plans...every family has them. Whether it's fishing, swimming, or simply picnicking by the river, water plays a significant role in many recreational endeavors. Encouraging students and their families to use their "scientific eyes" to explore these wonderful wet places is what Weekend Science Project is all about. Weekend Science Project…

  4. The Intricacies of Children’s Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Brusseau Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physical activity patterns of youth is an essential step in preparing programming and interventions needed to change behavior. To date, little is known about the intricacies of youth physical activity across various physical activity segments (i.e. in school, out of school, recess, classroom physical activity, physical education, weekends, etc.). Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine the physical activity patterns of elementary school children across various seg...

  5. Recovery, health, and job performance : effects of weekend experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Charlotte; Sonnentag, Sabine

    2005-01-01

    This study extended research on respites by examining the extent to which experiences during the weekend contribute to health and job performance after the weekend. Longitudinal data including 3 measurement occasions from 87 emergency service workers indicated that nonwork hassles, absence of positive work reflection, and low social activity during the weekend predicted burnout and poor general well-being after the weekend. Weekend experiences also predicted different aspects of job performan...

  6. Physical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Anderssen, Sigmund Alfred; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Andersen LB, Anderssen SA, Wisløff U, Hellénius M-L, Fogelholm M, Ekelund U. (Expert Group) Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012. Integrating nutrition and physical activity. Chapter: Physical Activity p. 195-217.Nordic Counsil of Ministers.......Andersen LB, Anderssen SA, Wisløff U, Hellénius M-L, Fogelholm M, Ekelund U. (Expert Group) Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012. Integrating nutrition and physical activity. Chapter: Physical Activity p. 195-217.Nordic Counsil of Ministers....

  7. Creating a Recovery Filled Weekend: The Moderating Effect of Occupation Type on the Relationship between Non-Work Creative Activity and State of Feeling Recovered at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschleman, Kevin J.; Mathieu, Michael; Cooper, Jehangir

    2017-01-01

    The activities workers engage in during their personal time are likely to influence whether workers return to work feeling reenergized, refreshed, and fully rested. Two longitudinal studies were conducted to examine the importance of nonwork creative activity during the weekend on workers' state of feeling recovered at work on Monday. Job titles…

  8. Leisure activities, the social weekend, and alcohol use: evidence from a daily study of first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Andrea K; Ram, Nilam; Maggs, Jennifer L; Caldwell, Linda L

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to document within-person and between-persons associations between the duration of day-to-day activities (volunteering, spiritual activities, media use, socializing, entertainment/campus events and clubs, athletics, classes, working for pay) and alcohol use (quantity and heavy drinking) and to examine whether these associations differed by gender and the time of week. First-semester college students (N = 717 persons; 51.6% female) provided up to 14 consecutive days of data (N = 9,431 days) via daily web-based surveys. Multilevel analyses tested whether alcohol use was associated with activity duration, gender, and time of week. Between-persons associations indicated that alcohol use was higher among individuals who spent more time involved in athletics and socializing and lower among students who spent more time in spiritual and volunteer activities. Within-person associations indicated that students consumed more alcohol and were more likely to drink heavily on weekends, on days they spent more time than usual socializing, and on days they spent less time than usual in spiritual activities and using media. Select activities and days were linked with less alcohol use at both the between- and within-person levels, suggesting that attention should be paid to both selection effects and social context to understand the mechanisms linking activity duration and student drinking.

  9. Leisure Activities, the Social Weekend, and Alcohol Use: Evidence From a Daily Study of First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Andrea K.; Ram, Nilam; Maggs, Jennifer L.; Caldwell, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to document within-person and between-persons associations between the duration of day-to-day activities (volunteering, spiritual activities, media use, socializing, entertainment/campus events and clubs, athletics, classes, working for pay) and alcohol use (quantity and heavy drinking) and to examine whether these associations differed by gender and the time of week. Method: First-semester college students (N=717 persons; 51.6% female) provided up to 14 consecutive days of data (N= 9,431 days) via daily web-based surveys. Multilevel analyses tested whether alcohol use was associated with activity duration, gender, and time of week. Results: Between-persons associations indicated that alcohol use was higher among individuals who spent more time involved in athletics and socializing and lower among students who spent more time in spiritual and volunteer activities. Within-person associations indicated that students consumed more alcohol and were more likely to drink heavily on weekends, on days they spent more time than usual socializing, and on days they spent less time than usual in spiritual activities and using media. Conclusions: Select activities and days were linked with less alcohol use at both the between- and within-person levels, suggesting that attention should be paid to both selection effects and social context to understand the mechanisms linking activity duration and student drinking. PMID:22333332

  10. Improving surgical weekend handover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culwick, Caroline; Devine, Chris; Coombs, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Effective handovers are vital to patient safety and continuity of care, and this is recognised by several national bodies including the GMC. The existing model at Great Western Hospital (GWH) involved three general surgical teams and a urology team placing their printed patient lists, complete with weekend jobs, in a folder for the on-call team to collect at the weekend. We recognised a need to reduce time searching for patients, jobs and reviews, and to streamline weekend ward rounds. A unified weekend list ordering all surgical patients by ward and bed number was introduced. Discrepancies in the layout of each team's weekday list necessitated the design of a new weekday list to match the weekend list to facilitate the easy transfer of information between the two lists. A colour coding system was also used to highlight specific jobs. Prior to this improvement project only 7.1% of those polled were satisfied with the existing system, after a series of interventions satisfaction increased to 85.7%. The significant increase in overall satisfaction with surgical handover following the introduction of the unified weekend list is promising. Locating patients and identifying jobs is easier and weekend ward rounds can conducted in a more logical and timely fashion. It has also helped facilitate the transition to consultant ward rounds of all surgical inpatients at the weekends with promising feedback from a recent consultants meeting. PMID:26734294

  11. The Intricacies of Children’s Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brusseau Timothy A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the physical activity patterns of youth is an essential step in preparing programming and interventions needed to change behavior. To date, little is known about the intricacies of youth physical activity across various physical activity segments (i.e. in school, out of school, recess, classroom physical activity, physical education, weekends, etc.. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine the physical activity patterns of elementary school children across various segments and during two seasons. A total of 287 fourth and fifth graders from the Southwest US wore the Yamax Digiwalker SW-200 pedometer for 7 consecutive days during the Fall and Spring seasons. Children were prompted to record their step counts when arriving and leaving school, before and after physical education and recess, as well as on the weekends. Means and standard deviations were calculated and ANOVAs and t tests were utilized to examine difference by sex, season, and segment. Youth were more active outside of school and on weekdays (p<0.05. Boys were generally more active than girls and all youth were more active during the milder Spring season. There is a clear need for Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming and weekend physical activity opportunities. Furthermore, greater emphasis is needed on PE and across other activity segments for girls to increase their physical activity levels.

  12. Pupil Voice on Being Gifted and Talented in Physical Education: "They Think It's Just, Like, a Weekend Sort of Thing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Penny; Lane, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pupils' views have been elicited in physical education over a long period, but is a comparatively under-examined area within literature on gifted and talented (G&T) in physical education concerns pupil voice and their accounts of being placed on their schools' G&T register. Purpose: This small-scale qualitative study consulted…

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for Children Activities ... Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social ... Physical Activity Steps to Wellness Walkability Audit Tool Sample ...

  14. Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Time Differ According to Education Level in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantomaa, Marko T; Tikanmäki, Marjaana; Kankaanpää, Anna; Vääräsmäki, Marja; Sipola-Leppänen, Marika; Ekelund, Ulf; Hakonen, Harto; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Tammelin, Tuija H

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the association of education level with objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in young adults. Data from the Finnish ESTER study (2009-2011) (n = 538) was used to examine the association between educational attainment and different subcomponents of physical activity and sedentary time measured using hip-worn accelerometers (ActiGraph GT1M) for seven consecutive days. Overall physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity and sedentary time were calculated separately for weekdays and weekend days. A latent profile analysis was conducted to identify the different profiles of sedentary time and the subcomponents of physical activity. The educational differences in accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary time varied according to the subcomponents of physical activity, and between weekdays and weekend days. A high education level was associated with high MVPA during weekdays and weekend days in both sexes, high sedentary time during weekdays in both sexes, and a low amount of light-intensity physical activity during weekdays in males and during weekdays and weekend days in females. The results indicate different challenges related to unhealthy behaviours in young adults with low and high education: low education is associated with a lack of MVPA, whereas high education is associated with a lack of light-intensity physical activity and high sedentary time especially during weekdays.

  15. Physical Activity Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use this site. health.gov Physical Activity Guidelines Physical Activity Physical activity is key to improving the health of the Nation. Based on the latest science, the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is an essential resource for ...

  16. Between- and within-day variability in physical activity and inactivity in 9- and 15-year-old European children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A; Anderssen, S A; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    To examine differences in levels of physical activity (PA), time spent at moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and time spent sedentary between and within days in children from four European countries, 1954 9 - and 15-year-olds were included. PA was measured during 2 weekdays and 2 weekend days...... using the manufacturing technology-incorporated (MTI) accelerometer. Average count per minute, time spent sedentary, time spent at MVPA and the proportion of children accumulating >/=60 min of MVPA were calculated. Data were compared between weekdays and weekend days and between school time and leisure....... Few children (4-31%) accumulated >/=60 min of MVPA either during school time or during leisure-time. Differences in activity patterns between weekdays and weekend days are explained by less accumulated time in MVPA during weekend days. Weekend days and leisure-time during weekdays seem appropriate...

  17. Physical Activity and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Physical Activity and Cancer On This Page What is physical activity? What is known about the relationship between physical ...

  18. Physical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not exercised or been active in a long time, start slowly to prevent injuries. Taking a brisk 10-minute walk twice a week is a good start. Try joining a dance, yoga, or karate class if it appeals to you. You could also ...

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for ... Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical ...

  20. Types of Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basics Types of physical activity Types of physical activity Not sure what kinds of physical activity you should do? Well, you need three main types of activity . They are aerobic (sometimes called "cardio"), muscle-strengthening , ...

  1. Physical activity levels and energy expenditure of 9-year-old – 12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-09-23

    Sep 23, 2010 ... skills to make more active choices during weekday mornings while at school, and even during weekends. References. Aires, L., Santos, R., Silva, P., Santos, P., Oliveira, J., Ribeiro, J.C. et al., 2007, 'Daily differences in patterns of physical activity among overweight/obese children engaged in a physical ...

  2. Correlates of preschool children's physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Trina; Salmon, Jo; Okely, Anthony D; Hesketh, Kylie; Crawford, David

    2012-08-01

    Physical activity is important for children's health, and identifying factors associated with their physical activity is important for future interventions and public health programs. This study sought to identify multidimensional correlates of preschool children's physical activity. The social-ecological model (SEM) was used to identify constructs potentially associated with preschool children's physical activity. Data were collected from 1004 preschool children, aged 3-5 years, and parents in 2008-2009, and analyzed in 2010-2011. Physical activity was measured over 8 days using ActiGraph accelerometers. Parents completed a comprehensive survey. Generalized linear modeling was used to assess associations between potential correlates and percentage of time spent in physical activity. Correlates of physical activity were found across all the domains of the SEM and varied between boys and girls and week and weekend days. Age was the only consistent correlate, with children spending approximately 10% less time in physical activity for each advancing year of age. Some modifiable correlates that were related to more than one physical activity outcome were rules restricting rough games inside and usual daily sleep time for boys. For girls, a preference to play inside/draw/do crafts rather than be active, and child constraints, was associated with more than one of the physical activity outcomes. A novel finding in this study is the counterintuitive association between parental rules restricting rough games inside and boys' higher physical activity participation levels. Potential strategies for promoting children's physical activity should seek to influence children's preference for physical activity and parent rules. Gender-specific strategies also may be warranted. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Income and Physical Activity among Adults: Evidence from Self-Reported and Pedometer-Based Physical Activity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Jaana T.; Pehkonen, Jaakko; Hirvensalo, Mirja; Yang, Xiaolin; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Tammelin, Tuija H.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between income and physical activity by using three measures to illustrate daily physical activity: the self-reported physical activity index for leisure-time physical activity, pedometer-based total steps for overall daily physical activity, and pedometer-based aerobic steps that reflect continuous steps for more than 10 min at a time. The study population consisted of 753 adults from Finland (mean age 41.7 years; 64% women) who participated in 2011 in the follow-up of the ongoing Young Finns study. Ordinary least squares models were used to evaluate the associations between income and physical activity. The consistency of the results was explored by using register-based income information from Statistics Finland, employing the instrumental variable approach, and dividing the pedometer-based physical activity according to weekdays and weekend days. The results indicated that higher income was associated with higher self-reported physical activity for both genders. The results were robust to the inclusion of the control variables and the use of register-based income information. However, the pedometer-based results were gender-specific and depended on the measurement day (weekday vs. weekend day). In more detail, the association was positive for women and negative or non-existing for men. According to the measurement day, among women, income was positively associated with aerobic steps despite the measurement day and with totals steps measured on the weekend. Among men, income was negatively associated with aerobic steps measured on weekdays. The results indicate that there is an association between income and physical activity, but the association is gender-specific and depends on the measurement type of physical activity. PMID:26317865

  4. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gov . Physical Activity Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ...

  5. Physical Activity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community ...

  7. Guide to Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Guide to Physical Activity Physical activity is an important part of your ... to injury. Examples of moderate-intensity amounts of physical activity Common Chores Washing and waxing a car for ...

  8. Physical Activity Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Physical Activity Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How much physical activity do you need? Regular physical activity helps improve ...

  9. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact ...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact ...

  11. Breakfast consumption and physical activity in adolescents: daily associations and hourly patterns123

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sluijs, Esther MF; Ridgway, Charlotte L; Steele, Rebekah M; Prynne, Celia J; Stephen, Alison M; Bamber, Diane J; Dunn, Valerie J; Goodyer, Ian M; Ekelund, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between breakfast consumption and physical activity (PA) is inconclusive. Objective: We aimed to investigate daily associations and hourly patterns of PA and breakfast consumption in British adolescents. Design: Daily PA [accelerometry-derived moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA)] and breakfast consumption (diet diary) were measured simultaneously over 4 d in 860 adolescents (boys: 43.4%; mean ± SD age: 14.5 ± 0.5 y). Associations between MVPA and breakfast consumption were assessed by using a multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression separately by sex and for weekends and weekdays. Hourly patterns of MVPA by breakfast consumption status were displayed graphically, and differences were tested by using ANOVA. Multilevel linear regression was used to investigate differences in log MVPA on days when 570 inconsistent breakfast consumers ate or skipped breakfast. Results: On weekends, boys and girls with higher MVPA were more likely to eat breakfast [OR (95% CI): boys, 1.78 (1.30, 2.45) (P breakfast consumers compared with nonconsumers on weekends (P breakfast consumers did more MVPA on days when they ate breakfast [exponentiated β coefficients (95% CIs): 1.2 (1.0, 1.5) on weekdays and 1.4 (1.1, 1.8) on weekends for boys and 1.6 (1.3, 2.1) on weekends for girls; all P breakfast was associated with higher MVPA on weekends. The time of peak MVPA differed between breakfast consumers and nonconsumers on weekends. Breakfast consumption at weekends is worth additional investigation to potentially inform PA promotion in adolescents. PMID:24284440

  12. Physical activity and obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bouchard, Claude; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2010-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 The Physical Activity and Exercise Continuum 7 Darren Warburton Definition of Health, Physical Activity, and Exercise . . . . . . . 7 The Continuum...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies Worksite Physical Activity Steps to Wellness Walkability Audit Tool Sample ...

  14. Joint mathematical weekend in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Notes from the 2008 joint mathematical weekend (29.02-02.03.2008) organized by the Danish Mathematical Society......Notes from the 2008 joint mathematical weekend (29.02-02.03.2008) organized by the Danish Mathematical Society...

  15. Objectively measured habitual physical activity in a highly obesogenic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, S A; Summerbell, C D; Reilly, J J

    2009-05-01

    While the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children continues to grow nationally, prevalence in the North-East of England is among the highest in the UK. The objective of this study was to investigate the habitual physical activity levels in a particularly obesogenic environment in the North-East of England. Eight primary schools were selected using a stratified random sampling frame ranking average deprivation levels. Participating children (n = 246, mean age 10 years) wore an accelerometer (Actigraph, GT-256) over five consecutive days (weekend plus three weekdays). Total daily moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity was calculated using thresholds by Puyau and colleagues. Only 7% (17/246) of children were sufficiently active. Boys were more physically active than girls (766 +/- 268 vs. 641 +/- 202 counts/min, 95% CI for the difference 63-186 cpm.). Total physical activity was not influenced significantly by deprivation levels or weight status, and there were no significant differences in physical activity between school or weekend days. The North-East of England is a recognized 'hot spot' for paediatric obesity and the present study shows that low levels of habitual physical activity are typical. Choice of accelerometry threshold affects both the apparent amount of physical activity and the ability to detect groups with particularly low levels of physical activity.

  16. Feasibility of a Nurse-Led Weekend Group Exercise Program for People after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Scrivener

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Additional physical activity including repetitive task practice can improve outcomes after stroke. The additional practice can be facilitated by therapists and family members or could also be delivered by nursing staff. Objective. To investigate the feasibility of a nurse-led weekend exercise program after stroke. Participants. Individuals after stroke, who participated in a weekend exercise program during their hospital admission. Methods. A retrospective audit of the number of referrals to and amount of exercise repetitions achieved in a nurse-led weekend exercise program was undertaken. The weekend exercise program occurs on each Saturday and Sunday for one hour. The repetitions of exercise completed during each class were documented by staff. An audit was conducted to ascertain the amount and type of exercise completed within the class. Results. During the study period 284 people were referred to the exercise program. The mean number of exercise repetitions completed per participant in each class was 180.7 (SD 205.4. The number of exercise repetitions completed by participants was highly variable ranging from 0 to 1190 per class. Conclusion. The amount of average exercise repetitions completed in the Weekend Warrior program was large but with significant variability. A nurse-led exercise class is a feasible method of delivering exercise opportunities to individuals in hospital after stroke.

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart ...

  18. Facts about Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some Americans ... Activity Guideline for aerobic activity than older adults. Physical activity and socioeconomic status Adults with more education are ...

  19. Pedometer-determined physical activity and active transport in girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schofield Grant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that the risk of insufficient physical activity is greater in girls than in boys, especially during the adolescent years. The promotion of active transport (AT to and from school has been posited as a practical and convenient solution for increasing girls' total daily activity. However, there is limited information describing the associations between AT choices and girls' physical activity across a range of age, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. The objectives of this study were to (1 investigate physical activity patterns in a large multiethnic sample of female children and adolescents, and to (2 estimate the physical activity associated with AT to and from school. Methods A total of 1,513 girls aged 5–16 years wore sealed multiday memory (MDM pedometers for three weekdays and two weekend days. The ethnic composition of this sample was 637 European (42.1%, 272 Pacific Island (18.0%, 207 East Asian (13.7%, 179 Maori (11.8%, 142 South Asian (9.4%, and 76 from other ethnic groups (5%. Pedometer compliance and school-related AT were assessed by questionnaire. Results Mean weekday step counts (12,597 ± 3,630 were higher and less variable than mean weekend steps (9,528 ± 4,407. A consistent decline in daily step counts was observed with age: after adjustment for ethnicity and SES, girls in school years 9–10 achieved 2,469 (weekday and 4,011 (weekend fewer steps than girls in years 1–2. Daily step counts also varied by ethnicity, with Maori girls the most active and South Asian girls the least active. Overall, 44.9% of participants used AT for school-related travel. Girls who used AT to and from school averaged 1,052 more weekday steps than those who did not use AT. However, the increases in steps associated with AT were significant only in older girls (school years 5–10 and in those of Maori or European descent. Conclusion Our data suggest that adolescent-aged girls and girls of Asian descent are

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for ... June 4, 2015 Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion ... Listen Watch ...

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for ... Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  3. Relationships of physical activity and sedentary time in obese parent-child dyads: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Robert G; Berry, Diane C; Schwartz, Todd A; Hall, Emily G; Neal, Madeline N; Li, Siying; Lam, Diana

    2016-02-06

    Research suggests physical activity is linked to obesity. Further, the physical activity of healthy parents and their children is associated with each other. However, this relationship has not been examined in obese parents and their obese children. The purpose of this study was to compare the physical activity and sedentary time of obese, low-income, ethnic minority parents and their children on weekdays and weekend days using accelerometry. Data were obtained from eight rural sites in the middle and eastern part of North Carolina (N.C.), United States (U.S.) from 2007-2010 using a rolling enrollment. One hundred and ninety-nine obese parents (94 % female) and their obese children (54 % female) wore accelerometers simultaneously for three weekdays and one weekend day. Total physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time and proportions were determined. Parents' and children's total physical activity and MVPA levels were lower on weekend days than weekdays. Total counts per minute for children on weekdays and weekend days were greater than for parents (p obese parent-child dyads on sedentary time were stronger for girls, while associations between dyads on MVPA were stronger for boys. However, formal interaction analyses were not significant (p > 0.13). Since physical activity levels of obese parents and their obese child are somewhat related, especially on weekend days, combined parent-child obesity programs focused on reducing sedentary time could be beneficial, particularly for the child. In conclusion, this study of the physical activity levels of obese parents and their obese children found some relationships between the parents' and children's physical activity and sedentary behavior patterns, especially on weekend days. NCT01378806 .

  4. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour typologies of 10-11 year olds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockman Rowan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted interventions may be more effective at increasing children's physical activity. The aim of this study was to identify clusters of children based on physical activity and sedentary patterns across the week. Methods Participants were 761, 10-11 year old children. Participant's self-reported time spent in eight physical activity and sedentary contexts and wore an accelerometer. Cluster analysis was conducted on the time spent in the self-reported physical activity and sedentary contexts. Mean minutes of accelerometer derived of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA and sedentary time were derived for the entire week, weekdays only, weekend days and four different time periods across each type (weekend or weekday of days. Differences in the physical activity patterns of the groups derived from the cluster analysis were assessed for overall physical activity as well as for the four time periods on weekdays and weekend days. Results Three clusters emerged: 1 High active/Low sedentary; 2 Low active/Moderate sedentary; and 3 High Active/High sedentary. Patterns of activity differed across the week for each group and the High Active/High sedentary obtained the most minutes of MVPA. Conclusions Patterns of physical activity and sedentary time differed across the week for each cluster. Interventions could be targeted to the key periods when each group is inactive.

  5. Neighborhood walkability, income, and hour-by-hour physical activity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Daniel; Eriksson, Ulf; Lönn, Sara Larsson; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate both the mean daily physical activity and the hour-by-hour physical activity patterns across the day using accelerometry and how they are associated with neighborhood walkability and individual income. Moderate physical activity (MPA) was assessed by accelerometry in 2252 adults in the city of Stockholm, Sweden. Neighborhood walkability (residential density, street connectivity, and land use mix) was objectively assessed within 1000m network buffers around the participants' residence and individual income was self-reported. Living in a high walkability neighborhood was associated with more mean daily MPA compared with living in a low walkability neighborhood on weekdays and weekend days. Hour-by-hour analyses showed that this association appeared mainly in the afternoon/early evening during weekdays, whereas it appeared across the middle of the day during weekend days. Individual income was associated with mean daily MPA on weekend days. On weekdays, the hour-by-hour analyses showed that high income was associated with more MPA around noon and in late afternoon/early evening, whereas low income was associated with more MPA at the hours before noon and in the early afternoon. During the weekend, high income was more consistently associated with higher MPA. Hour-by-hour accelerometry physical activity patterns provides a more comprehensive picture of the associations between neighborhood walkability and individual income and physical activity and the variability of these associations across the day.

  6. Physical activity levels and estimated energy expenditure in overweight and normal-weight 11-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soric, M; Misigoj-Durakovic, M

    2010-02-01

    To objectively evaluate physical activity and energy expenditure in overweight and normal-weight 11-year-old children. The final sample consisted of 91 children (32 overweight and 59 normal-weight children), mean age (SD) = 11.3 (0.2) years. Energy expenditure and physical activity were assessed during two weekdays and two weekend days using a multiple-sensor body monitor (SenseWear Armband; BodyMedia Inc., Pittsburgh, PA, USA). Time spent in physical activity was higher in normal-weight compared with overweight children (p = 0.002). The highest level of physical activity was noted in normal-weight boys [mean (SD) = 258 (114) min/day] and the lowest in overweight girls [mean (SD) = 136 (59) min/day] (p = 0.002). In contrast, energy expended during physical activity did not differ between normal-weight and overweight children (2.6 and 2.7 MJ/day, respectively, p = 0.89). The average decrease in physical activity at weekends was 39 min in overweight children (from 166 to 127 min/day) and 27 min in their normal-weight counterparts (from 230 to 203 min/day). Overweight children engaged in less physical activity of both moderate and vigorous intensity compared with their normal-weight peers. Both overweight and normal-weight children were less active at weekends than on weekdays. Initiatives aiming to increase physical activity of overweight children at weekends are warranted.

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  16. Physical Activity During School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars Domino

    to be even more active during school hours further enhancing their academic behaviour, it is important to know when, why and how they are active, and their attitude towards different types of physical activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to categorize the physical activities attended by students...... during school hours and to elucidate their attitude towards the different types of activities. The data consisted of observations of lessons followed by group interviews. Analyses of the observations revealed six categories of physical activities, varying from mandatory physical activities, activities...

  17. Physical activity and sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillard, Fabien; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Carnac, Gilles; Mercier, Jacques; Rami, Jacques; Rivière, Daniel; Rolland, Yves

    2011-08-01

    Physical activity can be a valuable countermeasure to sarcopenia in its treatment and prevention. In considering physical training strategies for sarcopenic subjects, it is critical to consider personal and environmental obstacles to access opportunities for physical activity for any patient with chronic disease. This article presents an overview of current knowledge of the effects of physical training on muscle function and the physical activity recommended for sarcopenic patients. So that this countermeasure strategy can be applied in practice, the authors propose a standardized protocol for prescribing physical activity in chronic diseases such as sarcopenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does cumulating endurance training at the weekends impair training effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tim; Auracher, Markus; Heeg, Katrin; Urhausen, Axel; Kindermann, Wilfried

    2006-08-01

    Due to occupational restrictions many people's recreational endurance activities are confined to the weekends. We intended to clarify if cumulating the training load in such a way diminishes endurance gains. We conducted a longitudinal study comparing training-induced changes within three independent samples. Thirty-eight healthy untrained participants (45+/-8 years, 80+/-18 kg; 172+/-9 cm) were stratified for endurance capacity and sex and randomly assigned to three groups: 'weekend warrior' (n=13, two sessions per week on consecutive days, 75 min each, intensity 90% of the anaerobic threshold; baseline lactate+1.5 mmol/l), regular training (n=12, five sessions per week, 30 min each, same intensity as weekend warrior), and control (n=13, no training). Training was conducted over 12 weeks and monitored by means of heart rate. Identical graded treadmill protocols before and after the training program served for exercise prescription and assessment of endurance effects. VO2max improved similarly in weekend warrior (+3.4 ml/min per kg) and register training (+1.5 ml/min per kg; P=0.20 between groups). Compared with controls (-1.0 ml/min per kg) this effect was significant for weekend warriors (Pexercise decreased significantly by 11 beats/min (weekend warriors, Ppopulation of healthy untrained subjects, cumulating the training load at the weekends does not lead to an impairment of endurance gains in comparison with a smoother training distribution.

  19. Correlates of physical activity in 2-year-old toddlers: The generation R study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, A.I.; Kooijman, M.N.; Kiefte-de Jong, J.C.; Vries, S.I. de; Henrichs, J.; Jansen, W.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Hofman, A.; Moll, H.A.; Raat, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe and identify correlates of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior in 2-year-old toddlers. Study design: A total of 347 children participating in a birth cohort study wore a unaxial ActiGraph accelerometer during 1 weekday and 1 weekend day. Information

  20. Correlates of physical activity in 2-year-old toddlers : The Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, A.I.; Kooijman, M.N.; Kiefte-de Jong, J.C.; de Vries, S.; Henrichs, J.; Jansen, W.; Jaddou, V.W.V.; Hofman, A.; Moll, H.A.; Raat, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe and identify correlates of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior in 2-year-old toddlers. Study design A total of 347 children participating in a birth cohort study wore a unaxial ActiGraph accelerometer during 1 weekday and 1 weekend day. Information on

  1. Preschoolers’ Physical Activity Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Jennifer D.; He, Meizi; Bouck, L. Michelle Sangster; Tucker, Patricia; Pollett, Graham L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand parents’ perspectives of their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours. Methods A maximum variation sample of 71 parents explored their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours through 10 semi-structured focus group discussions. Results Parents perceived Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines for Children as inadequate; that their preschoolers get and need more than 30–90 minutes of activity daily; and that physical activity habits must be established during the preschool years. Nine barriers against and facilitators toward adequate physical activity were proposed: child’s age, weather, daycare, siblings, finances, time, society and safety, parents’ impact, and child’s activity preferences. Discussion The need for education and interventions that address current barriers are essential for establishing physical activity as a lifestyle behaviour during early childhood and, consequently, helping to prevent both childhood and adulthood obesity. PMID:16625802

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  3. Physical activity and motor skills in children attending 43 preschools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Line Grønholt; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Ried-Larsen, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about health characteristics and the physical activity (PA) patterns in children attending preschools. The objective of this study was to describe the gender differences in relation to body mass index (BMI), motor skills (MS) and PA, including PA patterns by the day type......-referenced classification of MS, the Danish sample distribution was significantly well for aiming and catching but poorer for the motor coordination test.The total sample and the least active children were most active on weekdays, during preschool time and in the late afternoon at the weekend. However, a relatively larger...

  4. Dietary patterns on weekdays and weekend days in 4–14-year-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothausen, Berit Worm; Matthiessen, Jeppe; Andersen, L. F.

    2013-01-01

    National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2003–8, where a total of 784 children aged 4–14 years completed a 7 d pre-coded food record. Principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns in the age groups 4–6, 7–10 and 11–14 years. Consistently, two dietary patterns, labelled......Little is known about dietary patterns on weekdays and weekend days in children, and the aim of the present study was to investigate 4–14-year-old children's dietary patterns specifically on weekdays (Monday–Thursday) and weekend days (Saturday–Sunday). Dietary data were derived from the Danish...... ‘processed’ and ‘health conscious’, emerged on both weekdays and weekend days. Factor scores from corresponding dietary patterns were significantly correlated between weekdays and weekend days with the exception of the ‘health conscious’ pattern in the 7–10-year-olds. Within each age group, children...

  5. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  7. The test-retest reliability of habitual incidental physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Gavin; Giles-Corti, Billie; Milligan, Rex

    2003-01-01

    To determine the test-retest reliability of items measuring habitual incidental physical activity, incidental physical activity behaviour and sedentary behaviours. Eighty-four subjects aged 18-65 years were interviewed from randomly selected households within metropolitan and rural Western Australia. Subjects were administered the interview on two separate occasions 10 days apart. Subjects were asked about habitual incidental physical activity (i.e. bouts performed for 10 minutes or less) performed during the week and on weekends. Intraclass correlations performed for items measuring incidental physical activity were generally found to be low to moderate. The frequency of incidental physical activity was more reliably recalled than the average duration spent on short trips (ICC 0.582 to 0.872 compared with 273 to 0.551). Kappa coefficients for habitual incidental physical activity behaviour items were observed to have moderate-to-high (0.478 to 0.939) agreement between administrations. Sedentary behaviours overall showed high test-retest reliability (ICC 0.646 to 0.925). These findings demonstrate that adults can reliably recall the frequency, but not the duration, of habitual incidental physical activity. Thus, the frequency measured by these items could be used to determine the effectiveness of current Australian physical activity guidelines and possibly identify shifts in incidental physical activity behaviour over time. Measurement of physical activity in all domains including incidental physical activity is required to determine the effectiveness of current guidelines and implemented health promotion interventions.

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ...

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  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  12. Physical Activity And Physical Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, William L.; Troiano, Richard P.; Hammond, Jane A.; Phillips, Michael J.; Strader, Lisa C.; Marquez, David X.; Grant, Struan F.; Ramos, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the PhenX (Phenotypes and eXposures) Toolkit is to provide researchers whose expertise lies outside a particular area with key measures identified by experts for uniform use in large-scale genetic studies and other extensive epidemiologic efforts going forward. The current paper specifically addresses the PhenX Toolkit research domain of physical activity and physical fitness (PA/PF), which are often associated with health outcomes. A Working Group (WG) of content experts completed a 6-month consensus process in which they identified a set of 14 high-priority, low-burden, and scientifically supported measures. During this process the WG considered self-reported and objective measures which included the latest technology (e.g., accelerometers, pedometers, heart-rate monitors). They also sought the input of measurement experts and other members of the research community during their deliberations. A majority of the measures include protocols for children (or adolescents), adults, and older adults or are applicable to all ages. Measures from the PA/PF domain and 20 other domains are publicly available and found at the PhenX Toolkit website, www.phenxtoolkit.org. The use of common measures and protocols across large studies enhances the capacity to combine or compare data across studies, benefitting both PA/PF experts and non-experts. Use of these common measures by the research community should increase statistical power and enhance the ability to answer scientific questions that might have previously gone unanswered. PMID:22516489

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  14. Global physical activity levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallal, Pedro C; Andersen, Lars Bo; Bull, Fiona C

    2012-01-01

    To implement effective non-communicable disease prevention programmes, policy makers need data for physical activity levels and trends. In this report, we describe physical activity levels worldwide with data for adults (15 years or older) from 122 countries and for adolescents (13-15-years...

  15. Obesity and physical activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. k.westerterp@hb.unimaas.nl OBJECTIVES: Three aspects of obesity and physical activity are reviewed: whether the obese are inactive; how the activity level can be increased; and which are the effects of an increase in physical

  16. Peak Longevity Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    People who engage in three to five times the recommended minimum level of leisure-time physical activity derive the greatest benefit in terms of mortality reduction when compared with people who do not engage in leisure-time physical activity.

  17. Measuring children's physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Bentsen, Peter; Nielsen, Glen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring has become the method of choice in many large-scale physical activity (PA) studies. However, there is an ongoing debate regarding the placement of the device, the determination of device wear time, and how to solve a lack of participant...

  18. Correlates of physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauman, Adrian E; Reis, Rodrigo S; Sallis, James F

    2012-01-01

    that age, sex, health status, self-efficacy, and motivation are associated with physical activity. Ecological models take a broad view of health behaviour causation, with the social and physical environment included as contributors to physical inactivity, particularly those outside the health sector......Physical inactivity is an important contributor to non-communicable diseases in countries of high income, and increasingly so in those of low and middle income. Understanding why people are physically active or inactive contributes to evidence-based planning of public health interventions, because......, such as urban planning, transportation systems, and parks and trails. New areas of determinants research have identified genetic factors contributing to the propensity to be physically active, and evolutionary factors and obesity that might predispose to inactivity, and have explored the longitudinal tracking...

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    Full Text Available ... Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies Worksite Physical Activity Steps to Wellness Walkability ... Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch ...

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  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  4. Physical activity: genes & health

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Carl Johan SUNDBERG is an Associate Professor in Physiology and Licenced Physician. His research focus is Molecular mechanisms involved in the adaptation of human skeletal muscle to physical activity.

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    Full Text Available ... Sample Audit Glossary Selected References Discount Fitness Club Network Assessing Need and Interest Selecting a DFCN Promotion ... Physical Activity, and Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube ...

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    Full Text Available ... per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water aerobics Bicycling slower than 10 miles per hour ... 2015 Page last updated: June 4, 2015 Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National ...

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  11. Markers of metabolic health in children differ between weekdays--the result of unhealthier weekend behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Mads F; Damsgaard, Camilla T; Michaelsen, Kim F; Astrup, Arne; Sjödin, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether indicators of metabolic health fluctuate during the week in a group of children posing unhealthier physical activity, sedentary time, and sleep during weekends compared to weekdays. A total of 807 eight- to eleven-year-old children had valid metabolic health markers from one, two, or three measurements contributing 2190 to 2240 observations of metabolic health markers. The weekly variation was tested using linear mixed models. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR), triglycerides, leptin (all P ghrelin increased (P ghrelin was 7% lower on Mondays compared to Fridays (all P < 0.001). The large weekly variation in HOMAIR , triglycerides, and leptin was likely the result of unhealthier behaviors during weekends. These findings have public health relevance and raise methodological issues that should ideally be taken into account in future studies. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  12. Contributions of a retreat weekend to the healing and coping of cancer patients' relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaert, Antonia; Gabos, Theresa; Ballenas, Vincent; Rutledge, Robert D H

    2010-02-01

    Relatives play a key role in the daily support and care of cancer patients. This role, however, can negatively affect relatives physically, psychologically, emotionally, and spiritually, challenging their health and well-being. Consequently, this could inhibit relatives' abilities to continue in their roles as caregivers. Although various studies have examined different interventions for the relatives of cancer patients, no formal research has been published on the role that retreat weekends play in their cancer journeys. In this qualitative study we used semistructured interviews to explore the experiences of 8 relatives who attended a "Skills for Healing Retreat Weekend" in Ontario, Canada. The findings indicate that the retreat, in bringing people together to partake in discussions and activities, fostered a sense of community among the participants. The retreat also had enduring effects, contributing to relatives' ongoing processes of healing as well as providing them with strategies for coping in their roles as caregivers.

  13. Physical Activity and Health: The Benefits of Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State and Local Programs Related Topics Diabetes Nutrition Physical Activity and Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Your Chances of Living Longer The Benefits of Physical Activity Regular physical activity is one of the most ...

  14. Parent-offspring correlations in pedometer-assessed physical activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jacobi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical activity is a major component of a healthy lifestyle in youth and adults. To identify determinants of this complex behavior is an important research objective in the process of designing interventions to promote physical activity at population level. In addition to individual determinants, there is evidence documenting familial influences on physical activity. However, the few studies that have addressed this issue with objective measures did not provide data on parent-offspring physical activity relationships throughout childhood and adolescence. The purpose of this study was to assess familial correlations in pedometer-assessed physical activity. METHODS: We measured ambulatory activity in 286 French nuclear families (283 mothers, 237 fathers, and 631 children aged 8-18 years by pedometer recordings (Yamax Digiwalker DW 450 over a week. Correlations were computed with their 95% confidence intervals (CI for spouse pairs, siblings, mother-offspring, and father-offspring. Data were expressed as steps per day and computed both for the full recording period and separately for weekdays and weekends. RESULTS: The correlations were the highest between siblings (r=0.28, 95%CI: 0.17-0.38. Parent-offspring correlations were significant in mothers (r=0.21, 95%CI: 0.12-0.30, especially between mothers and daughters (r=0.24, 95%CI: 0.12-0.36 vs. r=0.18, 95%CI: 0.05-0.31 for sons, but were almost nonexistent in fathers. Correlations were generally higher on weekend days compared to weekdays. Mother-offspring correlations did not decrease with increasing age of children (r=0.17, 95%CI: 0.00-0.34 in 8-11-year-olds, r=0.20, 95%CI: 0.07-0.33 in 12-15-year-olds, and r=0.25, 95%CI: 0.07-0.39 in ≥16-year-olds. Finally, between-spouse correlations were significant only during weekend days (r=0.14, 95%CI: 0.01-0.27. CONCLUSION: Ambulatory activity correlated within families, with a possible mother effect. Mother-offspring correlations remained

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    Full Text Available ... relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple ...

  18. Physical activity and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Blinc

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to technological development, the average level of physical activity is decreasing among residents of developed countries, which is an important factor in the epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome.Results (findings. Although excessive physical exertion disrupts hormonal balance, harms the immune system and somewhat increases the risk of sudden cardiac death, the overwhelming majority of adaptations to regular exercise comprise health benefits. Sensitivity to insulin is increased, metabolism of triglycerides and cholesterol is improved, and the basal tone of the sympathetic nervous system is decreased, which all reduces coronary atherothrombotic events and cardio-vascular mortality. Physical exercise is linked to reduced risk of colon carcinoma, breast cancer and endometrial carcinoma. Regular physical activity prolongs life on average by about two years in comparison with sedentary population, but even more importantly, it preserves endurance and power necessary for independent living well into in advanced age. Physical exercise reduces symptoms of depression and improves the perceived level of satisfaction.Conclusions. In order to achieve the metabolic and psychological benefits of exercise, it is necessary to engage in at least a half hour of moderately intense activity on most days of the week, but daily physical activity is even better.

  19. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: WHITSUNTIDE WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Whitsuntide weekend are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. DATE RESTAURANT No. Opening times Saturday, June 7 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Sunday, June 8 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Monday, June 9 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed SATELLITE CAFETERIAS (Bldgs. 30, 40, 54) and the KIOSK will be closed on 7, 8 and 9 June.

  20. Walkability and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Rodrigo Siqueira; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Kerr, Jacqueline; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence from developing countries is limited on how income level for a given neighborhood is related to physical activity among its residents. Purpose The goal of the study was to examine the association between walkability and physical activity outcomes, and the effect of income on the relationship between walkability and physical activity in adults. Methods The Spaces for Physical Activity in Adults Study (ESPACOS Project) took place in Curitiba, Brazil. Data were collected in 2010 in 32 census tracts selected to vary in income and walkability, as measured by GIS. Participants were 697 individuals aged 18–65 years (52.0% were women) randomly sampled from the selected neighborhoods. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to measure physical activity. All analyses were conducted in 2012. Results The proportion of those who walked for transportation for ≥150 minutes/week was 21.1% in low-walkability areas, and ranged from 33.5% to 35.0% in high-walkability areas. A total of 12.6% of residents were found to walk for leisure for ≥150 minutes/week; this result did not vary across quadrants of walkability and income level. The prevalence of leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was 7.1–10.5 percentage points higher in high-compared to low-walkability areas. After adjusting for all individual confounders, walkability showed an independent association with walking for transport (OR=2.10, 95% CI=1.31, 3.37, p=0.002) and leisure-time MVPA (OR=1.57; 95% CI=1.06, 2.32; p=0.024). Neighborhood income level was independently associated with leisure-time MVPA (OR=1.70; 95% CI=1.06, 2.74, p=0.029). No association was found between walkability and walking for leisure. No interaction was found between walkability and neighborhood income level. Conclusions This study, among adults living in Curitiba, Brazil, confirms findings from studies of high-income countries showing that walkability is positively associated with

  1. Effect of a family focused active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Mareesa V; Fairclough, Stuart J; Knowles, Zoe; Stratton, Gareth

    2012-10-01

    Early childhood provides a window of opportunity for the promotion of physical activity. Given the limited effectiveness of interventions to date, new approaches are needed. Socio-ecological models suggest that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier lifestyles in children. This study describes the effectiveness of a family-focused 'Active Play' intervention in decreasing sedentary time and increasing total physical activity in preschool children. Seventy-seven families were recruited from 8 randomly selected SureStart children's centres in the North West of England. Centres were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 4) or a comparison group (n = 4). Parents and children in the intervention group received a 10-week active play programme delivered by trained active play professionals; this included an activity and educational component. Families in the comparison group were asked to maintain their usual routine. Each participating parent and child wore a uni-axial accelerometer for 7 days at baseline and post-test. Week and weekend day sedentary time and total physical activity adjusted for child- and home- level covariates were analysed using multilevel analyses. Significant intervention effects were observed for sedentary time and physical activity for both week and weekend days. Children in the intervention group engaged in 1.5% and 4.3% less sedentary time during week and weekend days, respectively and 4.5% and 13.1% more physical activity during week and weekend days, respectively than children in the comparison group. Parent's participation in sport and their physical activity levels, child's sex, availability of media in the home and attendance at organised activities were significant predictors of sedentary time and physical activity in this age group. A 10-week family focused active play intervention produced positive changes in sedentary time and total physical activity levels in preschool children

  2. Effect of a family focused active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Dwyer Mareesa V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early childhood provides a window of opportunity for the promotion of physical activity. Given the limited effectiveness of interventions to date, new approaches are needed. Socio-ecological models suggest that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier lifestyles in children. This study describes the effectiveness of a family-focused ‘Active Play’ intervention in decreasing sedentary time and increasing total physical activity in preschool children. Method Seventy-seven families were recruited from 8 randomly selected SureStart children’s centres in the North West of England. Centres were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 4 or a comparison group (n = 4. Parents and children in the intervention group received a 10-week active play programme delivered by trained active play professionals; this included an activity and educational component. Families in the comparison group were asked to maintain their usual routine. Each participating parent and child wore a uni-axial accelerometer for 7 days at baseline and post-test. Week and weekend day sedentary time and total physical activity adjusted for child- and home- level covariates were analysed using multilevel analyses. Results Significant intervention effects were observed for sedentary time and physical activity for both week and weekend days. Children in the intervention group engaged in 1.5% and 4.3% less sedentary time during week and weekend days, respectively and 4.5% and 13.1% more physical activity during week and weekend days, respectively than children in the comparison group. Parent’s participation in sport and their physical activity levels, child’s sex, availability of media in the home and attendance at organised activities were significant predictors of sedentary time and physical activity in this age group. Conclusion A 10-week family focused active play intervention produced positive

  3. Effect of a family focused active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Early childhood provides a window of opportunity for the promotion of physical activity. Given the limited effectiveness of interventions to date, new approaches are needed. Socio-ecological models suggest that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier lifestyles in children. This study describes the effectiveness of a family-focused ‘Active Play’ intervention in decreasing sedentary time and increasing total physical activity in preschool children. Method Seventy-seven families were recruited from 8 randomly selected SureStart children’s centres in the North West of England. Centres were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 4) or a comparison group (n = 4). Parents and children in the intervention group received a 10-week active play programme delivered by trained active play professionals; this included an activity and educational component. Families in the comparison group were asked to maintain their usual routine. Each participating parent and child wore a uni-axial accelerometer for 7 days at baseline and post-test. Week and weekend day sedentary time and total physical activity adjusted for child- and home- level covariates were analysed using multilevel analyses. Results Significant intervention effects were observed for sedentary time and physical activity for both week and weekend days. Children in the intervention group engaged in 1.5% and 4.3% less sedentary time during week and weekend days, respectively and 4.5% and 13.1% more physical activity during week and weekend days, respectively than children in the comparison group. Parent’s participation in sport and their physical activity levels, child’s sex, availability of media in the home and attendance at organised activities were significant predictors of sedentary time and physical activity in this age group. Conclusion A 10-week family focused active play intervention produced positive changes in sedentary time and

  4. Physical activity and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gates, L S; Leyland, K M; Sheard, S

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is increasingly recognised as an important factor within studies of osteoarthritis (OA). However, subjective methods used to assess PA are highly variable and have not been developed for use within studies of OA, which creates difficulties when comparing and interpreting PA...... established via an international expert consensus meeting and modified Delphi exercise using a geographically diverse committee selected on the basis of individual expertise in physical activity, exercise medicine, and OA. Agreement was met for all aims of study: (1) The use of Metabolic Equivalent of Task...

  5. Maternal-child co-participation in physical activity-related behaviours: prevalence and cross-sectional associations with mothers and children's objectively assessed physical activity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuk, Jill A; DeDecker, Ellen; Hesketh, Kylie D; Cardon, Greet

    2017-05-25

    Co-participation in physical activity may be a useful strategy for increasing physical activity in mothers and their young children, yet little empirical evidence exists on this topic for young families. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of mother-child co-participation in physical activity and examine the association between co-participatory behaviours and objectively-assessed physical activity in young children and their mothers. One-hundred twenty-three 4-6 year-old children and their mothers were recruited from preschools in Belgium between November 2010 and January 2011. Mothers completed a questionnaire assessing the frequency of co-participation in five activities. Both mothers and children wore ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers concurrently for 7 days to assess the time spent in moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and light- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (LMVPA). Descriptive statistics (means, frequencies) were used to determine the prevalence of co-participation. Separate multiple linear regression analyses examined the association between co-participation and mothers' and children's physical activity on weekdays and weekends. Most mothers reported infrequent co-participation in physical activities with their children. On weekdays, walking or cycling for short trips was positively associated with children's MVPA while attending a park or similar more than once per week was negatively associated with children's MVPA and LMVPA. Going to an indoor play centre together once or more per week was negatively associated with mother's LMVPA. On weekends, walking or cycling with their child in their free time was positively associated with both children's and mothers' MVPA and childrens' LMVPA. Going to an indoor play centre together 1-3 times/month was negatively associated with children's weekend MVPA. Reported rates of co-participation in mothers and their preschool children were low. The association with maternal and child

  6. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project ... intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test ...

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults ... Needs Assessment Evaluating Success CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider ...

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Perceived Exertion Scale) Videos Glossary of Terms Personal Stories Harold, Age 7 Maria, Age 16 Alex, Age 32 Demetrise, Age 42 Susan, Age 45 David, Age 65 Harold, Age 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and ...

  9. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E ... of Search Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Physical Activity Note: ...

  10. Physical activity and associated factors among students attending evening classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Luis Ceschini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the physical activity level and associated factors among students attending evening classes in public and private schools in a region of the city of São Paulo. The sample was composed of 1,844 adolescents of both sexes aged 15-20 years. Three public and private schools in the city of São Paulo were visited. Daily physical activity level was assessed through International Physical Activity Questionnaire that classifies physical activity level. Physical activity level was divided into insufficiently active (when subject reported less than 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activities per week and physically active (when subject reported more than 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activities per week. Information related to risk behavior such as smoking and alcohol consumption was collected. Data were analyzed using logistic regression with three levels of data input and p<.05 as significance level. The prevalence of physically active adolescents was 36.1%. Most active subjects were: A younger boys with low socioeconomic levels; B adolescents from private schools; C adolescents that do not smoke or drink alcoholic beverages; D those who do not attend formal exercise program; E those who go to school to perform physical activities on weekends. Adolescents attending evening classes tended to be insufficiently active. We believe that school structure, working hours, and distance from home and workplace to school and risk factor should explain these data. Intervention programs could significantly contribute to increase the physical activity level among adolescents.

  11. Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise Home For Patients Search FAQs Staying ... Exercise FAQ045, November 2016 PDF Format Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise Women's Health What are the benefits ...

  12. Physical Activity in Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirpakova, Veronika; Sedliak, Milan; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried; Hamar, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial irreversible process associated with significant decline in muscle mass and neuromuscular functions. One of the most efficient methods to counteract age-related changes in muscle mass and function is physical exercise. An alternative effective intervention to improve muscle structure and performance is electrical stimulation. In the present work we present the positive effects of physical activity in elderly and a study where the effects of a 8-week period of functional electrical stimulation and strength training with proprioceptive stimulation in elderly are compared. PMID:26913164

  13. Measuring Children's Physical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Bentsen, Peter; Nielsen, Glen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring has become the method of choice in many large-scale physical activity (PA) studies. However, there is an ongoing debate regarding the placement of the device, the determination of device wear time, and how to solve a lack of participant...... compliance. The aim of this study was to assess the compliance of Axivity AX3 accelerometers taped directly to the skin of 9-13-year-old children. METHODS: Children in 46 school classes (53.4% girls, age 11.0±1.0 years, BMI 17.7±2.8 kg*m) across Denmark wore two Axivity AX3 accelerometers, one taped...

  14. Physical activity among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, P W; Ingholt, L; Rasmussen, M

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (a) to examine the association between various kinds of parental social support and adolescents' physical activity (PA) and (b) to examine whether various kinds of social support from mothers and fathers were differently associated with boys' and girls' PA. Data...... to understand why some adolescents are physically active and others are not....... came from the Aarhus School Survey that included 2100 schoolchildren at 11, 13, and 15 years of age. Parental social support for PA was measured by items about encouragement to do PA, doing joint PA, parents watching PA, and talking about PA. PA was measured as at least 4 h of vigorous PA per week...

  15. Physical Activity and Quit Motivation Moderators of Adolescent Smoking Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Melissa D; Ferris, Kaitlyn A; Metzger, Aaron; Gentzler, Amy; Duncan, Christina; Jarrett, Traci; Dino, Geri

    2017-07-01

    We examined participant characteristics as moderators of adolescents' smoking cessation outcomes as a function of intervention: Not-on-Tobacco (N-O-T), N-O-T with a physical activity (PA) module (N-O-T+FIT), or Brief Intervention (BI). We randomly assigned youth (N = 232) recruited from public high schools to an intervention, and measured their baseline levels of PA and motivation to quit. The number of cigarettes/day for weekdays and weekends was obtained at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Across timepoints, cigarette use declined for youth in N-O-T (p = .007) and N-O-T+FIT (ps Adolescents may benefit from interventions designed to address the barriers faced during a quit attempt, including their motivation to make a change and their engagement in other healthy behaviors such as physical activity.

  16. Sources of variation in habitual physical activity of children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Lund; Korsholm, L; Møller, N C

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of gender, maturity state, seasonality, type of measurement day and socioeconomic status (SES) on habitual physical activity in 8-10-year-old children and 14-16-year-old adolescents (n=1318). Physical activity was assessed objectively by accelerometry....... The results showed a significant effect of the type of measurement day on physical activity with a general pattern of lower activity levels in weekends compared with weekdays. Furthermore, higher physical activity levels were observed during the months of spring/summer compared with the months of autumn....../winter for the 8-10-year-olds, whereas no significant effect of months was observed for the 14-16-year-olds, possibly due to exam preparations and lack of physical activity registration during the months of summer for this cohort. SES was unrelated to physical activity in the 8-10-year-olds, whereas an inverse...

  17. Increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary activity in adolescent girls – The Incorporating More Physical Activity and Calcium in Teens (IMPACT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hergenroeder Albert

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of regular physical activity and consequent sub-optimal bone mass acquisition in youth has been implicated as a primary cause of adult-onset osteoporosis. IMPACT was a behavioral theory-based 1 1/2 year randomized controlled field study aimed at increasing bone accretion in middle school girls. The objective of this study was to determine the intervention effects of the IMPACT program upon key physical and sedentary activity endpoints among schools that participated in the IMPACT study. Endpoints examined included weight bearing physical activity (WBPA; moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA; vigorous physical activity (VPA; MET (metabolic equivalent – weighted WBPA and MVPA; sedentary activity; before/after-school physical activity; and weekend physical activity. Methods Primary data analysis using a pretest-posttest control group design was conducted utilizing mixed model analysis of covariance. Data gathered from the IMPACT cohort from 2000–2002 were analyzed to determine baseline versus follow-up differences in activity endpoints. Confounders investigated included ethnicity, body mass index, menarcheal status, participation in 7th grade PE/athletics, friend/familial support and neighborhood safety. Results Follow-up means were higher for participating intervention schools relative to control schools for all physical activity variables but were statistically significant only for the following variables: daily minutes of vigorous physical activity (mean difference between Intervention (I and Control (C = 6.00↑ minutes, 95% CI = 5.82–6.18, p = 0.05, daily after school activity minutes (mean difference between I and C = 8.95↑ minutes, 95% CI = 8.69–9.21, p = 0.04, and daily weekend activity minutes (mean difference between I and C = 19.00↑ minutes, 95% CI = 18.40–19.60, p = 0.05. The intervention significantly reduced duration of student daily TV/Video watching (mean difference between I and C = 12

  18. Involvement in Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gavin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1,096 adolescents participated in 123 focus groups regarding the perceived outcomes of their involvement in sports and physical activity (PA. The groups, segmented by grade level, sex, and school types, were conducted in both public and private high schools in Montreal, Quebec. We sought to understand, through the participants’ own words, their perception of the outcome matrix of involvement in sports and PA. Focus group questions emphasized changes that adolescents associated with such engagement. In particular, participants were asked how sports and PA might influence behaviors, emotional states, personal characteristics, and other outcomes. Twelve themes were identified in the responses: Positive Health and Physical Changes (18.5%, Activity-Related Positive Emotions (15.6%, and Personal Learning (11.3% were most prevalent in the discussions. A cluster of deeper personal changes thematically described as Self-Identity, Autonomy, and Positive Character Development accounted for another 16.5% of the responses. Relatively few commentaries emphasized negative effects (7.1%. Converting the proportions of qualitative data into a quantitative index allowed us to analyze potential differences in emphasis according to sex, age, and school type. Though a few significant findings emerged, the larger pattern was of a uniform perceptual map across the variables for this adolescent sample. Implications drawn from this investigation highlight the need to clearly articulate concrete pathways to positive nonphysical changes (e.g., mood states, autonomy, positive character development from engagements in sports and PA.

  19. Is It Physical Education or Physical Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, 2005

    2005-01-01

    With heightened attention on childhood obesity prevention efforts, there seems to be some confusion between the terms "physical education" and "physical activity." Often the words are used interchangeably but they differ in important ways. Understanding the difference between the two is critical to understanding why both contribute to the…

  20. Weekend-weekday lightning variability for an urban region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. L.; Stallins, J. A.; Ashley, W. S.

    2011-12-01

    We characterized differences in warm-season weekday and weekend aerosol conditions and cloud-to- ground (CG) flashes (1995-2008) for an 80,000 square kilometer region around Atlanta, Georgia. Under weekday aerosol concentrations, a greater augmentation of CG flash activity within a 100 km radius around Atlanta was found. On weekends these effects contracted toward the city. This minimized any weekly anthropogenic cycle over the more densely populated urban center even though this location had a higher flash density, a higher percentage of days with flashes, and stronger peak currents over the course of a week compared to the surrounding region. The sharper contrasts in weekday and weekend lightning regime developed outside the perimeter of the city over non urban land uses. Here lightning on weekend and weekdays differed more in its density, frequency, polarity, and peak current. Across the full extent of the study region, weekday peak currents were stronger and flash days more frequent, suggesting that weekly CG lightning signals have a regional component not tied to a single city source.

  1. Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity Nutrition and physical activity ... What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going ...

  2. Physical activity - preventive medicine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical activity contributes to health by reducing the heart rate, decreasing the risk for cardiovascular disease, and reducing ... loss that is associated with age and osteoporosis. Physical activity also helps the body use calories more efficiently, ...

  3. Personal and social-environmental correlates of objectively measured physical activity in Norwegian pre-adolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, I H; Grydeland, M; Bjelland, M; Lien, N; Andersen, L F; Klepp, K-I; Anderssen, S A; Ommundsen, Y

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine modifiable biological, psychological, behavioral and social-environmental correlates of physical activity among 1129 Norwegian 11-year-old children within a cross-sectional sample from the HEalth In Adolescents study. Physical activity was assessed by accelerometer, and weight and height were measured objectively. Age- and gender-specific cut-off points proposed by the International Obesity Task Force were used to define body mass index. Social-environmental variables were self-reported by questionnaire. Hierarchical regression (linear mixed models) revealed that normal weight children scored higher on percentage daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity [% daily moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)] than overweight/obese children (Pgame-use on weekends (Pgame-use on weekends and % daily MVPA was detected (Pgame-use on weekends was associated with lower % MVPA among the overweight/obese, but not among the normal weight. Modifiable correlates from multiple domains accounted for 14% of the variance in % daily MVPA. Prospective and intervention studies are needed to examine whether these factors act as mediators for physical activity change in pre-adolescent children. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Assessing and Increasing Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, Carole M.; Hayes, Lynda B.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing physical activity is a crucial component of any comprehensive approach to combat the growing obesity epidemic. This review summarizes recent behavioral research on the measurement of physical activity and interventions aimed at increasing physical activity and provides directions for future research.

  5. Physical Activity and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physically active adults are at lower risk for depression and declines in cognitive function as they get older. (Cognitive function includes thinking, learning, and judgment skills.) Physically active children and teens ... of depression than their peers. Physical activity also lowers your ...

  6. [Physical activity and cancer survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romieu, Isabelle; Touillaud, Marina; Ferrari, Pietro; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Antoun, Sami; Berthouze-Aranda, Sophie; Bachmann, Patrick; Duclos, Martine; Ninot, Grégory; Romieu, Gilles; Sénesse, Pierre; Behrendt, Jan; Balosso, Jacques; Pavic, Michel; Kerbrat, Pierre; Serin, Daniel; Trédan, Olivier; Fervers, Béatrice

    2012-10-01

    Physical activity has been shown in large cohort studies to positively impact survival in cancer survivors. Existing randomized controlled trials showed a beneficial effect of physical activity on physical fitness, quality of life, anxiety and self-esteem; however, the small sample size, the short follow-up and the lack of standardization of physical activity intervention across studies impaired definite conclusion in terms of survival. Physical activity reduces adiposity and circulating estrogen levels and increases insulin sensitivity among other effects. A workshop was conducted at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in April 2011 to discuss the role of physical activity on cancer survival and the methodology to develop multicentre randomized intervention trials, including the type of physical activity to implement and its association with nutritional recommendations. The authors discuss the beneficial effect of physical activity on cancer survival with a main focus on breast cancer and report the conclusions from this workshop.

  7. Physical, cognitive and social activity levels of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation within a mixed rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Heidi; Ada, Louise; Bernhardt, Julie; McElduff, Patrick; Pollack, Michael; Nilsson, Michael; Spratt, Neil

    2014-01-01

    To determine physical, cognitive and social activity levels of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation, and whether these changed over time. Observational study using behavioural mapping techniques to record patient activity over 12 hours on one weekday and one weekend day at baseline (week 1) and again two weeks later (week 2). A 20-bed mixed rehabilitation unit. Fourteen stroke patients. None. Percentage of day spent in any activity or physical, cognitive and social activities. Level of independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and mood using the Patient Health Questionniare-9 (PHQ-9). The stroke patients performed any activity for 49%, social activity for 32%, physical activity for 23% and cognitive activity for 4% of the day. Two weeks later, physical activity levels had increased by 4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1 to 8), but levels of any activity or social and cognitive activities had not changed significantly. There was a significant: (i) positive correlation between change in physical activity and change in FIM score (r = 0.80), and (ii) negative correlation between change in social activity and change in PHQ-9 score (r = -0.72). The majority of activity was performed by the bedside (37%), and most physical (47%) and cognitive (54%) activities performed when alone. Patients undertook 5% (95% CI 2 to 9) less physical activity on the weekends compared with the weekdays. Levels of physical, cognitive and social activity of stroke patients were low and remained so even though level of independence and mood improved. These findings suggest the need to explore strategies to stimulate activity within rehabilitation environments.

  8. Objective assessment of levels and patterns of physical activity in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasholt, Martin; Chawes, Bo; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2013-01-01

    ) wore an accelerometer day and night over a 4-weekperiod. The main outcome measure was level of physical activity using the raw data.A secondary measure was time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity. A Fourier series analysis was applied to study in detail patterns over time......Background:To study in detail levels and patterns of physical activity in preschool children and the effect of gender and body mass index on this activity.Methods:Two hundred and fifty-three children aged 5 years participating in the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2000.......Results:Activity profiles throughout the year were unique for each sex with boys being overall more active than girls except for winter months. Preschool children also showed distinct patterns of physical activity during weekdays compared to weekends, and were most active in weekdays. Preschool children in the highest...

  9. Perceived family functioning and friendship quality: cross-sectional associations with physical activity and sedentary behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Andrew J; Corder, Kirsten; Goodyer, Ian; Bamber, Diane; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Soren; Dunn, Valerie; van Sluijs, Esther M F

    2015-02-21

    This study examined the association of adolescent-reported family functioning and friendship quality with objectively-measured moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), sedentary time, and self-reported sedentary behaviours. Data are from the ROOTS study. MVPA and sedentary time were assessed using combined movement and heart rate sensing. Time spent TV viewing, using the internet, playing video games, doing homework and reading for pleasure was self-reported. Data on objectively-measured and self-reported outcomes for weekdays was available for 738 (age 14.5y, 55.7% female) and 800 (56.3% female) participants, respectively. Adolescents perceived family functioning and friendship quality (Two subscales: 'Good friendship qualities', 'Friendship difficulties') was assessed by questionnaire. Analyses were conducted using multi-level linear or logistic regression. Adolescents reporting better family functioning accumulated more MVPA on weekdays (beta; 95% confidence interval: 0.57; 0.17,0.98). Higher scores on the good friendship qualities subscale was associated with greater MVPA throughout the week (weekdays: 1.13; 0.62,1.65, weekend: 0.56; 0.09,1.02) and lower sedentary time on weekdays (-10.34; -17.03,-3.66). Boys from better functioning families were less likely to report playing video games at the weekend (OR; 95% confidence interval: 0.73; 0.57,0.93) or reading for pleasure (weekday: 0.73; 0.56,0.96 weekend: 0.75; 0.58,0.96). Boys who attained higher scores on the good friendship qualities scale were less likely to play video games at the weekend (0.61; 0.44,0.86) or report high homework on weekdays (0.54; 0.31,0.94). A higher score for good friendship qualities was associated with lower odds of girls playing video games during the week (0.76; 0.58,1.00) or reading for pleasure at the weekend (0.61; 0.42,0.88). Girls that reported fewer friendship difficulties had lower odds of high TV viewing (0.76; 0.62,0.93) or playing video games (0.71; 0.52,0.97) at

  10. Public Parks in Hong Kong: Characteristics of Physical Activity Areas and Their Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bik C. Chow

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Public parks, salient locations for engaging populations in health promoting physical activity, are especially important in high-density cities. We used the System for Observing Physical Activity in Communities (SOPARC to conduct the first-ever surveillance study of nine public parks in Hong Kong (288 observation sessions during 36 weekdays and 36 weekend days and observed 28,585 visitors in 262 diverse areas/facilities. Parks were widely used throughout the day on weekdays and weekend days and across summer and autumn; visitor rates were among the highest seen in 24 SOPARC studies. In contrast to other studies where teens and children dominated park use, most visitors (71% were adults and seniors. More males (61% than females used the parks, and they dominated areas designed for sports. Over 60% of visitors were observed engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, a rate higher than other SOPARC studies. Facilities with user fees were less accessible than non-fee areas, but they provided relatively more supervised and organized activities. Assessing parks by age, gender, and physical activity can provide useful information relative to population health. This study not only provides information useful to local administrators for planning and programming park facilities relative to physical activity, but it also provides a baseline for comparison by other high-density cities.

  11. Motor Skill Competence and Physical Activity in Preschoolers: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Roger; An, Ruopeng

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Preschoolers 3-5 years of age are in a crucial stage of motor skill competence. While preschoolers develop their motor skill competence through engagement in physical activity, a majority of them fail to meet guideline-recommended physical activity level. This study reviews scientific evidence on the relationship between motor skill competence and physical activity among preschoolers. Methods This systematic review followed the PRISMA framework. Keyword and reference search were conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria included-age: 3-5 years of age; setting: preschool environment (e.g., preschool, childcare, head start); main outcomes: motor skill competence and physical activity; study design: cross-sectional study, case-control study, retrospective cohort study, prospective cohort study, or randomized controlled trial; language: English; and article type: peer-reviewed publication. Results Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria, including 6 randomized controlled trials and 5 cross-sectional studies. Studies were conducted in 5 countries: United States (5), United Kingdom (2), Australia (2), Switzerland (1), and Finland (1). Eight out of the 11 studies included in the review reported a significant relationship between motor skill competence and physical activity. The specific pattern and strength of the relationship tend to differ by gender, physical activity intensity, motor skill type, and day of the week (weekdays versus weekends). Conclusions An association has been consistently documented between motor skill competence and physical activity. Future research is warranted to elucidate the underlining causal link, examine potential heterogeneity, and determine the role of environment in the relationship between motor skill competence and physical activity among preschoolers.

  12. The benefits of group music at the 1996 music weekend for women with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobia, D M; Shamos, E F; Harper, D M; Walch, S E; Currie, J L

    1999-01-01

    Music therapy has been proven to benefit cancer patients physically and emotionally. The Music Weekend for Women with Cancer was developed as a novel opportunity for participants to experience the healing powers of music amidst others who had a shared understanding of their illness. Fourteen female mixed cancer patients, three spouses, and one daughter attended the weekend from Friday evening through Sunday afternoon. Workshops and events centered on the use of music as a vehicle for expression of emotions, reflection, relaxation, communication, and enjoyment. Questionnaires were collected before the weekend to describe our population as well as three months after the weekend to assess any changes in their utilization of music and mood state. Although insufficiency of post-weekend data limited the potential for assessing the effects of the weekend on the participants' utilization of music and mood state, the extremely positive evaluations supported the role music can play in helping patients and families explore their reactions to cancer. Events such as this answer the call in the literature for more opportunities to use music and the arts in cancer education. The authors hope this weekend will serve as a prototype for future events that aim to offer the benefits of music.

  13. Promoting physical activity in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, N

    1993-10-01

    Neil Armstrong, director of the Coronary Prevention in Children Project, argues for a comprehensive programme for promoting children's physical activity. The project's survey of adult coronary risk factors in British children revealed a worryingly low level of physical activity among British schoolchildren. Schools are ideally placed to encourage children to take physical exercise, he writes, but parental role models also play an important part.

  14. The Physics of Sport Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Walter C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a physics course, Biomechanics, designed for physical education majors, where stroboscopic photography is used to provide student data to calculate average velocities of objects in different sport activities. (GA)

  15. Weekend experiences and subjective well-being of retired older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jinmoo; Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Byung-Gook; Heo, Seongmoo

    2014-07-01

    To examine how involvement in activities is related to subjective well-being (SWB) among older adults in particular during weekends. To explore the situational and behavioral factors such as day of week, type of activities, and social context and their impact on subjective well being of older adults. The experience sampling method (ESM) was used with retired older adults. Participants reported lower levels of SWB on the weekend. They experienced higher levels of SWB when they were engaged in active leisure on the weekend. Social contexts were significant predictors of older adults' SWB on the weekend. These findings extend the body of knowledge that involvement in active leisure and socializing with friends improve SWB of older adults.

  16. How is active transport associated with children's and adolescents' physical activity over time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carver Alison

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As few longitudinal studies have examined how active transport is associated with physical activity among children and adolescents over time, and how active transport tracks through childhood and adolescence, it is important to understand whether physically active children retain their activity patterns through adolescence. This study aimed to examine (a tracking of active transport and of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA across childhood and adolescence in two age cohorts; and (b associations between active transport and MVPA at three distinct time-points, over five years. Methods This longitudinal study of two cohorts aged 5-6 years (n = 134 and 10-12 years (n = 201 at baseline (T1, in Melbourne, Australia, gathered follow-up data at three (T2 and five years (T3. Walking/cycling to local destinations was survey-reported; while MVPA was recorded using accelerometers and mean time spent daily in MVPA on week days and on weekends was computed. Tracking of these behaviours was examined over five years using General Estimating Equations. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine associations between active transport and MVPA at each time-point. Results Active transport tracked moderately among children (boys, βs = 0.36; girls, βs = 0.51 but not among adolescents. Physical activity tracked moderately (βs value range: 0.33-0.55 for both cohorts. Active transport was not associated with children's MVPA at any time-point, but was associated with adolescent boys' MVPA on week days at T1 (B = 1.37 (95% CI: 0.15, 2.59, at T2 (B = 1.27 (95% CI: 0.03, 2.51 and at T3 (B = 0.74 (95% CI: 0.01, 1.47, and with adolescent girls' MVPA on week days (B = 0.40 (95% CI: 0.04, 0.76 and on weekends (B = 0.54 (95% CI: 0.16, 0.93 at T3 only. Conclusion Active transport was associated only with boys' MVPA during early adolescence and with boys' and girls' MVPA during late adolescence. While active transport should be encouraged

  17. Body size and physical activity levels of adults on Rarotonga, the Cook Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulijaszek, S J

    2001-09-01

    Few studies of physical activity and energy expenditure have been carried out in the Pacific Region. In this study, the physical activity levels (PALs) of adult Cook Islanders living a largely modernised lifestyle by age group and occupation category were determined by a 3 day activity recall diary method. The period of observation included the previous Sunday, as a representative non-working day. A volunteer sample of 332 Cook Islanders aged 22 to 86 years was obtained from the total adult population of Rarotonga. Older adults are significantly less active than younger adults during the working week, but not during the weekend. Males are more physically active than females during the working week, but not on weekends. The mean weekday PAL of males engaged in traditional subsistence or who are unemployed is 1.88, while the mean weekday PAL of females engaged in traditional subsistence or who are housewives is 1.69. Male manual workers have a weekday PAL of 1.96, while female manual workers have a weekday PAL of 1.67. The weekday PAL values for those employed in clerical and administrative work are 1.82 (males) and 1.64 (females), while values for professionals are 1.76 (males) and 1.65 (females). Weekday physical activity is negatively associated with age, in nonlinear fashion. The PALs of adult Cook Islanders living a largely modernised lifestyle is lower in older age groups but does not vary by occupation category.

  18. Daily Weather and Children's Physical Activity Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, Teun; Thijs, Carel; Timperio, Anna; Salmon, J O; Veitch, Jenny; Kremers, Stef P J; Ridgers, Nicola D

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how the weather affects physical activity (PA) may help in the design, analysis, and interpretation of future studies, especially when investigating PA across diverse meteorological settings and with long follow-up periods. The present longitudinal study first aims to examine the influence of daily weather elements on intraindividual PA patterns among primary school children across four seasons, reflecting day-to-day variation within each season. Second, we investigate whether the influence of weather elements differs by day of the week (weekdays vs weekends), gender, age, and body mass index. PA data were collected by ActiGraph accelerometers for 1 wk in each of four school terms that reflect each season in southeast Australia. PA data from 307 children (age range 8.7-12.8 yr) were matched to daily meteorological variables obtained from the Australian Government's Bureau of Meteorology (maximum temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, day length, and rainfall). Daily PA patterns and their association with weather elements were analyzed using multilevel linear mixed models. Temperature was the strongest predictor of moderate and vigorous PA, followed by solar radiation and humidity. The relation with temperature was curvilinear, showing optimum PA levels at temperatures between 20°C and 22°C. Associations between weather elements on PA did not differ by gender, child's age, or body mass index. This novel study focused on the influence of weather elements on intraindividual PA patterns in children. As weather influences cannot be controlled, knowledge of its effect on individual PA patterns may help in the design of future studies, interpretation of their results, and translation into PA promotion.

  19. Physical activity in obesity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PhD Geenen; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise education in overweight and obese patients not only requires knowledge of physical exercise programs, but also knowledge of psychological processes such as cognitions that may hamper adherence to the exercise program and knowledge of social processes, e.g., consciousness of the

  20. Physical activity in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinie Geenen; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise education in overweight and obese patients not only requires knowledge of physical exercise programs, but also knowledge of psychological processes such as cognitions that may hamper adherence to the exercise program and knowledge of social processes, e.g., consciousness of the

  1. Physical activity of office workers

    OpenAIRE

    E Biernat; Tomaszewski, P.; K Milde

    2010-01-01

    Inactivity or insufficient physical activity is risk factor for metabolic or cardiovascular diseases. In most of cases the nature of work of office employees does not require high physical efforts and consists mostly of sitting but the reports on leisure activity of office workers are still lacking. Thus, the aim of the study was to assess physical activity of civil and local administration workers and bank officials. 293 randomly selected office workers took part in the study. They were recr...

  2. Physical activity and human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Wojciechowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dynamic development of the automotive industry, transport, and the media means that human life has become much easier. At the same time, the comfortable living conditions have decreased physical activity. Biologically conditioned, the need of activity has been minimised by the ever-increasing pace of life. As a result, it may lead to the loss of physical and mental health. Active recreation is not only an excellent source of activity, but also a source of satisfaction. Youths and adults should therefore spend their free time primarily on various forms of physical activity. Aim of the research : To evaluate the physical fitness of students who regularly practice physical exercise, those who occasionally practice, and those not practicing any form of physical activity. Material and methods : In the research we used a questionnaire of the Ruffier test and an orthostatic test. The study involved a group of 15 people aged 20–25 years. Participation in the study was entirely voluntary and anonymous. The study group consisted only of women. Results obtained from the questionnaire survey were fully reflected during exercise tests performed. Results and conclusions: Only regularly practiced physical activity has an effect on our body. Regular exercise increases our body’s physical capacity. Activity is the best means of prevention of lifestyle diseases. Youths and adults should spend their free time mainly doing various forms of physical activity.

  3. pedometer-measured physical activity, self-reported physical activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    physical activity and sedentary behaviour in older adults? Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:62. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-8-62]. 17. World Health Organization. Global Recommendations on Physical Activity for. Health. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2010. 18. Tudor-Locke C, Sisson SB, Collova T, Lee SM, ...

  4. Physical Activity and Aging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    STEWART, KERRY J

    2005-01-01

    ..., but also for enhancing substantially the quality of daily life. Aerobic and resistance training have complementary benefits, and can be undertaken at almost any age and physical condition, given appropriate medical clearance and supervision as warranted.

  5. Sleep, physical activity and BMI in six to ten-year-old children measured by accelerometry: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Nyberg, Gisela; Ingre, Michael; Ekblom, Örjan; Marcus, Claude

    2013-06-22

    The aim of this study is to describe the relationship between objective measures of sleep, physical activity and BMI in Swedish pre-adolescents. The day-to-day association between physical activity and sleep quality as well as week-day and weekend pattern of sleep is also described. We conducted a cross sectional study consisted of a cohort of 1.231 children aged six to ten years within the Stockholm county area. Sleep and physical activity were measured by accelerometry during seven consecutive days. Outcome measures are total sleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep start and sleep end; physical activity intensity divided into: sedentary ( 3 METS); and Body Mass Index standard deviations score, BMIsds. Total sleep time decreased with increasing age, and was shorter in boys than girls on both weekdays and weekends. Late bedtime but consistent wake-up time during weekends made total sleep time shorter on weekends than on weekdays. Day-to-day within-subject analysis revealed that moderate-to-vigorous intense physical activity promoted an increased sleep efficiency the following night (CI sleep time was not affected (CI -0.003 to 0.043). Neither sleep duration (CI -0.024 to 0.022) nor sleep efficiency (CI -0.019 to 0.028) affected mean physical activity level the subsequent day. The between-subject analysis indicates that the sleep of children characterized by high moderate-to-vigorous physical activity during the day was frequently interrupted (SE = -.23, P sleep duration was found (-.10, p sleep duration was associated with high BMI in six to ten year old children. This study underscores the importance of consistent bedtimes throughout the week for promoting sleep duration in preadolescents. Furthermore, this study suggests that a large proportion of intensive physical activity during the day might promote good sleep quality.

  6. Physical activity extends life expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisure-time physical activity is associated with longer life expectancy, even at relatively low levels of activity and regardless of body weight, according to a study by a team of researchers led by the NCI.

  7. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  8. Cancer, Physical Activity, and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin C.; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Lee, Augustine; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the relationship between physical activity and cancer along the cancer continuum, and serves as a synthesis of systematic and meta-analytic reviews conducted to date. There exists a large body of epidemiologic evidence that conclude those who participate in higher levels of physical activity have a reduced likelihood of developing a variety of cancers compared to those who engage in lower levels of physical activity. Despite this observational evidence, the causal pathway underling the association between participation in physical activity and cancer risk reduction remains unclear. Physical activity is also a useful adjunct to improve the deleterious sequelae experienced during cancer treatment. These deleterious sequelae may include fatigue, muscular weakness, deteriorated functional capacity, including many others. The benefits of physical activity during cancer treatment are similar to those experienced after treatment. Despite the growing volume of literature examining physical activity and cancer across the cancer continuum, a number of research gaps exist. There is little evidence on the safety of physical activity among all cancer survivors, as most trials have selectively recruited participants. It is also unclear the specific dose of exercise needed that is optimal for primary cancer prevention or symptom control during and after cancer treatment. PMID:23720265

  9. Interdisciplinarity in Adapted Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Marcel; Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that inquiry in adapted physical activity involves the use of different disciplines to address questions. It is often advanced today that complex problems of the kind frequently encountered in adapted physical activity require a combination of disciplines for their solution. At the present time, individual research…

  10. Physical Activity and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between physical activity and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a comprehensive school physical activity program to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  11. Physical activity among nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilar Leona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses need to encourage patients to lead a healthy lifestyle, hence it is important that as nursing students they are already aware of the importance of physical activity. The purpose of the study was to investigate the physical activities of nursing students.

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists ... upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a breath. Absolute Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. ...

  14. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... activity. If you're doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Absolute ... ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL ...

  15. Barriers for recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    differences in children's perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. METHODS: Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools......BACKGROUND: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender...... and girls identified the same barriers, there were both inter- and intra-gender differences in the perception of these barriers. Weather was a barrier for all children, apart from the most active boys. Conflicts were perceived as a barrier particularly by those boys who played ballgames. Girls said...

  16. The relationship between physical activity and sedentary behaviour in parents and their children aged 9-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigmund Erik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is documented that parents have an essential influence on the physical activity (PA of their children. More physically active parents bring up more physically active children in comparison with children of less physically active parents. However, the relationship between parents-child PA is not exactly quantified and little is known about whether the parents' PA helps their children achieve the currently recommended daily step count (SC on weekdays and at weekends. PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine and quantify the relationship between parents' behaviour (SC and screen time [ST] and children's SC on weekdays and at weekends. This study also investigates whether parents' level of SC helps children achieve the step count recommendations. METHODS: The participants (388 parents aged 35-45 and their 485 children aged 9-12 were randomly recruited from 21 Czech government-funded primary schools. The participants recorded their SC (The Yamax Digiwalker SW-200 and their ST duration for seven consecutive days (≥ 10 hours/day during April-May and September-October of 2013. The associations between the parents' behaviour (SC and ST and children's SC were estimated using general linear regression. Logistic regression (enter method was used to examine the odds of achievement of the recommendations of 11,000 SC/day for girls and 13,000 SC/day for boys. RESULTS: Each 1,000 SC increase in the mothers' (fathers' SC/weekday was significantly (p < .05 associated with an extra 261 SC/day in their daughters and 413 (244 SC/day in their sons. Each 1,000 SC increase in mothers' (fathers' SC/weekend day was significantly (p < .05 associated with an extra 523 (386 SC/day in their daughters and 508 (435 SC/day in their sons. A reduction in the mothers' ST by 30 minutes per weekend day was significantly (p < .05 associated with an extra 494 SC/day in their daughters and 467 SC/day in their sons. The children of the mothers and fathers who met the

  17. Physical Activity and Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bellizzi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is burdened by high cardiovascular risk because of increased prevalence of traditional and disease-specific cardiovascular risk factors and, consequently, patients are affected by greater morbidity and mortality. In renal transplanted patients, healthy lifestyle and physical activity are recommended to improve overall morbidity and cardiovascular outcomes. According to METs (Metabolic Equivalent Task; i.e. the amount of energy consumed while sitting at rest, physical activities are classified as sedentary (<3.0 METs, of moderate-(3.0 to 5.9 METs or vigorous-intensity (≥6.0 METs. Guidelines suggest for patients with chronic kidney disease an amount of physical activity of at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity five times per week (min 450 MET-minutes/week. Data on physical activity in renal transplanted patients, however, are limited and have been mainly obtained by mean of non-objective methods. Available data suggest that physical activity is low either at the start or during renal transplantation and this may be associated with poor patient and graft outcomes. Therefore, in renal transplanted patients more data on physical activity obtained with objective, accelerometer-based methods are needed. In the meanwhile, physical activity have to be considered as an essential part of the medical care for renal transplanted recipients.

  18. Maternal-child co-participation in physical activity-related behaviours: prevalence and cross-sectional associations with mothers and children’s objectively assessed physical activity levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A. Hnatiuk

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-participation in physical activity may be a useful strategy for increasing physical activity in mothers and their young children, yet little empirical evidence exists on this topic for young families. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of mother-child co-participation in physical activity and examine the association between co-participatory behaviours and objectively-assessed physical activity in young children and their mothers. Methods One-hundred twenty-three 4–6 year-old children and their mothers were recruited from preschools in Belgium between November 2010 and January 2011. Mothers completed a questionnaire assessing the frequency of co-participation in five activities. Both mothers and children wore ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers concurrently for 7 days to assess the time spent in moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA and light- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (LMVPA. Descriptive statistics (means, frequencies were used to determine the prevalence of co-participation. Separate multiple linear regression analyses examined the association between co-participation and mothers’ and children’s physical activity on weekdays and weekends. Results Most mothers reported infrequent co-participation in physical activities with their children. On weekdays, walking or cycling for short trips was positively associated with children’s MVPA while attending a park or similar more than once per week was negatively associated with children’s MVPA and LMVPA. Going to an indoor play centre together once or more per week was negatively associated with mother’s LMVPA. On weekends, walking or cycling with their child in their free time was positively associated with both children’s and mothers’ MVPA and childrens’ LMVPA. Going to an indoor play centre together 1–3 times/month was negatively associated with children’s weekend MVPA. Conclusions Reported rates of co-participation in

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, ... If you're doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a ...

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. ... Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, ...

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project Checklist CDC’s Example Related Resources ... Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Videos Glossary of Terms Personal Stories Harold, Age 7 Maria, Age 16 Alex, Age 32 Demetrise, Age ... aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4:48 More videos Here are some ways to ...

  4. Benefits of Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a bone-strengthening activity. Stretching helps improve your flexibility and your ability to fully move your joints. ... own, consider joining a support group. Many hospitals, workplaces, and community groups offer classes to help people ...

  5. Physical activity and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2015-01-01

    Brain development is a complex process, and stimuli during this developmental period may modulate the brain's functional maturation and determine its lifelong integrity. Human and animal studies have shown that environmental stimuli such as physical activity habits seem to have a favorable influence on brain development. Research on humans has demonstrated improvement in cognitive performance in the children of women who exercised regularly throughout pregnancy and in individuals who were physically active during childhood and adolescence. Investigations using animal models have also reported that physical activity improves the cognitive function of developing rats. In this review, we will present the neurobiological mechanisms of such effects.

  6. Why Physical Activity Is Important (for Girls)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Fitness Why physical activity is important Why physical activity is important You may wonder if being physically ... you are to be around. That's partly because physical activity gets your brain to make "feel-good" chemicals ...

  7. Physical Activity Improves Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Physical activity improves quality of life Updated:Mar 2,2015 ... proven to improve both mental and physical health. Physical activity boosts mental wellness. Regular physical activity can relieve ...

  8. Contribution of free play towards physical activity guidelines for New Zealand primary school children aged 7-9 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGall, S E; McGuigan, M R; Nottle, C

    2011-02-01

    the objectives of this study were to investigate children's physical activity patterns to gain comparisons between home and school and to determine whether the current physical activity guidelines of 60 min of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) daily were being met. participants were recruited from two New Zealand primary schools (60 children, mean age (SD) 8.3 (0.7) years). Physical activity was measured for seven consecutive days using Actigraph accelerometers. Total activity and average counts were determined for school playtime, after school and weekends. Differences between average counts for these intervals were compared using the t statistic. Time and percentage of time spent were categorised into the activity thresholds: sedentary (5200). Total activity for each day was also determined. no child met the recommended 60 min of MVPA daily during the investigation. Compared to school playtime, activity counts were lower by 36% (CI 25% to 45.5%, ptime engaged in light or sedentary activities. Even during school playtime, where the children were most active, only 8 of 80 min were spent engaged in MVPA. this study found activity levels were considerably lower than the recommended guidelines, and children were more active during school playtime compared to after school and weekends.

  9. Physical activity patterns in children and adolescents: a brief summary of current knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Garganta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this review was to accost conceptual and operational issues associated with physical activity patterns (PAF in children and adolescents. A systematic research was done in national and international data bases in order to select recent studies with information concerning PAF. There are different ways to describe and quantify PAF using univariate and multivariate statistical techniques. Most of studies identified that physical activity is characterized by extremely short periods of high intensity, with a predominance of moderate to low intensity activity.On weekends these periods are longer and boys have higher frequencies of episodes in different levels of intensity. “Physical activity pattern” is a usual expression, but there is no unanimous concept and interpretation. Using a multimode approach would certainly improve our understanding of PAF, considering its type, frequency, duration, and intensity.

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but not race-walking) Water aerobics Bicycling slower than 10 miles per hour ...

  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stair Usage Project Checklist CDC’s Example Related Resources Walking Step It Up! Surgeon General’s Call to Action ... doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate Intensity Walking briskly (3 miles per hour or faster, but ...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E F G H I J K L M ... Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant ... page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Our Division ...

  13. Parental education and physical activity in pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, S; Ricardo, N; Soares-Miranda, L; Santos, R; Moreira, C; Mota, J

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively assess pre-school children's total physical activity (TPA) patterns and compliance with guidelines and to examine differences relative to parental education. The sample consisted on 509 healthy pre-school children, aged 3-6 years recruited from kindergartens located in the metropolitan area of Porto, Portugal. The PA was assessed for 7 consecutive days by accelerometry. For TPA, we followed the guidelines of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (children who spent at least >120  min per day in active play). For TPA, we calculated the proportion of children who spent at least >120  min per day in active play and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), we calculated the proportion of children who spent at least >60  min per day in active play. Parental education was analysed according to the Portuguese education system. Children with parents in the highest education level were less active than children from low and middle education level (P ≤ 0.001) in all patterns of PA (week and weekend). Regarding TPA during the week we found that the majority of children from low and middle parental education meet the NASPE guidelines. On the other hand, more than half the children from high parental education did not meet these recommendations (P ≤ 0.001) and MVPA recommendations (P ≤ 0.05). In both recommendations, children from low parental education were twice more likely to meet the recommendations compared with children belonging to high parental education. Parent education was negatively associated with children's daily physical activity patterns and compliance with guidelines. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Physical activity of office workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Biernat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Inactivity or insufficient physical activity is risk factor for metabolic or cardiovascular diseases. In most of cases the nature of work of office employees does not require high physical efforts and consists mostly of sitting but the reports on leisure activity of office workers are still lacking. Thus, the aim of the study was to assess physical activity of civil and local administration workers and bank officials. 293 randomly selected office workers took part in the study. They were recruited from employees of local (n=97 or civil (n=119 administration authorities or banks (n=77 and subjected to interviews with the use of IPAQ questionnaire (short version. Low physical activity was noted in about 70% of local administration employees, in almost 50% of bank officials and about 35% of workers employed in civil administration. Total daily time spent on sitting was on average 9.7±1.7 hour/day irrespectively of gender or group studied. Very low level of physical activity of Polish office workers may be a result of improper habits of spending spare time, low awareness of beneficial effects of physical activity and still insufficient promotion of healthy/active lifestyle in East-European countries.

  15. Could strength of exposure to the residential neighbourhood modify associations between walkability and physical activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Vivienne C; Blakely, Tony; Pearce, Jamie; Witten, Karen; Bagheri, Nasser; Badland, Hannah; Schofield, Grant

    2015-12-01

    The importance of neighbourhoods for health and wellbeing may vary according to an individual's reliance on their local resources, but this assertion is rarely tested. We investigate whether greater neighbourhood 'exposure' through reliance on or engagement with the residential setting magnifies neighbourhood-health associations. Three built environment characteristics (destination density, streetscape (attractiveness of built environment) and street connectivity) and two physical activity components (weekday and weekend accelerometer counts) were measured for 2033 residents living in 48 neighbourhoods within four New Zealand cities in 2009-2010, giving six different built environment-physical activity associations. Interactions for each built environment-physical activity association with four individual-level characteristics (acting as proxies for exposure: gender, working status, car access, and income) were assessed with multi-level regression models; a total of 24 'tests'. Of the 12 weekday built environment-physical activity tests, 5 interaction terms were significant (p walkability of the built environment was associated with an overall 3.8% (95% CI: 3.6%-4.1%) greater increase in weekday physical activity across all the types of people we hypothesised to spend more time in their residential neighbourhood, and for weekend physical activity it was 4.2% (95% CI 3.9%-4.5%). Using multiple evaluation methods, interactions were in line with our hypothesis, with a stronger association seen for proxy exposure indicators (for example, restricted car access). Added to the wider evidence base, our study strengthens causal evidence of an effect of the built environment on physical activity, and highlights that health gains from improvements of the residential neighbourhood may be greater for some people. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical activity, obesity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauman, Adrian E; Grunseit, Anne C; Rangul, Vegar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortalit...

  17. Towards physical activity support community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elloumi, Lamia; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Nowadays it is recognized that physical activity, besides other lifestyles, has indisputable beneficial affects on cardiovascular diseases prevention and treatment. Additionally the social support is important and has a valuable impact on the outcomes in cardiovascular disease patients. To provide

  18. Physical activity, obesity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauman, Adrian E.; Grunseit, Anne C.; Rangul, Vegar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortalit...

  19. Epilepsy, physical activity and sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrizosa-Moog, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available People with epilepsy are prone to be sedentary compared with the general population. The causes of inactivity are ignorance, prejudice, overprotection, fear and shame. There is no scientific evidence supporting a limitation of physical exercise in persons with epilepsy. The benefits of exercise in these patients are huge. Positive aspects are: physical conditioning, prevention of seizures, emotional wellbeing, social interaction, drug treatment adherence, osteoporosis prevention and better quality of life for patients and their families. Having in mind the individual characteristics, physical exercise should be prescribed and guided. Available evidence underlies the complementary therapeutic effects of physical activity with large positive results at a low cost. Sports or regular physical activity should be a standard indication for persons with epilepsy.

  20. Physical Activity for a Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Physical Activity for a Healthy Weight Language: English Español (Spanish) ... calories are used in typical activities? Why is physical activity important? Regular physical activity is important for good ...

  1. Psychosocial factors underlying physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheng-Ye

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the increasing importance of obesity in China, prevention interventions encouraging physical activity by middle school students are needed. The purpose of this study is to illustrate how a rapid elicitation method can be used to identify salient consequences, referents, and circumstances about physical activity as perceived by middle school students and to provide suggestions for interventions and quantitative research. Method A theory-based qualitative study using a self-completion elicitation was conducted with 155 students from two middle schools in Beijing, China. Following the Theory of Planned Behavior, six open-ended questions asked students for their perceptions about performing physical activity at least 60 minutes each day: advantages of participating in physical activity; disadvantages of doing so; people who approve of participation; people who disapprove; things that make it easy; and things that make it hard. Content analysis revealed categories of salient consequences, reference groups, and circumstances. Results While the three most frequently mentioned advantages elicited from the students were physical health consequences (e.g., will strengthen my body (58.7%, four of the salient advantages were not (e.g., will improve my grades (12.2%. Parents were the most frequently mentioned social referent (42.6% as approving; 27.7% as disapproving when students were asked who might approve or disapprove of their participation. Circumstances perceived to hinder daily physical activity included having too many assignments and not having enough time. Conclusion While many of the beliefs about physical activity elicited from this study were similar to those found with students from England and the US, several were unique to these students from Beijing. The results of this qualitative research suggest that interventions to encourage physical activity among middle school students should address: perceived consequences

  2. Kinaesthetic activities in physics instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Christiansen, Frederik V

    2016-01-01

    One of the major difficulties in learning physics is for students to develop a conceptual understanding of the core concepts of physics. Many authors argue that students’ conceptions of basic physical phenomena are rooted in basic schemas, originating in fundamental kinaesthetic experiences...... of being. We argue that this idea should be utilized in physics instruction, that kinaesthetic activities will provide useful entry point for students’ acquisition of the basic conceptions of physics, and that they can overcome the phenomenological gap between experiential and conceptual understanding. We...... discuss the nature of image schemas and focus particularly on one: effort-resistance-flow. This schema is fundamental not only in our everyday experience, but also in most of school physics. We show how enactment of a particular kinaesthetic model can support student understanding and intuition...

  3. Physical activity during pregnancy in obese and normal-weight women as assessed by pedometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renault, Kristina; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Andreasen, Kirsten Riis

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare physical activity as assessed by a pedometer in obese and normal-weight pregnant women at different gestational ages. To evaluate the use of a pedometer in pregnancy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Department of obstetrics and gynecology in a university hospital......-weight or obese at gestational ages 11-13, 18-22, and 36-38, and expressed as median number of daily steps during a whole week, working days, and weekends. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relation between BMI and physical activity during pregnancy and compliance with wearing the pedometer. RESULTS: Noncompliance was more...... in Copenhagen. POPULATION: 338 pregnant women, 175 normal-weight women with body mass index (BMI) 20-25 kg/m(2) and 163 obese women with BMI > or = 30 kg/m(2). METHODS: Physical activity was assessed by a pedometer (Yamax Digiwalker SW-700/701) on seven consecutive days in six different groups: normal...

  4. Comparisons in ambulatory physical activity in children from the United Kingdom and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Birch, Samantha L; Eyre, Emma; Bryant, Elizabeth; Rutten, Cindy; Boen, Filip; Seghers, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to examine ambulatory physical activity levels in adolescents from the UK and Belgium. Following ethics approval, 2760 children (1247 boys, 1513 girls), aged 9-14 years from Belgium (n = 1614) and the UK (n = 1146), wore a pedometer for 4 days including at least 1 weekend day. Body mass index (BMI) was determined from height and mass. A 2 (gender) × 2 (country) way ANCOVA, controlling for age and BMI, revealed a significant country-by-gender interaction for steps/day (p = 0.0001). In both Belgium and the UK, boys were more physically active than girls (both p = 0.0001), but the difference between boys and girls was greater for Belgian than UK children. These results suggest there are differences in the ambulatory physical activity patterns of children in the UK and Belgium.

  5. Physical activity during pregnancy in obese and normal-weight women as assessed by pedometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renault, Kristina; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Andreasen, Kirsten Riis

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare physical activity as assessed by a pedometer in obese and normal-weight pregnant women at different gestational ages. To evaluate the use of a pedometer in pregnancy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Department of obstetrics and gynecology in a university hospital...... in Copenhagen. POPULATION: 338 pregnant women, 175 normal-weight women with body mass index (BMI) 20-25 kg/m(2) and 163 obese women with BMI > or = 30 kg/m(2). METHODS: Physical activity was assessed by a pedometer (Yamax Digiwalker SW-700/701) on seven consecutive days in six different groups: normal......-weight or obese at gestational ages 11-13, 18-22, and 36-38, and expressed as median number of daily steps during a whole week, working days, and weekends. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relation between BMI and physical activity during pregnancy and compliance with wearing the pedometer. RESULTS: Noncompliance was more...

  6. Tips for Starting Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Choose physical activities that do not require special gear or advanced skills. Turn on some music and host a dance party with friends and family. Prepare to break through your roadblocks. What are the top three things keeping YOU from being more active? ...

  7. Physical Activity in the Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Réol, Lise Andersen

    2016-01-01

    It is a wide held belief among scientist and teachers that physical activities in school creates joyfulness and supports the development of a ‘positive’ learning environment. This belief is solid, but built on scant scientific documentation. In Denmark new governmental policy prescribes 45 minutes...... activities in school enhance positive emotions and support an inclusive and safe learning environment. Thought it does also point to the fact, that it is indeed not that simple. Teachers’ sport-specific educational competences, their own experience of well-being and fun related to physical activities...

  8. [Behavior and knowledge on physical activity among urban junior students in Hangzhou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yan-Jun; Liu, Qing-Min; Lü, Jun; Li, Li-Ming

    2012-07-01

    To study the status of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors and relevant knowledge to it among junior students. In a cross-sectional study, a self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the PA, sedentary behaviors and relevant knowledge on 4549 eligible urban junior students. Among the 4549 junior students, only 7.50% engaged in ≥ 60 minutes of PA, per day. Those junior students spending 2 hours on weekdays, 3 hours on weekends in doing homework and those spending ≥ 30 min on weekdays, 2 hours on weekends in doing other sedentary activities, accounted for the highest proportion of the subjects respectively. The awareness rate of spending at least 60 minutes each day on PA to stay fit and healthy was 24.63%. Differences in gender and grade at school were significantly on 'understanding of health benefits regarding PA' (P students were lack of awareness and appropriate behavior on physical activities so the related intervention should be taken actively to improve the current situation among the adolescents at school.

  9. Physical Activity Surveillance in Parks Using Direct Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Cohen, Deborah; Evenson, Kelly R.; Golinelli, Daniela; Hillier, Amy; Lapham, Sandra C.; Williamson, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Primary features of observational public health surveillance instruments are that they are valid, can reliably estimate physical activity behaviors, and are useful across diverse geographic settings and seasons by different users. Previous studies have reported the validity and reliability of Systematic Observation of Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to estimate park and user characteristics. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the use of SOPARC as a surveillance instrument and to situate the findings from the study in the context of the previous literature. Methods We collected data by using SOPARC for more than 3 years in 4 locations: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Columbus, Ohio; Chapel Hill/Durham, North Carolina; and Albuquerque, New Mexico during spring, summer, and autumn. Results We observed a total of 35,990 park users with an overall observer reliability of 94% (range, 85%–99%) conducted on 15% of the observations. We monitored the proportion of park users engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and found marginal differences in MVPA by both city and season. Park users visited parks significantly more on weekend days than weekdays and visitation rates tended to be lower during summer than spring. Conclusion SOPARC is a highly reliable observation instrument that can be used to collect data across diverse geographic settings and seasons by different users and has potential as a surveillance system. PMID:24384304

  10. Video game genre preference, physical activity and screen-time in adolescent boys from low-income communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Hayden T; Smith, Jordan J; Morgan, Philip J; Babic, Mark J; Lubans, David R

    2014-12-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between the types of video games played by adolescent boys and their participation in physical activity and recreational screen-time. Participants were 320 boys (mean age = 12.7, ±0.5 years) from 14 secondary schools located in low-income areas of New South Wales, Australia. Outcomes included height, weight, physical activity (accelerometers), total screen-time, and video game genre preference. Significant differences in both weekday and weekend screen-time were found between video game genre groups. In addition, significant differences in overall activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were found between genre groups on weekdays. Between-group differences in physical activity on weekends were not statistically significant. This cross-sectional study has demonstrated that video game genre preference is associated with physical activity and screen-time in adolescent boys from low-income communities. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Crohn's disease and physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kšírová, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Bachelor thesis "Crohn's disease and physical activity" deal with Crohn's disease, its clinics, diagnosis and treatment. The next part give notice about some complication of disease which may be treatment by physiotherapy and this part is also about influence of exercise to digestion. This bachelor thesis is going to name positives and negatives of physical exercise on process Crohn's disease. Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)

  12. Enhancing Physical Education with a Supplemental Physical Activity Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Megan; Bice, Matthew R.; Heelan, Kate; Ball, James

    2017-01-01

    For decades, schools have played a pivotal role in providing physical activity opportunities to children. For many students, school-time physical activity serves as the primary source of activity, via activity clubs, classroom physical activity breaks, and family health awareness nights. The purpose of this article is to describe how three schools…

  13. FastStats: Exercise or Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Exercise or Physical Activity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... adults aged 18 and over who met the Physical Activity Guidelines for aerobic physical activity: 51.7% Percent ...

  14. Exploring Mothers' Influence on Preschoolers' Physical Activity and Sedentary Time: A Cross Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, Alana M; Vanderloo, Leigh M; Tucker, Patricia

    2018-02-06

    Objectives Physical activity patterns can track from childhood into adulthood; therefore, establishing active behaviors early is imperative. Given the multidimensional nature of a mother's influence on their children, there is a need to utilize more comprehensive measures to assess the relationship between mother and child activity behaviors. Specifically, mothers have been identified as influencing preschoolers' activity behaviors and are often in control of organizing a family's opportunities to be active. The purpose of this study was to explore maternal influence on preschoolers' physical activity and sedentary time. Methods Preschoolers (n = 24) and their mothers (n = 24) wore Actical™ accelerometers for 7 consecutive days (e.g., 5 weekday, 2 weekend days), and mothers completed the adapted Environmental Determinants of Physical Activity in Preschool Children-Parent Survey. Direct entry regression analyses were conducted to explore maternal influence (e.g., role modeling through mothers' activity levels, maternal support, and enjoyment of being active) on preschoolers' activity levels. Results Maternal support was found to be a significant predictor of preschoolers' light and moderate-vigorous physical activity, and sedentary time (p < .05); accounting for 37.3-46.7% of the variation. Conclusions for Practice Mothers supportive behaviors influenced preschoolers' physical activity and sedentary time. Future research is needed to investigate facilitators/barriers that mothers with preschoolers encounter with regard to providing support to be active or modeling active behaviors themselves.

  15. Association of Light Exposure on Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Aggio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate whether light exposure was associated with objectively measured physical activity (PA and sedentary behaviour in young people. Methods: Participants (n = 229, 46.7% female were young people (mean 8.8 years [SD ± 2.2] from the borough of Camden, UK. Daily sedentary time, moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA and light exposure were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer with an ambient light sensor during the summer. Multiple linear regression models examined associations between average daily light exposure, sedentary time and time in MVPA. Models were repeated investigating weekdays and weekend days separately. Analyses were adjusted for pre-specified covariables, including age, sex, device wear time, ethnic group, school and body fat. Results: There were significant associations between average daily light exposure and time sedentary (β coefficient = −11.2, 95% CI, −19.0 to −3.4 and in MVPA (β coefficient = 3.5, 95% CI, 1.2 to 5.9. Light exposure was significantly associated with weekend sedentary time (β coefficient = −10.0, 95% CI, −17.6, −2.4, weekend MVPA (β coefficient = 3.7, 95% CI, 1.7, 5.7, weekday sedentary time (β coefficient = −15.0, 95% CI, −22.7 to −7.2, but not weekday MVPA (β coefficient = 2.0, 95% CI, −0.5 to 4.5. Conclusion: Average daily light exposure is positively associated with time in MVPA and negatively associated with sedentary time. Increasing daylight exposure may be a useful intervention strategy for promoting physical activity.

  16. Childhood asthma and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochte, Lene; Nielsen, Kim G; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents. The obj......BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents...

  17. The "weekend effect" in pediatric surgery - increased mortality for children undergoing urgent surgery during the weekend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Seth D; Papandria, Dominic J; Aboagye, Jonathan; Salazar, Jose H; Van Arendonk, Kyle; Al-Omar, Khaled; Ortega, Gezzer; Sacco Casamassima, Maria Grazia; Abdullah, Fizan

    2014-07-01

    For a number of pediatric and adult conditions, morbidity and mortality are increased when patients present to the hospital on a weekend compared to weekdays. The objective of this study was to compare pediatric surgical outcomes following weekend versus weekday procedures. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the Kids' Inpatient Database, we identified 439,457 pediatric (Pediatric patients undergoing common urgent surgical procedures during a weekend admission have a higher adjusted risk of death, blood transfusion, and procedural complications. While the exact etiology of these findings is not clear, the timing of surgical procedures should be considered in the context of systems-based deficiencies that may be detrimental to pediatric surgical care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CERN Webfest: A weekend for science on the web

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Are you passionate about science? Do you like communicating that passion to the general public? Then come along to the CERN Summer Student Webfest on the weekend of 3-4 August! It is a grassroots initiative by the summer students, open to all staff and users, and aims to spark new ideas that could innovate the future of web-based education about CERN, the LHC and particle physics.   The CERN Summer Student Webfest is a weekend of online web-based creativity modelled on the gatherings (sometimes called hackfests or hackathons) that energize many open-source communities. You can work with like-minded students and CERN staff to design and build demos of the web apps you would like to see online. Prizes will be awarded to the best projects, with a Grand Prize winner receiving a trip to the Mozilla Festival in London! Participants in the CERN Summer Student Webfest will work in teams and design neat applications that encourage the public to learn more about science and, in particular, CE...

  19. A cool Web challenge on a hot weekend

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Summer Student Webfest took place last weekend and brought dozens of young web enthusiasts to the Main Auditorium. Fifteen projects were presented in the Friday pitching session and after that the challenge was launched. And the winner is…   Five of the six members of the team behind the “Mother hunting” project during a brainstorming session. Image: Jiannan Zhang. … the “Mother hunting” game! An end-state particle explores CERN to try to reconstruct his (or her) family history of decay mothers and ancestors. Along the way, the particle meets famous physicists who teach it physics. A globe sphinx asks physics questions before the player can progress to various stages (read the game description on the dedicated page). Targeted at high school students, the game features very appealing 3D graphics, which accurately reproduce the layout of CERN. “Mother hunting” was one of the 15 projects presented at the...

  20. ENERGY EXPENDITURE AND HABITUAL PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES IN ADOLESCENT SPRINT ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Aerenhouts

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess total energy expenditure (TEE and specific habitual physical activities in adolescent sprint athletes. Two methods used to estimate TEE, an activity diary (AD and SenseWear armband (SWA, were compared. Sixteen athletes (6 girls, 10 boys, mean age 16.5 ± 1.6 yr simultaneously wore a SWA and completed an AD and food diary during one week. Basal energy expenditure as given by the SWA when taken off was corrected for the appropriate MET value using the AD. TEE as estimated by the AD and SWA was comparable (3196 ± 590 kcal and 3012 ± 518 kcal, p = 0.113 without day-to-day variations in TEE and energy expended in activities of high intensity. Daily energy intake (2569 ± 508 kcal did not match TEE according to both the AD and SWA (respectively p < 0.001 and p = 0.007. Athletes were in a supine position for a longer time on weekend days than on week days and slept longer on Sundays. Athletes reported a longer time of high-intensive physical activities in the AD than registered by the SWA on 4 out of 7 days. In addition to specific sprint activities on 3 to 7 days per week, 11 out of 16 athletes actively commuted to school where they participated in sports once or twice per week. The AD and the SWA are comparable in the estimation of TEE, which appears realistic and sustainable. The SWA offers an appropriate and objective method in the assessment of TEE, sleeping and resting in adolescent athletes on the condition that detailed information is given for the times the armband is not worn. The AD offers activity specific information but relies on the motivation, compliance and subjectivity of the individual, especially considering high-intensive intermittent training

  1. Stress hormones and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Hormone secretion during physical activity of specific duration and intensity is part of the stress response. In a study to investigate the secretion of ß-endorphin, leucine enkephalin and other recognised stress hormones during physical exercise, blood samples were taken from fourteen (14 healthy, male athletes who competed in a 21 km roadrace. Blood samples were collected before and after completion of the race. This study shows that ß-endorphin/ß-lipotropin, leucine enkephalin, prolactin, and melatonin may be classified as stress hormones in physical activity of duration 80 to 120 minutes and intensity exceeding 75%-V0₂max. Widespread intra-individual variation in serum cortisol concentrations prevent definite conclusion. The un­expected increase in serum testosterone levels warrants further research.

  2. Metabolic benefits of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Volčanšek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is the most beneficial intervention in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. Life style, which has become mostly sedentary, leads to growing incidence in obesity, what could cause the first so far reduction in life expectancy in developed countries.Physical activity reduces the chronic low-grade inflammation, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer. Regular physical activity exerts two anti-inflammatory effects: reduction of visceral fat, which produces the majority of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and production of myokines. It has been proposed that cytokines and other peptides that are produced by muscle fibers should be classified as myokines that exert autocrine, paracrine and endocrine effects. Myokines induce muscle hypertrophy and myogenesis, stimulate fat oxidation, improve insulin sensitivity and have an anti-inflammatory effect.  Therefore, skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ and this provides the basis for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs, such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, gut, bones and brain. Physical inactivity leads to an altered myokine profile, associating sedentary life style with some chronic diseases.Physical activity is recommended as a tool for weight management and prevention of weight gain, for weight loss and for prevention of weight regain. High quality studies have confirmed the important impact of exercise on improving blood glucose control in diabetic patients, and on preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in predisposed populations. Prescribing specific exercise tailored to individual's needs is an intervention strategy for health improvement. Physical fitness counteracts the detrimental effects of obesity reducing morbidity and mortality.

  3. Youth physical activity resource use and activity measured by accelerometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andréa L; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    To examine whether use of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. One hundred eleven adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported use of a physical activity resource (none /1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily (1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and (2) vigorous physical activity. Using a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources.

  4. Youth Physical Activity Resources Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether utilization of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods 111 adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported utilization of a physical activity resource (none/1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily 1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and 2) vigorous physical activity. Results Utilizing a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African-Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources. PMID:21204684

  5. The Physical Activity Levels and Sedentary Behaviors of Latino Children in London (Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Mandich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the physical activity and sedentary behaviors of a sample of Latino children in London, Ontario, Canada. Methods: Seventy-four Latino children (54.1% male; mean age = 11.4 completed self-report questionnaires related to physical activity and sedentary behaviors. A subset of children (n = 64 wore Actical (Mini Mitter, Respironics accelerometers for a maximum of four days. Results: Latino children self-reported moderate levels of physical activity (i.e., mean score of 2.8 on 5-point scale. Accelerometer data revealed that children spent an average of 50.0 min in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA; 59.2 min on weekdays and 50.6 min on weekend days and were sedentary for an average of 8.4 h (508.0 min per day (533.5 min on weekdays and 497.7 min on weekend days. Children reported spending an average of 3.8 h (228 min daily in front of screens—1.7 h (102 min watching television, 1.2 h (72 min on the computer, and 0.9 h (54 min playing video games. Conclusions: This feasibility project provided a preliminary account of objectively measured daily physical activity and sedentary time among a sample of Latino children in Canada, as well as insight into the challenge of measuring these behaviors. Sedentary behavior reduction techniques should be explored and implemented in this young population, along with strategies to promote adherence to accelerometer protocols.

  6. Overweight adult cats have significantly lower voluntary physical activity than adult lean cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Maria Rc; Shoveller, Anna K

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objectives of the current pilot study were to evaluate whether body condition score (BCS) and body weight are significantly related to physical activity counts, and to evaluate potential interaction between BCS and voluntary physical activity measured over a 14 day period. Methods Ten (five lean, five overweight), neutered, adult American Shorthair cats were selected for this study (median age 4 ± 0.5 years). Cats with a BCS of ⩽3.0 were considered lean, whereas cats with a BCS >3.0 were considered overweight, using a 5-point scale. Cats were housed in a free-living environment with indoor/outdoor access and were individually fed once daily a commercially available dry extruded diet and allowed 1 h to eat. Voluntary physical activity was measured consecutively for 14 days using the Actical Activity Monitors that were worn parallel to the ribs and attached via a harness. Results Lean cats had a greater mean total daily voluntary physical activity ( P = 0.0059), and a greater voluntary physical activity during light ( P = 0.0023) and dark ( P = 0.0446) periods, with overweight cats having 60% of the physical activity of lean cats. Lean cats were more active before feeding and during animal care procedures. These data suggest that lean cats have a greater anticipatory physical activity prior to feeding and are more eager to have social interaction with humans than overweight cats. A significant interaction was observed between day of physical activity measurement and BCS for total daily voluntary physical activity ( P = 0.0133) and activity during the light period ( P = 0.0016) where lean cats were consistently more active than overweight cats. In general, cats were more active during weekdays vs weekends. Conclusions and relevance The results of this study suggest that overweight cats are less active than lean cats and that voluntary physical activity level appears to be influenced by social interaction with humans.

  7. The effectiveness of worksite physical activity programs on physical activity, physical fitness, and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proper, K.I.; Koning, M.; Beek, A.J. van der; Hildebrandt, V.H.; Bosscher, R.J.; Mechelen, W. van

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To critically review the literature with respect to the effectiveness of worksite physical activity programs on physical activity, physical fitness, and health. Data Sources: A search for relevant English-written papers published between 1980 and 2000 was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE,

  8. Increasing Physical Activity during the School Day through Physical Activity Classes: Implications for Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Megan; Bice, Matt; Bartee, Todd; Heelan, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Across the nation schools are adopting health and wellness policies, specifically physical activity (PA) initiatives that aid healthy long-term lifestyles. Interest has been generated about the inclusion of physical activity classes to complement existing physical education classes. Furthermore, discussion has evolved as to if additional…

  9. The types and levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour of Senior Phase learners in Potchefstroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna C.W. De Vos

    2016-10-01

    Objective: To determine the types and levels of physical activity as well as that of sedentary behaviour of a group Senior Phase learners in South Africa. Methods: The adapted Children's Leisure Activities Study Survey (CLASS questionnaire was used for determining the types and levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour of 230 Grade 7 learners, from three schools in Potchefstroom. Data were analysed by means of the SAS statistics programme, and descriptive statistics, as well as independent t-tests andeffect sizes (ES were used. Results: Moderate to high-intensity physical activity levels of between 334 and 361 min per week were found, and sedentary behaviour of between 3077 and 3410 min per week, which implies that between 70.7% and 71.9% of the participants, did not meet the recommended health-based guidelines. Higher activity levels were shown during weekends, where the boys were significantly more active than girls (p < 0.001; ES between 0.21 and 0.56, and girls showed more sedentary behaviours than the boys (ES between 0.18 and 0.20. The leisure time physical activities with the highest participation were soccer, recreational swimming, jogging and dancing, while the sedentary activities were listening to music, riding a vehicle and being busy on the phone. Conclusion: Strategies need to be implemented to raise the physical activity levels of Senior Phase learners, especially during weekdays, and to decrease sedentary behaviour. With this view in mind, recommendations are made for Physical Education teachers.

  10. A daily process analysis of intentions and physical activity in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, David E; Elavsky, Steriani; Doerksen, Shawna E; Maher, Jaclyn P

    2013-10-01

    Social-cognitive theories, such as the theory of planned behavior, posit intentions as proximal influences on physical activity (PA). This paper extends those theories by examining within-person variation in intentions and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) as a function of the unfolding constraints in people's daily lives (e.g., perceived time availability, fatigue, soreness, weather, overeating). College students (N = 63) completed a 14-day diary study over the Internet that rated daily motivation, contextual constraints, and MVPA. Key findings from multilevel analyses were that (1) between-person differences represented 46% and 33% of the variability in daily MVPA intentions and behavior, respectively; (2) attitudes, injunctive norms, self-efficacy, perceptions of limited time availability, and weekend status predicted daily changes in intention strength; and (3) daily changes in intentions, perceptions of limited time availability, and weekend status predicted day-to-day changes in MVPA. Embedding future motivation and PA research in the context of people's daily lives will advance understanding of individual PA change processes.

  11. Objectively measured physical activity in Brazilians with visual impairment: description and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa Porcellis da Silva, Rafael; Marques, Alexandre Carriconde; Reichert, Felipe Fossati

    2017-05-19

    Low level of physical activity is a serious health issue in individuals with visual impairment. Few studies have objectively measured physical activity in this population group, particularly outside high-income countries. The aim of this study was to describe physical activity measured by accelerometry and its associated factors in Brazilian adults with visual impairment. In a cross-sectional design, 90 adults (18-95 years old) answered a questionnaire and wore an accelerometer for at least 3 days (including one weekend day) to measure physical activity (min/day). Sixty percent of the individuals practiced at least 30 min/day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Individuals who were blind were less active, spent more time in sedentary activities and spent less time in moderate and vigorous activities than those with low vision. Individuals who walked mainly without any assistance were more active, spent less time in sedentary activities and spent more time in light and moderate activities than those who walked with a long cane or sighted guide. Our data highlight factors associated with lower levels of physical activity in people with visual impairment. These factors, such as being blind and walking without assistance should be tackled in interventions to increase physical activity levels among visual impairment individuals. Implications for Rehabilitation Physical inactivity worldwide is a serious health issue in people with visual impairments and specialized institutions and public policies must work to increase physical activity level of this population. Those with lower visual acuity and walking with any aid are at a higher risk of having low levels of physical activity. The association between visual response profile, living for less than 11 years with visual impairment and PA levels deserves further investigations Findings of the present study provide reliable data to support rehabilitation programs, observing the need of taking special attention to

  12. Polar Science Weekend: A University / Science Center Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, H. L.; Moritz, R. E.; Lettvin, E.; Schatz, D.; Russell, L.

    2008-12-01

    Polar Science Weekend (PSW) is a four-day event featuring hands-on activities, live demonstrations, and a variety of exhibits about the polar regions and current polar research, presented by scientists from the University of Washington's Polar Science Center, and held at Seattle's Pacific Science Center. PSW was conceived and organized jointly by the Polar Science Center and Pacific Science Center, which is Washington State's most well-attended museum. The first PSW in March 2006 drew over 5000 visitors, and subsequent PSWs in 2007 and 2008 have both surpassed that figure. The success of this university / science center partnership has made PSW an annual event, and has served as a model for Pacific Science Center's Portal to the Public program, in which partnerships with other scientific institutions have been built. Researchers at the Polar Science Center (PSC) study the physical processes controlling high-latitude oceans, atmosphere, sea ice, and ice sheets, and are involved in numerous IPY projects. PSC scientists also engage in many outreach efforts such as classroom visits and public lectures, but PSW stands out as the highlight of the year. The partnership with Pacific Science Center brings access to facilities, publicity, and a large audience that would not otherwise be readily available to PSC. Pacific Science Center, constructed for the 1962 World's Fair in Seattle, serves more than one million visitors per year. Pacific Science Center's mission is to inspire a lifelong interest in science, math and technology by engaging diverse communities through interactive and innovative exhibits and programs. PSW helps to advance this mission by bringing students, teachers, and families face-to-face with scientists who work in some of the most remote and challenging places on earth, to learn first-hand about polar research in a fun and informal setting. This is made possible only by the partnership with PSC. In this talk we will present descriptions and photos of PSW

  13. The physical therapist's role in physical activity promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, E.; Engbers, L.

    2009-01-01

    Clinicians are increasingly confronted with the diseases of physical inactivity. Paradoxically, a promising strategy to motivate sedentary individuals to become more active is the opportunity to encourage physical activity related behavioural change when individuals encounter health professionals.

  14. Public health aspects of physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendel-Vos, G.C.W.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis different public health aspects of physical activity in the Netherlands were addressed, taking into account its broad scope. Research was carried out on physical activity methodology, determinants of physical activity and the relationship between physical activity and different health

  15. Physical activity levels and energy expenditure in urban Serbian adolescents--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašić, M; Milanović, I; Radisavljević Janić, S; Jurak, Radisavljević Janić; Sorić, M; Mirkov, D M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of PA and EE in Serbian urban adolescents, using an objective measure. In particular, we explored gender and weight status related differences in PA level and EE among Serbian adolescents. In addition, their PA and EE obtained during schooldays and weekends were compared. From the representative sample of elementary schools in Belgrade, one school was selected by random sampling for the purpose of the objective PA assessment. The sample included 115 students (53 boys and 62 girls) of the average age 14.0 (0.6) years. EE and the duration of PA levels were assessed by the Sense Wear PRO3 Armband device (Body Media Inc., Pittsburgh, PA, USA). IOTF cut-off points were used to define subjects as non-overweight, overweight or obese. Analysis of variance was applied to examine the impacts of gender and weight status on EE and PA duration. Adolescents spent most of the time in sedentary regime 241.7 ± 62.8 min/day, on average and they were totally physically active for 196.0 ± 73.5 min/day. Boys accumulated more PA than girls and during schooldays, the PA of all adolescents was higher than during weekend days. OW girls spent less time in total PA, MPA, and VVPA. On the other hand, NW and OW boys differed only in VVPA. Consequently, OW girls had lower energy expenditure compared with their NW peers, but no such differences in boys were found. The results of this study indicate that low PA activity might be a more important factor in propagation of overweight in girls than boys, at least in early adolescent period. PA in girls should be strongly encouraged, with a special focus on vigorous PA during weekends. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Osteoporosis, calcium and physical activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, A. D.; Houston, C S

    1987-01-01

    Sales of calcium supplements have increased dramatically since 1983, as middle-aged women seek to prevent or treat bone loss due to osteoporosis. However, epidemiologic studies have failed to support the hypothesis that larger amounts of calcium are associated with increased bone density or a decreased incidence of fractures. The authors examine the evidence from controlled trials on the effects of calcium supplementation and physical activity on bone loss and find that weight-bearing activit...

  17. Physical Activity and Pediatric Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Jonathan A.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to determine whether moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior (SB) were independently associated with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in children and adolescents. Methods Data from the International Children's Accelerometry Database ...... at the population-level could shift the upper tails of the BMI and WC frequency distributions to lower values, thereby lowering the number of children and adolescents classified as obese....

  18. Physical activity and lipid oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Marrugat, Jaume; Arquer, Andreu; Elosua, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Part of these benefits is related to the effects over the classic cardiovascular risk factors. These effects, however, only explain part of the protection of PA from these types of diseases. The oxidation of LDL cholesterol particles, which is the aetiopathogenic mechanism of a great part of cardiovascular diseases, plays an important role in the arteriosclerotic process. This narrative review pres...

  19. Large Scale Population Assessment of Physical Activity Using Wrist Worn Accelerometers: The UK Biobank Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiden Doherty

    Full Text Available Physical activity has not been objectively measured in prospective cohorts with sufficiently large numbers to reliably detect associations with multiple health outcomes. Technological advances now make this possible. We describe the methods used to collect and analyse accelerometer measured physical activity in over 100,000 participants of the UK Biobank study, and report variation by age, sex, day, time of day, and season.Participants were approached by email to wear a wrist-worn accelerometer for seven days that was posted to them. Physical activity information was extracted from 100Hz raw triaxial acceleration data after calibration, removal of gravity and sensor noise, and identification of wear / non-wear episodes. We report age- and sex-specific wear-time compliance and accelerometer measured physical activity, overall and by hour-of-day, week-weekend day and season.103,712 datasets were received (44.8% response, with a median wear-time of 6.9 days (IQR:6.5-7.0. 96,600 participants (93.3% provided valid data for physical activity analyses. Vector magnitude, a proxy for overall physical activity, was 7.5% (2.35mg lower per decade of age (Cohen's d = 0.9. Women had a higher vector magnitude than men, apart from those aged 45-54yrs. There were major differences in vector magnitude by time of day (d = 0.66. Vector magnitude differences between week and weekend days (d = 0.12 for men, d = 0.09 for women and between seasons (d = 0.27 for men, d = 0.15 for women were small.It is feasible to collect and analyse objective physical activity data in large studies. The summary measure of overall physical activity is lower in older participants and age-related differences in activity are most prominent in the afternoon and evening. This work lays the foundation for studies of physical activity and its health consequences. Our summary variables are part of the UK Biobank dataset and can be used by researchers as exposures, confounding factors or outcome

  20. How Was the Weekend? How the Social Context Underlies Weekend Effects in Happiness and Other Emotions for US Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, John F; Wang, Shun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we estimate the size of weekend effects for seven emotions and then explore their main determinants for the working population in the United States, using the Gallup/Healthways US Daily Poll 2008-2012. We first find that weekend effects exist for all emotions, and that these effects are not explained by sample selection bias. Full-time workers have larger weekend effects than do part-time workers. We then explore the sources of weekend effects and find that workplace trust and workplace social relations, combined with differences in social time spent with family and friends, together almost fully explain the weekend effects for happiness, laughter, enjoyment and sadness, for both full-time and part-time workers, with significant but smaller proportions explained for the remaining three emotions-worry, anger and stress. Finally, we show that workplace trust and social relations significantly improve emotions and life evaluations on both weekends and weekdays for all workers.

  1. Occupational and leisure time physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2012-01-01

    Men with low physical fitness and high occupational physical activity are recently shown to have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The association between occupational physical activity with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality may also depend on leisure...... time physical activity....

  2. Ways optimization physical activity students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilij Sutula

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: on the basis of the analysis of results of poll of students, first, to define structure and the importance of the factors influencing formation of motivation at them to sports and sports activity, secondly, to allocate possible subjects for extension of the maintenance of theoretical and methodical-practical components of sports formation of student's youth. Material and Methods: the study involved students of first and second courses of the Institute for training bodies and the Faculty of Law of the National University №9 Yaroslav the Wise and the students of the Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts and Zhytomyr State University named after Ivan Franko. Results: it is established that during training at national law university interests of students concerning factors which motivate them to sports and sports activity significantly change. The analyses data testify that a key factor which prevents students to be engaged in sports and sports activity, lack of free time is. It is proved that students consider necessary to receive information on the physical state. Conclusions: results of research allowed allocating the most significant factors which motivate students to be engaged in sports and sports activity. It is established subjects of theoretical and methodical and practical components of sports education which interest students of NLU and KNUCA and ZSU. It is shown that for students of Law University of importance topic of theoretical and methodological and practical components of physical education strongly depends on the year of their training.

  3. Macronutrient Intake for Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas

    Proper nutrition is an essential element of athletic performance, body composition goals, and general health. Although natural variability among persons makes it impossible to create a single diet that can be recommended to all; examining scientific principles makes it easier for athletes and other physically active persons to eat a diet that prepares them for successful training and/or athletic competition. A proper nutritional design incorporates these principles and is tailored to the individual. It is important for the sports nutritionist, coach, and athlete to understand the role that each of the macronutrients plays in an active lifestyle. In addition, keys to success include knowing how to determine how many calories to consume, the macronutrient breakdown of those calories, and proper timing to maximize the benefits needed for the individual's body type and activity schedule.

  4. The Effects of Daily Weather on Accelerometer-measured Physical Activity among Adults with Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinglass, Joe; Lee, Julia; Dunlop, Dorothy; Song, Jing; Semanik, Pam; Chang, Rowland W.

    2010-01-01

    Background This study analyzes Chicago-area weather effects on objectively measured physical activity over a three year period among a cohort of 241 participants in an on-going arthritis physical activity trial. Methods Uniaxial accelerometer counts and interview data were analyzed for up to six weekly study waves involving 4823 days of wear. The effects of temperature, rainfall, snowfall and daylight hours were analyzed after controlling for participant characteristics, day of the week, and daily accelerometer wear hours in a mixed effects linear regression model. Results Daylight hours, mean daily temperature snowfall) were all significantly associated with lower physical activity after controlling for the significant effects of weekends, accelerometer wear hours, age, sex, type of arthritis, employment, Hispanic ethnicity, obesity, and SF36 physical and mental health scores. Conclusions The cumulative effects of weather are reflected in a 38.3% mean monthly difference in daily counts between November and June, reflecting over three additional hours of sedentary time. Physical activity promotion programs for older persons with chronic conditions need lifestyle physical activity plans adapted to weather extremes. PMID:21885884

  5. Assessing physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Patricia; Marcus, Robin L

    2013-05-01

    Patients with CKD are characterized by low levels of physical functioning, which, along with low physical activity, predict poor outcomes in those treated with dialysis. The hallmark of clinical care in geriatric practice and geriatric research is the orientation to and assessment of physical function and functional limitations. Although there is increasing interest in physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD, the nephrology field has not focused on this aspect of care. This paper provides an in-depth review of the measurement of physical function and physical activity. It focuses on physiologic impairments and physical performance limitations (impaired mobility and functional limitations). The review is based on established frameworks of physical impairment and functional limitations that have guided research in physical function in the aging population. Definitions and measures for physiologic impairments, physical performance limitations, self-reported function, and physical activity are presented. On the basis of the information presented, recommendations for incorporating routine assessment of physical function and encouragement for physical activity in clinical care are provided.

  6. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Provided are activities focusing on phenomena associated with rotation of a double wheel (two bicycle wheels mounted on a common axis and free to rotate independently of each other) and on the operation of an electromagnetic toy car. (JN)

  7. Want weekend working Mr Hunt? Then pay for it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Janet

    2015-07-22

    I loved the #ImInWorkJeremy Twitter response to the health secretary's ultimatum last week over moving to a seven-day NHS by 2020. Health staff posted selfies of themselves at work over the weekend to make the point that for many front line NHS professionals, weekend working is already the norm.

  8. Activities report in applied physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research concerning acoustics, heat, architecture, materials research, and (optical) instrumentation is presented; active noise control and acoustic path identification were investigated. Energy conservation, solar energy, and building physics activities were carried out. Ultraviolet absorbing glasses, glass fibers, sheet glass, and aluminium and silicon oxynitrides, were studied. Glass fiber based sensor and laser applications, and optical space-instrumentation are discussed. Signal processing, sensors, and integrated electronics applications were developed. Scale model experiments for flow induced noise and vibrations, caused by engines, ventilators, wind turbines, and propellers, were executed. A multispectral charge coupled device airborne scanner, with four modules (one for forward observations) is described. A ground radar, based on seismic exploration signal processing and used for the location of pipes, sewers and cables, was developed.

  9. Objectively assessed physical activity and aerobic fitness in a population-based sample of Norwegian 9- and 15-year-olds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolle, E; Steene-Johannessen, J; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2010-01-01

    The present study described current physical activity, determined compliance with physical activity guidelines and assessed aerobic fitness in a nationally representative sample of 9- and 15-year-olds in Norway. In 2005-2006, 2299 children and adolescents were randomly recruited. The participation...... more active than 15-year-olds. Physical activity was higher during weekdays than weekends, and 9-year-olds were most active during spring. While four out of five children met current physical activity guidelines, only half of the adolescents did. The mean (SD) values for peak VO2 were: 9-year-old boys....... Finally, girls and adolescents seem appropriate targets when promoting physical activity in order to increase the proportion meeting the recommendations....

  10. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity in which two pulleys are connected by a wire loop; when the bottom pulley is dipped into hot water, the pulleys rotate. Also suggests that students design/build a machine to propel a bean; the machine must use materials including one bean, two plastic straws, and two rubber bands. (JN)

  11. Physical Activity and Health in Preschool Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Brinch

    Physical activity is beneficial in relation to several life style diseases and the association between physical activity and early predictors of life style diseases seem to be present already in preschool age. Since physical activity and other health behaviours are established during childhood...... and track from childhood into adult life, it is relevant to address physical activity already in the preschool age. The research in preschool children’s physical activity is relatively new, and because of methodological inconsistencies, the associations between physical activity and health are less clear...... in this age group. The objective of this thesis was to contribute to the knowledge base regarding physical activity in preschoolers; How active are preschoolers? Are activity levels related to specific settings during a typical week? And are the activity levels related to a range of health outcomes...

  12. Quantifying physical activity heat in farm animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, W.J.J.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Labussière, E.; Klinken, van J.B.

    2015-01-01

    The time dependent character of data generated by modern calorimetry equipment provides the unique opportunity to monitor short term changes in energy expenditure related to physical activity, feeding pattern and other experimental interventions. When timed recordings of physical activity are

  13. Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Issues Subscribe July 2014 Print this issue Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile En español Send us your comments A carefully structured, moderate physical activity program helped vulnerable older people maintain their mobility. ...

  14. Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity Updated:Sep 12,2017 Exercise Is for Everyone ... almost all patients do some form of regular physical activity. There are a few exceptions, so it's good ...

  15. AHA's Recommendations for Physical Activity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food and Beverage Toolkit The AHA's Recommendations for Physical Activity in Children Updated:Oct 18,2016 Click image ... Inactive children are likely to become inactive adults. Physical activity helps with: controlling weight reducing blood pressure raising ...

  16. the subject of physical education and extracurricular physical activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Campos Izquierdo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article there is analyzed the possible connection of physical education classes with the extracurricular physical activities in the Primary School of the Region of Madrid. This research places inside the methodology of quantitative type of descriptive cut, across survey, which has been in use as instrument of withdrawal of information the interview standardized by means of questionnaire created ad hoc, that was completed by 300 teachers. In the study there is obtained that the vast majority of the teachers who give classes in the extracurricular physical activities say they do not establish any coordination with the Physical Education teacher of the school. However, most of these teachers feel they would be good if there were a coordination with the teachers of Physical Education. However, more than half of teachers who give classes in the extracurricular physical activities believe that the objectives of the activities they provide are not related to the objectives of the Physical Education.

  17. Physical Activity and Health in Preschool Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Brinch

    Physical activity is beneficial in relation to several life style diseases and the association between physical activity and early predictors of life style diseases seem to be present already in preschool age. Since physical activity and other health behaviours are established during childhood...... and waking up are recommended over one fixed time-slot defining day time. It seem reasonable to highlight the importance of healthy active living from the early childhood by given recommendations for physical activity. However, the recommendation of at least 3 hours daily activity of at least light intensity...... and track from childhood into adult life, it is relevant to address physical activity already in the preschool age. The research in preschool children’s physical activity is relatively new, and because of methodological inconsistencies, the associations between physical activity and health are less clear...

  18. Putting Physical Activity on the Policy Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Catherine B.; Mutrie, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline why physical activity policy is important in terms of promoting population based increases in physical activity. The promotion of physical activity through public policy happens globally and nationally, however to be successful it should also happen at state and local levels. We outline the rationale for the…

  19. Exposure to Air Pollutants During Physical Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    The context for this thesis is the concern that people who practice physical activity are more susceptible to air pollution. For the studies presented here, three perspectives of physical activity were considered: in indoor, i) physical activity in fitness centers; in outdoor ii) the use of bicycle

  20. Promoting physical activity in socially vulnerable groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herens, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background:  In the Netherlands, inequalities in physical activity behaviour go hand in hand with socioeconomic inequalities in health. To promote physical activity effectively and equitably, participatory community-based physical activity interventions seem promising and are

  1. Global recommendations on physical activity for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... кий Español Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health Menu Diet, Physical Activity & Health Global ... obesity Documents & publications Related links Global recommendations on physical activity for health WHO developed the "Global Recommendations on ...

  2. Physical Education and Physical Activity: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Although many recent studies have shown that the lack of physical activity is one of the major causes of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease among children and adolescents, few studies have shown the connection between the lack of physical education and the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle. However, it is clear that physical education…

  3. Does HOPSports Promote Youth Physical Activity in Physical Education Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Stephanie T.; Shores, Kindal A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how a technological intervention, HOPSports (HOPS), impacted youth physical activity (PA) in a physical education (PE) class. Research indicates rising levels of youth television watching and video game use, physical inactivity, and related overweight. One approach to increase youth PA is to use technology-based…

  4. Physical activity, body composition and physical fitness status of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to assess the physical activity (PA), body composition and physical fitness status of 1361 (boys: n=678; girls: n= 683) primary school children aged 9-12 years in Mpumalanga (MP) and Limpopo (LP) provinces of South Africa. Anthropometric and physical fitness measurements were taken using the ...

  5. Influence of Physical Activities to Science Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RS Wilson DR. Constantino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the physical activities of fifth and sixth graders that projected correlations to science performance and how these physical activities may be utilized for classroom purposes in the context of science-related play activities. Descriptive survey correlational design directed the data collection and analysis of the physical activities of purposively selected 133 fifth and sixth graders. Primarily, the study used a researcher-developed and validated instrument (Physical Activity Questionnaire [PAQ], and standard instruments: Philippine National Physical Activity Guide (PNPAG and General Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ. The latter classified the physical activities into five domains which directed the interpretation of the participants‟ responses. The Pearson-r Moment of Correlation described the level of correlation of the frequency of engagement to physical activities (limited to local and localized activities and the science grade of the respondents. Results show that each of the physical activity domains showed specific correlations to science performance of the respondents. For further research, enrichment of the relationship of the physical activities and the science performance may focus on possible moderating variables like economic status, and time allotment for physical activities.

  6. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE : ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30.   RESTAURANT SATELLITE CAFETERIAS KIOSQUE No. Opening times Usual opening times ASCENSION Thursday 9 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00 Friday 10 May 1 2 3   07h00 - 21h00 07h00 - 18h00 Bldg. 40 Bldg. 30, 54 Bldg. 864 08h00 - 17h00     Saturday 11 May 1 2 3 07h00 - 23h00     Sunday 12 May 1 2 3 07h00 - 23h00     WHITSUNTIDE Saturday 18 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Sunday 19 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Monday 20 May 1 2 3 08h00 - 21h00     Restaurant Supervisory Committee Tel. 77551

  7. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. DATERESTAURANT No.Opening times ASCENSION Thursday, May 29 1 2 08h00 - 21h00 3 Friday, May 30 1 2 07h00 - 21h00 3 07h00 - 18h00 Saturday, May 31 1 2 09h00 - 20h00 3 Sunday, June 1st 1 2 09h00 - 20h00 3 WHITSUNTIDE Saturday, June 7 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 Sunday, June 8 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 Monday, June 9 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 3 SATELLITE CAFETERIAS (Bldgs. 30, 40, 54) will open at the usual hours on Friday 30 May only. The KIOSK will open from 8:00 to 17:00 hrs on Friday 30 May.

  8. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: ASCENSION AND WHITSUNTIDE WEEKENDS

    CERN Document Server

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2001-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Ascension and Whitsuntide weekends are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. RESTAURANT CAFETERIAS PERIPHERIQUES SATELLITE CAFETERIAS KIOSQUE No. Horaire Opening times Horaire : comme d'habitude Usual opening times   ASCENSION         Jeudi 24 mai 1       Thursday, May 24 2 08h00 - 21h00 3           Vendredi 25 mai 1   Bâts. /Bldgs 6 13 17 40Bâts. /Bldgs. 30 54 Bâts. /Bldgs 864 08h00 — 17h00 Friday, May 25 2 07h00 - 21h00   3 07h00 - 18h00           Samedi 26 mai 1 07h00 - 23h00     Saturday, May 26 2   3           Dimanche 27 mai 1 07h00 - 23h00     Sunday, May 27 2   3                   PENTECOTE WHITSUNTIDE         Samedi 2 juin 1 08h00 - 21h00     Saturday, June 2 2   3           Dimanche 3 juin 1 08h00 — 21h00     Sunday, Jun...

  9. Variability and Stability in Daily Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity among 10 Year Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pereira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Day-to-day variability and stability of children’s physical activity levels across days of the week are not well understood. Our aims were to examine the day-to-day variability of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA, to determine factors influencing the day-to-day variability of MVPA and to estimate stability of MVPA in children. The sample comprises 686 Portuguese children (10 years of age. MVPA was assessed with an accelerometer, and BMI was computed from measured height and weight. Daily changes in MVPA and their correlates (gender, BMI, and maturity were modeled with a multilevel approach, and tracking was calculated using Foulkes & Davies γ. A total of 51.3% of boys and 26.2% of girls achieved 60 min/day of MVPA on average. Daily MVPA was lower during the weekend (23.6% of boys and 13.6% of girls comply with the recommended 60 min/day of MVPA compared to weekdays (60.8% and 35.4%, boys and girls, respectively. Normal weight children were more active than obese children and no effect was found for biological maturation. Tracking is low in both boys (γ = 0.59 ± 0.01 and girls (γ = 0.56 ± 0.01. Children’s MVPA levels during a week are highly unstable. In summary, boys are more active than girls, maturation does not affect their MVPA, and obese children are less likely to meet 60 min/day of MVPA. These results highlight the importance of providing opportunities for increasing children’s daily MVPA on all days of week, especially on the weekend.

  10. Exergaming for Physical Activity in Online Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooiman, Brian J.; Sheehan, Dwayne P.; Wesolek, Michael; Reategui, Eliseo

    2016-01-01

    For many the thought of students taking an online course conjures up images of students sitting at a computer desk. Students taking online physical education (OLPE) at home may lack opportunities for competitive or cooperative physical activity that are available to students in a traditional setting. Active video games (exergames) can be played…

  11. Physical Disability, Stigma, and Physical Activity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, Carolyn J.; Armstrong, Brittany D.; Hetz, Samuel P.; Latimer, Amy E.

    2010-01-01

    Using the stereotype content model as a guiding framework, this study explored whether the stigma that able-bodied adults have towards children with a physical disability is reduced when the child is portrayed as being active. In a 2 (physical activity status) x 2 (ability status) study design, 178 university students rated a child described in…

  12. Physical education, school physical activity, school sports and academic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Trudeau, François; Shephard, Roy J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to review relationships of academic performance and some of its determinants to participation in school-based physical activities, including physical education (PE), free school physical activity (PA) and school sports. Methods Linkages between academic achievement and involvement in PE, school PA and sport programmes have been examined, based on a systematic review of currently available literature, including a comprehensive search of MEDLINE ...

  13. [Mortality and medical care of patients hospitalized during weekends].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana-García, J L; Granados, C J; Zambrana-Luque, J L

    It has been shown that patients admitted to hospital during the weekends tend to have less favourable outcomes, including higher mortality rates, compared with those admitted during weekdays. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of on the health outcomes of patients admitted during the weekend. A retrospective observational study was conducted on all patients admitted to Montilla Hospital (Córdoba).. All hospitalised patients were attended to daily, including weekends and holidays. An analysis was performed on the epidemiological variables and health outcomes (total mortality). The study included a total of 2,565 hospital admissions, of whom 653 (25.6%) were discharged during the weekend. Patients discharged during the weekend were significantly younger [53 (27) versus 56 (27) years, P<.002], had fewer diagnoses on discharge [6.2 (3.7) versus 6.7 (3.9), P<.003], and had fewer procedures performed [(3 (1.9) versus 3.2 (1.8), P<.005]. The mean length of stay was shorter for weekend discharges than the weekday discharges [3 (2.6) days versus 3.7 (3.9) days, P<.001). The total mortality was 4%, and there were no differences between weekday and weekend admissions (4.3% versus 3.7%). Home discharges on the weekend were related to a reduction in the mean length of stay by 0.3 days (from 3.6 to 3.9 days, P<.001). Hospitalised patient care has led to the disappearance of increased mortality during weekends. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Promotion of physical activity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floriani, Victoria; Kennedy, Christine

    2008-02-01

    Promotion of physical activity continues to be recommended as an essential component of obesity treatment and prevention interventions. This review explores recent updates in the area of physical activity promotion and its impact on the physical and mental health consequences of childhood obesity. Despite the availability of opportunities for physical activity in the school environment, namely recess and physical education classes, students do not appear to be meeting activity recommendations at school alone. Access to neighborhood parks may increase levels of physical activity and reduce time spent in sedentary behaviors at home. Less time spent watching television and in other sedentary behaviors such as playing videogames may contribute to higher rates of physical activity. Frequency of physical activity also appears to be related to improved mental health status, although the direction of this relationship warrants further exploration. Physical activity is an evidence-based intervention that offers benefits to both physical and mental health. Pediatric health care providers are encouraged to engage in discussions with patients and families on the topic of physical activity and to assist them in finding ways to incorporate activity into daily life.

  15. Does the benefit on survival from leisure time physical activity depend on physical activity at work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2013-01-01

    To investigate if persons with high physical activity at work have the same benefits from leisure time physical activity as persons with sedentary work.......To investigate if persons with high physical activity at work have the same benefits from leisure time physical activity as persons with sedentary work....

  16. Roles of mothers and fathers in supporting child physical activity: a cross-sectional mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon-Moore, Emma; Toumpakari, Zoi; Sebire, Simon J; Thompson, Janice L; Lawlor, Deborah A; Jago, Russell

    2018-01-21

    Examine the extent that parent gender is associated with supporting children's physical activity. Cross-sectional mixed-methods study. 47 primary schools located in Bristol (UK). 944 children aged 8-9 years and one of their parents provided quantitative data; 51 parents (20 fathers) were interviewed. Children wore an accelerometer, and mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day, counts per minute (CPM) and achievement of national MVPA guidelines were derived. Parents reported who leads in supporting child activity during the week and weekend. Linear and logistic regression examined the association between gender of parent who supports child activity and child physical activity. For the semistructured telephone interviews, inductive and deductive content analyses were used to explore the role of gender in how parents support child activity. Parents appeared to have a stronger role in supporting boys to be more active, than girls, and the strongest associations were when they reported that both parents had equal roles in supporting their child. For example, compared with the reference of female/mother support, equal contribution from both parents during the week was associated with boys doing 5.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 10.6) more minutes of MVPA per day and more CPM when both parents support on weekday and weekends (55.1 (14.3 to 95.9) and 52.8 (1.8 to 103.7), respectively). Associations in girls were weaker and sometimes in the opposite direction, but there was no strong statistical evidence for gender interactions. Themes emerged from the qualitative data, specifically; parents proactively supporting physical activity equally, mothers supporting during the week, families getting together at weekends, families doing activities separately due to preferences and parents using activities to bond one-to-one with children. Mothers primarily support child activity during the week. Children, possibly more so boys, are more active if both parents share

  17. Preschoolers' physical activity behaviours: parents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Jennifer D; He, Meizi; Bouck, L Michelle Sangster; Tucker, Patricia; Pollett, Graham L

    2005-01-01

    To understand parents' perspectives of their preschoolers' physical activity behaviours. A maximum variation sample of 71 parents explored their preschoolers' physical activity behaviours through 10 semi-structured focus group discussions. Parents perceived Canada's Physical Activity Guidelines for Children as inadequate; that their preschoolers get and need more than 30-90 minutes of activity daily; and that physical activity habits must be established during the preschool years. Nine barriers against and facilitators toward adequate physical activity were proposed: child's age, weather, daycare, siblings, finances, time, society and safety, parents' impact, and child's activity preferences. The need for education and interventions that address current barriers are essential for establishing physical activity as a lifestyle behaviour during early childhood and, consequently, helping to prevent both childhood and adulthood obesity.

  18. Exergames: Increasing Physical Activity through Effective Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudella, Jennifer L.; Butz, Jennifer V.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States, educators must consider new ways to increase physical activity in an effort to address obesity. There are a variety of ways educators can increase physical activity in the classroom, and exergames--video games that require physical movement in order to play--are a modern-day approach to…

  19. Physical activity and health promotion strategies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Physical inactivity has become a global health concern and is among the 10 leading causes of death and disability. Physiotherapists are in a position to combat inactivity and effectively promote physical activity to their clients. Objectives: To establish the relationship between physical activity levels of ...

  20. Physical activity and health promotion strategies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Abstract. Background: Physical inactivity has become a global health concern and is among the 10 leading causes of death and disability. Physiotherapists are in a position to combat inactivity and effectively promote physical activity to their clients. Objectives: To establish the relationship between physical activity levels of ...

  1. Exergaming: Syncing Physical Activity and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lisa; Higgins, John

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses exergaming, a groundbreaking type of video game which is creating a revolution in physical education. Exergaming combines physical activity and video gaming to create an enjoyable and appealing way for students to be physically active. An extremely popular choice in this genre is the music video/dance rhythm game (MVDG). One…

  2. Choosing a Physically Active Lifestyle Now!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Murray

    2007-01-01

    A major goal for most quality physical education programs is to provide sufficient education and motivation for students to choose to live physically active lifestyles. This article clarifies what a "physically active lifestyle" really means both now to school-aged students, and in the future, as these students become adults.…

  3. Pattern of physical activity among persons with type 2 diabetes with special consideration to daily routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Rozina; Younis, Bilal Bin; Masood, Junaid; Tahira, Maham; Khurhsid, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity is essential in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Physical activity can improve general health, quality of life and diabetes management. The aim and objective of the study was to assess the physical activity trends in daily routine of people with type 2 diabetes. Two hundred persons with diabetes from four different clinical settings were included to access the trends of physical activity using a customized questionnaire EPIC-2. Pattern of physical activity was assessed across a set of domains including sleep time, hours of TV watch, preferred mode of transport for specific distance and household activities. Data was analyzed using SPSS 21. Out of 200 persons with diabetes, 104(52%) were male and 96 (48%) were female. Out of the total sample of patients, 85 (81.7%) Male and 80 (83.3%) female patients preferred walk to cover a distance of less than one mile. There was a significant difference in selection of mode of transport for all other specified distance, esp. in female patients with both age groups. There was insignificant difference for physical activity pattern related to household activities in young and elderly male subjects. The mean sleeping time for younger male subjects on weekend was 464.31± 88.88 minutes/day and for elder it was 418.65± 102.66 minutes/day while for young female subjects was 476.25± 113.74 minutes/day and in female elderly subjects it was 420.62± 120.62 minutes/day respectively. In type 2 diabetics we observed a low level of physical activity which may be detrimental for the control of diabetes mellitus.

  4. Children with cancer and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhan Soyuer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Most people participate in physical activity on a regular basis. However, among the many patients with cancer, few incorporate physical activity into their daily routine. It is because of parental or physician restriction, the fact remains that patients with epilepsy are less fit and do not get the exercise they need. Participating in physical activity, physical fitness as they have less of a fear. However, this overprotective attitude has been changing in light of the recent literature on this subject. This review discusses benefits of physical activity in cancer and the effects of exercise on seizure.

  5. Family circumstance, sedentary behaviour and physical activity in adolescents living in England: Project STIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorely Trish

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of non-modifiable correlates of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in youth contributes to the development of effective targeted intervention strategies. The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships between family circumstances (e.g. socio-economic status, single vs. dual parent household, presence/absence of siblings and leisure-time physical activity and sedentary behaviours in adolescents. Methods A total of 1171 adolescents (40% male; mean age 14.8 years completed ecological momentary assessment diaries every 15 minutes for 3 weekdays outside of school hours and 1 weekend day. Analysed behaviours were sports/exercise, active travel, TV viewing, computer use, sedentary socialising (hanging-out, using the telephone, sitting and talking and total sedentary behaviour. Linear regression was employed to estimate levels of association between individual family circumstance variables and each behaviour. Results Compared to girls from higher socioeconomic status (SES groups, girls from low SES groups reported higher weekend TV viewing and higher weekday total sedentary behaviour. For boys, single parent status was associated with greater total sedentary behaviour compared to those from dual parent households. Boys and girls from low socio-economic neighbourhoods reported lower participation in sports/exercise compared to those living in higher socio-economic neighbourhoods. Conclusion Associations were not consistent across behaviours or between genders. Overall, findings indicate that boys from single parent households and girls from low socio-economic families may be at increased risk of high sedentary behaviour. Those living in low socioeconomic neighbourhoods may be at increased risk of reduced participation in sports and exercise.

  6. Subjective and objective physical activity patterns after Roux-en Y gastric bypass surgery compared with non-operated obese and non-obese control women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Britta; Ernst, Barbara; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on physical activity after bariatric surgery provided inconsistent results. The aim of our study was to comprehensively assess physical activity by subjective (questionnaires) and objective (accelerometry) measures in women who had undergone Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and to compare results with those of women displaying grade II or higher obesity and of non-obese control women. Our cross-sectional case-control study included 12 women in each group (RYGB, obese, non-obese). Wrist accelerometry was performed over 5 days. Two questionnaires were used to assess women's self-reported leisure- and work-time and sport-related physical activity. Accelerometry indicated a lower physical activity in RYGB women than in non-obese women in particular during the weekend (p=0.010), while there was no difference between RYGB and obese women (p=0.57). Questionnaires revealed that RYGB women self-report a greater leisure- and work-time physical activity than obese women and also greater work-related physical activity than non-obese women (all p≤0.032). In contrast, sport-related activities were reduced in RYGB as compared with non-obese women (p=0.011), while there was no difference between RYGB and obese women (p=0.51). Comparison of the obese and non-obese group revealed less leisure-time and sport-related activities in the obese women (both p≤0.002). Despite the preliminary character of our rather small study, data suggest a differential physical activity pattern in women who have previously undergone RYGB surgery that is characterized by rare sport activities, an increased subjective work-related physical activity and objectively reduced physical activity during the weekend as compared with non-obese control women. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. When Mothers' Work Matters for Youths' Daily Time Use: Implications of Evening and Weekend Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomi; Davis, Kelly D; McHale, Susan M; Kelly, Erin L; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Crouter, Ann C

    2017-08-01

    Drawing upon the work-home resources model, this study examined the implications of mothers' evening and weekend shifts for youths' time with mother, alone, and hanging out with peers unsupervised, with attention to both the amount and day-to-day consistency of time use. Data came from 173 mothers who worked in the long-term care industry and their youths who provided daily diaries. Multilevel modeling revealed that youths whose mothers worked more evening shifts on average spent less time with their mothers compared to youths whose mothers worked fewer evening shifts. Youths whose mothers worked more weekend shifts, however, spent more time with their mothers and exhibited less consistency in their time in all three activity domains compared to youths whose mothers worked fewer weekend shifts. Girls, not boys, spent less time alone on days when mothers worked weekend shifts than on days with standard shifts. Older but not younger adolescents spent more time hanging out with friends on evening and weekend shift days, and their unsupervised peer time was less consistent across days when mothers worked more evening shifts. These effects adjusted for sociodemographic and day characteristics, including school day, number of children in the household, mothers' marital status and work hours, and time with fathers. Our results illuminate the importance of the timing and day of mothers' work for youths' daily activities. Future interventions should consider how to increase mothers' resources to deal with constraints on parenting due to their work during nonstandard hours, with attention to child gender and age.

  8. Exposure to Air Pollutants During Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    The context for this thesis is the concern that people who practice physical activity are more susceptible to air pollution. For the studies presented here, three perspectives of physical activity were considered: in indoor, i) physical activity in fitness centers; in outdoor ii) the use of bicycle in cycle paths; and iii) active transportation. Knowing the effects that air pollution has in the respiratory function, the increased V? (Minute Ventilation) that practitioners experience during ex...

  9. The World Transplant Games: an incentive to improve physical fitness and habitual activity in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliva, Robin D; Patterson, Catherine; So, Stephanie; Pellow, Vanessa; Miske, Stephanie; McLister, Carol; Manlhiot, Cedric; Pollock-BarZiv, Stacey; Drabble, Alison; Dipchand, Anne I

    2014-12-01

    This prospective, interventional study examined the impact of training for the WTG on levels of health-related physical fitness and habitual activity in a cohort of pediatric SOT recipients. Physical fitness (FitnessGram(®) ) and habitual activity (HAES) measures were performed on participants (n = 19) in the WTG and compared to non-participant controls (n = 14) prior to and following the WTG. Pre-WTG exercise training was provided to participants. Participants demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in their habitual weekday (6.1 ± 1.7 to 8.5 ± 1.9 h; p = 0.002) and weekend (6.3 ± 2.6 to 8.4 ± 2.5 h; p = 0.01) activity over the training period, while controls improved weekday activity only (6.3 ± 2.0 to 8.3 ± 2.1 h; p = 0.05. Weekend activity: 7.7 ± 2.7 to 8.3 ± 2.3 h; p = 0.68). Participants demonstrated a non-statistical improvement in select physical fitness parameters; however, a greater number of participants achieved healthy criterion standards for cardiovascular fitness (2 vs. 1), abdominal strength (5 vs. 3), and upper body strength (7 vs. 3) following training and participating in the WTG. The WTG can provide a positive incentive for greater levels of physical activity and promote improvements in physical fitness levels. Further study is needed to examine long-term impact on lifestyle changes and health outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dynamic activity-related incentives for physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Schüler, Julia; Brunner, Sibylle

    2012-01-01

    The present studies adopted the theoretical framework of activity- and purpose-related incentives (Rheinberg, 2008) to explain the maintenance of physical activity. We hypothesized that activity-related incentives (e.g., “fun”) increase more than purpose-related incentives (e.g., “health”) between the initiation and maintenance phase of physical activity. Additionally, change in activity-related incentives was hypothesized to be a better predictor of maintenance of physical activity than chan...

  11. Stroke rehabilitation: are highly structured units more conducive to physical activity than less structured units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, F; Ada, L; Heard, R; Adams, R

    1996-10-01

    To determine if the physical design and organizational structure of rehabilitation units is related to the amount of patients' motor activity. An observational study was conducted; time samples of the motor activity of patients following stroke were taken between 7AM and 7PM both on weekdays and weekends. Two rehabilitation units associated with general hospitals with different physical design and organizational structure. One unit was spread over a large area and had a highly organized daily structure; the other was small and informally organized. Inpatients with hemiplegia as a result of stroke who gave consent to participate. The nature and frequency of 14 motor activities were compared between units. No significant difference was found in any of the observed motor activities between the units when using independent groups t tests (p = 0.1-0.8). Subjects in both units spent more than 70% of their day in activities largely unrelated to physical outcome (eg, conversing with visitors or doing nothing observable) and less than 20% of the day in activities that could potentially contribute to their recovery (eg, in therapy or exercising independently). Rehabilitation units are not functioning as learning environments. The challenge is to identify and implement measures that will change this finding.

  12. Active travel intervention and physical activity behaviour: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Patricia; Eberth, Barbara; Farrar, Shelley; Anable, Jillian; Ludbrook, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A physically active lifestyle is an important contributor to individual health and well-being. The evidence linking higher physical activity levels with better levels of morbidity and mortality is well understood. Despite this, physical inactivity remains a major global risk factor for mortality and, consequently, encouraging individuals to pursue physically active lifestyles has been an integral part of public health policy in many countries. Physical activity promotion and interventions are now firmly on national health policy agendas, including policies that promote active travel such as walking and cycling. This study evaluates one such active travel initiative, the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme in Scotland, intended to encourage uptake of walking, cycling and the use of public transport as more active forms of travel. House to house surveys were conducted before and after the programme intervention, in May/June 2009 and 2012 (12,411 surveys in 2009 and 9542 in 2012), for the evaluation of the programme. This paper analyses the physical activity data collected, focussing on what can be inferred from the initiative with regards to adult uptake of physical activity participation and whether, for those who participated in physical activity, the initiative impacted on meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. The results suggest that the initiative impacted positively on the likelihood of physical activity participation and meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. Individuals in the intervention areas were on average 6% more likely to meet the physical activity guidelines compared to individuals in the non intervention areas. However, the absolute prevalence of physical activity participation declined in both intervention and control areas over time. Our evaluation of this active transport initiative indicates that similar programmes may aid in contributing to achieving physical activity targets and adds to the international

  13. Leisure time physical activity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Føns Johnsen, Nina; Ekblond, Annette; Thomsen, Birthe Lykke

    2013-01-01

    cohort, including 29,129 women and 26,576 men aged 50-64 years at baseline 1993-1997. Using Cox proportional hazards models we investigated the associations between mortality rate and leisure time physical activity by exploring 1) participation (yes/no) in each type of activity; 2) a simple dose...... in specific leisure time physical activities, but not with more time spent on those activities. This could suggest that avoiding a sedative lifestyle is more important than a high volume of activity. Nonparticipation in these types of physical activity may be considered as risk factors.......BACKGROUND: Some studies indicate that a large part of the beneficial effect of physical activity on mortality is confined to a threshold effect of participation. METHODS: Self-reported physical activity was investigated in relation to all-cause mortality in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health...

  14. Break for Physical Activity: Incorporating Classroom-Based Physical Activity Breaks into Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Danielle D.; Robinson, Leah E.; Beckham, Karen; Webster, Kip

    2012-01-01

    Engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity is essential to lifelong health and wellness. Physical activity behaviors established in early childhood relate to physical activity behaviors in later years. However, research has shown that children are adopting more sedentary behaviors. Incorporating structured and planned physical activity…

  15. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: Helping All Students Achieve 60 Minutes of Physical Activity Each Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Eloise; Erwin, Heather; Hall, Tina; Heidorn, Brent

    2013-01-01

    The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance recommends that all schools implement a comprehensive school physical activity program. Physical activity is important to the overall health and well-being of everyone, including all school age children. The benefits of physical activity are well documented and include the…

  16. Effectiveness of School-Initiated Physical Activity Program on Secondary School Students' Physical Activity Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gråstén, Arto; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Watt, Anthony; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The promotion of physical activity and health has become a universal challenge. The Sotkamo Physical Activity as Civil Skill Program was implemented to increase students' physical activity by promoting supportive psychological and physical school environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the…

  17. Nearby outdoor environments and seniors physical activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available More than 60% of older Americans have sedentary lifestyles1 1 According to DHHS (1996. and are recommended more physical activities for health benefit. Nearby outdoor environments on residential sites may impact older inhabitants׳ physical activities there (defined as walking, gardening, yard work, and other outdoor physical activities on residential sites. This study surveyed 110 assisted-living residents in Houston, Texas, regarding their previous residential sites before moving to a retirement community and physical activities there. Twelve environmental features were studied under four categories (typology, motivators, function, and safety. Based on data availability, a subset of 57 sample sites was analyzed in Geographic Information Systems. Hierarchical linear modeling was applied to estimate physical activities as a function of the environments. Higher levels of physical activity were found to be positively related with four environmental features (transitional-areas, connecting-paths, walk-ability, and less paving.

  18. Biopsychosocial Benefits of Physical Activity in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Meydanlioglu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity levels in children have been steadily decreasing in recent years. Reduced physical activity leads to numerous chronic diseases at an early age, particularly obesity. Lifelong participation in physical activity and maintenance of ideal bodyweight are highly effective in the prevention of chronic diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, Type II diabetes, lung and colon cancers. At the same time physical activity increases self-confidence, self-esteem and academic achievement, and reduces symptoms of depression. Therefore, this study was designed to improve awareness of professional groups and families working with children and adolescents about physical activity benefits on children health, as well as psychosocial benefits and planned to offer suggestions for increasing physical activity levels of children. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(2: 125-135

  19. Barriers to physical activity among working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Jill J

    2011-04-01

    Working mothers experience several barriers to physical activity. If these barriers can be identified by occupational health nurses and they can partner with working mothers to reduce these perceived barriers, the health of these workers can be improved and chronic disease risk prevented. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of self-regulatory efficacy on physical activity among working mothers and to describe specific barriers to physical activity. The Barriers Specific Self-Efficacy Scale (BARSE) and the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (KPAS) were used to measure the variables. Self-regulatory efficacy was found to be a strong predictor of physical activity in a diverse sample of working mothers who did not meet current recommendations for physical activity. Occupational health nurses can use these findings to design programs for groups and for counseling individuals. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Barriers to Physical Activity on University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajat; Sultoni, K.; Suherman, A.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the research is to analyze the factors that become barriers to physical activity in university students based on physical activity level. An internet-based survey was conducted. The participants were 158 University students from Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. Barriers to Physical Activity Quiz (BPAQ) were used to assessed the factors that become barriers to physical activity in university students. IPAQ (short form) were used to assessed physical activity level. The results show there was no differences BPAQ based on IPAQ level. But when analyzed further based on seven factors barriers there are differences in factors “social influence and lack of willpower” based IPAQ level. Based on this it was concluded that the “influence from other and lack of willpower” an inhibiting factor on students to perform physical activity.

  1. The Evolution of the Physical Activity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Steven N.; Powell, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    This article includes an historical review of research on physical activity and health, and how the findings have contributed to physical activity participation and promotion today. In the 20th century, research began to accumulate on the effects of exercise on physiological functions, and later on the relation between regular activity and various…

  2. Successfully Improving Physical Activity Behavior After Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Hidde P.; Streppel, Kitty R.M.; van der Beek, Allard J.; Woude, Luc H.V.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; van Harten, Willem H.; van Mechelen, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of the physical activity promotion programs Rehabilitation & Sports (R&S) and Active after Rehabilitation (AaR) on sport and daily physical activity 1 year after in- or outpatient rehabilitation. Design Subjects in intervention rehabilitation centers were randomized

  3. Physical Activity Levels in Chinese One-Year-Old Children and Their Parents, an Early STOPP China Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Mei

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA is associated with health benefits, already in childhood. However, little is known about actual levels, patterns and gender differences in PA level in very young children. This study examines Chinese one-year-old children and their parents' PA levels and patterns, and assesses the correlations between children's PA level and gender, body mass index standard deviation score (BMI SDS, parental BMI and parental PA level.Data from 123 families participating in the Early STOPP China study were used. Families were recruited based on parental BMI and were classified as either high-risk or low-risk of obesity. Parents and children wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ to assess the average PA levels. PA levels and hourly patterns during weekdays and weekends were examined as were correlations with gender, BMI SDS, parental BMI and parental PA levels.There were no significant differences in children's averaged PA between risk groups, genders, or between weekdays and weekends. Children's peak average activity level was at 7 pm and they were least active at 3 pm (p<0.001. Both mothers and fathers demonstrated a similar PA pattern as their children, although paternal PA level was consistently lower than that of mothers and children. No significant association was found between children's PA and their gender, BMI SDS, parental BMI or paternal PA levels. Maternal PA was found positively associated with child PA (p<0.05.PA in one-year-old Chinese children vary over the day but weekdays and weekends are similar. At this age, children's PA is not related to gender, BMI SDS, parental BMI or paternal PA. Larger scale studies with more contextual information are needed to improve the understanding of our findings.

  4. Physical activity, energy balance and obesity.

    OpenAIRE

    Jordi Salas-Salvado; Jose Luis Griera; Jose Maria Manzanares; Montserrat Barbany; Jose Contreras; Pilar Amigo

    2007-01-01

    Physical activity, energy balance and obesity. Obesity appears when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. The most important variable compound of energy expenditure is physical activity. The global epidemics of obesity seem closely related to reduced physical activity and sedentariness widely increasing nowadays. Once obesity has developed, caloric intake becomes similar to energy expenditure. To lose weight, besides decreasing energy intake, energy expenditure must be increased. The p...

  5. Association of physical activity and physical fitness with blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study was conducted to determine how physical activity level and physical fitness affects the blood pressure profile of Maharashtrian adolescents to help in developing preventive strategies for the local population, as ethnic differences exist in the aetiopathogenesis of hypertension. A cross-sectional study was ...

  6. Physical Activity Levels in Portuguese High School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmeleira, Jose Francisco Filipe; Aldeias, Nuno Micael Carrasqueira; da Graca, Pedro Miguel dos Santos Medeira

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the physical activity (PA) levels of high school Portuguese students during physical education (PE) and investigate the association of PA levels with students' goal orientation and intrinsic motivation. Forty-six students from three high schools participated. Heart rate telemetry and pedometry were used…

  7. Physical activity after cancer: physiologic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Physical activity has many and varied effects on the human body. The physiologic effects of physical activity and exercise in persons with cancer have been largely unstudied. Cancer patients as a group are at risk for diseases and conditions related to lack of physical activity. In persons with cancer, exercise has been shown to improve fitness and physical functioning, reduce fatigue, and modestly decrease weight and body fat. The effects of physical activity on prognosis, however, are unknown. In persons without cancer, exercise has beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and endocrine systems, reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and diabetes. Increased physical activity reduces risk for several common cancers, which is relevant to cancer survivors who are at increased risk for new primary cancers. Additional benefits of physical activity include improvements in fitness, muscular-skeletal problems including arthritis symptoms, immune system function, cognition and sleep. Risks of increased physical activity in cancer patients and survivors have not been defined, but could be expected to include musculo-skeletal injuries, and a small increased risk in sudden death with vigorous exercise and serious accidents with some sports. The effect of physical activity on survival from cancer is unknown, but physical activity might improve prognosis through beneficial effect on cancer biomarkers and energy balance, as well as decreasing risk for cardiovascular disease, an important cause of death for many cancer survivors. The long-term benefits and risks of physical activity in cancer patients and survivors are unknown. Nevertheless, increasing physical activity is probably beneficial and safe in the majority of cancer survivors.

  8. Physical activity motivation and cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Bernardine M; Ciccolo, Joseph T

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) participation has been shown to be helpful in improving physical and mental well-being among cancer survivors. The purpose of this chapter is to review the literature on the determinants of physical activity motivation and behavior among cancer survivors. Using theories of behavior change, researchers have sought to identify the correlates of motivation that predict the participation in regular physical activity in observational studies, while intervention studies have focused on manipulating those factors to support the initiation of physical activity. The majority of this work has been conducted with breast cancer survivors, and there is an interest in expanding this work to survivors of others cancers (e.g., prostate, lung, and colorectal cancer). Results suggest that constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), Transtheoretical Model (TTM), and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) are associated with greater motivation for physical activity, and some of these constructs have been used in interventions to promote physical activity adoption. There is scope for understanding the determinants of physical activity adoption in various cancer survivor populations. Much more needs to done to identify the determinants of maintenance of physical activity.

  9. Physical Activity for the Autistic Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Physical, cognitive, and social-emotional symptoms of autism are described, along with possible causes of the condition and treatments. A "theraplay" physical education program in Newark, Delaware, is discussed, where physical activities such as rhythm, body awareness, perceptual motor development, and swimming are used to engage…

  10. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    OpenAIRE

    Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-01-01

    Our research indicated that 10–12-year-old children receiving two active Wii™ (Nintendo®; Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity.

  11. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-06-01

    Our research indicated that 10-12-year-old children receiving two active Wii™ (Nintendo®; Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity.

  12. Physical activity in youth dance classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Kelli L; Gavand, Kavita A; Conway, Terry L; Peck, Emma; Bracy, Nicole L; Bonilla, Edith; Rincon, Patricia; Sallis, James F

    2015-06-01

    The majority of youth are not meeting the US Department of Health and Human Services physical activity guidelines. Dance is a popular activity, particularly for girls, and has the potential to increase physical activity for many youth. This study investigated physical activity of children and adolescents in 7 dance types: ballet, hip-hop, jazz, Latin-flamenco, Latin-salsa/ballet folklorico, partnered, and tap. Data were collected in 17 private studios and 4 community centers in San Diego, California. A total of 264 girls from 66 classes participated (n =154 children; n = 110 adolescents). Physical activity was measured with accelerometers, and activity levels during class were calculated. Participants recorded an average of 17.2 ± 8.9 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (36% of class), but this varied by age and dance type. For children, dance type differences were observed with percent of class in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity ranging from 13.6% (Latin-flamenco) to 57% (hip-hop). For adolescents, there were no differences across dance types. Children were more active than adolescents in all types except ballet. Children and adolescents were more active in private compared with community center classes. Overall, physical activity in youth dance classes was low; 8% of children and 6% of adolescents met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 30-minute guideline for after-school physical activity during dance. To increase physical activity in dance classes, teaching methods could be employed to increase activity in all types, or emphasis could be placed on greater participation in more active dance types. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. "Weekend-effect" evidence for intensification of storms by pollution over U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T. L.; Rosenfeld, D.; Kim, K.-M.; Hahnenberger, M.

    2006-01-01

    Aerosols change the way precipitating clouds evolve, due to their effect on condensation and ice formation. The net effect of aerosols on precipitation varies depending on the local environment and synoptic situation, the types of aerosols, and also on how far downstream one looks for effects. Repeated experiments with controlled release of aerosols would be helpful in unraveling how aerosols affect precipitation. The weekly variation in human activity may provide just such a set of experiments. Using the rainfall estimates from the passive microwave instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), which has been orbiting for over eight years and can view areas as far north as about 40 degs, we find that there is indeed a weekly variation in summer (JJA) rainfall over the southeastern U.S. land area, with the average rain rate peaking in the middle of the week (Tue-Thu). Rainfall over nearby oceanic areas, on the other hand, seems to peak on weekends. A bootstrap statistical test indicates that the variations are unlikely to be due to chance. Physically related weekly variations in the statistics of ground-based measurements and model reanalysis data are found. The midweek peak in rainfall over land coincides with the well documented midweek peak in pollution around much of the U.S., and is unlikely to be due to other weekly variations in human influence. The midweek increase is also unlikely to be a consequence of the radiative heating or cooling of the atmosphere by the aerosols.

  14. The physical activity level of Mexican children decreases upon entry to elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui, Alejandra; Villalpando, Salvador; Rangel-Baltazar, Eduardo; Castro-Hernández, Jessica; Lara-Zamudio, Yaveth; Méndez-Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    To compare the physical activity patterns of a cohort of Mexican children in kindergarten (K), first (1ES) and second grade (2ES) of elementary school. The physical activity of 217 children (123 girls and 94 boys) aged 5-6 years was measured (five full-day triaxial accelerometry) annually.Weekday and weekend moderate/ vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and school and off-school MVPA was calculated. Comparisons between surveys were made using longitudinal multilevel generalized linear models. Weekday MVPA was 22 and 37 min/d lower for 1ES (p=0.06) and 2ES (pSchool MVPA for 1ES and 2ES was 37 (-5.0 min/h) and 40% (-5.5 min/h) (pschool MVPA among school stages (p>0.5). MVPA was significantly reduced from K to ES,in part because of a decline in MVPA during school activities. Interventions targeted to school environment modifications should be promoted.

  15. School-based health promotion and physical activity during and after school hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ploeg, Kerry A; McGavock, Jonathan; Maximova, Katerina; Veugelers, Paul J

    2014-02-01

    Comprehensive school health (CSH) is a multifaceted approach to health promotion. A key objective of CSH is to foster positive health behaviors outside of school. This study examined the 2-year change in physical activity during and after school among students participating in a CSH intervention in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. This was a quasi-experimental, pre-post trial with a parallel, nonequivalent control group. Intervention schools had to be located in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods. In the spring of 2009 and 2011, pedometer recordings (7 full days) and demographic data were collected from cross-sectional samples of fifth grade students from 10 intervention schools and 20 comparison schools. A total of 1157 students participated in the study. Analyses were adjusted for potential confounders and the clustered design. Relative to 2009, children in 2011 were more active on schools days (1172 steps per day; P schools than in comparison schools (school days: 1221 steps per day; P = .009; weekends: 2001 steps per day; P = .005). These increases remained significant after adjusting for gender and overweight status. These findings provide evidence of the effectiveness of CSH to affect children's physical activity during and outside of school. Results of this study justify broader implementation of effective CSH interventions for physical activity promotion and obesity prevention in the long term.

  16. Parent-Adolescent Patterns of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviors and Sleep Among a Sample of Overweight and Obese Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Andrew W; Watts, Allison W; Masse, Louise C

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between parent and adolescent levels of physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and sleep among a group of overweight and obese adolescents. Baseline data of parent-adolescent pairs who enrolled in a lifestyle modification intervention were analyzed for this study (n = 176). Participants completed questionnaires about their screen time (TV, video game, and computer time), wore an accelerometer for 8 days, and completed a sleep diary for 1 week. In total, 98 parent-adolescent dyads provided valid data for the analyses. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between parent and adolescent's moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA), step counts, sedentary behaviors, and sleep duration. Analyses were split by weekday, weekday evening and weekend. Parent-adolescent MVPA was significantly associated on weekdays (b = 0.18; SE = 0.08; β = 0.26), weekday evenings (b = 0.21; SE = 0.08; β = 0.28), and weekends (b = 0.29; SE = 0.12; β = 0.27). This study found associations between parent-child video game time on weekends (b = 1.10; SE = 0.49; β = 0.24) and computer time on weekdays (b = 0.42; SE = 0.19; β = 0.23). Adolescent sleep was associated with parental sleep on weekdays only (b = 0.38; SE = 0.09; β = 0.46). The findings warrant further investigation into the direction and mechanism of the relationship between parent and adolescent weight related behaviors.

  17. Social influences on physical activity in Anglo- and Vietnamese-Australian adolescent males in a single sex school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew N; Dollman, James

    2007-06-01

    Understanding factors that influence physical activity levels of adolescents can assist the design of more effective interventions. Social support is a consistent correlate of youth physical activity but few studies have examined this in different cultural settings. Male adolescents (n=180, age=13.58+/-0.97 years) from a metropolitan single sex private school participated in this study. Habitual physical activity was estimated using the 3-day physical activity recall (3dPAR), and aspects of social support to be physically active using a specifically designed questionnaire. Comparisons were made between Anglo-Australians (n=118), whose parents were both born in Australia, and Vietnamese-Australians (n=62), whose parents were both born in Vietnam. There was a trend towards higher physical activity among Anglo-Australians, particularly on weekends. Anglo-Australians reported significantly more parental and peer support across most items pertaining to these constructs. Among the whole sample, social support variables explained 5-12% of the total explained variance in physical activity, with items pertaining to father and best friend support emerging as the strongest and most consistent predictors in multiple regression models. Among Anglo-Australians, the prediction models were relatively weak, explaining 0-9% of the total explained variance in physical activity. Prediction models for physical activity among Vietnamese-Australians were much stronger, explaining 11-32% of the total explained variance, with father's support variables contributing consistently to these models. The strong paternal influence on physical activity among Vietnamese-Australians needs to be confirmed in more diverse population groups, but results from this study suggest that interventions promoting physical activity among adolescent boys need to take into account cultural background as a moderator of widely reported social influences.

  18. Peripheral bone mineral density and different intensities of physical activity in children 6-8 years old: the Copenhagen School Child Intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselstrøm, H; Karlsson, K M; Hansen, S E

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between objectively measured habitual physical activity and calcaneal and forearm bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)), one mechanically more loaded and one less loaded skeletal region, in children aged 6-8 years. BMD was measured in 297 boys and 265...... girls by peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the forearm and calcaneus. An accelerometer registered the level of physical activity during 4 days (2 weekdays and the weekend). Weight, height, and skinfold thickness were measured. In order to establish thresholds (count . min(-1)) for bone......-stimulating physical activity, we evaluated different definitions of vigorous physical activity. The boys had 3.2% higher distal forearm bone mineral content (BMC, P

  19. Pedometer-determined physical activity levels of adolescents: differences by age, sex, time of week, and transportation mode to school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohepa, Maea; Schofield, Grant; Kolt, Gregory S; Scragg, Robert; Garrett, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined high school students' physical activity habits using objective measures. The purpose of this study was to describe pedometer-determined habitual physical activity levels of youth. 236 high school students (age 12-18 years) wore sealed pedometers for 5 consecutive days. Data were analyzed using generalizing estimating equations. Mean steps/d (+/- SE) differed significantly by sex (males, 10,849 (+/- 381; females, 9652 (+/- 289), age (junior students [years 9-11], 11,079 (+/- 330; senior students [years 12 and 13], 9422 (+/- 334), time of week (weekday, 12,259 (+/- 287; weekend day, 8241 (+/- 329), and mode of transportation to and from school (walkers, 13,308 (+/- 483; car transit users, 10,986 (+/- 435). Only 14.5% of students achieved at least 10,000 steps on every day during the monitoring period. Daily step counts differed substantially by age, sex, time of week, and transportation mode to school.

  20. Physical Activity and Exercise: Implications for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Wayne A.; Mauzey, Edward D.; Hall, Charla R.

    2003-01-01

    Authors address current recommendations for physical activity and health, physical activity and mental well being, and implications for counselors and the counseling profession. Specifically, they review a recent article published in the "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology" and examine in detail the resulting implications for counselors…

  1. Representation of physical activity domains and sedentary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schools play an important role in promoting active lifestyles among children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the representation of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SBs) in the images of physical education (PE) textbooks. The initial sample was composed of 1 094 images from Spanish PE textbooks.

  2. Intensity versus duration of physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Adam Høgsbro; Kristiansen, Ole P; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    To explore the relative importance of leisure time physical activity (LTPA), walking and jogging on risk of developing the metabolic syndrome (MS).......To explore the relative importance of leisure time physical activity (LTPA), walking and jogging on risk of developing the metabolic syndrome (MS)....

  3. Understanding Motivators and Barriers to Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patay, Mary E.; Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Fahey, Kathleen; Sinclair, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the factors that influence physical activity among year-round residents in an isolated summer resort community. Specifically, we explored the personal, environmental, social, and culture-specific perceived motivators and barriers to physical activity. Participants were formally interviewed about their…

  4. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  5. Interdisciplinary Best Practices for Adapted Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Rick

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the literature on interdisciplinary research. It then draws lessons from that literature for the field of adapted physical activity. It is argued that adapted physical activity should be a self-consciously interdisciplinary field. It should insist that research be performed according to recognized…

  6. Promote Physical Activity--It's Proactive Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Dan; Sonsteng, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Healthy child development relies on physical activity. New curriculum models are effectively integrating physical activity in education programs. The authors describe three such models: S.M.A.R.T. (Stimulating Maturity through Accelerated Readiness Training); Kids in Action, incorporating cardiovascular endurance, muscle strength and endurance,…

  7. Increasing Physical Activity through Recess. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighle, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity promotes important health benefits, reduces risk for obesity and is linked with enhanced academic performance among students. The U.S. Surgeon General recommends that children engage in at least 60 minutes of moderate physical activity most days of the week, yet fewer than half of children ages 6 to 11 meet that…

  8. Evidence-based intervention in physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heath, Gregory W; Parra, Diana C; Sarmiento, Olga L

    2012-01-01

    Promotion of physical activity is a priority for health agencies. We searched for reviews of physical activity interventions, published between 2000 and 2011, and identified effective, promising, or emerging interventions from around the world. The informational approaches of community-wide and m...

  9. Physical activity after total hip arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenmakers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Regular physical activity plays an important role in the primary and secondary prevention of several chronic conditions, and is linked to a reduction in all-cause mortality. It also enhances musculoskeletal fitness. Through these effects, regular physical activity can make an important contribution

  10. Physical Activity before and after School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighle, Aaron; Moore, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses a variety of before- and after-school programs (BASPs) that can be implemented from preschool through 12th grade. These programs offer physical activity opportunities before and after school for youths of various ages, skill levels, and socioeconomic levels. In addition, strategies for the director of physical activity to…

  11. Effectiveness of worksite physical activity counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proper, K.I.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to describe the effectiveness of a particular worksite physical activity intervention involving individual counseling of workers. First, a summary of the existing literature is given as to the effectiveness of worksite physical activity programs. A strong evidence was

  12. Jumpin' Jaguars: Encouraging Physical Activity After School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Heather E.; Rose, Stephanie A.; Small, Sarah R.; Perman, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Many afterschool physical activity programs and curricula are available, but evaluation of their effectiveness is needed. Well-marketed programs such as the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) Kids Club have shown limited effectiveness in increasing physical activity for participants in comparison to control groups.…

  13. Promoting Physical Activity in Afterschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighle, Aaron; Beets, Michael W.; Erwin, Heather E.; Huberty, Jennifer; Moore, Justin B.; Stellino, Megan

    2010-01-01

    Children in the United States are not engaging in sufficient amounts of routine physical activity, and this lack is an emerging public health concern (Strong, Malina, Blimkie, Daniels, Dishman, Gutin, et al., 2005). Efforts to increase the physical activity levels of children and adolescents has become a national priority, attracting attention…

  14. Multimorbidity, cognitive function, and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that both physical activity and multimorbidity are associated with cognitive function. However, the extent to which physical activity may moderate the relationship between multimorbidity and cognitive function has not been thoroughly evaluated. Data from the 1999-2002 NHANES were used (60+ years; N = 2157). A multimorbidity index variable was created based on physician diagnosis of a multitude of chronic diseases. Physical activity was self-reported and cognitive function was evaluated from the digit symbol substitution test. Multimorbidity was inversely associated with cognitive function for the unadjusted and adjusted models. However, generally, multimorbidity was no longer associated with cognitive function for the majority of older adults who achieved the minimum recommended physical activity level (≥2000 MET-min-month), as issued by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. In this national sample of older adults, there was some evidence to suggest that physical activity moderates the relationship between multimorbidity and cognitive function.

  15. Physical activity and health in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bhavesh; Robinson, Rebecca; Till, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Adolescence represents a critical period of development during which personal lifestyle choices and behaviour patterns establish, including the choice to be physically active. Physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour and low cardiorespiratory fitness are strong risk factors for the development of chronic diseases with resulting morbidity and mortality, as well as economic burden to wider society from health and social care provision, and reduced occupational productivity. Worrying trends in adverse physical activity behaviours necessitate urgent and concerted action. Healthcare professionals caring for adolescents and young adults are ideally placed and suited to deliver powerful messages promoting physical activity and behaviour change. Every encounter represents an opportunity to ask about physical activity, provide advice, or signpost to appropriate pathways or opportunities. Key initial targets include getting everyone to reduce their sedentary behaviour and be more active, with even a little being more beneficial than none at all. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  16. Young people's participation in physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Frydendal; Ottesen, Laila; Thing, Lone Friis

    ; Shame has an immense influence on the girls’ participation in physical activity; The offers regarding physical activity, provided by the school, appeal more to the boys and the students who are already physically active. Consequently, the students express a wish to have more influence on physical...... activity and health in their environment. Furthermore, most of the students would like to become healthier or more active, and they see the school and their parents as important factors in helping them get there. Conclusively, aspects like school, leisure, spare time jobs and cultural norms shape the lives......The paper presents the results of a questionnaire survey conducted in a Danish Gymnasium. The purpose of the survey was to gain knowledge on the perspectives of the students regarding physical education, exercise and health. Other studies have examined the views of young people regarding PE...

  17. An assessment of schoolyard renovation strategies to encourage children's physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Emily

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children in poor and minority neighborhoods often lack adequate environmental support for healthy physical development and community interventions designed to improve physical activity resources serve as an important approach to addressing obesity. In Denver, the Learning Landscapes (LL program has constructed over 98 culturally-tailored schoolyard play spaces at elementary schools with the goal to encourage utilization of play spaces and physical activity. In spite of enthusiasm about such projects to improve urban environments, little work has evaluated their impact or success in achieving their stated objectives. This study evaluates the impacts of LL construction and recency of renovation on schoolyard utilization and the physical activity rates of children, both during and outside of school, using an observational study design. Methods This study employs a quantitative method for evaluating levels of physical activity of individuals and associated environmental characteristics in play and leisure environments. Schools were selected on the basis of their participation in the LL program, the recency of schoolyard renovation, the size of the school, and the social and demographic characteristics of the school population. Activity in the schoolyards was measured using the System for Observing Play and Leisure Activity (SOPLAY, a validated quantitative method for evaluating levels of physical activity of individuals in play and leisure environments. Trained observers collected measurements before school, during school recess, after school, and on weekends. Overall utilization (the total number of children observed on the grounds and the rate of activity (the percentage of children observed who were physically active were analyzed. Observations were compared using t-tests and the data were stratified by gender for further analysis. In order to assess the impacts of LL renovation, recently-constructed LL schoolyards were

  18. Physical Activity in Hospitalised Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya West

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to examine the amount and type of physical activity engaged in by people hospitalised after stroke. Method. We systematically reviewed the literature for observational studies describing the physical activity of stroke patients. Results. Behavioural mapping, video recording and therapist report are used to monitor activity levels in hospitalised stroke patients in the 24 included studies. Most of the patient day is spent inactive (median 48.1%, IQR 39.6%–69.3%, alone (median 53.7%, IQR 44.2%–60.6% and in their bedroom (median 56.5%, IQR 45.2%–72.5%. Approximately one hour per day is spent in physiotherapy (median 63.2 minutes, IQR 36.0–79.5 and occupational therapy (median 57.0 minutes, IQR 25.1–58.5. Even in formal therapy sessions limited time is spent in moderate to high level physical activity. Low levels of physical activity appear more common in patients within 14 days post-stroke and those admitted to conventional care. Conclusions. Physical activity levels are low in hospitalised stroke patients. Improving the description and classification of post stroke physical activity would enhance our ability to pool data across observational studies. The importance of increasing activity levels and the effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity after stroke need to be tested further.

  19. The Prevalence of Physical Activity Levels in Albanian Children and Adolescents in the Physical Education Class and Their Leisure Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shehu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies that show that all individuals (children, adolescents, adults who participate in regular Physical Activity, namely "every day" their memory, concentration and communication, problem solving and leadership skills will be improved compared with individuals who are inactive. Moreover, these improvements can have a positive impact in their process of learning and many other subject areas. The purpose of this study is to present the prevalence of physical activity in Albanian children's and adolescents during their leisure time and teaching process. The instrument used in this study is 'Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children's and Adolescents (PAQ-A and PAQ-C, by Kowalski et al. (1997, made up 8 questions. The sample of the study includes 400 pupils aged 9 - 19 (185 Male and 215 Female. The statistical data processing was performed by SPPS statistical program, version 20. Cronbach's Alpha .820 was used to assess the reliability of the instrument. Volleyball, athletics and football sports are among the most favored by pupils in their leisure time. 56.5% of them claim that they are always intensely involved in the class of PE and 48.3% of them claim that after lesson they prefer to stand around/walk. In extracurricular activities 36% of adolescent's claim that they are not included ever and 30.5% of them state that they are included 1 times at the week and during weekends 52.5% of them are involved 2 - 3 times. The subjects were engaged to get involved in PA at class and during schools day but they are more involved during Saturday and Sun-day, during their leisure time.

  20. Measuring physical activity environments: a brief history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallis, James F

    2009-04-01

    Physical activity is usually done in specific types of places, referred to as physical activity environments. These often include parks, trails, fitness centers, schools, and streets. In recent years, scientific interest has increased notably in measuring physical activity environments. The present paper provides an historical overview of the contributions of the health, planning, and leisure studies fields to the development of contemporary measures. The emphasis is on attributes of the built environment that can be affected by policies to contribute to the promotion of physical activity. Researchers from health fields assessed a wide variety of built environment variables expected to be related to recreational physical activity. Settings of interest were schools, workplaces, and recreation facilities, and most early measures used direct observation methods with demonstrated inter-observer reliability. Investigators from the city planning field evaluated aspects of community design expected to be related to people's ability to walk from homes to destinations. GIS was used to assess walkability defined by the 3Ds of residential density, land-use diversity, and pedestrian-oriented designs. Evaluating measures for reliability or validity was rarely done in the planning-related fields. Researchers in the leisure studies and recreation fields studied mainly people's use of leisure time rather than physical characteristics of parks and other recreation facilities. Although few measures of physical activity environments were developed, measures of aesthetic qualities are available. Each of these fields made unique contributions to the contemporary methods used to assess physical activity environments.

  1. Efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children: the healthy homework pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Scott

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most physical activity and nutrition interventions in children focus on the school setting; however, evidence suggests that children are less active and have greater access to unhealthy food at home. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children. Methods The six-week 'Healthy Homework' programme and complementary teaching resource was developed under the guidance of an intersectoral steering group. Eight senior classes (year levels 5-6 from two diverse Auckland primary schools were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. A total of 97 children (57 intervention, 40 control aged 9-11 years participated in the evaluation of the intervention. Daily step counts were monitored immediately before and after the intervention using sealed multiday memory pedometers. Screen time, sports participation, active transport to and from school, and the consumption of fruits, vegetables, unhealthy foods and drinks were recorded concurrently in a 4-day food and activity diary. Results Healthy Homework resulted in a significant intervention effect of 2,830 steps.day-1 (95% CI: 560, 5,300, P = 0.013. This effect was consistent between sexes, schools, and day types (weekdays and weekend days. In addition, significant intervention effects were observed for vegetable consumption (0.83 servings.day-1, 95% CI: 0.24, 1.43, P = 0.007 and unhealthy food consumption (-0.56 servings.day-1, 95% CI: -1.05, -0.07, P = 0.027 on weekends but not weekdays, with no interactions with sex or school. Effects for all other variables were not statistically significant regardless of day type. Conclusions Compulsory health-related homework appears to be an effective approach for increasing physical activity and improving vegetable and unhealthy food consumption in children. Further research in a larger study is required to confirm these initial

  2. Efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children: the healthy homework pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Scott; McPhee, Julia C; Schluter, Philip J; Zinn, Caryn; Smith, Richard; Schofield, Grant

    2011-11-15

    Most physical activity and nutrition interventions in children focus on the school setting; however, evidence suggests that children are less active and have greater access to unhealthy food at home. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the efficacy of a compulsory homework programme for increasing physical activity and healthy eating in children. The six-week 'Healthy Homework' programme and complementary teaching resource was developed under the guidance of an intersectoral steering group. Eight senior classes (year levels 5-6) from two diverse Auckland primary schools were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. A total of 97 children (57 intervention, 40 control) aged 9-11 years participated in the evaluation of the intervention. Daily step counts were monitored immediately before and after the intervention using sealed multiday memory pedometers. Screen time, sports participation, active transport to and from school, and the consumption of fruits, vegetables, unhealthy foods and drinks were recorded concurrently in a 4-day food and activity diary. Healthy Homework resulted in a significant intervention effect of 2,830 steps.day-1 (95% CI: 560, 5,300, P = 0.013). This effect was consistent between sexes, schools, and day types (weekdays and weekend days). In addition, significant intervention effects were observed for vegetable consumption (0.83 servings.day-1, 95% CI: 0.24, 1.43, P = 0.007) and unhealthy food consumption (-0.56 servings.day-1, 95% CI: -1.05, -0.07, P = 0.027) on weekends but not weekdays, with no interactions with sex or school. Effects for all other variables were not statistically significant regardless of day type. Compulsory health-related homework appears to be an effective approach for increasing physical activity and improving vegetable and unhealthy food consumption in children. Further research in a larger study is required to confirm these initial results.

  3. Perceptions of neighborhood safety and physical activity among youth: the CLAN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Alison; Timperio, Anna; Crawford, David

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between perceptions of neighborhood safety and physical activity among youth. We completed a cross-sectional study of children age 8 to 9 years (n = 188) and adolescents age 13 to 15 years (n = 346) in areas of varying socioeconomic status in Melbourne, Australia. Parents and adolescents completed questionnaires on perceptions of neighborhood safety. Scores were computed for perceptions of road safety, incivilities, and personal safety of the child or adolescent. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) before or after school, on evenings, and on weekends was recorded using accelerometers. There were no associations between parental perceptions of neighborhood safety and children's MVPA outside school hours. Parental perception of personal safety was positively associated with adolescent boys' MVPA after school. Adolescent girls' concern about road safety was negatively associated with their MVPA during evenings and outside school hours. Perceptions of neighborhood safety might influence physical activity among youth in different ways according to age group and sex.

  4. Physics Education activities sponsored by LAPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora Ley, Cesar E.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we present the first activities of the Latin-American Physics Education Network (LAPEN) organized by representatives of Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Uruguay, Peru and Spain. These activities include Seminars, Congress, Postgraduate Programs on Physics Education and several publications. The creation of LAPEN has been inspired and warranted by members of the International Commission on Physics Education of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. LAPEN was constituted in the International Meeting on Teaching Physics and Training Teachers (RIEFEP 2005) which was held in Matanzas, Cuba in November 2005. The creation of LAPEN was also warranted by the General Assembly of the IX Inter-American Conference on Physics Education held in San José, Costa Rica from 3 to 7 July 2006, and by the ICPE Committee in the International Conference on Physics Education 2006 at Tokyo, Japan. LAPEN has a Coordinator Committee integrated by a President, a Vice-president and an Executive Secretary.

  5. History of body weight and physical activity of elderly women differing in current physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, L E; Meijers, J H; Sol, P; Seidell, J C; van Staveren, W.A.

    Development of overweight and physical activity during life was studied retrospectively in a group of physically active and a group of sedentary elderly women. The two groups of elderly women were selected based on a validated physical activity questionnaire. A previous study on their current

  6. [Effectiveness of physical activity intervention at workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malińska, Marzena

    2017-03-24

    A physical activity is a key factor contributing to the improvement and maintenance of one's general health. Although this issue is by no means limited to the workplace, it is precisely the work environment that can provide the basis for keeping and reinforcing more health-conscious attitudes and lifestyles, including programs promoting a physical activity. The paper presents an analysis of the literature on the effectiveness of physical activity intervention at the workplace. Particular attention is paid to the impact of the physical activity programs on musculoskeletal disorders, absenteeism, work ability, physical capacity and body weight of the participants. Given a marginal extent of programs of this kind in Poland, the authors' intention was to show the benefits resulting from implementation of and participation in such initiatives. Med Pr 2017;68(2):277-301. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. Effectiveness of physical activity intervention at workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Malińska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A physical activity is a key factor contributing to the improvement and maintenance of one’s general health. Although this issue is by no means limited to the workplace, it is precisely the work environment that can provide the basis for keeping and reinforcing more health-conscious attitudes and lifestyles, including programs promoting a physical activity. The paper presents an analysis of the literature on the effectiveness of physical activity intervention at the workplace. Particular attention is paid to the impact of the physical activity programs on musculoskeletal disorders, absenteeism, work ability, physical capacity and body weight of the participants. Given a marginal extent of programs of this kind in Poland, the authors’ intention was to show the benefits resulting from implementation of and participation in such initiatives. Med Pr 2017;68(2:277–301

  8. Physical activity: Cinderella or Rodney Dangerfield?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Antronette K; Sallis, James F

    2009-10-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the leading causes of death, disability, and health care costs, but resources and other investments in promoting physical activity are neither proportional to nor ideally suited to address the problem, especially in the United States. Capacity for physical activity promotion is lacking, when compared to the response to other major health risk and protective behaviors. The authors of the commentaries in this special issue were asked to identify key issues from a variety of perspectives and to recommend actions that can be taken now to increase physical activity across the population so that all segments of society benefit, especially those at high risk of chronic diseases. The goal is to stimulate research institutions, public health agencies at all levels, and policy makers to raise physical activity as a priority commensurate with other pressing public health concerns.

  9. [Relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chong-hua; Zuo, Hui-juan; Kong, Ling-zhi; Yang, Xiao-guang; Zhai, Feng-ying

    2006-08-15

    To investigate the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome (MS). A multi-stage stratified cluster sampling was conducted in 132 sampling 218,920 residents, aged 44.3 +/- 15.3 (15 - 96), in the 31 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities of the mainland China according to the program of the National Nutrition and Health Survey. Questionnaire survey, interview, physical examination, measurement of biochemical indices, and dietary investigation were done. Information of physical activity and measurement of fasting glucose and/or glucose 2 hours after meal, blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were obtained in 50,494 participants. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Chinese Medical Association's definition. The intensity of physical activity was divided into 3 categories according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of US/American College of Sports Medicine criteria. 50,495 subjects, 23,932 males (47.4%) and 26,562 females (52.6%), were diagnosed as with MS. The MS incidence of those with high intensity of physical activity was lower by 60% in comparison with those with low intensity of physical activity (odds ratio 0.60, 95% CI: 0.362 - 0.443) adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and alcohol intake. The risk of MS in those with moderate intensity of physical activity of 151 - 300 minutes/week was slightly decreased compared to those with moderate intensity of physical activity of 90 - 150 minutes/week, (odds ratio 0.935, 95% CI: 0.685 - 1.277), however, the risk of MS in those with the moderate intensity of physical activity over 300 minutes/week increased slightly (OR = 1.269, 95% CI: 0.923 - 1.745). The risk of MS in those with low-level physical activity of 301 - 420 minutes/week was lower by 35% in comparison with those with the low-level physical activity of 90 - 150 minutes/week (95% CI: 0.451 - 0.933), however, the risk of MS in those with the low-level physical activity over 420

  10. Physical activity and obesity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Andrew P; Andersen, Lars Bo; Byrne, Nuala M

    2011-09-01

    Globally, obesity is affecting an increasing proportion of children. Physical activity plays an important role in the prevention of becoming overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence, and reducing the risk of obesity in adulthood. Puberty and the following adolescent period are acknowledged as particularly vulnerable times for the development of obesity due to sexual maturation and, in many individuals, a concomitant reduction in physical activity. In many Western settings, a large proportion of children and adolescents do not meet recommended physical activity guidelines and, typically, those who are more physically active have lower levels of body fat than those who are less active. Active behaviours have been displaced by more sedentary pursuits which have contributed to reductions in physical activity energy expenditure. Without appropriate activity engagement there is an increased likelihood that children will live less healthy lives than their parents. Owing to the high risk of overweight adolescents becoming obese adults, the engagement of children and adolescents in physical activity and sport is a fundamental goal of obesity prevention.

  11. Improving physical activity in daycare interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonis, Marc; Loftin, Mark; Ward, Dianne; Tseng, Tung Sung; Clesi, Ann; Sothern, Melinda

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to objectively determine whether the Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) program improved physical activity levels during the school day. The study compared the physical activity levels of subjects from 26 daycare centers, randomized into treatment (N=13) and control (N=13) groups. The subjects were 3 to 5 year olds (N=209, 104 males and 105 females; age [years]=3.85±0.8 [mean±standard deviation]), and accelerometry was used to determine the subjects' physical activity levels. Accelerometers were attached to each subject for 2 days before and immediately after a 6-month intervention. Height, mass, and waist were also measured. Regression analyses indicated that the treatment group demonstrated significant increases in moderate and vigorous physical activity, as compared to the control group (F(1, 207)=6.3, pdaycare facilities resulted in significant increases in objectively measured physical activity levels, compared to the control group, demonstrating physical activity improvement in the treatment daycare centers.

  12. Enhancing physical activity in older adults receiving hospital based rehabilitation: a phase II feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Catherine M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation have low activity levels and poor mobility outcomes. Increased physical activity may improve mobility. The objective of this Phase II study was to evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT of enhanced physical activity in older adults receiving rehabilitation. Methods Patients admitted to aged care rehabilitation with reduced mobility were randomized to receive usual care or usual care plus additional physical activity, which was delivered by a physiotherapist or physiotherapy assistant. The feasibility and safety of the proposed RCT protocol was evaluated. The primary clinical outcome was mobility, which was assessed on hospital admission and discharge by an assessor blinded to group assignment. To determine the most appropriate measure of mobility, three measures were trialled; the Timed Up and Go, the Elderly Mobility Scale and the de Morton Mobility Index. Results The protocol was feasible. Thirty-four percent of people admitted to the ward were recruited, with 47 participants randomised to a control (n = 25 or intervention group (n = 22. The rates of adverse events (death, falls and readmission to an acute service did not differ between the groups. Usual care therapists remained blind to group allocation, with no change in usual practice. Physical activity targets were met on weekdays but not weekends and the intervention was acceptable to participants. The de Morton Mobility Index was the most appropriate measure of mobility. Conclusions The proposed RCT of enhanced physical activity in older adults receiving rehabilitation was feasible. A larger multi-centre RCT to establish whether this intervention is cost effective and improves mobility is warranted. Trial registration The trial was registered with the ANZTCR (ACTRN12608000427370.

  13. Workdays, in-between workdays and the weekend: a diary study on effort and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooff, Madelon L M; Geurts, Sabine A E; Kompier, Michiel A J; Taris, Toon W

    2007-07-01

    Effort-recovery theory (Meijman and Mulder in Handbook of work and organizational psychology, Psychology Press/Erlbaum, Hove, pp 5-33, 1998) proposes that effort expenditure may have adverse consequences for health in the absence of sufficient recovery opportunities. Thus, insight in the relationships between effort and recovery is imperative to understand work-related health. This study therefore focused on the relation between work-related effort and recovery (1) during workdays, (2) in-between workdays and (3) in the weekend. For these three time periods, we compared a group of employees reporting relatively low levels of work-related effort ("low-effort group") and a group of employees reporting relatively high levels of work-related effort ("high-effort group") with respect to (1) activity patterns, (2) the experience of these activity patterns, and (3) health and well-being indicators. Data were collected among university staff members. Participants (N(high-effort group) = 24 and N(low-effort group) = 27) completed a general questionnaire and took part in a 7-day daily diary study covering five weekdays and the following weekend. Differences between the two effort-groups were examined by means of analysis of variance. Compared to the low-effort group, the high-effort group (1) engaged less often in active leisure activities during the week and worked more overtime in the weekend, (2) considered both work and home activities as more effortful, but not as less pleasurable, and (3) reported higher levels of sleep complaints (weekdays only) and fatigue, more preoccupation with work (weekdays only) and lower motivation to start the next workweek during the weekend. Work-related effort is associated with various aspects of work time and (potential) recovery time in-between workdays and in the weekend. High levels of work-related effort are associated with activity patterns that are less beneficial in terms of recovery, with higher effort expenditure during and

  14. Physical activity and sedentary behavior among children and adolescents living in an area affected by the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami for 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanzo Okazaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the change in physical activity levels among children and adolescents living in the area affected by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami for 3 years immediately following the disaster. Children and adolescents graded four to nine and attending school in the Pacific coastal area of northern Japan were included in a total of four serial prevalence investigations: the first at 6 months after the earthquake/tsunami (I, n = 434 and additional surveys at 1 year (II, n = 437, 2 years (III, n = 401, and 3 years (IV, n = 365 after the earthquake. Students were also required to undergo assessment of their accelerometer-determined daily steps and sedentary time using a self-administrated questionnaire. Accelerometer-determined median daily steps of children and adolescents were significantly different (p < 0.05 on both weekdays and weekends over 3 years. The median daily steps of children of both genders on weekdays and those of girls on weekends at period IV were significantly lower than those at period I. In addition, the median daily steps of adolescents on weekdays among girls and weekends among boys at period IV were significantly lower than those at period I. It appears that children and adolescents who survive the earthquake and tsunami experience a decrease in physical activity levels. Future research should elucidate longitudinal demographic and sociocultural factors that contribute to changes in physical activity levels among children and adolescents living in the areas affected by these disasters.

  15. : Diabetes mellitus 1. type and physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Prouza, Michal

    2014-01-01

    1 Abstrakt Name of thesis Diabetes mellitus I. type and physical activity Aim of thesis The bachelor's thesis deals with diabetes mellitus I. type, the opportunity of compensation by adequate physical aktivity and diet and consecutive complications of diabetes. Methodology Collecting of the data from available literature and internet's resources. There is no personal interviews in this work. Results General description of the diabetes mellitus I. type, question of the physical aktivity with t...

  16. Bion's Agony in The Long Week-End.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Robert

    2017-08-01

    In The Long Week-End Wilfred Bion focuses on his emotional distress during the first twenty-one years of his life. Rarely employing psychoanalytic terminology, he attempts to explore his emotional experience directly, struggling to find a language that could capture the complexity of inner life. Central to The Long Week-End is his desire to communicate how easily he could feel unintelligent, inept, weak, ashamed, guilty, angry, frightened, and cowardly in various settings. This self-criticism at times undermines his theoretical stance in this work, as he emphasizes the importance of doubt and uncertainty when attempting to comprehend most dimensions of experience.

  17. Worksite physical activity policies and environments in relation to employee physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Noe C; Sallis, James F; Conway, Terry L; Saelens, Brian E; Frank, Lawrence D

    2011-01-01

    Examine associations between worksite physical activity promotion strategies and employees' physical activity and sedentary behaviors. Cross-sectional. Seattle-King County, Washington and Baltimore, Maryland-Washington, D.C. regions. Adults working outside the home (n = 1313). Mean age was 45 ± 10 years, 75.8% of participants were non-Hispanic white, 56% were male, and 51% had income ≥$70,000/year. Participants reported demographic characteristics and presence/absence of nine physical activity promotion environment and policy strategies in their work environment (e.g., showers, lockers, physical activity programs). A worksite physical activity promotion index was a tally of strategies. Total sedentary and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) min/d were objectively assessed via 7-day accelerometry. Total job-related physical activity minutes and recreational physical activity minutes were self-reported with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Mixed-effects models and generalized estimating equations evaluated the association of the worksite promotion index with physical activity and sedentary behavior, adjusting for demographics. A higher worksite promotion index was significantly associated with higher total sedentary behavior (β = 3.97), MVPA (β = 1.04), recreational physical activity (β = 1.1 and odds ratio = 1.39; away from work and at work, respectively) and negatively with job-related physical activity (β = .90). Multiple worksite physical activity promotion strategies based on environmental supports and policies may increase recreational physical activity and should be evaluated in controlled trials. These findings are particularly important given the increasingly sedentary nature of employment.

  18. The active video games' narrative impact on children's physical activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active video games (AVGs) capable of inducing physical activity offer an innovative approach to combating childhood obesity. Unfortunately, children's AVG game play decreases quickly, underscoring the need to identify novel methods for player engagement. Narratives have been demonstrated to influenc...

  19. The influence of neighbourhood green space on children's physical activity and screen time: findings from the longitudinal study of Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Taren; Feng, Xiaoqi; Fahey, Paul P; Lonsdale, Chris; Astell-Burt, Thomas

    2015-09-30

    It is often hypothesised that neighbourhood green space may help prevent well-known declines in physical activity and increases in sedentary behaviour that occur across childhood. As most studies in this regard are cross-sectional, the purpose of our study was to use longitudinal data to examine whether green space promotes active lifestyles as children grow older. Data came from participants (n = 4983; age = 4-5) of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, a nationally representative study on health and child development. Physical activity and screen time were measured biennially (2004-2012) using questionnaires and time use diaries. Quantity of neighbourhood green space was objectively measured using Australian Bureau of Statistics mesh block data for each participant's statistical area level 2. Multilevel regression was used to test for associations between physical activity and screen time with green space quantity, adjusting for socio-economic confounders. Boys living in areas with 10% more neighbourhood green space had a: 7% (95% CI = 1.02, 1.13) greater odds of choosing physically active pastimes; 8% (95 % CI = 0.85, 1.00) lower odds of not enjoying physical activity; 2.3 min reduction in weekend television viewing (95% CI = -4.00, -0.69); and 7% (95% CI = 1.02; 1.12) and 9% (95% CI = 1.03; 1.15) greater odds of meeting physical activity guidelines on weekdays and weekends, respectively. No statistically (or practically) significant results were observed for girls. Current provisions of neighbourhood green space may be more amenable to promoting active lifestyles among boys than girls. Research is needed to explore what types of green space promote active lifestyles in all children.

  20. Physical active rest in education of active personality of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaycev V.P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Meaningfulness of physical recreation is rotined in education of active personality of students. Research material is literary sources on this issue. Factors which influence on an educate function of personality of students are considered. Application of physical recreation is grounded for education of active personality of students. It is marked that physical recreation in pedagogical process decides educate, educational, health and social tasks. It positively influences on education of active personality of students. It is rotined that in education of active personality of students an important role is played by their research activity.

  1. Physical Activity, Public Health, and Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Kahan, David

    2008-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a serious public health problem that is associated with numerous preventable diseases. Public health concerns, particularly those related to the increased prevalence of overweight, obesity, and diabetes, call for schools to become proactive in the promotion of healthy, physically active lifestyles. This article begins by…

  2. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and adolescent girls' physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Julie; Hume, Clare; Timperio, Anna; Salmon, Jo

    2012-12-03

    Understanding the influences on physical activity is crucial, particularly among important target groups such as adolescent girls. This study describes cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between parenting style and girls' participation in organized sport, walking/cycling trips and objectively assessed moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Data were collected from adolescent girls (n=222) and their parents in 2004 and again in 2006. Parents self-reported their demographic characteristics and parenting style. Girls self-reported their organized sport participation and weekly walking/cycling trips, while MVPA was assessed using accelerometers. Linear regression and interaction analyses were performed. Interactions between socio-demographic factors and parenting style with organized sport, walking/cycling trips and MVPA are presented. There were cross-sectional associations between authoritative (B=-0.45, p=0.042) and indulgent (B=-0.56, p=0.002) parenting and the number of walking/cycling trips, and authoritarian (B=0.27, p=0.033) parenting and frequency of organized sport. Significant interactions included those between: family status, authoritative parenting and daily (p=0.048) and week day (p=0.013) MVPA; education, indulgent parenting and MVPA on weekend days (p=0.006); and, employment, authoritarian parenting and duration and frequency of organized sport (p=0.004), highlighting the complexity of these relationships. Longitudinal analyses revealed significant decreases in organized sport and MVPA, significant increases in walking/cycling trips and no significant associations between parenting and physical activity. Parenting styles appear to influence walking and cycling trips among adolescent girls, though not physical activity within other domains. Socio-demographic characteristics interact with the relationships between parenting and physical activity. While these findings can inform the development of family-based interventions to improve

  3. Physical activity in relation to selected physical health components ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The men show higher cardiovascular risk than women. With regard to physical activity and cardiovascular disease risk, all three women groups show statistically significant differences compared to all three men's groups. There are also moderate practically significant differences between the women's and men's groups.

  4. Children's Physical Activity Behavior during School Recess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Troelsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Schoolyards are recognized as important settings for physical activity interventions during recess. However, varying results have been reported. This pilot study was conducted to gain in-depth knowledge of children's physical activity behavior during recess using a mixed-methods approach combining...... participated in go-along group interviews, and recess behavior was observed using an ethnographical participant observation approach. All data were analyzed separated systematically answering the Five W Questions. Children were categorized into Low, Middle and High physical activity groups and these groups...... preferred the schoolyard over the field to avoid the competitive soccer games on the field whereas boys dominated the field playing soccer. Using a mixed-methods approach to investigate children's physical activity behavior during recess helped gain in-depth knowledge that can aid development of future...

  5. Physical activity, energy balance and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís Griera, José; María Manzanares, José; Barbany, Montserrat; Contreras, José; Amigó, Pilar; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2007-10-01

    Obesity appears when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. The most important variable compound of energy expenditure is physical activity. The global epidemics of obesity seem closely related to reduced physical activity and sedentariness widely increasing nowadays. Once obesity has developed, caloric intake becomes similar to energy expenditure. To lose weight, besides decreasing energy intake, energy expenditure must be increased. The promotion of physical activity is difficult and so the results of treatment of obesity are discouraging for doctors, other health professionals and patients. Proactive efforts from patients and health providers with an intensive feedback between them may be extremely helpful. Nevertheless, more studies are needed to provide better approaches on the role of physical activity for the prevention and treatment of obesity and for long-term weight-loss maintenance.

  6. Childhood Obesity, Physical Activity, and Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemet, Dan

    2017-02-01

    As the incidence of childhood obesity increases, there is a need to promote leisure time physical activity. Traditional approaches to promote the population physical activity levels have shown at best moderate improvements. High percentage of children today carry a cell phone, thus the use of this portable device seems promising for enhancing physical activity. Pokémon Go, is a smartphone game that uses augmented reality, where players are incentivized to get out and walk significant distances to catch the Pokémon. Initial reports suggested increases in the number of steps that players performed, yet this effect of the game was not sustained. Incorporating physical activity into modern technology seems promising, clearly there is need to explore creative ways to achieve a longer term effect.

  7. Why Should I Be Physically Active?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... minutes to write your questions for the next time you see your healthcare provider. For example: What’s the best type of physical activity for me? How much should I exercise? My Questions: We have many other fact sheets ...

  8. Physical activity and obesity in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hills, Andrew P; Andersen, Lars Bo; Byrne, Nuala M

    2011-01-01

    Globally, obesity is affecting an increasing proportion of children. Physical activity plays an important role in the prevention of becoming overweight and obese in childhood and adolescence, and reducing the risk of obesity in adulthood. Puberty and the following adolescent period are acknowledged...... as particularly vulnerable times for the development of obesity due to sexual maturation and, in many individuals, a concomitant reduction in physical activity. In many Western settings, a large proportion of children and adolescents do not meet recommended physical activity guidelines and, typically, those who...... that children will live less healthy lives than their parents. Owing to the high risk of overweight adolescents becoming obese adults, the engagement of children and adolescents in physical activity and sport is a fundamental goal of obesity prevention....

  9. The Role of Physical Activity in Everyday Life of Contemporary Students Studied by Various Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Danilenko

    2016-11-01

    improves the health of pupils in recovery period after the weekend. Conclusions. The study of the physical activity of fifth-grade pupils found the pupils of 5P and 5E2 forms to have high and sufficient level of physical activity during the week. At the same time, pupils of 5E1 form had sufficiently and low level of physical activity and poor well-being at the end of the work day and at the end of the day off. Pupils studied by a new system almost didn’t have time for outdoor exercise. It was associated with increased educational activity, the volume of homework and extra classes. Sports improves the well-being of the pupils in recovery period after the weekend regardless the educational system.

  10. Perceived climate in physical activity settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Diane L; Morrow, Ronald G; Collins, Karen E; Lucey, Allison B; Schultz, Allison M

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the perceived climate for LGBT youth and other minority groups in physical activity settings. A large sample of undergraduates and a selected sample including student teachers/interns and a campus Pride group completed a school climate survey and rated the climate in three physical activity settings (physical education, organized sport, exercise). Overall, school climate survey results paralleled the results with national samples revealing high levels of homophobic remarks and low levels of intervention. Physical activity climate ratings were mid-range, but multivariate analysis of variation test (MANOVA) revealed clear differences with all settings rated more inclusive for racial/ethnic minorities and most exclusive for gays/lesbians and people with disabilities. The results are in line with national surveys and research suggesting sexual orientation and physical characteristics are often the basis for harassment and exclusion in sport and physical activity. The current results also indicate that future physical activity professionals recognize exclusion, suggesting they could benefit from programs that move beyond awareness to skills and strategies for creating more inclusive programs.

  11. What Young People Say about Physical Activity: The Children's Sport Participation and Physical Activity (CSPPA) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannehill, Deborah; MacPhail, Ann; Walsh, Julia; Woods, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The Children's Sport Participation and Physical Activity (CSPPA) study is a unique multi-centre/discipline study undertaken by three Irish institutions, Dublin City University, University of Limerick and University College Cork. The study sought to assess participation in physical activity, physical education and sport (PAPES) among 10-18 year…

  12. Weekly variability in outcome expectations: Examining associations with related physical activity experiences during physical activity initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loehr, V.G.; Baldwin, A.S.; Rosenfield, D.; Smits, J.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how outcome expectations change after physical activity initiation and whether changes are associated with physical activity experiences. In a diary study, physically inactive adults (N = 102) initiated an exercise regimen and reported their experiences daily (e.g. progress

  13. Physical active rest in education of active personality of students

    OpenAIRE

    Zaycev V.P.; Manucharyan S.V.; Kramskoy S.I.

    2010-01-01

    Meaningfulness of physical recreation is rotined in education of active personality of students. Research material is literary sources on this issue. Factors which influence on an educate function of personality of students are considered. Application of physical recreation is grounded for education of active personality of students. It is marked that physical recreation in pedagogical process decides educate, educational, health and social tasks. It positively influences on education of acti...

  14. Perceived Barriers to Walking for Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dunton, Genevieve F.; Schneider, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Although the health benefits of walking for physical activity have received increasing research attention, barriers specific to walking are not well understood. In this study, questions to measure barriers to walking for physical activity were developed and tested among college students. The factor structure, test–retest and internal consistency reliability, and discriminant and criterion validity of the perceived barriers were evaluated. Methods A total of 305 undergraduate stud...

  15. Physical activity information seeking and advertising recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tanya R; Spence, John C; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Bauman, Adrian

    2011-04-01

    The purposes of this research were to examine the characteristics of those who look for physical activity-related information, where they find it, and to examine what types of physical activity-related advertisements are recalled (i.e., publicly funded or commercial). These purposes were tested using secondary data analyses from two population health surveys. Results from the first survey (n=1211) showed gender, age, education, and activity-level differences in who is more likely to search for physical activity-related information. Adding the goal of being active into the model made age and activity level no longer significant but gender and education remained significant factors. The Internet was the most often cited source of physical activity information. The second survey (n=1600) showed that adults 55 years of age or older and participants with the least amount of education were more than twice as likely to name commercial advertisements than were participants aged 18-54 years or those with more education. These results help further our understanding of how publicly funded promotional campaigns fare against commercial advertising and also highlight the need to understand physical activity information-seeking behavior on the Internet and its implications for health promotion.

  16. Psychosocial Aspects of Youth Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Lindsay E

    2017-02-01

    Two articles that contribute to the literature on psychosocial predictors of youths' physical activity motivation and behavior were chosen for commentary. The first article by Fenner and colleagues showed that a family-based intervention was effective at increasing overweight adolescents' self-determined motivation for physical activity and healthy eating and their quality of life. Significant study contributions include a multidisciplinary team of researchers, multiple pre and post intervention assessments, and a longitudinal test of mechanisms of change. Findings contribute to understanding how to provide overweight adolescents with support and choices at a critical developmental period to ultimately foster lifelong healthy behaviors. The second article by Garn and colleagues examined longitudinal relationships between physical self-perceptions and physical activity among children. Important study contributions include use of accelerometers to assess physical activity and tests of bidirectional relationships. The sample of young children aged 8-11 years also contributes to the literature. Results highlight body acceptance as an important mechanism of focus to foster children's physical activity behavior. Overall, the highlighted studies show that parental support and positive self-perceptions are important to consider in supporting youths' active lifestyles.

  17. Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Jeri; Sorensen, Dina; Trowbridge, Matthew; Lee, Karen K; Breithecker, Dieter; Frerichs, Leah; Huang, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Increasing children's physical activity at school is a national focus in the U.S. to address childhood obesity. While research has demonstrated associations between aspects of school environments and students' physical activity, the literature currently lacks a synthesis of evidence to serve as a practical, spatially-organized resource for school designers and decision-makers, as well as to point to pertinent research opportunities. This paper describes the development of a new practical tool: Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture. Its aims are to provide architects and designers, as well as school planners, educators, and public health professionals, with strategies for making K-12 school environments conducive to healthy physical activity, and to engage scientists in transdisciplinary perspectives toward improved knowledge of the school environment's impact. We used a qualitative review process to develop evidence-based and theory-driven school design guidelines that promote increased physical activity among students. The design guidelines include specific strategies in 10 school design domains. Implementation of the guidelines is expected to enable students to adopt healthier physical activity behaviors. The tool bridges a translational gap between research and environmental design practice, and may contribute to setting new industry and education standards.

  18. Weight, physical activity and breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, Anne

    2018-02-26

    Weight, weight change and physical activity may affect prognosis among women who are diagnosed with breast cancer. Observational studies show associations between overweight/obesity and weight gain with several measures of reduced prognosis in women with breast cancer, and some suggestions of lower survival in women who are underweight or who experience unexplained weight loss after diagnosis. Observational studies have also shown an association between higher levels of physical activity and reduced breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, although a dose-response relationship has not been established. The effects of purposive dietary weight loss and increase in physical activity on survival or recurrence in breast cancer are not yet established, and randomised controlled trials are needed for definitive data. This paper presents the epidemiologic evidence on weight status, weight change, and physical activity and breast cancer survival; suggests potential mediating mechanisms; summarises evidence on weight loss interventions in breast cancer survivors; describes ongoing randomised clinical trials designed to test the effects of weight loss or physical activity on breast cancer survival; and provides information on available guidelines on weight and physical activity for cancer survivors.

  19. Physical Activity and Body Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Candace C.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Caban-Martinez, Alberto J.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Kenwood, Christopher T.; Sabbath, Erika L.; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Hopcia, Karen; Allen, Jennifer; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-01-01

    Background The workplace is an important domain for adults, and many effective interventions targeting physical activity and weight reduction have been implemented in the workplace. However, the U.S. workforce is aging and few studies have examined the relationship of BMI, physical activity, and age as they relate to workplace characteristics. Purpose This paper reports on the distribution of physical activity and BMI by age in a population of hospital-based healthcare workers and investigates the relationships among workplace characteristics, physical activity, and BMI. Methods Data from a survey of patient care workers in two large academic hospitals in the Boston area were collected in late 2009 and analyzed in early 2013. Results In multivariate models, workers reporting greater decision latitude (OR=1.02; 95% CI=1.01, 1.03) and job flexibility (OR=1.05; 95% CI=1.01, 1.10) reported greater physical activity. Overweight and obesity increased with age (pworkplace characteristics. Sleep deficiency (OR=1.56; 95% CI=1.15, 2.12) and workplace harassment (OR= 1.62; 95% CI=1.20, 2.18) were also associated with obesity. Conclusions These findings underscore the persistent impact of the work environment for workers of all ages. Based on these results, programs or policies aimed at improving the work environment, especially decision latitude, job flexibility and workplace harassment should be included in the design of worksite-based health promotion interventions targeting physical activity or obesity. PMID:24512930

  20. Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeri Brittin

    Full Text Available Increasing children's physical activity at school is a national focus in the U.S. to address childhood obesity. While research has demonstrated associations between aspects of school environments and students' physical activity, the literature currently lacks a synthesis of evidence to serve as a practical, spatially-organized resource for school designers and decision-makers, as well as to point to pertinent research opportunities. This paper describes the development of a new practical tool: Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture. Its aims are to provide architects and designers, as well as school planners, educators, and public health professionals, with strategies for making K-12 school environments conducive to healthy physical activity, and to engage scientists in transdisciplinary perspectives toward improved knowledge of the school environment's impact. We used a qualitative review process to develop evidence-based and theory-driven school design guidelines that promote increased physical activity among students. The design guidelines include specific strategies in 10 school design domains. Implementation of the guidelines is expected to enable students to adopt healthier physical activity behaviors. The tool bridges a translational gap between research and environmental design practice, and may contribute to setting new industry and education standards.

  1. Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Jeri; Sorensen, Dina; Trowbridge, Matthew; Lee, Karen K.; Breithecker, Dieter; Frerichs, Leah; Huang, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Increasing children’s physical activity at school is a national focus in the U.S. to address childhood obesity. While research has demonstrated associations between aspects of school environments and students’ physical activity, the literature currently lacks a synthesis of evidence to serve as a practical, spatially-organized resource for school designers and decision-makers, as well as to point to pertinent research opportunities. This paper describes the development of a new practical tool: Physical Activity Design Guidelines for School Architecture. Its aims are to provide architects and designers, as well as school planners, educators, and public health professionals, with strategies for making K-12 school environments conducive to healthy physical activity, and to engage scientists in transdisciplinary perspectives toward improved knowledge of the school environment’s impact. We used a qualitative review process to develop evidence-based and theory-driven school design guidelines that promote increased physical activity among students. The design guidelines include specific strategies in 10 school design domains. Implementation of the guidelines is expected to enable students to adopt healthier physical activity behaviors. The tool bridges a translational gap between research and environmental design practice, and may contribute to setting new industry and education standards. PMID:26230850

  2. Familial Resemblance of Body Composition, Physical Activity, and Resting Metabolic Rate in Pre-School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurosh Djafarian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although parental obesity is a well-established predisposing factor for the development of obesity, associations between regional body compositions, resting metabolic rates (RMR, and physical activity (PA of parents and their pre-school children remain unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate parent-child correlations for total and regional body compositions, resting energy expenditures, and physical activity. Methods: Participants were 89 children aged 2-6 years and their parents, consisting of 61 families. Resting metabolic rate was assessed using indirect calorimetry. Total and regional body compositions were measured by both dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA and deuterium dilution. Physical activity was assessed by an accelerometer. Results: There was a significant parent-offspring regression for total fat free mass (FFM between children and their mothers (P=0.02, fathers (P=0.02, and mid-parent (average of father and mother value (P=0.002 when measured by DXA. The same was true for fat mass (FM between children and mothers (P<0.01, fathers (P=0.02, and mid-parent (P=0.001. There was no significant association between children and parents for physical activity during the entire week, weekend, weekdays, and different parts of days, except for morning activity, which was positively related to the mothers’ morning activities (P<0.01 and mid-parent (P=0.009. No association was found between RMR of children and parents before and after correction for FFM and FM. Conclusion: These data suggest a familial resemblance for total body composition between children and their parents. Our data showed no familial resemblance for PA and RMR between children and their parents.

  3. DETERMINATION OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG YOUNG ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songul A. VAIZOÐLU

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The physical activities have changed and decreased as the technological improvements increase. Physical inactivity is one of the most important public health problems in the last several decades. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study is conducted in the 1. grade students of Kaya Bayazitoglu High School by using “Physical Activity Questionnnaire Form” under observation in April 2003. Participation rate is 95.8 %. SPSS 11.0 version (Statistical Package for Social Sciences statistical programme was used for entrance and analysis of the data. Results: 50,4% of the participants were female and 49,6% were male. Mean age was 15,21 ± 0,59. The mean of the energy spent by the participants was 1779,67 ± 2539.86 kilocalories/day and the the mean MET/week spent by the physical activities was 47,32 ± 68,08. In conclusion 26,0 % of the participants were found to be sedentary. 35,7 % of the females and 16,2 % of the males were sedentary. The energy spent by the males by physical activity weekly was statisticaly higher than that of the females (2 = 11,615, p = 0,001. Also the energy spent by the licenced sportsmen weekly by physical activity was statisticaly higher than that of the students who are not sportsmen (Fisher Exact, p = 0,037 Conclusions and recommendation: The physical activity of the participants was found to be low. Health and educational associations, schools and municipalities have to colloborate in increasing the physical activity of this age group. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(4.000: 63-71

  4. Physical activity levels early after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickerson, Lisa; Mathur, Sunita; Singer, Lianne G; Brooks, Dina

    2015-04-01

    Little is known of the early changes in physical activity after lung transplantation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe physical activity levels in patients up to 6 months following lung transplantation and (2) to explore predictors of the change in physical activity in that population. This was a prospective cohort study. Physical activity (daily steps and time spent in moderate-intensity activity) was measured using an accelerometer before and after transplantation (at hospital discharge, 3 months, and 6 months). Additional functional measurements included submaximal exercise capacity (measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test), quadriceps muscle torque, and health-related quality of life (measured with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey 36 [SF-36] and the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire). Thirty-six lung transplant recipients (18 men, 18 women; mean age=49 years, SD=14) completed posttransplant measurements. Before transplant, daily steps were less than a third of the general population. By 3 months posttransplant, the largest improvement in physical activity had occurred, and level of daily steps reached 55% of the general population. The change in daily steps (pretransplant to 3 months posttransplant) was inversely correlated with pretransplant 6-minute walk distance (r=-.48, P=.007), daily steps (r=-.36, P=.05), and SF-36 physical functioning (SF-36 PF) score (r=-.59, P=.0005). The SF-36 PF was a significant predictor of the change in physical activity, accounting for 35% of the variation in change in daily steps. Only individuals who were ambulatory prior to transplant and discharged from the hospital in less than 3 months were included in the study. Physical activity levels improve following lung transplantation, particularly in individuals with low self-reported physical functioning. However, the majority of lung transplant recipients remain sedentary between 3 to 6 months following transplant. The role of exercise

  5. Additional weekend therapy may reduce length of rehabilitation stay after stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie English

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Among people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke, does additional weekend physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy reduce the length of rehabilitation hospital stay compared to those who receive a weekday-only service, and does this change after controlling for individual factors? Does additional weekend therapy improve the ability to walk and perform activities of daily living, measured at discharge? Does additional weekend therapy improve health-related quality of life, measured 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation? Which individual, clinical and hospital characteristics are associated with shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay? Design: This study pooled individual data from two randomised, controlled trials (n = 350 using an individual patient data meta-analysis and multivariate regression. Participants: People with stroke admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Intervention: Additional weekend therapy (physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy compared to usual care (5 days/week therapy. Outcome measures: Length of rehabilitation hospital stay, independence in activities of daily living measured with the Functional Independence Measure, walking speed and health-related quality of life. Results: Participants who received weekend therapy had a shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay. In the un-adjusted analysis, this was not statistically significant (MD –5.7 days, 95% CI –13.0 to 1.5. Controlling for hospital site, age, walking speed and Functional Independence Measure score on admission, receiving weekend therapy was significantly associated with a shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay (β = 7.5, 95% CI 1.7 to 13.4, p = 0.001. There were no significant between-group differences in Functional Independence Measure scores (MD 1.9 points, 95% CI –2.8 to 6.6, walking speed (MD 0.06 m/second, 95% CI –0.15 to 0.04 or health-related quality of life (SMD –0.04, 95% CI

  6. Additional weekend therapy may reduce length of rehabilitation stay after stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Coralie; Shields, Nora; Brusco, Natasha K; Taylor, Nicholas F; Watts, Jennifer J; Peiris, Casey; Bernhardt, Julie; Crotty, Maria; Esterman, Adrian; Segal, Leonie; Hillier, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Among people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke, does additional weekend physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy reduce the length of rehabilitation hospital stay compared to those who receive a weekday-only service, and does this change after controlling for individual factors? Does additional weekend therapy improve the ability to walk and perform activities of daily living, measured at discharge? Does additional weekend therapy improve health-related quality of life, measured 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation? Which individual, clinical and hospital characteristics are associated with shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay? This study pooled individual data from two randomised, controlled trials (n=350) using an individual patient data meta-analysis and multivariate regression. People with stroke admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Additional weekend therapy (physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy) compared to usual care (5 days/week therapy). Length of rehabilitation hospital stay, independence in activities of daily living measured with the Functional Independence Measure, walking speed and health-related quality of life. Participants who received weekend therapy had a shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay. In the un-adjusted analysis, this was not statistically significant (MD -5.7 days, 95% CI -13.0 to 1.5). Controlling for hospital site, age, walking speed and Functional Independence Measure score on admission, receiving weekend therapy was significantly associated with a shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay (β=7.5, 95% CI 1.7 to 13.4, p=0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in Functional Independence Measure scores (MD 1.9 points, 95% CI -2.8 to 6.6), walking speed (MD 0.06 m/second, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.04) or health-related quality of life (SMD -0.04, 95% CI -0.26 to 0.19) at discharge. Modest evidence indicates that additional weekend therapy might reduce

  7. Health-enhancing physical activity among Saudi adults using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2007-01-01

    To describe the physical activity profile of Saudi adults living in Riyadh, using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short-version telephone format. Physical activity was assessed using the official Arabic short form of IPAQ, intended for use in telephone interview. The instrument asks for times spent in walking, moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity of at least 10 min duration. The sample consisted of 1616 Saudis, between 15 and 78 years of age, living in Riyadh. Participants were drawn from a list of names in the telephone book using a simple random method. Telephone interviews were administered during the spring of 2003 by trained male interviewers. The final sample size was 1064 Saudi males and females (response rate of 66%), with males comprising about 66% of the respondents. Over 43% of Saudis did not participate in any type of moderate-intensity physical activity lasting for at least 10 min. More than 72% of the sample did not engage in any type of vigorous-intensity physical activity lasting for at least 10 min. The proportion of Saudis who walked for 150 min or more per week was 33.3%. Females were engaged more in moderate physical activity than males, whereas males participated more in vigorous activity compared with females. Activity levels did not show significant relationships with education level or job hours per week. Based on the three activity categories established by IPAQ, 40.6% of Saudis were inactive, 34.3% were minimally active and 25.1% were physically active. Physical inactivity increased with advancing age. The data suggest that the prevalence of physical inactivity among Saudis adults is relatively high. Efforts are needed to encourage Saudis to be more physically active, with the goal of increasing the proportion of Saudis engaging in health-enhancing physical activity.

  8. Cholecystectomy During the Weekend Increases Patients' Length of Hospital Stay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    30 days between week time and weekend time. A longer postoperative length of stay was observed for patients operated on Fridays and Saturdays even though surgical complication rates were alike between weekdays. Patients with acute cholecystitis had a longer length of stay on Saturdays. CONCLUSION: We...

  9. Evaluating Active U: an internet-mediated physical activity program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodrich David E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engaging in regular physical activity can be challenging, particularly during the winter months. To promote physical activity at the University of Michigan during the winter months, an eight-week Internet-mediated program (Active U was developed providing participants with an online physical activity log, goal setting, motivational emails, and optional team participation and competition. Methods This study is a program evaluation of Active U. Approximately 47,000 faculty, staff, and graduate students were invited to participate in the online Active U intervention in the winter of 2007. Participants were assigned a physical activity goal and were asked to record each physical activity episode into the activity log for eight weeks. Statistics for program reach, effectiveness, adoption, and implementation were calculated using the Re-Aim framework. Multilevel regression analyses were used to assess the decline in rates of data entry and goal attainment during the program, to assess the likelihood of joining a team by demographic characteristics, to test the association between various predictors and the number of weeks an individual met his or her goal, and to analyze server load. Results Overall, 7,483 individuals registered with the Active U website (≈16% of eligible, and 79% participated in the program by logging valid data at least once. Staff members, older participants, and those with a BMI P Conclusion Internet-mediated physical activity interventions that focus on physical activity logging and goal setting while incorporating team competition may help a significant percentage of the target population maintain their physical activity during the winter months.

  10. Leisure-time physical activity in relation to occupational physical activity among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenga, Christine C; Parks, Christine G; Wilson, Lauren E; Sandler, Dale P

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association between occupational physical activity and leisure-time physical activity among US women in the Sister Study. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 26,334 women who had been employed in their current job for at least 1 year at baseline (2004-2009). Occupational physical activity was self-reported and leisure-time physical activity was estimated in metabolic equivalent hours per week. Log multinomial regression was used to evaluate associations between occupational (sitting, standing, manually active) and leisure-time (insufficient, moderate, high) activity. Models were adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, education, income, geographic region, and body mass index. Only 54% of women met or exceeded minimum recommended levels of leisure-time physical activity (moderate 32% and high 22%). Women who reported sitting (prevalence ratio (PR)=0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74-0.92) or standing (PR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.75-0.94) most of the time at work were less likely to meet the requirements for high leisure-time physical activity than manually active workers. Associations were strongest among women living in the Northeast and the South. In this nationwide study, low occupational activity was associated with lower leisure-time physical activity. Women who are not active in the workplace may benefit from strategies to promote leisure-time physical activity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Reliability and validity of the transport and physical activity questionnaire (TPAQ for assessing physical activity behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J Adams

    Full Text Available No current validated survey instrument allows a comprehensive assessment of both physical activity and travel behaviours for use in interdisciplinary research on walking and cycling. This study reports on the test-retest reliability and validity of physical activity measures in the transport and physical activity questionnaire (TPAQ.The TPAQ assesses time spent in different domains of physical activity and using different modes of transport for five journey purposes. Test-retest reliability of eight physical activity summary variables was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC and Kappa scores for continuous and categorical variables respectively. In a separate study, the validity of three survey-reported physical activity summary variables was assessed by computing Spearman correlation coefficients using accelerometer-derived reference measures. The Bland-Altman technique was used to determine the absolute validity of survey-reported time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA.In the reliability study, ICC for time spent in different domains of physical activity ranged from fair to substantial for walking for transport (ICC = 0.59, cycling for transport (ICC = 0.61, walking for recreation (ICC = 0.48, cycling for recreation (ICC = 0.35, moderate leisure-time physical activity (ICC = 0.47, vigorous leisure-time physical activity (ICC = 0.63, and total physical activity (ICC = 0.56. The proportion of participants estimated to meet physical activity guidelines showed acceptable reliability (k = 0.60. In the validity study, comparison of survey-reported and accelerometer-derived time spent in physical activity showed strong agreement for vigorous physical activity (r = 0.72, p<0.001, fair but non-significant agreement for moderate physical activity (r = 0.24, p = 0.09 and fair agreement for MVPA (r = 0.27, p = 0.05. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean

  12. Physical activity and modernization among Bolivian Amerindians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurven, Michael; Jaeggi, Adrian V; Kaplan, Hillard; Cummings, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a growing public health problem, and the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality. Conversely, indigenous populations living traditional lifestyles reportedly engage in vigorous daily activity that is protective against non-communicable diseases. Here we analyze physical activity patterns among the Tsimane, forager-horticulturalists of Amazonian Bolivia with minimal heart disease and diabetes. We assess age patterns of adult activity among men and women, test whether modernization affects activity levels, and examine whether nascent obesity is associated with reduced activity. A factorial method based on a large sample of behavioral observations was employed to estimate effects of age, sex, body mass index, and modernization variables on physical activity ratio (PAR), the ratio of total energy expenditure to basal metabolic rate. Accelerometry combined with heart rate monitoring was compared to the factorial method and used for nighttime sampling. Tsimane men and women display 24 hr physical activity level (PAL) of 2.02-2.15 and 1.73-1.85, respectively. Little time was spent "sedentary", whereas most activity was light to moderate, rather than vigorous. Activity peaks by the late twenties in men, and declines thereafter, but remains constant among women after the early teens. Neither BMI, fat free mass or body fat percentage are associated with PAR. There was no negative effect of modernization on physical activity. Tsimane display relatively high PALs typical of other subsistence populations, but of moderate intensity, and not outside the range of developed populations. Despite rapidly increasing socioeconomic change, there is little evidence that total activity has yet been affected. Overweight and obesity are more prevalent among women than men, and Spanish fluency is associated with greater obesity in women. The lack of cardiovascular disease among Tsimane is unlikely caused by activity alone; further study of diet, food intake and

  13. Physical activity and modernization among Bolivian Amerindians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gurven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity is a growing public health problem, and the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality. Conversely, indigenous populations living traditional lifestyles reportedly engage in vigorous daily activity that is protective against non-communicable diseases. Here we analyze physical activity patterns among the Tsimane, forager-horticulturalists of Amazonian Bolivia with minimal heart disease and diabetes. We assess age patterns of adult activity among men and women, test whether modernization affects activity levels, and examine whether nascent obesity is associated with reduced activity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A factorial method based on a large sample of behavioral observations was employed to estimate effects of age, sex, body mass index, and modernization variables on physical activity ratio (PAR, the ratio of total energy expenditure to basal metabolic rate. Accelerometry combined with heart rate monitoring was compared to the factorial method and used for nighttime sampling. Tsimane men and women display 24 hr physical activity level (PAL of 2.02-2.15 and 1.73-1.85, respectively. Little time was spent "sedentary", whereas most activity was light to moderate, rather than vigorous. Activity peaks by the late twenties in men, and declines thereafter, but remains constant among women after the early teens. Neither BMI, fat free mass or body fat percentage are associated with PAR. There was no negative effect of modernization on physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Tsimane display relatively high PALs typical of other subsistence populations, but of moderate intensity, and not outside the range of developed populations. Despite rapidly increasing socioeconomic change, there is little evidence that total activity has yet been affected. Overweight and obesity are more prevalent among women than men, and Spanish fluency is associated with greater obesity in women. The lack of cardiovascular disease among Tsimane is unlikely

  14. Physical activity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Bradford W; Driscoll, Sherilyn Whateley

    2012-11-01

    After obesity rates in youth reached alarming rates, public health officials recognized the need for specific physical activity guidelines for children and adolescents. Numerous health care groups and sports and fitness organizations collaborated on the development of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans in 2008, which have been widely endorsed and include recommendations for the pediatric population. Children and adolescents should participate in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity 1 or more hours per day and muscle and bone-strengthening activities 3 or more times per week. Physical activities should be age appropriate, enjoyable, and varied and occur beyond what is required for typical activities of daily living. Adequate exercise in youth improves strength, cardiorespiratory fitness, and body composition and therefore decreases cardiovascular risk factors. An improved cardiovascular profile provides a continued benefit in adulthood. Exercise also improves bone health, psychological well-being, cognition, and school performance and may decrease the risk of sports injury. Exercise habits established in childhood often continue into adulthood. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Somatotype analysis of physically active individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, A H S; Santos, S A G; Castro, P J P; Rizzo, J A; Batista, G R

    2013-06-01

    The present study aimed at comparing demographic variables, physical activity level, and health-related anthropometric indicators according to somatotype among physically active individuals. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study, in which the sample consisted of 304 individuals, who are users of the jogging track at the Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE) in Recife, state of Pernambuco, northeastern Brazil. Somatotypes were analyzed using the anthropometric technique proposed by Heath & Carter (1990). To assess physical activity level, we used the short version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). We used as health-related anthropometric indicators: body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), and conicity index (CI). We used descriptive statistics to characterize the sample, and then used a multivariate analysis of variance (a = 0.05) to test for differences. In the somatotype analysis, we observed among women significant predominance of the endomorphy and lower predominance of the ectomorphy in comparison to men. In the age group ≤ 29 years significantly lower values were found for endomorphy than in other age groups. Irregularly active individuals had significantly lower values of endomorphy. We observed that individuals with obesity and risk in WHR, WC and CI had higher scores of endomorphy and mesomorphy and lower scores of ectomorphy. The somatotype of physically active individuals in the present study raises health concern, mainly related to high relative adiposity represented by endomorphy.

  16. Identifying physical activity gender differences among youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical activity (PA) is an important part of a healthy lifestyle and reduces risk of certain chronic diseases. Many youth do not currently meet PA guidelines; evidence suggests that girls are less active than boys are at all ages. PA differences need to be understood, so that gender-specific inter...

  17. [Patients on the move: validated methods to quantify physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E.A.; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Vegt, F. de; Busser, G.S.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    - Physical activity is an important component in the maintenance and improvement of general health; physical inactivity is, however, an increasing problem in the Netherlands.- Requests for advice on physical activity are increasing within the healthcare. - Assessment of an individual's physical

  18. Validation of reported physical activity for cholesterol control using two different physical activity instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Z Fan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amy Z Fan1, Sandra A Ham2, Shravani Reddy Muppidi3, Ali H Mokdad41Behavioral Surveillance Branch, Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; 2Physical Activity and Health Branch, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA; 4Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: The National Cholesterol Education Program recommends increasing physical activity to improve cholesterol levels and overall cardiovascular health. We examined whether US adults who reported increasing their physical activity to control or lower blood cholesterol following physician’s advice or on their own efforts had higher levels of physical activity than those who reported that they did not. We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2004, which implemented two physical activity assessment instruments. The physical activity questionnaire (PAQ assessed self-reported frequency, intensity, and duration of leisure-time, household, and transportation-related physical activity in the past month. Physical movement was objectively monitored using a waist accelerometer that assessed minute-by-minute intensity (counts of movement/minute during waking time over a 7-day period. We adjusted our analysis for age, gender, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, and body mass index. Participants who reported increasing physical activity to control blood cholesterol had more PAQ-assessed physical activity and more accelerometer-assessed active days per week compared to those who did not. However, there were no significant differences in cholesterol levels between comparison groups. These findings suggest that self-report of exercising

  19. Perceived risk of osteoporosis: Restricted physical activities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reventlow, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To explore elderly women's physical activity in relation to their perception of the risk of osteoporosis. Design. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Setting. Informants were purposely selected from a Danish population-based, age-specific cohort study conducted in the county...... of Copenhagen with people born in 1936. Subjects. Women in their sixties. Results. Women who perceived a current risk of osteoporosis tended to reduce their physical activity in an attempt to reduce the risk of bone damage. This behaviour was related to the imagined fragility of the bones (the risk inside...... the body), and the actual situations (the risk outside the body), including places and activities. Knowledge of a reduced bone mass reinforced the women's uncertainty about what their bones could endure. Experiences managing physical activity without injury resulted in reinterpretations of their risk...

  20. Lifestyle and physical activity of the physical education professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima M. Maia

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was: 1 to identify the physical activity habits in daily life of the professors at the Physical Education Department of UNIMONTES; 2 to verify the lifestyles of these individuals in terms of five well-being-related items (nutrition, physical activity, preventative behavior, social relationships, and stress control. Twenty Physical Education professors (5 women and 15 men, 27 to 53 years of age were evaluated. Three instruments were employed to obtain the required information: 1 PAR-Q, 2 Physical Activity Survey, and 3 Life Style Profi le using the Well Being Pentagram. It was verifi ed that 74% of the males were apparently fi t enough to initiate a physical exercise program. On the other hand, this number decreased to 40% in the female group. Concerning the physical activity questionnaire, 75% of the male group were active or very active, and only 40% of the female group were active. Regarding the lifestyle profi les (Well Being Pentagram, females did not report desirable healthy behavior, since their mean score was 1.4 points. In the male group, the mean score was 2.0 points, which indicates a healthy lifestyle, as well as an attitude more favorable to preventative health. We concluded that women require more attention than men, relating to the aspects mentioned above, and that men should not forget to keep on having healthy habits. RESUMO Este estudo teve por objetivos: a identifi car os hábitos de atividades físicas no cotidiano dos professores de Educação Física da UNIMONTES; b verifi car o perfi l do estilo de vida considerando cinco fatores (nutrição, atividade física, comportamento preventivo, relacionamento social e controle do stress individuais relacionados ao bem-estar. Foram avaliados 20 (vinte professores de Educação Física, sendo cinco mulheres (25% e quinze homens (75%, na faixa etária de 27 a 53 anos de idade. Para coleta das informações, utilizou-se três instrumentos: a PAR-Q; Physical

  1. Can We Make Time for Physical Activity? Simulating Effects of Daily Physical Activity on Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Geoff Rowe; Tremblay, Mark S.; Douglas G. Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Background. The link between physical activity and health outcomes is well established, yet levels of physical activity remain low. This study quantifies effects on mortality of the substitution of low activity episodes by higher activity alternatives using time-use data. Methods. Sample time profiles are representative of the Canadian population (n=19,597). Activity time and mortality are linked using metabolic equivalents(METs). Mortality risk is determined by peak daily METs and hours sp...

  2. Do physical activity facilities near schools affect physical activity in high school girls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilk, Jennifer L; Ward, Dianne S; Dowda, Marsha; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Porter, Dwayne E; Hibbert, James; Pate, Russell R

    2011-03-01

    To investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities within walking distance of school and physical activity behavior in 12th grade girls during after-school hours. Girls (N=1394) from 22 schools completed a self-report to determine physical activity after 3:00 p.m. The number of physical activity facilities within a 0.75-mile buffer of the school was counted with a Geographic Information System. Associations between the number of facilities and girls' physical activity were examined using linear mixed-model analysis of variance. Overall, girls who attended schools with ≥5 facilities within the buffer reported more physical activity per day than girls in schools with schools with ≥5 facilities reported ∼12% more physical activity per day than girls who attended rural schools with schools with ≥5 vs. school siting decisions are made, the number of physical activity facilities surrounding the school should be considered to encourage physical activity in 12th grade girls. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recommendations for physical activity for pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Videmšek

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Properly selected and prescribed physical activity during pregnancy has a favorable effects on the health of pregnant women and the fetus, and is excellent preparation for childbirth. Absolute and relative contraindications to exercise during pregnancy are well defined, as well as the warning signs to terminate exercise while pregnant. Knowledge of these is essential for physically active pregnant women and exercise professionals that work with pregnant women. Pregnant women should be moderately physically active every day of the week for at least 30 minutes. The term moderate is thoroughly and clearly defined in the guidelines. Resistance exercises during pregnancy are safe but it is advised to use light loads and a large number of repetitions (e.g. 15-20 repetitions. Strength exercises for the pelvic floor muscles deserves a special place during pregnancy. Appropriate forms of physical activity for pregnant women are walking and jogging, swimming and aquatic exercise, cycling, Pilates and yoga, aerobics, fitness and cross-country skiing. Certain forms of physical activity need special adjustments (alpine skiing, ice skating and rollerblading, racket sports, team ball games, horseback riding and scuba diving. 

  4. Nutrition and Physical Activity in CKD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamasco Cupisti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD patients are at risk for protein-energy wasting, abnormal body composition and impaired physical capacity. These complications lead to increased risk of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality.In CKD patient as well as in healthy people, there is a close association between nutrition and physical activity. Namely, inadequate nutrient (energy intake impairs physical performance thus favoring a sedentary lifestyle: this further contributes to loss of muscle strength and mass, which limit the quality of life and rehabilitation of CKD patients. In CKD as well as in end-stage-renal-disease patients, regular physical activity coupled with adequate energy and protein intake counteracts protein-energy wasting and related comorbidity and mortality. In summary, exercise training can positively influence nutritional status and the perception of well-being of CKD patients and may facilitate the anabolic effects of nutritional interventions.

  5. Occupational physical activity, but not leisure-time physical activity increases the risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skielboe, Ane K; Marott, Jacob L; Dixen, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous findings regarding physical activity and risk of incident atrial fibrillation (AF) are controversial, focusing on leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and without distinguishing it from occupational physical activity (OPA). Our aim was to study the association between physical...... activity and risk of AF, with special attention to the possible divergent effects of OPA and LTPA. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a prospective, observational cohort study, 17,196 subjects were included from the Copenhagen Population Register. All participants had a physical examination, a 12-lead...... electrocardiogram (ECG), and answered a questionnaire regarding health and physical activity. Participants without previously diagnosed AF who answered adequately regarding OPA and LTPA were included. LTPA and OPA were each graded into four levels. Follow-up were carried out between 1981-1983, 1991-1994, and 2001...

  6. The effect of physical activity homework on physical activity among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, David; Wells, Gayle M

    2009-03-01

    This study examined the effect of using physical activity homework on physical activity levels of college students. Students in randomly assigned sections of a university health course were assigned 30 minutes of physical activity homework 3 days a week or no homework for 12 weeks. Participants completed self-reports of physical activity before the homework intervention and again at the conclusion of the 12 weeks of physical activity homework. Participants in all course sections reported significant increases in the number of days per week of moderate and vigorous physical activity. Participants in homework sections additionally showed significant increases in the days they engaged in muscular strength/endurance training and activities to manage weight. Participants in sections without homework showed a significant increase in the number of days engaged in flexibility training. Comparison of gain scores showed statistically significant increases by the homework group in the days they participated in activities designed to manage weight. Physical activity homework was deemed to be an effective method of increasing college students' levels of physical activity.

  7. Ambulatory feedback at daily physical activity patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Evering, R.M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are characterized with persistent fatigue which disturbs activities of daily life. CFS is a symptom-based diagnosis that is made without findings of distinguished physical examination or laboratory tests. CFS can be diagnosed if the fatigue lasts for at least six months, is of new onset, is not the result of persistent physical exertion, does not improve considerably by taking rest, and has resulted in substantial loss in professional, social or pe...

  8. The place of physical activity in the WHO Global Strategy on Diet and Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Cora L

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In an effort to reduce the global burden of non-communicable disease, the World Health Organization released a Global Strategy for Diet and Physical Activity in May 2004. This commentary reports on the development of the strategy and its importance specifically for physical activity-related work of NGOs and researchers interested in increasing global physical activity participation. Sparked by its work on global efforts to target non-communicable disease prevention in 2000, the World Health Organization commissioned a global strategy on diet and physical activity. The physical activity interest followed efforts that had led to the initial global "Move for Health Day" in 2002. WHO assembled a reference group for the global strategy, and a regional consultation process with countries was undertaken. Underpinning the responses was the need for more physical activity advocacy; partnerships outside of health including urban planning; development of national activity guidelines; and monitoring of the implementation of the strategy. The consultation process was an important mechanism to confirm the importance and elevate the profile of physical activity within the global strategy. It is suggested that separate implementation strategies for diet and physical activity may be needed to work with partner agencies in disparate sectors (e.g. urban planning for physical activity, agriculture for diet. International professional societies are well situated to make an important contribution to global public health by advocating for the importance of physical activity among risk factors; developing international measures of physical activity and global impacts of inactivity; and developing a global research and intervention agenda.

  9. Physical education, school physical activity, school sports and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, François; Shephard, Roy J

    2008-02-25

    The purpose of this paper is to review relationships of academic performance and some of its determinants to participation in school-based physical activities, including physical education (PE), free school physical activity (PA) and school sports. Linkages between academic achievement and involvement in PE, school PA and sport programmes have been examined, based on a systematic review of currently available literature, including a comprehensive search of MEDLINE (1966 to 2007), PSYCHINFO (1974 to 2007), SCHOLAR.GOOGLE.COM, and ERIC databases. Quasi-experimental data indicate that allocating up to an additional hour per day of curricular time to PA programmes does not affect the academic performance of primary school students negatively, even though the time allocated to other subjects usually shows a corresponding reduction. An additional curricular emphasis on PE may result in small absolute gains in grade point average (GPA), and such findings strongly suggest a relative increase in performance per unit of academic teaching time. Further, the overwhelmingly majority of such programmes have demonstrated an improvement in some measures of physical fitness (PF). Cross-sectional observations show a positive association between academic performance and PA, but PF does not seem to show such an association. PA has positive influences on concentration, memory and classroom behaviour. Data from quasi-experimental studies find support in mechanistic experiments on cognitive function, pointing to a positive relationship between PA and intellectual performance. Given competent providers, PA can be added to the school curriculum by taking time from other subjects without risk of hindering student academic achievement. On the other hand, adding time to "academic" or "curricular" subjects by taking time from physical education programmes does not enhance grades in these subjects and may be detrimental to health.

  10. Physical education, school physical activity, school sports and academic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shephard Roy J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is to review relationships of academic performance and some of its determinants to participation in school-based physical activities, including physical education (PE, free school physical activity (PA and school sports. Methods Linkages between academic achievement and involvement in PE, school PA and sport programmes have been examined, based on a systematic review of currently available literature, including a comprehensive search of MEDLINE (1966 to 2007, PSYCHINFO (1974 to 2007, SCHOLAR.GOOGLE.COM, and ERIC databases. Results Quasi-experimental data indicate that allocating up to an additional hour per day of curricular time to PA programmes does not affect the academic performance of primary school students negatively, even though the time allocated to other subjects usually shows a corresponding reduction. An additional curricular emphasis on PE may result in small absolute gains in grade point average (GPA, and such findings strongly suggest a relative increase in performance per unit of academic teaching time. Further, the overwhelmingly majority of such programmes have demonstrated an improvement in some measures of physical fitness (PF. Cross-sectional observations show a positive association between academic performance and PA, but PF does not seem to show such an association. PA has positive influences on concentration, memory and classroom behaviour. Data from quasi-experimental studies find support in mechanistic experiments on cognitive function, pointing to a positive relationship between PA and intellectual performance. Conclusion Given competent providers, PA can be added to the school curriculum by taking time from other subjects without risk of hindering student academic achievement. On the other hand, adding time to "academic" or "curricular" subjects by taking time from physical education programmes does not enhance grades in these subjects and may be detrimental to health.

  11. Sedentary Behavior, Physical Activity, and Fitness-The Maastricht Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, J.H. van der; Koster, A.; Berg, J.D. van der; Sep, S.J.; Kallen, C.J. van der; Dagnelie, P.C.; Schram, M.T.; Henry, R.M.; Eussen, S.J.; Dongen, M.C. van; Stehouwer, C.D.; Schaper, N.C.; Savelberg, H.H.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: This cross-sectional study examined the mutual independent associations of sedentary behavior, lower intensity physical activity (LPA) and higher intensity physical activity HPA (an approximation of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF).

  12. Mobile computer application for promoting physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Siobhan; Vankipuram, Mithra; Fleury, Julie

    2013-04-01

    Despite evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of falls and other causes of disability and death, the majority of older adults do not engage in physical activity on a regular basis. Mobile technology applications have emerged as potential resources for promoting physical activity behavior. This article describes features of a new application, Ready∼Steady, highlighting approaches used in its design and development, and implications for clinical practice. Iterative processes enabled the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the application consistent with the wellness motivation theory, as well as established user-specific strategies and theoretical design principles. Implications in terms of potential benefits and constraints are discussed. Integrating technology that promotes health and wellness in the form of mobile computer applications is a promising adjunct to nursing practice. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Effect of physical activities on obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roberto Adriano Prati

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase in body fat levels associated with the decrease in physical activities in adolescents has been the concern of recent researches because there is a strong correlation between the growing number of early-age obesity cases and the appearance of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hypertension, behavior problems and even death when not treated in time. So this study aimed to analyze through a bibliographical investigation some of the factors that cause obesity in adolescents and propose alternative physical activities to help in the treatment and minimize the problem. The analysis showed that programmed, controlled and adequate physical activities, associated with changes in behavior and lifestyle, may revert obesity condition and improve life quality of these adolescents.

  14. Injuries during physical activity in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundblad, Gunilla; Saartok, Tönu; Engström, Lars-Magnus; Renström, Per

    2005-10-01

    During the spring of 2001, 1975 children, from grades 3, 6 and 9 participated in a nationwide, multidisciplinary collaboration study. The students came from randomly selected classes throughout Sweden, representing different geographical and socio-economic areas. The aim of this study was to collect and evaluate self-reported injuries and associated factors during various physical activities as recalled retrospectively for 3 months by the students. Every sixth student (n=299 or 16%) reported 306 injuries. Twice as many girls than boys were injured during physical education class. Ninth-grade students reported relatively more injuries during organized sports than during physical education class and leisure activities. There were no age or gender differences in incidence rate during leisure activities. Most injuries were minor, as 70% were back in physical activity within a week. Half of the students (50%) reported that they previously had injured the same body part. Primary care of the injured student was, with the exception of a family member, most often carried out by the physical education teacher or coach, which accentuates the importance of continuous sports medicine first aid education for this group.

  15. Physical Activity Recognition from Smartphone Embedded Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prudêncio, João; Aguiar, Ana; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquity of smartphones has motivated efforts to use the embedded sensors to detect various aspects of user context to transparently provide personalized and contextualized services to the user. One relevant piece of context is the physical activity of the smartphone user. In this paper, we...... propose a novel set of features for distinguishing five physical activities using only sensors embedded in the smartphone. Specifically, we introduce features that are normalized using the orientation sensor such that horizontal and vertical movements are explicitly computed. We evaluate a neural network...

  16. Objectively measured physical activity, physical activity related personality and body mass index in 6- to 10-yr-old children: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Bourdeaudhuij Ilse

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and level of overweight in childhood is rapidly increasing. One potential contributor to the rise in overweight is a decline in physical activity (PA. The purpose of this study was to compare levels and patterns of PA and PA related personality in normal-weight (NW and overweight (OW 6- to 10-yr-old children. Methods Subjects were grouped into OW (N = 59, BMI = 24.2 ± 4.8 kg/m2 or NW (N = 61, BMI = 15.7 ± 1.5 kg/m2 according to International Obesity Task Force cut-offs. PA was assessed by accelerometry. Parents filled in a questionnaire on PA and sedentary behaviour and PA related personality of their child (born tired, moves slowly, is often tired, lacks energy, avoids physical efforts, prefers watching playing children instead of joining them, is always active, needs to let himself/herself go, has a lot of energy. Results NW children spent on average 77 min/day in MVPA, whereas OW children only 57 min/day (p = .001. OW children had fewer 5, 10 and 20 min bouts of MVPA (p = .01. OW and NW children showed identical PA patterns on both week days and weekends, although at different levels. According to parents' report, a greater percentage of OW children was not engaged in any sport (46% versus 23%, chi2 = 6.3, p = .01. OW children had a less active personality (p Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that NW children spent on average 20 min per day more in MVPA. PA patterns were similar in NW versus OW children, although at different levels. Greatest differences in PA according to weight status were found in the afternoon during after school hours. This is the first study to show distinct PA related personality traits in OW children compared to NW peers.

  17. Recommendations for sufficient physical activity at work : promoting physical activity in low intensity static jobs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commissaris, D.A.C.M.; Douwes, M.; Schoenmaker, N.; Korte, E.M. de

    2006-01-01

    Many contemporary work tasks are characterised by little or no physical activity. This pertains to the whole body as well as specific areas such as neck and shoulders. Too little whole body physical activity is generally known to increase the risk of chronic diseases like vascular disorders and

  18. A Process-Analysis Based Study of the Ozone Weekend Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonse, Shaheen R.; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Jin, Ling

    2008-05-09

    We have used the 3D photochemical model CMAQ to simulate the ozone weekend effect, a phenomenon in which urban areas can have higher ozone concentrations on weekends than on weekdays even though NO{sub x} emissions are usually lower on weekends. A simulation containing a weekend is compared to hypothetical simulations in which the anthropogenic emissions for the weekend have been replaced by weekday emissions. The simulations are identical in all other respects. Process analysis is used to explain the results. We find that the weekend effect can be decomposed into an ozone titration component and an odd oxygen component, each contributing about half of the excess weekend ozone. The titration component simply requires that there be lower weekend NO{sub x} emissions. The odd oxygen component additionally requires that on weekends there be a higher rate of OH + (VOC or CO) reactions, brought about by one or more of lower nitric acid formation, higher OH formation from O{sub 3} photolysis, and higher VOC emissions. This causes higher weekend peroxy radical formation. The odd oxygen component also requires sufficiently high NO concentration even on the lower-NO{sub x} weekends to propagate this higher rate of peroxy formation back to higher weekend OH formation.

  19. Applying Transtheoretical Model to Promote Physical Activities Among Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Ghofranipour, Fazllolah; Feizi, Awat

    2015-01-01

    .... Inadequate regular physical activities among women, the importance of education in promoting the physical activities, and lack of studies on the women using transtheoretical model, persuaded us...

  20. The Dynamic Nature of Physical Activity Intentions: A Within-Person Perspective on Intention-Behavior Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, David E.; Elavsky, Steriani; Hyde, Amanda L.; Doerksen, Shawna E.

    2014-01-01

    The intention-behavior gap has proven to be a vexing problem for theorists and practitioners interested in physical activity. Intention stability is one factor which moderates this gap. This study articulated and tested contrasting views of intention stability as (a) a dynamic characteristic of people that influences assessment error (and therefore the predictive power of intentions), and (b) the product of a dynamic process that unfolds within people over time. Using an ecological momentary assessment design, young adults (N = 30) rated weekly physical activity intentions for 10 weeks and wore pedometers for the first 4 weeks of the study. Substantial within-person variability existed in intentions over both 4- and 10-week intervals, and this variability was not a function of time exclusively. Multilevel modeling revealed that overall intention strength (across weeks) and weekly deviations in intention strength interacted to predict weekday (but not weekend) physical activity. These findings indicate that the person and context interact to selectively couple or decouple intentions from daily physical activity. PMID:22262706

  1. [Gender and leisure-time physical activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles-Costa, Rosana; Heilborn, Maria Luiza; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Faerstein, Eduardo; Lopes, Claudia S

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between gender and the social construction of the body, specifically focusing on physical exercise during leisure time. The Pró-Saúde Project is a prospective study consisting of 4,030 employees of a university in Rio de Janeiro, in which we analyzed the answers on leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) by 3,740 participants. The results show a prevalence of males in LTPA. Age, schooling, and per capita family income were directly associated with exercise among women, as compared to per capita family among men. Men were more frequently involved in group sports and physical activities that required more strength than women, including football, tennis, volleyball, martial arts, jogging, and weight lifting. Women performed more individual physical activities and those demanding less strength, like walking, dance, gymnastics, and hydrogym. The results suggest that LTPA is a domain of daily life that is organized according to certain conventions, amongst which gender-related conceptions concerning the ideal body, where men and women display distinct behaviors in relation to physical exercise.

  2. Physical activity among Canadian children on school days and nonschool days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ploeg, Kerry Ann; Wu, Biao; McGavock, Jon; Veugelers, Paul J

    2012-11-01

    Schools are frequently cited as a favorable venue to promote physical activity (PA), however little data exist describing times when students are least active. Our objective was to overcome this limitation and describe time periods when students are least active. We used a cross-sectional design to assess patterns of PA in 923 grade 5 students [mean age: 10.9 (± 0.4) years] from 30 schools in Alberta, Canada. Students wore time-stamped pedometers for 9 consecutive days, providing 7 full days of data. We compared step counts adjusted for nonwear time between school days and nonschool days as well as during school hours and after school hours. 689 (75%) students provided complete data. The average daily step count was higher on school days (boys 13,476 ± 4123 step/day; girls 11,436 ± 3158 steps/day) than nonschool days (boys 11,009 ± 5542 steps/day; girls 10,256 ± 5206 steps/day). More steps were also taken during school hours than nonschool hours (boys +206 ± 420 steps/hour, P school hours, and weekends.

  3. Evaluation of methods to assess physical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Nicole Y. J. M.

    Epidemiological evidence has accumulated that demonstrates that the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure during a week reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and all-cause mortality. To further understand the amount of daily physical activity and related energy expenditure that are necessary to maintain or improve the functional health status and quality of life, instruments that estimate total (TDEE) and physical activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) under free-living conditions should be determined to be valid and reliable. Without evaluation of the various methods that estimate TDEE and PAEE with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method in females there will be eventual significant limitations on assessing the efficacy of physical activity interventions on health status in this population. A triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, (TT)), an uniaxial (Computer Science and Applications Inc., (CSA)) activity monitor, a Yamax-Digiwalker-500sp°ler , (YX-stepcounter), by measuring heart rate responses (HR method) and a 7-d Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (7-d PAR) were compared with the "criterion method" of DLW during a 7-d period in female adults. The DLW-TDEE was underestimated on average 9, 11 and 15% using 7-d PAR, HR method and TT. The underestimation of DLW-PAEE by 7-d PAR was 21% compared to 47% and 67% for TT and YX-stepcounter. Approximately 56% of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the registration of body movement with accelerometry. A larger proportion of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} was explained by jointly incorporating information from the vertical and horizontal movement measured with the CSA and Tritrac-R3D (rsp2 = 0.87). Although only a small amount of variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the number of steps taken per day, because of its low cost and ease of use, the Yamax-stepcounter is useful in studies promoting daily walking. Thus, studies involving the

  4. Restaurant opening times for the Ascension and Whitsun weekends

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    For the Ascension weekend (from Thursday, 17 May to Sunday, 20 May inclusive) and the Whitsun weekend (from Saturday, 26 May to Monday, 28 May inclusive), the restaurant opening times will be as follows: Restaurant No.1 will be open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., with hot meals being served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m. (except Friday 18 May, when the restaurant will be open as normal). Restaurant No.2 will be closed (except Friday 18 May, when the restaurant will be open as normal). Restaurant No.3 will be closed.

  5. BARRIERS TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN THE ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Matias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The population awareness of the physical exercise’s benefits is widely diffused. These benefits are particularly important in the elderly because, with increasing age, there is a decline of the musculoskeletal system and the maximum oxygen consumption which reduces the functional fitness of the elderly and can often lead to a significant decline in the quality of life. Despite this awareness, a large part of the population remains sedentary. It is important to know what the barriers are, so they can be circumvented in order to increase the engagement of the elderly population in existing physical activity programs.Objectives: This study aims to identify some of the personal, behavioral and environmental barriers that prevent older adults to be physically active.

  6. Doing physical activity – not learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ole

    2017-01-01

    to Annerstedt’s (2008) analysis of PE, it seems crucial that if physical activities in schools should contribute to at least well-being and learning, the teaching content (the doing) and strategies must prioritize and engaging pupils in the inherent qualities of physical education (Kretchmar, 2000). References...... are not the end but reduced to means. From a child perspective children are viewed as becomings instead of beings (James, Jenks & Prout, 1998). Instead of focusing on the now, the focus is pointing against the future. Method and discussion Based on short-term ethnographical fieldwork and pedagogical literature (e...... to be crucial to keep the pedagogical practice in mind. Like pedagogical literature on play have mentioned, play can be a useful pedagogical tool as long as the essence of play or the nerve of play is maintained. The same issue seems to be relevant for physical activity. Results and conclusions In contrast...

  7. Gene × physical activity interactions in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shafqat; Rukh, Gull; Varga, Tibor V

    2013-01-01

    -administered questionnaires. Multiplicative interactions between the GRS and physical activity on BMI were tested in linear and logistic regression models in each cohort, with adjustment for age, age(2), sex, study center (for multicenter studies), and the marginal terms for physical activity and the GRS. These results were...... combined using meta-analysis weighted by cohort sample size. The meta-analysis yielded a statistically significant GRS × physical activity interaction effect estimate (Pinteraction  = 0.015). However, a statistically significant interaction effect was only apparent in North American cohorts (n = 39......,810, Pinteraction  = 0.014 vs. n = 71,611, Pinteraction  = 0.275 for Europeans). In secondary analyses, both the FTO rs1121980 (Pinteraction  = 0.003) and the SEC16B rs10913469 (Pinteraction  = 0.025) variants showed evidence of SNP × physical activity interactions. This meta-analysis of 111,421 individuals...

  8. Habitual physical activity, peripheral neuropathy, foot deformities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    among those who have it.8–12 In other words, physical activity is relevant .... ture sensitivity. A higher score (out of a maximum score of 13 points) indicates more self-reported neuropathic symptoms.36 Though there are 15 items in this section, only 13 of the items are used in scoring. .... Are your feet too sensitive to touch?

  9. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  10. Relationship between physical activity, body fatness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low cardiorespiratory fitness and inactivity are strong health predictors associated with excessive fatness. The objective of this study was to determine the associations between physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness and body fatness in South African adolescents. A cross-sectional study was performed with a ...

  11. Heart disease, family history and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Millar, W J

    2001-08-01

    This article examines the association of family history of heart disease and leisure-time physical activity with incident heart disease. The data are from the 1994/95, 1996/97 and 1998/99 longitudinal household components of Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey. This study is based on information provided by 9,255 respondents aged 20 or older who reported that, in 1994/95, they were free of diagnosed heart disease and in good health. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the association of family history and physical activity with a new diagnosis of heart disease, while controlling for age, sex, educational attainment, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, and body mass index. When family history and other risk factors were taken into account, people who, in 1994/95, engaged in regular physical activity at a moderate level or beyond had lower odds of receiving a new diagnosis of heart disease than did sedentary individuals. People with a family history of heart disease who regularly participated in at least moderate physical activity had lower odds of developing heart disease than did their sedentary counterparts.

  12. Physical activity in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Biological aging is typically associated with a progressive increase in body fat mass and a loss of lean body mass. Owing to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. Lifestyle modification, specifically changes in diet, physical activity, and exercise, is considered the cornerstone of obesity management. However, for most overweight people it is difficult to lose weight permanently through diet or exercise. Thus, prevention of weight gain is thought to be more effective than weight loss in reducing obesity rates. A key question is whether physical activity can extenuate age-related weight gain and promote metabolic health in adults. Current guidelines suggest that adults should accumulate about 60 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity daily to prevent unhealthy weight gain. Because evidence suggests that resistance training may promote a negative energy balance and may change body fat distribution, it is possible that an increase in muscle mass after resistance training may be a key mediator leading to better metabolic control. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. REPRESENTATION OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY DOMAINS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autor

    aim of this study was to evaluate the representation of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours ... A review of the literature has shown that a lack of PA and high amount of Sedentary. Behaviour (SB) are ..... occurring during adolescence, especially for the girls (Kwan et al., 2012), it is particularly important to avoid ...

  14. Habitual Physical Activity as a Promising Moderator

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Psychosocial Stress Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Habitual Physical Activity as a Promising Moderator. Adeniyi, A.F., Ogwumike, O.O., Kolawole, E.B., Fasanmade, A.A.. 1. 1. 1. 2. Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. 1. Department of Medicine, University College ...

  15. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e/sup +/e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC.

  16. Physical activity impairment in depressed COPD subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Fabiano; Terraneo, Silvia; Roggi, Maria Adelaide; Repossi, Alice C; Pellegrino, Giulia M; Veronelli, Anna; Santus, Pierachille; Pontiroli, Antonio E; Centanni, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Limited exercise tolerance is a cardinal clinical feature in COPD. Depression and COPD share some clinical features, such as reduced physical activity and impaired nutritional status. The aim of the present study was to evaluate maximum and daily physical activities and the nutritional status of COPD patients affected or not by depression. In 70 COPD out-patients, daily and maximum physical activities were assessed by multisensor accelerometer armband, 6-min walk test, and cardiopulmonary exercise test. Mental status, metabolic/muscular status, and systemic inflammation were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and with regard to fibrinogen/C-reactive protein, respectively. Depressed subjects (27% of the sample) showed a similar level of respiratory functional impairment but a higher level of shortness of breath and a worse quality of life compared to non-depressed subjects (P physical activity impairment consisting of a reduced number of steps per day, a lower peak of oxygen consumption, an early anaerobic threshold, and a reduced distance in the 6-min walk test (P daily number of steps. Our study found that depressed COPD patients have a reduced daily and maximum exercise capacity compared to non-depressed patients. This further suggests the potential utility of screening for depression in COPD.

  17. Ambulatory feedback at daily physical activity patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evering, R.M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are characterized with persistent fatigue which disturbs activities of daily life. CFS is a symptom-based diagnosis that is made without findings of distinguished physical examination or laboratory tests. CFS can be diagnosed if the fatigue lasts for at

  18. Exploring the relationship between physical activity, psychological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hockey players perceived themselves as having more positive relations with others and sport competence than either health club members or runners. The relevance of these findings and further implications for health and sport psychological research and interventions were discussed. Keywords: physical activity ...

  19. Perceived competence and physical activity involvement among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined if the factor structure of the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents (SPPA) suggested by Harter (1978; 1988) would fit a sample of youths from Botswana and whether perceived competence would predict patterns of involvement in sport and physical activity among the youths. Participants were ...

  20. The Relationship between Physical Activity and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    1971) replicated several of these results in their research. Further, short term memory improved with physical activity in another study (Davey, 1973...PF, EYSENCK PERSONALITY Ni (1970)A INVENTORY, AAICL (AINIETY) I1O NIUYA (1977)C SELF-CONCEPT FOURTH GRAMR NO (4 EKS, PIERS- HRRIS CHILDREN’S O DAI 30

  1. Is physical activity in natural environments better for mental health than physical activity in other environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that there may be synergy between the psychological benefits of physical activity, and the restorative effects of contact with a natural environment; physical activity in a natural environment might produce greater mental health benefits than physical activity elsewhere. However, such experiments are typically short-term and, by definition, artificially control the participant types, physical activity and contact with nature. This observational study asked whether such effects can be detected in everyday settings at a population level. It used data from the Scottish Health Survey 2008, describing all environments in which respondents were physically active. Associations were sought between use of each environment, and then use of environments grouped as natural or non-natural, and the risk of poor mental health (measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)) and level of wellbeing (measured by the Warwick Edinburgh Mental health and Wellbeing Score (WEMWBS). Results showed an independent association between regular use of natural environments and a lower risk of poor mental health, but not for activity in other types of environment. For example, the odds of poor mental health (GHQ ≥ 4) among those regularly using woods or forests for physical activity were 0.557 (95% CI 0.323-0.962), compared to non-users. However, regular use of natural environments was not clearly associated with greater wellbeing, whilst regular use of non-natural environments was. The study concludes that physical activity in natural environments is associated with a reduction in the risk of poor mental health to a greater extent than physical activity in other environments, but also that activity in different types of environment may promote different kinds of positive psychological response. Access to natural environments for physical activity should be protected and promoted as a contribution to protecting and improving population mental health

  2. Exploring associations between parental and peer variables, personal variables and physical activity among adolescents: a mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloigne, Maïté; Veitch, Jenny; Carver, Alison; Salmon, Jo; Cardon, Greet; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Timperio, Anna

    2014-09-18

    This study aimed to investigate how parental and peer variables are associated with moderate- to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) on week- and weekend days among Australian adolescents (13-15 y), and whether perceived internal barriers (e.g. lack of time), external barriers (e.g. lack of others to be physically active with) and self-efficacy mediated these associations. Cross-sectional data were drawn from the Health, Eating and Play Study, conducted in Melbourne, Australia. Adolescents (mean age = 14.11 ± 0.59 years, 51% girls) and one of their parents completed a questionnaire and adolescents wore an ActiGraph accelerometer for a week (n = 134). Mediating effects of perceived barriers and self-efficacy were tested using MacKinnon's product-of-coefficients test based on multilevel linear regression analyses. Parental logistic support was positively related to MVPA on weekdays (τ = 0.035) and weekend days (τ = 0.078), peer interest (τ =0.036) was positively related to MVPA on weekdays, and parental control (τ = -0.056) and parental concern (τ = -0.180) were inversely related to MVPA on weekdays. Internal barriers significantly mediated the association between parental logistic support and MVPA on weekdays (42.9% proportion mediated). Self-efficacy and external barriers did not mediate any association. Interventions aiming to increase adolescents' MVPA should involve parents, as parental support may influence MVPA on weekdays by reducing adolescents' perceived internal barriers. Longitudinal and experimental research is needed to confirm these findings and to investigate other personal mediators.

  3. Community wide interventions for increasing physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Philip R A; Francis, Daniel P; Soares, Jesus; Weightman, Alison L; Foster, Charles

    2015-01-05

    Multi-strategic community wide interventions for physical activity are increasingly popular but their ability to achieve population level improvements is unknown. To evaluate the effects of community wide, multi-strategic interventions upon population levels of physical activity. We searched the Cochrane Public Health Group Segment of the Cochrane Register of Studies,The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in Process, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, PsycINFO, ASSIA, the British Nursing Index, Chinese CNKI databases, EPPI Centre (DoPHER, TRoPHI), ERIC, HMIC, Sociological Abstracts, SPORT Discus, Transport Database and Web of Science (Science Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index). We also scanned websites of the EU Platform on Diet, Physical Activity and Health; Health-Evidence.org; the International Union for Health Promotion and Education; the NIHR Coordinating Centre for Health Technology (NCCHTA); the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and NICE and SIGN guidelines. Reference lists of all relevant systematic reviews, guidelines and primary studies were searched and we contacted experts in the field. The searches were updated to 16 January 2014, unrestricted by language or publication status. Cluster randomised controlled trials, randomised controlled trials, quasi-experimental designs which used a control population for comparison, interrupted time-series studies, and prospective controlled cohort studies were included. Only studies with a minimum six-month follow up from the start of the intervention to measurement of outcomes were included. Community wide interventions had to comprise at least two broad strategies aimed at physical activity for the whole population. Studies which randomised individuals from the same community were excluded. At least two review authors independently extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias. Each study was assessed for the setting, the number of included components

  4. Benefits of Attending a Weekend Childhood Cancer Survivor Family Retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashore, Lisa; Bender, Joyce

    2017-09-01

    To explore the long-term benefits to families of childhood cancer survivors who attended a weekend childhood cancer survivor family retreat. Descriptive-qualitative study including families who had attended the weekend retreat at least once but not in the past 12 months, and who attend a large pediatric hematology and oncology cancer survivorship program in Texas. A semistructured interview guide was used during three audio-taped focus groups to explore the benefits of having attended a weekend retreat. Descriptive qualitative analysis was used to analyze the focus groups' transcripts. Seven families participated in the focus groups, and the themes identified were reconnecting (with others or family), putting life in perspective, and changing outlook on life. Retreats offer families of cancer survivors opportunities to reconnect with others and their own family members in a therapeutic environment. These reconnections in a therapeutic environment enriched the families' positive outlooks on life and changed their perspectives. Families of childhood cancer survivors report a lack of support following the completion of therapy. Retreats in a nonclinical therapeutic setting optimize family-perceived support, relationship building, and reconnecting survivor families. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Be Active Your Way: A Guide for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... living room to your favorite music. It all adds up. 2 Be Active Your Way: A Guide for Adults It costs too much. Solution: You don’t ... a couple of months. You might want to add biking on the weekends for variety. 4 Be Active Your Way: A Guide for Adults How much physical activity do you need each ...

  6. Physical activity assessment in patients with axial spondyloarthritis compared to healthy controls: a technology-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Willem Swinnen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Traditionally, assessment in axial Spondyloarthritis (aSpA includes the evaluation of the capacity to execute tasks, conceptualized as physical function. The role of physical activity, defined as movement-related energy expenditure, is largely unknown and almost exclusively studied using patient-reported outcome measures. The aims of this observational cross-sectional study are to compare physical activity between patients with aSpA and healthy controls (HC and to evaluate the contribution of disease activity to physical activity differences between groups. METHODS: Forty patients with aSpA were matched by age, gender, period of data acquisition in terms of days and season to 40 HC. Physical activity was measured during five consecutive days (three weekdays and two weekend days using ambulatory monitoring (SenseWear Armband. Self-reported disease activity was measured by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI. Differences in physical activity between patients with aSpA and HC were examined with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and a mixed linear model. Difference scores between patients and HC were correlated with disease activity. RESULTS: Average weekly physical activity level (Med(IQR; HC:1.54(1.41-1.73; aSpA:1.45(1.31-1.67,MET and energy expenditure (HC:36.40(33.43-41.01; aSpA:34.55(31.08-39.41,MET.hrs/day were significantly lower in patients with aSpA. Analyses across intensity levels revealed no significant differences between groups for inactivity and time spent at light or moderate physical activities. In contrast, weekly averages of vigorous (HC:4.02(1.20-12.60; aSpA:0.00(0.00-1.20,min/d, very vigorous physical activities (HC0.00(0.00-1.08; aSpA:0.00(0.00-0.00,mind/d and moderate/(veryvigorous combined (HC2.41(1.62-3.48; aSpA:1.63(1.20-2.82,hrs/d were significantly lower in patients with aSpA. Disease activity did not interact with differences in physical activity between patients with aSpA and HC

  7. A Portfolio Approach to Impacting Physically Active Lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ray; Pulling, Andrew R.; Alpert, Amanda; Jackman, Emma

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a physical activity portfolio designed to help students manage their own fitness and health-related physical activity outside of the physical education classroom. A main goal of physical education programs is to prepare students to lead a physically active lifestyle and maintain a lifetime of health-related fitness. The…

  8. 1988 active Army physical fitness survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J S; Bahrke, M S; Tetu, R G

    1990-12-01

    The U.S. Army Physical Fitness School (USAPFS) at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, IN was tasked with measuring the physical fitness of the active Army. Performance on the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) was used to determine fitness levels. Data were collected at 14 U.S. Army installations CONUS-wide between October 1 and November 30, 1988. Five thousand three hundred forty-six male and 676 female active Army soldiers (N = 6.022) between the ages of 17-52 and in 60 military occupational specialties (MOSs) participated in the study. Generally, the results were favorable. Senior age groups performed well overall, especially females. Improvement in muscular strength and endurance conditioning since 1984 was also observed. However, concern was raised about poor performance in the youngest age group (17-21), where 16.6% of the males failed the 2-mile run event and 29.0% failed overall. Likewise, for females in the 17-21 year age group, 28.8% failed the 2-mile run and 36.0% failed overall. Several reasons are suggested for the poor performance of the younger age groups, including inadequate leadership in fitness training and low levels of self-motivation. This study suggest that many soldiers, especially young soldiers, may not possess sufficient levels of physical fitness to meet the physical demands of war.

  9. Longitudinal Physical Activity, Body Composition, and Physical Fitness in Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Marja H; Henriksson, Pontus; Delisle Nyström, Christine; Henriksson, Hanna; Ortega, Francisco B; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina; Löf, Marie

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate longitudinal associations of objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) with body composition and physical fitness at a 12-month follow-up in healthy Swedish 4-yr-old children. The data from the population-based MINISTOP trial were collected between 2014 and 2016, and this study included the 138 children who were in the control group. PA and SB were assessed using the wrist-worn ActiGraph (wGT3x-BT) accelerometer during seven 24-h periods and, subsequently, defined as SB, light-intensity PA, moderate-intensity PA, vigorous-intensity PA (VPA), and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). Body composition was measured using air-displacement plethysmography and physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, lower and upper muscular strength as well as motor fitness) by the PREFIT fitness battery. Linear regression and isotemporal substitution models were applied. Greater VPA and MVPA at the age of 4.5 yr were associated with higher fat-free mass index (FFMI) at 5.5 yr (P fitness, lower body muscular strength, and motor fitness at 12-month follow-up (P = 0.001 to P = 0.031). Substituting 5 min·d of SB, light-intensity PA, or moderate-intensity PA for VPA at the age of 4.5 yr were associated with higher FFMI, and with greater upper and lower muscular strength at 12-month follow-up (P fitness at 12-month follow-up. Our results indicate that promoting high-intensity PA at young ages may have long-term beneficial effects on childhood body composition and physical fitness, in particular muscular strength.

  10. Physical activity and the pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are common, with 1 in 4 US women reporting moderate to severe symptoms of urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, or fecal incontinence. Given the high societal burden of these disorders, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial. Physical activity is one such potentially modifiable risk factor; the large number of girls and women participating in sport and strenuous training regimens increases the need to understand associated risks and benefits of these exposures. The aim of this review was to summarize studies reporting the association between physical activity and pelvic floor disorders. Most studies are cross-sectional and most include small numbers of participants. The primary findings of this review include that urinary incontinence during exercise is common and is more prevalent in women during high-impact sports. Mild to moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking, decreases both the odds of having and the risk of developing urinary incontinence. In older women, mild to moderate activity also decreases the odds of having fecal incontinence; however, young women participating in high-intensity activity are more likely to report anal incontinence than less active women. Scant data suggest that in middle-aged women, lifetime physical activity increases the odds of stress urinary incontinence slightly and does not increase the odds of pelvic organ prolapse. Women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are more likely to report a history of heavy work than controls; however, women recruited from the community with pelvic organ prolapse on examination report similar lifetime levels of strenuous activity as women without this examination finding. Data are insufficient to determine whether strenuous activity while young predisposes to pelvic floor disorders later in life. The existing literature suggests that most physical activity does not harm the pelvic floor and does provide numerous health benefits for

  11. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THE PELVIC FLOOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Shaw, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) are common, with one in four U.S. women reporting moderate to severe symptoms of urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse or fecal incontinence. Given the high societal burden of these disorders, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial. Physical activity is one such potentially modifiable risk factor; the large number of girls and women participating in sport and strenuous training regimens increases the need to understand associated risks and benefits of these exposures. The aim of this review is to summarize studies reporting the association between physical activity and PFDs. Most studies are cross-sectional and most include small numbers of participants. The primary findings of this review include: Urinary incontinence during exercise is common and is more prevalent in women during high-impact sports. Mild to moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking, decreases both the odds of having and the risk of developing urinary incontinence. In older women, mild to moderate activity also decreases the odds of having fecal incontinence; however, young women participating in high intensity activity are more likely to report anal incontinence than less active women. Scant data suggest that in middle-aged women, lifetime physical activity increases the odds of stress urinary incontinence slightly and does not increase the odds of pelvic organ prolapse. Women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are more likely to report a history of heavy work than controls; however, women recruited from the community with pelvic organ prolapse on examination report similar lifetime levels of strenuous activity as women without this exam finding. Data are insufficient to determine whether strenuous activity while young predisposes to pelvic floor disorders later in life. The existing literature suggests that most physical activity does not harm the pelvic floor and does provide numerous health benefits for women. However

  12. Physical Activity and Beverage Consumption among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibiloni, Maria del Mar; Özen, Asli Emine; Pons, Antoni; González-Gross, Marcela; Tur, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship between physical activity and beverage consumption among adolescents with a population based cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Balearic Islands, Spain (n = 1988; 12–17 years old). Body composition, educational and income level, physical activity (PA), and beverage consumption and energy intake were assessed. Sixty-two percent of adolescents engaged in >300 min/week of PA. Boys were more active than girls, younger adolescents were more active than older counterparts, low parental income was associated with physical inactivity, and time spent watching TV (including, TV, Internet or handheld cellular devices) was inversely associated with PA practice. The average beverage intake of the studied adolescents was 0.9 L/day, higher in boys than in girls. Beverage intake was positively associated with PA practice, and the highest amount of energy intake from beverages was observed in active boys and girls. Most of the studied adolescent population met the PA recommendations. Gender, age, parental income, and time spent watching TV were significant determinants of PA. Type and amount of beverages drunk varied according to gender and PA, and general daily total beverage intake was lower than recommended adequate fluid intake. PA behavior should be considered when analyzing beverage consumption in adolescents. PMID:27347993

  13. Physical Activity and Beverage Consumption among Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Mar Bibiloni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the relationship between physical activity and beverage consumption among adolescents with a population based cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Balearic Islands, Spain (n = 1988; 12–17 years old. Body composition, educational and income level, physical activity (PA, and beverage consumption and energy intake were assessed. Sixty-two percent of adolescents engaged in >300 min/week of PA. Boys were more active than girls, younger adolescents were more active than older counterparts, low parental income was associated with physical inactivity, and time spent watching TV (including, TV, Internet or handheld cellular devices was inversely associated with PA practice. The average beverage intake of the studied adolescents was 0.9 L/day, higher in boys than in girls. Beverage intake was positively associated with PA practice, and the highest amount of energy intake from beverages was observed in active boys and girls. Most of the studied adolescent population met the PA recommendations. Gender, age, parental income, and time spent watching TV were significant determinants of PA. Type and amount of beverages drunk varied according to gender and PA, and general daily total beverage intake was lower than recommended adequate fluid intake. PA behavior should be considered when analyzing beverage consumption in adolescents.

  14. Physical terms and leisure time activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovičová, Ľubomíra; Siptáková, Mária; ŠtubÅa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    People have to educate not only in school but also outside it. One approach to acquire new knowledge are leisure activities such as hobby groups or camps. Leisure activities, more and more seem to be the appropriate form for informal learning of physics concepts. Within leisure activities pupils have the possibility to acquire new concepts in unusual and interesting way. It is possible to inspire their intrinsic motivation on the matter or the phenomenon which is the aim of all teachers. This article deals with the description of and insights on acquisition of the concept of uniform and non-uniform rectilinear movement during a physics camp where pupils had the opportunity to use modern technologies which are despite of modernization of education still unconventional teaching methods in our schools.

  15. Beyond the Gym: Increasing Outside of School Physical Activity through Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stephen; Bycura, Dierdra

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of physical education is to guide youngsters to become and remain physically active for life. Research on correlates and determinants of physical activity has shown the importance of developing intrinsic motivation in students so that they will choose to be physically active in their leisure time. When the physical education curriculum…

  16. Physical Activity and Enjoyment: Measurement, Evaluation, and Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Childhood engagement in physical activity improves health and contributes to the sustainment of physical activity in adulthood. My dissertation research broadens scholarship by disentangling the effects of sports- vs. non-sports-focused summer camps on children’s physical activity and identifying modifiable activity characteristics contributing to physical activity enjoyment, an important predictor of physical activity sustainment. My work also challenges current discourse by presenting the a...

  17. Physical activity and mental health: relationships between depressiveness, psychological disorders and physical activity level in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kull

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted with an objective to study relationships between physical activity and emotional wellbeing of women. The study involved 659 women aged 18–45. The following questionnaires were used: General Health Questionnaire, Health Questionnaire for Adults, Beck Depression Inventory. Physically active women experienced less stress disorders (P<0.05 and less depressiveness (P<0.05. Results showed that even a low level of physical activity (1-2 times per week can account for positive impact on women’s mental health (depressive feelings and psychological disorders.

  18. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been diagnosed in adolescents and among the associated factors are low levels of physical activity, sedentary behavior over long periods and low cardiorespiratory fitness. However, specifically in adolescents, studies present conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies, in order to map the association between physical activity, sedentary behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness and MetS in adolescents. Methods A search was performed in the databases PubMed, SPORTDiscus, LILACS and the Cochrane Library. For the meta-analysis, the odds ratio (OR) was calculated together with the respective confidence intervals (95% CI), in which the measures of effect were analyzed by dichotomous data (exposure variables) with MetS used as events. Results Eighteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Primary analysis demonstrated that low levels of physical activity (OR = 1.35 [1.03 to 1.79]; p = 0.03) and low cardiorespiratory fitness (OR = 4.05 [2.09 to 7.87]; p 2 hours/day, a significant association was not identified (OR = 1.20 [0.91 to 1.59]; p = 0.20). Subgroup analyses demonstrated that the association between low physical activity and MetS was dependent on the use of the accelerometry technique (OR = 2.93 [1.56 to 5.47]; p 2 hours/day was significantly associated with MetS only on weekends (OR = 2.05 [1.13 to 3.73]; p = 0.02). With respect to cardiorespiratory fitness, a significant association with MetS was found independent of the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) measurement method. Conclusions Low levels of physical activity, low indices of cardiorespiratory fitness and sedentary behavior, represented by screen time > 2 hours/day on weekends, were significantly associated with the development of MetS in adolescence. PMID:27997601

  19. Daily physical-rest activities in relation to nutritional state, metabolism, and quality of life in cancer patients with progressive cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladiun, Marita; Körner, Ulla; Gunnebo, Lena; Sixt-Ammilon, Petra; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Lundholm, Kent

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate daily physical-rest activities in cancer patients losing weight in relation to disease progression. Physical activity-rest rhythms were measured (ActiGraph, armband sensor from BodyMedia) in relation to body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), energy metabolism, exercise capacity (walking test), and self-scored quality of life (SF-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) in weight-losing outpatients with systemic cancer (71 +/- 2 years, n = 53). Well-nourished, age-matched, and previously hospitalized non-cancer patients served as controls (74 +/- 4 years, n = 8). Middle-aged healthy individuals were used as reference subjects (49 +/- 5 years, n = 23). Quality of life was globally reduced in patients with cancer (P < 0.01), accompanied by significantly reduced spontaneous physical activity during both weekdays and weekends compared with reference subjects (P < 0.01). Spontaneous physical activity declined over time during follow-up in patients with cancer (P < 0.05). However, overall physical activity and the extent of sleep and bed-rest activities did not differ between patients with cancer and age-matched non-cancer patients. Spontaneous physical activity correlated weakly with maximum exercise capacity in univariate analysis (r = 0.41, P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that spontaneous physical activity was related to weight loss, blood hemoglobin concentration, C-reactive protein, and to subjectively scored items of physical functioning and bodily pain (SF-36; P < 0.05-0.004). Anxiety and depression were not related to spontaneous physical activity. Patient survival was predicted only by weight loss and serum albumin levels (P < 0.01), although there was no such prediction for spontaneous physical activity. Daily physical-rest activities represent variables which probably reflect complex mental physiologic and metabolic interactions. Thus, activity-rest monitoring provides a new dimension in the evaluation of medical and drug

  20. Perceived physical competence towards physical activity, and autonomous motivation and enjoyment in physical education as longitudinal predictors of adolescents' self - reported physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Jaakkola, Timo; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Watt, Anthony; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to investigate if adolescents’ perceived physical competence towards physical activity (PA), and autonomous motivation and enjoyment in physical education (PE) during early adolescence can predict amount and intensity of self-reported physical activity six years later. Design This study utilized a 6-year longitudinal data set collected within Finnish school settings. Students responded to questionnaires measuring their perceived physical compete...

  1. The effects of exergaming on physical activity among inactive children in a physical education classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fogel, Victoria A; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Graves, Rachel; Koehler, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    ... on the reinforcing effects of video games to increase physical activity in children. This study evaluated the effects of exergaming on physical activity among 4 inactive children in a physical education (PE) classroom...

  2. Associations between physical activity parenting practices and adolescent girls' self-perceptions and physical activity intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebire, Simon J; Haase, Anne M; Montgomery, Alan A; McNeill, Jade; Jago, Russ

    2014-05-01

    The current study investigated cross-sectional associations between maternal and paternal logistic and modeling physical activity support and the self-efficacy, self-esteem, and physical activity intentions of 11- to 12-year-old girls. 210 girls reported perceptions of maternal and paternal logistic and modeling support and their self-efficacy, self-esteem and intention to be physically active. Data were analyzed using multivariable regression models. Maternal logistic support was positively associated with participants' self-esteem, physical activity self-efficacy, and intention to be active. Maternal modeling was positively associated with self-efficacy. Paternal modeling was positively associated with self-esteem and self-efficacy but there was no evidence that paternal logistic support was associated with the psychosocial variables. Activity-related parenting practices were associated with psychosocial correlates of physical activity among adolescent girls. Logistic support from mothers, rather than modeling support or paternal support may be a particularly important target when designing interventions aimed at preventing the age-related decline in physical activity among girls.

  3. Physical Activity and Energy Expenditure: Findings from the Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Physical activity, if there are no medical caveats, is beneficial to all people including pregnant women. This study examined the level of physical activity in a group of pregnant Nigerian women. Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to assess the physical activity of 453 pregnant women. The mean age of ...

  4. ASSESMENT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu Tripathi

    2017-01-01

    There is a need to find out the association between school-based physical activity, including physical education and academic performance among school-aged youth. To better understand these connections, this research paper first finds out the independent variables upon which academic performance depends. Study is from a range of physical activity contexts, including school-based physical education, recess, classroom-based physical activity and extracurricular physical activity. In his attempt...

  5. The weekend effect within and downwind of Sacramento ─ Part 1: Observations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and VOC reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Goldstein

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Day-of-week patterns in human activities can be used to examine the ways in which differences in primary emissions result in changes in the rates of photochemical reactions, and the production of secondary pollutants. Data from twelve California Air Resources Board monitoring sites in Sacramento, CA, and the downwind Mountain Counties air basin are analyzed to reveal day of week patterns in ozone and its precursors in the summers of 1998–2002. Measurements of non-methane hydrocarbons are available for the summers of 2001–2003 at three of these sites and NOx at six of these sites for the full time period. This routine monitoring data is complemented by data sets of ozone and nitrogen oxide concentrations obtained in the summers of 2001 and 2003 at three sites in the region and comprehensive measurements of VOC reactivity at two sites in 2001. Daytime concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx≡NO+NO2 are approximately 35% lower on weekends at all the sites, whereas the VOC reactivity changes by less than 10%. All six sites in the Sacramento Valley have higher 8-h maximum average ozone on the weekend and are more likely to exceed the national standard of 85 ppb on the weekend. In contrast, all the sites in the Mountain Counties are less likely to exceed the federal ozone standard on the weekend. Analysis of the day-of-week trends in odd oxygen show that the weekend effect of ozone within Sacramento is strongly influenced by NO sources close to the monitoring sites. This suggests that ozone measurements from monitoring sites close to highways, including two rural locations, may not be representative of the regional abundance, and lead to underestimates of long term exposure for humans and ecosystems.

  6. Fundamental movement skills training to promote physical activity in children with and without disability: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Capio

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that improved FMS proficiency could potentially contribute to heightened PA and decreased sedentary time during weekends for children. Such effect of improved FMS proficiency on PA appears to be greater in those with physical disability than in those without disability. It is recommended that the findings of this pilot study should be further examined in future research.

  7. [Weight status, dietary habits and physical activity among 6-12 year-old children in Castile-La Mancha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, S; Cuervo, M; Zazpe, I; Ortega, A; García-Perea, A; Martínez, J A

    2014-02-01

    Childhood obesity is a multifactorial disease, in which unhealthy dietary patterns and sedentary lifestyles play a decisive role. The aim of this study was to assess the weight status, dietary habits and physical activity in Castile-La Mancha children. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 3061 children 6-12 years-old who were participating in the programme, "Alimenta su salud". Anthropometric measurements, food consumption frequency, dietary habits and physical activity were assessed by a questionnaire, including gender, age and geographical influences. The prevalence of subjects with excess weight-for-height was 24.0% and obesity was 14.3%, with geographical differences. Girls more often have mid-morning snacks, consume more supplements, and reported to be less active than boys. Special diets and sports activities were lower in children aged 6-9 years as compared to the 10-12 years old group. The intake of vegetables and fruit is low, while there is overconsumption of sausages, pastries, salted snacks, sweets and fast food, with some differences by age group. One out of four children is overweight or obese in this population. Children do not meet recommendations for fruit and vegetables and there is a high consumption of foods associated with obesity risk. Physical inactivity was more prevalent during the weekends, and among girls. Copyright © 2010 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Associations between parenting partners' objectively-assessed physical activity and Body Mass Index: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, Jesmond; Jago, Russell; Sebire, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Family members have the capacity to influence each other's health behaviours. This study examined whether there were associations in the objectively assessed physical activity and Body Mass Index (BMI) of mothers and fathers. Recruitment took place in Bristol (UK) during 2012/13. Participants were 272 pairs of parents (dyads) that wore an accelerometer for at least 500 min on 3 or more days. Parents provided demographic information and self-reported height and weight. Multi-variable linear and logistic regression models examined the relationships between parents' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and BMI. MVPA minutes (r = 0.26, p < 0.001) and Body Mass Index (r = 0.20, p = 0.002) of parents were correlated. Logistic regression analysis showed that mothers were almost twice (OR 1.87, p < 0.05) as likely to be overweight or obese when fathers were. Linear regression models showed that at the weekend every 9 min of paternal MVPA was associated with 3 min of maternal MVPA (r = 0.34, p < 0.001). Both physical activity and BMI of parenting partners were associated. Since parents tend to share home environments and often perform activities together or as a family, then behavioural changes in one parent may have a ripple effect for other family members.

  9. Parental Influence on Young Children's Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A. Zecevic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Parents influence on their young children's physical activity (PA behaviours was examined in a sample of 102 preschool-aged children (54 boys. Questionnaires regarding family sociodemographics and physical activity habits were completed. Results showed that children who received greater parental support for activity (B=.78, P<.10 and had parents who rated PA as highly enjoyable (B=.69, P<.05 were significantly more likely to engage in one hour or more of daily PA. Being an older child (B=−.08, P<.01, having older parents (B=−.26, P<.01, and watching more than one hour of television/videos per day (B=1.55, P<.01 reduced the likelihood that a child would be rated as highly active. Children who received greater parental support for PA were 6.3 times more likely to be highly active than inactive (B=1.44, P<.05. Thus, parents can promote PA among their preschoolers, not only by limiting TV time but also by being highly supportive of their children's active pursuits.

  10. Associations between Socio-Motivational Factors, Physical Education Activity Levels and Physical Activity Behavior among Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Weihong; Gao, Zan; Lodewyk, Ken

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between established socio-motivational factors and children's physical activity levels daily and during physical education classes. A total of 307 middle school students (149 boys, 158 girls) from a suburban public school in the Southern United States participated in this study. Participants completed…

  11. Physical Activity and Quality of Life Experienced by Highly Active Individuals with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Stancil, Michael; Hardin, Brent; Bryant, Lance

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined links between physical activity and quality of life experienced by individuals with physical disabilities recruited from a wheelchair user's basketball tournament. The participants included 12 male and 14 female adults between the ages of 18-54 (M = 31.12, SD = 10.75) who all reported one or more condition(s) that…

  12. Neighborhood disadvantage, physical activity barriers, and physical activity among African American breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antwan Jones

    2015-01-01

    Higher renter rates and individual barriers both contribute to lower levels of physical activity in African American breast cancer survivors. These data suggest that the potential for constant residential turnover (via rentership and perceived barriers may increase physical inactivity even where facilities may be available.

  13. CERN Summer Student Webfest: a weekend for science and creativity | 29 - 31 July 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Are you passionate about science? Do you like communicating that passion to the general public? Then come along to the CERN Summer Student Webfest on the weekend of 29-31 July! It is a grassroots initiative, open to all, that aims to spark new ideas that could innovate the future of web-based education about CERN, the LHC, particle physics, humanitarian matters and health.   The CERN Summer Student Webfest is a weekend of online web-based creativity modelled on the gatherings (sometimes called hackfests or hackathons) that energize many open-source communities. Participants will work in teams and design neat applications that encourage the public to learn more about science. The projects can range from designing online games for kids to crafting citizen science projects and developing low-cost mobile-phone-based cosmic ray detectors. You do not have to be a software or hardware expert to contribute: many types of skill sets are needed to develop a fun project, from writing and designing ...

  14. Physical Activity and Health: Does Physical Education Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Russell R.; O'Neill, Jennifer R.; McIver, Kerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Physical education has been an institution in American schools since the late 19th century, and today almost all American children are exposed to physical education classes. It has often been claimed that physical education provides important benefits to public health. The purpose of this paper is to determine if physical education increases…

  15. Children's Physical Activity Behavior during School Recess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Troelsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Schoolyards are recognized as important settings for physical activity interventions during recess. However, varying results have been reported. This pilot study was conducted to gain in-depth knowledge of children's physical activity behavior during recess using a mixed-methods approach combining...... quantitative GPS and accelerometer measurements with qualitative go-along group interviews and participant observations. Data were collected during three weekdays in a public school in Denmark. Eighty-one children (47 girls) wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X) and GPS (QStarz BT-Q1000xt), sixteen children...... were predominantly staying in three different locations during recess: school building, schoolyard and field, respectively. Mostly girls were in the building remaining in there because of a perceived lack of attractive outdoor play facilities. The children in the schoolyard were predominantly girls who...

  16. Physical activity and determinants of physical activity in obese and non-obese children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S G Trost; L M Kerr; D S Ward; R R Pate

    2001-01-01

      OBJECTIVE:: To compare the physical activity (PA) patterns and the hypothesized psychosocial and environmental determinants of PA in an ethnically diverse sample of obese and non-obese middle school children. DESIGN...

  17. Autonomous motivation mediates the relation between goals for physical activity and physical activity behavior in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Eyre, Emma Lj; Bryant, Elizabeth; Seghers, Jan; Galbraith, Niall; Nevill, Alan M

    2017-04-01

    Overall, 544 children (mean age ± standard deviation = 14.2 ± .94 years) completed self-report measures of physical activity goal content, behavioral regulations, and physical activity behavior. Body mass index was determined from height and mass. The indirect effect of intrinsic goal content on physical activity was statistically significant via autonomous ( b = 162.27; 95% confidence interval [89.73, 244.70]), but not controlled motivation ( b = 5.30; 95% confidence interval [-39.05, 45.16]). The indirect effect of extrinsic goal content on physical activity was statistically significant via autonomous ( b = 106.25; 95% confidence interval [63.74, 159.13]) but not controlled motivation ( b = 17.28; 95% confidence interval [-31.76, 70.21]). Weight status did not alter these findings.

  18. Impact of an After-School Physical Activity Program on Youth's Physical Activity Correlates and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaoqun; Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C.; Schultz, Barry; Newton, Maria; Jenson, William

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of a sports-based, after-school physical activity (PA) program on youth's physical activity PA levels and PA correlates. After the pretest, 130 youth were assigned to the intervention group (i.e., after-school PA group) or the comparison (i.e., no after-school PA group) group.…

  19. Validation of reported physical activity for cholesterol control using two different physical activity instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Amy Z; Ham, Sandra A; Muppidi, Shravani Reddy; Mokdad, Ali H

    2009-01-01

    Amy Z Fan1, Sandra A Ham2, Shravani Reddy Muppidi3, Ali H Mokdad41Behavioral Surveillance Branch, Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; 2Physical Activity and Health Branch, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA;...

  20. Physical activity as a metabolic stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, E F

    2000-08-01

    Both physical activity and diet stimulate processes that, over time, alter the morphologic composition and biochemical function of the body. Physical activity provides stimuli that promote very specific and varied adaptations according to the type, intensity, and duration of exercise performed. There is further interest in the extent to which diet or supplementation can enhance the positive stimuli. Prolonged walking at low intensity presents little metabolic, hormonal, or cardiovascular stress, and the greatest perturbation from rest appears to be from increased fat oxidation and plasma free fatty acid mobilization resulting from a combination of increased lipolysis and decreased reesterification. More intense jogging or running largely stimulates increased oxidation of glycogen and triacylglycerol, both of which are stored directly within the muscle fibers. Furthermore, these intramuscular stores of carbohydrate and fat appear to be the primary substrates for the enhanced oxidative and performance ability derived from endurance training-induced increases in muscle mitochondrial density. Weightlifting that produces fatigue in brief periods (ie, in 15-90 s and after 15 repetitive contractions) elicits a high degree of motor unit recruitment and muscle fiber stimulation. This is a remarkably potent stimulus for altering protein synthesis in muscle and increasing neuromuscular function. The metabolic stress of physical activity can be measured by substrate turnover and depletion, cardiovascular response, hormonal perturbation, accumulation of metabolites, or even the extent to which the synthesis and degradation of specific proteins are altered, either acutely or by chronic exercise training.

  1. Childhood temperament predictors of adolescent physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Janssen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Many patterns of physical activity involvement are established early in life. To date, the role of easily identifiable early-life individual predictors of PA, such as childhood temperament, remains relatively unexplored. Here, we tested whether childhood temperamental activity level, high intensity pleasure, low intensity pleasure, and surgency predicted engagement in physical activity (PA patterns 11 years later in adolescence. Methods Data came from a longitudinal community study (N = 206 participants, 53% females, 70% Caucasian. Parents reported their children’s temperamental characteristics using the Child Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ when children were 4 & 5 years old. Approximately 11 years later, adolescents completed self-reports of PA using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Ordered logistic regression, ordinary least squares linear regression, and Zero-inflated Poisson regression models were used to predict adolescent PA from childhood temperament. Race, socioeconomic status, and adolescent body mass index were used as covariates. Results Males with greater childhood temperamental activity level engaged in greater adolescent PA volume (B = .42, SE = .13 and a 1 SD difference in childhood temperamental activity level predicted 29.7% more strenuous adolescent PA per week. Males’ high intensity pleasure predicted higher adolescent PA volume (B = .28, SE = .12. Males’ surgency positively predicted more frequent PA activity (B = .47, SE = .23, OR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.54 and PA volume (B = .31, SE = .12. No predictions from females’ childhood temperament to later PA engagement were identified. Conclusions Childhood temperament may influence the formation of later PA habits, particularly in males. Boys with high temperamental activity level, high intensity

  2. A frequency questionnaire to estimate free-living physical activity among Tunisian preadolescent and adolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Gharbia, Houda; Gartner, Agnès; Traissac, Pierre; Delpeuch, Francis; Maire, Bernard; El Ati, Jalila

    2014-10-01

    To develop a child- and adolescent-appropriate physical activity frequency questionnaire (PAFQ) in Tunisia, North Africa. A PAFQ was developed from a physical activity (PA) inventory that comprised major activity components (at home, preparing meals, school time, transport, non-sport leisure, sports, prayer and sleeping time). Then, type and duration of each activity undertaken during the past week were estimated. Total energy expenditure (TEE) estimated by the PAFQ was compared with data derived from two criterion methods: heart-rate monitoring (HRM) and a 24 h PA recall (24h-R), both collected during a 3 d period including one weekday and two weekend days. Two elementary schools and two high schools of the most developed and urbanized area, Greater Tunis. One hundred and forty-two volunteer children and adolescents aged 10-19 years. The PAFQ strongly was correlated with both HRM (r = 0·70; 95% CI 0·62, 0·76) and 24h-R (r = 0·81; 95% CI 0·77, 0·84). It featured acceptable agreement with both criterion measures, slightly underestimating TEE compared with 24h-R (-2·8%, mean of individual differences -272·7 kJ/d; 95% CI -490·6, -57·4 kJ/d) and moderately overestimating it compared with HRM (+11·3%, mean of individual differences +1106·2 kJ/d; 95% CI 845·8, 1366·6 kJ/d). Reliability ranged from moderate to good (weighted kappa coefficients from 0·47 to 0·78 and intra-class correlation coefficients between 0·79 and 0·86 for energy expenditure by PA categories), indicating strong agreement between the two assessments. This PAFQ could be useful in the description and surveillance of PA patterns or for the evaluation of population-based interventions directed at promoting PA in Tunisian children and adolescents.

  3. Feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements to assess physical activity in toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Bourdeaudhuij Ilse

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accelerometers are considered to be the most promising tool for measuring physical activity (PA in free-living young children. So far, no studies have examined the feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements in children under 3 years of age. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the feasibility and validity of accelerometer measurements in toddlers (1- to 3-year olds. Methods Forty-seven toddlers (25 boys; 20 ± 4 months wore a GT1M ActiGraph accelerometer for 6 consecutive days and parental perceptions of the acceptability of wearing the monitor were assessed to examine feasibility. To investigate the validity of the ActiGraph and the predictive validity of three ActiGraph cut points, accelerometer measurements of 31 toddlers (17 boys; 20 ± 4 months during free play at child care were compared to directly observed PA, using the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children-Preschool (OSRAC-P. Validity was assessed using Pearson and Spearman correlations and predictive validity using area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC-AUC. Results The feasibility examination indicated that accelerometer measurements of 30 toddlers (63.8% could be included with a mean registration time of 564 ± 62 min during weekdays and 595 ± 83 min during weekend days. According to the parental reports, 83% perceived wearing the accelerometer as 'not unpleasant and not pleasant' and none as 'unpleasant'. The validity evaluation showed that mean ActiGraph activity counts were significantly and positively associated with mean OSRAC-P activity intensity (r = 0.66; p Conclusions The present findings suggest that ActiGraph accelerometer measurements are feasible and valid for quantifying PA in toddlers. However, further research is needed to accurately identify PA intensities in toddlers using accelerometry.

  4. Physical Activity, Sleep, and BMI Percentile in Rural and Urban Ugandan Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, Mary J; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S; Baingana, Rhona; Ntambi, James M

    Uganda is experiencing a dual burden of over- and undernutrition, with overweight prevalence increasing while underweight remains common. Potential weight-related factors, particularly physical activity, sleep, and rural/urban status, are not currently well understood or commonly assessed in Ugandan youth. The purpose of this study was to pilot test a survey measuring weight-related factors in rural and urban Ugandan schoolchildren. A cross-sectional survey measured sociodemographics, physical activity, sleep patterns, and dietary factors in 148 rural and urban schoolchildren aged 11-16 in central Uganda. Height and weight were objectively measured. Rural and urban youth were compared on these factors using χ2 and t tests. Regression was used to identify correlates of higher body mass index (BMI) percentile in the full sample and nonstunted youth. Youth were on average 12.1 ± 1.1 years old; underweight (10%) was more common than overweight (1.4%). Self-reported sleep duration and subjective sleep quality did not differ by rural/urban residence. Rural children overall had higher BMI percentile and marginally higher stunting prevalence. In adjusted analyses in both the full and nonstunted samples, higher BMI percentile was related to living in a rural area, higher frequency of physical activity, and higher subjective sleep quality; it was negatively related to being active on weekends. In the full sample, higher BMI percentile was also related to female gender, whereas in nonstunted youth, higher BMI was related to age. BMI percentile was unrelated to sedentary time, performance of active chores and sports, and dietary factors. This study is one of the first to pilot test a survey assessing weight-related factors, particularly physical activity and sleep, in Ugandan schoolchildren. BMI percentile was related to several sociodemographic, sleep, and physical activity factors among primarily normal-weight school children in Uganda, providing a basis for understanding

  5. Physical activity and survival in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Søgaard, Karen; Karlsen, Randi V

    2016-01-01

    the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort, all enrolled before diagnosis. Self-reported PA was measured as time per activity, and estimated metabolic equivalent task (MET)-hours per week were summed for each activity. We constructed measures for household, exercise, and total PA. The association between......PURPOSE: Knowledge about lifestyle factors possibly influencing survival after breast cancer (BC) is paramount. We examined associations between two types of postdiagnosis physical activity (PA) and overall survival after BC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used prospective data on 959 BC survivors from...... from all causes during the study period. In adjusted analyses, exercise PA above eight MET h/week compared to lower levels of activity was significantly associated with improved overall survival (HR, 0.68; confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.99). When comparing participation in exercise to non...

  6. The prevalence of leisure time sedentary behaviour and physical activity in adolescent boys: an ecological momentary assessment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorely, Trish; Biddle, Stuart J H; Marshall, Simon J; Cameron, Noel

    2009-01-01

    To use ecological momentary assessment to describe how adolescent boys in the United Kingdom spend their leisure time. Design. Cross-sectional, stratified, random sample from secondary schools in 15 regions within the United Kingdom. The data are from a larger study of adolescent lifestyles (Project STIL). A total of 561 boys with a mean age of 14.6 years (range 12.7-16.7 years). The majority were white-European (86.5%). Television viewing occupied the most leisure time on both weekdays (131 minutes) and weekend (202.5 minutes) days. On weekdays the five most time consuming sedentary activities (television viewing, homework, motorised travel, playing computer/video games and shopping/hanging out) occupied on average 272.2 minutes. On weekend days, the five most time consuming sedentary activities (television viewing, shopping/hanging out, motorised travel, sitting and talking and playing computer/video games) occupied 405.5 minutes. In total, 54 minutes were occupied by active transport or sports and exercise per weekday and 81 minutes per weekend day. Only a minority watched more than 4 hours of TV per day (8.9% on weekdays and 33.8% on weekend days). Differences were noted in the means and prevalence between weekend and weekdays, reflecting the greater discretionary time available at the weekend. Adolescent boys engage in a variety of sedentary and active free time behaviours. It appears prudent to encourage adolescents to adopt overall healthy lifestyles by considering the combination of both active and sedentary pursuits an individual engages in and by moving beyond a focus on any one single behaviour.

  7. Connecting Physical Education to Out-of-School Physical Activity through Sport Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamberger, Benjamin; Sinelnikov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    One of the goals of physical education, according to The Society of Health and Physical Educators, is for children to establish "patterns of regular participation in meaningful physical activity." However, participation alone in physical education classes is not enough for students to reach daily recommended levels of physical activity.…

  8. Common Problems and Solutions for Being Physically Active

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home • What is Cardiac Rehab? • How Will I Benefit? • Am I Eligible? • Addressing My Concerns • What Can I Expect? Introduction Getting Physically Active - Introduction - Physical Activity & Health - What Type of Activity is Best? - Develop a ...

  9. Modifications to weekend recovery sleep delay circadian phase in older adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Carskadon, Mary A

    2010-08-01

    Adolescents often report shorter time in bed and earlier wake-up times on school days compared to weekend days. Extending sleep on weekend nights may reflect a "recovery" process as youngsters try to compensate for an accumulated school-week sleep debt. The authors examined whether the circadian timing system of adolescents shifted after keeping a common late weekend "recovery" sleep schedule; it was hypothesized that a circadian phase delay shift would follow this later and longer weekend sleep. The second aim of this study was to test whether modifying sleep timing or light exposure on weekends while still providing recovery sleep can stabilize the circadian system. Two experiments addressed these aims. Experiment 1 was a 4-wk, within-subjects counterbalanced design comparing two weekend sleep schedule conditions, "TYPICAL" and "NAP." Compared to weeknights, participants retired 1.5 h later and woke 3 h later on TYPICAL weekends but 1 h later on NAP weekends, which also included a 2-h afternoon nap. Experiment 2 was a 2-wk, between-subjects design with two groups ("TYPICAL" or "LIGHT") that differed by weekend morning light exposure. TYPICAL and LIGHT groups followed the TYPICAL weekend schedule of Experiment 1, and the LIGHT group received 1 h of light (454-484 nm) upon weekend wake-up. Weekend time in bed was 1.5 h longer/night than weeknights in both experimental protocols. Participants slept at home during the study. Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) phase was assessed in the laboratory before (Friday) and after (Sunday) each weekend. Participants were ages 15 to 17 yrs. Twelve participants (4 boys) were included in Experiment 1, and 33 (10 boys) were included in Experiment 2. DLMO phase delayed over TYPICAL weekends in Experiment 1 by (mean +/- SD) 45 +/- 31 min and Experiment 2 by 46 +/- 34 min. DLMO phase also delayed over NAP weekends (41 +/- 34 min) and did not differ from the TYPICAL condition of Experiment 1. DLMO phase delayed over LIGHT weekends (38

  10. Workplace pedometer interventions for increasing physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freak-Poli, Rosanne L A; Cumpston, Miranda; Peeters, Anna; Clemes, Stacy A

    2013-04-30

    The World Health Organization and the World Economic Forum have recommended further research to strengthen current knowledge of workplace health programmes, particularly on effectiveness and using simple instruments. A pedometer is one such simple instrument that can be incorporated in workplace interventions. To assess the effectiveness of pedometer interventions in the workplace for increasing physical activity and improving subsequent health outcomes. Electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (671 potential papers), MEDLINE (1001), Embase (965), CINAHL (1262), OSH UPDATE databases (75) and Web of Science (1154) from the earliest record to between 30th January and 6th February 2012 yielded 3248 unique records. Reference lists of articles yielded an additional 34 papers. Contact with individuals and organisations did not produce any further records. We included individual and cluster-randomised controlled trials of workplace health promotion interventions with a pedometer component in employed adults. The primary outcome was physical activity and was part of the eligibility criteria. We considered subsequent health outcomes, including adverse effects, as secondary outcomes. Two review authors undertook the screening of titles and abstracts and the full-text papers independently. Two review authors (RFP and MC) independently completed data extraction and risk of bias assessment. We contacted authors to obtain additional data and clarification. We found four relevant studies providing data for 1809 employees, 60% of whom were allocated to the intervention group. All studies assessed outcomes immediately after the intervention had finished and the intervention duration varied between three to six months. All studies had usual treatment control conditions; however one study's usual treatment was an alternative physical activity programme while the other three had minimally active controls. In general, there was high risk of bias mainly

  11. Physical activity in former elite cricketers and strategies for promoting physical activity after retirement from cricket: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Nicholas; Jones, Mary E; Arden, Nigel K

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The health benefits of professional sport dissipate after retirement unless an active lifestyle is adopted, yet reasons for adopting an active or inactive lifestyle after retirement from sport are poorly understood. Elite cricket is all-encompassing, requiring a high volume of activity and unique physical demands. We aimed to identify influences on physical activity behaviours in active and insufficiently active former elite cricketers and provide practical strategies for promoting physical activity after cricket retirement. Design 18 audio-recorded semistructured telephone interviews were performed. An inductive thematic approach was used and coding was iterative and data-driven facilitated by NVivo software. Themes were compared between sufficiently active and insufficiently active participants. Setting All participants formerly played professional cricket in the UK. Participants Participants were male, mean age 57±11 (range 34–77) years, participated in professional cricket for 12±7 seasons and retired on average 23±9 years previously. Ten participants (56%) were classified as sufficiently active according to the UK Physical Activity Guidelines (moderate-intensity activity ≥150 min per week or vigorous-intensity activity ≥75 min per week). Eight participants did not meet these guidelines and were classified as insufficiently active. Results Key physical activity influences were time constraints, habit formation, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, physical activity preferences, pain/physical impairment and cricket coaching. Recommendations for optimising physical activity across the lifespan after cricket retirement included; prioritise physical activity, establish a physical activity plan prior to cricket retirement and don’t take a break from physical activity, evaluate sources of physical activity motivation and incorporate into a physical activity plan, find multiple forms of satisfying physical activity that can be adapted to

  12. perceptions of physical activity, activity preferences and health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AND HEALTH AMONG A GROUP OF ADULT WOMEN IN URBAN. GHANA: A PILOT STUDY ... Health and the Centre for Human Nutrition, 2Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg. School of Public Health, Baltimore, ... programming. Keywords: physical activity, Ghana, women, facilita- tors, barriers.

  13. Perceptions of physical activity, activity preferences and health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obesity and other lifestyle-related chronic diseases impact urban West African women at high rates. Physical activity (PA) can improve these health outcomes, but there is little published data on the associated psychosocial predictors in this population. Objectives: We aimed to explore preliminary associations ...

  14. Physical activity does not attenuate the obesity risk of TV viewing in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-López, J P; Ruiz, J R; Vicente-Rodríguez, G; Gracia-Marco, L; Manios, Y; Sjöström, M; De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Moreno, L A

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the association of television (TV) time, the frequency of meals while watching TV and the presence of TV set in the bedroom with total and abdominal obesity and to assess whether physical activity (PA) attenuates the obesity risk of TV viewing. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 2200 adolescents (46% boys) from 10 European cities, The Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study, between 2006 and 2007. TV viewing, PA (by accelerometry) and body composition were measured. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed. Even adjusting by vigorous PA, TV in the bedroom (odds ratio [OR]: 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.74) and >4 h d(-1) TV during week days (OR: 1.30, 95% CI, 1.02-1.67) (in boys) and eating every day with TV (OR: 1.18, 95% CI, 1.07-1.30) and >2 h d(-1) TV during weekend days (OR: 1.68, 95% CI, 1.25-2.26) (in girls) were significantly associated with total obesity. Likewise, in both sexes, having a TV set at bedroom was significantly associated with abdominal obesity. Adolescents spending excessive TV time are prone to obesity independently of their PA levels. Families should put TV sets out of adolescents' bedroom and keep TV sets off during meal times. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  15. Within-Day Time-Varying Associations Between Behavioral Cognitions and Physical Activity in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jaclyn P; Dzubur, Eldin; Huh, Jimi; Intille, Stephen; Dunton, Genevieve F

    2016-08-01

    This study used time-varying effect modeling to examine time-of-day differences in how behavioral cognitions predict subsequent physical activity (PA). Adults (N = 116) participated in three 4-day "bursts" of ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Participants were prompted with eight EMA questionnaires per day assessing behavioral cognitions (i.e., intentions, self-efficacy, outcome expectations) and wore an accelerometer during waking hours. Subsequent PA was operationalized as accelerometer-derived minutes of moderate- or vigorousintensity PA in the 2 hr following the EMA prompt. On weekdays, intentions positively predicted subsequent PA in the morning (9:25 a.m.-11:45 a.m.) and in the evening (8:15 p.m.-10:00 p.m.). Self-efficacy positively predicted subsequent PA on weekday evenings (7:35 p.m.-10:00 p.m.). Outcome expectations were unrelated to subsequent PA on weekdays. On weekend days, behavior cognitions and subsequent PA were unrelated regardless of time of day. This study identifies windows of opportunity and vulnerability for motivation-based PA interventions aiming to deliver intervention content within the context of adults' daily lives.

  16. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  17. Physical Activity Among Nurses in Kanombe Military Hospital | Lela ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher job-related physical activity (84%) and lower leisure-time physical activity (5%) were reported among nurses. Age (P=0.033), marital status (P=0.001) and working experience (P=0.026) of nurses were significantly associated with physical activity, but not with low back pain. There is a need for leisure-time physical ...

  18. Physical Activity Levels of Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Physical Activity in T1D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Valderi Abreu; Mascarenhas, Luis Paulo Gomes; Decimo, Juliana Pereira; de Souza, William Cordeiro; Monteiro, Anna Louise Stellfeld; Lahart, Ian; França, Suzana Nesi; Leite, Neiva

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in comparison with healthy scholar participants. Total of 154 teenagers (T1D = 45 and CON = 109). Height, weight, cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), and the level of physical activity by the Bouchard's Physical Activity Record were measured, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in T1D. The VO2max was lower in the T1D (38.38 ± 7.54) in comparison with the CON (42.44 ± 4.65; p < .05). The VO2max had correlation with the amount of time of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (r = .63; p = .0001) and an inverse correlation with sedentary activities (r= -0.46; p = .006). In the T1D the levels of HbA1c had an inverse correlation with the amount of time of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (r= -0.34; p = .041) and correlation with the BMI z-score (r = .43; p = .017). Only 37,8% of the participants in the T1D reached the adequate amount of daily moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity, in the CON 81,7% reached the WHO's recommendation. T1D had less cardiorespiratory capacity then healthy controls, the teenagers of T1D with lower BMI z-score and that dedicated a greater time in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity demonstrated a better glycemic control.

  19. Transformational teaching and physical activity engagement among adolescents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beauchamp, Mark R; Morton, Katie L

    2011-01-01

    The integrative hypothesis presented in this paper is that transformational leadership, as displayed by school physical education teachers, leads to improved engagement in physical activity behaviors among adolescents...

  20. Engaging Middle School Students in Physical Education and Physical Activity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    With school-based physical activity emerging as a public health issue, it is more important than ever to understand what keeps children and adolescents interested and participating in physical education and physical activity. As the research on physical activity patterns indicates, the middle school years may be a watershed moment in the lives of…